WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapidly emerging class

  1. Accuracy of rapid disposition by emergency clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backay, Andrew; Bystrzycki, Adam; Smit, De Villiers; Keogh, Martin; O'Reilly, Gerard; Mitra, Biswadev

    2017-05-01

    Objectives Rapid disposition protocols are increasingly being considered for implementation in emergency departments (EDs). Among patients presenting to an adult tertiary referral hospital, this study aimed to compare prediction accuracy of a rapid disposition decision at the conclusion of history and examination, compared with disposition following standard assessment. Methods Prospective observational data were collected for 1 month between October and November 2012. Emergency clinicians (including physicians, registrars, hospital medical officers, interns and nurse practitioners) filled out a questionnaire within 5min of obtaining a history and clinical examination for eligible patients. Predicted patient disposition (representing 'rapid disposition') was compared with final disposition (determined by 'standard assessment'). Results There were 301 patient episodes included in the study. Predicted disposition was correct in 249 (82.7%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 78.0-86.8) cases. Accuracy of predicting discharge to home appeared highest among emergency physicians at 95.8% (95% CI 78.9-99.9). Overall accuracy at predicting admission was 79.7% (95% CI 67.2-89.0). The remaining 20.3% (95% CI 11.0-32.8) were not admitted following standard assessment. Conclusion Rapid disposition by ED clinicians can predict patient destination accurately but was associated with a potential increase in admission rates. Any model of care using rapid disposition decision making should involve establishment of inpatient systems for further assessment, and a culture of timely inpatient team transfer of patients to the most appropriate treating team for ongoing patient management. What is known about the topic? In response to the National Emergency Access Targets, there has been widespread adoption of rapid-disposition-themed care models across Australia. Although there is emerging data that clinicians can predict disposition accurately, this data is currently limited. What does this

  2. Rapid BAL Variability: Re-Emerging Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damla Erakuman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We study BAL variations of SDSS J141955.28+522741.4 utilizing 32 epochs of spectroscopic observations from SDSS. We identify three individual BAL troughs for C iv and one BAL trough for Si iv. The deepest C iv BAL trough shows significant EW variations in timescales of a few 10 h. The fast component of the deepest C iv BAL presents disappearance and re-emergence preserving its initial velocity range and profile. All identified BAL troughs show coordinated variations supporting that the possible mechanism behind variations are the ionization level changes of the absorbing gas.

  3. The emerging middle classes in India: mobilizing for inclusive development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baud, I.

    2015-01-01

    The recent numerical expansion of the middle classes in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) has (re)opened the debate on their positioning in the broader political and social development processes within each of these countries, and the emergence of global Southern perspectives on

  4. Rapid Weight Loss in Sports with Weight Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaee, Morteza; Olewinski, Lucianne; Shadgan, Babak; Kiningham, Robert R

    2015-01-01

    Weight-sensitive sports are popular among elite and nonelite athletes. Rapid weight loss (RWL) practice has been an essential part of many of these sports for many decades. Due to the limited epidemiological studies on the prevalence of RWL, its true prevalence is unknown. It is estimated that more than half of athletes in weight-class sports have practiced RWL during the competitive periods. As RWL can have significant physical, physiological, and psychological negative effects on athletes, its practice has been discouraged for many years. It seems that appropriate rule changes have had the biggest impact on the practice of RWL in sports like wrestling. An individualized and well-planned gradual and safe weight loss program under the supervision of a team of coaching staff, athletic trainers, sports nutritionists, and sports physicians is recommended.

  5. RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN EMERGENCY MILK SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-07-17

    A new rapid separation method for radiostrontium in emergency milk samples was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that will allow rapid separation and measurement of Sr-90 within 8 hours. The new method uses calcium phosphate precipitation, nitric acid dissolution of the precipitate to coagulate residual fat/proteins and a rapid strontium separation using Sr Resin (Eichrom Technologies, Darien, IL, USA) with vacuum-assisted flow rates. The method is much faster than previous method that use calcination or cation exchange pretreatment, has excellent chemical recovery, and effectively removes beta interferences. When a 100 ml sample aliquot is used, the method has a detection limit of 0.5 Bq/L, well below generic emergency action levels.

  6. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY SOIL SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

    2009-11-09

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for samples up to 2 grams in emergency response situations. The actinides in soil method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha sources are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency soil samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinides in soil results were reported within 4-5 hours with excellent quality.

  7. The Rapid Emergence of High Level Gentamicin Resistance in Enterococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Forward

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of enterococci isolated from blood and urine cultures that were highly resistant to gentamicin and streptomycin were determined. No blood or urine isolates highly resistant to gentamicin were seen in 1983, whereas by 1986–87 25% of blood and 17% of urine isolates were highly resistant. The rapid emergence of gentamicin resistance has serious implications for patients with life threatening enterococcal disease.

  8. The Rapid Emergence of High Level Gentamicin Resistance in Enterococci

    OpenAIRE

    Forward, Kevin R; Kennedy, James K; Degagne, Patricia A; Bartlett, Kathy R; Harding, Godfrey KM

    1990-01-01

    The proportion of enterococci isolated from blood and urine cultures that were highly resistant to gentamicin and streptomycin were determined. No blood or urine isolates highly resistant to gentamicin were seen in 1983, whereas by 1986–87 25% of blood and 17% of urine isolates were highly resistant. The rapid emergence of gentamicin resistance has serious implications for patients with life threatening enterococcal disease.

  9. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR EMERGENCY WATER AND URINE SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-08-27

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Bioassay Lab participated in the 2008 NRIP Emergency Response program administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in May, 2008. A new rapid column separation method was used for analysis of actinides and {sup 90}Sr the NRIP 2008 emergency water and urine samples. Significant method improvements were applied to reduce analytical times. As a result, much faster analysis times were achieved, less than 3 hours for determination of {sup 90}Sr and 3-4 hours for actinides. This represents a 25%-33% improvement in analysis times from NRIP 2007 and a {approx}100% improvement compared to NRIP 2006 report times. Column flow rates were increased by a factor of two, with no significant adverse impact on the method performance. Larger sample aliquots, shorter count times, faster cerium fluoride microprecipitation and streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation were also employed. Based on initial feedback from NIST, the SRS Environmental Bioassay Lab had the most rapid analysis times for actinides and {sup 90}Sr analyses for NRIP 2008 emergency urine samples. High levels of potential matrix interferences may be present in emergency samples and rugged methods are essential. Extremely high levels of {sup 210}Po were found to have an adverse effect on the uranium results for the NRIP-08 urine samples, while uranium results for NRIP-08 water samples were not affected. This problem, which was not observed for NRIP-06 or NRIP-07 urine samples, was resolved by using an enhanced {sup 210}Po removal step, which will be described.

  10. RAPID ANALYSIS OF EMERGENCY URINE AND WATER SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S

    2007-02-26

    There is a need for fast, reliable methods for the determination of actinides and Sr-89/90 analysis on environmental and bioassay samples in response to an emergency radiological incident. The SRS (Savannah River Site) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory participated in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Radiochemistry Intercomparison Program (NRIP-06) and analyzed water and urine samples within 8 hours of receipt. The SRS Environmental Laboratory was the only lab that participated in the program that analyzed these samples for both actinides and Sr-89/90 within the requested 8 hour turnaround time. A new, rapid actinide and strontium 89/90 separation method was used for both urine and water samples. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and Sr-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U), and americium (Am), curium (Cm) and thorium (Th) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. By using vacuum box cartridge technology and stacked cartridges with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time was minimized. This paper discusses the technology and conditions employed for both water and urine samples and presents the SRS performance data on the NRIP-06 samples.

  11. Rapid screening of radioactivity in food for emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, A; Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Syed, U-F; Roselan, A; Haines, D K; Roth, G; West, L; Arndt, M

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the development of methods for the rapid screening of gross alpha (GA) and gross beta (GB) radioactivity in liquid foods, specifically, Tang drink mix, apple juice, and milk, as well as screening of GA, GB, and gamma radioactivity from surface deposition on apples. Detailed procedures were developed for spiking of matrices with (241)Am (alpha radioactivity), (90)Sr/(90)Y (beta radioactivity), and (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (241)Am (gamma radioactivity). Matrix stability studies were performed for 43 days after spiking. The method for liquid foods is based upon rapid digestion, evaporation, and flaming, followed by gas proportional (GP) counting. For the apple matrix, surface radioactivity was acid-leached, followed by GP counting and/or gamma spectrometry. The average leaching recoveries from four different apple brands were between 63% and 96%, and have been interpreted on the basis of ion transport through the apple cuticle. The minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs) were calculated from either the background or method-blank (MB) measurements. They were found to satisfy the required U.S. FDA's Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) in all but one case. The newly developed methods can perform radioactivity screening in foods within a few hours and have the potential to capacity with further automation. They are especially applicable to emergency response following accidental or intentional contamination of food with radioactivity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. 78 FR 74007 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Grand Rapids, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... amends Class E airspace within the Grand Rapids, MI, area by updating the airport name and geographic... Regulations (14 CFR) Part 71 by adjusting the geographic coordinates within the Class E airspace areas, of... (Lat. 42 52'51'' N., long. 85 31'22'' W.) Spectrum Medical Center/Downtown Campus, MI, Point in Space...

  13. Modernity, Cosmopolitanism, and the Emergence of Middle Classes in Tonga

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Niko Besnier

    2009-01-01

    The formation of social classes in Pacific Islands societies and in their diasporas continues to raise theoretical questions about the nature of social classes and their relationship to prior forms...

  14. Modernity, cosmopolitanism, and the emergence of middle classes in Tonga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besnier, N.

    2009-01-01

    The formation of social classes in Pacific Islands societies and in their diasporas continues to raise theoretical questions about the nature of social classes and their relationship to prior forms of social organization. In Tonga, middle classes both reproduce aspects of the older rank-based system

  15. On distinguishing different models of a class of emergent Universe ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Souvik Ghose

    2018-02-20

    Feb 20, 2018 ... over, it is essential to incorporate a phase of inflation in early Universe in the standard Big-Bang cosmol- ogy as the present observations favour such an ... vational data permit us to distinguish between different models belonging to this class. It is straightforward to explain the present scheme. SNIa data ...

  16. Learning through Making: Emerging and Expanding Designs for College Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trust, Torrey; Maloy, Robert W.; Edwards, Sharon

    2018-01-01

    As higher education institutions seek to prepare an increasingly diverse population of students for a rapidly changing future, makerspaces offer a pedagogical approach for engaging all learners in active thinking and hands-on learning while promoting creativity, problem solving, and collaboration skills. In this paper, we discuss ways to integrate…

  17. Heterocyclic N-Oxides - An Emerging Class of Therapeutic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mfuh, A M; Larionov, O V

    2015-01-01

    Heterocyclic N-oxides have emerged as potent compounds with anticancer, antibacterial, antihypertensive, antiparasitic, anti-HIV, anti-inflammatory, herbicidal, neuroprotective, and procognitive activities. The N-oxide motif has been successfully employed in a number of recent drug development projects. This review surveys the emergence of this scaffold in the mainstream medicinal chemistry with a focus on the discovery of the heterocyclic N-oxide drugs, N-oxide-specific mechanisms of action, drug-receptor interactions and synthetic avenues to these compounds. As the first review on this subject that covers the developments since 1950s to date, it is expected that it will inspire wider implementation of the heterocyclic N-oxide motif in the rational design of new medicinal agents.

  18. Managing marine disease emergencies in an era of rapid change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, Maya L; Maynard, Jeffrey; Breyta, Rachel; Carnegie, Ryan B; Dobson, Andy; Friedman, Carolyn S; Froelich, Brett; Garren, Melissa; Gulland, Frances M D; Heron, Scott F; Noble, Rachel T; Revie, Crawford W; Shields, Jeffrey D; Vanderstichel, Raphaël; Weil, Ernesto; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Harvell, C Drew

    2016-03-05

    Infectious marine diseases can decimate populations and are increasing among some taxa due to global change and our increasing reliance on marine environments. Marine diseases become emergencies when significant ecological, economic or social impacts occur. We can prepare for and manage these emergencies through improved surveillance, and the development and iterative refinement of approaches to mitigate disease and its impacts. Improving surveillance requires fast, accurate diagnoses, forecasting disease risk and real-time monitoring of disease-promoting environmental conditions. Diversifying impact mitigation involves increasing host resilience to disease, reducing pathogen abundance and managing environmental factors that facilitate disease. Disease surveillance and mitigation can be adaptive if informed by research advances and catalysed by communication among observers, researchers and decision-makers using information-sharing platforms. Recent increases in the awareness of the threats posed by marine diseases may lead to policy frameworks that facilitate the responses and management that marine disease emergencies require. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Nitric Oxide Modulators: An Emerging Class of Medicinal Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, S. R.; Satyanarayana, K.; Rao, M. N. A.; Pai, K. V.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide, a unique messenger in biological system, is ubiquitously present virtually in all tissues revealing its versatile nature of being involved in diverse physiological functions such as vascular tone, inhibition of platelet aggregation, cell adhesion, neurotransmission and enzyme and immune regulation. The tremendous advancements made in the past few decades in this area suggests that the nitric oxide modulation either by its exogenous release through nitric oxide donors or inhibition of its synthesis by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors in physiological milieu may provide newer clinical strategies for the treatment of some diseases. In this review, an attempt is made to document and understand the biological chemistry of different classes of nitric oxide modulators that would prove to be a fruitful area in the years to come. PMID:23798773

  20. Gender roles and binge drinking among Latino emerging adults: a latent class regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Ellen L; Wong, Y Joel; Middendorf, Katharine G

    2014-09-01

    Gender roles are often cited as a culturally specific predictor of drinking among Latino populations. This study used latent class regression to test the relationships between gender roles and binge drinking in a sample of Latino emerging adults. Participants were Latino emerging adults who participated in Wave III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 2,442). A subsample of these participants (n = 660) completed the Bem Sex Role Inventory--Short. We conducted latent class regression using 3 dimensions of gender roles (femininity, social masculinity, and personal masculinity) to predict binge drinking. Results indicated a 3-class solution. In Class 1, the protective personal masculinity class, personal masculinity (e.g., being a leader, defending one's own beliefs) was associated with a reduction in the odds of binge drinking. In Class 2, the nonsignificant class, gender roles were not related to binge drinking. In Class 3, the mixed masculinity class, personal masculinity was associated with a reduction in the odds of binge drinking, whereas social masculinity (e.g., forceful, dominant) was associated with an increase in the odds of binge drinking. Post hoc analyses found that females, those born outside the United States, and those with greater English language usage were at greater odds of being in Class 1 (vs. Class 2). Males, those born outside the United States, and those with greater Spanish language usage were at greater odds of being in Class 3 (vs. Class 2). Directions for future research and implications for practice with Latino emerging adults are discussed.

  1. Genomic insights into the rapid emergence and evolution of MDR in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Alex J; Harrison, Ewan M; Stanczak-Mrozek, Kinga; Leggett, Bernadette; Waller, Andrew; Holmes, Mark A; Lloyd, David H; Lindsay, Jodi A; Loeffler, Anette

    2015-04-01

    MDR methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) strains have emerged rapidly as major canine pathogens and present serious treatment issues and concerns to public health due to their, albeit low, zoonotic potential. A further understanding of the genetics of resistance arising from a broadly susceptible background of S. pseudintermedius is needed. We sequenced the genomes of 12 S. pseudintermedius isolates of varied STs and resistance phenotypes. Nine distinct clonal lineages had acquired either staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec elements and/or Tn5405-like elements carrying up to five resistance genes [aphA3, sat, aadE, erm(B), dfrG] to generate MRSP, MDR methicillin-susceptible S. pseudintermedius and MDR MRSP populations. The most successful and clinically problematic MDR MRSP clones, ST68 SCCmecV(T) and ST71 SCCmecII-III, have further accumulated mutations in gyrA and grlA conferring resistance to fluoroquinolones. The carriage of additional mobile genetic elements (MGEs) was highly variable, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer is frequent in S. pseudintermedius populations. Importantly, the data suggest that MDR MRSP evolved rapidly by the acquisition of a very limited number of MGEs and mutations, and that the use of many classes of antimicrobials may co-select for the spread and emergence of MDR and XDR strains. Antimicrobial stewardship will need to be comprehensive, encompassing human medicine and veterinary disciplines to successfully preserve antimicrobial efficacy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Prediction of Class II improvement after rapid maxillary expansion in early mixed dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Caprioglio

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to identify cephalometric pretreatment parameters for prediction of Class II improvement induced by rapid maxillary expansion. Methods Lateral cephalograms of 30 patients (mean age 8.3 ± 1.6 years old showing Class II molar relationship and undergone to rapid maxillary expansion on the upper deciduous molars were traced before treatment, and molar relation changes were evaluated on dental casts before and after treatment. Overall treatment time lasted 10.2 ± 2 months. Good responders (18 subjects, 10 females and 8 males showed improvement of at least 2.50 mm, and bad responders (12 subjects, 7 females and 5 males showed no improvement, improvement less than 2.50 mm, or worsening of molar relationship after treatment. Student’s t test was used to assess significance of differences between groups, and discriminant analysis allowed identification of predictive pretreatment variables. Results Articular angle, superior gonial angle, and mandibular dimensions (Co-Gn, S-Ar, Ar-Go, Go-Me showed significant differences in the comparison between groups. Mandibular length Co-Gn and superior gonial angle were selected as significant predictive variable for discrimination. Conclusions Patients with smaller mandibular length and more acute superior gonial angle are expected to have more chances to improve molar Class II after rapid maxillary expansion.

  3. Sporothrix brasiliensis outbreaks and the rapid emergence of feline sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchotene, Karine Ortiz; Madrid, Isabel Martins; Klafke, Gabriel Baracy; Bergamashi, Mariana; Della Terra, Paula Portella; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski

    2015-11-01

    Sporotrichosis is the main subcutaneous mycosis in Brazil, and is caused by Sporothrix schenckii and allied species. Sporothrix propagules present on soil and plant debris may be traumatically inoculated into the cutaneous/ subcutaneous tissues of the warm-blooded host. An alternative route involves direct animal-animal and animal-human transmissions through deep scratches and bites of diseased cats. Sporotrichosis is much more common than previously appreciated with several cases emerging over the years especially in South and Southeast Brazil. We conducted an epidemiological surveillance in endemic areas of feline sporotrichosis in the southern region of Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. Over the last 5-year period the number of feline sporotrichosis in Rio Grande increased from 0.75 new cases per month in 2010 to 3.33 cases per month in 2014. The wide geographic distribution of diagnosed cases highlights the dynamics of Sporothrix transmission across urban areas with high population density. Molecular identification down to species level by PCR-RFLP of cat-transmitted Sporothrix revealed the emergence of the clonal offshoot S. brasiliensis during feline outbreaks; this scenario is similar to the epidemics taking place in the metropolitan areas of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. Controlling and preventing sporotrichosis outbreaks are essential steps to managing the disease among humans and animals. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. The rapid emergence of stimulus specific perceptual learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra eHussain

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Is stimulus specific perceptual learning the result of extended practice or does it emerge early in the time course of learning? We examined this issue by manipulating the amount of practice given on a face identification task on Day 1, and altering the familiarity of stimuli on Day 2. We found that a small number of trials was sufficient to produce stimulus specific perceptual learning of faces: on Day 2, response accuracy decreased by the same amount for novel stimuli regardless of whether observers practiced 105 or 840 trials on Day 1. Current models of learning assume early procedural improvements followed by late stimulus specific gains. Our results show that stimulus specific and procedural improvements are distributed throughout the time course of learning

  5. Rapid Detection and Characterization of Emerging Foreign Animal Disease Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaing, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    To best safeguard human and animal health requires early detection and characterization of disease events. This must include effective surveillance for emerging infectious diseases. Both deliberate and natural outbreaks have enormous economic and public health impacts, and can present serious threats to national security. In this project, we developed novel next generation detection technologies to protect the agricultural economy and biosecurity. The first technology is a multiplexed assay to simultaneously detection 10 swine viral and bacterial pathogens. The second one is the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) which can detect more than 10,000 microbial species including 4219 viruses, 5367 bacteria, 265 fungi, 117 protozoa and 293 archaea. We analyzed a series of swine clinical samples from past disease events to demonstrate the utility of the assays for faster and cheaper detection of emerging and foreign animal disease pathogens, and their utility as s routine diagnosis and surveillance tool. A second goal of the study is to better understand mechanisms of African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection in pigs to aid the development of countermeasures and diagnostics. There is no vaccine available for ASF. ASF outbreak is on the rise on several European countries. Though ASF is not currently in the U.S., a potential outbreak in the U.S. would be detrimental to the swine industry and the US agricultural economy. We pursued a genome-wide approach to characterize the pig immune responses after ASFV infection. We used RNA sequencing and bioinformatics methods to identify genes and pathways that are affected during ASF infection. We have identified a list of most differentially expressed genes that are in the immune response pathways.

  6. Diagnosis of acute mononucleosis in emergency: comparison of rapid tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Scaggiante

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a gammaherpesvirus that causes a number of clinical syndromes, including acute mononucleosis.Acute infection with EBV can vary widely with regard to the severity and presentation of illness, ranging from an asymptomatic infection to a serious, life-threatening version of mononucleosis with associated liver damage and splenomegaly. Additionally, other acute viral syndromes, including those caused by hepatitis viruses and cytomegalovirus (CMV, can lead to similar clinical syndromes. The variety of symptoms and the overlap with other viral infections underscore the importance of laboratory testing in the diagnosis of acute EBV-related disease.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of an agglutination test for the detection of heterophile antibodies (Monotest and two EBV-specific rapid immunochromatographic tests (VCA-IgM and VCA-IgG/EBNA-IgG. Heterophile antibody determination is resulted to have not a real diagnostic utility for the low sensibility and specificity of the test. In our experience the only use of VCA-IgG/EBNA-IgG test is sufficient to discriminate between an acute mononucleosis and a past infection.

  7. Emerging technologies for rapid identification of bloodstream pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Atul; Morgan, Margie; Haake, David A

    2014-07-15

    Technologies for rapid microbial identification are poised to revolutionize clinical microbiology and enable informed decision making for patients with life-threatening bloodstream infections. Species identification of microorganisms in positive blood cultures can be performed in minutes using commercial fluorescence in situ hybridization tests or mass spectroscopy. Microorganisms in positive blood cultures can also be identified within 1-2.5 hours using automated polymerase chain reaction-based systems that can also detect selected antibiotic resistance markers, such as methicillin resistance. When combined with antibiotic stewardship programs, these approaches improve clinical outcomes and reduce healthcare expenditures. Tests for direct detection in whole blood samples are highly desirable because of their potential to identify bloodstream pathogens without waiting 1-2 days for blood cultures to become positive. However, results for pathogen detection in whole blood do not overlap with those of conventional blood culture techniques and we are still learning how best to use these approaches. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Incorporating indel information into phylogeny estimation for rapidly emerging pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchard Marc A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenies of rapidly evolving pathogens can be difficult to resolve because of the small number of substitutions that accumulate in the short times since divergence. To improve resolution of such phylogenies we propose using insertion and deletion (indel information in addition to substitution information. We accomplish this through joint estimation of alignment and phylogeny in a Bayesian framework, drawing inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo. Joint estimation of alignment and phylogeny sidesteps biases that stem from conditioning on a single alignment by taking into account the ensemble of near-optimal alignments. Results We introduce a novel Markov chain transition kernel that improves computational efficiency by proposing non-local topology rearrangements and by block sampling alignment and topology parameters. In addition, we extend our previous indel model to increase biological realism by placing indels preferentially on longer branches. We demonstrate the ability of indel information to increase phylogenetic resolution in examples drawn from within-host viral sequence samples. We also demonstrate the importance of taking alignment uncertainty into account when using such information. Finally, we show that codon-based substitution models can significantly affect alignment quality and phylogenetic inference by unrealistically forcing indels to begin and end between codons. Conclusion These results indicate that indel information can improve phylogenetic resolution of recently diverged pathogens and that alignment uncertainty should be considered in such analyses.

  9. Rapid and real-time detection technologies for emerging viruses of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-10-17

    Oct 17, 2008 ... The development of technologies with rapid and sensitive detection capabilities and increased throughput have become crucial for responding to greater number threats posed by emerging and re-emerging viruses in the recent past. The conventional identification methods require time-consuming culturing ...

  10. Drinking patterns of alcohol intoxicated adolescents in the emergency department: A latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestelkamp, Silke; Kriston, Levente; Arnaud, Nicolas; Wartberg, Lutz; Sack, Peter-Michael; Härter, Martin; Thomasius, Rainer

    2015-11-01

    The increasing number of children and adolescents in need of emergency medical treatment following acute alcohol intoxication has been a major public health concern in Europe in recent years. However, little is known about drinking habits and associated risks in this population. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine drinking patterns and associated risks in adolescent emergency department patients following alcohol intoxication. The aim of this study is to establish a classification system for admitted adolescents Latent class analysis was used to identify subgroups of adolescents with distinct patterns of habitual drinking as defined by the quantity of consumed alcohol on a typical drinking occasion, frequency of binge drinking and drunkenness, alcohol-related problems, prior alcohol-related hospitalizations and alcohol-related risk behaviors. Subgroup characteristics were examined with regard to sociodemographics, other substance use and psychosocial problems using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests. A total of 316 adolescents aged 12-17 treated in 6 urban emergency departments in Germany were analyzed. Five classes of drinking patterns were identified: one class representing low-risk drinking (class 1 "low-risk" (61.2%)), two classes representing risky drinking (class 2 "moderate-risk" (5.7%) and class 3 "frequent drunk" (15.8%)), as well as two classes representing high-risk drinking (class 4 "alcohol-related problems" (11.4%) and class 5 "excessive drinking" (5.1%)). Membership of classes 4 and 5 was associated with the most severe psychosocial problems, especially with regard to aggressive-dissocial behaviors. The CRAFFT-d and brief RAPI screening tools allowed identifying the two risky drinking classes and two high-risk drinking classes. Our findings provide the first in-depth analysis of habitual drinking in this study population and may help practitioners to better tailor interventions to patients' needs by using the

  11. Premature translational termination products are rapidly degraded substrates for MHC class I presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua R Lacsina

    Full Text Available Nearly thirty percent of all newly synthesized polypeptides are targeted for rapid proteasome-mediated degradation. These rapidly degraded polypeptides (RDPs are a source of antigenic substrates for the MHC class I presentation pathway, allowing for immunosurveillance of newly synthesized proteins by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Despite the recognized role of RDPs in MHC I presentation, it remains unclear what molecular characteristics distinguish RDPs from their more stable counterparts. It has been proposed that premature translational termination products may constitute a form of RDP; indeed, in prokaryotes translational drop-off products are normal by-products of protein synthesis and are subsequently rapidly degraded. To study the cellular fate of premature termination products, we used the antibiotic puromycin as a means to experimentally manipulate prematurely terminated polypeptide production in human cells. At low concentrations, puromycin enhanced flux into rapidly degraded polypeptide pools, with small polypeptides being markedly more labile then high molecular weight puromycin adducts. Immunoprecipitation experiments using anti-puromycin antisera demonstrated that the majority of peptidyl-puromycins are rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. Low concentrations of puromycin increased the recovery of cell surface MHC I-peptide complexes, indicating that prematurely terminated polypeptides can be processed for presentation via the MHC I pathway. In the continued presence of puromycin, however, MHC I export to the cell surface was inhibited, coincident with the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins. The time- and dose-dependent effects of puromycin suggest that the pool of peptidyl-puromycin adducts differ in their targeting to various proteolytic pathways that, in turn, differ in the efficiency with which they access the MHC I presentation machinery. These studies highlight the diversity of cellular proteolytic pathways

  12. 76 FR 75953 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Emergency Solutions Grants Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... housing after experiencing a housing crisis and/or homelessness. DATES: Effective date: January 4, 2012... response for addressing the needs of homelessness established administratively by HUD in 1995. The single... revised to broaden existing emergency shelter and homelessness prevention activities and to add short- and...

  13. 77 FR 28765 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Emergency Solutions Grants Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ...The document advises that the interim rule for the Emergency Solutions Grants program, published on December 5, 2011, displayed an incorrect RIN number. This document advises of the correct RIN number, 2506-AC31, as displayed in the heading of this document.

  14. Mandibular response after rapid maxillary expansion in class II growing patients: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Lione

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT was to evaluate the sagittal mandibular response induced by rapid maxillary expansion (RME therapy in mixed dentition patients with class II malocclusion, comparing the effects of bonded RME and banded RME with a matched untreated class II control group. Methods This RCT was designed in parallel with an allocation ratio of 1:1:1. The sample consisted of 30 children with a mean age of 8.1 ± 0.6 years who were randomly assigned to three groups: group 1 treated with bonded RME, group 2 treated with banded RME, and group 3 the untreated control group. All patients met the following inclusion criteria: early mixed dentition, class II molar relationship, transverse discrepancy ≥ 4 mm, overjet ≥ 5 mm, and prepubertal skeletal maturity stage (CS1–CS2. The expansion screw was activated one quarter of a turn per day (0.25 mm until overcorrection was reached. For each subject, lateral cephalograms and plaster casts were obtained before treatment (T1 and after 1 year (T2. A randomization list was created for the group assignment, with an allocation ratio of 1:1:1. The observer who performed all the measurements was blinded to group assignment. The study was single-blinded in regard to statistical analysis. Results RME was effective in the correction of maxillary deficiency. Class II patients treated with both types of RME showed no significant improvement of the anteroposterior relationship of the maxilla and the mandible at both skeletal and occlusal levels. The acrylic splint RME had significant effects on reducing the skeletal vertical dimension and the gonial angle. Conclusions The orthopedic expansion did not affect the sagittal relationship of class II patients treated in the early mixed dentition when compared with the untreated control group. Additional studies with a larger sample are warranted to elucidate individual variations in dento-skeletal mandibular

  15. Mandibular response after rapid maxillary expansion in class II growing patients: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lione, Roberta; Brunelli, Valerio; Franchi, Lorenzo; Pavoni, Chiara; Quiroga Souki, Bernardo; Cozza, Paola

    2017-11-06

    The aim of this pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to evaluate the sagittal mandibular response induced by rapid maxillary expansion (RME) therapy in mixed dentition patients with class II malocclusion, comparing the effects of bonded RME and banded RME with a matched untreated class II control group. This RCT was designed in parallel with an allocation ratio of 1:1:1. The sample consisted of 30 children with a mean age of 8.1 ± 0.6 years who were randomly assigned to three groups: group 1 treated with bonded RME, group 2 treated with banded RME, and group 3 the untreated control group. All patients met the following inclusion criteria: early mixed dentition, class II molar relationship, transverse discrepancy ≥ 4 mm, overjet ≥ 5 mm, and prepubertal skeletal maturity stage (CS1-CS2). The expansion screw was activated one quarter of a turn per day (0.25 mm) until overcorrection was reached. For each subject, lateral cephalograms and plaster casts were obtained before treatment (T1) and after 1 year (T2). A randomization list was created for the group assignment, with an allocation ratio of 1:1:1. The observer who performed all the measurements was blinded to group assignment. The study was single-blinded in regard to statistical analysis. RME was effective in the correction of maxillary deficiency. Class II patients treated with both types of RME showed no significant improvement of the anteroposterior relationship of the maxilla and the mandible at both skeletal and occlusal levels. The acrylic splint RME had significant effects on reducing the skeletal vertical dimension and the gonial angle. The orthopedic expansion did not affect the sagittal relationship of class II patients treated in the early mixed dentition when compared with the untreated control group. Additional studies with a larger sample are warranted to elucidate individual variations in dento-skeletal mandibular response to the maxillary expansion protocol in class

  16. 76 FR 75994 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Defining “Homeless”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Homelessness Grant program. The HEARTH Act also codifies in law the Continuum of Care planning process, long a... emergency shelter and homelessness prevention activities and to add rapid rehousing activities. The new Rural Housing Stability program replaces the Rural Homelessness Grant program. The HEARTH Act also...

  17. 77 FR 35962 - Utilizing Rapidly Deployable Aerial Communications Architecture in Response to an Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... COMMISSION Utilizing Rapidly Deployable Aerial Communications Architecture in Response to an Emergency AGENCY... seeks comment on the role of deployable aerial communications architecture (DACA) in facilitating... eRulemaking Portal, or (3) by filing paper copies. Comments and reply comments may be filed...

  18. Rapid response seismic networks in Europe: lessons learnt from the L'Aquila earthquake emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Strollo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    The largest dataset ever recorded during a normal fault seismic sequence was acquired during the 2009 seismic emergency triggered by the damaging earthquake in L'Aquila (Italy. This was possible through the coordination of different rapid-response seismic networks in Italy, France and Germany. A seismic network of more than 60 stations recorded up to 70,000 earthquakes. Here, we describe the different open-data archives where it is possible to find this unique set of data for studies related to hazard, seismotectonics and earthquake physics. Moreover, we briefly describe some immediate and direct applications of emergency seismic networks. At the same time, we note the absence of communication platforms between the different European networks. Rapid-response networks need to agree on common strategies for network operations. Hopefully, over the next few years, the European Rapid-Response Seismic Network will became a reality.

  19. Latent Class Analysis of Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration and Victimization among Latino Emerging Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grest, Carolina Villamil; Lee, Jungeun Olivia; Gilreath, Tamika; Unger, Jennifer B

    2018-03-01

    While there are known developmental consequences and correlates of intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization, research focused on bidirectional and multiple forms of partner violence among Latino emerging adults is needed. This longitudinal study identified latent classes of intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization patterns among emerging adult Latinos (N = 1060; 60.6% female). A second aim examined acculturation and cumulative substance use correlates in high school, as predictors of intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization classes in emerging adulthood. Average age of participants was 15.5 years in 10th grade and 22.7 years in emerging adulthood. We identified four distinct subgroups of intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization, with 22% of individuals identified in a violence perpetration and victimization subgroup. Cumulative heavy episodic drinking and marijuana use in high school predicted belonging to the psychological bidirectional intimate partner violence group rather than the group with no violence. Cumulative marijuana use in high school, predicted belonging to the sexual bidirectional partner violence group compared to the no violence group. Our study extends the literature across developmental periods among Latino youth. The findings have implications for early adolescent prevention strategies and promotion of healthy intimate relationships.

  20. Characterization of flavin-based fluorescent proteins: an emerging class of fluorescent reporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Fluorescent reporter proteins based on flavin-binding photosensors were recently developed as a new class of genetically encoded probes characterized by small size and oxygen-independent maturation of fluorescence. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs address two major limitations associated with existing fluorescent reporters derived from the green fluorescent protein (GFP-namely, the overall large size and oxygen-dependent maturation of fluorescence of GFP. However, FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development and have been utilized in only a handful of biological studies. Importantly, a full understanding of the performance and properties of FbFPs as a practical set of biological probes is lacking. In this work, we extensively characterize three FbFPs isolated from Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, and Arabidopsis thaliana, using in vitro studies to assess probe brightness, oligomeric state, maturation time, fraction of fluorescent holoprotein, pH tolerance, redox sensitivity, and thermal stability. Furthermore, we validate FbFPs as stable molecular tags using in vivo studies by constructing a series of FbFP-based transcriptional constructs to probe promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Overall, FbFPs show key advantages as broad-spectrum biological reporters including robust pH tolerance (4-11, thermal stability (up to 60°C, and rapid maturation of fluorescence (<3 min.. In addition, the FbFP derived from Arabidopsis thaliana (iLOV emerged as a stable and nonperturbative reporter of promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that FbFP-based reporters have the potential to address key limitations associated with the use of GFP, such as pH-sensitive fluorescence and slow kinetics of fluorescence maturation (10-40 minutes for half maximal fluorescence recovery. From this view, FbFPs represent a useful new addition to the fluorescent reporter protein palette, and our results constitute an important framework to

  1. Camouflage treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion with asymmetry using a bone-borne rapid maxillary expander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yu-Jin; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Kim, Seong-Hun; Nelson, Gerald

    2015-03-01

    This case report presents the successful use of palatal mini-implants for rapid maxillary expansion and mandibular distalization in a skeletal Class III malocclusion. The patient was a 13-year-old girl with the chief complaint of facial asymmetry and a protruded chin. Camouflage orthodontic treatment was chosen, acknowledging the possibility of need for orthognathic surgery after completion of her growth. A bone-borne rapid expander (BBRME) was used to correct the transverse discrepancy and was then used as indirect anchorage for distalization of the lower dentition with Class III elastics. As a result, a Class I occlusion with favorable inclination of the upper teeth was achieved without any adverse effects. The total treatment period was 25 months. Therefore, BBRME can be considered an alternative treatment in skeletal Class III malocclusion.

  2. Alcohol Use as Risk Factors for Older Adults’ Emergency Department Visits: A Latent Class Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namkee G. Choi, PhD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Late middle-aged and older adults’ share of emergency department (ED visits is increasing more than other age groups. ED visits by individuals with substance-related problems are also increasing. This paper was intended to identify subgroups of individuals aged 50+ by their risk for ED visits by examining their health/mental health status and alcohol use patterns. Methods: Data came from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey’s Sample Adult file (n=15,713. Following descriptive analysis of sample characteristics by alcohol use patterns, latent class analysis (LCA modeling was fit using alcohol use pattern (lifetime abstainers, ex-drinkers, current infrequent/light/ moderate drinkers, and current heavy drinkers, chronic health and mental health status, and past-year ED visits as indicators. Results: LCA identified a four-class model. All members of Class 1 (35% of the sample; lowest-risk group were infrequent/light/moderate drinkers and exhibited the lowest probabilities of chronic health/ mental health problems; Class 2 (21%; low-risk group consisted entirely of lifetime abstainers and, despite being the oldest group, exhibited low probabilities of health/mental health problems; Class 3 (37%; moderate-risk group was evenly divided between ex-drinkers and heavy drinkers; and Class 4 (7%; high-risk group included all four groups of drinkers but more ex-drinkers. In addition, Class 4 had the highest probabilities of chronic health/mental problems, unhealthy behaviors, and repeat ED visits, with the highest proportion of Blacks and the lowest proportions of college graduates and employed persons, indicating significant roles of these risk factors. Conclusion: Alcohol nonuse/use (and quantity of use and chronic health conditions are significant contributors to varying levels of ED visit risk. Clinicians need to help heavy-drinking older adults reduce unhealthy alcohol consumption and help both heavy drinkers and ex

  3. Understanding rapid internationalization of new low-technology ventures from emerging economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    2012-01-01

    This theory-building study makes an attempt to advance the field of international entrepreneurship that is (i) fragmented and suffers from theoretical paucity, as well as from coverage bias by focusing mostly on high-technology international new ventures from developed economies and (ii) that needs...... to borrow more actively from other disciplines in order for the international entrepreneurship theory to emerge. In this endeavour, the study draws from the institutional theory in order to explore the process of rapid internationalization of new ventures from emerging economies....

  4. Grolar Bears, Social Class, and Policy Relevance: Extraordinary Agendas for the Emerging 21stCentury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Susan T

    2015-08-01

    This Agenda article first considers whether social psychology is in the best or worst of times and suggests that we are instead in extraordinary times, given exciting agendas and potential policy relevance, if we are careful. The article illustrates with two current research agendas-the hybrid vigor of multiple categories and the psychology of social class-that could inform policy. The essay then reflects on how we know when our work is indeed ready for the public arena. Regarding hybrids: World immigration, social media, and global businesses are increasing. How will this complicate people's stereotypes of each other? One agenda could build on the existing social and behavioral science of people as social hybrids, emerging with a framework to synthesize existing work and guide future research that better reflects our changing world. Policy implications already emerge from our current knowledge of hybrids. Regarding the social psychology of social class: We do not know enough yet to give advice, except to suggest questioning some common stereotypes, e.g., about the economic behavior of lower-income people. Before the budding social psychology of class can be ready for policy export, the research results need replication, validation, and generality. Overall, principles of exportable policy insights include peer-reviewed standards, honest brokering, nonpartisan advice, and respectful, trustworthy communication. Social psychology can take advantage of its extraordinary times to be innovative and useful.

  5. Rapid qualitative research methods during complex health emergencies: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ginger A; Vindrola-Padros, Cecilia

    2017-09-01

    The 2013-2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa highlighted both the successes and limitations of social science contributions to emergency response operations. An important limitation was the rapid and effective communication of study findings. A systematic review was carried out to explore how rapid qualitative methods have been used during global heath emergencies to understand which methods are commonly used, how they are applied, and the difficulties faced by social science researchers in the field. We also asses their value and benefit for health emergencies. The review findings are used to propose recommendations for qualitative research in this context. Peer-reviewed articles and grey literature were identified through six online databases. An initial search was carried out in July 2016 and updated in February 2017. The PRISMA checklist was used to guide the reporting of methods and findings. The articles were assessed for quality using the MMAT and AACODS checklist. From an initial search yielding 1444 articles, 22 articles met the criteria for inclusion. Thirteen of the articles were qualitative studies and nine used a mixed-methods design. The purpose of the rapid studies included: the identification of causes of the outbreak, and assessment of infrastructure, control strategies, health needs and health facility use. The studies varied in duration (from 4 days to 1 month). The main limitations identified by the authors were: the low quality of the collected data, small sample sizes, and little time for cross-checking facts with other data sources to reduce bias. Rapid qualitative methods were seen as beneficial in highlighting context-specific issues that need to be addressed locally, population-level behaviors influencing health service use, and organizational challenges in response planning and implementation. Recommendations for carrying out rapid qualitative research in this context included the early designation of community leaders as a point of

  6. Rapid intervention and treatment zone: redesigning nursing services to meet increasing emergency department demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Julie; Lucas, Elspeth; Martin, Roslyn; Stergiou, Helen E; Kropman, Matthew; Chiu, Herman

    2012-02-01

    The impact of emergency nursing roles in demand management systems is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate emergency nurses' role in a specific emergency department (ED) demand management system: rapid intervention and treatment zone (RITZ). A descriptive exploratory approach was used. Data were collected from audit of 193 randomly selected patient records and 12 h of clinical practice observation. The median age of participants was 31 years, 51.8% were males and 99.5% were discharged home. Nurse qualifications or seniority had no significant effect on waiting time or length of stay (LOS). There were disparities between documented and observed nursing practice. The designation and qualifications of RITZ nurses made little difference to waiting times and ED LOS. Specific documentation and communication systems for areas of the ED that manage large numbers of low complexity patients warrant further research. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. GradDock: Rapid Simulation and Tailored Ranking Functions for Peptide-MHC Class I Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeong, Hyun-Ho; Choi, Yoonjoo; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2017-09-18

    The identification of T-cell epitopes has many profound translational applications in the areas of transplantation, disease diagnosis, vaccine/therapeutic protein development and personalized immunotherapy. While data-driven methods have been widely used for the prediction of peptide binders with notable successes, the structural modeling of peptide binding to MHC molecules is crucial for understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of the immunological processes. We developed GradDock, a structure-based method for the rapid and accurate modeling of peptide binding to MHC class I (pMHC-I). GradDock explicitly models diverse unbound peptides in vacuo and inserts them into the MHC-I groove through a steered gradient descent with a topological correction process. The simulation process yields diverse structural conformations including native-like peptides. We completely revised the Rosetta score terms and developed a new ranking function specifically for pMHC-I. Using the diverse peptides, a linear programming approach is applied to find the optimal weights for the individual Rosetta score terms. Our examination revealed that a refinement of the dihedral angles and a modification of the repulsion can dramatically improve the modeling quality. GradDock is five-times faster than a Rosetta-based docking approach for pMHC-I. We also demonstrate that the predictive capability of GradDock with the re-weighted Rosetta ranking function is consistently more accurate than the Rosetta-based method with the standard Rosetta score (approximately three-times better for a cross-docking set). GradDock is freely available for academic purposes. The program and the ranking score weights for Rosetta are available at http://bel.kaist.ac.kr/research/GradDock . Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. A UAV BASED CLOSE-RANGE RAPID AERIAL MONITORING SYSTEM FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Choi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As the occurrences and scales of disasters and accidents have been increased due to the global warming, the terrorists' attacks, and many other reasons, the demand for rapid responses for the emergent situations also has been thus ever-increasing. These emergency responses are required to be customized to each individual site for more effective management of the emergent situations. These requirements can be satisfied with the decisions based on the spatial changes on the target area, which should be detected immediately or in real-time. Aerial monitoring without human operators is an appropriate means because the emergency areas are usually inaccessible. Therefore, a UAV is a strong candidate as the platform for the aerial monitoring. In addition, the sensory data from the UAV system usually have higher resolution than other system because the system can operate at a lower altitude. If the transmission and processing of the data could be performed in real-time, the spatial changes of the target area can be detected with high spatial and temporal resolution by the UAV rapid mapping systems. As a result, we aim to develop a rapid aerial mapping system based on a UAV, whose key features are the effective acquisition of the sensory data, real-time transmission and processing of the data. In this paper, we will introduce the general concept of our system, including the main features, intermediate results, and explain our real-time sensory data georeferencing algorithm which is a core for prompt generation of the spatial information from the sensory data.

  9. Review article: Methodology for the 'rapid review' series on musculoskeletal injuries in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudwick, Kirsten; McPhee, Megan; Bell, Anthony; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Russell, Trevor

    2018-02-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a common presentation to the ED, with significant costs involved in the management of these injuries, variances in care within the ED and associated morbidity. A series of rapid review papers were completed to guide best practice for the assessment and management of common musculoskeletal injuries presenting to the ED. This paper presents the methodology used across the rapid reviews. PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, TRIP and the grey literature, including relevant organisational websites, were searched in 2015. The search was repeated consistently for each topic area (injuries of the foot and ankle, knee, hand and wrist, elbow, shoulder, lumbar spine and cervical spine). English-language primary studies, systematic reviews and guidelines that were published in the last 10 years and addressed acute musculoskeletal injury management were considered for inclusion. Data extraction of each included article was conducted, followed by a quality appraisal. The extracted data from each article was synthesised to group similar evidence together. For each rapid review, the evidence has been organised in a way that a clinician can direct their attention to a specific component of the clinical cycle of care in the ED, such as the assessment, diagnostic tests, management and follow-up considerations from ED. The series of rapid reviews are designed to foster evidence-based practice within the ED, targeting the injuries most commonly presenting. The reviews provide clinicians in EDs with rapid access to the best current evidence, which has been synthesised and organised to assist decision-making. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  10. Utility and assessment of non-technical skills for rapid response systems and medical emergency teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalwin, R P; Flabouris, A

    2013-09-01

    Efforts are ongoing to improve outcomes from cardiac arrest and medical emergencies. A promising quality improvement modality is use of non-technical skills (NTS) that aim to address human factors through improvements in performance of leadership, communication, situational awareness and decision-making. Originating in the airline industry, NTS training has been successfully introduced into anaesthesia, surgery, emergency medicine and other acute medical specialities. Some aspects of NTS have already achieved acceptance for cardiac arrest teams. Leadership skills are emphasised in advanced life support training and have shown favourable results when employed in simulated and clinical resuscitation scenarios. The application of NTS in medical emergency teams as part of a rapid response system attending medical emergencies is less certain; however, observations of simulations have also shown promise. This review highlights the potential benefits of NTS competency for cardiac arrest teams and, more importantly, medical emergency teams because of the diversity of clinical scenarios encountered. Discussion covers methods to assess and refine NTS and NTS training to optimise performance in the clinical environment. Increasing attention should be applied to yielding meaningful patient and organisational outcomes from use of NTS. Similarly, implementation of any training course should receive appropriate scrutiny to refine team and institutional performance. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. Grolar Bears, Social Class, and Policy Relevance: Extraordinary Agendas for the Emerging 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Susan T.

    2016-01-01

    This Agenda article first considers whether social psychology is in the best or worst of times and suggests that we are instead in extraordinary times, given exciting agendas and potential policy relevance, if we are careful. The article illustrates with two current research agendas—the hybrid vigor of multiple categories and the psychology of social class—that could inform policy. The essay then reflects on how we know when our work is indeed ready for the public arena. Regarding hybrids: World immigration, social media, and global businesses are increasing. How will this complicate people’s stereotypes of each other? One agenda could build on the existing social and behavioral science of people as social hybrids, emerging with a framework to synthesize existing work and guide future research that better reflects our changing world. Policy implications already emerge from our current knowledge of hybrids. Regarding the social psychology of social class: We do not know enough yet to give advice, except to suggest questioning some common stereotypes, e.g., about the economic behavior of lower-income people. Before the budding social psychology of class can be ready for policy export, the research results need replication, validation, and generality. Overall, principles of exportable policy insights include peer-reviewed standards, honest brokering, nonpartisan advice, and respectful, trustworthy communication. Social psychology can take advantage of its extraordinary times to be innovative and useful. PMID:27397941

  12. Emergent inequality and self-organized social classes in a network of power and frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahault, Benoit; Saxena, Avadh; Nisoli, Cristiano

    2017-01-01

    We propose a simple agent-based model on a network to conceptualize the allocation of limited wealth among more abundant expectations at the interplay of power, frustration, and initiative. Concepts imported from the statistical physics of frustrated systems in and out of equilibrium allow us to compare subjective measures of frustration and satisfaction to collective measures of fairness in wealth distribution, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini index. We find that a completely libertarian, law-of-the-jungle setting, where every agent can acquire wealth from or lose wealth to anybody else invariably leads to a complete polarization of the distribution of wealth vs. opportunity. This picture is however dramatically ameliorated when hard constraints are imposed over agents in the form of a limiting network of transactions. There, an out of equilibrium dynamics of the networks, based on a competition between power and frustration in the decision-making of agents, leads to network coevolution. The ratio of power and frustration controls different dynamical regimes separated by kinetic transitions and characterized by drastically different values of equality. It also leads, for proper values of social initiative, to the emergence of three self-organized social classes, lower, middle, and upper class. Their dynamics, which appears mostly controlled by the middle class, drives a cyclical regime of dramatic social changes.

  13. A Personality-Based Latent Class Analysis of Emerging Adult Gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Rodriguez, Lindsey M; Rinker, Dipali V; Neighbors, Clayton

    2015-12-01

    Increases in access to gambling venues have been accompanied by increased gambling behavior among young adults. The present research examined associations among Five Factor Model personality traits, motives for gambling, and gambling behavior and problems using latent class analysis. College students (N = 220) completed online measures of personality and gambling behavior as part of a larger intervention trial. Agreeableness and conscientiousness were negatively associated with indicators of gambling behavior. Low agreeableness and high neuroticism were associated with gambling-specific motives, particularly for less frequently endorsed motives. Personality-based latent class analyses of emerging adult gamblers revealed support for three distinct groups reflecting a resilient personality group, a normative personality group, and a vulnerable personality group, which were further differentiated by gambling behaviors and gambling-specific motives. Associations between personality traits and gambling-specific motives highlight potential heterogeneity among college students who gamble. Together, findings suggest that the correlational and latent class-based analyses, as well as the personality and motivation analyses, present complementary information with respect to the attributes of college student gamblers. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  14. Emergent Dynamics of a Generalized Lohe Model on Some Class of Lie Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seung-Yeal; Ko, Dongnam; Ryoo, Sang Woo

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a Lohe group which is a new class of matrix Lie groups and present a continuous dynamical system for the synchronization of group elements in a Lohe group. The Lohe group includes classical Lie groups such as the orthogonal, unitary, and symplectic groups, and since Lohe groups need not be compact, global existence of ODEs may fail. The proposed dynamical system generalizes the Lohe model (Lohe in J Phys A 43:465301, 2010; Lohe in J Phys A 42:395101-395126, 2009) itself a nonabelian generalization of the Kuramoto model, and alongside we also generalize the analytical framework (Ha and Ryoo in J Stat Phys 163:411-439, 2016) of emergent and unique phase-locked states. For the construction of the phase-locked states, we introduce Lyapunov functions measuring the ensemble diameter and the dissimilarity between two Lohe flows, and derive Gronwall-type differential inequalities for them. The global existence of solutions then become a consequence of the boundedness of these Lyapunov functions. Our sufficient framework for the emergent dynamics is formulated in terms of coupling strength and initial states, and it leads to the global existence of solutions and the formation and uniqueness of a phase-locked asymptotic state. As a concrete example, we demonstrate how our theory can show emergent phenomenon on the Heisenberg group, where all initial configurations tend to a unique phase-locked state exponentially fast.

  15. Rapid post-earthquake modelling of coseismic landslide intensity and distribution for emergency response decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Robinson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Current methods to identify coseismic landslides immediately after an earthquake using optical imagery are too slow to effectively inform emergency response activities. Issues with cloud cover, data collection and processing, and manual landslide identification mean even the most rapid mapping exercises are often incomplete when the emergency response ends. In this study, we demonstrate how traditional empirical methods for modelling the total distribution and relative intensity (in terms of point density of coseismic landsliding can be successfully undertaken in the hours and days immediately after an earthquake, allowing the results to effectively inform stakeholders during the response. The method uses fuzzy logic in a GIS (Geographic Information Systems to quickly assess and identify the location-specific relationships between predisposing factors and landslide occurrence during the earthquake, based on small initial samples of identified landslides. We show that this approach can accurately model both the spatial pattern and the number density of landsliding from the event based on just several hundred mapped landslides, provided they have sufficiently wide spatial coverage, improving upon previous methods. This suggests that systematic high-fidelity mapping of landslides following an earthquake is not necessary for informing rapid modelling attempts. Instead, mapping should focus on rapid sampling from the entire affected area to generate results that can inform the modelling. This method is therefore suited to conditions in which imagery is affected by partial cloud cover or in which the total number of landslides is so large that mapping requires significant time to complete. The method therefore has the potential to provide a quick assessment of landslide hazard after an earthquake and may therefore inform emergency operations more effectively compared to current practice.

  16. Rapid post-earthquake modelling of coseismic landslide intensity and distribution for emergency response decision support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tom R.; Rosser, Nicholas J.; Densmore, Alexander L.; Williams, Jack G.; Kincey, Mark E.; Benjamin, Jessica; Bell, Heather J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Current methods to identify coseismic landslides immediately after an earthquake using optical imagery are too slow to effectively inform emergency response activities. Issues with cloud cover, data collection and processing, and manual landslide identification mean even the most rapid mapping exercises are often incomplete when the emergency response ends. In this study, we demonstrate how traditional empirical methods for modelling the total distribution and relative intensity (in terms of point density) of coseismic landsliding can be successfully undertaken in the hours and days immediately after an earthquake, allowing the results to effectively inform stakeholders during the response. The method uses fuzzy logic in a GIS (Geographic Information Systems) to quickly assess and identify the location-specific relationships between predisposing factors and landslide occurrence during the earthquake, based on small initial samples of identified landslides. We show that this approach can accurately model both the spatial pattern and the number density of landsliding from the event based on just several hundred mapped landslides, provided they have sufficiently wide spatial coverage, improving upon previous methods. This suggests that systematic high-fidelity mapping of landslides following an earthquake is not necessary for informing rapid modelling attempts. Instead, mapping should focus on rapid sampling from the entire affected area to generate results that can inform the modelling. This method is therefore suited to conditions in which imagery is affected by partial cloud cover or in which the total number of landslides is so large that mapping requires significant time to complete. The method therefore has the potential to provide a quick assessment of landslide hazard after an earthquake and may therefore inform emergency operations more effectively compared to current practice.

  17. Current and emerging technologies for rapid detection and characterization of Salmonella in poultry and poultry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Si Hong; Aydin, Muhsin; Khatiwara, Anita; Dolan, Maureen C; Gilmore, David F; Bouldin, Jennifer L; Ahn, Soohyoun; Ricke, Steven C

    2014-04-01

    Salmonella is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses in the United States, and one of the main contributors to salmonellosis is the consumption of contaminated poultry and poultry products. Since deleterious effects of Salmonella on public health and the economy continue to occur, there is an ongoing need to develop more advanced detection methods that can identify Salmonella accurately and rapidly in foods before they reach consumers. Rapid detection and identification methods for Salmonella are considered to be an important component of strategies designed to prevent poultry and poultry product-associated illnesses. In the past three decades, there have been increasing efforts towards developing and improving rapid pathogen detection and characterization methodologies for application to poultry and poultry products. In this review, we discuss molecular methods for detection, identification and genetic characterization of Salmonella associated with poultry and poultry products. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of the established and emerging rapid detection and characterization methods are addressed for Salmonella in poultry and poultry products. The methods with potential application to the industry are highlighted in this review. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Emerging infectious disease leads to rapid population declines of common British birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Robinson

    Full Text Available Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly cited as threats to wildlife, livestock and humans alike. They can threaten geographically isolated or critically endangered wildlife populations; however, relatively few studies have clearly demonstrated the extent to which emerging diseases can impact populations of common wildlife species. Here, we report the impact of an emerging protozoal disease on British populations of greenfinch Carduelis chloris and chaffinch Fringilla coelebs, two of the most common birds in Britain. Morphological and molecular analyses showed this to be due to Trichomonas gallinae. Trichomonosis emerged as a novel fatal disease of finches in Britain in 2005 and rapidly became epidemic within greenfinch, and to a lesser extent chaffinch, populations in 2006. By 2007, breeding populations of greenfinches and chaffinches in the geographic region of highest disease incidence had decreased by 35% and 21% respectively, representing mortality in excess of half a million birds. In contrast, declines were less pronounced or absent in these species in regions where the disease was found in intermediate or low incidence. Also, populations of dunnock Prunella modularis, which similarly feeds in gardens, but in which T. gallinae was rarely recorded, did not decline. This is the first trichomonosis epidemic reported in the scientific literature to negatively impact populations of free-ranging non-columbiform species, and such levels of mortality and decline due to an emerging infectious disease are unprecedented in British wild bird populations. This disease emergence event demonstrates the potential for a protozoan parasite to jump avian host taxonomic groups with dramatic effect over a short time period.

  19. Emerging Infectious Disease Leads to Rapid Population Declines of Common British Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toms, Mike P.; Peck, Kirsi M.; Kirkwood, James K.; Chantrey, Julian; Clatworthy, Innes R.; Evans, Andy D.; Hughes, Laura A.; Hutchinson, Oliver C.; John, Shinto K.; Pennycott, Tom W.; Perkins, Matthew W.; Rowley, Peter S.; Simpson, Vic R.; Tyler, Kevin M.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly cited as threats to wildlife, livestock and humans alike. They can threaten geographically isolated or critically endangered wildlife populations; however, relatively few studies have clearly demonstrated the extent to which emerging diseases can impact populations of common wildlife species. Here, we report the impact of an emerging protozoal disease on British populations of greenfinch Carduelis chloris and chaffinch Fringilla coelebs, two of the most common birds in Britain. Morphological and molecular analyses showed this to be due to Trichomonas gallinae. Trichomonosis emerged as a novel fatal disease of finches in Britain in 2005 and rapidly became epidemic within greenfinch, and to a lesser extent chaffinch, populations in 2006. By 2007, breeding populations of greenfinches and chaffinches in the geographic region of highest disease incidence had decreased by 35% and 21% respectively, representing mortality in excess of half a million birds. In contrast, declines were less pronounced or absent in these species in regions where the disease was found in intermediate or low incidence. Also, populations of dunnock Prunella modularis, which similarly feeds in gardens, but in which T. gallinae was rarely recorded, did not decline. This is the first trichomonosis epidemic reported in the scientific literature to negatively impact populations of free-ranging non-columbiform species, and such levels of mortality and decline due to an emerging infectious disease are unprecedented in British wild bird populations. This disease emergence event demonstrates the potential for a protozoan parasite to jump avian host taxonomic groups with dramatic effect over a short time period. PMID:20805869

  20. Reliable Rapid Assay for Gonorrhea and Chlamydia in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sean P; Vohra, Taher; Goldberg, Jared; Price, Christopher; Calo, Sean; Mahan, Meredith; Miller, Joseph

    2017-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) are common sexually transmitted infections seen in the emergency department (ED). Due to an inability to reliably make accurate diagnosis by physical examination, concern for unreliable follow-up, and current delays in diagnostic nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT), presumptive treatment active against CT and NG, as described by Centers for Disease Control clinical practice guidelines, is often performed. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a rapid, urine NAAT performed in the ED is noninferior in its diagnostic sensitivity compared with a traditional, swab NAAT assay. We performed a prospective, noninferiority study comparing two U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved NAAT assays for CT and NG: a 90-min rapid assay, the Xpert CT/NG Assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) using a urine sample vs. a traditional assay, the Aptima Combo 2 Assay (Gen-Probe Incorporated, San Diego, CA) using a swab sample. This study was registered on Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02386514). A total of 1162 patient samples were included in the primary analysis. We observed excellent kappa agreement between assays: NG for men, 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.00); NG for women, 0.87 (95% CI 0.79-0.94); CT for men, 0.81 (95% CI 0.59-1.00); and CT for women: 0.85 (95% CI 0.80-0.90), as well as excellent negative and positive predictive values for the rapid assay. Although the rapid Xpert CT/NG assay's diagnostic sensitivity did not meet our prespecified threshold for noninferiority, the diagnostic characteristics are robust enough to fit into a management pathway that may reduce unnecessary antibiotic use. There may be an opportunity to utilize the rapid Xpert CT/NG assay to improve accuracy of treatment in the ED. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid emergence of climate change in environmental drivers of marine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Stephanie A.; Beaulieu, Claudie; Ilyina, Tatiana; John, Jasmin G.; Long, Matthew; Séférian, Roland; Tjiputra, Jerry; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    2017-03-01

    Climate change is expected to modify ecological responses in the ocean, with the potential for important effects on the ecosystem services provided to humankind. Here we address the question of how rapidly multiple drivers of marine ecosystem change develop in the future ocean. By analysing an ensemble of models we find that, within the next 15 years, the climate change-driven trends in multiple ecosystem drivers emerge from the background of natural variability in 55% of the ocean and propagate rapidly to encompass 86% of the ocean by 2050 under a `business-as-usual' scenario. However, we also demonstrate that the exposure of marine ecosystems to climate change-induced stress can be drastically reduced via climate mitigation measures; with mitigation, the proportion of ocean susceptible to multiple drivers within the next 15 years is reduced to 34%. Mitigation slows the pace at which multiple drivers emerge, allowing an additional 20 years for adaptation in marine ecological and socio-economic systems alike.

  2. Advances in a rapidly emerging field of hair follicle stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokos, Zrinka Bukvić; Mosler, Elvira Lazić

    2014-03-01

    Human skin maintains the ability to regenerate during adulthood, as it constantly renews itself throughout adult life, and the hair follicle (HF) undergoes a perpetual cycle of growth and degeneration. The study of stem cells (SCs) in the epidermis and skin tissue engineering is a rapidly emerging field, where advances have been made in both basic and clinical research. Advances in basic science include the ability to assay SCs of the epidermis in vivo, identification of an independent interfollicular epidermal SC, and improved ability to analyze individual SCs divisions, as well as the recent hair organ regeneration via the bioengineered hair follicular unit transplantation (FUT) in mice. Advances in the clinic include recognition of the importance of SCs for wound repair and for gene therapy in inherited skin diseases, for example epidermolysis bullosa. The study of the HF stem cells (HFSCs) started by identification of epidermal SC in the HF bulge as quiescent "label retaining cells". The research of these cells emerged rapidly after the identification of bulge cell molecular markers, such as keratin 15 (K15) and CD34 in mice and CD200 in humans, which allowed the isolation and characterization of bulge cells from follicles. This paper provides an overview of the current knowledge on epidermal SCs in the HF describing their essential characteristics and the control of follicle SCs fate, their role in alopecia, as well as their use in tissue engineering.

  3. Rapid emergence of hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor resistance is expected

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Libin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 170 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Current therapy, consisting of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV), leads to sustained viral elimination in only about 45% of patients treated. Telaprevir (VX-950), a novel HCV NS3-4A serine protease inhibitor, has demonstrated substantial antiviral activity in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection. However, some patients experience viral breakthrough during dosing, with drug resistant variants being 5%-20% of the virus population as early as day 2 after treatment initiation. Why viral variants appear such a short time after the start of dosing is unclear, especially since this has not been seen with monotherapy for either human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis B virus. Here, using a viral dynamic model, we explain why such rapid emergence of drug resistant variants is expected when potent HCV protease inhibitors are used as monotherapy. Surprisingly, our model also shows that such rapid emergence need not be the case with some potent HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors. Examining the case of telaprevir therapy in detail, we show the model fits observed dynamics of both wild-type and drug-resistant variants during treatment, and supports combination therapy of direct antiviral drugs with PEG-IFN and/or RBV for hepatitis C.

  4. Rapid monitoring in vaccination campaigns during emergencies: the post-earthquake campaign in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Jeanette J; Sugerman, David; Brennan, Muireann; Cadet, Jean Ronald; Ernsly, Jackson; Lacapère, François; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Mubalama, Jean-Claude; Nandy, Robin

    2013-12-01

    The earthquake that struck Haiti in January 2010 caused 1.5 million people to be displaced to temporary camps. The Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population and global immunization partners developed a plan to deliver vaccines to those residing in these camps. A strategy was needed to determine whether the immunization targets set for the campaign were achieved. Following the vaccination campaign, staff from the Ministry of Public Health and Population interviewed convenience samples of households - in specific predetermined locations in each of the camps - regarding receipt of the emergency vaccinations. A camp was targeted for "mop-up vaccination" - i.e. repeat mass vaccination - if more than 25% of the children aged 9 months to 7 years in the sample were found not to have received the emergency vaccinations. Rapid monitoring was implemented in camps located in the Port-au-Prince metropolitan area. Camps that housed more than 5000 people were monitored first. By the end of March 2010, 72 (23%) of the 310 vaccinated camps had been monitored. Although 32 (44%) of the monitored camps were targeted for mop-up vaccination, only six of them had received such repeat mass vaccination when checked several weeks after monitoring. Rapid monitoring was only marginally beneficial in achieving immunization targets in the temporary camps in Port-au-Prince. More research is needed to evaluate the utility of conventional rapid monitoring, as well as other strategies, during post-disaster vaccination campaigns that involve mobile populations, particularly when there is little capacity to conduct repeat mass vaccination.

  5. Improving Class II malocclusion as a side-effect of rapid maxillary expansion: a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Susan S; McNamara, James A; Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the dentoalveolar and skeletal effects induced by rapid maxillary expansion (RME) therapy in mixed dentition patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion compared with a matched untreated Class II Division 1 control group. The treatment sample consisted of cephalometric records of 50 patients with Class II malocclusion (19 boys, 31 girls) treated with an RME protocol including an acrylic splint expander. Some patients also had a removable mandibular Schwarz appliance or maxillary incisor bracketing as part of their treatment protocol. Postexpansion, the patients were stabilized with a removable maintenance plate or a transpalatal arch. The mean age at the start of treatment of the RME group was 8.8 years (T1), with a prephase 2 treatment cephalogram (T2) taken 4.0 years later. The control sample, derived from the records of 3 longitudinal growth studies, consisted of the cephalometric records of 50 Class II subjects (28 boys, 22 girls). The mean age of initial observation for the control group was 8.9 years, and the mean interval of observation was 4.1 years. All subjects in both groups were prepubertal at T1 and showed comparable prevalence rates for prepubertal or postpubertal stages at T2. Independent-sample Student t tests were used to examine between-group differences. Class II patients treated with the described bonded RME protocol showed statistically significant increases in mandibular length and advancement of pogonion relative to nasion perpendicular. The acrylic splint RME had significant effects on the anteroposterior relationship of the maxilla and the mandible, as shown by the improvements toward Class I in the maxillomandibular differential value, the Wits appraisal value, and the ANB angle. Patients treated with the bonded RME showed the greatest effects of therapy at the occlusal level, specifically highly significant improvement of Class II molar relationship and decrease in

  6. Prescribing preferences in rapid tranquillisation: a survey in Belgian psychiatrists and emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bervoets, Chris; Roelant, Ella; De Fruyt, Jürgen; Demunter, Hella; Dekeyser, Barry; Vandenbussche, Leen; Titeca, Koen; Pieters, Guido; Sabbe, Bernard; Morrens, Manuel

    2015-06-05

    The pharmacotherapeutic management of agitation is a common clinical challenge. Pharmacotherapy is frequently used, the use of published guidelines is not known. The purpose of this study was twofold; to describe the prescribing patterns of psychiatrists and emergency physicians and to evaluate to which extent guidelines are used. A cross-sectional survey in the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium is carried out in 39 psychiatric hospitals, 11 psychiatric wards of a general hospital and 61 emergency departments. All physicians are asked for demographic information, their prescribing preferences, their use of guidelines and the type of monitoring (effectiveness, safety). For the basic demographic data and prescription preferences descriptive statistics are given. For comparing prescribing preferences of the drug between groups Chi square tests (or in case of low numbers Fisher's exact test) were performed. Mc Nemar test for binomial proportions for matched-pair data was performed to see if the prescription preferences of the participants differ between secluded and non-secluded patients. 550 psychiatrist and emergency physicians were invited. The overall response rate was 20% (n = 108). The number 1 preferred medication classes were antipsychotics (59.3%) and benzodiazepines (40.7%). In non-secluded patients, olanzapine (22.2%), lorazepam (21.3%) and clotiapine (19.4%) were most frequently picked as number 1 choice drug. In secluded patients, clotiapine (21.3%), olanzapine (21.3%) and droperidol (14.8%) were the three most frequently chosen number 1 preferred drugs. Between-group comparisons show that emergency physicians prefer benzodiazepines significantly more than psychiatrists do. Zuclopenthixol and olanzapine show a particular profile in both groups of physicians. Polypharmacy is more frequently used in secluded patients. Published guidelines and safety or outcome monitoring are rarely used. Our results show that prescription practice in Flanders (Belgium) in acute

  7. Factors associated with refusal of rapid HIV testing in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisculli, Mary L; Reichmann, William M; Losina, Elena; Donnell-Fink, Laurel A; Arbelaez, Christian; Katz, Jeffrey N; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2011-05-01

    HIV screening studies in the emergency department (ED) have demonstrated rates of HIV test refusal ranging from 40-67%. This study aimed to determine the factors associated with refusal to undergo routine rapid HIV testing in an academic ED in Boston. HIV counselors offered routine testing to 1,959 patients; almost one-third of patients (29%) refused. Data from a self-administered survey were used to determine independent correlates of HIV testing refusal. In multivariate analysis, women and patients with annual household incomes of $50,000 or more were more likely to refuse testing, as were those who reported not engaging in HIV risk behaviors, those previously HIV tested and those who did not perceive a need for testing. Enrollment during morning hours was also associated with an increased risk of refusal. Increased educational efforts to convey the rationale and benefits of universal screening may improve testing uptake among these groups.

  8. Rapid emergence of baculovirus resistance in codling moth due to dominant, sex-linked inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asser-Kaiser, S; Fritsch, E; Undorf-Spahn, K; Kienzle, J; Eberle, K E; Gund, N A; Reineke, A; Zebitz, C P W; Heckel, D G; Huber, J; Jehle, J A

    2007-09-28

    Insect-specific baculoviruses are increasingly used as biological control agents of lepidopteran pests in agriculture and forestry, and they have been previously regarded as robust to resistance development by the insects. However, in more than a dozen cases of field resistance of the codling moth Cydia pomonella to commercially applied C. pomonella granulovirus (CpGV) in German orchards, resistance ratios exceed 1000. The rapid emergence of resistance is facilitated by sex-linkage and concentration-dependent dominance of the major resistance gene and genetic uniformity of the virus. When the gene is fixed, resistance levels approach 100,000-fold. Our findings highlight the need for development of resistance management strategies for baculoviruses.

  9. Correction of a skeletal Class II malocclusion with severe crowding by a specially designed rapid maxillary expander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honghong; Feng, Jing; Lu, Peijun; Shen, Gang

    2015-02-01

    To correct an Angle Class II malocclusion or to create spaces in the maxillary arch by nonextraction treatment, distal movement of the maxillary molars is required. Various modalities for distalizing the buccal segment have been reported. Conventional extraoral appliances can be used to obtain maximum anchorage. However, many patients reject headgear wear because of social and esthetic concerns, and the success of this treatment depends on patient compliance. Intraoral appliances, such as repelling magnets, nickel-titanium coils, pendulum appliance, Jones jig appliance, distal jet appliance, and modified Nance appliance, have been introduced to distalize the molars with little or no patient cooperation. However, intraoral appliances can result in anchorage loss of the anterior teeth and distal tipping of the maxillary molars. In this case report, we introduce a diversified rapid maxillary expansion appliance that was custom designed and fabricated for the treatment of a growing girl with a skeletal Class II malocclusion and severe crowding from a totally lingually positioned lateral incisor. The appliance concomitantly expanded the maxilla transversely and retracted the buccal segment sagittally, distalizing the maxillary molars to reach a Class I relationship and creating the spaces to displace the malpositioned lateral incisor. The uniqueness of this special diversified rapid maxillary expansion appliance was highlighted by a series of reconstructions and modifications at different stages of the treatment to reinforce the anchorage. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid emergence of a ceftazidime-resistant Burkholderia multivorans strain in a cystic fibrosis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokell, Joshua R; Gharaibeh, Raad Z; Steck, Todd R

    2013-12-01

    Burkholderia multivorans poses a serious health threat to cystic fibrosis patients due to innate resistance to multiple antibiotics and acquisition of resistance to a range of antibiotics due to the frequent use of antibiotics to treat chronic infections. Monitoring antibiotic susceptibility is crucial to managing patient care. We identified the rapid emergence of a ceftazidime-resistant strain in a single patient within four days during a hospitalization for treatment of an exacerbation. B. multivorans was isolated from expectorated sputum samples using Burkholderia cepacia selective agar. A macrodilution assay was performed on all isolates to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of ceftazidime. Approximately 4000 colonies were scored to identify the percent of ceftazidime-resistant colonies. Extracted DNA was used to determine the total bacterial counts and abundance of B. multivorans using quantitative PCR. An increase from no detectable B. multivorans ceftazidime-resistant colonies to over 75% of all colonies tested occurred within a four-day period. The resistant population remained dominant in 6 of the 8 samples in the following 17 months of the study. qPCR revealed an association between change in the percent of resistant colonies and abundance of B. multivorans, but not of total bacteria. No association was found between the acquisition of resistance to ceftazidime and other antibiotics commonly used to treat B. multivorans infections. The rapid emergence of a ceftazidime-resistant by B. multivorans strain occurred during a hospitalization while under selective pressure of antibiotics. The resistant strain maintained dominance in the B. multivorans population which resulted in an overall decline in a patient health and treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2013 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of a rapid rehydration guideline on Emergency Department management of gastroenteritis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Danielle; McGrath, Ian; Maude, Phil

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated the use and effect of a rapid rehydration guideline for the management of gastroenteritis in children 6months to 4years of age in an Emergency Department (ED). The guideline aims to facilitate rehydration within 4h of arrival to the ED, using oral or nasogastric fluids. Primary outcome measures were ED Length of Stay (LOS) and hospital admission rates. Documentation of physiological recovery and consistency of re-hydration regimes used were examined as secondary outcomes. A quasi-experimental design using the medical records of 235 children pre and post intervention was used. Descriptive statistics (frequencies, medians, interquartile ranges) were used to summarize the data. The pre and post-test groups were compared using Chi Square and the Mann Whitney U Test. There was an increase in the ED LOS and in hospital admission rates post implementation of the rapid rehydration guideline in the ED. However, the time frame for initiation of rehydration therapy using oral or nasogastric routes improved post guideline implementation. The need for improvements in the ED management of dehydration secondary to gastroenteritis has been highlighted providing potential benefits to patient care and outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of class III malocclusion in primary and mixed dentition with rapid palatal expansion and facemask

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Soldevilla, Luciano; Dpto. Académico de Estomatología Pediátrica.Facultad de Odontología. Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.; Aliaga Del Castillo, Arón; Dpto. Académico de Estomatología Pediátrica.Facultad de Odontología. Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.

    2014-01-01

    We report the follow-up of a cross-bite clinical case which initially undertook the use of a Rigid acrylic-bonded palatal appliance that after stabilization treatment and coincident with the anterior tooth replacement, suffered a recurrence of anterior crossbite wich was corrected with the use of facemask. The purpose of correcting the crossbite at early ages allowed to drive improvements in the Class III skeletal pattern and reduces the amount of compensation to dental and skeletal discrepan...

  13. Long-term outcome of skeletal Class II Division 1 malocclusion treated with rapid palatal expansion and Kloehn cervical headgear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Roberto M A Lima; Lima, Anna Letícia

    2003-08-01

    The treatment of a patient with a skeletal Class II Division 1 malocclusion, with excessive overjet, complete overbite, airway obstruction, and severe arch length deficiency in the mandibular dental arch, is presented. The maxilla was narrow compared with the mandible, and the posterior teeth were compensated, with the maxillary teeth inclined buccally and the mandibular teeth inclined lingually. The palatal vault was extremely high. Treatment included rapid palatal expansion to correct the transverse maxillary deficiency and Kloehn cervical headgear to correct the anteroposterior skeletal discrepancy. Long-term stability (12-year follow-up) is reported.

  14. Metal-organic frameworks: a rapidly growing class of versatile nanoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Scott T; Greathouse, Jeffery A; Allendorf, Mark D

    2011-01-11

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) represent a new class of hybrid organic-inorganic supramolecular materials comprised of ordered networks formed from organic electron donor linkers and metal cations. They can exhibit extremely high surface areas, as well as tunable pore size and functionality, and can act as hosts for a variety of guest molecules. Since their discovery, MOFs have enjoyed extensive exploration, with applications ranging from gas storage to drug delivery to sensing. This review covers advances in the MOF field from the past three years, focusing on applications, including gas separation, catalysis, drug delivery, optical and electronic applications, and sensing. We also summarize recent work on methods for MOF synthesis and computational modeling.

  15. Zika Virus in Ontario: Evaluating a Rapid Risk Assessment Tool for Emerging Infectious Disease Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meer, Ryan; Hohenadel, Karin; Fitzgerald-Husek, Alanna; Warshawsky, Bryna; Sider, Doug; Schwartz, Brian; Nelder, Mark P

    To determine the Ontario-specific risk of local and travel-related Zika virus transmission in the context of a public health emergency of international concern, Public Health Ontario (PHO) completed a rapid risk assessment (RRA) on January 29, 2016, using a newly developed RRA guidance tool. The RRA concluded that risk of local mosquito-borne transmission was low, with a high risk of imported cases through travel. The RRA was updated 3 times based on predetermined triggers. An independent evaluation assessed both the application of the RRA guidance tool (process evaluation) and the usefulness of the RRA (outcome evaluation). We conducted face-to-face, semi-structured interviews with 7 individuals who participated in the creation or review of the Zika virus RRA and 4 end-users at PHO and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. An inductive thematic analysis of responses was undertaken, whereby themes were directly informed by the data. The process evaluation determined that most steps outlined in the RRA guidance tool were adhered to, including forming a cross-functional writing team, clarifying the scope and describing context, completing the RRA summary report, and updating the RRA based on predefined triggers. The outcome evaluation found that end-users judged the Zika virus RRA as evidence-informed, useful, consistent, and timely. The evaluation established that the locally tailored guidance tool, adapted from national and international approaches to RRAs, facilitated a systematic, evidence-informed, and timely formal RRA process at PHO for the Zika virus RRA, which met the needs of end-users. Based on the evaluation, PHO will modify future RRAs by incorporating some flexibility into the literature review process to support timeliness of the RRA, explicitly describing the limitations of studies used to inform the RRA, and refining risk algorithms to better suit emerging infectious disease threats. It is anticipated that these refinements will improve upon the

  16. Characterization of flavin-based fluorescent proteins: an emerging class of fluorescent reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Walker, Joshua; Weyant, Kevin B; Schroeder, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent reporter proteins based on flavin-binding photosensors were recently developed as a new class of genetically encoded probes characterized by small size and oxygen-independent maturation of fluorescence. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) address two major limitations associated with existing fluorescent reporters derived from the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-namely, the overall large size and oxygen-dependent maturation of fluorescence of GFP. However, FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development and have been utilized in only a handful of biological studies. Importantly, a full understanding of the performance and properties of FbFPs as a practical set of biological probes is lacking. In this work, we extensively characterize three FbFPs isolated from Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, and Arabidopsis thaliana, using in vitro studies to assess probe brightness, oligomeric state, maturation time, fraction of fluorescent holoprotein, pH tolerance, redox sensitivity, and thermal stability. Furthermore, we validate FbFPs as stable molecular tags using in vivo studies by constructing a series of FbFP-based transcriptional constructs to probe promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Overall, FbFPs show key advantages as broad-spectrum biological reporters including robust pH tolerance (4-11), thermal stability (up to 60°C), and rapid maturation of fluorescence (fluorescence and slow kinetics of fluorescence maturation (10-40 minutes for half maximal fluorescence recovery). From this view, FbFPs represent a useful new addition to the fluorescent reporter protein palette, and our results constitute an important framework to enable researchers to implement and further engineer improved FbFP-based reporters with enhanced brightness and tighter flavin binding, which will maximize their potential benefits.

  17. Changes in skeletal and dental relationship in Class II Division I malocclusion after rapid maxillary expansion: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratieri, Carolina; Alves, Matheus; Bolognese, Ana Maria; Nojima, Matilde C G; Nojima, Lincoln I

    2014-01-01

    To assess skeletal and dental changes immediately after rapid maxillary expansion (RME) in Class II Division 1 malocclusion patients and after a retention period, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Seventeen children with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion and maxillary skeletal transverse deficiency underwent RME following the Haas protocol. CBCT were taken before treatment (T1), at the end of the active expansion phase (T2) and after a retention period of 6 months (T3). The scanned images were measured anteroposteriorly (SNA, SNB, ANB, overjet and MR) and vertically (N-ANS, ANS-Me, N-Me and overbite). Significant differences were identified immediately after RME as the maxilla moved forward, the mandible moved downward, overjet increased and overbite decreased. During the retention period, the maxilla relapsed backwards and the mandible was displaced forward, leaving patients with an overall increase in anterior facial height. RME treatment allowed more anterior than inferior positioning of the mandible during the retention period, thus significantly improving Class II dental relationship in 75% of the patients evaluated.

  18. Changes in skeletal and dental relationship in Class II Division I malocclusion after rapid maxillary expansion: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Baratieri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess skeletal and dental changes immediately after rapid maxillary expansion (RME in Class II Division 1 malocclusion patients and after a retention period, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT imaging. METHODS: Seventeen children with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion and maxillary skeletal transverse deficiency underwent RME following the Haas protocol. CBCT were taken before treatment (T1, at the end of the active expansion phase (T2 and after a retention period of 6 months (T3. The scanned images were measured anteroposteriorly (SNA, SNB, ANB, overjet and MR and vertically (N-ANS, ANS-Me, N-Me and overbite. RESULTS: Significant differences were identified immediately after RME as the maxilla moved forward, the mandible moved downward, overjet increased and overbite decreased. During the retention period, the maxilla relapsed backwards and the mandible was displaced forward, leaving patients with an overall increase in anterior facial height. CONCLUSION: RME treatment allowed more anterior than inferior positioning of the mandible during the retention period, thus significantly improving Class II dental relationship in 75% of the patients evaluated.

  19. An emerging class of amphiphilic dendrimers for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications: Janus amphiphilic dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikwal, Dhiraj R; Kalhapure, Rahul S; Govender, Thirumala

    2017-01-15

    In recent years, a new class of dendrimer, known as Janus dendrimers (JDs), has attracted much attention due to their different structures and properties to the conventional symmetric forms. The broken symmetry of JDs offers the opportunity to form complex self-assembled materials, and presents new sets of properties that are presently inconceivable for homogeneous or symmetrical dendrimers. Due to their unique features, JDs have a promising future in pharmaceutical and biomedical fields, as seen from the recent interest in their application in conjugating multiple drugs and targeting moieties, forming supramolecular hydrogels, enabling micellar delivery systems, and preparing nano-vesicles, known as dendrimersomes, for drug encapsulation. The present paper is the first review, with an emphasis on various emerging applications of JDs, in the drug delivery and biomedical field reported so far. In addition, the paper describes different synthetic methods for producing JDs that can guide the design of new biocompatible forms with pharmacological activities, and that have the potential to be nano drug delivery vehicles. Furthermore, future studies to optimize the applications of JDs in drug delivery sciences and biomedical field to realize their potential to treat various disease conditions are identified and highlighted. Overall, this review identifies the current status of JDs in terms of their synthesis and applications, as well as the future research for their translation into macromolecules for clinical applications to solve health problems. It highlights the future combined efforts needed to be taken by dendrimer chemists, formulation scientist and microbiologists to develop novel antibacterials and nanomedicines from JDs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Is alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction an effective protocol in the treatment of Class III malocclusion? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; Santos, Nathalia de Lima; Santos, Camila Rangel Barreto Dos; Baião, Felipe Carvalho Souza; Pinheiro, Murilo Costa Rangel; Matos, Manoel; Souza, Ianderlei Andrade; Paula, Rafael Pereira de

    2016-01-01

    the treatment of Class III malocclusion in early age is one of the greatest challenges for orthodontists, and the establishment of more effective treatment method is a constant concern for these professionals. Thus, the objective of this systematic review is to verify the effectiveness of the therapy protocol for alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction (Alt-RAMEC) in the early treatment of Class III malocclusion. searches were performed in the following electronic databases: Cochrane Library, Medline (EBSCO and PubMed), SciELO, LILACS and Scopus. The following inclusion criteria were used: in vivo studies conducted with early intervention (patient in craniofacial development phase) with the use of the Alt-RAMEC protocol. Reviews, case reports, editorials, and studies with syndromic patients or under use of systemic drug were excluded. Duplicates were also excluded. The studies were assessed for methodological quality using the Cochrane tool for assessment of risk of bias, and classified as high or low risk of bias. 53 articles were found. Duplicates exclusion was thus performed and 35 articles remained. After inclusion analysis, only 5 matched the criteria. Two articles were classified as low risk of bias and three as high risk of bias. It was observed that the Alt-RAMEC enable protraction in less time and with better results, promoting greater effectiveness in the protraction treatment of Class III malocclusion. Although there is positive evidence of the effectiveness of early treatment with the Alt-RAMEC protocol in patients with Class III malocclusion, further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness using long-term methodology.

  1. Intubation conditions after rocuronium or succinylcholine for rapid sequence induction with alfentanil and propofol in the emergency patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P B; Hansen, E G; Jacobsen, L S

    2005-01-01

    conditions of standard doses of rocuronium 0.6 mg kg[-1] and succinylcholine 1.0 mg kg[-1] during a strict rapid-sequence induction regimen including propofol and alfentanil. Methods: Male and female patients (ASA I-III) older than 17 yr scheduled for emergency abdominal or gynaecological surgery...

  2. Recognition of Emerging Technology Trends. Class-selective study of citations in the U.S. Patent Citation Network

    CERN Document Server

    Bruck, Péter; Szente, Judit; Tobochnik, Jan; Érdi, Péter

    2016-01-01

    By adopting a citation-based recursive ranking method for patents the evolution of new fields of technology can be traced. Specifically, it is demonstrated that the laser / inkjet printer technology emerged from the recombination of two existing technologies: sequential printing and static image production. The dynamics of the citations coming from the different "precursor" classes illuminates the mechanism of the emergence of new fields and give the possibility to make predictions about future technological development. For the patent network the optimal value of the PageRank damping factor is close to 0.5; the application of d=0.85 leads to unacceptable ranking results.

  3. Rapid Identification of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Sporothrix Species with Rolling Circle Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anderson M.; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J.; de Hoog, G. Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo P.

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and guiding antifungal therapy. In areas of limited resources where sporotrichosis is endemic, high-throughput detection methods that are specific and sensitive are preferred over phenotypic methods that usually result in misidentification of closely related Sporothrix species. We sought to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA) as a low-cost screening tool for species-specific identification of human-pathogenic Sporothrix. We developed six species-specific padlock probes targeting polymorphisms in the gene encoding calmodulin. BLAST-searches revealed candidate probes that were conserved intraspecifically; no significant homology with sequences from humans, mice, plants or microorganisms outside members of Sporothrix were found. The accuracy of our RCA-based assay was demonstrated through the specificity of probe-template binding to 25 S. brasiliensis, 58 S. schenckii, 5 S. globosa, 1 S. luriei, 4 S. mexicana, and 3 S. pallida samples. No cross reactivity between closely related species was evident in vitro, and padlock probes yielded 100% specificity and sensitivity down to 3 × 106 copies of the target sequence. RCA-based speciation matched identifications via phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding calmodulin and the rDNA operon (kappa 1.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-1.0), supporting its use as a reliable alternative to DNA sequencing. This method is a powerful tool for rapid identification and specific detection of medically relevant Sporothrix, and due to its robustness has potential for ecological studies. PMID:26696992

  4. Clinical review criteria and medical emergency teams: evaluating a two-tier rapid response system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Gordon; Fossum, Mariann; Barratt, Macey; Bucknall, Tracey

    2015-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of patients fulfilling clinical review criteria (CRC), to determine activation rates for CRC assessments, to compare baseline characteristics and outcomes of patients who fulfilled CRC with patients who did not, and to identify the documented nursing actions in response to CRC values. A cross-sectional study using a retrospective medical record audit, in a universityaffiliated, tertiary referral hospital with a two-tier rapid response system in Melbourne, Australia. We used a convenience sample of hospital inpatients on general medical, surgical and specialist service wards admitted during a 24-hour period in 2013. Medical emergency team (MET) or code blue activation, unplanned intensive care unit admissions, hospital length of stay and inhospital mortality. For patients who fulfilled CRC or MET criteria during the 24- hour period, the specific criteria fulfilled, escalation treatments and outcomes were collected. Of the sample (N = 422), 81 patients (19%) fulfilled CRC on 109 occasions. From 109 CRC events, 66 patients (81%) had at least one observation fulfilling CRC, and 15 patients (18%) met CRC on multiple occasions. The documented escalation rate was 58 of 109 events (53%). The number of patients who fulfilled CRC and subsequent MET call activation criteria within 24 hours was significantly greater than the number who did not meet CRC (P CRC during the study period; these patients were about four times more likely to also fulfil MET call criteria. Contrary to hospital policy, escalation was not documented for about half the patients meeting CRC values. Despite the clarity of escalation procedures on the graphic observation chart, escalation remains an ongoing problem. Further research is needed on the impact on patient outcomes over time and to understand factors influencing staff response.

  5. [Effect of maxillary protraction with or without rapid palatal expansion in treating early skeletal Class III malocclusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wen-Sheng; Lu, Hai-Yan; Dong, Fu-Sheng; Hu, Xiao-Ying; Li, Xing-Chao

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with maxillary protraction with or without rapid palatal expansion (RPE) for skeletal Class III malocclusion in mixed dentition. A total of 31 children with Class III malocclusion in mixed dentition were selected, and 15 (group A) received maxillary protraction treatment with RPE, the other 16 (group B) received maxillary protraction without RPE. Cephalometric films were taken before and after treatment, and traditional and Pancherz analysis were used. The average duration of treatment was 10.14 months in group A and 9.77 months in group B respectively (P>0.05). According to Pancherz analysis, maxillary basal bone moved forwards by 2.99 mm in group A and 3.33 mm in group B respectively (P>0.05), mandibular basal bone moved backwards by 0.07 mm in group A, while forwards by 0.80 mm in group B (P>0.05), the overjet increased by 4.51 mm in group A and 6.37 mm in group B respectively (P0.05). The effects were clinically satisfactory in the both groups. Lower molar moved forwards by 1.18 mm in basal bone in group A, while backwards by 1.20 mm in group B (PClass III malocclusion.

  6. Denture-frame modifications in class III patients treated with rapid palatal expansion and facemask: a prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorati, M; Signori, A; Isaia, L; Menini, A; Rubiano, R; Aonzo, E; Silvestrini Biavati, A

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this prospective controlled investigation was to analyze the short-term cephalometric treatment outcomes, according to the denture frame analysis proposed by Sato, of rapid palatal expansion (RPE) and facial mask (FM) therapy. A group of 21 patients with Class III malocclusion treated with the RPE and FM (TG) was compared with untreated Class III controls (CG). The mean age of treatment group was 8.8 years; treatment consisted of 4 weeks of RPE activation (0.20 mm/die) followed by 14 hours wear of the FM for a mean of 333.1 days. As CG were used the data published by Tanaka and Sato. Pre- and post-treatment cephalometric values were compared and statistical analyzed with one-sample t-test. A P-value plane (POC) values some differences compared to control group were found but they were not statistically significant (P=0.067) while for aterior occlusal plane (POA) no differences where noticed. This study revealed an increase in inter-jaw angle during treatment with FM and RPE, an increase in the inclination of the posterior occlusal plane with respect to the Frankfurt plane and a posterior and lower adaptation of the mandible.

  7. The effect of rapid diagnostic testing for influenza on the reduction of antibiotic use in paediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaya, E; Cambaz, N; Coşkun, Y; Mete, F; Geyik, M; Samanci, N

    2009-10-01

    To determine the influence of rapid diagnosis of influenza on antibiotic prescribing to children presenting with influenza-like illness in the emergency department in a inner city hospital in Istanbul, Turkey. Patients aged 3 to 14 years presenting to an urban children's teaching hospital emergency department were screened for fever and cough, coryza, myalgias and/or malaise. After obtaining informed consent, patients were allocated into two groups. Group 1: patients were prescribed antibiotics after only physical examination; or Group 2: patients were prescribed antibiotics after rapid influenza testing. Nasopharyngeal swabs obtained from all patients were immediately tested in a single-blind manner with Influenza A/B Rapid Test(R) for influenza A and B. A total of 97 patients were enrolled, and 33 (34%) of these tested positive for influenza. Although frequency of positive results for influenza between the groups was similar (36% vs 32%, respectively), patients in Group 2 were less likely to be prescribed antibiotics when compared to those in Group 1 (32% vs 100%, respectively, p < 0.0001). Rapid diagnosis of influenza in the paediatric emergency department may allow a significant reduction in the over-prescription of antibiotics.

  8. Emergency Ebola response: a new approach to the rapid design and development of vaccines against emerging diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Claire M; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2015-03-01

    The epidemic of Ebola virus disease has spread at an alarming rate despite containment efforts. As a result, unprecedented large-scale international response efforts have been made in an attempt to gain control of the outbreak and reduce transmission. Several international consortia have been formed in a remarkable worldwide collaborative effort to expedite trials of two candidate Ebola virus vaccines: cAd3-EBOZ and rVSV-EBOV. In parallel, both vaccines are being manufactured in large amounts to enable future rapid deployment for management of the crisis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intubation conditions after rocuronium or succinylcholine for rapid sequence induction with alfentanil and propofol in the emergency patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P B; Hansen, E G; Jacobsen, L S

    2005-01-01

    conditions of standard doses of rocuronium 0.6 mg kg[-1] and succinylcholine 1.0 mg kg[-1] during a strict rapid-sequence induction regimen including propofol and alfentanil. Methods: Male and female patients (ASA I-III) older than 17 yr scheduled for emergency abdominal or gynaecological surgery...... not fulfil the inclusion criteria. Clinically acceptable intubation conditions were present in 93.5% and 96.1% of patients in the succinylcholine group (n=107) and the rocuronium group (n=102), respectively (P=0.59). Conclusions: During a rapid-sequence induction with alfentanil and propofol, both rocuronium...

  10. Emerging trends in Chinese healthcare: the impact of a rising middle class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joyce; Wood, David; Xiaofeng, Jia; Gifford, Blair

    2008-01-01

    In this report, the authors examine a major phenomenon in the Chinese healthcare marketplace: the explosion of a vigorous and demanding middle class and its impact on the future directions the industry should pursue. Little is known about the expectations of the middle class regarding their healthcare needs other than through anecdotal or informal sources. The views of the middle class are shaped by a variety of influences which include exposure through direct personal contact with international healthcare facilities when traveling abroad or indirectly through increased exposure to the entertainment industry with its abundance of hospital and medical dramas. In addition to a general increased international awareness arising from more advanced education, the perspective of the middle class consumer is also shaped by the reality of what is currently available in China and what is realistic to expect. This report addresses this lack of factual data through an extensive survey of middle class consumers in three major cities in China: Beijing, Shanghai and Chengdu. The survey took a practical and pragmatic approach to exploring this issue. No attempt was made in this study to explain why the consumer feels the way they do about their healthcare expectations. The purpose was simply to outline what expectations the middle class have for the healthcare marketplace in China. In some respects the results are not surprising. They are the expectations that people have in any country, any where. They expect greater privacy and dignity in the care-giving process. They want to be more involved in the decisions that are made regarding their care. They would prefer a personal, private physician as opposed to a revolving door of faces they will never see a second time. They rely strongly on family and friends to advise them on their choice of provider. They expect clean, well-maintained facilities, efficient systems and courteous personnel. In other respects, the conclusions are not

  11. Race, Class, and Emerging Sexuality: Teacher Perceptions and Sexual Harassment in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Regina; Liston, Delores

    2011-01-01

    Sexual harassment is a highly troubling gendered phenomenon that plagues young women on a daily basis. The way in which sexual harassment is perceived and treated is varied and is largely based on racial and class stereotypes. This paper highlights the findings from a study in which a group of middle and high school teachers were interviewed and…

  12. Insulation recovery time after fault arc interruption for rapid auto-reclosing on UHV (1000kV class) transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goda, Yutaka; Matsuda, Shoji; Inaba, Tsuginori; Ozaki, Yuzo [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    The insulation recovery time after arc interruption must be known in order to select an adequate reclosing dead time of rapid auto-reclosing on transmission lines. The flashover probability of the insulation recovery voltage obtained from the insulation recovery tests using full size insulator assemblies was calculated. The insulation recovery time at the fault point for rapid auto-reclosing on UHV(1000kV class) transmission lines was estimated.

  13. Association of apneic oxygenation with decreased desaturation rates during rapid sequence intubation by a Chinese emergency medicine service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yong; Qin, Zong-He

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and safe airway management has always been of paramount importance in successful management of critically ill and injured patients in the emergency department. The achievement rate of emergency medicine inhabitants in airway management improved enhanced essentially subsequent to finishing anaesthesiology turn. There was a slightly higher rate of quick sequence intubation in the postapneic oxygenation groups (preapneic oxygenation 6.4%; postapneic oxygenation 9.1%). The majority of patients intubated in both groups were men (preapneic oxygenation 72.3%; postapneic oxygenation 63.5%). A higher percentage of patients in the preapneic oxygenation group had a Cormack-Lehane grade III or worse view (23.2% versus 11.8%). Anaesthesiology turns should be considered as an essential component of emergency medicine training programs. A collateral curriculum of this nature should also focus on the acquisition of skills in airway management. PMID:26379959

  14. Rapid Identification of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Sporothrix Species with Rolling Circle Amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, Anderson M; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo P

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and

  15. Succinylcholine for Emergency Airway Rescue in Class B Ambulatory Facilities: The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Position Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Girish P; Desai, Meena S; Gayer, Steven; Vila, Hector

    2017-05-01

    Procedures in class B ambulatory facilities are performed exclusively with oral or IV sedative-hypnotics and/or analgesics. These facilities typically do not stock dantrolene because no known triggers of malignant hyperthermia (ie, inhaled anesthetics and succinylcholine) are available. This article argues that, in the absence of succinylcholine, the morbidity and mortality from laryngospasm can be significant, indeed, higher than the unlikely scenario of succinylcholine-triggered malignant hyperthermia. The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia (SAMBA) position statement for the use of succinylcholine for emergency airway management is presented.

  16. Impact of the rapid antigen detection test in diagnosis and treatment of acute pharyngotonsillitis in a pediatric emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Débora Morais; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Hsin, Shieh Huei; Machado, Beatriz Marcondes; de Paulis, Milena; Lotufo, João Paulo B; Martinez, Marina Baquerizo; Grisi, Sandra Josefina E

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of the routine use of rapid antigen detection test in the diagnosis and treatment of acute pharyngotonsillitis in children. This is a prospective and observational study, with a protocol compliance design established at the Emergency Unit of the University Hospital of Universidade de São Paulo for the care of children and adolescents diagnosed with acute pharyngitis. 650 children and adolescents were enrolled. Based on clinical findings, antibiotics would be prescribed for 389 patients (59.8%); using the rapid antigen detection test, they were prescribed for 286 patients (44.0%). Among the 261 children who would not have received antibiotics based on the clinical evaluation, 111 (42.5%) had positive rapid antigen detection test. The diagnosis based only on clinical evaluation showed 61.1% sensitivity, 47.7% specificity, 44.9% positive predictive value, and 57.5% negative predictive value. The clinical diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis had low sensitivity and specificity. The routine use of rapid antigen detection test led to the reduction of antibiotic use and the identification of a risk group for complications of streptococcal infection, since 42.5% positive rapid antigen detection test patients would not have received antibiotics based only on clinical diagnosis.

  17. Rapid emergence of pathogens in agro-ecosystems: global threats to agricultural sustainability and food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bruce A; Stukenbrock, Eva H

    2016-12-05

    Agricultural ecosystems are composed of genetically depauperate populations of crop plants grown at a high density and over large spatial scales, with the regional composition of crop species changing little from year to year. These environments are highly conducive for the emergence and dissemination of pathogens. The uniform host populations facilitate the specialization of pathogens to particular crop cultivars and allow the build-up of large population sizes. Population genetic and genomic studies have shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms underlying speciation processes, adaptive evolution and long-distance dispersal of highly damaging pathogens in agro-ecosystems. These studies document the speed with which pathogens evolve to overcome crop resistance genes and pesticides. They also show that crop pathogens can be disseminated very quickly across and among continents through human activities. In this review, we discuss how the peculiar architecture of agro-ecosystems facilitates pathogen emergence, evolution and dispersal. We present four example pathosystems that illustrate both pathogen specialization and pathogen speciation, including different time frames for emergence and different mechanisms underlying the emergence process. Lastly, we argue for a re-design of agro-ecosystems that embraces the concept of dynamic diversity to improve their resilience to pathogens. This article is part of the themed issue 'Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Heterocyclic N-Oxides – An Emerging Class of Therapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mfuh, Adelphe M.; Larionov, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterocyclic N-oxides have emerged as potent compounds with anticancer, antibacterial, antihypertensive, antiparasitic, anti-HIV, anti-inflammatory, herbicidal, neuroprotective, and procognitive activities. The N-oxide motif has been successfully employed in a number of recent drug development projects. This review surveys the emergence of this scaffold in the mainstream medicinal chemistry with a focus on the discovery of the heterocyclic N-oxide drugs, N-oxide-specific mechanisms of action, drug-receptor interactions and synthetic avenues to these compounds. As the first review on this subject that covers the developments since 1950s to date, it is expected that it will inspire wider implementation of the heterocyclic N-oxide motif in the rational design of new medicinal agents. PMID:26087764

  19. Emergence of a spectral gap in a class of random matrices associated with split graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Kevin E.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by the intriguing behavior displayed in a dynamic network that models a population of extreme introverts and extroverts (XIE), we consider the spectral properties of ensembles of random split graph adjacency matrices. We discover that, in general, a gap emerges in the bulk spectrum between -1 and 0 that contains a single eigenvalue. An analytic expression for the bulk distribution is derived and verified with numerical analysis. We also examine their relation to chiral ensembles, which are associated with bipartite graphs.

  20. Synthesis and biology of cyclic imine toxins, an emerging class of potent, globally distributed marine toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivala, Craig E; Benoit, Evelyne; Aráoz, Rómulo; Servent, Denis; Novikov, Alexei; Molgó, Jordi; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-03-01

    From a small group of exotic compounds isolated only two decades ago, Cyclic Imine (CI) toxins have become a major class of marine toxins with global distribution. Their distinct chemical structure, biological mechanism of action, and intricate chemistry ensures that CI toxins will continue to be the subject of fascinating fundamental studies in the broad fields of chemistry, chemical biology, and toxicology. The worldwide occurrence of potent CI toxins in marine environments, their accumulation in shellfish, and chemical stability are important considerations in assessing risk factors for human health. This review article aims to provide an account of chemistry, biology, and toxicology of CI toxins from their discovery to the present day.

  1. IBO Case Report: Management of Skeletal Class III Malocclusion with Combined Rapid Maxillary Expansion: Facemask Therapy and 5-Year Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Surana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with maxillary deficiency in an adolescent girl, using combined rapid maxillary expansion-facemask approach, followed by comprehensive fixed appliance mechanotherapy. Excellent long-term stability is demonstrated up to 5 years post-treatment.

  2. Disorders of phospholipid metabolism: an emerging class of mitochondrial disease due to defects in nuclear genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Wen eLu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The human nuclear and mitochondrial genomes co-exist within each cell. While the mitochondrial genome encodes for a limited number of proteins, transfer RNAs, and ribosomal RNAs, the vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome. Of the multitude of mitochondrial disorders known to date, only a fifth are maternally inherited. The recent characterization of the mitochondrial proteome therefore serves as an important step towards delineating the nosology of a large spectrum of phenotypically heterogeneous diseases. Following the identification of the first nuclear gene defect to underlie a mitochondrial disorder, a plenitude of genetic variants that provoke mitochondrial pathophysiology have been molecularly elucidated and classified into six categories that impact: 1 oxidative phosphorylation (subunits and assembly factors; 2 mitochondrial DNA maintenance and expression; 3 mitochondrial protein import and assembly; 4 mitochondrial quality control (chaperones and proteases; 5 iron-sulfur cluster homeostasis; and 6 mitochondrial dynamics (fission and fusion. Here, we propose that an additional class of genetic variant be included in the classification schema to acknowledge the role of genetic defects in phospholipid biosynthesis, remodeling, and metabolism in mitochondrial pathophysiology. This seventh class includes a small but notable group of nuclear-encoded proteins whose dysfunction impacts normal mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism. The resulting human disorders present with a diverse array of pathologic consequences that reflect the variety of functions that phospholipids have in mitochondria and highlight the important role of proper membrane homeostasis in mitochondrial biology.

  3. α-Oligofurans: an emerging class of conjugated oligomers for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidron, Ori; Bendikov, Michael

    2014-03-03

    While the field of organic electronics has developed extensively in recent years, it remains limited by number of materials available. Further expansion requires the innovation of new types of π-conjugated backbones, but suitable candidates are discovered only very rarely. The recent introduction of a new class of conjugated materials, long α-oligofurans, was therefore greeted with considerable interest. α-Oligofurans possess many of the properties required to excel in applications as organic electronic materials, can be manufactured from renewable resources, and are expected to be biodegradable. This Minireview provides an account of long oligofurans from the perspectives of their synthesis, molecular properties, chemical reactivity, and use in electronic devices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Elastin-like polypeptides: Therapeutic applications for an emerging class of nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despanie, Jordan; Dhandhukia, Jugal P; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; MacKay, J Andrew

    2016-10-28

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) constitute a genetically engineered class of 'protein polymers' derived from human tropoelastin. They exhibit a reversible phase separation whereby samples remain soluble below a transition temperature (Tt) but form amorphous coacervates above Tt. Their phase behavior has many possible applications in purification, sensing, activation, and nanoassembly. As humanized polypeptides, they are non-immunogenic, substrates for proteolytic biodegradation, and can be decorated with pharmacologically active peptides, proteins, and small molecules. Recombinant synthesis additionally allows precise control over ELP architecture and molecular weight, resulting in protein polymers with uniform physicochemical properties suited to the design of multifunctional biologics. As such, ELPs have been employed for various uses including as anti-cancer agents, ocular drug delivery vehicles, and protein trafficking modulators. This review aims to offer the reader a catalogue of ELPs, their various applications, and potential for commercialization across a broad spectrum of fields. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Intubation conditions after rocuronium or succinylcholine for rapid sequence induction with alfentanil and propofol in the emergency patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P B; Hansen, E G; Jacobsen, L S

    2005-01-01

    the intubation 60 s after injection of the neuromuscular blocker. Intubating conditions were evaluated according to an established guideline. Tracheal intubation not completed within 30 s was recorded as failed. Results: 222 patients were randomized. Three patients had their operation cancelled and 10 did......Background and objective: Previous studies mainly conducted on elective patients recommend doses of 0.9-1.2 mg kg[-1] rocuronium to obtain comparable intubation conditions with succinylcholine 1.0 mg kg[-1] after 60 s during a rapid-sequence induction. We decided to compare the overall intubating...... conditions of standard doses of rocuronium 0.6 mg kg[-1] and succinylcholine 1.0 mg kg[-1] during a strict rapid-sequence induction regimen including propofol and alfentanil. Methods: Male and female patients (ASA I-III) older than 17 yr scheduled for emergency abdominal or gynaecological surgery...

  6. Management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with unilateral crossbite on a growing patient using facemask-bonded rapid palatal expander and fixed appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinnie Effendy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Facemask (FM and bonded rapid palatal expander (RPE are part of growth modification treatments for correcting skeletal Class III pattern with retrognathic maxilla. This orthopaedic treatment is usually preceded by fixed appliances to achieve aesthetic dental alignment and improve interdigitation. This case report reviews treatment of Class III malocclusion with unilateral crossbite in a 12-year-old boy using FM and bonded RPE, followed by fixed appliances. Choice of FM and bonded RPE was in line with indication which was mild Class III malocclusion with retrognathic maxilla. Execution of treatment was made considering treatment biomechanics and patient cooperation. This orthopaedic treatment was followed by orthodontic treatment specifically aimed to correct unilateral crossbite, canine relationship yet to reach Class I, lower midline shift, as well as unintended dental consequences of using bonded RPE, namely posterior open bite and deepening curve of spee. Posttreatment facial profile and smile are more esthetic. Occlusion is significantly improved both functionally and aesthetically.

  7. Host-jump drives rapid and recent ecological speciation of the emergent fungal pathogen Colletotrichum kahawae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diogo N; Talhinhas, Pedro; Cai, Lei; Manuel, Luzolo; Gichuru, Elijah K; Loureiro, Andreia; Várzea, Vítor; Paulo, Octávio S; Batista, Dora

    2012-06-01

    Ecological speciation through host-shift has been proposed as a major route for the appearance of novel fungal pathogens. The growing awareness of their negative impact on global economies and public health created an enormous interest in identifying the factors that are most likely to promote their emergence in nature. In this work, a combination of pathological, molecular and geographical data was used to investigate the recent emergence of the fungus Colletotrichum kahawae. C. kahawae emerged as a specialist pathogen causing coffee berry disease in Coffea arabica, owing to its unparalleled adaptation of infecting green coffee berries. Contrary to current hypotheses, our results suggest that a recent host-jump underlay the speciation of C. kahawae from a generalist group of fungi seemingly harmless to coffee berries. We posit that immigrant inviability and a predominantly asexual behaviour could have been instrumental in driving speciation by creating pleiotropic interactions between local adaptation and reproductive patterns. Moreover, we estimate that C. kahawae began its diversification at pathogens through ecological speciation. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Early medieval stone-lined graves in Southern Germany: analysis of an emerging noble class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rott, Andreas; Turner, Nils; Scholz, Ulrike; von Heyking, Kristin; Immler, Franziska; Peters, Joris; Haberstroh, Jochen; Harbeck, Michaela

    2017-04-01

    Stone-lined graves, which first appear in Bavarian territory during the 7(th) century AD, are assumed to be tombs of emerging nobility. While previous research on stone-lined grave goods supports their status as elite burials, an important factor defining nobility-kinship-has not been examined so far. Morphological analysis of the commingled skeletal remains of 21 individuals from three archaeological sites was carried out. Radiocarbon dating was conducted on these individuals to gain information on usage intervals of these graves. To test whether stone-lined graves can be considered family graves, analyses of mitochondrial HVR I, Y-chromosomal and autosomal STRs were carried out. Morphological examination revealed a surplus of males buried in stone-lined graves and radiocarbon dating points to usage of the tombs for several generations. According to aDNA analysis, kinship can be assumed both between and within stone-lined graves. Taken together, these results hint at burials of family members with high social status being inhumed at the same site, in some cases even the same grave, for several generations. They also suggest, for the first time, that an early medieval linear cemetery was structured according to biological kinship. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A Survey of the Rapidly Emerging Field of Nanotechnology: Potential Applications for Scientific Instruments and Technologies for Atmospheric Entry Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    The field of Nanotechnology is well funded worldwide and innovations applicable to Solar System Exploration are emerging much more rapidly than thought possible just a few years ago. This presentation will survey recent innovations from nanotechnololgy with a focus on novel applications to atmospheric entry science and probe technology, in a fashion similar to that presented by Arnold and Venkatapathy at the previous workshop forum at Lisbon Portugal, October 6-9, 2003. Nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that builds systems, devices and materials from the bottom up, atom by atom, and in so doing provides them with novel and remarkable macro-scale performance. This technology has the potential to revolutionize space exploration by reducing mass and simultaneously increasing capability. Thermal, Radiation, Impact Protective Shields: Atmospheric probes and humans on long duration deep space missions involved in Solar System Exploration must safely endure 3 significant hazards: (i) atmospheric entry; (ii) radiation; and (iii) micrometeorite or debris impact. Nanostructured materials could be developed to address all three hazards with a single protective shield, which would involve much less mass than a traditional approach. The concept can be ready in time for incorporation into NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicle, and possible entry probes to fly on the Jupiter Icy Moons

  10. The emergence of pan-resistant Gram-negative pathogens merits a rapid global political response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Timothy R; Toleman, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Recent media coverage of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) put antibiotic resistance back on the political map if only for the wrong reasons, mainly the reaction to the naming of NDM-1 and the incorrect assumption that medical tourism was being deliberately targeted. However, work on NDM-1 has most certainly highlighted the rapid dissemination of new antibiotic resistance mechanisms via economic globalization. The example of NDM-1 has also magnified the desperate need for a publicly funded global antibiotic surveillance system rather than just national or regional systems. Furthermore, there is a pressing need to establish a global task force to enforce international transparency and accountability on antibiotic stewardship and the implementation of measures to curb antibiotic resistance. An international antibiotic stewardship index should be established that is related to each country's gross domestic product (GDP) and assesses how much of their GDP is committed to publically funded health initiatives aimed at controlling antibiotic resistance.

  11. Artificial stone-associated silicosis: a rapidly emerging occupational lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Ryan F; Baird, Timothy; Hammerschlag, Gary; Hart, David; Johnson, Anthony R; King, Paul; Putt, Michael; Yates, Deborah H

    2018-01-01

    Artificial stone is an increasingly popular material used to fabricate kitchen and bathroom benchtops. Cutting and grinding artificial stone is associated with generation of very high levels of respirable crystalline silica, and the frequency of cases of severe silicosis associated with this exposure is rapidly increasing. To report the characteristics of a clinical series of Australian workers with artificial stone-associated silicosis. Respiratory physicians voluntarily reported cases of artificial stone-associated silicosis identified in their clinical practices. Physicians provided information including occupational histories, respiratory function tests, chest radiology and histopathology reports, when available. Seven male patients were identified with a median age of 44 years (range 26-61). All were employed in small kitchen and bathroom benchtop fabrication businesses with an average of eight employees (range 2-20). All workplaces primarily used artificial stone, and dust control measures were poor. All patients were involved in dry cutting artificial stone. The median duration of exposure prior to symptoms was 7 years (range 4-10). Six patients demonstrated radiological features of progressive massive fibrosis. These individuals followed up over a median follow-up period of 16 months (IQR 21 months) demonstrated rapid decline in prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 386 mL/year (SD 204 mL) and forced vital capacity of 448 mL/year (SD 312 mL). This series of silicosis in Australian workers further demonstrates the risk-associated high-silica content artificial stone. Effective dust control and health surveillance measures need to be stringently implemented and enforced in this industry. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Path-integral calculation for the emergence of rapid evolution from demographic stochasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hong-Yan; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2014-11-01

    Genetic variation in a population can sometimes arise so fast as to modify ecosystem dynamics. Such phenomena have been observed in natural predator-prey systems and characterized in the laboratory as showing unusual phase relationships in population dynamics, including a π phase shift between predator and prey (evolutionary cycles) and even undetectable prey oscillations compared to those of the predator (cryptic cycles). Here we present a generic individual-level stochastic model of interacting populations that includes a subpopulation of low nutritional value to the predator. Using a master equation formalism and by mapping to a coherent state path integral solved by a system-size expansion, we show that evolutionary and cryptic quasicycles can emerge generically from the combination of intrinsic demographic fluctuations and clonal mutations alone, without additional biological mechanisms.

  13. Emergency Department Visit Data for Rapid Detection and Monitoring of Norovirus Activity, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrer, Sherry; Park, Soyoun; Trivedi, Tarak; Parashar, Umesh D.; Lopman, Benjamin A.

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of gastroenteritis in the United States, but timely measures of disease are lacking. BioSense, a national-level electronic surveillance system, assigns data on chief complaints (patient symptoms) collected during emergency department (ED) visits to 78 subsyndromes in near real-time. In a series of linear regression models, BioSense visits mapped by chief complaints of diarrhea and nausea/vomiting subsyndromes as a monthly proportion of all visits correlated strongly with reported norovirus outbreaks from 6 states during 2007–2010. Higher correlations were seen for diarrhea (R = 0.828–0.926) than for nausea/vomiting (R = 0.729–0.866) across multiple age groups. Diarrhea ED visit proportions exhibited winter seasonality attributable to norovirus; rotavirus contributed substantially for children norovirus season within 4 weeks of observed dates and could be reliable, timely indicators of norovirus activity. PMID:23876432

  14. Value of rapid antigen test for pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Murat; Gençpinar, Pinar; Ozbek, Ozgen Alpay; Ozdemir, Durgül; Sayiner, A Arzu

    2013-05-01

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza is the predominant influenza virus circulating in Turkey in 2009. Because of the clinical manifestations of influenza overlap with those attributable to other common respiratory illnesses of childhood, establishing a diagnosis of influenza requires confirmatory testing. The aim of our study was to define the predictive value of rapid influenza antigen detection test in children presenting to a pediatric emergency care department with influenza-like illness and to compare with clinical signs and symptoms. From October to November 2009, 3646 patients presented with influenza-like illness to the pediatric emergency department. Influenza-like illness is defined as fever with cough or sore throat in the absence of a known cause other than influenza. Enrollment criteria included fever and at least one of the following symptoms: coryza, cough, headache, sore throat, or myalgia. All 322 enrolled patients received a nasal wash for rapid influenza diagnostic tests, and the results were compared with clinical signs. Rapid influenza detection test result was found positive in 167 (51.9%) of 322 patients. Clinical findings included fever as the presenting complaint (100%), fever (≥38 °C) (93.4%), cough (91.3%), rhinorrhea (66.1%), sore throat (35.1%), vomiting-diarrhea (22.4%), myalgia (20.2%), headache (18%) and shortness of breath (12.1%). There were 211 patients (65.5%) at high risk for the development of complications of pandemic H1N1 influenza A such as chronic lung disease (asthma) (n = 103, 48.8%), age younger than 2 years (n = 78, 37%), and neurologic disease (n = 10, 4.7%). The positivity rate and sensitivity of the test increase up to 70% in patients, who had the high body temperature (≥39 °C). The rapid test achieved the highest sensitivity in patients, who have high fever (≥39 °C), myalgia, vomiting, and diarrhea. We found that if the patients have high fever (≥39 °C), myalgia, and vomiting-diarrhea together, the likelihood of

  15. Independent Emergence of Resistance to Seven Chemical Classes of Fungicides in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ortuño, Dolores; Grabke, Anja; Li, Xingpeng; Schnabel, Guido

    2015-04-01

    Gray mold, caused by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, is one of the most destructive diseases of small fruit crops and control is largely dependent on the application of fungicides. As part of a region-wide resistance-monitoring program that investigated 1,890 B. cinerea isolates from 189 fields in 10 states of the United States, we identified seven isolates (0.4%) from five locations in four different states with unprecedented resistance to all seven Fungicide Resistance Action Committee (FRAC) codes with single-site modes of action including FRAC 1, 2, 7, 9, 11, 12, and 17 registered in the United States for gray mold control. Resistance to thiophanate-methyl, iprodione, boscalid, pyraclostrobin, and fenhexamid was based on target gene mutations that conferred E198A and F200Y in β-tubulin, I365N/S in Bos1, H272R/Y in SdhB, G143A in Cytb, and T63I and F412S in Erg27. Isolates were grouped into MDR1 and MDR1h phenotypes based on sensitivity to fludioxonil and variations in transcription factor mrr1. MDR1h isolates had a previously described 3-bp deletion at position 497 in mrr1. Expression of ABC transporter atrB was increased in MDR1 isolates but highest in MDR1h isolates. None of the isolates with seven single resistances (SR) had identical nucleotide variations in target genes, indicating that they emerged independently. Multifungicide resistance phenotypes did not exhibit significant fitness penalties for the parameters used in this study, but MDR1h isolates produced more sclerotia at low temperatures and exhibited increased sensitivity to salt stress. In this study we show that current resistance management strategies have not been able to prevent the geographically independent development of resistance to all seven site-specific fungicides currently registered for gray mold control in the United States and document the presence of MDR1h in North America.

  16. Costs of Rapid HIV Screening in an Urban Emergency Department and a Nearby County Jail in the Southeastern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne C Spaulding

    Full Text Available Emergency departments and jails provide medical services to persons at risk for HIV infection and are recommended venues for HIV screening. Our main objective in this study was to analyze the cost per new HIV diagnosis associated with the HIV screening program in these two venues. The emergency department's parallel testing program was conducted at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia starting in 2008; the jail's integrated testing program began at the Fulton County (GA Jail in 2011. The two sites, four miles apart from one another, employed the same rapid HIV test. Ascertainment that cases were new differed by site; only the jail systematically checked identities against health department HIV registries. The program in the emergency department used dedicated HIV test counselors and made 242 diagnoses over a 40-month period at a cost of $2,981 per diagnosis. The jail program used staff nurses, and found 41 new HIV cases over 10.5 months at a cost of $6,688 per new diagnosis. Differences in methods for ascertainment of new diagnoses, previously undiagnosed HIV sero-positivity, and methodologies used for assessing program costs prevent concluding that one program was more economical than the other. Nonetheless, our findings show that testing in both venues yielded many new diagnoses, with the costs within the range reported in the literature.

  17. Cephalometric evaluation of the hyoid triangle before and after maxillary rapid expansion in patients with skeletal class II, mixed dentition, and infantile swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisella, Valeria; Vozza, Iole; Capasso, Francesca; Luzzi, Valeria; Ierardo, Gaetano; Nofroni, Italo; Polimeni, Antonella

    2012-07-01

    Rocabado's hyoid triangle is the only cephalometric parameter that can assess the effects of orthodontic treatment on tongue posture. To evaluate the restoration of tongue posture and function by conducting a cephalometric assessment of the hyoid triangle before and after rapid maxillary expansion. Sixty-four healthy patients aged 6-11 years with skeletal class II malocclusion, mixed dentition, and infantile swallowing took part in this study. They submitted to lateral cephalometric radiography before and after orthodontic maxillary rapid expansion, in order to assess the resulting changes in the proportions of the hyoid triangle (following Rocabado's parameters). The cephalometric findings were compared according to sex, age, and divergence using the chi-square McNemar test at the 5% significance level (ptriangle was modified by the orthodontic maxillary expansion, reconditioning of tongue posture and function particularly among male, aged 6-7 years old with skeletal class II malocclusion, mixed dentition, and infantile swallowing.

  18. Strategic camouflage treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion (mandibular prognathism) using bone-borne rapid maxillary expansion and mandibular anterior subapical osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yu-Jin; Lin, Lu; Kim, Seong-Hun; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Nelson, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This case report presents the camouflage treatment that successfully improved the facial profile of a patient with a skeletal Class III malocclusion using bone-borne rapid maxillary expansion and mandibular anterior subapical osteotomy. The patient was an 18-year-old woman with chief complaints of crooked teeth and a protruded jaw. Camouflage treatment was chosen because she rejected orthognathic surgery under general anesthesia. A hybrid type of bone-borne rapid maxillary expander with palatal mini-implants was used to correct the transverse discrepancy, and a mandibular anterior subapical osteotomy was conducted to achieve proper overjet with normal incisal inclination and to improve her lip and chin profile. As a result, a Class I occlusion with a favorable inclination of the anterior teeth and a good esthetic profile was achieved with no adverse effects. Therefore, the hybrid type of bone-borne rapid maxillary expander and a mandibular anterior subapical osteotomy can be considered effective camouflage treatment of a skeletal Class III malocclusion, providing improved inclination of the dentition and lip profile. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid emergence of free-riding behavior in new pediatric immunization programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris T Bauch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mathematical models have formalized how free-rider effects can threaten the stability of high vaccine coverage levels under established voluntary vaccination programs. However, little research has addressed the question of when free-riding begins to develop when a new vaccine is first introduced in a population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we combine a game theoretical model of vaccinating behavior with an age-structured compartmental model to analyze rational vaccinating behavior in the first years of a universal immunization program, where a new vaccine is free to all children of a specified age. The model captures how successive birth cohorts face different epidemiological landscapes that have been shaped by the vaccinating decisions of previous birth cohorts, resulting in a strategic interaction between individuals in different birth cohorts. The model predicts a Nash equilibrium coverage level of for the first few birth cohorts under the new program. However, free-riding behavior emerges very quickly, with the Nash equilibrium vaccine coverage dropping significantly within 2-5 years after program initiation. Subsequently, a rich set of coupled dynamics between infection prevalence and vaccinating behaviors is possible, ranging from relatively stable (but reduced coverage in later birth cohorts to wide fluctuations in vaccine coverage from one birth cohort to the next. Individual tolerance for vaccine risk also starts out at relatively high levels before dropping significantly within a few years. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that even relatively new immunization programs can be vulnerable to drops in vaccine coverage caused by vaccine scares and exacerbated by herd immunity effects, necessitating vigilance from the start.

  20. Rapid emergence of free-riding behavior in new pediatric immunization programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Chris T; Bhattacharyya, Samit; Ball, Robert F

    2010-09-15

    Mathematical models have formalized how free-rider effects can threaten the stability of high vaccine coverage levels under established voluntary vaccination programs. However, little research has addressed the question of when free-riding begins to develop when a new vaccine is first introduced in a population. Here, we combine a game theoretical model of vaccinating behavior with an age-structured compartmental model to analyze rational vaccinating behavior in the first years of a universal immunization program, where a new vaccine is free to all children of a specified age. The model captures how successive birth cohorts face different epidemiological landscapes that have been shaped by the vaccinating decisions of previous birth cohorts, resulting in a strategic interaction between individuals in different birth cohorts. The model predicts a Nash equilibrium coverage level of for the first few birth cohorts under the new program. However, free-riding behavior emerges very quickly, with the Nash equilibrium vaccine coverage dropping significantly within 2-5 years after program initiation. Subsequently, a rich set of coupled dynamics between infection prevalence and vaccinating behaviors is possible, ranging from relatively stable (but reduced) coverage in later birth cohorts to wide fluctuations in vaccine coverage from one birth cohort to the next. Individual tolerance for vaccine risk also starts out at relatively high levels before dropping significantly within a few years. These results suggest that even relatively new immunization programs can be vulnerable to drops in vaccine coverage caused by vaccine scares and exacerbated by herd immunity effects, necessitating vigilance from the start.

  1. [The effect of two different methods of rapid maxillary expansion on treatment results of skeletal Class III malocclusion patients with maxillary protraction in early permanent dentition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi-hua; Xie, Xing-qian

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the effect of single rapid maxillary expansion and repetitive rapid expansion and constriction with maxillary protraction in treating early permanent skeletal Class III patients. Twenty children with skeletal Class III malocclusion were randomly divided into two groups.Ten patients received 1 week of rapid expansion,followed by maxillary protraction(group A) and the other ten patients received 5 weeks of repetitive rapid expansion and constriction followed by maxillary protraction (group B).Cephalometric analysis was performed before and after treatment. The data was analyzed with SPSS 13.0 software package for paired t test. Significant changes in cranio-maxillofacial structures were observed in both groups after 6 months of treatment.Point A moved forward. SNA, ANB, UL-EP, U1-PP, SN-MP, ANS-Me/N-Me, Wit's value increased. L1-MP, LL-EP decreased. Significant differences were found in SNA,ANB,UL-EP between the two groups(PClass III malocclusion patients.

  2. The precedence of syntax in the rapid emergence of human language in evolution as defined by the integration hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor eNóbrega

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Our core hypothesis is that the emergence of human language arose very rapidly from the linking of two pre-adapted systems found elsewhere in the animal world—an expression system, found, for example, in birdsong, and a lexical system, suggestively found in non-human primate calls (Miyagawa et al., 2013, 2014. We challenge the view that language has undergone a series of gradual changes—or a single preliminary protolinguistic stage—before achieving its full character. We argue that a full-fledged combinatorial operation Merge triggered the integration of these two pre-adapted systems, giving rise to a fully developed language. This goes against the gradualist view that there existed a structureless, protolinguistic stage, in which a rudimentary proto-Merge operation generated internally flat words. It is argued that compounds in present-day language are a fossilized form of this prior stage, a point which we will question.

  3. The precedence of syntax in the rapid emergence of human language in evolution as defined by the integration hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Vitor A; Miyagawa, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Our core hypothesis is that the emergence of human language arose very rapidly from the linking of two pre-adapted systems found elsewhere in the animal world-an expression system, found, for example, in birdsong, and a lexical system, suggestively found in non-human primate calls (Miyagawa et al., 2013, 2014). We challenge the view that language has undergone a series of gradual changes-or a single preliminary protolinguistic stage-before achieving its full character. We argue that a full-fledged combinatorial operation Merge triggered the integration of these two pre-adapted systems, giving rise to a fully developed language. This goes against the gradualist view that there existed a structureless, protolinguistic stage, in which a rudimentary proto-Merge operation generated internally flat words. It is argued that compounds in present-day language are a fossilized form of this prior stage, a point which we will question.

  4. C-MAC videolaryngoscope compared with direct laryngoscopy for rapid sequence intubation in an emergency department: A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulser, Simon; Ubmann, Dirk; Schlaepfer, Martin; Brueesch, Martin; Goliasch, Georg; Seifert, Burkhardt; Spahn, Donat R; Ruetzler, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Airway management in the emergency room can be challenging when patients suffer from life-threatening conditions. Mental stress, ignorance of the patient's medical history, potential cervical injury or immobilisation and the presence of vomit and/or blood may also contribute to a difficult airway. Videolaryngoscopes have been introduced into clinical practice to visualise the airway and ultimately increase the success rate of airway management. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the C-MAC videolaryngoscope improves first-attempt intubation success rate compared with direct laryngoscopy in patients undergoing emergency rapid sequence intubation in the emergency room setting. A randomised clinical trial. Emergency Department of the University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. With approval of the local ethics committee, we prospectively enrolled 150 patients between 18 and 99 years of age requiring emergency rapid sequence intubation in the emergency room of the University Hospital Zurich. Patients were randomised (1 : 1) to undergo tracheal intubation using the C-MAC videolaryngoscope or by direct laryngoscopy. Owing to ethical considerations, patients who had sustained maxillo-facial trauma, immobilised cervical spine, known difficult airway or ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation were excluded from our study. All intubations were performed by one of three very experienced anaesthesia consultants. First-attempt success rate served as our primary outcome parameter. Secondary outcome parameters were time to intubation; total number of intubation attempts; Cormack and Lehane score; inadvertent oesophageal intubation; ease of intubation; complications including violations of the teeth, injury/bleeding of the larynx/pharynx and aspiration/regurgitation of gastric contents; necessity of using further alternative airway devices for successful intubation; maximum decrease of oxygen saturation and technical problems with the device. A total of 150

  5. A rapid-kinetic study of the class C beta-lactamase of Enterobacter cloacae 908R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnaie, D; Virden, R; Frère, J M

    1992-07-20

    The individual rate constants for acylation and deacylation (k2 and k3, respectively) of the class C beta-lactamase of Enterobacter cloacae 908R by ampicillin and carbenicillin have been determined. For several other beta-lactams, the value of k2 was too high to be determined and the k2/k3 ratio could be larger than 10,000. Branched pathways were also shown to occur with several penicillins and cephalosporins.

  6. Treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion using face mask therapy with alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction (Alt-RAMEC) protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Anand Ramchandra; Kumari, N Retna; Vadakkepuriyal, Kannan; Santhkumar, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Class III malocclusion is very common malocclusion and can be due to maxillary retrusion, mandibular prognathism, or combination. Ellis and McNamara found a combination of maxillary retrusion and mandibular protrusion to be the most common skeletal relationship (30%). The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. Reverse pull head gear combined with maxillary expansion can effectively correct skeletal Class III malocclusion due to maxillary deficiency in growing patient. An eight-year-old female patient with chief complaint of prognathic mandible and anterior crossbite was successfully treated in duration of 5 months with facemask and expansion therapy based on Alternate Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Constriction (Alt-RAMEC) protocol.

  7. Treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion using face mask therapy with alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction (Alt-RAMEC protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Ramchandra Rathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Class III malocclusion is very common malocclusion and can be due to maxillary retrusion, mandibular prognathism, or combination. Ellis and McNamara found a combination of maxillary retrusion and mandibular protrusion to be the most common skeletal relationship (30%. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. Reverse pull head gear combined with maxillary expansion can effectively correct skeletal Class III malocclusion due to maxillary deficiency in growing patient. An eight-year-old female patient with chief complaint of prognathic mandible and anterior crossbite was successfully treated in duration of 5 months with facemask and expansion therapy based on Alternate Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Constriction (Alt-RAMEC protocol.

  8. Genomic Analysis of the Emergence and Rapid Global Dissemination of the Clonal Group 258 Klebsiella pneumoniae Pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Jolene R; Kitchel, Brandon; Driebe, Elizabeth M; MacCannell, Duncan R; Roe, Chandler; Lemmer, Darrin; de Man, Tom; Rasheed, J Kamile; Engelthaler, David M; Keim, Paul; Limbago, Brandi M

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae producing the KPC carbapenemase have rapidly spread throughout the world, causing severe healthcare-associated infections with limited antimicrobial treatment options. Dissemination of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae is largely attributed to expansion of a single dominant strain, ST258. In this study, we explore phylogenetic relationships and evolution within ST258 and its clonal group, CG258, using whole genome sequence analysis of 167 isolates from 20 countries collected over 17 years. Our results show a common ST258 ancestor emerged from its diverse parental clonal group around 1995 and likely acquired blaKPC prior to dissemination. Over the past two decades, ST258 has remained highly clonal despite diversity in accessory elements and divergence in the capsule polysaccharide synthesis locus. Apart from the large recombination event that gave rise to ST258, few mutations set it apart from its clonal group. However, one mutation occurs in a global transcription regulator. Characterization of outer membrane protein sequences revealed a profile in ST258 that includes a truncated OmpK35 and modified OmpK37. Our work illuminates potential genomic contributors to the pathogenic success of ST258, helps us better understand the global dissemination of this strain, and identifies genetic markers unique to ST258.

  9. Economic Impact of a New Rapid PCR Assay for Detecting Influenza Virus in an Emergency Department and Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Marcelo; Sampietro-Colom, Laura; Vilella, Anna; Pantoja, Efraín; Asenjo, María; Arjona, Ruth; Hurtado, Juan Carlos; Trilla, Antoni; Alvarez-Martínez, Míriam José; Mira, Aurea; Vila, Jordi; Marcos, María Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality and has a substantial economic impact on the healthcare system. The main objective of this study was to compare the cost per patient for a rapid commercial PCR assay (Xpert® Flu) with an in-house real-time PCR test for detecting influenza virus. Community patients with influenza like-illness attending the Emergency Department (ED) as well as hospitalized patients in the Hospital Clínic of Barcelona were included. Costs were evaluated from the perspective of the hospital considering the use of resources directly related to influenza testing and treatment. For the purpose of this study, 366 and 691 patients were tested in 2013 and 2014, respectively. The Xpert® Flu test reduced the mean waiting time for patients in the ED by 9.1 hours and decreased the mean isolation time of hospitalized patients by 23.7 hours. This was associated with a 103€ (or about $113) reduction in the cost per patient tested in the ED and 64€ ($70) per hospitalized patient. Sensitivity analyses showed that Xpert® Flu is likely to be cost-saving in hospitals with different contexts and prices.

  10. The HEADS-ED: a rapid mental health screening tool for pediatric patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Mario; Gray, Clare; Zemek, Roger; Cloutier, Paula; Kennedy, Allison; Glennie, Elizabeth; Doucet, Guy; Lyons, John S

    2012-08-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics called for action for improved screening of mental health issues in the emergency department (ED). We developed the rapid screening tool home, education, activities/peers, drugs/alcohol, suicidality, emotions/behavior, discharge resources (HEADS-ED), which is a modification of "HEADS," a mnemonic widely used to obtain a psychosocial history in adolescents. The reliability and validity of the tool and its potential for use as a screening measure are presented. ED patients presenting with mental health concerns from March 1 to May 30, 2011 were included. Crisis intervention workers completed the HEADS-ED and the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths-Mental Health tool (CANS MH) and patients completed the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). Interrater reliability was assessed by using a second HEADS-ED rater for 20% of the sample. A total of 313 patients were included, mean age was 14.3 (SD 2.63), and there were 182 females (58.1%). Interrater reliability was 0.785 (P mental health concerns.

  11. [Treatment of Class II malocclusion using Herbst appliance with headgear and rapid palatal expansion and straight wire appliance with implant anchorage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-jie; Zheng, Cang-shang; Zhang, Min

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effects of early treatment of Class II malocclusion with Herbst appliance with headgear and rapid palatal expansion and straight wire appliance with implant anchorage. Twenty-five Chinese children (14 males, 11 females, aged from 10-12 years with an average age of 10.5 years) were treated with Herbst appliance with headgear and rapid palatal expansion for 6 months. Then they were further treated with straight wire appliance with implant anchorage. Cephalometric data pre- and post-treatment were measured and analysed. Multiple correlation analysis was performed with SPSS13.0 software package. Compared with pretreatment, as angle SNB (4.2800±1.4000)° and as angle NP-FH (3.5600±1.0440)° increased posttreatment. as angle SNA (0.5600±0.8206)°, as angle ANB (4.7600±1.2000)°, as angle U1-NA (11.9200±1.4411)° and as angle U1-SN (13.1600±1.7720)° decreased posttreatment (Pheadgear and rapid palatal expansion. The maxillary dentition is significantly retracted by fixed appliance with implant anchorage and the skeletal pattern of patients is significantly improved.

  12. Combination of copeptin and troponin assays to rapidly rule out non-ST elevation myocardial infarction in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Sandrine; Maupas-Schwalm, Françoise; Cournot, Maxime; Elbaz, Meyer; Botella, Jean Marie; Lauque, Dominique

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the diagnostic accuracy and the clinical usefulness of the combination of troponin I (cTnI) and copeptin measured at presentation with an automated assay to rapidly rule out non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) in patients with suspected cardiac chest pain presenting to an emergency department (ED). This study was an ancillary analysis of a prospective observational study. Copeptin and cTnI levels were sampled at presentation in 641 consecutive patients admitted to the ED for chest pain with onset within the last 12 hours and without ST elevation on a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). Copeptin was measured with an automated assay and troponin with conventional assay. The performance of a combination of cTnI and copeptin for NSTEMI diagnosis was studied, the clinical utility was assessed by multivariate analysis, and an area under the curve (AUC) calculation was used to determine accuracy. NSTEMI was diagnosed in 95 patients (15%). The sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV) of the combination of copeptin and cTnI measures were 90.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 88.2% to 92.7%) and 97.6% (95% CI = 96.4% to 98.7%) versus 55.3% (95% CI = 51.5% to 59.2%) and 92.8% (95% CI = 90.8% to 94.8%) with cTnI alone. The AUC of the combination of copeptin and cTnI was 0.89 (95% CI = 0.85% to 0.92%) and was significantly higher than the AUC of cTnI alone (0.77, 95% CI = 0.72% to 0.82%, p < 0.05). The patient classification was slightly improved when copeptin was added to the usual diagnostic tools used for NSTEMI management. In this study, determination of copeptin, in addition to cTnI, improves early diagnostic accuracy of NSTEMI. However, the sensitivity of this combination even using a conventional troponin assay remains insufficient to safely rule out NSTEMI at the time of presentation. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. Rapid delivery of diazepam from supersaturated solutions prepared using prodrug/enzyme mixtures: toward intranasal treatment of seizure emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Mamta; Winter, Tate; Lis, Lev; Georg, Gunda I; Siegel, Ronald A

    2014-05-01

    Current treatments for seizure emergencies, such as status epilepticus, include intravenous or rectal administration of benzodiazepines. While intranasal delivery of these drugs is desirable, the small volume of the nasal cavity and low drug solubility pose significant difficulties. Here, we prepared supersaturated diazepam solutions under physiological conditions and without precipitation, using a prodrug/enzyme system. Avizafone, a peptide prodrug of diazepam, was delivered with--Aspergillus oryzae (A.O.) protease, an enzyme identified from a pool of hydrolytic enzymes in assay buffer, pH 7.4 at 32°C. This enzyme converted avizafone to diazepam at supersaturated concentrations. In vitro permeability studies were performed at various prodrug/enzyme ratios using Madin-Darby canine kidney II-wild type (MDCKII-wt) monolayers, a representative model of the nasal epithelium. Monolayer integrity was examined using TEER measurement and the lucifer yellow permeability assay. Prodrug/drug concentrations were measured using HPLC. Enzyme kinetics with avizafone-protease mixtures revealed K(M) = 1,501 ± 232 μM and V(max) = 1,369 ± 94 μM/s. Prodrug-protease mixtures, when co-delivered apically onto MDCKII-wt monolayers, showed 2-17.6-fold greater diazepam flux (S = 1.3-15.3) compared to near-saturated diazepam (S = 0.7). Data for prodrug conversion upstream (apical side) and drug permeability downstream (basolateral side) fitted reasonably well to a previously developed in vitro two compartment pharmacokinetic model. Avizafone-protease mixtures resulted in supersaturated diazepam in less than 5 min, with the rate and extent of supersaturation determined by the prodrug/enzyme ratio. Together, these results suggest that an intranasal avizafone-protease system may provide a rapid and alternative means of diazepam delivery.

  14. The Eruption of a Small-scale Emerging Flux Rope as the Driver of an M-class Flare and of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. L.; Jiang, C. W.; Xue, Z. K.; Wang, J. C.; Priest, E. R.; Yang, L. H.; Kong, D. F.; Cao, W. D.; Ji, H. S.

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are the most powerful explosions in the Sun. They are major sources of potentially destructive space weather conditions. However, the possible causes of their initiation remain controversial. Using high-resolution data observed by the New Solar Telescope of Big Bear Solar Observaotry, supplemented by Solar Dynamics Observatory observations, we present unusual observations of a small-scale emerging flux rope near a large sunspot, whose eruption produced an M-class flare and a coronal mass ejection. The presence of the small-scale flux rope was indicated by static nonlinear force-free field extrapolation as well as data-driven magnetohydrodynamics modeling of the dynamic evolution of the coronal three-dimensional magnetic field. During the emergence of the flux rope, rotation of satellite sunspots at the footpoints of the flux rope was observed. Meanwhile, the Lorentz force, magnetic energy, vertical current, and transverse fields were increasing during this phase. The free energy from the magnetic flux emergence and twisting magnetic fields is sufficient to power the M-class flare. These observations present, for the first time, the complete process, from the emergence of the small-scale flux rope, to the production of solar eruptions.

  15. Orthopedic treatment of Class III malocclusion with rapid maxillary expansion combined with a face mask: a cephalometric assessment of craniofacial growth patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Torres Tagawa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective study was to assess potential changes in the cephalometric craniofacial growth pattern of 17 children presenting Angle Class III malocclusion treated with a Haas-type expander combined with a face mask. METHODS: Lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken at beginning (T1 and immediately after removal of the appliances (T2, average of 11 months of treatment. Linear and angular measurements were used to evaluate the cranial base, dentoskeletal changes and facial growth pattern. RESULTS: The length of the anterior cranial base experienced a reduction while the posterior cranial base assumed a more vertical position at T1. Some maxillary movement occurred, there was no rotation of the palatal plane, there was a slight clockwise rotation of the mandible, although not significant. The ANB angle increased, thereby improving the relationship between the jaws; dentoalveolar compensation was more evident in the lower incisors. Five out of 12 cases (29.41% showed the following changes: In one case the pattern became more horizontal and in four cases more vertical. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded after a short-term assessment that treatment with rapid maxillary expansion (RME associated with a face mask was effective in the correction of Class III malocclusion despite the changes in facial growth pattern observed in a few cases.

  16. New recombinant HLA-B alleles in a tribe of South American Amerindians indicate rapid evolution of MHC class I loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, D I; McAdam, S N; Liu, X; Strang, C R; Milford, E L; Levine, C G; Garber, T L; Dogon, A L; Lord, C I; Ghim, S H

    1992-05-28

    Evidence suggests that the New World was colonized only 11,000-40,000 years ago by Palaeo-Indians. The descendants of these Palaeo-Indians therefore provide a unique opportunity to study the effects of selection on major histocompatibility complex class I genes over a short period. Here we analyse the class I alleles of the Waorani of South America and the Zuni of North America. Four of the Waorani HLA-B alleles were new functional variants which could be accounted for by intralocus recombination. In contrast, all of the Zuni HLA-A and -B molecules were present in caucasians and orientals. This suggests that the new Waorani HLA-B variants arose in South America. The description of four new HLA-B alleles in the Waorani and another five new HLA-B alleles from two other tribes of South American Amerindians indicates that the HLA-B locus can evolve rapidly in isolated populations. These studies underline the importance of gathering genetic data on endangered native human populations.

  17. The Effects of Maxillary Protraction with or without Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Age Factors in Treating Class III Malocclusion: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Qu, Hong-Chen; Yu, Mo; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of 12 studies to examine whether maxillary protraction face mask associated with rapid maxillary expansion (FM/RME) could be an effective treatment for Class III malocclusion and to evaluate the effect of timing on treatment response. Patients with a maxillary deficiency who were treated with FM with or without RME were compared with those who had an untreated Class III malocclusion. In both treatment groups, forward displacement of the maxilla and skeletal changes were found to be statistically significant. In addition, posterior rotation of the mandible and increased facial height were more evident in the FM group compared with the control group. However, no significant differences were observed between the early treatment groups and late treatment groups. The results indicated that both FM/RME and FM therapy produced favorable skeletal changes for correcting anterior crossbite, and the curative time was not affected by the presence of deciduous teeth, early mixed dentition or late mixed dentition in the patient. PMID:26068221

  18. The Effects of Maxillary Protraction with or without Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Age Factors in Treating Class III Malocclusion: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available We conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of 12 studies to examine whether maxillary protraction face mask associated with rapid maxillary expansion (FM/RME could be an effective treatment for Class III malocclusion and to evaluate the effect of timing on treatment response. Patients with a maxillary deficiency who were treated with FM with or without RME were compared with those who had an untreated Class III malocclusion. In both treatment groups, forward displacement of the maxilla and skeletal changes were found to be statistically significant. In addition, posterior rotation of the mandible and increased facial height were more evident in the FM group compared with the control group. However, no significant differences were observed between the early treatment groups and late treatment groups. The results indicated that both FM/RME and FM therapy produced favorable skeletal changes for correcting anterior crossbite, and the curative time was not affected by the presence of deciduous teeth, early mixed dentition or late mixed dentition in the patient.

  19. Update on emergence of HIV-1 resistance to antiretroviral drug classes in an Italian national database: 2007-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giambenedetto, S; Prosperi, M; Fanti, I; Bruzzone, B; Paolucci, S; Penco, G; Meini, G; Di Biagio, A; Paolini, E; Micheli, V; Meraviglia, P; Castelli, P; Corsi, P; Gonnelli, A; Fabbiani, M; Zazzi, M; De Luca, A

    2011-09-01

    We analysed trends of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance during 2007-2009 in the Italian national HIV drug resistance database 'ARCA'. Prevalence of resistance in each year was examined on the basis of the presence of major International AIDS Society-2009 mutations. Predictors of resistance were analysed by multivariable logistic regression. Nine hundred and sixty-six patients were selected. Resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors showed a significant decline with respect to previous surveys. Resistance to any class of drug and three drug classes remained stable. Independent predictors of three-class resistance were the number of treatment regimens experienced, prior suboptimal nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor therapy and the current use of ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  20. Damage control operations in non-trauma patients: defining criteria for the staged rapid source control laparotomy in emergency general surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Becher, Robert D.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Sperry, Jason L.; Jared R Gallaher; Neff, Lucas P.; Sun, Yankai; Miller, Preston R.; Chang, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The staged laparotomy in the operative management of emergency general surgery (EGS) patients is an extension of trauma surgeons operating on this population. Indications for its application, however, are not well defined, and are currently based on the lethal triad used in physiologically-decompensated trauma patients. This study sought to determine the acute indications for the staged, rapid source control laparotomy (RSCL) in EGS patients. Methods All EGS patients undergoing eme...

  1. The Antithesis of Inclusion? The Emergence and Functioning of ADHD Special Education Classes in the Swedish School System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmqvist, Johan; Nilholm, Claes

    2016-01-01

    The neuropsychiatric paradigm has substantial impact on schools. The increase in the number of pupils being diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is an expression of the medicalisation of deviance. There is also an increase in educational classes specially designed to meet the needs of children with ADHD. This is contrary…

  2. Accuracy of early rapid ultrasound in shock (RUSH) examination performed by emergency physician for diagnosis of shock etiology in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane, Mohammad Reza; Gharib, Mohammadhadi; Ebrahimi, Ali; Saeedi, Morteza; Akbari-Kamrani, Marjan; Rezaee, Maryam; Rasouli, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Rapid Ultrasound in Shock (RUSH) is a recently reported emergency ultrasound protocol designed to help clinicians better recognize distinctive shock etiologies in a short time. We tried to evaluate the accuracy of early RUSH protocol performed by emergency physicians to predict the shock type in critically ill patients. Our prospective study was approved by the ethics committee of trauma research center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Science, Iran. We enrolled 52 patients with shock state in the emergency department from April 2013 to October 2013. We performed early bed-side sonographic examination for participants based on RUSH protocol. Patients received all needed standard therapeutic and diagnostic interventions without delay and were followed to document their final diagnosis. Agreement (Kappa index) of initial impression provided by RUSH with final diagnosis, and also sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of RUSH for diagnosis of each shock type were calculated. Fifty-two patients were enrolled in our study. Kappa index was 0.7 (P value = 0.000), reflecting acceptable general agreement between initial impression and final diagnosis. For hypovolemic and obstructive shocks, the protocol had sensitivity of 100% but had lower PPV. For shocks with distributive or mixed etiology, RUSH showed PPV of 100% but had low sensitivity. For cardiogenic shocks, all reliability indices were above 90%. We highlight the role of RUSH examination in the hands of an emergency physician in making a rapid diagnosis of shock etiology, especially in ruling out obstructive, cardiogenic, and hypovolemic types.

  3. Emergence of cosmic space and minimal length in quantum gravity: a large class of spacetimes, equations of state, and minimal length approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Abdel; Diab, Abdel

    2016-10-01

    We argue that the modified Landau-Raychaudhuri equations should first be analysed in a large class of spacetimes and in dependence on various equations of states, before endorsing any conclusion about (non)singular Big Bang. From the corrected entropy-area law in a large class of metrics, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) and the modified dispersion relation (MDR) approaches, and various equations of states, the modified Friedmann equations are derived. They are applied on Landau-Raychaudhuri equations in emergence of cosmic space framework from fixed point method. We show that any conclusion about (non)singular Big Bang is simply badly model-dependent, especially when utilizing GUP and MDR approaches, which can not replace a good theory for quantum gravity. We conclude that the various quantum gravity approaches, metrics and equations of state lead to different modifications in Friedmann and Landau-Raychaudhuri equations and thus to different (non)singular solutions for Big Bang theory.

  4. Emergence of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 variants followed by rapid disease progression in hemophiliac slow progressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunefusa Hayashida

    Full Text Available The association between emergence of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 variants (X4 variants and disease progression of HIV-1 infection has been reported. However, it is not known whether the emergence of X4 variants is the cause or result of HIV-1 disease progression. We tried to answer this question.HIV-1 env sequences around the V3 region were analyzed in serially stocked samples in order to determine whether X4 variants emerged before or after the fall in CD4+ T-cell count.The study subjects were five HIV-1-infected hemophiliac slow progressors. Deep sequencing around the HIV-1 env V3 region was conducted in duplicate. Tropism was predicted by geno2pheno [coreceptor] 2.5 with cutoff value of false positive ratio at <5%. When X4 variant was identified in the latest stocked sample before the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, we checked viral genotype in previously stocked samples to determine the time of emergence of X4 variants.Emergence of X4 variants was noted in two of the five patients when their CD4+ T-cell counts were still high. The rate of decrease of CD4+ T-cell count or of rise of HIV-1 load accelerated significantly after the emergence of X4 variants in these two cases. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these X4 variants emerged from CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses with several amino acid changes in the V3 region.The emergence of X4 variants preceded HIV-1 disease progression in two hemophiliac slow progressors.

  5. Screening to Identify Groups of Pediatric Emergency Department Patients Using Latent Class Analysis of Reported Suicidal Ideation and Behavior and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herres, Joanna; Kodish, Tamar; Fein, Joel; Diamond, Guy

    2017-01-25

    Latent class analysis of medical records data from 3,523 emergency department (ED) patients (ages 14-24; 31% Caucasian; 67% female) distinguished 6 groups with varying histories of suicidal ideation and behavior based on items endorsed on the Behavioral Health Screen, a web based, nurse-initiated screening tool. As expected, the more severe suicidality groups reported higher levels of depressive symptoms, traumatic distress, and substance abuse symptoms. Findings support the validity of the BHS and its utility as a medical decision tool to help ED staff evaluate the severity of patients' suicidality.

  6. Knowledge and attitudes about the differences between emergency contraception and medical abortion among middle-class women and men of reproductive age in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Heather; Ellertson, Charlotte; Corona, Georgina

    2002-12-01

    Two reproductive technologies--emergency contraception and medical abortion--have the potential to reduce unintended pregnancy significantly in Latin America. Lack of knowledge and negative attitudes about the methods may limit their impact, however. Results from focus group discussions with middle-class men and women of reproductive age residing in Mexico City indicate that knowledge about emergency contraception and medical abortion is low. After being informed about both methods, participants supported emergency contraception but tied their support for medical abortion to its legal status. Participants remained concerned about the methods' efficacy, mechanism of action, and potential to encourage sexual risk-taking. While almost all desired greater dissemination of information about and access to both methods in Mexico, participants cited religious and cultural concerns, as well as barriers in communication with providers and within families, as significant challenges. Participants hoped, however, that both emergency contraception and medical abortion might play important roles in preventing unwanted pregnancy and abortion-related morbidity and mortality in Mexico in the future. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  7. Intubation conditions after rocuronium or succinylcholine for rapid sequence induction with alfentanil and propofol in the emergency patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P B; Hansen, E G; Jacobsen, L S

    2005-01-01

    and with increased risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric content were randomized to a rapid-sequence induction with succinylcholine 1.0 mg kg[-1] or rocuronium 0.6 mg kg[-1]. Patients with a predicted difficult airway were excluded. A senior anaesthesiologist 'blinded' for the randomization performed...

  8. Design and implementation of a controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of routine opt-out rapid human immunodeficiency virus screening in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukoos, Jason S; Hopkins, Emily; Byyny, Richard L; Conroy, Amy A; Silverman, Morgan; Eisert, Sheri; Thrun, Mark; Wilson, Michael; Boyett, Brian; Heffelfinger, James D

    2009-08-01

    In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released revised recommendations for performing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing in health care settings, including implementing routine rapid HIV screening, the use of an integrated opt-out consent, and limited prevention counseling. Emergency departments (EDs) have been a primary focus of these efforts. These revised CDC recommendations were primarily based on feasibility studies and have not been evaluated through the application of rigorous research methods. This article describes the design and implementation of a large prospective controlled clinical trial to evaluate the CDC's recommendations in an ED setting. From April 15, 2007, through April 15, 2009, a prospective quasi-experimental equivalent time-samples clinical trial was performed to compare the clinical effectiveness and efficiency of routine (nontargeted) opt-out rapid HIV screening (intervention) to physician-directed diagnostic rapid HIV testing (control) in a high-volume urban ED. In addition, three nested observational studies were performed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and patient and staff acceptance of the two rapid HIV testing methods. This article describes the rationale, methodologies, and study design features of this program evaluation clinical trial. It also provides details regarding the integration of the principal clinical trial and its nested observational studies. Such ED-based trials are rare, but serve to provide valid comparisons between testing approaches. Investigators should consider similar methodology when performing future ED-based health services research.

  9. Accuracy of early rapid ultrasound in shock (RUSH examination performed by emergency physician for diagnosis of shock etiology in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Ghane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rapid Ultrasound in Shock (RUSH is a recently reported emergency ultrasound protocol designed to help clinicians better recognize distinctive shock etiologies in a short time. We tried to evaluate the accuracy of early RUSH protocol performed by emergency physicians to predict the shock type in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: Our prospective study was approved by the ethics committee of trauma research center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Science, Iran. We enrolled 52 patients with shock state in the emergency department from April 2013 to October 2013. We performed early bed-side sonographic examination for participants based on RUSH protocol. Patients received all needed standard therapeutic and diagnostic interventions without delay and were followed to document their final diagnosis. Agreement (Kappa index of initial impression provided by RUSH with final diagnosis, and also sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV of RUSH for diagnosis of each shock type were calculated. Results: Fifty-two patients were enrolled in our study. Kappa index was 0.7 (P value = 0.000, reflecting acceptable general agreement between initial impression and final diagnosis. For hypovolemic and obstructive shocks, the protocol had sensitivity of 100% but had lower PPV. For shocks with distributive or mixed etiology, RUSH showed PPV of 100% but had low sensitivity. For cardiogenic shocks, all reliability indices were above 90%. Conclusion: We highlight the role of RUSH examination in the hands of an emergency physician in making a rapid diagnosis of shock etiology, especially in ruling out obstructive, cardiogenic, and hypovolemic types.

  10. A rapid anion-exchange chromatography for measurement of cholesterol concentrations in five lipoprotein classes and estimation of lipoprotein profiles in male volunteers without overt diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manita, Daisuke; Hirowatari, Yuji; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of lipoprotein profile gives important clinical information for lipid-lowering therapy which prevents atherosclerotic diseases. The lipoprotein classes can be isolated from serum with ultracentrifugation, which inevitably consumes a long time and needs large serum volume. We have established a method with anion-exchange chromatography with 1.0 µL of the injected volume in 5.2 min for assay of one sample. One-hundred-forty-one male volunteers without overt diseases were divided three groups (Group 1, non-dyslipidemia with LDL-cholesterol [LDL-C] cholesterol (HDL-C) ≥40 mg/dL; Group 2, borderline dyslipidemia with 120 ≤ LDL-C cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol, and other fraction (chylomicron + lipoprotein [a])-cholesterol (other-C). The within-day and between-day assay coefficients of variation of lipoprotein cholesterol values were 0.33-4.31% and 2.37-9.19%, respectively. The correlation coefficients between values of HDL-C, LDL-C, IDL-C and VLDL-C by the anion-exchange chromatography and those by ultracentrifugal method were 0.97, 0.92, 0.58 and 0.94, respectively. Group 3 had significantly lower HDL-C and higher concentrations of IDL-C, VLDL-C and other-C than did Group 1. Group 2, borderline dyslipidemia, had significantly higher concentrations of IDL-C and VLDL-C than did Group 1. The rapid anion-exchange chromatography assay may be sufficiently applied to the assessment of borderline dyslipidemia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Rapid antigen detection tests for malaria diagnosis in severely ill Papua New Guinean children: a comparative study using Bayesian latent class models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens Manning

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs have practical advantages over light microscopy (LM and good sensitivity in severe falciparum malaria in Africa, their utility where severe non-falciparum malaria occurs is unknown. LM, RDTs and polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based methods have limitations, and thus conventional comparative malaria diagnostic studies employ imperfect gold standards. We assessed whether, using Bayesian latent class models (LCMs which do not require a reference method, RDTs could safely direct initial anti-infective therapy in severe ill children from an area of hyperendemic transmission of both Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We studied 797 Papua New Guinean children hospitalized with well-characterized severe illness for whom LM, RDT and nested PCR (nPCR results were available. For any severe malaria, the estimated prevalence was 47.5% with RDTs exhibiting similar sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV to nPCR (≥96.0%. LM was the least sensitive test (87.4% and had the lowest NPV (89.7%, but had the highest specificity (99.1% and positive predictive value (98.9%. For severe falciparum malaria (prevalence 42.9%, the findings were similar. For non-falciparum severe malaria (prevalence 6.9%, no test had the WHO-recommended sensitivity and specificity of >95% and >90%, respectively. RDTs were the least sensitive (69.6% and had the lowest NPV (96.7%. CONCLUSIONS: RDTs appear a valuable point-of-care test that is at least equivalent to LM in diagnosing severe falciparum malaria in this epidemiologic situation. None of the tests had the required sensitivity/specificity for severe non-falciparum malaria but the number of false-negative RDTs in this group was small.

  12. In defiance of Duverger: The class cleavage and the emergence of district-level multiparty systems in western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At its core, Duverger’s Law, which holds that the number of viable parties in first-past-the-post systems should not exceed two, applies primarily at the district level. While the number of parties nationally may exceed two, district-level party system fragmentation should not. A growing body of research, however, shows that district-level party system fragmentation can indeed exceed two in first-past-the-post systems. This piece addresses the fundamental tension between Duverger’s Law and recent scholarship on district-level party systems. I explore whether the major alternative explanation for party system fragmentation – the social cleavage approach – can explain violations of Duverger’s Law. Testing this argument in several west European elections prior to the adoption of proportional representation, I find evidence favouring a social cleavage explanation: with the expansion of the class cleavage, the average district-level party system eventually came to violate the two-party predictions associated with Duverger’s Law. This suggests that, in defiance of Duverger, greater levels of social cleavage diversity may produce multiparty systems even in first-past-the-post systems.

  13. Rapid emergence and predominance of a broadly recognizing and fast-evolving norovirus GII.17 variant in late 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Martin C. W.; Lee, Nelson; Hung, Tin-Nok; Kwok, Kirsty; Cheung, Kelton; Tin, Edith K. Y.; Lai, Raymond W. M.; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Leung, Ting F.; Chan, Paul K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) has been the predominant cause of viral gastroenteritis since 1996. Here we show that during the winter of 2014–2015, an emergent variant of a previously rare norovirus GII.17 genotype, Kawasaki 2014, predominated in Hong Kong and outcompeted contemporary GII.4 Sydney 2012 in hospitalized cases. GII.17 cases were significantly older than GII.4 cases. Root-to-tip and Bayesian BEAST analyses estimate GII.17 viral protein 1 (VP1) evolves one order of magnitude faster than GII.4 VP1. Residue substitutions and insertion occur in four of five inferred antigenic epitopes, suggesting immune evasion. Sequential GII.4-GII.17 infections are noted, implicating a lack of cross-protection. Virus bound to saliva of secretor histo-blood groups A, B and O, indicating broad susceptibility. This fast-evolving, broadly recognizing and probably immune-escaped emergent GII.17 variant causes severe gastroenteritis and hospitalization across all age groups, including populations who were previously less vulnerable to GII.4 variants; therefore, the global spread of GII.17 Kawasaki 2014 needs to be monitored. PMID:26625712

  14. Chemical cardioversion of recent-onset atrial fibrillation in the emergency department using vernakalant hydrochloride achieves safe and rapid restoration of sinus rhythm and facilitates same day discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneman, P; Gilligan, P; Mahon, P; Sheahan, R

    2017-11-01

    Vernakalant hydrochloride is a rapid-acting antiarrhythmic drug licensed in the EU since 2010 for the conversion of recent-onset atrial fibrillation with proven efficacy and safety when compared with placebo and amiodarone in randomized clinical trials. The aim of our study was to determine the feasibility of same day discharge (following 2 h monitoring) from the emergency department after successful cardioversion using vernakalant hydrochloride. Patients with recent-onset atrial fibrillation treated in the emergency department of a large Dublin academic teaching hospital. Patients received a maximum of two weight based 10 min infusions of vernakalant. Hypotensive events (>30% initial blood pressure), arrhythmias, conversion rates, and time to conversion were recorded. Sinus rhythm was restored in 35 out of 42 patients (83%) in an average of 8.8 min (median 8 min), average CHA2DS2-VASc of 0.92, HAS-BLED of 0.21 and average symptoms duration of 12 h. There were no hypotensive or arrhythmogenic events. 41 out of 42 patients were discharged after 2 h of monitoring. Vernakalant hydrochloride has provided a quick, safe, and practical means of achieving rapid restoration of sinus rhythm in our ED population with stable recent-onset AF who would otherwise not have undergone routine electrically cardioversion and same day discharge.

  15. Rapid Emergence of Co-colonization with Community-acquired and Hospital-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains in the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, E M C; Webb, G F; Pressley, J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA- MRSA), a novel strain of MRSA, has recently emerged and rapidly spread in the community. Invasion into the hospital setting with replacement of the hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) has also been documented. Co-colonization with both CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA would have important clinical implications given differences in antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and the potential for exchange of genetic information. METHODS: A deterministic mathematical model was developed to characterize the transmission dynamics of HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA in the hospital setting and to quantify the emergence of co-colonization with both strains RESULTS: The model analysis shows that the state of co-colonization becomes endemic over time and that typically there is no competitive exclusion of either strain. Increasing the length of stay or rate of hospital entry among patients colonized with CA-MRSA leads to a rapid increase in the co-colonized state. Compared to MRSA decolonization strategy, improving hand hygiene compliance has the greatest impact on decreasing the prevalence of HA-MRSA, CA-MRSA and the co-colonized state. CONCLUSIONS: The model predicts that with the expanding community reservoir of CA-MRSA, the majority of hospitalized patients will become colonized with both CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA.

  16. ClearColi BL21(DE3)-based expression of Zika virus antigens illustrates a rapid method of antibody production against emerging pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viranaicken, Wildriss; Nativel, Brice; Krejbich-Trotot, Pascale; Harrabi, Wissal; Bos, Sandra; El Kalamouni, Chaker; Roche, Marjolaine; Gadea, Gilles; Desprès, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    Available rapid, simple and accurate methods for detection and diagnosis of emerging viral diseases are required. Recently, there was an urgent need for specific antibodies against mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV), which is an emerging zoonotic disease of medical concern in different regions of the world. Here, we showed that overexpression of ZIKV antigens in ClearColi BL21(DE3), a bacteria strain expressing a non-endotoxic form of LPS, is suitable for the production of specific ZIKV antisera. Two major ZIKV antigenic domains, the domain III from envelope E glycoprotein, which brings the virus-specific epitopes, and the N-terminal region of nonstructural NS1 glycoprotein, which is responsible for pathophysiological conditions, were overexpressed in ClearColi BL21(DE3). Immunization of adult rat with insoluble recombinant ZIKV antigens in inclusion bodies resulted in the production of specific antibodies in a few weeks. Anti-E and anti-NS1 antibodies are efficient as biological tools for ZIKV detection by indirect ELISA and immunoblot assay. This method could successfully be applied to any emerging viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  17. The granite tors of Dartmoor, Southwest England: rapid and recent emergence revealed by Late Pleistocene cosmogenic apparent exposure ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnell, Yanni; Jarman, David; Braucher, Régis; Calvet, Marc; Delmas, Magali; Leanni, Laetitia; Bourlès, Didier; Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Keddaouche, Karim

    2013-02-01

    Dartmoor, in SW England, is a classic periglaciated granite upland adorned with a population of over 150 tors. The origin of the tors has been controversial, but their emergence by differentiation after stripping of regolith during Pleistocene cold phases is accepted. However, their actual age has been unknown, with possible scenarios ranging from preservation since the early Middle Pleistocene to relatively short-lived landforms in a maritime climate with high denudation rates. The latter is now supported by 32 cosmogenic surface exposure dates from 28 tors across the whole upland. The distribution of apparent 10Be ages peaks strongly in the Middle Devensian (36-50 ka), which with corrections for weathering and limited ice shielding could be interpreted as Early Devensian. These ages are much younger than those found for three glacially unmodified Cairngorms tors, and somewhat younger even than glacially modified Cairngorms tors. The dates show little spatial variation. Although an ice cap has now been modelled in the heart of northern Dartmoor, tors here are of median age, suggesting that ice cover sufficient to shield tors from incoming radiation was of short duration. The few younger tor ages support the idea of continuing landform instability across the landscape, with weathering flakes redeveloping soon after inferred loss of top pillows by gelifraction or gravitational toppling. The few older tor ages have no systematic explanation, and may indicate inheritance from an earlier cycle of bedrock near-exposure. Since most tors are modest in height (typically 2-5 m), volumetrically insignificant, and often in advanced stages of disintegration, the general impression is that they are evanescent features, which emerge and quickly disappear during every Pleistocene climatic downturn. Tor populations may thus flicker across the landscape rather randomly over the Quaternary. The remarkably consistent age of the present tor population could be associated with a

  18. Identification of potentially emerging food safety issues by analysis of reports published by the European Community's Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF) during a four-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Prandini, A.; Filippi, L.; Marvin, H.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    The SAFE FOODS project undertakes to design a new approach towards the early identification of emerging food safety hazards. This study explored the utility of notifications filed through RASFF, the European Commission¿s Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed, to identify emerging trends in food

  19. Investigating and managing the rapid emergence of white-nose syndrome, a novel, fatal, infectious disease of hibernating bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Janet; Clifford, Deana; Castle, Kevin; Cryan, Paul M.; Ostfeld, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fatal disease of bats that hibernate. The etiologic agent of WNS is the fungus Geomyces destructans, which infects the skin and wing membranes. Over 1 million bats in six species in eastern North America have died from WNS since 2006, and as a result several species of bats may become endangered or extinct. Information is lacking on the pathogenesis of G. destructans and WNS, WNS transmission and maintenance, individual and site factors that contribute to the probability of an outbreak of WNS, and spatial dynamics of WNS spread in North America. We considered how descriptive and analytical epidemiology could be used to fill these information gaps, including a four-step (modified) outbreak investigation, application of a set of criteria (Hill's) for assessing causation, compartment models of disease dynamics, and spatial modeling. We cataloged and critiqued adaptive-management options that have been either previously proposed for WNS or were helpful in addressing other emerging diseases of wild animals. These include an ongoing program of prospective surveillance of bats and hibernacula for WNS, treatment of individual bats, increasing population resistance to WNS (through vaccines, immunomodulators, or other methods), improving probability of survival from starvation and dehydration associated with WNS, modifying hibernacula environments to eliminate G. destructans, culling individuals or populations, controlling anthropogenic spread of WNS, conserving genetic diversity of bats, and educating the public about bats and bat conservation issues associated with WNS.

  20. Damage control operations in non-trauma patients: defining criteria for the staged rapid source control laparotomy in emergency general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Robert D; Peitzman, Andrew B; Sperry, Jason L; Gallaher, Jared R; Neff, Lucas P; Sun, Yankai; Miller, Preston R; Chang, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    The staged laparotomy in the operative management of emergency general surgery (EGS) patients is an extension of trauma surgeons operating on this population. Indications for its application, however, are not well defined, and are currently based on the lethal triad used in physiologically-decompensated trauma patients. This study sought to determine the acute indications for the staged, rapid source control laparotomy (RSCL) in EGS patients. All EGS patients undergoing emergent staged RSCL and non-RSCL over 3 years were studied. Demographics, physiologic parameters, perioperative variables, outcomes, and survival were compared. Logistic regression models determined the influence of physiologic parameters on mortality and postoperative complications. EGS-RSCL indications were defined. 215 EGS patients underwent emergent laparotomy; 53 (25 %) were staged RSCL. In the 53 patients who underwent a staged RSCL based on the lethal triad, adjusted multivariable regression analysis shows that when used alone, no component of the lethal triad independently improved survival. Staged RSCL may decrease mortality in patients with preoperative severe sepsis / septic shock, and an elevated lactate (≥3); acidosis (pH ≤ 7.25); elderly (≥70); male gender; and multiple comorbidities (≥3). Of the 162 non-RSCL emergent laparotomies, 27 (17 %) required unplanned re-explorations; of these, 17 (63 %) had sepsis preoperatively and 9 (33 %) died. The acute physiologic indicators that help guide operative decisions in trauma may not confer a similar survival advantage in EGS. To replace the lethal triad, criteria for application of the staged RSCL in EGS need to be defined. Based on these results, the indications should include severe sepsis / septic shock, lactate, acidosis, gender, age, and pre-existing comorbidities. When correctly applied, the staged RSCL may help to improve survival in decompensated EGS patients.

  1. Streptococcus A in paediatric accident and emergency: are rapid streptococcal tests and clinical examination of any help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Limbergen, J; Kalima, P; Taheri, S; Beattie, T F

    2006-01-01

    Rapid streptococcal tests (RSTs) for streptococcal pharyngitis have made diagnosis at once simpler and more complicated. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all RSTs be confirmed by a follow up throat culture unless local validation has proved the RST to be equally sensitive. To evaluate (a) RST as a single diagnostic tool, compared with RST with or without throat culture; (b) clinical diagnosis and the relative contribution of different symptoms. The study included 213 patients with clinical signs of pharyngitis. Throat swabs were analysed using Quickvue+ Strep A Test; negative RSTs were backed up by throat culture. Thirteen clinical features commonly associated with strep throat were analysed using backward stepwise logistic regression. Positive results (RST or throat culture) were obtained in 33 patients; RST correctly identified 21. Eleven samples were false negative on RST. At a strep throat prevalence of 15.9%, sensitivity of RST was 65.6% (95% CI 46.8% to 81.4%) and specificity 99.4% (96.7% to 99.9%). Sensitivity of clinical diagnosis alone was 57% (34% to 78%) and specificity 71% (61% to 80%). Clinically, only history of sore throat, rash, and pyrexia contributed to the diagnosis of strep throat (pstrep throat. However, the low sensitivity of RST does not support its use as a single diagnostic tool. The sensitivity in the present study is markedly different from that reported by the manufacturer. Clinical examination is of limited value in the diagnosis of strep throat. It is important to audit the performance of new diagnostic tests, previously validated in different settings.

  2. Investigation of storage-phosphor autoradiography for the rapid quantitative screening of air filters for emergency response purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Athena Marie

    Past nuclear accidents, such as Chernobyl, resulted in a large release of radionuclides into the atmosphere. Radiological assessment of the vicinity of the site of the incident is vital to assess the exposure levels and dose received by the population and workers. Therefore, it is critical to thoroughly understand the situation and risks associated with a particular event in a timely manner in order to properly manage the event. Current atmospheric radiological assessments of alpha emitting radioisotopes include acquiring large quantities of air samples, chemical separation of radionuclides, sample mounting, counting through alpha spectrometry, and analysis of the data. The existing methodology is effective, but time consuming and labor intensive. Autoradiography, and the properties of phosphor imaging films, may be used as an additional technique to facilitate and expedite the alpha analysis process in these types of situations. Although autoradiography is not as sensitive to alpha radiation as alpha spectrometry, autoradiography may benefit alpha analysis by providing information about the activity as well as the spatial distribution of radioactivity in the sample under investigation. The objective for this research was to develop an efficient method for quantification and visualization of air filter samples taken in the aftermath of a nuclear emergency through autoradiography using 241Am and 239Pu tracers. Samples containing varying activities of either 241Am or 239Pu tracers were produced through microprecipitation and assayed by alpha spectroscopy. The samples were subsequently imaged and an activity calibration curve was produced by comparing the digital light units recorded from the image to the known activity of the source. The usefulness of different phosphor screens was examined by exposing each type of film to the same standard nuclide for varying quantities of time. Unknown activity samples created through microprecipiation containing activities of

  3. Class Schedules Need Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfette, Ronald J.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that college publications, including class schedules, must be accurate, timely, and easy to read and follow. Describes Schoolcraft College's unified format approach to publications marketing. Offers suggestions on the design, format, and distribution of class schedules. (DMM)

  4. [Use of the rapid appraisal method for the identification of perceived needs in a low-class barrio in the city of Buenos Aires].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotersztain, M; Zorat, M; Lecouna, M; Motta, M

    2000-12-01

    To present rapid appraisal as a qualitative technique for researching the perceived needs of a population, which is valid, rapid and cheap. Qualitative method: semi-structured interviews with key informants, focus group. A poor quarter with 2921 inhabitants in the city of Buenos Aires. Key informants: people resident in the area for over 10 years. The main problems perceived by the community were: environmental pollution because of the accumulation of rubbish, alcohol and drug abuse among the young, and the need to extend the opening hours of the area's health centre. The needs perceived surpassed specific medical problems. They covered social questions, environmental problems and how to organise the health care system.

  5. The overlap of youth violence among aggressive adolescents with past-year alcohol use-A latent class analysis: aggression and victimization in peer and dating violence in an inner city emergency department sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Lauren K; Ranney, Megan L; Chermack, Stephen T; Zimmerman, Marc A; Cunningham, Rebecca M; Walton, Maureen A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify overlap and violence types between peer and dating aggression and victimization using latent class analysis (LCA) among a sample of aggressive adolescents with a history of alcohol use and to identify risk and protective factors associated with each violence class. From September 2006 to September 2009, a systematic sample of patients (14-18 years old) seeking care in an urban emergency department were approached. Adolescents reporting any past-year alcohol use and aggression completed a survey using validated measures including types of violence (severe and moderate aggression, severe and moderate victimization with both peers and dating partners). Using LCA, violence classes were identified; correlates of membership in each LCA class were determined. Among this sample (n = 694), LCA identified three classes described as (a) peer aggression (PA) (52.2%), (b) peer aggression + peer victimization (PAPV) (18.6%), and (c) multiple domains of violence (MDV) (29.3%). Compared with those in the PA class, those in the PAPV class were more likely to be male, report injury in a fight, and have delinquent peers. Compared with the PA class, those in the MDV class were more likely to be female, African American, report injury in a fight, carry a weapon, experience negative consequences from alcohol use, and have delinquent peers and more family conflict. Compared with the PAPV class, those in the MDV class were likely to be female, African American, receive public assistance, carry a weapon, experience negative consequences from alcohol use, and use marijuana. There is extensive overlap of victimization and aggression in both peer and dating relationships. Also, those with high rates of violence across relationships have increased alcohol misuse and marijuana use. Thus, violence-prevention efforts should consider addressing concomitant substance use.

  6. Rapid Quantitative Analysis of Multiple Explosive-Compound Classes on a Single Instrument via Flow-Injection Analysis Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    criminal  forensics,  [11]  rapid  sample screening, [12,13,14,15] and trace‐evidence chem‐ ical  imaging [16,17,18]. Explosives detection has also  pro ...date,  FIA‐ MS/MS  has  been  used  for  rapid  quantitative  analysis  of  pharmaceuticals  [33],  pesticides   [34], environmental con‐ taminants...the literature reference listed  in the reference section of this paper.    As shown  in the Table 3 FIA ESI/APCI MSMS  pro ‐ vides quick and sensitive

  7. Methods of a multi-faceted rapid knowledge synthesis project to inform the implementation of a new health service model: Collaborative Emergency Centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jill A; Killian, Lara; Zygmunt, Austin; Babineau, Jessica; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Jensen, Jan L; Carter, Alix J

    2015-01-14

    The aim of this rapid knowledge synthesis was to provide relevant research evidence to inform the implementation of a new health service in Nova Scotia, Canada: Collaborative Emergency Centres (CECs). CECs propose to deliver both primary and urgent care to rural populations where traditional delivery is a challenge. This paper reports on the methods used in a rapid knowledge synthesis project to provide timely evidence to policy makers about this novel healthcare delivery model. We used a variety of methods, including a jurisdictional/scoping review, modified systematic review methodologies, and integrated knowledge translation. We scanned publicly available information about similar centres across our country to identify important components of CECs and CEC-type models to operationalize the definition of a CEC. We conducted literature searches in PubMed, CINAHL, and EMBASE, and in the grey literature, to identify evidence on the key structures and processes and effectiveness of CEC-type models of care delivery. Our searches were limited to published systematic reviews. The research team facilitated two integrated knowledge translation workshops during the project to engage stakeholders, to refine the research goals and objectives, and to share interim and final results. Citations and included articles were categorized by whether they addressed the CEC model or component structures and processes. Data and key messages were extracted from these reviews to inform implementation. CEC-type models have limited peer-reviewed evidence available; no peer-reviewed studies on CECs as a standalone healthcare model were found. As a result, our evidence search and synthesis was revised to focus on core CEC-type structures and processes, prioritized through consensus methods with the stakeholder group, and resulted in provision of a meaningful evidence synthesis to help inform the development and implementation of CECs in Nova Scotia. A variety of methods and partnership with

  8. Rapid and accurate taxonomic classification of insect (class Insecta) cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) DNA barcode sequences using a naïve Bayesian classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Teresita M; Gibson, Joel F; Shokralla, Shadi; Baird, Donald J; Golding, G Brian; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Current methods to identify unknown insect (class Insecta) cytochrome c oxidase (COI barcode) sequences often rely on thresholds of distances that can be difficult to define, sequence similarity cut-offs, or monophyly. Some of the most commonly used metagenomic classification methods do not provide a measure of confidence for the taxonomic assignments they provide. The aim of this study was to use a naïve Bayesian classifier (Wang et al. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2007; 73: 5261) to automate taxonomic assignments for large batches of insect COI sequences such as data obtained from high-throughput environmental sequencing. This method provides rank-flexible taxonomic assignments with an associated bootstrap support value, and it is faster than the blast-based methods commonly used in environmental sequence surveys. We have developed and rigorously tested the performance of three different training sets using leave-one-out cross-validation, two field data sets, and targeted testing of Lepidoptera, Diptera and Mantodea sequences obtained from the Barcode of Life Data system. We found that type I error rates, incorrect taxonomic assignments with a high bootstrap support, were already relatively low but could be lowered further by ensuring that all query taxa are actually present in the reference database. Choosing bootstrap support cut-offs according to query length and summarizing taxonomic assignments to more inclusive ranks can also help to reduce error while retaining the maximum number of assignments. Additionally, we highlight gaps in the taxonomic and geographic representation of insects in public sequence databases that will require further work by taxonomists to improve the quality of assignments generated using any method.

  9. Three-Dimensional Evaluation of the Upper Airway Morphological Changes in Growing Patients with Skeletal Class III Malocclusion Treated by Protraction Headgear and Rapid Palatal Expansion: A Comparative Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueling Chen

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological changes of upper airway after protraction headgear and rapid maxillary expansion (PE treatment in growing patients with Class III malocclusion and maxillary skeletal deficiency compared with untreated Class III patients by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT.Thirty growing patients who have completed PE therapy were included in PE group. The control group (n = 30 was selected from the growing untreated patients with the same diagnosis. The CBCT scans of the pre-treatment (T1 and post-treatment (T2 of PE group and the control group were collected. Reconstruction and registration of the 3D models of T1 and T2 were completed. By comparing the data obtained from T1, T2 and control group, the morphological changes of the upper airway during the PE treatment were evaluated.Comparing with the data from T1 group, the subspinale (A of maxilla and the upper incisor (UI of the T2 group were moved in the anterior direction. The gnathion (Gn of mandible was moved in the posterior-inferior direction. The displacement of the hyoid bone as well as the length and width of dental arch showed significant difference. The volume and mean cross-sectional area of nasopharynx, velopharynx and glossopharynx region showed significant difference. The largest anteroposterior/the largest lateral (AP/LR ratios of the velopharynx and glossopharynx were increased, but the AP/LR ratio of the hypopharynx was decreased. In addition, the length and width of the maxillary dental arch, the displacement of the hyoid bone, the volume of nasopharynx and velopharynx, and the AP/LR ratio of the hypopharynx and velopharynx showed significant difference between the data from control and T2 group.The PE treatment of Class III malocclusion with maxillary skeletal hypoplasia leads to a significant increase in the volume of nasopharynx and velopharynx.

  10. Three-Dimensional Evaluation of the Upper Airway Morphological Changes in Growing Patients with Skeletal Class III Malocclusion Treated by Protraction Headgear and Rapid Palatal Expansion: A Comparative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueling; Liu, Dongxu; Liu, Ju; Wu, Zizhong; Xie, Yongtao; Li, Liang; Liu, Hong; Guo, Tiantian; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological changes of upper airway after protraction headgear and rapid maxillary expansion (PE) treatment in growing patients with Class III malocclusion and maxillary skeletal deficiency compared with untreated Class III patients by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Thirty growing patients who have completed PE therapy were included in PE group. The control group (n = 30) was selected from the growing untreated patients with the same diagnosis. The CBCT scans of the pre-treatment (T1) and post-treatment (T2) of PE group and the control group were collected. Reconstruction and registration of the 3D models of T1 and T2 were completed. By comparing the data obtained from T1, T2 and control group, the morphological changes of the upper airway during the PE treatment were evaluated. Comparing with the data from T1 group, the subspinale (A) of maxilla and the upper incisor (UI) of the T2 group were moved in the anterior direction. The gnathion (Gn) of mandible was moved in the posterior-inferior direction. The displacement of the hyoid bone as well as the length and width of dental arch showed significant difference. The volume and mean cross-sectional area of nasopharynx, velopharynx and glossopharynx region showed significant difference. The largest anteroposterior/the largest lateral (AP/LR) ratios of the velopharynx and glossopharynx were increased, but the AP/LR ratio of the hypopharynx was decreased. In addition, the length and width of the maxillary dental arch, the displacement of the hyoid bone, the volume of nasopharynx and velopharynx, and the AP/LR ratio of the hypopharynx and velopharynx showed significant difference between the data from control and T2 group. The PE treatment of Class III malocclusion with maxillary skeletal hypoplasia leads to a significant increase in the volume of nasopharynx and velopharynx.

  11. First-Year Composition Teachers' Uses of New Media Technologies in the Composition Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Lilian W.

    2014-01-01

    As new media technologies emerge and evolve rapidly, the need to make informed decisions about using these technologies in teaching writing increases. This dissertation research study aimed at achieving multiple purposes. The first purpose was to catalog the new media technologies writing teachers use in teaching first-year composition classes.…

  12. Oncologic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endicott, Melissa

    2003-05-01

    Cancer can lead to emergencies either due to the primary disease, or as a result of therapy. Appropriate diagnosis and rapid treatment of these conditions can result in survival of the patient. Whether chemotherapy is implemented or not, the clinician may be presented with a patient in need of emergency stabilization. Common occurring emergencies are related to effects of the cancer, ranging from immune dysfunction due to marrow infiltration to brain herniation due to increased intracranial pressure from neoplasia. Often adverse effects secondary to chemotherapy can cause emergency situations such as sepsis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment may result in a favorable outcome. Addressed in this chapter are commonly occurring emergencies and specific stabilizing treatments.

  13. Dependent Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasiunas, Vaidas; Mezini, Mira; Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Virtual classes allow nested classes to be refined in subclasses. In this way nested classes can be seen as dependent abstractions of the objects of the enclosing classes. Expressing dependency via nesting, however, has two limitations: Abstractions that depend on more than one object cannot...... be modeled and a class must know all classes that depend on its objects. This paper presents dependent classes, a generalization of virtual classes that expresses similar semantics by parameterization rather than by nesting. This increases expressivity of class variations as well as the flexibility...... of their modularization. Besides, dependent classes complement multi-methods in scenarios where multi-dispatched abstractions rather than multi-dispatched method are needed. They can also be used to express more precise signatures of multi-methods and even extend their dispatch semantics. We present a formal semantics...

  14. Surgical assessment clinic - One stop emergency out-patient clinic for rapid assessment, reduced admissions and improved acute surgical service: A quality improvement study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A.W. Macano

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: By providing suitable guidance for referring practitioners we have optimised our clinic use significantly and improved our acute ambulatory surgical care. We have reduced admissions, provided rapid treatment and have established a service that helps address the ever increasing demand on acute services within the NHS.

  15. Efeitos transversais da expansão rápida da maxila em pacientes com má oclusão de Classe II: avaliação por Tomografia Computadorizada Cone-Beam Transverse effects of rapid maxillary expansion in Class II malocclusion patients: a Cone-Beam Computed Tomography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Baratieri

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar por meio de Tomografia Computadorizada Cone-Beam (TCCB os efeitos transversais, imediatos e após o período de contenção, da expansão rápida da maxila (ERM em pacientes com má oclusão de Classe II. MÉTODOS: dezessete crianças (idade inicial média de 10,36 anos com má oclusão de Classe II e deficiência transversal esquelética da maxila foram submetidas ao protocolo de ERM com aparelho expansor de Haas. TCCBs foram realizadas antes dos procedimentos clínicos (T1, imediatamente após a estabilização do parafuso expansor (T2 e após completados 6 meses de contenção e removido o aparelho (T3. Com o software Dolphin, foram possíveis a manipulação das imagens e as mensurações. O teste t de Student pareado foi utilizado para identificar significância estatística (pOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate by Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT transversal responses, immediately and after the retention period, to rapid maxillary expansion (RME, in Class II malocclusion patients. METHODS: Seventeen children (mean initial age of 10.36 years, with Class II malocclusion and skeletal constricted maxilla, underwent Haas´ protocol for RME. CBCT scans were taken before treatment (T1, at the end of the active expansion phase (T2 and after the retention period of six months (T3. The scans were managed in Dolphin software, where landmarks were marked and measured, on a coronal slice passing through the upper first molar. The paired Student´s t-test was used to identify significant differences (p<0.05 between T2 and T1, T3 and T2, and T3 and T1. RESULTS: Immediately after RME, the mean increase in maxillary basal, alveolar and dental width was 1.95 mm, 4.30 mm and 6.89 mm, respectively. This was accompanied by buccal inclination of the right (7.31° and left (6.46° first molars. At the end of the retention period, the entire transverse dimension increased was maintained and the dentoalveolar inclination resumed

  16. Emergence of dhfrXVb and blaCARB-4 gene cassettes in class 1 integrons from clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated in Amazon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica L Fonseca

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Integrons play a role in horizontal acquisition and expression of genes, as well as gene reservoir, contributing for the resistance phenotype, particularly relevant to bacteria of clinical importance. We aimed to determine the composition and the organization of the class 1 integron variable region present in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Brazil. Strains carrying class 1 integrons were resistant to the majority of antibiotics tested, except to imipenem and ceftazidime. Sequence analysis of the integron variable region revealed the presence of the blaCARB-4 gene into two distinct cassette arrays: aacA4-dhfrXVb-blaCARB-4 and aadB-aacA4-blaCARB-4 . dhfrXVb gene cassette, which is rare in Brazil and in P. aeruginosa species, was found in one isolate. PFGE analysis showed the spread of blaCARB-4 among P. aeruginosa clones. The occurrence of blaCARB-4 and dhfrXVb in Brazil may contribute for developing resistance to clinically important antibiotics, and shows a diversified scenarium of these elements occurring in Amazon clinical settings, where no study about integron dinamycs was performed to date.

  17. The emergence of the work class "family farmer" as individuals with rights in the path of the Brazilian rural syndicalism A emergência dos "agricultores familiares" como sujeitos de direitos na trajetória do sindicalismo rural brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Lazzaretti Picolotto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of the family farmers' recognition as individuals with rights demonstrates having their first roots, in spite of being recent, if compared to the history of the Brazilian rural syndicalism, still in the constitution of the labor-syndical legislation in 1930. Therefore, seeking to explore that process the present paper has as objective to analyze the family farmers' emergence as individuals of rights in the contemporary Brazilian society, analyzing the processes of formation of the rural syndicalism and the expansion of the labor law for the rural workers as a form of accomplishment of a "regulated citizenship" until the decade of 1970; the urge to the official syndicalism, the structuring of a "new syndicalism" and the new social actors' appearance in the field, which made possible the enlargement of the citizenship spaces in the period of re-democratization in Brazil; the "crisis" of the new syndicalism, the creation of new syndical structures "apart" of the official structure (syndicalism of the family agriculture and the emergency of the "family farmers" as subject of rights in the recent periodO processo de reconhecimento dos agricultores familiares como sujeitos de direitos apesar de ser recente quando pensado a partir da trajetória do sindicalismo rural brasileiro demonstra ter suas primeiras raízes ainda na constituição da legislação trabalhista-sindical dos anos de 1930. Visando explorar esse processo o artigo tem por objetivo analisar a emergência dos agricultores familiares como sujeitos de direitos na sociedade brasileira contemporânea. Analisa-se os processos de formação do sindicalismo rural e de expansão da legislação trabalhista para os trabalhadores rurais como forma de realização de uma "cidadania regulada" até a década de 1970; o questionamento do sindicalismo oficial, a estruturação de um "novo sindicalismo" e a emergência de novos atores sociais no campo, que possibilitaram a ampliação dos

  18. Coding Class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine; Hansbøl, Mikala

    Sammenfatning af de mest væsentlige pointer fra hovedrapporten: Dokumentation og evaluering af Coding Class......Sammenfatning af de mest væsentlige pointer fra hovedrapporten: Dokumentation og evaluering af Coding Class...

  19. Emergency red cells first: Rapid response or speed bump? The evolution of a massive transfusion protocol for trauma in a single UK centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutefnouchet, Tarek; Gregg, Richard; Tidman, Jane; Isaac, John; Doughty, Heidi

    2015-09-01

    Death from massive haemorrhage due to traumatic injury is potentially preventable after hospital admission using haemorrhage control and improved resuscitation techniques including massive transfusion protocols. Massive transfusion protocols (MTP) are an essential element of damage control resuscitation and provide a coordinated clinical pathology response to massive haemorrhage after hospital admission. The decision to activate and de-activate a MTP is based on a number of patient and local factors. The purpose of this before-and-after study was to determine the impact of modifying a protocol to include emergency red cells. In addition, we investigated whether massive transfusion prediction models could have been used to guide on-going transfusion support. Sequential MTP activations over three years, before and after protocol revision, were analysed. Percentage of MTP activation, component usage and outcome data were compared. Trauma associated severe haemorrhage (TASH) and assessment of blood consumption (ABC) scores were derived and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis undertaken for an outcome defined as the use of >6 red cell units. 52 MTP1 and 66 MTP2 activations arose from 216 and 495 major trauma cases, respectively. Protocol change significantly reduced the MTP activation rate (p=0.0006) from 24% to 13%, and the number of activations requiring >10 RCC increased from 13% to 36% (p=0.006). Average emergency red cells usage in the second cohort increased to 4 units. Survival, coagulation parameters, and time to MTP pack issue were all unaffected by the protocol revision. The TASH score showed an area under ROC (AUROC) of 0.88 ongoing transfusion requirements. The change in protocol increased the use of emergency red cells but reduced MTP activation and use of multiple blood components. The TASH score appears to provide a useful predictive tool for ongoing transfusion support and may be of value for the trauma clinicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  20. The extraordinary outburst in the massive protostellar system NGC6334I-MM1: the emergence of Class II 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Todd Russell; Brogan, Crystal; MacLeod, Gordon; Chibueze, James; Cyganowski, Claudia; Chandler, Claire J.; Friesen, Rachel; Hirota, Tomoya; Young, Ken

    2018-01-01

    Our 2015 and 2016 ALMA 1.3 to 0.87 mm observations (resolution ~ 200 au) of the massive protocluster NGC6334I revealed that an extraordinary outburst (luminosity increase of 70x) had occurred in the dominant millimeter dust core MM1 when compared with earlier SMA data from 2008. We describe new results from our recent JVLA A-configuration observations of the 5 cm continuum and 6.7 GHz methanol masers in this region. These Class II masers had not previously been detected toward MM1 in any interferometric observations recorded over the past 30 years that targeted the bright masers toward other members of the protocluster (MM2 and MM3 = NGC6334F). Strong masers now appear both toward and adjacent to MM1 with the strongest spots located in a dust cavity about 1 arcsec (1300 au) north of the MM1B hypercompact HII region, along the same direction as a jet and the compact synchrotron source CM2. These data provide direct observational evidence of the effects of episodic accretion onto a deeply-embedded high mass protostar and affords a unique opportunity to assess the ongoing impact of this event on the surrounding cluster. These data demonstrate the need for higher sensitivity and higher angular resolution centimeter observations, as enabled by the ngVLA, to trace the earliest phases of massive star formation.

  1. Multi-class, multi-residue analysis of trace veterinary drugs in milk by rapid screening and quantification using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaqian; Li, Xiang; Liu, Xiaomao; Zhang, Jinjie; Cao, Yanzhong; Shi, Zhihong; Sun, Hanwen

    2015-12-01

    A simple and rapid multi-class multi-residue analytical method was developed for the screening and quantification of veterinary drugs in milk by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS). A total of 90 veterinary drugs investigated belonged to almost 20 classes including lincomycins, macrolides, sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, β-agonists, β-lactams, sedatives, β-receptor antagonists, sex hormones, glucocorticoids, nitroimidazoles, benzimidazoles, nitrofurans, and some others. A modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) procedure was developed for the sample preparation without the solid-phase extraction step. The linearity, sensitivity, accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility of the method were fully validated. The response of the detector was linear for each target compound in a wide concentration range with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9973 to 0.9999 (among them R(2)>0.999 for 73 of 90 analytes). The range of the limit of quantification for these compounds in the milk ranged from 0.10 to 17.30μg/kg. The repeatability and reproducibility were in the range of 2.11 to 9.62% and 2.76 to 13.9%, respectively. The average recoveries ranged from 72.62 to 122.2% with the RSD (n=6) of 1.30 to 9.61% at 3 concentration levels. For the screening method, the data of the precursor and product ions of the target analytes were simultaneously acquired under the all ions MS/MS mode in a single run. An accurate mass database for the confirmation and identification of the target compounds was established. The applicability of the screening method was verified by applying to real milk samples. The proposed analytical method allows the identification and confirmation of the target veterinary drugs at trace levels employing quick analysis time. Certain veterinary drugs were detected in some cases. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by

  2. Association between prepayment systems and emergency medical services use among patients with acute chest discomfort syndrome. For the Rapid Early Action for Coronary Treatment (REACT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, D B; Mann, N C; Hedges, J R; Daya, M R

    2000-06-01

    Cost concerns may inhibit emergency medical services (EMS) use. Novel tax-based and subscription prepayment programs indemnify patients against the cost of EMS treatment and transport. We determine whether the presence of (or enrollment in) prepayment plans increase EMS use among patients with acute chest discomfort, particularly those residing in low-income areas, those lacking private insurance, or both. This study uses a subset of baseline data from the REACT trial, a multicenter, randomized controlled community trial designed, in part, to increase EMS use. The sample includes 860 consecutive noninstitutionalized patients (>30 years old) presenting with nontraumatic chest discomfort to hospital emergency departments in 4 Oregon/Washington communities. The association between prepayment systems and EMS use was analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Overall EMS use was 52% (n=445). Among EMS users, 338 (75%) were subsequently admitted to the hospital and 110 (25%) were released from the ED. Prepayment was not associated with increased EMS use in the overall patient sample. However, patients residing in low-income census block groups (median annual income Economic considerations may affect EMS system utilization among underinsured and low-income patients experiencing a cardiac event. Prepayment systems may increase EMS utilization among these groups.

  3. Emergence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with class 1 integron carrying blaVIM-2 and blaVIM-4 in the University Clinical Hospital of Bialystok (northeastern Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska-Falkowska, Anna; Sacha, Paweł Tomasz; Grześ, Henryk; Hauschild, Tomasz; Wieczorek, Piotr; Ojdana, Dominika; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta Anna

    2017-07-11

    The effectiveness of carbapenems, considered as last-resort antimicrobials in severe infections, becomes compromised by bacterial resistance. The production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) is the most significant threat to carbapenems activity among Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study was to assess the presence and type of MBLs genes in carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains, to identify the location of MBLs genes and to determine genetic relatedness between MBL-producers using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The first identified MBL-positive (with blaVIM genes) P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from patients hospitalized in the University Clinical Hospital of Bialystok in the period from September 2012 to December 2013. Variants of MBLs genes and variable integron regions were characterized by PCR and sequencing. PFGE was performed after digesting of bacterial genomes by XbaI enzyme. By MLST seven housekeeping genes were analyzed for the determination of sequence type (ST). Three strains carried the blaVIM-2 gene and one harbored the blaVIM-4 gene. The blaVIM genes resided within class 1 integrons. PCR mapping of integrons revealed the presence of four different cassette arrays. Genetic relatedness analysis by PFGE classified VIM-positive strains into four unrelated pulsotypes (A-D). MLST demonstrated the presence of four (ST 111, ST27, and ST17) different sequence type including one previously undescribed new type of ST 2342. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that VIM-positive strains were resistant to carbapenems, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and quinolones, intermediate to aztreonam, and susceptible only to colistin. Integrons mapping, PFGE, and MLST results may point to different origin of these strains and independent introduction into hospitalized patients.

  4. Charge-shift bonding--a class of electron-pair bonds that emerges from valence bond theory and is supported by the electron localization function approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Sason; Danovich, David; Silvi, Bernard; Lauvergnat, David L; Hiberty, Philippe C

    2005-10-21

    This paper deals with a central paradigm of chemistry, the electron-pair bond. Valence bond (VB) theory and electron-localization function (ELF) calculations of 21 single bonds demonstrate that along the two classical bond families of covalent and ionic bonds, there exists a class of charge-shift bonds (CS bonds) in which the fluctuation of the electron pair density plays a dominant role. In VB theory, CS bonding manifests by way of a large covalent-ionic resonance energy, RE(CS), and in ELF by a depleted basin population with large variances (fluctuations). CS bonding is shown to be a fundamental mechanism that is necessary to satisfy the equilibrium condition, namely the virial ratio of the kinetic and potential energy contributions to the bond energy. The paper defines the atomic propensity and territory for CS bonding: Atoms (fragments) that are prone to CS bonding are compact electronegative and/or lone-pair-rich species. As such, the territory of CS bonding transcends considerations of static charge distribution, and involves: a) homopolar bonds of heteroatoms with zero static ionicity, b) heteropolar sigma and pi bonds of the electronegative and/or electron-pair-rich elements among themselves and to other atoms (e.g., the higher metalloids, Si, Ge, Sn, etc), c) all hypercoordinate molecules. Several experimental manifestations of charge-shift bonding are discussed, such as depleted bonding density, the rarity of ionic chemistry of silicon in condensed phases, and the high barriers of halogen-transfer reactions as compared to hydrogen-transfers.

  5. Emergence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with class 1 integron carrying blaVIM-2 and blaVIM-4 in the University Clinical Hospital of Bialystok (northeastern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Michalska-Falkowska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of carbapenems, considered as last-resort antimicrobials in severe infections, becomes compromised by bacterial resistance. The production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs is the most significant threat to carbapenems activity among Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study was to assess the presence and type of MBLs genes in carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains, to identify the location of MBLs genes and to determine genetic relatedness between MBL-producers using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST.The first identified MBL-positive (with blaVIM genes P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from patients hospitalized in the University Clinical Hospital of Bialystok in the period from September 2012 to December 2013. Variants of MBLs genes and variable integron regions were characterized by PCR and sequencing. PFGE was performed after digesting of bacterial genomes by XbaI enzyme. By MLST seven housekeeping genes were analyzed for the determination of sequence type (ST. Three strains carried the blaVIM-2 gene and one harbored the blaVIM-4 gene. The blaVIM genes resided within class 1 integrons. PCR mapping of integrons revealed the presence of four different cassette arrays. Genetic relatedness analysis by PFGE classified VIM-positive strains into four unrelated pulsotypes (A–D. MLST demonstrated the presence of four (ST 111, ST27, and ST17 different sequence type including one previously undescribed new type of ST 2342. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that VIM-positive strains were resistant to carbapenems, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and quinolones, intermediate to aztreonam, and susceptible only to colistin. Integrons mapping, PFGE, and MLST results may point to different origin of these strains and independent introduction into hospitalized patients.

  6. Rapid method for the determination of some organophosphorus insecticides in a small amount of serum in emergency and occupational toxicology cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhoopendra; Dogra, T. D.

    2009-01-01

    A simple and rapid method is described for the estimation of some organophosphorus insecticides in the serum of occupationally exposed persons. The compounds are extracted with a mixture of acetone and diethyl ether (1:1 v/v) in acidic medium and the extraction residue is analyzed by gas chromatography with nitrogen phosphorus detection method. Linearity was acceptable over concentrations from 0.25 to 4.0 μg/mL. The method percentile recovery for the six different organophosphorus insecticides was 86.3% for phorate, 78.3% for dimethoate, 82.3% for malathion, 79.4% for chlorpyrifos, 80.2% for diazinon, and 68.5% for ethion at the μg/mL level. Serum samples of nine workers who had been occupationally exposed to malathion in an insecticide manufacturing factory, were analyzed and malathion was found at low levels in all the samples. PMID:20386625

  7. Genomic analysis of an emerging multiresistant Staphylococcus aureus strain rapidly spreading in cystic fibrosis patients revealed the presence of an antibiotic inducible bacteriophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for a variety of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Recent reports show that the prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus (MRSA infections in cystic fibrosis (CF patients is increasing. In 2006 in Marseille, France, we have detected an atypical MRSA strain with a specific antibiotic susceptibility profile and a unique growth phenotype. Because of the clinical importance of the spread of such strain among CF patients we decided to sequence the genome of one representative isolate (strain CF-Marseille to compare this to the published genome sequences. We also conducted a retrospective epidemiological analysis on all S. aureus isolated from 2002 to 2007 in CF patients from our institution. Results CF-Marseille is multidrug resistant, has a hetero-Glycopeptide-Intermediate resistance S. aureus phenotype, grows on Cepacia agar with intense orange pigmentation and has a thickened cell wall. Phylogenetic analyses using Complete Genome Hybridization and Multi Locus VNTR Assay showed that CF-Marseille was closely related to strain Mu50, representing vancomycin-resistant S. aureus. Analysis of CF-Marseille shows a similar core genome to that of previously sequenced MRSA strains but with a different genomic organization due to the presence of specific mobile genetic elements i.e. a new SCCmec type IV mosaic cassette that has integrated the pUB110 plasmid, and a new phage closely related to phiETA3. Moreover this phage could be seen by electron microscopy when mobilized with several antibiotics commonly used in CF patients including, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, or imipenem. Phylogenetic analysis of phenotypically similar h-GISA in our study also suggests that CF patients are colonized by polyclonal populations of MRSA that represents an incredible reservoir for lateral gene transfer. Conclusion In conclusion, we demonstrated the emergence and

  8. Diagnostics-in-a-Suitcase: Development of a portable and rapid assay for the detection of the emerging avian influenza A (H7N9) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; Weidmann, Manfred; Hufert, Frank T

    2015-08-01

    In developing countries, equipment necessary for diagnosis is only available in few central laboratories, which are less accessible and of limited capacity to test large numbers of incoming samples. Moreover, the transport conditions of samples are inadequate, therefore leading to unreliable results. The development of a rapid, inexpensive, and simple test would allow mobile detection of viruses. A suitcase laboratory "Diagnostics-in-a-Suitcase" (56cm×45.5cm×26.5cm) containing all reagents and devices necessary for performing a reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assay was developed. As an example, two RT-RPA assays were established for the detection of hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N) genes of the novel avian influenza (H7N9) virus. The sensitivities of the H7 and the N9 RT-RPA assays were 10 and 100 RNA molecules, respectively. The assays were performed at a single temperature (42°C). The results were obtained within 2-7min. The H7N9 RT-RPA assays did not show a cross-detection either of any other respiratory viruses affecting humans and/or birds or of the human or chicken genomes. All reagents were used, stored, and transported at ambient temperature, that is, cold chain independent. In addition, the Diagnostics-in-a-Suitcase was operated by a solar-powered battery. The developed assay protocol and mobile setup performed well. Moreover, it can be easily implemented to perform diagnoses at airports, quarantine stations, or farms for rapid on-site viral nucleic acid detection. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [High-sensitivity troponin T testing and coronary computed tomography angiography for rapid diagnosis of chest pain in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Cambra, Albert; Rosselló, Xavier; Sans-Roselló, Jordi; Vila, Montserrat; Hidalgo, Alberto; Rodríguez, Iván Díaz-; Leta, Rubén; Pons-Lladó, Guillem; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Sionis, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    To determine the probability of finding significant coronary lesions, the time to diagnosis, and the safety of a new diagnostic approach based on high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hsTnT) testing followed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in patients with chest pain of possible coronary origin. The method was compared with our hospital emergency department's standard practice. Unblinded randomized controlled trial in a tertiary level university hospital between February 2011 and April 2013. We included emergency patients with chest pain and nondiagnostic electrocardiographic findings. Patients were assigned randomly to the new approach (hsTnT assay, followed by CCTA if the assay findings were negative) or the conventional approach (fourth generation TnT assay and, if negative, followed by an exercise stress test). Invasive coronary angiography was ordered in all patients if the results of either troponin assay, the CCTA, or the stress test were positive. We recorded the results of angiography, time until diagnosis, and all-cause mortality, new myocardial infarction, new unstable angina, or need for revascularization within the next 3 months. Of 102 patients randomized, 7 were excluded; 50 of the remaining 95 patients were assigned to the new strategy, and 45 to the conventional approach. Coronary angiography demonstrated significant lesions in 92.9% of the patients treated with the new strategy and 66.7% of those diagnosed conventionally. A higher percentage of patients were diagnosed within 6 hours with the new approach (20.0% vs 4.4% of conventional-approach patients, P = .023). During the 3 months following diagnosis, 1 death occurred in the intervention group and none in the conventional-approach group. The new strategy could accelerate diagnosis and increase the probability of finding significant coronary lesions, but we found no significant differences in adverse events in the 3 months following diagnosis. These findings should be confirmed

  10. Gastrointestinal emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, L R; Brockman, D J; Brown, D C

    2000-05-01

    The animal with a surgical gastrointestinal emergency usually requires a rapid, thorough physical examination with concurrent resuscitation. As the diagnosis is being made, the animal must be made as stable as possible before undergoing general anesthesia. During surgery, there must be a critical evaluation of gastrointestinal viability and the use of precise technical skills to achieve the best outcome. Adept postoperative management, including careful monitoring and an index of suspicion for potential complications, is vital.

  11. Using the past to predict the future: latent class analysis of patterns of health service use of older adults in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, S Nicole; Whitson, Heather E; Sloane, Richard; Landerman, Lawrence R; Horney, Carolyn; Johnson, Kimberly S

    2014-04-01

    To classify older adults in the emergency department (ED) according to healthcare use and to examine associations between group membership and future ED visits and hospital admissions. Secondary analysis. Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. Adults aged 65 and older with at least one treat-and-release ED visit between January 1, 2000, and September 30, 2007 (N = 4,964). Measures of health service use included primary care visits, treat-and-release ED visits, and hospital days in the 12 months preceding the index ED visit. Five groups of individuals in the ED with distinct patterns of health service use were identified. "Primary Carederly" (39%) had low rates of ED and hospital use and a high mean number of primary care visits. "Wellderly" (34%) had fewer visits of all types than other groups. "Chronically Illderly" (14%) had the highest mean number of primary care visits and hospital days. "Acute Carederly" (9.8%) had lowest mean number of primary care visits but higher ED visits and hospital days than all other groups except the "Sickest Elderly." Sickest Elderly (3.2%) had the highest number of ED visits; mean number of hospital days was more than four times that of any other group. Primary Carederly and Wellderly had a lower risk of hospital admission within 30 days of the index ED visit than the other groups. In older adults released from an ED, group membership was associated with future health services use. Classification of individuals using readily available previous visit data may improve targeting of interventions to improve outcomes. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  12. Using the Past to Predict the Future: Latent Class Analysis of Patterns of Health Service Use Among Older Emergency Department Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, S. Nicole; Whitson, Heather E.; Sloane, Richard; Landerman, Lawrence R.; Horney, Carolyn; Johnson, Kimberly S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To classify older emergency department (ED) patients by health care use and to examine associations between group membership and future ED visits and hospital admissions. Design Secondary analysis Setting Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey Participants Adults aged > = 65 years with at least one treat-and-release ED visit between 1/1/00 and 9/30/07 (N = 4,964). Measurements Measures of health service use included (1) primary care visits, (2) treat-and-release ED visits, and (3) hospital days in the 12 months preceding the index ED visit. Results Five groups of ED patients with distinct patterns of health service use were identified. "Primary Carederly" (39%) had low rates of ED and hospital use and a high mean number of primary care (PC) visits. “Wellderly" (34%) had fewer visits of all types compared to other groups. “Chronically Illderly” (14%) patients had the highest mean number of PC visits and hospital days. “Acute Carederly” (9.8%) had lowest mean number of PC visits but higher ED visits and hospital days than all other groups except the Sickest Elderly. Patients in the “Sickest Elderly” group (3.2%) had the highest number of ED visits; mean number of hospital days was more than four times that of any other group. “Primary Carederly” and “Wellderly” had a lower risk of hospital admission within 30 days of the index ED visit, while all other groups had a higher risk. Conclusion Among older patients released from an ED, group membership was associated with future health services use. Classification of patients using readily available previous visit data may improve targeting of interventions to improve patient outcomes. PMID:24635112

  13. Managing Community Resilience to Climate Extremes, Rapid Unsustainable Urbanization, Emergencies of Scarcity, and Biodiversity Crises by Use of a Disaster Risk Reduction Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canyon, Deon V; Burkle, Frederick M; Speare, Rick

    2015-12-01

    Earth's climate is changing and national and international decision-makers are recognizing that global health security requires urgent attention and a significant investment to protect the future. In most locations, current data are inadequate to conduct a full assessment of the direct and indirect health impacts of climate change. All states require this information to evaluate community-level resilience to climate extremes and climate change. A model that is being used successfully in the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand is recommended to generate rapid information to assist decision-makers in the event of a disaster. The model overcomes barriers to success inherent in the traditional ''top-down'' approach to managing crises and recognizes the capacity of capable citizens and community organizers to facilitate response and recovery if provided the opportunity and resources. Local information is a prerequisite for strategic and tactical statewide planning. Time and resources are required to analyze risks within each community and what is required to prevent (mitigate), prepare, respond, recover (rehabilitate), anticipate, and assess any threatening events. Specific requirements at all levels from state to community must emphasize community roles by focusing on how best to maintain, respond, and recover public health protections and the infrastructure necessary for health security.

  14. Rapid emergence of atherosclerosis in Asia: a systematic review of coronary atherosclerotic heart disease epidemiology and implications for prevention and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Zhang, De Xing; Wang, Harry H X

    2015-08-01

    There is a global epidemic of coronary heart disease (CHD) caused by atherosclerosis. We discussed its emergence, underlying reasons, and implications for prevention and control strategies in Asia. Most countries in Asia are experiencing the challenges from CHD, with the mortality rate varying from 103 to 366 per 100 000 adult populations, reported by recently published studies. Raised population cholesterol levels played a pivotal role. Men, older adults, and those with dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes were high-risk individuals. During the past decade, there was a marked rising trend of atherosclerosis-related burden particularly in Eastern Asia where an alarming increase of 117.2 and 115.3% of total deaths and disability adjusted life-years, respectively, were observed. The rise of CHD could be attributed to unhealthy lifestyles, clinical-risk factors, psychosocial factors, and public health transitions. Ageing, urbanization, and increase in prosperity may serve as underlying key drivers. The burden of CHD is substantial, whereas contributors are multifactorial. This grand challenge should be a top priority for injecting healthcare resources. The formulation of public health measures will need to adopt an integrated and life-course approach, based on the need and risks of different population subgroups in Asia.

  15. An emerging method for rapid characterization of feed structures and feed component matrix at a cellular level and relation to feed quality and nutritive value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-06-01

    Feed quality, feed characteristics, nutrient utilization and digestive behaviour are closely related to: (i) total feed composition, (ii) feed intrinsic structures, and (iii) biological component matrix (such as protein to starch matrix, protein to carbohydrate matrix). Conventional "wet" chemical analysis can determine total chemical composition, but fails to detect the feed intrinsic structures and biological component matrix due to destruction of feed samples during the processing for chemical analysis and the "wet" chemical analysis cannot link structural information to chemical information within intact feed tissue. Recently, advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy has been developed as a non-destructive and non-invasive structural-chemical analytical technique. This technique can link chemical information to structural information of biological samples within intact tissue within cellular dimensions. It can provide four kinds of information simultaneously: tissue composition, tissue structure, tissue chemistry and tissue environment. However, this novel technique has been found mainly for medical science research, extremely rare for feed science and nutrition research. The objective of this review article was to illustrate synchrotron-based FTIR microspectroscopy as a novel research tool for rapid characterization of feed structures at a cellular level and for detection of chemical features and molecular chemical make-up of feed biological component matrix and nutrient interaction. The emphasis of this article was to show that feed structural-chemical features at a cellular level are closely related to feed characteristics, feed quality and nutritive value in animals. The synchrotron-based technology will provide us with a greater understanding of the plant-animal interface.

  16. Dynamic CT in early stage of cerebral ischemia; Clinical usefulness of dynamic CT for rapid evaluation of patients considered for emergency cerebral revascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aritake, Koichi; Sano, Keiji (Fuji Brain Inst. Hospital, Fujinomiya, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    In the present study, we correlated collateral flow patterns derived from dynamic CT (DCT) and the evolution of cerebral infarction in patients with ischemic episodes and analyzed the efficacy of emergency cerebral revascularization (ECR) in preventing infarction. Forty-four patients, all of whom presented cerebral arterial occlusion without showing any hypodense areas on their initial CT scans, were examined. Eleven patients underwent ECR. Time-density curves (TDCs) within 239 different regions in territories of occluded arteries were derived from DCT. The degree of collateral flow and delay of circulation time were assessed, comparing peak values and peak times of TDCs on the occluded side with those in corresponding regions on the non-occluded side. Hemodynamic patterns of TDCs were classified into the following three types: Type 1 - the residual flow was considerably preserved with markedly delayed circulation time; Type 2 - the collateral flow was considerably preserved, but its circulation time was minimally or moderately delayed; and Type 3 - the residual flow was minimal or moderate with or without slowing of circulation time. In the medically-treated group, follow-up CT scans demonstrated infarction in 89% of Type 1, 6% of Type 2 and 97% of Type 3. In the surgically-treated group, infarction developed in 20% of Type 1, 0% of Type 2 and 95% of Type 3. The hemodynamic pattern map, demonstrated with the advent of the personal computer, was clinically useful in predicting the appearance and extent of infarction and judging the prognosis of patients, even immediately after the ischemic ictus. It would appear that patients whose preoperative DCT discloses a Type 1 perfusion pattern can be expected to benefit the most from ECR. (author).

  17. On a class of incomplete gamma functions with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhry, M Aslam

    2001-01-01

    The subject of special functions is rich and expanding continuously with the emergence of new problems encountered in engineering and applied science applications. The development of computational techniques and the rapid growth in computing power have increased the importance of the special functions and their formulae for analytic representations. However, problems remain, particularly in heat conduction, astrophysics, and probability theory, whose solutions seem to defy even the most general classes of special functions.On a Class of Incomplete Gamma Functions with Applications introduces a class of special functions, developed by the authors, useful in the analytic study of several heat conduction problems. It presents some basic properties of these functions, including their recurrence relations, special cases, asymptotic representations, and integral transform relationships. The authors explore applications of these generalized functions to problems in transient heat conduction, special cases of laser s...

  18. Class size versus class composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sam

    Raising schooling quality in low-income countries is a pressing challenge. Substantial research has considered the impact of cutting class sizes on skills acquisition. Considerably less attention has been given to the extent to which peer effects, which refer to class composition, also may affect...

  19. Word classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of recent literature and research on word classes, focusing in particular on typological approaches to word classification. The cross-linguistic classification of word class systems (or parts-of-speech systems) presented in this article is based on statements found...... a parts-of-speech system that includes the categories Verb, Noun, Adjective and Adverb, other languages may use only a subset of these four lexical categories. Furthermore, quite a few languages have a major word class whose members cannot be classified in terms of the categories Verb – Noun – Adjective...

  20. Birthing Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... class setting. Some hospitals are beginning to offer online courses, too.Expect to be required to pay ... called The Mongan Method, HypnoBirthing helps women learn self-hypnosis techniques to deliver their babies in a ...

  1. Safe and rapid disposition of low-to-intermediate risk patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain: a 1-year high-volume single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald L; Thomas, Dustin M; Barnwell, Megan L; Fentanes, Emilio; Young, Adam N; Barnwell, Robert; Foley, Austin T; Hilliard, Michael; Hulten, Edward A; Villines, Todd C; Cury, Ricardo C; Slim, Ahmad M

    2014-01-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CTA) is a powerful tool for the evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department (ED). Some debate persists regarding its cost-effectiveness in a low-to-intermediate risk population. This study sought to evaluate the safety and cost-effectiveness of coronary CTA for low-to-intermediate risk patients presenting to the ED with chest pain in a closed-loop referral system. Chest pain patients were evaluated in the ED via a local rapid coronary CTA protocol and tracked prospectively for ED throughput, disposition, chest pain recidivism, and cost utilization as compared with an age-matched cohort evaluated for chest pain treated with usual care. One hundred eighty-three patients underwent the rapid coronary CTA protocol compared with an age-matched cohort of 184 patients treated with usual care. The median follow-up period for major adverse cardiovascular events in the coronary CTA group was 9.0 months (range, 1.8-14.5 months) and 11.1 months (range, 0-14.0 months) for the age-matched cohort. The median ED length of stay (LOS) was 5.8 hours (range, 2.6-12.3 hours) for the rapid coronary CTA cohort and 12.2 hours (range, 1.7-40.3 hours) for the age-matched cohort (P < .001). The median time to performance of coronary CTA was 2.5 hours (range, 0.4-8.7 hours) with a median time from coronary CTA performance to disposition of 2.9 hours (range, 0.8-8.6 hours). Total median hospital LOS was 5.9 hours (range, 2.7-124 hours) in the rapid coronary CTA cohort compared with 25.0 hours (range, 1.2-208 hours) in the age-matched cohort (P < .001). Hospital admission was more common in the age-matched cohort (98.9% vs 9.3%; P < .001). There was a significant reduction in total payer cost in coronary CTA group when compared to usual care ($182,064.55 vs $685,190.77; P < .001). Coronary CTA for ED risk stratification and disposition within a closed referral system resulted in the shortest ED LOS published to date while being safe and cost-effective. Published

  2. Oral Biofluid Biomarker Research: Current Status and Emerging Frontiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Salivary diagnostics is a rapidly advancing field that offers clinicians and patients the potential of rapid, noninvasive diagnostics with excellent accuracy. In order for the complete realization of the potential of saliva, however, extensive profiling of constituents must be conducted and diagnostic biomarkers must be thoroughly validated. This article briefly overviews the process of conducting a study of salivary biomarkers in a patient cohort and highlights the studies that have been conducted on different classes of molecules in the saliva. Emerging frontiers in salivary diagnostics research that may significantly advance the field will also be highlighted.

  3. Social Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aktor, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    The notions of class (varṇa) and caste (jāti) run through the dharmaśāstra literature (i.e. Hindu Law Books) on all levels. They regulate marriage, economic transactions, work, punishment, penance, entitlement to rituals, identity markers like the sacred thread, and social interaction in general....... Although this social structure was ideal in nature and not equally confirmed in other genres of ancient and medieval literature, it has nevertheless had an immense impact on Indian society. The chapter presents an overview of the system with its three privileged classes, the Brahmins, the Kṣatriyas...

  4. Emergency medicine: beyond the basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    1997-07-01

    Medical emergencies can arise in the dental office. Preparedness for these emergencies is predicated on an ability to rapidly recognize a problem and to effectively institute prompt and proper management. In all emergency situations, management is based on implementation of basic life support, as needed. The author describes the appropriate management of two common emergency situations: allergy and chest pain.

  5. Rapid Automated Mission Planning System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is an automated UAS mission planning system that will rapidly identify emergency (contingency) landing sites, manage contingency routing, and...

  6. Emerging Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilit...

  7. Coding Class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine; Hansbøl, Mikala

    Denne rapport rummer evaluering og dokumentation af Coding Class projektet1. Coding Class projektet blev igangsat i skoleåret 2016/2017 af IT-Branchen i samarbejde med en række medlemsvirksomheder, Københavns kommune, Vejle Kommune, Styrelsen for IT- og Læring (STIL) og den frivillige forening...... Coding Pirates2. Rapporten er forfattet af Docent i digitale læringsressourcer og forskningskoordinator for forsknings- og udviklingsmiljøet Digitalisering i Skolen (DiS), Mikala Hansbøl, fra Institut for Skole og Læring ved Professionshøjskolen Metropol; og Lektor i læringsteknologi, interaktionsdesign......, design tænkning og design-pædagogik, Stine Ejsing-Duun fra Forskningslab: It og Læringsdesign (ILD-LAB) ved Institut for kommunikation og psykologi, Aalborg Universitet i København. Vi har fulgt og gennemført evaluering og dokumentation af Coding Class projektet i perioden november 2016 til maj 2017...

  8. Are Ghanaian Diaspora Middle Class? Linking Middle Class to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, since the return to constitutional rule in 1992, Ghana has emerged as one of the most stable countries in the West African sub-region and has become a beacon of democracy for other African countries to emulate. This political stability has been largely attributed to the positive role of the educated middle class ...

  9. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  10. Emergency medicine in Dubai, UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Robert; Abbo, Michael; Virk, Alamjit

    2009-08-18

    Dubai has rapidly risen to prominence in the Persian Gulf region as a center of global commerce and tourism and as a cultural crossroad between East and West. The health-care infrastructure has undergone rapid development. Collaborations with academic medical centers now exist to advance clinical care, teaching and research. Emergency medicine has also advanced and is undergoing dynamic change. Dubai may soon emerge as a regional leader in emergency medicine training and practice.

  11. The Effect of Mixed-Age Classes in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Elly-Ann; Lindahl, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Mixed-aged (MA) classes are a common phenomenon around the world. In Sweden, these types of classes increased rapidly during the 1980s and 1990s, despite the fact that existing empirical support for MA classes is weak. In this paper, the effect of attending an MA class during grades 4-6 on students' cognitive skills is estimated. Using a unique…

  12. Laptop Use during Class: A Review of Canadian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismaru, Romulus; Cismaru, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Laptop use in class is a characteristic of universities that is changing rapidly. Although much of the attention and research regarding this issue has focused on the debate of whether to impose mandatory laptop programs, the reality of wireless campuses allows students to use their laptops in class for class related and non-class related…

  13. Diabetic Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergencies A-Z Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Diabetic Emergencies It is estimated that more than 20 ... they have it. The best way to prevent diabetic emergencies is to effectively manage the disease through ...

  14. Multigrade Teaching Rapid Appraisal Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Dean

    Multigrade classes have been recognized as part of elementary education for many years, but their special needs have been largely ignored. This manual focuses on the survey research that should predate the design of instructional management strategies in multigrade classrooms. It describes rapid and reliable ways to collect information about the…

  15. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  16. Influence of Unusual Climatic Conditions on the Rapid Rising of Water Level of the Palcacocha Lake and Its Connection with the Emergency Situation in the Cordillera Blanca, Perú.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilca, Oscar

    2017-04-01

    Influence of Unusual Climatic Conditions on the Rapid Rising of Water Level of the Palcacocha Lake and Its Connection with the Emergency Situation in the Cordillera Blanca, Perú. Oscar Vilca, Ricardo Durán, Cesar Portocarrero and Benjamín Morales National Institute for Research on Glaciers and Mountain Ecosystems - INAIGEM The climate alterations in 2016 have led to important issues within the Cordillera Blanca. These unusual climate events were evidenced by the rising temperature and the dropping relative humidity between December 2015 and January 2016 this was mainly influenced by the Niño phenomenon (ENSO), as well as subsequent events, like the one that occurred in november 2016, which had no presence of the ENSO, but was more severe, and has had direct influence on accelerated glacier fusion, this resulted the sudden growth of the water flow of the glacier basins of the Cordillera Blanca. Palcacocha was declared a dangerous lake due to its historical growth records. Currently, a partial monitoring to the water level of this lake is performed, and records are registered on a daily basis, with a methodology that includes analysis, quality control and the elaboration of a daily time line of the lake levels (december 2015 - december 2016). Subsequently, by using an area-volume curve, the levels are converted into volume, which can finally be inferred as water flows of net contribution to the lake. The accelerated increase of the level of the lake corresponds to the water flow contributed by glacier fusion, as that period (November 2016) did not record precipitation. The record observed has shown maximum thrust sheets of 22 mm (06/11/216) and 30mm (27/11/2016). This sudden increase of water flows in all the sub-basins with glaciers has caused concern and alarmed the population since the general perception in november pointed to a "drought", the most critical case being, the one that occurred in Jancapampa, where the river flows reached historic maximum levels

  17. Development and validation of a rapid turboflow LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of LSD and 2-oxo-3-hydroxy LSD in serum and urine samples of emergency toxicological cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Patrick C; Liechti, Matthias E; Rentsch, Katharina M

    2015-02-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a widely used recreational drug. The aim of the present study is to develop a quantitative turboflow LC-MS/MS method that can be used for rapid quantification of LSD and its main metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy LSD (O-H-LSD) in serum and urine in emergency toxicological cases without time-consuming extraction steps. The method was developed on an ion-trap LC-MS/MS instrument coupled to a turbulent-flow extraction system. The validation data showed no significant matrix effects and no ion suppression has been observed in serum and urine. Mean intraday accuracy and precision for LSD were 101 and 6.84%, in urine samples and 97.40 and 5.89% in serum, respectively. For O-H-LSD, the respective values were 97.50 and 4.99% in urine and 107 and 4.70% in serum. Mean interday accuracy and precision for LSD were 100 and 8.26% in urine and 101 and 6.56% in serum, respectively. For O-H-LSD, the respective values were 101 and 8.11% in urine and 99.8 and 8.35% in serum, respectively. The lower limit of quantification for LSD was determined to be 0.1 ng/ml. LSD concentrations in serum were expected to be up to 8 ng/ml. 2-Oxo-3-hydroxy LSD concentrations in urine up to 250 ng/ml. The new method was accurate and precise in the range of expected serum and urine concentrations in patients with a suspected LSD intoxication. Until now, the method has been applied in five cases with suspected LSD intoxication where the intake of the drug has been verified four times with LSD concentrations in serum in the range of 1.80-14.70 ng/ml and once with a LSD concentration of 1.25 ng/ml in urine. In serum of two patients, the O-H-LSD concentration was determined to be 0.99 and 0.45 ng/ml. In the urine of a third patient, the O-H-LSD concentration was 9.70 ng/ml.

  18. The Neurobiology of Anesthetic Emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnal, Vijay; Vlisides, Phillip E; Mashour, George A

    2016-07-01

    Achieving a smooth and rapid emergence from general anesthesia is of particular importance for neurosurgical patients and is a clinical goal for neuroanesthesiologists. Recent data suggest that the process of emergence is not simply the mirror image of induction, but rather controlled by distinct neural circuits. In this narrative review, we discuss (1) hysteresis, (2) the concept of neural inertia, (3) the asymmetry between the neurobiology of induction and emergence, and (4) recent attempts at actively inducing emergence.

  19. Emergent geometry, emergent forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selesnick, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    We give a brief account of some aspects of Finkelstein’s quantum relativity, namely an extension of it that derives elements of macroscopic geometry and the Lagrangians of the standard model including gravity from a presumed quantum version of spacetime. These emerge as collective effects in this quantal substrate. Our treatment, which is largely self-contained, differs mathematically from that originally given by Finkelstein. Dedicated to the memory of David Ritz Finkelstein

  20. Integrating Rapid Prototyping into Graphic Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Renmei; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Integrating different science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) areas can help students learn and leverage both the equipment and expertise at a single school. In comparing graphic communications classes with classes that involve rapid prototyping (RP) technologies like 3D printing, there are sufficient similarities between goals,…

  1. Emergency contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... Emergency contraception most likely prevents pregnancy in the same way as regular birth control pills: By preventing ...

  2. Ophthalmic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Deborah C; Holt, Elaine

    2005-03-01

    Ophthalmic emergencies are common presenting complaints in an emergency room. Most ophthalmic emergencies can be treated and stabilized until an ophthalmologist can be consulted. Most ocular emergencies involve loss of vision, compromised globe integrity, or severe ocular pain. Delay in treating true emergencies may result ina blind eye or loss of an eye. This article discusses the clinical signs,diagnosis, and treatment as well as the prognosis of some of the more common ophthalmic emergencies.

  3. Entrepreneurship, Emerging Technologies, Emerging Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thukral, Inderpreet S.; Von Ehr, James; Walsh, Steven Thomas; Groen, Arend J.; van der Sijde, Peter; Adham, Khairul Akmaliah

    2008-01-01

    Academics and practitioners alike have long understood the benefits, if not the risks, of both emerging markets and emerging technologies.Yet it is only recently that foresighted firms have embraced emerging technologies and emerging markets through entrepreneurial activity. Emerging technologies

  4. Rapid HLA class I DNA typing using microtiter plate-reverse hybridization assay (MRHA) by simple thermoregulation: high-resolution subtyping of the HLA-A2 and -B40 antigen groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moribe, T; Kaneshige, T; Inagawa, A; Nakatani, S; Hirai, H; Morita, F; Ito, Y; Inoko, H

    1999-06-01

    We have established a precise, rapid, simple and economical subtyping method for alleles encoding the HLA-A2 and -B40 antigens using microtiter plate-reverse hybridization assay (MRHA), which is based on the general principle of HLA oligotyping by reverse dot blot hybridization. Amino-modified sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes were immobilized covalently onto a carboxylate-modified microtiter plate. In order to perform high-resolution subtyping of the HLA-A2 and -B40 antigen groups, the alpha1 and alpha2 domain regions were amplified using a pair of group-specific primers composed of an unlabeled sense primer and a biotinylated antisense primer. PCR-amplified products were hybridized with SSO probes in hybridization buffer containing formamide for 1 hour at 37 degrees C. After washing with 2 X SSC at room temperature, the bound PCR products were detected by alkaline phosphatase-conjugated streptavidine followed by color development. All of 8 HLA-B40 suballeles, all of 2 HLA-B47 suballeles (B40 group-specific primers used in this study allowed also B47 amplification) and 17 out of 21 HLA-A2 suballeles were discriminated. The remaining four HLA-A2 suballeles were determined by analysis after exon 4 amplification. HLA-DNA typing by this method was easily and exactly performed regardless of sample number. The greatest advantages of this technique are strong positive signals obtained, reproducibility and the ease of thermoregulation for hybridization and washing as compared to previously reported microtiter plate hybridization methods.

  5. Emerging therapeutic agents for lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagirathbhai Dholaria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lung cancer continues to be the most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics and immunotherapeutics have propelled the rapid development of novel treatment agents across all cancer subtypes, including lung cancer. Additionally, more pharmaceutical therapies for lung cancer have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in the last 5 years than in previous two decades. These drugs have ushered in a new era of lung cancer managements that have promising efficacy and safety and also provide treatment opportunities to patients who otherwise would have no conventional chemotherapy available. In this review, we summarize recent advances in lung cancer therapeutics with a specific focus on first in-human or early-phase I/II clinical trials. These drugs either offer better alternatives to drugs in their class or are a completely new class of drugs with novel mechanisms of action. We have divided our discussion into targeted agents, immunotherapies, and antibody drug conjugates for small cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We briefly review the emerging agents and ongoing clinical studies. We have attempted to provide the most current review on emerging therapeutic agents on horizon for lung cancer.

  6. [Emergency Radiology layout].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciani, E; Bertini, L; Lanciotti, S; Campagnano, S; Valentini, C; De Cicco, M L; Polettini, E; Gualdi, G F

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of Radiologic Unit in Emergency is to reach diagnostic and therapeutic effectiveness in the best way and in less time possible. The Portable Ultrasound Device is an instrument necessary in Emergency Room and in ambulance/helicopter to evaluate the evidence of endoperitoneal bleeding. The CT is the radiologic methodic more fast that permits a complete evaluation of all body segments in traumatized patient in the famous "golden hour" after the trauma, therefore it would be placed in Emergency Area. The multislice CT brought to a reduction of morbidity and mortality, thanks to a quick acquisition, to a thin collimation, to a more spatial resolution and to an optimal vessel opacization, determining a saving of hospital global costs, therefore a reduction of percentage of not necessaries operations and permitting a more rapid diagnosis, obtaining a considerable reduction of waiting in Trauma Emergency Room with more rapid and aimed therapies and a consequent costs reduction. To satisfy a so wide question of radiologic exams necessaries devices are informatic systems completely connected between Radiology department and other departments. Main advantages of MR in Emergency are the use of non ionising radiations, the possibility to effect diffusion and perfusion studies and to evaluate spinal cord damage. Reduction of time of patient preparation and times of acquisition and elaboration of imagines by modern and performant devices is basic to make more rapid therapeutic decisions.

  7. How Rapid is Rapid Prototyping? Analysis of ESPADON Programme Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D. Alston

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available New methodologies, engineering processes, and support environments are beginning to emerge for embedded signal processing systems. The main objectives are to enable defence industry to field state-of-the-art products in less time and with lower costs, including retrofits and upgrades, based predominately on commercial off the shelf (COTS components and the model-year concept. One of the cornerstones of the new methodologies is the concept of rapid prototyping. This is the ability to rapidly and seamlessly move from functional design to the architectural design to the implementation, through automatic code generation tools, onto real-time COTS test beds. In this paper, we try to quantify the term “rapid” and provide results, the metrics, from two independent benchmarks, a radar and sonar beamforming application subset. The metrics show that the rapid prototyping process may be sixteen times faster than a conventional process.

  8. Involvement of the Eukaryote-Like Kinase-Phosphatase System and a Protein That Interacts with Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 in Emergence of Cephalosporin Resistance in Cephalosporin-Sensitive Class A Penicillin-Binding Protein Mutants in Enterococcus faecium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene Desbonnet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic resistance of Enterococcus faecium to ceftriaxone and cefepime (here referred to as “cephalosporins” is reliant on the presence of class A penicillin-binding proteins (Pbps PbpF and PonA. Mutants lacking these Pbps exhibit cephalosporin susceptibility that is reversible by exposure to penicillin and by selection on cephalosporin-containing medium. We selected two cephalosporin-resistant mutants (Cro1 and Cro2 of class A Pbp-deficient E. faecium CV598. Genome analysis revealed changes in the serine-threonine kinase Stk in Cro1 and a truncation in the associated phosphatase StpA in Cro2 whose respective involvements in resistance were confirmed in separate complementation experiments. In an additional effort to identify proteins linked to cephalosporin resistance, we performed tandem affinity purification using Pbp5 as bait in penicillin-exposed E. faecium; these experiments yielded a protein designated Pbp5-associated protein (P5AP. Transcription of the P5AP gene was increased after exposure to penicillin in wild-type strains and in Cro2 and suppressed in Cro2 complemented with the wild-type stpA. Transformation of class A Pbp-deficient strains with the plasmid-carried P5AP gene conferred cephalosporin resistance. These data suggest that Pbp5-associated cephalosporin resistance in E. faecium devoid of typical class A Pbps is related to the presence of P5AP, whose expression is influenced by the activity of the serine-threonine phosphatase/kinase system.

  9. RxClass

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The RxClass Browser is a web application for exploring and navigating through the class hierarchies to find the RxNorm drug members associated with each class....

  10. A Virtual Class Calculus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik; Ostermann, Klaus; Cook, William Randall

    2006-01-01

    Virtual classes are class-valued attributes of objects. Like virtual methods, virtual classes are defined in an object's class and may be redefined within subclasses. They resemble inner classes, which are also defined within a class, but virtual classes are accessed through object instances......, not as static components of a class. When used as types, virtual classes depend upon object identity - each object instance introduces a new family of virtual class types. Virtual classes support large scale program composition techniques, including higher-order hierarchies and family polymorphism. The original...... definition of virtual classes in BETA left open the question of static type safety, since some type errors were not caught until runtime. Later the languages Caesar and gbeta have used a more strict static analysis in order to ensure static type safety. However, the existence of a sound, statically typed...

  11. Involvement of the Eukaryote-Like Kinase-Phosphatase System and a Protein That Interacts with Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 in Emergence of Cephalosporin Resistance in Cephalosporin-Sensitive Class A Penicillin-Binding Protein Mutants in Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbonnet, Charlene; Tait-Kamradt, Amelia; Garcia-Solache, Monica; Dunman, Paul; Coleman, Jeffrey; Arthur, Michel; Rice, Louis B

    2016-04-05

    The intrinsic resistance of Enterococcus faecium to ceftriaxone and cefepime (here referred to as "cephalosporins") is reliant on the presence of class A penicillin-binding proteins (Pbps) PbpF and PonA. Mutants lacking these Pbps exhibit cephalosporin susceptibility that is reversible by exposure to penicillin and by selection on cephalosporin-containing medium. We selected two cephalosporin-resistant mutants (Cro1 and Cro2) of class A Pbp-deficient E. faecium CV598. Genome analysis revealed changes in the serine-threonine kinase Stk in Cro1 and a truncation in the associated phosphatase StpA in Cro2 whose respective involvements in resistance were confirmed in separate complementation experiments. In an additional effort to identify proteins linked to cephalosporin resistance, we performed tandem affinity purification using Pbp5 as bait in penicillin-exposed E. faecium; these experiments yielded a protein designated Pbp5-associated protein (P5AP). Transcription of the P5AP gene was increased after exposure to penicillin in wild-type strains and in Cro2 and suppressed in Cro2 complemented with the wild-type stpA Transformation of class A Pbp-deficient strains with the plasmid-carried P5AP gene conferred cephalosporin resistance. These data suggest that Pbp5-associated cephalosporin resistance in E. faecium devoid of typical class A Pbps is related to the presence of P5AP, whose expression is influenced by the activity of the serine-threonine phosphatase/kinase system. β-Lactam antibiotics remain our most effective therapies against susceptible Gram-positive bacteria. The intrinsic resistance of Enterococcus faecium to β-lactams, particularly to cephalosporins, therefore represents a major limitation of therapy. Although the primary mechanism of resistance to β-lactams in E. faecium is the presence of low-affinity monofunctional transpeptidase (class B) penicillin-binding protein Pbp5, the interaction of Pbp5 with other proteins is fundamental to maintain a

  12. Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after unprotected sex. Often called the morning-after pill, emergency contraception pills (ECPs) are hormone pills that women ... Does It Cost? Depending on the types of pills, the emergency contraception pill costs between $10 and $80. An ...

  13. Emergency Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Week National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Emergency Checklist If someone may have been poisoned, call ... may save you from a visit to the emergency room. Below is a checklist to help you ...

  14. Obstetrical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, D; Macintire, D K

    2000-05-01

    This article discusses different techniques that can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of obstetrical emergencies. Female reproductive emergencies commonly encountered by small animal practitioners include pyometra, dystocia, cesarean section, mastitis, eclampsia, uterine torsion, and uterine prolapse. A thorough knowledge of normal and abnormal reproductive behavior will aid the emergency veterinarian in successfully managing such cases. Timely diagnosis and treatment of these emergencies will often give a good outcome.

  15. Loosely coupled class families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    Families of mutually dependent classes that may be accessed polymor- phically provide an advanced tool for separation of concerns, in that it enables client code to use a group of instances of related classes safely without depending on the exact classes involved. However, class families which ar...

  16. Resistance to novel drug classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelin, Anne-Genevieve; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Calvez, Vincent

    2009-11-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that underlie resistance development to novel drugs is essential to a better clinical management of resistant viruses and to prevent further resistance development and spread. Integrase inhibitors and CCR5 antagonists are the more recent antiretroviral classes developed. The HIV-1 integrase, responsible for the chromosomal integration of the newly synthesized double-stranded viral DNA into the host genomic DNA, represents a new and important target; and two integrase inhibitors (INIs), raltegravir and elvitegravir, have been shown promising results in clinical trials. Viral entry is also an attractive step for the development of new drugs against HIV variants resistant to current antiretroviral drugs, and two CCR5 antagonists have been designed to inhibit HIV-1 binding to R5 co-receptor and are under clinical investigation. Drug resistance to INIs occurs through the selection of mutations within HIV integrase. The kinetic of selection seems rapid and one mutation alone is able to confer resistance to integrase inhibitor, suggesting that this class of drug has a low genetic barrier. Two ways could explain the failure of the CCR5 antagonist class: a rapid outgrowth of pre-existing archived X4 virus or the selection of a resistance to CCR5 antagonists through amino acid changes in V3 loop.

  17. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1997-02-18

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Today markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies, to survive, have to be able to respond with quick-to-market, improved, high quality, cost efficient products. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies. The RRM project was established to leverage the expertise and resources of US private industries and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy new technologies that meet critical needs for effective product realization. The RRM program addressed a needed change in the US Manufacturing infrastructure that will ensure US competitiveness in world market typified by mass customization. This project provided the effort needed to define, develop and establish a customizable infrastructure for rapid response product development design and manufacturing. A major project achievement was the development of a broad-based framework for automating and integrating the product and process design and manufacturing activities involved with machined parts. This was accomplished by coordinating and extending the application of feature-based product modeling, knowledge-based systems, integrated data management, and direct manufacturing technologies in a cooperative integrated computing environment. Key technological advancements include a product model that integrates product and process data in a consistent, minimally redundant manner, an advanced computer-aided engineering environment, knowledge-based software aids for design and process planning, and new production technologies to make products directly from design application software.

  18. Emerging Biomaterials in Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhary, Kirollos E; Thakker, Jayini S

    2017-02-01

    Emerging technologies and research into the science of biomaterials have developed exponentially and provide facial reconstructive surgeons with a plethora of options for a multitude of varying presentations. This article presents a comprehensive discussion in the ever-evolving field of material science and emerging biomaterials. A complete understanding of the current status of such materials is necessary for the appropriate incorporation and applicability to adequate clinical situations. The rapid progress seen in biomaterials is evidenced through the forward direction of bioengineered tissues, the incorporation of growth factors in varying scenarios, and the unique characteristics of 3-D printing of patient specific scaffolds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Emergency medicine in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannebaum, R D; Arnold, J L; De Negri Filho, A; Spadoni, V S

    2001-02-01

    Emergency medicine is developing rapidly in southern Brazil, where elements of both the Franco-German and the Anglo-American models of emergency care are in place, creating a uniquely Brazilian approach to emergency care. Although emergency medical services (EMS) in Brazil have been directly influenced by the French mobile EMS (SAMU) system, with physicians dispatched by ambulances to the scenes of medical emergencies, the first American-style emergency medicine residency training program in Brazil was recently established at the Hospital de Pronto Socorro (HPS) in Porto Alegre. Emergency trauma care appears to be particularly developed in southern Brazil, where advanced trauma life support is widely taught and SAMU delivers sophisticated trauma care en route to trauma centers designated by the state.

  20. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    National reports recommended that peri-operative care should be improved for elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery. Postoperative mortality and morbidity rates remain high, and indicate that emergency ruptured aneurysm repair, laparotomy and hip fracture fixation are high-risk procedures...... undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through professional guidance. Given that the number of elderly patients presenting for emergency surgery is likely...

  1. Identifying Low-risk Patients for Early Discharge From Emergency Department Without Using Subjective Descriptions of Chest Pain: Insights From Providing Rapid Out of Hospital Acute Cardiovascular Treatment (PROACT) 3 and 4 Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrvand, Nariman; Zheng, Yinggan; Armstrong, Paul W; Welsh, Robert C; Ezekowitz, Justin A

    2017-06-01

    Several accelerated diagnostic protocols (ADPs) have been developed to allow emergency department (ED) physicians to identify appropriate patients for safe early discharge after presentation with symptom of chest pain. Most ADPs require chest pain to be described and modify the algorithm based on the subjective chest pain characteristics. We investigated the performance of three established major ADPs simplified by eliminating the need for chest pain as a descriptor. We pooled patients from PROACT-3 and -4 trials, in which patients presenting to emergency medical services with chest pain or dyspnea were enrolled. The simplified Vancouver Chest Pain Rule (sVCPR), the simplified Emergency Department Assessment of Chest Pain Score (sEDACS) ADP and the Accelerated Diagnostic protocol to Assess Patients with chest pain using contemporary troponins as the only biomarker (ADAPT-ADP) were compared using the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (NPV). The primary outcome of interest was 30-day major adverse cardiac events (MACE); the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) occurring within 30 days after ED presentation was also explored. A total of 1,081 patients were included (median age = 67 years, 53% male, median GRACE score = 113) of which 222 ACS diagnoses and 150 cardiac events occurred within 30 days after index ED presentation. The sVCPR, sEDACS ≥ 3, and ADAPT-ADP, respectively, identified 9.7, 13.3, and 4.1% of patients as low risk with a sensitivity and NPV of 100% for the primary outcome of 30-day MACE. The sEDACS-ADP identified 24.2% of patients as low risk with a cut-point score of 4 (sensitivity of 98.0% and NPV of 98.8%). The sVCPR, sEDACS ≥ 3, and ADAPT-ADP, respectively, had NPVs of 98.1, 95.8, and 93.3% in identifying patients at higher risk of ACS diagnosis within 30 days after index ED visit. The diagnostic protocols performed well without their chest pain characteristics component. Further studies are

  2. Reproductive emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutkowitz, L Ari

    2005-03-01

    The emergency clinician is frequently called on to manage problems relating to the female reproductive tract. Because owners sel-dom have the medical knowledge needed to differentiate normal from abnormal reproductive behaviors, they frequently look to the emergency veterinarian for guidance and information during and after parturition. For this reason, it is essential that the veterinarian have a good understanding of the normal reproductive cycle as well as the common emergencies that may occur. This article reviews the events surrounding normal parturition in the dog and cat and the reproductive emergencies seen most commonly in practice.

  3. The capitalist class of modern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Rakhmanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1978 People’s Republic of China has been carrying out the policy of reforms. As the result of these reforms, the powerful capitalist class has emerged. This class has transformed into a junior partner of the party-state bureaucracy of China. The author analyzes the capitalist class of China from different perspectives - number, wealth, age, gender, style of life. The author compares the capitalist class of China with capitalist classes of other countries - the USA, Germany, Japan, Russia, and India and so on. The author highlights the importance of the branch specialization of the capitalist class of China. The development of this class generates causes the industrialization and modernization. By contrast, the formation of the capitalist class causes the deindustrialization of Russia. The author highlights the main contradictions of the development of modern China. The situation of the capitalist class of China is contradictory. On one side, it needs the strong socialist state, on the other side, it needs the dismantlement of socialism.

  4. Automatic Identification Systems the Effects of Class B on the Use of Class A Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Andy

    2006-05-01

    The standards for CSTDMA Class B AIS will shortly be published by the International Electrotechnical Commission and equipment will become available during 2006. The perceived benefits that Class B brings to leisure craft users and its relatively low cost will make it attractive in the market place. A rapid take-up of Class B use can therefore be expected. This paper considers the impact that increased use of Class B will have on users of Class A AIS that are compulsorily fitted to larger vessels to meet the requirements of the International Maritime Organization Safety of Life at Sea convention. The CSTDMA Class B system has been designed to prevent overloading of the AIS VHF data link. This is briefly reviewed but there are a number of other aspects that need to be considered. These include: the increased garbling of Class B messages compared to those of Class A; the problems accruing from the low update rate of Class B information; the increase in display information that will need to be managed; and the possible increase in inappropriate manoeuvres of leisure craft caused by misplaced reliance on AIS. As a result of the investigation the paper highlights the fact that Class B users must not assume that their own presence, in the form of Class B transmissions, will be particularly visible on the bridge of many SOLAS vessels. This will continue to be the case for many years into the future, until such vessels are mandated to carry radar with AIS target overlay capability.

  5. PRCR Classes and Activities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — This data is specific to Parks and Recreation classes, workshops, and activities within the course catalog. It contains an entry for upcoming classes.*This data set...

  6. Class 1 Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A "Class 1" area is a geographic area recognized by the EPA as being of the highest environmental quality and requiring maximum protection. Class I areas are areas...

  7. The Emergence of Latin Multinationals

    OpenAIRE

    Santiso, Javier

    2008-01-01

    The corporate world has changed remarkably in the past 10 years. New multinationals are appearing in countries with emerging markets such as Brazil, India, China, South Africa and Mexico, which are not only top recipients of foreign capital, but have fast become major investors themselves. An important part of the remarkable story of emerging multinationals has been the eruption of world-class Latin multinationals (or multilatinas) from Mexico and Brazil, in particular, foll...

  8. Emerging arboviruses: Why today?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Gould

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent global (reemergence of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses, such as chikungunya and Zika virus, was widely reported in the media as though it was a new phenomenon. This is not the case. Arboviruses and other human microbial pathogens have been (reemerging for centuries. The major difference today is that arbovirus emergence and dispersion are more rapid and geographically extensive, largely due to intensive growth of global transportation systems, arthropod adaptation to increasing urbanisation, our failure to contain mosquito population density increases and land perturbation. Here we select examples of (reemerging pathogenic arboviruses and explain the reasons for their emergence and different patterns of dispersal, focusing particularly on the mosquito vectors which are important determinants of arbovirus emergence. We also attempt to identify arboviruses likely to (reemerge in the future.

  9. Feline ocular emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Elizabeth A

    2005-05-01

    Feline ocular emergencies include any ophthalmic condition that has rapidly developed or is the result of trauma to the eye or periocular structures. Common feline emergencies include proptosis, lid lacerations, corneal ulcers, and foreign bodies. Complete ophthalmic examination including procurement of the minimal ophthalmic database (Schirmer tear test, fluorescein stain, and intraocular pressure measurement) should be obtained whenever possible to ensure that the complete and correct diagnosis is made. Concern for the patient's vision and ocular comfort should guide the practioner's diagnostic and therapeutic plan. This article reviews some of the more common feline ocular emergencies, including conditions affecting the orbit and globe, adnexa, conjunctiva, and cornea. Feline uveitis, glaucoma, and lenticular diseases are covered more thoroughly elsewhere in this issue.

  10. Emergency Shelters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic Larsen, Olga; Lee, Daniel Sang-Hoon; Eskemose Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The report gives all the research, teaching, seminars carried in the duration of the shelter cluster. It concludes with proposing relevant research agendas in the field of emergency architecture......The report gives all the research, teaching, seminars carried in the duration of the shelter cluster. It concludes with proposing relevant research agendas in the field of emergency architecture...

  11. Class, Culture and Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrits, Gitte Sommer

    2013-01-01

    , discussions within political sociology have not yet utilized the merits of a multidimensional conception of class. In light of this, the article suggests a comprehensive Bourdieusian framework for class analysis, integrating culture as both a structural phenomenon co-constitutive of class and as symbolic...

  12. Bacteriological profiling of diphenylureas as a novel class of antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon Mohammad

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance to antibiotics remains an imposing global public health challenge. Of the most serious pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is problematic given strains have emerged that exhibit resistance to several antibiotic classes including β-lactams and agents of last resort such as vancomycin. New antibacterial agents composed of unique chemical scaffolds are needed to counter this public health challenge. The present study examines two synthetic diphenylurea compounds 1 and 2 that inhibit growth of clinically-relevant isolates of MRSA at concentrations as low as 4 µg/mL and are non-toxic to human colorectal cells at concentrations up to 128 μg/mL. Both compounds exhibit rapid bactericidal activity, completely eliminating a high inoculum of MRSA within four hours. MRSA mutants exhibiting resistance to 1 and 2 could not be isolated, indicating a low likelihood of rapid resistance emerging to these compounds. Bacterial cytological profiling revealed the diphenylureas exert their antibacterial activity by targeting bacterial cell wall synthesis. Both compounds demonstrate the ability to resensitize vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to the effect of vancomycin. The present study lays the foundation for further investigation and development of diphenylurea compounds as a new class of antibacterial agents.

  13. The emergent Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollowood, Timothy J.

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a new and conceptually simple interpretation of quantum mechanics based on reduced density matrices of sub-systems from which the standard Copenhagen interpretation emerges as an effective description of macroscopically large systems. This interpretation describes a world in which definite measurement results are obtained with probabilities that reproduce the Born rule. Wave function collapse is seen to be a useful but fundamentally unnecessary piece of prudent book keeping which is only valid for macro-systems. The new interpretation lies in a class of modal interpretations in that it applies to quantum systems that interact with a much larger environment. However, we show that it does not suffer from the problems that have plagued similar modal interpretations like macroscopic superpositions and rapid flipping between macroscopically distinct states. We describe how the interpretation fits neatly together with fully quantum formulations of statistical mechanics and that a measurement process can be viewed as a process of ergodicity breaking analogous to a phase transition. The key feature of the new interpretation is that joint probabilities for the ergodic subsets of states of disjoint macro-systems only arise as emergent quantities. Finally we give an account of the EPR-Bohm thought experiment and show that the interpretation implies the violation of the Bell inequality characteristic of quantum mechanics but in a way that is rather novel. The final conclusion is that the Copenhagen interpretation gives a completely satisfactory phenomenology of macro-systems interacting with micro-systems.

  14. Studying Emerge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Selin, Cynthia; Rodegher, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The Emerge event, held in Tempe, AZ in March 2012, brought together a range of scientists, artists, futurists, engineers and students in order to experiment with innovative methods for thinking about the future. These methodological techniques were tested through nine workshops, each of which made...... use of a different format; Emerge as a whole, then, offered an opportunity to study a diverse set of future-oriented engagement practices. We conducted an event ethnography, in which a team of 11 researchers collaboratively developed accounts of the practices at play within Emerge and its workshops...

  15. GPS queues with heterogeneous traffic classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, Sem; Mandjes, M.R.H.; van Uitert, Miranda

    2002-01-01

    We consider a queue fed by a mixture of light-tailed and heavy-tailed traffic. The two traffic classes are served in accordance with the generalized processor sharing (GPS) discipline. GPS-based scheduling algorithms, such as weighted fair queueing (WFQ), have emerged as an important mechanism for

  16. EMERGENCY TRIAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Rajapakse

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes emergency triage. It presents the reasons for implementation of triage and its benefits. Focuses on the Manchester triage system, which is formally validated triage model in Slovenia.

  17. Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for first responders, industry, federal, state and local governments on EPA's role and available resources for response to oil spills, chemical, biological, radiological releases, and large-scale national emergencies.

  18. Emergent emotion

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Elaine Finbarr

    2016-01-01

    I argue that emotion is an ontologically emergent and sui generis. I argue that emotion meets both of two individually necessary and jointly sufficient conditions for ontological emergence. These are, (i) that emotion necessarily has constituent parts to which it cannot be reduced, and (ii) that emotion has a causal effect on its constituent parts (i.e. emotion demonstrates downward causation).\\ud \\ud I argue that emotion is partly cognitive, partly constituted by feelings and partly perceptu...

  19. Dermatologic emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Simón Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatologic emergencies represent about 8–20% of the diseases seen in the Emergency Department of hospitals. It is often a challenge for primary care physicians to differentiate mundane skin ailments from more serious, life threatening conditions that require immediate intervention. In this review we included the following conditions: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrosis, pemphigus vulgaris, toxic shock syndrome, fasciitis necrotising, angioedema/urticaria, meningococcemia, Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  20. Emerging images

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2009-01-01

    Emergence refers to the unique human ability to aggregate information from seemingly meaningless pieces, and to perceive a whole that is meaningful. This special skill of humans can constitute an effective scheme to tell humans and machines apart. This paper presents a synthesis technique to generate images of 3D objects that are detectable by humans, but difficult for an automatic algorithm to recognize. The technique allows generating an infinite number of images with emerging figures. Our algorithm is designed so that locally the synthesized images divulge little useful information or cues to assist any segmentation or recognition procedure. Therefore, as we demonstrate, computer vision algorithms are incapable of effectively processing such images. However, when a human observer is presented with an emergence image, synthesized using an object she is familiar with, the figure emerges when observed as a whole. We can control the difficulty level of perceiving the emergence effect through a limited set of parameters. A procedure that synthesizes emergence images can be an effective tool for exploring and understanding the factors affecting computer vision techniques. © 2009 ACM.

  1. EMERGENCY CALLS

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors ...

  2. Developing an emergency ultrasound app

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kim Thestrup; Subhi, Yousif; Aagaard, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Focused emergency ultrasound is rapidly evolving as a clinical skill for bedside examination by physicians at all levels of education. Ultrasound is highly operator-dependent and relevant training is essential to ensure appropriate use. When supplementing hands-on focused ultrasound courses, e......-learning can increase the learning effect. We developed an emergency ultrasound app to enable onsite e-learning for trainees. In this paper, we share our experiences in the development of this app and present the final product....

  3. Personality development from adolescence to emerging adulthood: linking trajectories of ego development to the family context and identity formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Moin; Seiffge-Krenke, Inge

    2013-02-01

    This longitudinal study analyzed personality development using an individual approach by examining changes in ego development across the transition from adolescence to emerging adulthood. Specifically, the study mapped the heterogeniety in ego development growth trajectories and linked the different trajectories to the family context in adolescence and identity development in emerging adulthood. Participants were 98 families with a child who were followed from age 14 to age 24. Latent class growth analysis identified 4 distinct trajectories of growth in ego development of the children over the 10-year period. The results indicated that growth was more rapid during adolescence and tended to taper off in emerging adulthood. In addition, promotion of personal growth within the family and parents' ego development were particulary instrumental in children's ego developmental gains in adolescence. Finally, youth who demonstrated continued ego development into emerging adulthood also demonstrated heightened levels of identity exploration. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Test Schedules on the Formation of Linked Perceptual Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Lanny; Fitzer, Adrienne; Shamoun, Kimberly; Matneja, Priya; Watanabe, Mari; Tittelbach, Danielle

    2005-01-01

    After training conditional discriminations among selected stimuli from two perceptual classes, the emergence of novel relations involving other members of both classes was assessed using cross-class probes. The cross-class probes were presented using one of four different testing schedules. In the 2/9 test, nine different probes were presented in…

  5. Complicating the "Soccer Mom:" The Cultural Politics of Forming Class-Based Identity, Distinction, and Necessity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Using Pierre Bourdieu's theories of social class differentiation and class reproduction, this paper provides an analysis of class-based identity politics in contemporary suburban America. Through a critical ethnography of the emergent, American, upper-middle-class "soccer mom" phenomenon, this study contributes to a growing body of…

  6. Class network routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Gyan [Princeton, NJ; Blumrich, Matthias A [Ridgefield, CT; Chen, Dong [Croton On Hudson, NY; Coteus, Paul W [Yorktown Heights, NY; Gara, Alan G [Mount Kisco, NY; Giampapa, Mark E [Irvington, NY; Heidelberger, Philip [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D [Mount Kisco, NY; Takken, Todd E [Mount Kisco, NY; Vranas, Pavlos M [Bedford Hills, NY

    2009-09-08

    Class network routing is implemented in a network such as a computer network comprising a plurality of parallel compute processors at nodes thereof. Class network routing allows a compute processor to broadcast a message to a range (one or more) of other compute processors in the computer network, such as processors in a column or a row. Normally this type of operation requires a separate message to be sent to each processor. With class network routing pursuant to the invention, a single message is sufficient, which generally reduces the total number of messages in the network as well as the latency to do a broadcast. Class network routing is also applied to dense matrix inversion algorithms on distributed memory parallel supercomputers with hardware class function (multicast) capability. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the communication patterns of dense matrix inversion can be served by hardware class functions, which results in faster execution times.

  7. Dermatopathologic emergencies part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Hoffman Atmatzidis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In dermatopathology, there are several conditions which must be addressed emergently. While some conditions necessitate emergent intervention because of the pathology of the cutaneous manifestations, others require recognition of the underlying serious systemic conditions represented by the cutaneous signs and symptoms. We describe the desquamating disorders (Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, Stevens–Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis, and edema-related desquamation, erythema multiforme, cutaneous aspergillosis, tinea/Candida overlying fractures, rickettsial infections, and eczema herpeticum as diseases which should be addressed immediately upon presentation because of the seriousness and rapidity of progression of their pathology. Moreover, porphyria cutanea tarda, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, Muir-Torre syndrome, and acquired ochronosis may exemplify conditions where the cutaneous signs serve as warnings for severe systemic disease that may not be emergencies in isolation, but can indicate rapid occult development of destructive and sometimes deadly noncutaneous pathology. The literature review was conducted using searches in Pubmed and references to textbooks on the subjects.

  8. Puppy socialization classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seksel, K

    1997-05-01

    Setting up a puppy training program is one of the most important services veterinarians can offer. Puppy socialization classes aim not only to socialize the puppies so that they learn to interact well with children, adults, and other dogs, but also to teach basic obedience exercises. The classes build a strong bond between puppy, owner, and veterinary clinic. This article covers the techniques used, the structure of the classes, and outlines benefits for the dog, owner, veterinarian, and community.

  9. An effective way of reactivation of first class appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First class appliance produces rapid distalization of the maxillary first and second molars, even when the second molars are completely erupted. The range of molar distalization is 4-8 mm. It has both buccal and palatal component. Here, we are going to present a technique to reactivate a broken first class appliance for effective distalization.

  10. Acquired Class D β-Lactamases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno T. Antunes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Class D β-lactamases have emerged as a prominent resistance mechanism against β-lactam antibiotics that previously had efficacy against infections caused by pathogenic bacteria, especially by Acinetobacter baumannii and the Enterobacteriaceae. The phenotypic and structural characteristics of these enzymes correlate to activities that are classified either as a narrow spectrum, an extended spectrum, or a carbapenemase spectrum. We focus on Class D β-lactamases that are carried on plasmids and, thus, present particular clinical concern. Following a historical perspective, the susceptibility and kinetics patterns of the important plasmid-encoded Class D β-lactamases and the mechanisms for mobilization of the chromosomal Class D β-lactamases are discussed.

  11. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an array of four telescopes designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. CLASS aims to detect the B-mode polarization from primordial gravitational waves predicted by cosmic inflation theory, as well as the imprint left by reionization upon the CMB E-mode polarization. This will be achieved through a combination of observing strategy and state-of-the-art instrumentation. CLASS is observing 70% of the sky to characterize the CMB at large angular scales, which will measure the entire CMB power spectrum from the reionization peak to the recombination peak. The four telescopes operate at frequencies of 38, 93, 145, and 217 GHz, in order to estimate Galactic synchrotron and dust foregrounds while avoiding atmospheric absorption. CLASS employs rapid polarization modulation to overcome atmospheric and instrumental noise. Polarization sensitive cryogenic detectors with low noise levels provide CLASS the sensitivity required to constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio down to levels of r ~ 0.01 while also measuring the optical depth the reionization to sample-variance levels. These improved constraints on the optical depth to reionization are required to pin down the mass of neutrinos from complementary cosmological data. CLASS has completed a year of observations at 38 GHz and is in the process of deploying the rest of the telescope array. This poster provides an overview and update on the CLASS science, hardware and survey operations.

  12. Emergency preparedness

    CERN Document Server

    Cennini, E; Oortman Gerlings, P

    2009-01-01

    On September 19th 2008, a technical fault was at the centre of a sequence of events which hampered the performance of certain equipments of the LHC 3-4 sector. Once the first effects of this sequence of events were detected, the behaviour of the CERN staff confronted to this complex and critical situation became the centre of the risk control process. During such a downward spiral the preparation of all stakeholders is essential and should respect the (apparently) basic principles of emergency preparedness. Preparedness towards normal operation of CERN facilities towards minor up to major emergency situations will be presented. The main technical, organisational and legal frameworks of the CERN emergency preparedness will be recalled, highlighting the CERN risk management and risk control strategy. Then, the sequence of events experienced by different stakeholders on September 19th will be reported, thus starting the learned lessons process.

  13. EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Pantić

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception refers to any device or drug that is used as an emergency procedure to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse.The first method of emergency contraception was high dose of estrogen. Concern about side effects led to subsequent development of the so-called Yuzpe regimen which combined ethinil estradiol with levonorgestrel and levonorgestrel alone. Less convenient to use is the copper intauterine contraceptive device.It is known that in some women sexual steroids may inhibit or delay ovulation and may interfere with ovum and sperm transport and implantation. Copper intrauterine device causes a foreign-body effect on the endometrium and a direct toxic effect to sperm and blastocyst.The Yuzpe regimen reduces the risk of pregnancy after a single act of sexual intercourse by about 75% and the levonorgestrel alone by about 85%. The copper intrauterine device is an extremely effective method for selected patients.Nausea and vomiting are common among women using the Yuzpe regimen and considerably less common among women using levonorgestrel alone regimen.Emergency contraception is relatively safe with no contraindications except pregnancy. It is ineffective if a woman is pregnant. There is no need for a medical hystory or a phisical examination before providing emergency contraceptive pills. They are taken long before organogenesis starts, so they should not have a teratogenic effect.Counseling should include information about correct use of the method, possible side effects and her preferences for regular contraception.Unintended pregnancy is a great problem. Several safe, effective and inexpensive methods of emergency contraception are available including Yuzpe regimen, levonorges-trel-only regimen and copper intrauterine device.

  14. Effective Teaching Strategies for Open Enrollment Honors and AP Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebrenner, Susan

    2006-01-01

    A trend is emerging to open enrollment for honors and AP classes to all students who wish to take them. Teachers of these open enrollment classes may be facing several dilemmas. How can the high standards and academic rigor of the course be maintained? How can students who struggle to learn be supported in their endeavors to keep up with the…

  15. The emergency medicine management of severe alcohol withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Drew; Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-07-01

    Alcohol use is widespread, and withdrawal symptoms are common after decreased alcohol intake. Severe alcohol withdrawal may manifest with delirium tremens, and new therapies may assist in management of this life-threatening condition. To provide an evidence-based review of the emergency medicine management of alcohol withdrawal and delirium tremens. The underlying pathophysiology of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is central nervous system hyperexcitation. Stages of withdrawal include initial withdrawal symptoms, hallucinations, seizures, and delirium tremens. Management focuses on early diagnosis, resuscitation, and providing medications with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor activity. Benzodiazepines with symptom-triggered therapy have been the predominant medication class utilized and should remain the first treatment option with rapid escalation of dosing. Treatment resistant withdrawal warrants the use of phenobarbital or propofol, both demonstrating efficacy in management. Propofol can be used as an induction agent to decrease the effects of withdrawal. Dexmedetomidine does not address the underlying pathophysiology but may reduce the need for intubation. Ketamine requires further study. Overall, benzodiazepines remain the cornerstone of treatment. Outpatient management of patients with minimal symptoms is possible. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Physicians must rapidly diagnose these conditions while evaluating for other diseases. Benzodiazepines are the predominant medication class utilized, with adjunctive treatments including propofol or phenobarbital in patients with withdrawal resistant to benzodiazepines. Dexmedetomidine and ketamine require further study. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Teaching Social Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablante, Courtney B.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Discussing socioeconomic status in college classes can be challenging. Both teachers and students feel uncomfortable, yet social class matters more than ever. This is especially true, given increased income inequality in the United States and indications that higher education does not reduce this inequality as much as many people hope. Resources…

  17. Class II Microcins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, Gaëlle; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Peduzzi, Jean

    Class II microcins are 4.9- to 8.9-kDa polypeptides produced by and active against enterobacteria. They are classified into two subfamilies according to their structure and their gene cluster arrangement. While class IIa microcins undergo no posttranslational modification, class IIb microcins show a conserved C-terminal sequence that carries a salmochelin-like siderophore motif as a posttranslational modification. Aside from this C-terminal end, which is the signature of class IIb microcins, some sequence similarities can be observed within and between class II subclasses, suggesting the existence of common ancestors. Their mechanisms of action are still under investigation, but several class II microcins use inner membrane proteins as cellular targets, and some of them are membrane-active. Like group B colicins, many, if not all, class II microcins are TonB- and energy-dependent and use catecholate siderophore receptors for recognition/­translocation across the outer membrane. In that context, class IIb microcins are considered to have developed molecular mimicry to increase their affinity for their outer membrane receptors through their salmochelin-like posttranslational modification.

  18. Generalized Fourier transforms classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend; Møller, Steen

    2002-01-01

    The Fourier class of integral transforms with kernels $B(\\omega r)$ has by definition inverse transforms with kernel $B(-\\omega r)$. The space of such transforms is explicitly constructed. A slightly more general class of generalized Fourier transforms are introduced. From the general theory...

  19. Class in disguise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Stine Thidemann; Prieur, Annick

    This paper asks how class can have importance in one of the worlds’ most equal societies: Denmark. The answer is that class here appears in disguised forms. The field under study is a city, Aalborg, in the midst of transition from a stronghold of industrialism to a post industrial economy. The pa...

  20. Cutting Class Harms Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lewis A., III

    2012-01-01

    An accessible business school population of undergraduate students was investigated in three independent, but related studies to determine effects on grades due to cutting class and failing to take advantage of optional reviews and study quizzes. It was hypothesized that cutting classes harms exam scores, attending preexam reviews helps exam…

  1. Dermatologic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Anna H

    2015-02-01

    Although dermatology may be regarded as a medical specialty with few emergencies, they do exist and range from primary cutaneous disorders to severe systemic conditions with skin manifestations. Prompt recognition for appropriate diagnosis and treatment often is necessary to improve a patient's prognosis and a single decision can mark the difference between life and death.

  2. Emerging Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Breinbjerg, Morten; Pold, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The authors examine how materiality emerges from complex chains of mediation in creative software use. The primarily theoretical argument is inspired and illustrated by interviews with two composers of electronic music. The authors argue that computer mediated activity should not primarily...

  3. Emergence delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Louise; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Emergence delirium (ED) is a well-known phenomenon in the postoperative period. However, the literature concerning this clinical problem is limited. This review evaluates the literature with respect to epidemiology and risk factors. Treatment strategies are discussed. The review concludes...

  4. Neurosurgical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapatkin, A S; Vite, C H

    2000-05-01

    The neurologic patient is considered a neurosurgical emergency when delay of treatment may influence the patient's outcome. Diseases of the spinal cord, brain, and peripheral nerves are presented in this article. Diagnostic tools (i.e., advanced imaging and electrophysiologic tests), differential diagnoses, treatment options (conventional and controversial), whether the patient requires surgery, and the optimal time for surgical intervention are discussed.

  5. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Koyama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency post-coital contraception (EC is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method, and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference.

  6. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Atsuko; Hagopian, Laura; Linden, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference. PMID:24453516

  7. Novel environmental class 1 integrons and cassette arrays recovered from an on-farm bio-purification plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, María Carla; Quiroga, María Paula; Pistorio, Mariano; Lagares, Antonio; Centrón, Daniela; Papa, María Florencia Del

    2017-12-27

    Rapid dissemination and emergence of novel antibiotic resistance genes among bacteria are rising problems worldwide. Since their discovery in clinical isolates in the late 1980s, class 1 integrons have been found in a wide range of bacterial genera and have been extensively studied as contributors to dissemination of antibiotic resistance.The present study aimed to investigate the presence and structure of class 1 integrons in plasmid-carrying bacterial isolates obtained from a biopurification system used for decontamination of pesticide-contaminated water as well as their possible role as reservoir of antimicrobial-resistance gene cassettes. A total of 35 representative isolates were screened for the presence of class 1 integron integrase encoded by intI1. PCR and DNA sequencing revealed the presence of six class 1 integrons with four variable regions: 5'CS-aadA1b-3'CS, 5'CS-aadA2-3'CS, 5'CS-aadA11cΔ-3'CS and 5'CS-dfrB3-aadA1di-catB2-aadA6k-3'CS, the last two being unseen arrays of antimicrobial resistance gene cassettes associated with novel environmental alleles of intI1. These four class 1 integrons were identified as being present in four different genera, including Ochrobactrum, and Variovorax, where class 1 integrons have not been previously reported. The results provide evidence of the biopurification systems as a tank of class 1 integron carrying strains and novel environmental class 1 integron integrases associated with antimicrobial-resistance gene cassette arrays. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Emerging & re-emerging infections in India: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Dikid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of emerging infectious diseases in humans has increased within the recent past or threatens to increase in the near future. Over 30 new infectious agents have been detected worldwide in the last three decades; 60 per cent of these are of zoonotic origin. Developing countries such as India suffer disproportionately from the burden of infectious diseases given the confluence of existing environmental, socio-economic, and demographic factors. In the recent past, India has seen outbreaks of eight organisms of emerging and re-emerging diseases in various parts of the country, six of these are of zoonotic origin. Prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases will increasingly require the application of sophisticated epidemiologic and molecular biologic technologies, changes in human behaviour, a national policy on early detection of and rapid response to emerging infections and a plan of action. WHO has made several recommendations for national response mechanisms. Many of these are in various stages of implementation in India. However, for a country of size and population of India, the emerging infections remain a real and present danger. A meaningful response must approach the problem at the systems level. A comprehensive national strategy on infectious diseases cutting across all relevant sectors with emphasis on strengthened surveillance, rapid response, partnership building and research to guide public policy is needed.

  9. Metal azides under pressure: An emerging class of high energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ical properties.1 These materials belong to the category of primary explosives and can be used to detonate the secondary explosives.2 Among the inorganic metal azides, monovalent azides such as alkali metal azides are chemically and structurally simple compounds and have wide range of practical importance as ...

  10. Metal azides under pressure: An emerging class of high energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metal azides are well-known for their explosive properties such as detonation or deflagration. As chemically pure sources of nitrogen, alkali metal azides under high pressure have the ability to form polymeric nitrogen, an ultimate green high energy density material with energy density three times greater than that of known ...

  11. Metal ionophores - an emerging class of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei-Qun; Lind, Stuart E

    2009-11-01

    Compounds that bind metals such as copper and zinc have many biological activities, including the ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Although some of these compounds have been considered to act as chelators of metals, decreasing their bioavailability, others increase intracellular metal concentrations. We review recent work regarding the recognition of the biological effects of metal ionophores with different structures, particularly with regard to their actions upon cancer cells focusing on dithiocarbamates, pyrithione, and the 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative, clioquinol. We provide a biologically based classification of metal-binding compounds that allows an experimental distinction between chelators and ionophores that can be readily used by biologists, which may lead to further study and classification of metal-binding drugs. Metal ionophores may kill cancer cells by a number of mechanisms, including lysosomal disruption and proteasome inhibition, and likely others. Because some of these compounds have been safely administered to animals and humans, they have the potential to become clinically useful anticancer agents.

  12. On stable Baire classes

    OpenAIRE

    Karlova, Olena; Mykhaylyuk, Volodymyr

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and study adhesive spaces. Using this concept we obtain a characterization of stable Baire maps $f:X\\to Y$ of the class $\\alpha$ for wide classes of topological spaces. In particular, we prove that for a topological space $X$ and a contractible space $Y$ a map $f:X\\to Y$ belongs to the $n$'th stable Baire class if and only if there exist a sequence $(f_k)_{k=1}^\\infty$ of continuous maps $f_k:X\\to Y$ and a sequence $(F_k)_{k=1}^\\infty$ of functionally ambiguous sets of the $n$'th...

  13. Gesticulating Science: Emergent Bilingual Students' Use of Gestures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünsal, Zeynep; Jakobson, Britt; Wickman, Per-Olof; Molander, Bengt-Olov

    2018-01-01

    This article examines how emergent bilingual students used gestures in science class, and the consequences of students' gestures when their language repertoire limited their possibilities to express themselves. The study derived from observations in two science classes in Sweden. In the first class, 3rd grade students (9-10 years old) were…

  14. Autopsy interrogation of emergency medicine dispute cases: how often are clinical diagnoses incorrect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Danyang; Gan, Rongchang; Zhang, Weidi; Wang, Wei; Saiyin, Hexige; Zeng, Wenjiao; Liu, Guoyuan

    2018-01-01

    Emergency medicine is a 'high risk' specialty. Some diseases develop suddenly and progress rapidly, and sudden unexpected deaths in the emergency department (ED) may cause medical disputes. We aimed to assess discrepancies between antemortem clinical diagnoses and postmortem autopsy findings concerning emergency medicine dispute cases and to figure out the most common major missed diagnoses. Clinical files and autopsy reports were retrospectively analysed and interpreted. Discrepancies between clinical diagnoses and autopsy diagnoses were evaluated using modified Goldman classification as major and minor discrepancy. The difference between diagnosis groups was compared with Pearson χ2 test. Of the 117 cases included in this study, 71 of cases (58 class I and 13 class II diagnostic errors) were revealed as major discrepancies (60.7%). The most common major diagnoses were cardiovascular diseases (54 cases), followed by pulmonary diseases, infectious diseases and so on. The difference of major discrepancy between the diagnoses groups was significant (pclinical diagnoses and postmortem examinations exist in emergency medical disputes cases; acute aortic dissection and myocardial infarction are the most frequently major missed diagnoses that ED clinicians should pay special attention to in practice. This study reaffirmed the necessity and usefulness of autopsy in auditing death in EDs. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Reclaiming respectability? The class-cultural dynamics of crime, community and governance in inner-city Dublin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilan, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This paper critically examines developments in Irish urban governance through an ethnographic account of one community's historical memory and contemporary structure. During an era of rapid economic growth, the Irish state has courted previously excluded communities, offering them greater "inclusion" as "partners" in responding to urban decay and crime. The micro-governance structures this creates, however, become sites of contest between competing community factions and class-cultural imperatives. Tensions emerge between aspirational community leaders championing the aesthetics (if not the values) of "respectability" and residual residents who are presented as "rough". The paper demonstrates that nuances of class-cultural identity dictate the character of partnership governance at the community level with particular implications for local regeneration and crime control agendas.

  16. Overview of emerging nonvolatile memory technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Jagan Singh; Sze, Simon Min; Chand, Umesh; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Nonvolatile memory technologies in Si-based electronics date back to the 1990s. Ferroelectric field-effect transistor (FeFET) was one of the most promising devices replacing the conventional Flash memory facing physical scaling limitations at those times. A variant of charge storage memory referred to as Flash memory is widely used in consumer electronic products such as cell phones and music players while NAND Flash-based solid-state disks (SSDs) are increasingly displacing hard disk drives as the primary storage device in laptops, desktops, and even data centers. The integration limit of Flash memories is approaching, and many new types of memory to replace conventional Flash memories have been proposed. Emerging memory technologies promise new memories to store more data at less cost than the expensive-to-build silicon chips used by popular consumer gadgets including digital cameras, cell phones and portable music players. They are being investigated and lead to the future as potential alternatives to existing memories in future computing systems. Emerging nonvolatile memory technologies such as magnetic random-access memory (MRAM), spin-transfer torque random-access memory (STT-RAM), ferroelectric random-access memory (FeRAM), phase-change memory (PCM), and resistive random-access memory (RRAM) combine the speed of static random-access memory (SRAM), the density of dynamic random-access memory (DRAM), and the nonvolatility of Flash memory and so become very attractive as another possibility for future memory hierarchies. Many other new classes of emerging memory technologies such as transparent and plastic, three-dimensional (3-D), and quantum dot memory technologies have also gained tremendous popularity in recent years. Subsequently, not an exaggeration to say that computer memory could soon earn the ultimate commercial validation for commercial scale-up and production the cheap plastic knockoff. Therefore, this review is devoted to the rapidly developing new

  17. Semantic Analysis of Virtual Classes and Nested Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1999-01-01

    Virtual classes and nested classes are distinguishing features of BETA. Nested classes originated from Simula, but until recently they have not been part of main stream object- oriented languages. C++ has a restricted form of nested classes and they were included in Java 1.1. Virtual classes...... the central elements of the semantic analysis used in the Mjølner BETA compiler....

  18. Second-Class Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punke, Harold H.

    1972-01-01

    Those factors which motivate citizens to define themselves as first" or second" class are realistically discussed and alternatives to the present trends in the role of American citizenship are suggested. (JB)

  19. Special classes of semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Attila

    2001-01-01

    In semigroup theory there are certain kinds of band decompositions, which are very useful in the study of the structure semigroups There are a number of special semigroup classes in which these decompositions can be used very successfully The book focuses attention on such classes of semigroups Some of them are partially discussed in earlier books, but in the last thirty years new semigroup classes have appeared and a fairly large body of material has been published on them The book provides a systematic review on this subject The first chapter is an introduction The remaining chapters are devoted to special semigroup classes These are Putcha semigroups, commutative semigroups, weakly commutative semigroups, R-Commutative semigroups, conditionally commutative semigroups, RC-commutative semigroups, quasi commutative semigroups, medial semigroups, right commutative semigroups, externally commutative semigroups, E-m semigroups, WE-m semigroups, weakly exponential semigroups, (m,n)-commutative semigroups and n(2)...

  20. Talking Class in Tehroon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elling, Rasmus Christian; Rezakhani, Khodadad

    2016-01-01

    Persian, like any other language, is laced with references to class, both blatant and subtle. With idioms and metaphors, Iranians can identify and situate others, and thus themselves, within hierarchies of social status and privilege, both real and imagined. Some class-related terms can be traced...... back to medieval times, whereas others are of modern vintage, the linguistic legacy of television shows, pop songs, social media memes or street vernacular. Every day, it seems, an infectious set of phrases appears that make yesterday’s seem embarrassingly antiquated.......Persian, like any other language, is laced with references to class, both blatant and subtle. With idioms and metaphors, Iranians can identify and situate others, and thus themselves, within hierarchies of social status and privilege, both real and imagined. Some class-related terms can be traced...

  1. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M

    2016-01-01

    .... This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors...

  2. One Class, Many Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Boutonne, Sylvie; Lucas, Keith B.; McRobbie, Campbell J.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a study of a physics class in which few interactions occur among students. Concludes, through observations and interviews. that students describe both the social and physical world in different ways. Contains 33 references. (DDR)

  3. Nordic Walking Classes

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2015-01-01

    Four classes of one hour each are held on Tuesdays. RDV barracks parking at Entrance A, 10 minutes before class time. Spring Course 2015: 05.05/12.05/19.05/26.05 Prices 40 CHF per session + 10 CHF club membership 5 CHF/hour pole rental Check out our schedule and enroll at: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Nordic%20Walking/NewForm.aspx? Hope to see you among us! fitness.club@cern.ch

  4. Embodying class and gender

    OpenAIRE

    GEERS, ALEXIE

    2015-01-01

    In March 1937, when the first issue of Marie-Claire was published, the images of the female body it presented to its female readers from working-class backgrounds contrasted sharply with those featured in previous magazines. The female bodies are dressed and groomed to seduce and replace the hieratic bodies that presented fashions synonymous with membership in the upper classes. The present essay examines this shift and shows that the visual repertoire employed is borrowed from that of the fe...

  5. Rapid diagnosis of mycobacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Drancourt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB remains an important public health issue worldwide, there is an emerging interest in non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM which is responsible for opportunistic infections of the respiratory tract as well as other anatomical sites in both developed and developing countries. In this context the one goal of the clinical mycobacteriology laboratories is to provide physicians with an accurate identification of the mycobacterium as rapidly as possible. During the last ten years, several lines of laboratory tools have been developed in order to speed the isolation and identification of mycobacteria from clinical specimens. Chiefly, the composition of culture medium was renewed along with the protocol of incubation in order to recover Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB micro-colonies as soon as 48 h after the inoculation of the specimen. MALDI-TOF rapid identification is clearly the tool to be implemented in the laboratory for the rapid identification of the micro-colonies. Also, molecular tools and genomics are necessary in order to depict new mycobacteria species, including those of the Mycobacterium abscessus complex and the Mycobacterium avium complex. All these tools and their connections will be presented during this conference.

  6. Emerging Zika Virus Infection: A Rapidly Evolving Situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordi, Licia; Avsic-Zupanc, Tatjana; Lalle, Eleonora; Vairo, Francesco; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; da Costa Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, firstly identified in Uganda and responsible for sporadic human cases in Africa and Asia until recently, when large outbreak occurred in Pacific Ocean and the Americas. Since the main vectors during its spread outside of Africa have been Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti mosquitoes, which are widely distributed all over the world, there is urgent need for a coordinated response for prevention and spread of ZIKV epidemics.Despite clinical manifestation of Zika virus infection are usually mild and self limiting, there are reports suggesting, during the recent epidemic, an association of ZIKV infection with severe consequences, including fetal/newborn microcephaly, due to vertical in utero transmission, autoimmune-neurological presentations including cranial nerve dysfunction, and Guillain-Barré Syndrome in adults. The primary mode of transmission of Zika virus between humans is through the bite of an infected female mosquito of the Aedes genus, but also sexual and blood transfusion transmission may occur. Moreover, a case of non-sexual spread from one person to another has been described, indicating that we still have more to learn about Zika transmission.Biological basis for pathogenetic effects are under investigation. Laboratory diagnosis is challenging since, so far, there are no "gold standard" diagnostic tools, and the low and short viremia in the acute phase, and together with the high cross-reactivity among the members of flavivirus genus are the most challenging aspects to be overcome.

  7. Is it an Emergency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency 101 Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Is it an Emergency? Medical emergencies can be frightening and ... situation. Here you can find information about emergencies. It is essential to know how to recognize the ...

  8. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  9. Emergency thoracotomies: Two center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Ibrahim Sersar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim: Emergency thoracotomy is performed either immediately at the scene of injury, in the emergency department or in the operating room. It aims to evacuate the pericardial tamponade, control the haemorrhage, to ease the open cardiac massage and to cross-clamp the descending thoracic aorta to redistribute blood flow and maybe to limit sub-diaphragmatic haemorrhage, bleeding and iatrogenic injury are the common risk factors. We aimed to review our experience in the field of emergency thoracotomies, identify the predictors of death, analyze the early results, detect the risk factors and asses the mortalities and their risk factors. Patients and Methods: Our hospital records of 197 patients who underwent emergency thoracotomy were reviewed. We retrospectively analyzed a piece of the extensive experience of the Mansoura University Hospitals and Mansoura Emergency Hospital; Egypt and Saudi German Hospitals; Jeddah in the last 12 years in the management of trauma cases for whom emergency thoracotomy. The aim was to analyse the early results of such cases and to detect the risk factors of dismal prognosis. Results: Our series included 197 cases of emergency thoractomies in Mansoura; Egypt and SGH; Jeddah; KSA in the last 12 years. The mean age of the victims was 28 years and ranged between 5 and 62 years. Of the 197 patients with emergency thoracotomy, the indications were both penetrating and blunt chest trauma, iatrogenic and postoperative hemodynamito a surgical cause. The commonest indication was stab heart followed by traumatic diaphragmatic ruptures. Conclusion: The results of emergency thoracotomy in our series were cooping with the results of other reports, mainly due to our aggressive measures to achieve rapid stabilization of the hemodynamic condition. We emphasize the importance of emergency medicine education programs on rapid diagnosis of traumatic injuries with early intervention, and adequate hemodynamic and respiratory

  10. The Rapid Perceptual Impact of Emotional Distractors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana L Kennedy

    Full Text Available The brief presentation of an emotional distractor can temporarily impair perception of a subsequent, rapidly presented target, an effect known as emotion-induced blindness (EIB. How rapidly does this impairment unfold? To probe this question, we examined EIB for targets that immediately succeeded ("lag-1" emotional distractors in a rapid stream of items relative to EIB for targets at later serial positions. Experiments 1 and 2 suggested that emotional distractors interfere with items presented very soon after them, with impaired target perception emerging as early as lag-1. Experiment 3 included an exploratory examination of individual differences, which suggested that EIB onsets more rapidly among participants scoring high in measures linked to negative affect.

  11. Translation in ESL Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Imola Katalin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of translation in foreign language classes cannot be dealt with unless we attempt to make an overview of what translation meant for language teaching in different periods of language pedagogy. From the translation-oriented grammar-translation method through the complete ban on translation and mother tongue during the times of the audio-lingual approaches, we have come today to reconsider the role and status of translation in ESL classes. This article attempts to advocate for translation as a useful ESL class activity, which can completely fulfil the requirements of communicativeness. We also attempt to identify some activities and games, which rely on translation in some books published in the 1990s and the 2000s.

  12. Emerging Multinationals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, Peter

    abroad. Even though FDI usually constitutes only a minor part of countries' total capital formation, the relationships between FDI and economic growth, welfare, and industrial upgrading in developing countries have been the object of long and extensive treatment in the literature. However, the literature...... countries. Apart from a few early pioneering studies (Lecraw 1977; Lall 1983; Wells 1983; Agarwal 1985) only few studies have been made so far of outward investment from emerging and developing economies. This is in spite of the fact that the value of outward FDI stock from developing countries reached USD......859 billion in 2003, up from USD129 billion in 1990, and has increased 11 times since 1985. A limited number of recent studies do exist, though (e.g. Cai 1999; Lecraw 1993; van Hoesel 1999; Tolentino 1993; Andreff 2003; Chudnovsky and López 2000; Bulatov 1998, Yeung 2000). Furthermore, academic...

  13. MIDDLE CLASS MOVEMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. K. Sravana Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The middle class is placed between labour and capital. It neither directly awns the means of production that pumps out the surplus generated by wage labour power, nor does it, by its own labour, produce the surplus which has use and exchange value. Broadly speaking, this class consists of the petty bourgeoisie and the white-collar workers. The former are either self-employed or involved in the distribution of commodities and the latter are non-manual office workers, supervisors and profession...

  14. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  15. Emergencies and Emergency Permits for Ocean Dumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emergency permits under the MPRSA are issued if disposed material poses a threat to human health. Information is provided on emergency permit examples and disposal sites. Emergencies to safeguard life at sea does not require an ocean dumping permit.

  16. A Survey of Technology-Based Music Classes in New Jersey High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammers, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    As music technology has developed and advanced, music classes that use technology as the primary means for instruction have emerged. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which New Jersey public high schools offer music classes that are technology-based and to describe the nature of these classes. In the first phase of the…

  17. Civilization III and Whole-Class Play in High School Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John K.; Probert, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This study examined an 11th grade high school class as they played the game Civilization III. Over nine class sessions students played the game in support of other activities related to several predetermined and emergent topics in U. S. history. Gameplay was whole-class oriented and involved students taking turns at the computer controlling…

  18. Working Together in Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pateşan Marioara

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The scores obtained by the military students are very important as a lot of opportunities depend on them: the choice of the branch, selection for different in and off-campus activities, the appointment to the workplace and so on. A qualifier, regardless of its form of effective expression, can make a difference in a given context of issuing a value judgment, in relation to the student's performance assessment. In our research we tried to find out what motives students, what determines them to get actively involved in the tasks they are given and the ways we can improve their participation in classes and assignments. In order to have an educated generation we need to have not only well prepared teachers but ones that are open-minded, flexible and in pace with the methodological novelties that can improve the teaching learning process in class. Along the years we have noticed that in classes where students constituted a cohesive group with an increasing degree of interaction between members, the results were better than in a group that did not appreciate team-work. In this article we want to highlight the fact that a teacher can bring to class the appropriate methods and procedures can contribute decisively to the strengthening of the group cohesion and high scores.

  19. Class Actions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with the relatively new Danish Act on Class Action (Danish: gruppesøgsmål) which was suggested by The Permanent Council on Civil procedure (Retsplejerådet) of which the article's author is a member. The operability of the new provisions is illustrated through some wellknown Danish...

  20. Classes of Instructional Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigeluth, Charles M.; Merrill, M. David

    1979-01-01

    Describes three classes of variables which should be considered when one is designing instructional materials, doing research on instruction, or developing better methods of instruction, and proposes a classification scheme which is summarized in the last of the 13 figures that illustrate the article. A blbliography is included. (Author/RAO)

  1. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 7. The Class Number Problem - An Introduction to Algebraic Number Theory. Rajat Tandon. General Article Volume 3 Issue 7 July 1998 pp 28-37. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Charlo Class Scheduling Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebiger, Leo J.

    The design and implementation of a rotating class schedule which was put into effect in the Charlo High School, Charlo, Montana in September 1969 is discussed in this paper. The schedule, described in this report, consists of a 75-minute period followed by 2, 60-minute periods in the morning and 4, 45-minute afternoon periods. The program…

  3. Virtual Classes, Real Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem, Kate

    2010-01-01

    As Internet technology encroached on the public school classroom about a decade ago, Kim Ross, superintendent of the Houston School District in Houston, Minnesota, saw an opportunity. At first, he and his administrative team simply wanted to offer students in the district of 1,300 access to more classes via the web than what a district that size…

  4. An "expanded" class perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steur, Luisa Johanna

    2014-01-01

    -back of Adivasis against their age-old colonization or the work of ‘external’ agitators. Capitalist restructuring and ‘globalization’ was generally seen as simply the latest chapter in the suffering of these Adivasis. Little focused attention was paid to the recent class trajectory of their lives under changing...

  5. Class I Cytokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinocher, Helena

    The members of the class I cytokine receptor family are involved in a wide range of cellular processes and of high pharmaceutical importance, however, even though the transmembrane receptors have been studied for decades, it has not been fully elucidated yet, how these receptors induce their intr......The members of the class I cytokine receptor family are involved in a wide range of cellular processes and of high pharmaceutical importance, however, even though the transmembrane receptors have been studied for decades, it has not been fully elucidated yet, how these receptors induce...... their intracellular response. The overall goal of this thesis was to improve the understanding of class I cytokine receptor activation and regulation at an atomic level. Two members of the class I cytokine receptor family, the human growth hormone receptor (hGHR), and the human erythropoietin receptor (hEPOR) have...... the traptamers on the hEPOR TMD dimeric complex in detergent micelles. To gain a better understanding of hGHR regulation a point mutation in the hGHR intracellular domain (ICD), which has recently been linked to lung cancer, was characterized. The mutation was found to decrease binding of suppressor of cytokine...

  6. Emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Rabe, Thomas; Cheng, Linan

    2013-03-01

    There have been numerous attempts to control fertility after unprotected sexual intercourse (UPSI). From very bizarre methods like the vaginal application of Coca Cola to the more serious attempts using calcium antagonists influencing fertility parameters in sperm to hormonal methods or intrauterine devices. So far, hormonal methods preventing or delaying ovulation have proved to be the most popular starting with the combination of ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (LNG), known as the Yuzpe regimen. The first dose had to be taken within 72 hours of UPSI, a second one 12 hours later. Later on, LNG alone, at first in a regimen similar to the Yuzpe method (2 × 0.75 mg 12 hours apart) showed to be more successful, eventually resulting in the development of a 1.5 mg LNG pill that combined good efficacy with a high ease of use. Several efficacious and easy to use methods for emergency contraception (EC) are available on the market today with the most widely spread being LNG in a single dose of 1.5 mg (given as one tablet of 1.5 mg or 2 tablets of 0.75 mg each) for administration up to 3 days (according to WHO up to 5 days) after UPSI. Its limitations are the non-optimal efficacy which is decreasing the later the drug is taken and the fact that it is only approved for up to 72 hours after UPSI. This regimen has no effect on the endometrium, corpus luteum function and implantation, is not abortive and don't harm the fetus if accidentally taken in early pregnancy. It has no impact on the rate of ectopic pregnancies. It has become the standard method used up to this day in most countries. Since the mid 1970s copper IUDs have been used for EC, which show a high efficacy. Their disadvantages lie in the fact that EC is considered an off label use for most IUDs (not for the GynFix copper IUD in the European Union) and that they might not be acceptable for every patient. Furthermore IUD-insertion is an invasive procedure and it is required trained providers and

  7. Adeus à classe trabalhadora?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Eley

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available No início da década de 1980, a política centrada em classes da tradição socialista estava em crise, e comentadores importantes adotaram tons apocalípticos. No final da década, a esquerda permanecia profundamente dividida entre os advogados da mudança e os defensores da fé. Em meados dos anos 1990, os primeiros tinham, de modo geral, ganhado a batalha. O artigo busca apresentar essa mudança contemporânea não como a 'morte da classe', mas como o desa­parecimento de um tipo particular de ­sociedade de classes, marcado pelo ­processo de formação da classe trabalhadora entre os anos 1880 e 1940 e pelo alinhamento político daí resultante, atingindo seu apogeu na construção social-democrata do acordo do pós-guerra. Quando mudanças de longo prazo na economia se combinaram com o ataque ao keynesianismo na política de recessão a partir de meados da década de 1970, a unidade da classe trabalhadora deixou de estar disponível da forma antiga e bastante utilizada, como o terreno natural da política de esquerda. Enquanto uma coletividade dominante da classe trabalhadora entrou em declínio, outra se corporificou de modo lento e desigual para tomar o lugar daquela. Mas a unidade operacional dessa nova agregação da classe trabalhadora ainda está, em grande parte, em formação. Para recuperar a eficácia política da tradição socialista, alguma nova visão de agência política coletiva será necessária, uma visão imaginativamente ajustada às condições emergentes da produção e acumulação capitalista no início do século XXI.

  8. Emergent Universe with particle production

    CERN Document Server

    Gangopadhyay, Sunandan; Mukherjee, S

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of an emergent universe solution to Einstein's field equations allowing for an irreversible creation of matter at the expense of the gravitational field is shown. With the universe being chosen as spatially flat FRW spacetime together with equation of state proposed in [17], the solution exists when the ratio of the phenomenological matter creation rate to the number density times the Hubble parameter is a number $\\beta$ of the order of unity and independent of time. The thermodynamic behaviour is also determined for this solution. Interestingly, we also find that an emergent universe scenario is present with usual equation of state in cosmology when the matter creation rate is chosen to be a constant. More general class of emergent universe solutions are also discussed.

  9. Review of Spaceflight Dental Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Anil

    2012-01-01

    All exploration class missions--extending beyond earth's orbit--differ from existing orbital missions by being of longer duration and often not having a means of evacuation. If an exploration mission extends beyond a year, then there will be a greater lapse since the crewmembers last terrestrial dental exams, which routinely occur each year. This increased time since professional dental care could increase the chance of a dental emergency such as intractable pain, dental decay requiring a temporary filling, crown replacement, exposed pulp, abscess, tooth avulsion, or toothache. Additionally, any dental emergency will have to be treated in-flight with available resources and personnel who may not have extensive training in dental care. Thus, dental emergencies are an important risk to assess in preparation for exploration missions.

  10. Emerging nanotechnologies for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-05-01

    Founded on the growing insight into the complex cancer-immune system interactions, adjuvant immunotherapies are rapidly emerging and being adapted for the treatment of various human malignancies. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, for example, have already shown clinical success. Nevertheless, many approaches are not optimized, require frequent administration, are associated with systemic toxicities and only show modest efficacy as monotherapies. Nanotechnology can potentially enhance the efficacy of such immunotherapies by improving the delivery, retention and release of immunostimulatory agents and biologicals in targeted cell populations and tissues. This review presents the current status and emerging trends in such nanotechnology-based cancer immunotherapies including the role of nanoparticles as carriers of immunomodulators, nanoparticles-based cancer vaccines, and depots for sustained immunostimulation. Also highlighted are key translational challenges and opportunities in this rapidly growing field. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  11. Emerging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  12. Emerging memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Livio; Bez, Roberto; Sandhu, Gurtej

    2014-12-01

    Memory is a key component of any data processing system. Following the classical Turing machine approach, memories hold both the data to be processed and the rules for processing them. In the history of microelectronics, the distinction has been rather between working memory, which is exemplified by DRAM, and storage memory, exemplified by NAND. These two types of memory devices now represent 90% of all memory market and 25% of the total semiconductor market, and have been the technology drivers in the last decades. Even if radically different in characteristics, they are however based on the same storage mechanism: charge storage, and this mechanism seems to be near to reaching its physical limits. The search for new alternative memory approaches, based on more scalable mechanisms, has therefore gained new momentum. The status of incumbent memory technologies and their scaling limitations will be discussed. Emerging memory technologies will be analyzed, starting from the ones that are already present for niche applications, and which are getting new attention, thanks to recent technology breakthroughs. Maturity level, physical limitations and potential for scaling will be compared to existing memories. At the end the possible future composition of memory systems will be discussed.

  13. Typicality effects in contingency-shaped generalized equivalence classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galizio, Mark; Stewart, Katherine L; Pilgrim, Carol

    2004-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted using match-to-sample methodologies in an effort to model lexical classes, which include both arbitrary and perceptual relations between class members. Training in both experiments used a one-to-many mapping procedure with nonsense syllables as samples and eight sets of abstract stimuli as comparisons. These abstract stimuli differed along a number of dimensions, four of which were critical to the experimenter-defined class membership. Stimuli in some comparison sets included only one of the class-defining features, but stimuli in other sets included two, three, or all four of the critical features. After mastery of the baseline training, three types of probe tests were conducted: symmetry, transitivity/equivalence, and novel probe tests in which the training nonsense syllables served as samples, and comparisons were novel abstract stimuli that included one or more of the class-defining features. Symmetry and transitivity/equivalence probe tests showed that the stimuli used in training became members of equivalence classes. The novel stimuli also became class members on the basis of inclusion of any of the critical features. Thus these probe tests revealed the formation of open-ended generalized equivalence classes. In addition, typicality effects were observed such that comparison sets with more critical features were learned with fewer errors, responded to more rapidly, and judged to be better exemplars of the class. Contingency-shaped stimulus classes established through a match-to-sample procedure thus show several important behavioral similarities to natural lexical categories.

  14. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the smallest air passages of the lungs in children ( bronchiolitis ) Pneumonia or other lung infection Transient tachypnea of the newborn Anxiety and panic Other serious lung disease Home Care Rapid, shallow breathing should not be treated at home. It is ...

  15. Rapid Strep Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worse than normal. Your first thoughts turn to strep throat. A rapid strep test in your doctor’s office ... your suspicions.Viruses cause most sore throats. However, strep throat is an infection caused by the Group A ...

  16. RAPID3? Aptly named!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, J-M

    2014-01-01

    The RAPID3 score is the sum of three 0-10 patient self-report scores: pain, functional impairment on MDHAQ, and patient global estimate. It requires 5 seconds for scoring and can be used in all rheumatologic conditions, although it has mostly been used in rheumatoid arthritis where cutoffs for low disease activity (12/30) have been set. A RAPID3 score of ≤ 3/30 with 1 or 0 swollen joints (RAPID3 ≤ 3 + ≤ SJ1) provides remission criteria comparable to Boolean, SDAI, CDAI, and DAS28 remission criteria, in far less time than a formal joint count. RAPID3 performs as well as the DAS28 in separating active drugs from placebos in clinical trials. RAPID3 also predicts subsequent structural disease progression. RAPID3 can be determined at short intervals at home, allowing the determination of the area under the curve of disease activity between two visits and flare detection. However, RAPID3 should not be seen as a substitute for DAS28 and face to face visits in routine care. Monitoring patient status with only self-report information without a rheumatologist's advice (including joints and physical examination, and consideration of imaging and laboratory tests) may indeed be as undesirable for most patients than joint examination without a patient questionnaire. Conversely, combining the RAPID3 and the DAS28 may consist in faster or more sensitive confirmation that a medication is effective. Similarly, better enquiring of most important concerns of patients (pain, functional status and overall opinion on their disorder) should reinforces patients' confidence in their rheumatologist and treatments.

  17. Early class III management in deciduous dentition using reverse twin block

    OpenAIRE

    S S Sargod; N Shetty; A Shabbir

    2013-01-01

    Class III malocclusion poses a challenging dilemma for the clinician because these children have of growth patterns that differ from that of children with class I malocclusion. The mandible grows more rapidly than the maxilla, exacerbating the class III malocclusion as the child go through adolescence. Ever since Clark described a version of the twin block, it has steadily gained popularity in the management of early class III malocclusion in children. However, not many cases are reported in ...

  18. Generalized Frol\\'ik classes

    OpenAIRE

    Lipparini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The class $\\mathfrak C $ relative to countably compact topological spaces and the class $\\mathfrak P$ relative to pseudocompact spaces introduced by Z. Frol\\'ik are naturally generalized relative to every topological property. We provide a characterization of such generalized Frol\\'ik classes in the broad case of properties defined in terms of filter convergence. If a class of spaces can be defined in terms of filter convergence, then the same is true for its Frol\\'ik class.

  19. Rapid Assessment of Seismic Vulnerability in Palestinian Refugee Camps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbeek, Jalal N.; El-Kelani, Radwan J.

    Studies of historical and recorded earthquakes in Palestine demonstrate that damaging earthquakes are occurring frequently along the Dead Sea Transform: Earthquake of 11 July 1927 (ML 6.2), Earthquake of 11 February 2004 (ML 5.2). In order to reduce seismic vulnerability of buildings, losses in lives, properties and infrastructures, an attempt was made to estimate the percentage of damage degrees and losses at selected refugee camps: Al Ama`ri, Balata and Dhaishe. Assessing the vulnerability classes of building structures was carried out according to the European Macro-Seismic Scale 1998 (EMS-98) and the Fedral Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The rapid assessment results showed that very heavy structural and non structural damages will occur in the common buildings of the investigated Refugee Camps (many buildings will suffer from damages grades 4 and 5). Bad quality of buildings in terms of design and construction, lack of uniformity, absence of spaces between the building and the limited width of roads will definitely increase the seismic vulnerability under the influence of moderate-strong (M 6-7) earthquakes in the future.

  20. Oncological emergencies for the internist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An oncologic emergency is defined as any acute, potentially life-threatening event, either directly or indirectly related to a patient′s cancer (ca or its treatment. It requires rapid intervention to avoid death or severe permanent damage. Most oncologic emergencies can be classified as metabolic, hematologic, structural, or side effects from chemotherapy agents. Tumor lysis syndrome is a metabolic emergency that presents as severe electrolyte abnormalities. The condition is treated with aggressive hydration, allopurinol or urate oxidase to lower uric acid levels. Hypercalcemia of malignancy is treated with aggressive rehydration, furosemide, and intravenous (IV bisphosphonates. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone should be suspected if a patient with ca presents with normovolemic hyponatremia. This metabolic condition usually is treated with fluid restriction and furosemide. Febrile neutropenia is a hematologic emergency that usually requires inpatient therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics, although outpatient therapy may be appropriate for low-risk patients. Hyperviscosity syndrome usually is associated with Waldenstrφm′s macroglobulinemia, which is treated with plasmapheresis and chemotherapy. Structural oncologic emergencies are caused by direct compression of surrounding structures or by metastatic disease. Superior vena cava syndrome is the most common structural oncological emergency. Treatment options include chemotherapy, radiation, and IV stenting. Epidural spinal cord compression can be treated with dexamethasone, radiation, or surgery. Malignant pericardial effusion, which often is undiagnosed in ca patients, can be treated with pericardiocentesis or a pericardial window procedure.

  1. World Class Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Ole Emil; Jensen, Per Anker

    2013-01-01

    Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet.......Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet....

  2. Storytelling in EFL Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Bala

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Storytelling is one of the oldest ways of education and oral tradition that is continuously being used to transfer the previous nation‘s cultures, tradition and customs. It constructs a bridge between the new and the old. Storytelling in EFL classes usually provides a meaningful context, interesting atmosphere and is used as a tool to highly motivate students. Although it seems to be mostly based on speaking, it is used to promote other skills such as writing, reading, and listening. Storytelling is mainly regarded to be grounded on imitation and repetition; nevertheless many creative activities can be implemented in the classroom since this method directs learners to use their imaginations. This study discusses the importance of storytelling as a teaching method, and it outlines the advantages of storytelling in EFL classes.

  3. Flexible Word Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    a century, the phenomenon has not played a role in the development of linguistic typology or modern grammatical theory. The current volume aims to address this gap by offering detailed studies on flexible word classes, investigating their properties and what it means for the grammar of a language to have...... Indonesian, Santali, Sri Lanka Malay, Lushootseed, Gooniyandi, and Late Archaic Chinese. Readership: Linguists and students of linguistics and cognitive sciences, anthropologists, philosophers...

  4. China & The Cultural Identification of the Chinese Middle Class

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Benjamin Cedric

    2012-01-01

    This project is concerned with the relationship between the cultural identities of the emerging Chinese middle class and the current structures of power within the Chinese regime. By applying Antonio Gramsci’s theory of cultural hegemony, the relationship between the economic base of society being the Chinese middle class, and the superstructures being the cultural and ideological flows that orders and forms these identities, an understanding of the interrelationship between these spheres wil...

  5. World-Class Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    Future leaders' creativity and problem-solving skills have been honed in leadership courses, but that doesn't mean they are ready to use those skills to further a company's place in the world. With emerging markets in Asia, South America, and other areas of the world, a workforce needs to have an understanding of and interest in cultures beyond…

  6. Drug-induced angioedema: experience of Italian emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzoni, G; Spina, M T; Scarpellini, M G; Buccelletti, F; De Simone, M; Gregori, M; Valeriano, V; Pugliese, F R; Ruggieri, M P; Magnanti, M; Susi, B; Minetola, L; Zulli, L; D'Ambrogio, F

    2014-06-01

    Acute angioedema represents a cause of admission to the emergency department requiring rapid diagnosis and appropriate management to prevent airway obstruction. Several drugs, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and oral antidiabetics, have been reported to induce angioedema. The aim of this prospective observational study conducted in a setting of routine emergency care was to evaluate the incidence and extent of drug-induced non-histaminergic angioedema in this specific clinical setting, and to identify the class of drugs possibly associated with angioedema. Patients admitted to seven different emergency departments (EDs) in Rome with the diagnosis of angioedema and urticaria were enrolled during a 6-month period. Of the 120,000 patients admitted at the EDs, 447 (0.37 %) were coded as having angioedema and 655 (0.5 %) as having urticaria. After accurate clinical review, 62 cases were defined as drug-induced, non-histaminergic angioedema. NSAIDs were the most frequent drugs (taken by 22 out of 62 patients) associated with the angioedema attack. Of the remaining patients, 15 received antibiotic treatment and 10 antihypertensive treatment. In addition, we observed in our series some cases of angioedema associated with drugs (such as antiasthmatics, antidiarrheal and antiepileptics) of which there are few descriptions in the literature. The present data, which add much needed information to the existing limited literature on drug-induced angioedema in the clinical emergency department setting, will provide more appropriate diagnosis and management of this potentially life-threatening adverse event.

  7. Family business in Russia: the path to middle class?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhatova, N; McMylor, P; Mellor, R

    2001-06-01

    The paper seeks to explore via a series of interview-based case studies aspects of the emergence of an entrepreneurial middle-class in Russia. The paper notes the origins of those studied in the professional or highly skilled workers in the former Soviet Union. The paper reveals the complexity and fragility of the circumstances of these entrepreneurs and suggests that commentary in both Russia and the West that pins its hopes for social stability on the emergence of a new property owning middle class in Russia are, at best, premature.

  8. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design(RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.; Bloor, Malcolm I. G.; Wilson, Michael J.; Thomas, Almuttil M.

    2004-01-01

    An efficient methodology is presented for defining a class of airplane configurations. Inclusive in this definition are surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, vertical tail, horizontal tail, and canard components. The wing, tail, and canard components are manifested by solving a fourth-order partial differential equation subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design variables are incorporated into the boundary conditions, and the solution is expressed as a Fourier series. The fuselage has circular cross section, and the radius is an algebraic function of four design parameters and an independent computational variable. Volume grids are obtained through an application of the Control Point Form method. Grid sensitivity is obtained by applying the automatic differentiation precompiler ADIFOR to software for the grid generation. The computed surface grids, volume grids, and sensitivity derivatives are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation and configuration optimizations.

  9. FY98 Class Convening Schedule for Coast Guard Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-12

    This Notice publishes the FY98 class convening schedule of Coast Guard Class "A" : and "C" resident and exportable training courses defined by program/force : managers as essential or directly related to mission accomplishment for : achievement of pr...

  10. Ulipristal acetate in emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstajn, Marina Sprem; Baldani, Dinka Pavicić; Skrgatić, Lana; Radaković, Branko; Vrbić, Hrvoje; Canić, Tomislav

    2014-03-01

    Despite the widespread availability of highly effective methods of contraception, unintended pregnancy is common. Unplanned pregnancies have been linked to a range of health, social and economic consequences. Emergency contraception reduces risk of pregnancy after unprotected intercourse, and represents an opportunity to decrease number of unplanned pregnancies and abortions. Emergency contraception pills (ECP) prevent pregnancy by delaying or inhibiting ovulation, without interfering with post fertilization events. If pregnancy has already occurred, ECPs will not be effective, therefore ECPs are not abortificants. Ulipristal acetate (17alpha-acetoxy-11beta-(4N-N,N-dymethilaminophenyl)-19-norpregna--4,9-diene-3,20-dione) is the first drug that was specifically developed and licensed for use as an emergency contraceptive. It is an orally active, synthetic, selective progesterone modulator that acts by binding with high affinity to the human progesterone receptor where it has both antagonist and partial agonist effects. It is a new molecular entity and the first compound in a new pharmacological class defined by the pristal stem. Up on the superior clinical efficacy evidence, UPA has been quickly recognized as the most effective emergency contraceptive pill, and recently recommended as the first prescription choice for all women regardless of the age and timing after intercourse. This article provides literature review of UPA and its role in emergency contraception.

  11. Emergency teams in Danish emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafrenz, Thomas; Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; La Cour, Jeppe Lerche

    2012-01-01

    The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs.......The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs....

  12. Using Dynamic Classes and Role Classes to Model Object Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, Roelf J.; de Jonge, Wiebren; Spruit, Paul

    1995-01-01

    n this paper, we argue that object-oriented models must be able to represent three kinds of taxonomic structures: static classes, dynamic classes, and role classes, that behave differently with respect to object migration. If CAR is a static subclass of V EHICLE, then a vehicle that is not a car can

  13. Class impressions : Higher social class elicits lower prosociality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Doesum, Niels J.; Tybur, Joshua M.; Van Lange, Paul A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Social class predicts numerous important life outcomes and social orientations. To date, literature has mainly examined how an individual's own class shapes interactions with others. But how prosocially do people treat others they perceive as coming from lower, middle, or higher social classes?

  14. Rapid small lot manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The direct connection of information, captured in forms such as CAD databases, to the factory floor is enabling a revolution in manufacturing. Rapid response to very dynamic market conditions is becoming the norm rather than the exception. In order to provide economical rapid fabrication of small numbers of variable products, one must design with manufacturing constraints in mind. In addition, flexible manufacturing systems must be programmed automatically to reduce the time for product change over in the factory and eliminate human errors. Sensor based machine control is needed to adapt idealized, model based machine programs to uncontrolled variables such as the condition of raw materials and fabrication tolerances.

  15. Rapidly separating microneedles for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan Dan; Wang, Qi Lei; Liu, Xu Bo; Guo, Xin Dong

    2016-09-01

    The applications of polymer microneedles (MNs) into human skin emerged as an alternative of the conventional hypodermic needles. However, dissolving MNs require many minutes to be dissolved in the skin and typically have difficulty being fully inserted into the skin, which may lead to the low drug delivery efficiency. To address these issues, we introduce rapidly separating MNs that can rapidly deliver drugs into the skin in a minimally invasive way. For the rapidly separating MNs, drug loaded dissolving MNs are mounted on the top of solid MNs, which are made of biodegradable polylactic acid which eliminate the biohazardous waste. These MNs have sufficient mechanical strength to be inserted into the skin with the drug loaded tips fully embedded for subsequent dissolution. Compared with the traditional MNs, rapidly separating MNs achieve over 90% of drug delivery efficiency in 30s while the traditional MNs needs 2min to achieve the same efficiency. With the in vivo test in mice, the micro-holes caused by rapidly separating MNs can heal in 1h, indicating that the rapidly separating MNs are safe for future applications. These results indicate that the design of rapidly separating dissolvable MNs can offer a quick, high efficient, convenient, safe and potentially self-administered method of drug delivery. Polymer microneedles offer an attractive, painless and minimally invasive approach for transdermal drug delivery. However, dissolving microneedles require many minutes to be dissolved in the skin and typically have difficulty being fully inserted into the skin due to the skin deformation, which may lead to the low drug delivery efficiency. In this work we proposed rapidly separating microneedles which can deliver over 90% of drug into the skin in 30s. The in vitro and in vivo results indicate that the new design of these microneedles can offer a quick, high efficient, convenient and safe method for transdermal drug delivery. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc

  16. Rapid Column Extraction method for SoilRapid Column Extraction method for Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Sherrod, L. III; Culligan, Brian K.

    2005-11-07

    The analysis of actinides in environmental soil and sediment samples is very important for environmental monitoring as well as for emergency preparedness. A new, rapid actinide separation method has been developed and implemented that provides total dissolution of large soil samples, high chemical recoveries and effective removal of matrix interferences. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and DGA-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu) neptunium (Np), uranium (U), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. The method combines a rapid fusion step for total dissolution to dissolve refractory analytes and matrix removal using cerium fluoride precipitation to remove the difficult soil matrix. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized.

  17. Class prediction for high-dimensional class-imbalanced data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusa Lara

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of class prediction studies is to develop rules to accurately predict the class membership of new samples. The rules are derived using the values of the variables available for each subject: the main characteristic of high-dimensional data is that the number of variables greatly exceeds the number of samples. Frequently the classifiers are developed using class-imbalanced data, i.e., data sets where the number of samples in each class is not equal. Standard classification methods used on class-imbalanced data often produce classifiers that do not accurately predict the minority class; the prediction is biased towards the majority class. In this paper we investigate if the high-dimensionality poses additional challenges when dealing with class-imbalanced prediction. We evaluate the performance of six types of classifiers on class-imbalanced data, using simulated data and a publicly available data set from a breast cancer gene-expression microarray study. We also investigate the effectiveness of some strategies that are available to overcome the effect of class imbalance. Results Our results show that the evaluated classifiers are highly sensitive to class imbalance and that variable selection introduces an additional bias towards classification into the majority class. Most new samples are assigned to the majority class from the training set, unless the difference between the classes is very large. As a consequence, the class-specific predictive accuracies differ considerably. When the class imbalance is not too severe, down-sizing and asymmetric bagging embedding variable selection work well, while over-sampling does not. Variable normalization can further worsen the performance of the classifiers. Conclusions Our results show that matching the prevalence of the classes in training and test set does not guarantee good performance of classifiers and that the problems related to classification with class

  18. Class field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Artin, Emil

    2009-01-01

    This classic book, originally published in 1968, is based on notes of a year-long seminar the authors ran at Princeton University. The primary goal of the book was to give a rather complete presentation of algebraic aspects of global class field theory, and the authors accomplished this goal spectacularly: for more than 40 years since its first publication, the book has served as an ultimate source for many generations of mathematicians. In this revised edition, two mathematical additions complementing the exposition in the original text are made. The new edition also contains several new foot

  19. Reference class forecasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    Underbudgettering og budgetoverskridelser forekommer i et flertal af større bygge- og anlægsprojekter. Problemet skyldes optimisme og/eller strategisk misinformation i budgetteringsprocessen. Reference class forecasting (RCF) er en prognosemetode, som er udviklet for at reducere eller eliminere...... projekterne er almindelige nationalt eller internationalt, er det muligt at etablere en reference-klasse af tilsvarende projekter og dermed alligevel opnå et pålideligt lokalt budget. Denne projekttype er relativt almindelig. RCF kan ikke anvendes på projekter som er reelt unikke, d.v.s. projekter for hvilke...

  20. Rapid Cycling and Its Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Rapid Cycling and its Treatment What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar ... to Depression and Manic Depression . What is rapid cycling? Rapid cycling is defined as four or more ...

  1. Emerging Market Local Currency Bond Market, Too Risky to Invest?

    OpenAIRE

    Küçük, Ugur N.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade emerging market (EM) sovereign debt has become a firmly established strategic asset class. Besides Dollar-denominated debt, local currency emerging market debt has also been developing to become an attractive and complementary investment asset class. EM countries have been successful to reduce currency mismatches and maturity problems by implementing sound fiscal and monetary policies. Analyzing the period from 2002 to July 2009, we show that the local currency debt provi...

  2. Rapid manufacturing for microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . Microfluidics is at the forefront of developing solutions for drug discovery, diagnostics (from glucose tests to malaria and TB testing) and environmental diagnostics (E-coli monitoring of drinking water). In order to quickly implement new designs, a rapid...

  3. Rapid Prototyping in PVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PVSio is a conservative extension to the PVS prelude library that provides basic input/output capabilities to the PVS ground evaluator. It supports rapid prototyping in PVS by enhancing the specification language with built-in constructs for string manipulation, floating point arithmetic, and input/output operations.

  4. Rapid Prototyping Reconsidered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosier, James

    2011-01-01

    Continuing educators need additional strategies for developing new programming that can both reduce the time to market and lower the cost of development. Rapid prototyping, a time-compression technique adapted from the high technology industry, represents one such strategy that merits renewed evaluation. Although in higher education rapid…

  5. Frontiers of Performance Analysis on Leadership-Class Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, R J; Adhianto, L; de Supinski, B R; Fagan, M; Gamblin, T; Krentel, M; Mellor-Crummey, J; Schulz, M; Tallent, N

    2009-06-15

    The number of cores in high-end systems for scientific computing are employing is increasing rapidly. As a result, there is an pressing need for tools that can measure, model, and diagnose performance problems in highly-parallel runs. We describe two tools that employ complementary approaches for analysis at scale and we illustrate their use on DOE leadership-class systems.

  6. Managing large classes in developing countries | Asodike | Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reasons for large classes in developing countries are not far from the favourable government policies in the provision for free and compulsory basic education. This is in line with the global initiative for universal basic education coupled with the rapid population growth and awareness that a literate population is more ...

  7. Frontiers of performance analysis on leadership-class systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, R [Renaissance Computing Institute, UNC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Adhianto, L; Fagan, M; Krentel, M; Mellor-Crummey, J; Tallent, N [Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Supinski, B de; Gamblin, T; Schulz, M, E-mail: rjf@renci.or, E-mail: laksono@cs.rice.ed, E-mail: bronis@llnl.go, E-mail: mfagan@cs.rice.ed, E-mail: tgamblin@llnl.go, E-mail: krentel@cs.rice.ed, E-mail: johnmc@cs.rice.ed, E-mail: schulzm@llnl.go, E-mail: tallent@cs.rice.ed [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The number of cores in high-end systems for scientific computing are employingis increasing rapidly. As a result, there is an pressing need for tools that can measure, model, and diagnose performance problems in highly-parallel runs. We describe two tools that employ complementary approaches for analysis at scale and we illustrate their use on DOE leadership-class systems.

  8. Emergency teams in Danish emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafrenz, Thomas; Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; La Cour, Jeppe Lerche

    2012-01-01

    The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs....

  9. Chaotic Maps Dynamics, Fractals, and Rapid Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Goong

    2011-01-01

    This book consists of lecture notes for a semester-long introductory graduate course on dynamical systems and chaos taught by the authors at Texas A&M University and Zhongshan University, China. There are ten chapters in the main body of the book, covering an elementary theory of chaotic maps in finite-dimensional spaces. The topics include one-dimensional dynamical systems (interval maps), bifurcations, general topological, symbolic dynamical systems, fractals and a class of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems which are induced by interval maps, plus rapid fluctuations of chaotic maps as a

  10. Defeminization and social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, J

    1985-02-01

    The hypothesis that there might occur selective defeminization by social class between childhood and adulthood among homosexual men was explored. Interview data on 686 homosexual men were employed. It was found that there is a greater tendency for cross-gender propensities to persist into adulthood among respondents from blue-collar backgrounds. Effeminate respondents from such backgrounds were found to be disproportionately involved in same-sex sexual activities during adolescence. They were also sexually responsive to same-sex persons earlier. The interpretation is offered that early homosexual experiences reinforce cross-gender propensities among blue-collar respondents because of the greater gender role dichotomization found in blue-collar culture. Such reinforcement may explain the tendency for there to be greater persistence of cross-gendering among blue-collar men.

  11. Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people ... facilities. You may need care in the hospital emergency room (ER). Doctors and nurses there treat emergencies, ...

  12. Emergency Contraception Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Text Only Full media Version Get Emergency Contraception NOW INFO about Emergency Contraception Q&A about Emergency Contraception Español | Arabic Find a Morning After Pill Provider Near You This ...

  13. Propagating Class and Method Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a mixin based class and method combination mechanism with block structure propagation. Traditionally, mixins can be composed to form new classes, possibly merging the implementations of methods (as in CLOS). In our approach, a class or method combination operation may cause any...... number of implicit combinations. For example, it is possible to specify separate aspects of a family of classes, and then combine several aspects into a full-fledged class family. The combination expressions would explicitly combine whole-family aspects, and by propagation implicitly combine the aspects...... for each member of the class family, and again by propagation implicitly compose each method from its aspects. As opposed to CLOS, this is type-checked statically; and as opposed to other systems for advanced class combination/ merging/weaving, it is integrated directly in the language, ensuring a clear...

  14. 49 CFR 177.835 - Class 1 materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... metals, except that the lining is not required for truck load shipments loaded by the Departments of the... other articles or materials likely to damage such Class 1 (explosive) material or any package in which.... In such cases red electric lanterns, red emergency reflectors or red flags shall be set out in the...

  15. Rapid manufacturing facilitated customisation

    OpenAIRE

    Tuck, Christopher John; Hague, Richard; Ruffo, Massimiliano; Ransley, Michelle; Adams, Paul Russell

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes the production of body-fitting customised seat profiles utilising the following digital methods: three dimensional laser scanning, reverse engineering and Rapid Manufacturing (RM). The seat profiles have been manufactured in order to influence the comfort characteristics of an existing ejector seat manufactured by Martin Baker Aircraft Ltd. The seat, known as Navy Aircrew Common Ejection Seat (NACES), was originally designed with a generic profile. ...

  16. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development

  17. Tiber Personal Rapid Transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Carlo D'agostino

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The project “Tiber Personal Rapid Transit” have been presented by the author at the Rome City Vision Competition1 2010, an ideas competition, which challenges architects, engineers, designers, students and creatives individuals to develop visionary urban proposals with the intention of stimulating and supporting the contemporary city, in this case Rome. The Tiber PRT proposal tries to answer the competition questions with the definition of a provocative idea: a Personal Rapid transit System on the Tiber river banks. The project is located in the central section of the Tiber river and aims at the renewal of the river banks with the insertion of a Personal Rapid Transit infrastructure. The project area include the riverbank of Tiber from Rome Transtevere RFI station to Piazza del Popolo, an area where main touristic and leisure attractions are located. The intervention area is actually no used by the city users and residents and constitute itself a strong barrier in the heart of the historic city.

  18. Emerging Pathogens Initiative (EPI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Emerging Pathogens Initiative (EPI) database contains emerging pathogens information from the local Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). The EPI software...

  19. Hydromagnetic quasi-geostrophic modes in rapidly rotating planetary cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canet, E.; Finlay, Chris; Fournier, A.

    2014-01-01

    The core of a terrestrial-type planet consists of a spherical shell of rapidly rotating, electrically conducting, fluid. Such a body supports two distinct classes of quasi-geostrophic (QG) eigenmodes: fast, primarily hydrodynamic, inertial modes with period related to the rotation time scale and ...

  20. Student and faculty perceptions on the rapid scale-up of medical students in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengistu, Brittney S; Vins, Holly; Kelly, Caitrin M; McGee, Daphne R; Spicer, Jennifer O; Derbew, Miliard; Bekele, Abebe; Mariam, Damen Haile; Del Rio, Carlos; Blumberg, Henry M; Comeau, Dawn L

    2017-01-13

    Ethiopia is a country of over 94 million people that has a severe physician shortage with approximately only 2.5 physicians per 100,000 persons. Recently, the Ethiopian government implemented a "flood and retain" initiative to rapidly increase the quantity of physicians in Ethiopia. Consequently, medical student enrollment at Addis Ababa University (AAU) School of Medicine increased from 100 to approximately 300-400 students per class. This study evaluated the impact of the rapid scale-up in the number of medical students on the quality of medical education at AAU and the impact of the U.S. government-funded Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) grant awarded to AAU to provide resources to strengthen the quality of medical education at AAU. Qualitative, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 22 key informants including faculty members, administrators and medical students at AAU. The audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and interview data were analyzed with thematic analysis. Four key themes emerged from the data. Overall, participants perceived a decrease in the quality of medical education at AAU due to challenges created by the rapid scale-up in the number of medical students. Positive learning environments were described as difficult to achieve due to overcrowding in classrooms and the limited numbers of textbooks. Overall, participants stated that infrastructure improvement is needed to provide adequate medical student training. The medical education initiatives implemented and funded by MEPI have provided significant resources to support the medical student curriculum but additional resources are required to accommodate a large student body. The unprecedented rapid scale-up of medical students has impacted multiple facets of medical education at AAU. It is important to consider the perspectives of students and faculty in order to focus future medical education policies, MEPI programming and the allocation of resources.

  1. Class Action and Class Settlement in a European Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The article analyses the options for introducing common European rules on class action lawsuits with an opt-out-model in individual cases. An analysis is made of how the risks of misuse of class actions can be prevented. The article considers the Dutch rules on class settlements (the WCAM procedure......) and the advantage of integrating equivalent rules into a European rule set. The Danish rules, which have now been in effect for some years, are then considered....

  2. Adaptive Base Class Boost for Multi-class Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ping

    2008-01-01

    We develop the concept of ABC-Boost (Adaptive Base Class Boost) for multi-class classification and present ABC-MART, a concrete implementation of ABC-Boost. The original MART (Multiple Additive Regression Trees) algorithm has been very successful in large-scale applications. For binary classification, ABC-MART recovers MART. For multi-class classification, ABC-MART considerably improves MART, as evaluated on several public data sets.

  3. A resource-based view of internationalization in emerging economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hein Roelfsema; Martijn A. Boermans

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 2 in Impacts of Emerging Economies and Firms on International Business. One of the most remarkable phenomena of recent times is that a large number of firms from emerging economies have come to define and dominate new markets and enter the class of global innovation leaders. Firms that once

  4. Emergent Principles for Digital Documentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Lachman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital Documentaries are an area of rapid invention and experimentation at all levels, including creative content, production techniques, and business models.  As with many forms of digital storytelling, a focus on technologies can be distracting; platforms change rapidly, and are dependent on external commercial forces rather than creative potential.  This article presents several design strategies for driving experimentation in digital documentary above and beyond the specific of platform and technology. The core focus is on treating digital docs as experiences, with an expanded range of designable moments, as well as a strategic approach to designing interactions for their unique set of challenges.  The discussion is not intended to fully define digital documentary design factors, but rather, defines a useful subset of methods that can lead emerging practitioners to new innovations in their approach.

  5. Emerging Foodborne and Agriculture-Related Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, David H

    2016-08-01

    Viruses rapidly evolve and can emerge in unpredictable ways. Transmission pathways by which foodborne viruses may enter human populations and evolutionary mechanisms by which viruses can become virulent are discussed in this chapter. A majority of viruses emerge from zoonotic animal reservoirs, often by adapting and infecting intermediate hosts, such as domestic animals and livestock. Viruses that are known foodborne threats include hepatitis E virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus, enteroviruses, adenovirus, and astroviruses, among others. Viruses may potentially evolve and emerge as a result of modern agricultural practices which can concentrate livestock and bring them into contact with wild animals. Examples of viruses that have emerged in this manner are influenza, coronaviruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome, and the Nipah virus. The role of bats, bush meat, rodents, pigs, cattle, and poultry as reservoirs from which infectious pathogenic viruses emerge are discussed.

  6. ICT Innovation in Emerging Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Xiao; B. Califf, Christopher; Sarker, Saonee

    2013-01-01

    a third of the world’s largest 25 economies, and that they are likely to be critical for the success of a global economy, it is important to understand how these economies innovate, what factors affect innovation in such nations, and what are the impacts. However, to the best of our knowledge, little...... to future researchers, including a research model summarizing the salient issues that need examination. We believe that our study makes an important contribution to research on ICT innovation in emerging economies, and can be a useful resource for future researchers interested in this topic.......ICT innovation is known to significantly elevate a country’s growth and to enhance productivity. It is now well-acknowledged that emerging economies are beginning to innovate at a rapid rate despite some of the challenges they face. Given that these countries with such economies now comprise...

  7. The emergence of urban centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazaro, Evelyn; Agergaard, Jytte; Larsen, Marianne Nylandsted

    In this paper we aim at understanding how social and spatial transformation of dynamic rural regions is driving spatial concentration and urbanization. We are particularly concerned with the processes of spatial change, verbalized as the emergence of urban centres in rural areas. Emerging Urban...... Centres (EUCs) are characterized by rapid population growth related to continuous and diverse flows of migrants from rural hinterlands and more detached rural locations. Many of these centres are also characterized by economic dynamics related to agricultural sector activities that have been stimulated...... by Tanzanian market liberalizations and its long term effects on private enterprise. The paper is based on a study of four EUCs in Tanzania (Ilula, Igowole, Madizini and Kibaigwa) and seeks to answer three research questions: 1) What economic and spatial trends, including national policies, have formed...

  8. ON THE NATURE OF RAPIDLY ROTATING SINGLE EVOLVED STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, R. Rodrigues; Canto Martins, B. L.; De Medeiros, J. R., E-mail: renan@dfte.ufrn.br [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário, Natal RN (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the nature of the rapidly rotating, apparently single giant based on rotational and radial velocity measurements carried out by the CORAVEL spectrometers. From the analyzed sample, composed of 2010 spectroscopic, apparently single, evolved stars of luminosity classes IV, III, II, and Ib with spectral types G and K, we classified 30 stars that presented unusual, moderate to rapid rotation. This work reports, for the first time, the presence of these abnormal rotators among subgiant, bright giant, and Ib supergiant stars. To date, this class of stars was reported only among giant stars of luminosity class III. Most of these abnormal rotators present an IRAS infrared excess, which, in principle, can be related to dust around these stars.

  9. Emerging Biomarkers in Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklund, Meredith; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The field of aging and dementia is rapidly evolving with the aim of identifying individuals in the earliest stages of disease processes. Biomarkers allow the clinician to demonstrate the presence of an underlying pathologic process and resultant synapse dysfunction and neurodegeneration, even in those earliest stages. For example, PET amyloid imaging and CSF Aβ42 provide direct evidence of amyloid deposition and structural MRI, FDG-PET or SPECT and CSF tau provide indirect evidence of synapse dysfunction and neurodegeneration when the pathologic process is due to Alzheimer's disease (AD). While this review will focus on biomarkers for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to AD, structural MRI, FDG-PET or SPECT, and PET with dopamine ligands are also valuable in suggesting non-AD pathologic processes. While these biomarkers are very useful and can even be applied to diagnostic criteria in MCI, several limitations exist. As the field continues to grow, several new biomarkers are emerging and ultimately, a more biological characterization of subjects’ underlying pathophysiologic spectra will be possible. PMID:24094298

  10. Emerging therapies in Friedreich's ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranca, Tanya V; Jones, Tracy M; Shaw, Jessica D; Staffetti, Joseph S; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Fogel, Brent L; Wilmot, George R; Perlman, Susan L; Onyike, Chiadi U; Ying, Sarah H; Zesiewicz, Theresa A

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disease that typically affects teenagers and young adults. Therapeutic strategies and disease insight have expanded rapidly over recent years, leading to hope for the FRDA population. There is currently no US FDA-approved treatment for FRDA, but advances in research of its pathogenesis have led to clinical trials of potential treatments. This article reviews emerging therapies and discusses future perspectives, including the need for more precise measures for detecting changes in neurologic symptoms as well as a disease-modifying agent. PMID:26782317

  11. 14 CFR 29.803 - Emergency evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Emergency evacuation. (a) Each crew and passenger area must have means for rapid evacuation in a crash... folding seats. (e) A combination of analysis and tests may be used to show that the rotorcraft is capable...

  12. 14 CFR 25.803 - Emergency evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... evacuation. (a) Each crew and passenger area must have emergency means to allow rapid evacuation in crash... must be shown by actual demonstration using the test criteria outlined in appendix J of this part...

  13. Virtual Reality: Emerging Applications and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality is an emerging technology that has resulted in rapid expansion in the development of virtual immersive environments for use as educational simulations in schools, colleges and universities. This article presents an overview of virtual reality, describes a number of applications currently being used by special educators for…

  14. Rapidly variable relatvistic absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A.; Lohfink, A.; Buisson, D.; Alston, W.; Jiang, J.

    2017-10-01

    I will present results from the 1.5Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the most X-ray variable AGN, IRAS 13224-3809. We find a series of nine absorption lines with a velocity of 0.24c from an ultra-fast outflow. For the first time, we are able to see extremely rapid variability of the UFO features, and can link this to the X-ray variability from the inner accretion disk. We find a clear flux dependence of the outflow features, suggesting that the wind is ionized by increasing X-ray emission.

  15. Rapid prototype and test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  16. Right-Rapid-Rough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Craig

    2003-01-01

    IDEO (pronounced 'eye-dee-oh') is an international design, engineering, and innovation firm that has developed thousands of products and services for clients across a wide range of industries. Its process and culture attracted the attention of academics, businesses, and journalists around the world, and are the subject of a bestselling book, The Art of Innovation by Tom Kelley. One of the keys to IDEO's success is its use of prototyping as a tool for rapid innovation. This story covers some of IDEO's projects, and gives reasons for why they were successful.

  17. Pediatric ocular emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, H L

    1999-07-01

    There are few ocular emergencies that are unique to the pediatric patient. Most ocular emergencies are traumatic in origin, and the prognosis is often determined by the extent of the injury. Some congenital anomalies that may present as ocular emergencies are also discussed. The focus of this article is recognition and initial therapy for the more common pediatric ocular emergencies.

  18. Public Safety Transmitter Towers, Civil Service emergency siren locations within Sedgwick County. Cover is maintained interactively by GIS staff. Primary attributes include siren ID, class, range, model, description, ownership, control, address, city, and GPS verification status. Publi, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Public Safety Transmitter Towers dataset current as of 2008. Civil Service emergency siren locations within Sedgwick County. Cover is maintained interactively by GIS...

  19. Holomorphic Q classes

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The space Q p consists of all holomorphic functions f on the unit disk for which the L^2 area integrals of its derivative against the p-th power of the Green function of the unit disk are uniformly bounded in the variable that survives the integration. It turns out that Q 1 coincides with BMOA, while, for p>1, Q p are just the Bloch space. For p/in (0,1) the Q p furnish an increasing sequence of spaces, each invariant under conformal mappings of the unit disk onto itself, which interpolate between the Dirichlet space and BMOA. This monograph covers a number of important aspects in complex, functional and harmonic analysis. The primary focus is Q p, p/in (0,1), and their equivalent characterizations. Based on the up-to-date results obtained by experts in their respective fields, each of the eight chapters unfolds from the basics to the more complex. The exposition here is rapid-paced and efficient, with proofs and examples.

  20. An evaluation of rapid methods for monitoring vegetation characteristics of wetland bird habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernia, Brian G.; Lyons, James E.; Loges, Brian W.; Wilson, Andrew; Collazo, Jaime A.; Runge, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Wetland managers benefit from monitoring data of sufficient precision and accuracy to assess wildlife habitat conditions and to evaluate and learn from past management decisions. For large-scale monitoring programs focused on waterbirds (waterfowl, wading birds, secretive marsh birds, and shorebirds), precision and accuracy of habitat measurements must be balanced with fiscal and logistic constraints. We evaluated a set of protocols for rapid, visual estimates of key waterbird habitat characteristics made from the wetland perimeter against estimates from (1) plots sampled within wetlands, and (2) cover maps made from aerial photographs. Estimated percent cover of annuals and perennials using a perimeter-based protocol fell within 10 percent of plot-based estimates, and percent cover estimates for seven vegetation height classes were within 20 % of plot-based estimates. Perimeter-based estimates of total emergent vegetation cover did not differ significantly from cover map estimates. Post-hoc analyses revealed evidence for observer effects in estimates of annual and perennial covers and vegetation height. Median time required to complete perimeter-based methods was less than 7 percent of the time needed for intensive plot-based methods. Our results show that rapid, perimeter-based assessments, which increase sample size and efficiency, provide vegetation estimates comparable to more intensive methods.

  1. ClassPrep: A Peer Review System for Class Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jooyong

    2017-01-01

    Class preparation is recommended by instructors in most college courses, but checking whether a student does so is not easy. A new blended learning system, named ClassPrep, has been proposed and implemented. The usability of the system was examined for two undergraduate psychology courses: one advanced course (n = 11) and one introductory course…

  2. The Class of London 2012: Some Sociological Reflections on the Social Backgrounds of Team GB Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Andy Smith; David Haycock; Nicola Hulme

    2013-01-01

    This rapid response article briefly examines one feature of the relationship between social class and elite sport: the social backgrounds of the Olympians who comprised Team GB (Great Britain) at the 2012 London Olympics Games, and especially their educational backgrounds, as a means of shedding sociological light on the relationship between elite sport and social class. It is claimed that, to a large degree, the class-related patterns evident in the social profiles of medal-winners are expre...

  3. Rapid parapatric speciation on holey adaptive landscapes

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilets, S; Vose, M D; Gavrilets, Sergey; Li, Hai; Vose, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    A classical view of speciation is that reproductive isolation arises as a by-product of genetic divergence. Here, individual-based simulations are used to evaluate whether the mechanisms implied by this view may result in rapid speciation if the only source of genetic divergence are mutation and random genetic drift. Distinctive features of the simulations are the consideration of the complete process of speciation (from initiation until completion), and of a large number of loci, which was only one order of magnitude smaller than that of bacteria. It is demonstrated that rapid speciation on the time scale of hundreds of generations is plausible without the need for extreme founder events, complete geographic isolation, the existence of distinct adaptive peaks or selection for local adaptation. The plausibility of speciation is enhanced by population subdivision. Simultaneous emergence of more than two new species from a subdivided population is highly probable. Numerical examples relevant to the theory of ce...

  4. Rapid prototyping: An innovative technique in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeba Quadri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of advanced digital technology has opened up new perspectives for design and production in the field of dentistry. Rapid prototyping (RP is a technique to quickly and automatically construct a three-dimensional (3D model of a part or product using 3D printers or stereolithography machines. RP has various dental applications, such as fabrication of implant surgical guides, zirconia prosthesis and molds for metal castings, maxillofacial prosthesis and frameworks for fixed and removable partial dentures, wax patterns for the dental prosthesis and complete denture. Rapid prototyping presents fascinating opportunities, but the process is difficult as it demands a high level of artistic skill, which means that the dental technicians should be able to work with the models obtained after impression to form a mirror image and achieve good esthetics. This review aims to focus on various RP methods and its application in dentistry.

  5. Rapid mineralocorticoid receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekle, M; Bretschneider, M; Meinel, S; Ruhs, S; Grossmann, C

    2014-03-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that physiologically regulates water-electrolyte homeostasis and controls blood pressure. The MR can also elicit inflammatory and remodeling processes in the cardiovascular system and the kidneys, which require the presence of additional pathological factors like for example nitrosative stress. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for pathophysiological MR effects remain(s) elusive. The inactive MR is located in the cytosol associated with chaperone molecules including HSP90. After ligand binding, the MR monomer rapidly translocates into the nucleus while still being associated to HSP90 and after dissociation from HSP90 binds to hormone-response-elements called glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) as a dimer. There are indications that rapid MR trafficking is modulated in the presence of high salt, oxidative or nitrosative stress, hypothetically by induction or posttranslational modifications. Additionally, glucocorticoids and the enzyme 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase may also influence MR activation. Because MR trafficking and its modulation by micro-milieu factors influence MR cellular localization, it is not only relevant for genomic but also for nongenomic MR effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intranasal medications in pediatric emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pizzo, Jeannine; Callahan, James M

    2014-07-01

    Intranasal medication administration in the emergency care of children has been reported for at least 20 years and is gaining popularity because of ease of administration, rapid onset of action, and relatively little pain to the patient. The ability to avoid a needle stick is often attractive to practitioners, in addition to children and their parents. In time-critical situations for which emergent administration of medication is needed, the intranasal route may be associated with more rapid medication administration. This article reviews the use of intranasal medications in the emergency care of children. Particular attention will be paid to anatomy and its impact on drug delivery, pharmacodynamics, medications currently administered by this route, delivery devices available, tips for use, and future directions.

  7. Subaltern Classes, Class Struggles and Hegemony : a Gramscian Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Simionatto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article sought to revive the concept of subaltern classes and their relation with other categories, particularly the State, civil society and hegemony in the thinking of Antonio Gramsci, as a support for contemporary class struggles. It also analyzes the relations between subaltern classes, common sense and ideology, as well as the forms of “overcoming” conceptualized by Gramsci, through the culture and philosophy of praxis. The paper revives the discussion of the subaltern classes, based on the original Gramscian formulation in the realm of Marxism, through the dialectic interaction between structure and superstructure, economy and politics. In addition to the conceptual revival, it indicates some elements that can support the discussion of the forms of subalternity found in contemporary reality and the possibilities for strengthening the struggles of these class layers, above all in moments of strong demobilization of popular participation.

  8. Type Families with Class, Type Classes with Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serrano, Alejandro; Hage, Jurriaan; Bahr, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Type classes and type families are key ingredients in Haskell programming. Type classes were introduced to deal with ad-hoc polymorphism, although with the introduction of functional dependencies, their use expanded to type-level programming. Type families also allow encoding type-level functions......, now as rewrite rules. This paper looks at the interplay of type classes and type families, and how to deal with shortcomings in both of them. Furthermore, we show how to use families to simulate classes at the type level. However, type families alone are not enough for simulating a central feature...... of type classes: elaboration, that is, generating code from the derivation of a rewriting. We look at ways to solve this problem in current Haskell, and propose an extension to allow elaboration during the rewriting phase....

  9. The Zipf Law revisited: An evolutionary model of emerging classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitin, L.B. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Schapiro, B. [TINA, Brandenburg (Germany); Perlovsky, L. [NRC, Wakefield, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Zipf`s Law is a remarkable rank-frequency relationship observed in linguistics (the frequencies of the use of words are approximately inversely proportional to their ranks in the decreasing frequency order) as well as in the behavior of many complex systems of surprisingly different nature. We suggest an evolutionary model of emerging classification of objects into classes corresponding to concepts and denoted by words. The evolution of the system is derived from two basic assumptions: first, the probability to recognize an object as belonging to a known class is proportional to the number of objects in this class already recognized, and, second, there exists a small probability to observe an object that requires creation of a new class ({open_quotes}mutation{close_quotes} that gives birth to a new {open_quotes}species{close_quotes}). It is shown that the populations of classes in such a system obey the Zipf Law provided that the rate of emergence of new classes is small. The model leads also to the emergence of a second-tier structure of {open_quotes}super-classes{close_quotes} - groups of classes with almost equal populations.

  10. An Unusual Case of Rapidly Progressive Hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Thornton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an unusual case of hyperbilirubinemia with rapid early progression leading to bilirubin encephalopathy in a term neonate. Despite early recognition and intervention, the total serum bilirubin reached a maximum level of 39 mg/dL at 32 hours of life. Prior to an emergent exchange transfusion, the patient’s diagnostic evaluation was significant for Coombs-negative microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Further testing revealed a deficiency of ADAMTS13 protein, or von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease, a finding diagnostic of congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, or Upshaw-Schulman syndrome. This rare disease is often misdiagnosed, especially in the newborn period.

  11. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Saccucci Matteo; D’Attilio Michele; Rodolfino Daria; Festa Felice; Polimeni Antonella; Tecco Simona

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). ...

  12. Patterns of intergenerational mobility of the old and new middle classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güveli, Ayse; Luijkx, Ruud; Ganzeboom, Harry B.G.

    2013-01-01

    It has often been proposed that new cleavages have emerged within the middle class. In this paper, we examine the distinction between social and cultural specialists and technocrats, and investigate whether these new and old middle class fractions are differentiated by their patterns of

  13. Coronaviruses: emerging and re-emerging pathogens in humans and animals

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Chan, Jasper F. W.

    2015-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) epidemics have proven the ability of coronaviruses to cross species barrier and emerge rapidly in humans. Other coronaviruses such as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) are also known to cause major disease epidemics in animals wiith huge economic loss. This special issue in Virology Journal aims to highlight the advances and key discoveries in the anim...

  14. HLA class Ib in pregnancy and pregnancy-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Gry; Melsted, Wenna Nascimento; Nilsson, Line Lynge; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2017-08-01

    The HLA class Ib genes, HLA-E, HLA-F, and HLA-G, were discovered long after the classical HLA class Ia genes. The elucidation of their functions had a modest beginning. However, their basic functions and involvement in pathophysiology and a range of diseases are now emerging. Although results from a range of studies support the functional roles for the HLA class Ib molecules in adult life, especially HLA-G and HLA-F have most intensively been, and were also primarily, studied in relation to reproduction and pregnancy. The expression of HLA class Ib proteins at the feto-maternal interface in the placenta seems to be important for the maternal acceptance of the semi-allogenic fetus. In contrast to the functions of HLA class Ia, HLA-G possesses immune-modulatory and tolerogenic functions. Here, we review an accumulating amount of data describing the functions of HLA class Ib molecules in relation to fertility, reproduction, and pregnancy, and a possible role for these molecules in certain pregnancy complications, such as implantation failure, recurrent spontaneous abortions, and pre-eclampsia. The results from different kinds of studies point toward a role for HLA class Ib, especially HLA-G, throughout the reproductive cycle from conception to the birth weight of the child.

  15. Rapid Refresh (RAP) [13 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Rapid Refresh (RAP) numerical weather model took the place of the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) on May 1, 2012. Run by the National Centers for Environmental...

  16. Rapid Refresh (RAP) [20 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Rapid Refresh (RAP) numerical weather model took the place of the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) on May 1, 2012. Run by the National Centers for Environmental...

  17. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might...

  18. Supervised Object Class Colour Normalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riabchenko, Ekatarina; Lankinen, Jukka; Buch, Anders Glent

    2013-01-01

    . In this work, we develop a such colour normalisation technique, where true colours are not important per se but where examples of same classes have photometrically consistent appearance. This is achieved by supervised estimation of a class specic canonical colour space where the examples have minimal variation...

  19. On uniqueness of characteristic classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda

    2011-01-01

    We give an axiomatic characterization of maps from algebraic K-theory. The results apply to a large class of maps from algebraic K-theory to any suitable cohomology theory or to algebraic K-theory. In particular, we obtain comparison theorems for the Chern character and Chern classes and for the ...

  20. Translanguaging in a Reading Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Viniti; Subhan, Aidil

    2015-01-01

    Using translanguaging as a theoretical foundation, this paper analyses findings from a Grade 2 reading class for low achieving students, where Malay was used as a scaffold to teach English. Data come from one class in one school in Singapore and its Learning Support Programme (LSP), which is part of a larger research project on biliteracy. The LSP…

  1. Bringing the Brain to Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Carmany

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses strategies for encouraging the gifted child's brain to make the most of learning opportunities. Strategies include offering programming enrichment classes, accelerated classes, and teachers trained in differentiating instruction. The importance of providing enrichment, challenges, and feedback are stressed and the game…

  2. Rapid chemical separations

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, N

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the progress of fast chemical separation procedures during the last few years. Fast, discontinuous separation techniques are illustrated by a procedure for niobium. The use of such techniques for the chemical characterization of the heaviest known elements is described. Other rapid separation methods from aqueous solutions are summarized. The application of the high speed liquid chromatography to the separation of chemically similar elements is outlined. The use of the gas jet recoil transport method for nuclear reaction products and its combination with a continuous solvent extraction technique and with a thermochromatographic separation is presented. Different separation methods in the gas phase are briefly discussed and the attachment of a thermochromatographic technique to an on-line mass separator is shown. (45 refs).

  3. [On hospital emergency department crowding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudela, Pere; Mòdol, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a range of measures deployed to curb crowding in hospital emergency departments, but as episodes of overcrowding continue to occur the discussion of causes and possible solutions remains open. The problem is universal, and efforts to revamp health care systems as a result of current socioeconomic circumstances have put emergency services in the spotlight. Consensus was recently achieved on criteria that define emergency department overcrowding. The causes are diverse and include both external factors and internal ones, in the form of attributes specific to a department. The factors that have the most impact, however, involve hospital organization, mainly the availability of beds and the difficulty of assigning them to emergency patients requiring admission. Crowding is associated with decreases in most health care quality indicators, as departments see increases in the number of patients waiting, the time until initial processing, and the time until a physician or nurse intervenes. Crowding is also associated with risk for more unsatisfactory clinical outcomes. This situation leads to dissatisfaction all around-of patients, families, and staff-as aspects such as dignity, comfort, and privacy deteriorate. Proposals to remedy the problem include assuring that the staff and structural resources of a facility meet minimum standards and are all working properly, facilitating access to complementary tests, and providing observation areas and short-stay units. The response of hospitals to the situation in emergency departments should include alternatives to conventional admission, through means for rapid diagnosis, day hospitals, and home hospitalization as well as by offering a clear response in cases where admission is needed, granting easier access to beds that are in fact available. For its part, the health system overall, should improve the care of patients with chronic diseases, so that fewer admissions are required. It is also essential to

  4. Ecohealth Emerging Infectious Diseases Research Initiative (EcoEID)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    New infectious diseases, mostly of animal origin, are emerging more rapidly than ever. Southeast Asia is the current hotspot of disease emergence due to high population and animal densities, on the one hand, and relatively limited (human and animal) healthcare delivery capacity, on the other. This project aims to ...

  5. Using "Clicker 5" to Enhance Emergent Literacy in Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parette, Howard P.; Hourcade, Jack J.; Dinelli, Jenny M.; Boeckmann, Nichole M.

    2009-01-01

    Best practices in emergent literacy instruction for young children acknowledge and facilitate the smooth progression between children's early engagement with print materials and subsequent fuller literacy mastery. In so doing, model programs target five key emergent literacy skills. The rapid rise in the breadth and depth of educational…

  6. The genomic landscape of rapid repeated evolutionary ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic killifish populations have rapidly adapted to normally lethal levels of pollution in four urban estuaries. Through analysis of 384 whole killifish genome sequences and comparative transcriptomics in four pairs of sensitive and tolerant populations, we identify the aryl hydrocarbon receptor–based signaling pathway as a shared target of selection. This suggests evolutionary constraint on adaptive solutions to complex toxicant mixtures at each site. However, distinct molecular variants apparently contribute to adaptive pathway modification among tolerant populations. Selection also targets other toxicity-mediatinggenes and genes of connected signaling pathways; this indicates complex tolerance phenotypes and potentially compensatory adaptations. Molecular changes are consistent with selection on standing genetic variation. In killifish, high nucleotide diversityhas likely been a crucial substrate for selective sweeps to propel rapid adaptation. This manuscript describes genomic evaluations that contribute to our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary risks associated with chronic contaminant exposures to wildlife populations. Here, we assessed genetic patterns associated with long-term response to an important class of highly toxic environmental pollutants. Specifically, chemical-specific tolerance has rapidly and repeatedly evolved in an estuarine fish species resident to estuaries of the Atlantic U.S. coast. We used laboratory studies to ch

  7. Performance of the efferent limb of a rapid response system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emilie M; Petersen, Asger

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the distribution of outcomes following a medical emergency team (MET) call using a modified version of the multidisciplinary audit and evaluation of outcomes of rapid response (MAELOR) tool, and to evaluate its usefulness in monitoring the performance of the efferent limb...

  8. Building a rapid response team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Lisa; Garolis, Salomeja; Wallace-Scroggs, Allyson; Stenstrom, Judy; Maunder, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The use of rapid response teams is a relatively new approach for decreasing or eliminating codes in acute care hospitals. Based on the principles of a code team for cardiac and/or respiratory arrest in non-critical care units, the rapid response teams have specially trained nursing, respiratory, and medical personnel to respond to calls from general care units to assess and manage decompensating or rapidly changing patients before their conditions escalate to a full code situation. This article describes the processes used to develop a rapid response team, clinical indicators for triggering a rapid response team call, topics addressed in an educational program for the rapid response team members, and methods for evaluating effectiveness of the rapid response team.

  9. OEM Emergency Preparedness Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Emergency Management compiles a wide variety of information in support of Emergency Preparedness, including certain elements of the System for Risk...

  10. Emergency airway puncture - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100113.htm Emergency airway puncture - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 2016 Updated by: Jacob L. Heller, MD, MHA, Emergency Medicine, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also ...

  11. Costs of Emergency Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    American College of Emergency Physicians | News Room - Fact Sheets Newsroom Site Navigation News Releases Get News Alerts by Email All RSS Feeds ACEP ... Contact Us Site Body Main Content Annals of Emergency Medicine | EMAF Website | ACEP Policy Statements | ACEP Now | ...

  12. Emergency airway puncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003017.htm Emergency airway puncture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow ...

  13. Historicism and Industry Emergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsch, David; Moeen, Mahka; Wadhwani, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Management and organization scholars have increasingly turned to historical sources to examine the emergence and evolution of industries over time. This scholarship has typically used historical evidence as observations for testing theoretically relevant processes of industry emergence. In this c...

  14. Dog Bite Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Dog bite emergencies What do I do if I’ ... vaccination records. What do I do if my dog bites someone? Dog bites are scary for everyone ...

  15. Covering #SAE: A Mobile Reporting Class's Changing Patterns of Interaction on Twitter over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the social network that emerged on Twitter surrounding a mobile reporting class as they covered a national breaking news event. The work introduces pedagogical strategies that enhance students' learning opportunities. Through NodeXL and social network cluster analysis, six groups emerged from the Twitter interactions tied to…

  16. Emerging and reemerging of filoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, H; Slenczka, W; Klenk, H D

    1996-01-01

    Filoviruses are causative agents of a hemorrhagic fever in man with mortalities ranging from 22 to 88%. They are enveloped, nonsegmented negative-stranded RNA viruses and are separated into two types, Marburg and Ebola, which can be serologically, biochemically and genetically distinguished. In general, there is little genetic variability among viruses belonging to the Marburg type. The Ebola type, however, is subdivided into at least three distinct subtypes. Marburg virus was first isolated during an outbreak in Europe in 1967. Ebola virus emerged in 1976 as the causative agent of two simultaneous outbreaks in southern Sudan and northern Zaire. The reemergence of Ebola, subtype Zaire, in Kikwit 1995 caused a worldwide sensation, since it struck after a sensibilization on the danger of Ebola virus disease. Person-to-person transmission by intimate contact is the main route of infection, but transmission by droplets and small aerosols among infected individuals is discussed. The natural reservoir for filoviruses remains a mystery. Filoviruses are prime examples for emerging pathogens. Factors that may be involved in emergence are international commerce and travel, limited experience in diagnosis and case management, import of nonhuman primates, and the potential of filoviruses for rapid evolution.

  17. Novel classes of antibiotics or more of the same?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Anthony RM; Halls, Gerry; Hu, Yanmin

    2011-01-01

    The world is running out of antibiotics. Between 1940 and 1962, more than 20 new classes of antibiotics were marketed. Since then, only two new classes have reached the market. Analogue development kept pace with the emergence of resistant bacteria until 10–20 years ago. Now, not enough analogues are reaching the market to stem the tide of antibiotic resistance, particularly among gram-negative bacteria. This review examines the existing systemic antibiotic pipeline in the public domain, and reveals that 27 compounds are in clinical development, of which two are new classes, both of which are in Phase I clinical trials. In view of the high attrition rate of drugs in early clinical development, particularly new classes and the current regulatory hurdles, it does not seem likely that new classes will be marketed soon. This paper suggests that, if the world is to return to a situation in which there are enough antibiotics to cope with the inevitable ongoing emergence of bacterial resistance, we need to recreate the prolific antibiotic discovery period between 1940 and 1962, which produced 20 classes that served the world well for 60 years. If another 20 classes and their analogues, particularly targeting gram-negatives could be produced soon, they might last us for the next 60 years. How can this be achieved? Only a huge effort by governments in the form of finance, legislation and providing industry with real incentives will reverse this. Industry needs to re-enter the market on a much larger scale, and academia should rebuild its antibiotic discovery infrastructure to support this effort. The alternative is Medicine without effective antibiotics. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Respiratory Pharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-1 PMID:21323894

  18. Problems of rapid growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T D

    1980-01-01

    South Korea's export-oriented development strategy has achieved a remarkable growth record, but it has also brought 2 different problems: 1) since the country's exports accounted for about 1% of total world export volume, the 1st world has become fearful about Korea's aggressive export drive; and 2) the fact that exports account for over 30% of its total gross national product (GNP) exposes the vulnerability of South Korea's economy itself. South Korea continues to be a poor nation, although it is rated as 1 of the most rapidly growing middle income economies. A World Bank 1978 report shows Korea to be 28th of 58 middle income countries in terms of per capita GNP in 1976. Of 11 newly industrializing countries (NIC), 5 in the European continent are more advanced than the others. A recent emphasis on the basic human needs approach has tended to downgrade the concept of GNP. Korea has only an abundant labor force and is without any natural resources. Consequently, Korea utilized an export-oriented development strategy. Oil requirements are met with imports, and almost all raw materials to be processed into exportable products must be imported. To pay import bills Korea must export and earn foreign exchange. It must be emphasized that foreign trade must always be 2-way traffic. In order to export more to middle income countries like Korea, the countries of the 1st world need to ease their protectionist measures against imports from developing countries.

  19. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Matthew W (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal direction, or in a transverse direction, in the tip region, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip region, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip region. Each of the measured changes in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference electrical change signals, with each reference signal corresponding to an identified polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component with a reference polymer component. The nanopore preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  20. Rapidly rotating red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehan, Charlotte; Mosser, Benoît; Michel, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Stellar oscillations give seismic information on the internal properties of stars. Red giants are targets of interest since they present mixed modes, wich behave as pressure modes in the convective envelope and as gravity modes in the radiative core. Mixed modes thus directly probe red giant cores, and allow in particular the study of their mean core rotation. The high-quality data obtained by CoRoT and Kepler satellites represent an unprecedented perspective to obtain thousands of measurements of red giant core rotation, in order to improve our understanding of stellar physics in deep stellar interiors. We developed an automated method to obtain such core rotation measurements and validated it for stars on the red giant branch. In this work, we particularly focus on the specific application of this method to red giants having a rapid core rotation. They show complex spectra where it is tricky to disentangle rotational splittings from mixed-mode period spacings. We demonstrate that the method based on the identification of mode crossings is precise and efficient. The determination of the mean core rotation directly derives from the precise measurement of the asymptotic period spacing ΔΠ1 and of the frequency at which the crossing of the rotational components is observed.

  1. GENERIC PROPERTIES OF HOMOCLINIC CLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    CARLOS MARIA CARBALLO

    2001-01-01

    Uma classe homoclínica de um campo vetorial é o fecho do conjunto de pontos homoclínicos transversais associados a uma órbita periódica hiperbólica. Provamos as propriedades seguintes. 1. As classes homoclínicas de campos vetoriais C¹ genéricos em variedades de dimensão n são conjuntos transitivos maximais, saturados, e isolados se e somente se omega-isolados. 2. Os campos vetorias C¹ genéricos não têm ciclos formados por classes homoclínicas. 3. A...

  2. Modelling weed emergence patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleeshouwers, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    Anticipating weed pressure may be important in selecting and timing weed control measures in order to optimize their effectiveness, and thus reduce herbicide use. Therefore, a predictive model of the time of emergence and the numbers of seedling emerging (the weed emergence pattern) after

  3. Emerging technology and ethics

    CERN Document Server

    Wakunuma, Kutoma

    2011-01-01

    This e-book on Emerging Technologies and Ethics includes a collection of essays which explore the future and ethics of emerging information and communication technologies. Articles in the collection include an overview of the legal implications which may be relevant to the ethical aspects of emerging technologies and also ethical issues arising from the mass-take up of mobile technologies.

  4. Emerging applications of label-free optical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Giuliano; Lanfranco, Roberta; Giavazzi, Fabio; Bellini, Tommaso; Buscaglia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Innovative technical solutions to realize optical biosensors with improved performance are continuously proposed. Progress in material fabrication enables developing novel substrates with enhanced optical responses. At the same time, the increased spectrum of available biomolecular tools, ranging from highly specific receptors to engineered bioconjugated polymers, facilitates the preparation of sensing surfaces with controlled functionality. What remains often unclear is to which extent this continuous innovation provides effective breakthroughs for specific applications. In this review, we address this challenging question for the class of label-free optical biosensors, which can provide a direct signal upon molecular binding without using secondary probes. Label-free biosensors have become a consolidated approach for the characterization and screening of molecular interactions in research laboratories. However, in the last decade, several examples of other applications with high potential impact have been proposed. We review the recent advances in label-free optical biosensing technology by focusing on the potential competitive advantage provided in selected emerging applications, grouped on the basis of the target type. In particular, direct and real-time detection allows the development of simpler, compact, and rapid analytical methods for different kinds of targets, from proteins to DNA and viruses. The lack of secondary interactions facilitates the binding of small-molecule targets and minimizes the perturbation in single-molecule detection. Moreover, the intrinsic versatility of label-free sensing makes it an ideal platform to be integrated with biomolecular machinery with innovative functionality, as in case of the molecular tools provided by DNA nanotechnology.

  5. Class advantages and disadvantages are not so Black and White: intersectionality impacts rank and selves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Tiffany N; Higginbotham, Gerald D; Henderson, Kyshia

    2017-12-01

    At the intersection of race and class the consequences of being working-class or middle-class are not so Black and White. Rather, established and emerging research suggests that race/ethnicity and social class intersect to differentially afford benefits and burdens. For instance, racial/ethnic minorities often do not reap the social, psychological or economic benefits of higher social class; yet, in some key life domains (e.g. health and mortality) racial/ethnic minorities in the U.S. seem to be buffered from some burdens of lower social class. We integrate empirical evidence to suggest that such differential advantages and disadvantages along racial lines reflect that social class exists alongside, rather than separate from, race/ethnicity as two distinct yet intersecting sources of rank and in turn selves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interclass Relations and the Class Struggle in a Russian Village in 1930–1980s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Beznin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the relationship between the new agricultural classes emerged during the state capitalist transformation of the countryside 1930-1980s.: protobourgeoisie, managers, intellectuals, labor aristocracy, agricultural proletariat. The authors denote a radical change in the type of social relations during that period. Reference is also made to the origins of formation of cross-class relations: the number and the origin of each class, their economic stability, political role, mentality, their ability for 0class and cross-class solidarity. Separately, the author examines the place and importance of social protest and class struggle as a critical point of interclass relations. The essence of evolution of the social protest movement lied in the transitions from forms attributed to peasant society to manifestations of class struggle, typical for labor community.

  7. Mappings on Fuzzy Soft Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athar Kharal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We define the concept of a mapping on classes of fuzzy soft sets and study the properties of fuzzy soft images and fuzzy soft inverse images of fuzzy soft sets, and support them with examples and counterexamples.

  8. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saccucci Matteo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients, skeletal class II (70 patients and skeletal class III (65 patients. Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma. TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI. Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p 3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p 2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p  Conclusion Skeletal class appeared to be associated to the mandibular condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population.

  9. [Routine application of HLA class II oligotyping. Value of automatization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillat-Zucman, S; Bach, J F

    1992-12-02

    HLA class II typing by DNA amplification and hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotides has led to an improvement of the overall typing accuracy. In an attempt to apply this procedure to a large-scale analysis, we sought to implement an automation system using the Biomek 1,000 robotic work-station. This system allows a rapid preparation of many consecutive samples and avoids the risk of human errors. It is now routinely used in several laboratories.

  10. Rapid mixing kinetic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen R; Schilstra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Almost all of the elementary steps in a biochemical reaction scheme are either unimolecular or bimolecular processes that frequently occur on sub-second, often sub-millisecond, time scales. The traditional approach in kinetic studies is to mix two or more reagents and monitor the changes in concentrations with time. Conventional spectrophotometers cannot generally be used to study reactions that are complete within less than about 20 s, as it takes that amount of time to manually mix the reagents and activate the instrument. Rapid mixing techniques, which generally achieve mixing in less than 2 ms, overcome this limitation. This chapter is concerned with the use of these techniques in the study of reactions which reach equilibrium; the application of these methods to the study of enzyme kinetics is described in several excellent texts (Cornish-Bowden, Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics. Portland Press, 1995; Gutfreund, Kinetics for the life sciences. Receptors, transmitters and catalysis. Cambridge University Press, 1995).There are various ways to monitor changes in concentration of reactants, intermediates and products after mixing, but the most common way is to use changes in optical signals (absorbance or fluorescence) which often accompany reactions. Although absorbance can sometimes be used, fluorescence is often preferred because of its greater sensitivity, particularly in monitoring conformational changes. Such methods are continuous with good time resolution but they seldom permit the direct determination of the concentrations of individual species. Alternatively, samples may be taken from the reaction volume, mixed with a chemical quenching agent to stop the reaction, and their contents assessed by techniques such as HPLC. These methods can directly determine the concentrations of different species, but are discontinuous and have a limited time resolution.

  11. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccucci, Matteo; D'Attilio, Michele; Rodolfino, Daria; Festa, Felice; Polimeni, Antonella; Tecco, Simona

    2012-12-14

    Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. 200 Caucasian patients (15-30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI). Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI) were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p condylar volume was observed in class II subjects, respect to class I and class III (p condylar volume (699.8 ± 63.07 mm3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p condylar surface (423.24 ± 63.03 mm2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population.

  12. Actions of mapping class groups

    OpenAIRE

    PAPADOPOULOS, ATHANASE

    2014-01-01

    This paper has three parts. The first part is a general introduction to rigidity and to rigid actions of mapping class group actions on various spaces. In the second part, we describe in detail four rigidity results that concern actions of mapping class groups on spaces of foliations and of laminations, namely, Thurston's sphere of projective foliations equipped with its projective piecewise-linear structure, the space of unmeasured foliations equipped with the quotient topology, the reduced ...

  13. Less than a Class Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kristin Redington

    2012-01-01

    The iPad holds amazing potential for classroom use. Just a few--or even only one--is enough to get results. Having a class set promotes traditional, whole-class instruction, but fewer iPads facilitate individualized and tailored instruction. In this article, the author discusses the potential of the iPad and suggests ways to put the iPad to use in…

  14. Early treatment of Class III malocclusion by RME and modified Tandem appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhi Ansar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a skeletal Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency can be treated successfully using a combined protraction facemask and alternate rapid maxillary expansions and contractions (Alt-RAMEC. However, due to poor patient compliance during facemask therapy there has been growing interest in intraoral appliances for correcting Class III malocclusion. The tandem traction bow appliance (TTBA is an intraoral appliance which has been used successfully for the treatment of growing Class III patients. This case report describes the management of a 10-year-old boy with a Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency treated with modified TTBA appliance.

  15. Early treatment of Class III malocclusion by RME and modified Tandem appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansar, Juhi; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Patients with a skeletal Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency can be treated successfully using a combined protraction facemask and alternate rapid maxillary expansions and contractions (Alt-RAMEC). However, due to poor patient compliance during facemask therapy there has been growing interest in intraoral appliances for correcting Class III malocclusion. The tandem traction bow appliance (TTBA) is an intraoral appliance which has been used successfully for the treatment of growing Class III patients. This case report describes the management of a 10-year-old boy with a Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency treated with modified TTBA appliance.

  16. Color on emergency mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lili; Qi, Qingwen; Zhang, An

    2007-06-01

    There are so many emergency issues in our daily life. Such as typhoons, tsunamis, earthquake, fires, floods, epidemics, etc. These emergencies made people lose their lives and their belongings. Every day, every hour, even every minute people probably face the emergency, so how to handle it and how to decrease its hurt are the matters people care most. If we can map it exactly before or after the emergencies; it will be helpful to the emergency researchers and people who live in the emergency place. So , through the emergency map, before emergency is occurring we can predict the situation, such as when and where the emergency will be happen; where people can refuge, etc. After disaster, we can also easily assess the lost, discuss the cause and make the lost less. The primary effect of mapping is offering information to the people who care about the emergency and the researcher who want to study it. Mapping allows the viewers to get a spatial sense of hazard. It can also provide the clues to study the relationship of the phenomenon in emergency. Color, as the basic element of the map, it can simplify and clarify the phenomenon. Color can also affects the general perceptibility of the map, and elicits subjective reactions to the map. It is to say, structure, readability, and the reader's psychological reactions can be affected by the use of color.

  17. Train operation in emergencies

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Limin; Qin, Yong

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the latest findings on train operation theories and methods in the context of emergencies. It examines and assesses a range of aspects—including the definition of a railway emergency, transport organization modes in emergencies, calculating railway transport capacity in emergencies, line planning in emergencies, train re-pathing in emergencies and train re-scheduling in emergencies—that are urgently needed in the railway transportation field, which faces the serious challenge of dealing with emergencies worldwide. The book highlights the latest research results in an integrated and systematic way, and the methodology presented is oriented on real-world problems, allowing it to be used not only directly in railway operational management, but also as the point of departure for further applications or theoretical research. As such, the book will be of considerable interest to graduate students and researchers in the field of traffic and transportation engineering.>.

  18. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program rapid accident assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chester, C.V.

    1990-08-01

    This report develops a scheme for the rapid assessment of a release of toxic chemicals resulting from an accident in one of the most chemical weapon demilitarization plants or storage areas. The system uses such inputs as chemical and pressure sensors monitoring the plant and reports of accidents radioed to the Emergency Operations Center by work parties or monitoring personnel. A size of release can be estimated from previous calculations done in the risk analysis, from back calculation from an open-air chemical sensor measurement, or from an estimated percentage of the inventory of agent at the location of the release. Potential consequences of the estimated release are calculated from real-time meteorological data, surrounding population data, and properties of the agent. In addition to the estimated casualties, area coverage and no-death contours vs time would be calculated. Accidents are assigned to one of four categories: community emergencies, which are involve a threat to off-site personnel; on-post emergencies, which involve a threat only to on-site personnel; advisory, which involves a potential for threat to on-site personnel; and chemical occurrence, which can produce an abnormal operating condition for the plant but no immediate threat to on-site personnel. 9 refs., 20 tabs.

  19. Emergency Broadcast System Based On GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng, Kang; Baoyu, Wang; Xueying, Jiang; Xiaosheng, Liu

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, disaster occurs more and more frequently, which brings huge losses to the society. Presented a GIS based emergency broadcast system (GIS-EBS), to provide rapid, accurate information to the public, can reduce the people’s losses maximum. Different from the traditional radio data system (RDS), by adding broadcasting terminal control instruction on the FM signal, GIS-EBS extended the RDS protocol, which can control each radio terminal’s state. And through the extended RDS protocol, GIS-EBS can broadcast and release the emergency information to the right place and the people most in need in the shortest time.

  20. The theory of social classes Maurice Halbwachs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Kozlova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the basic thesis of Maurice Halbwachs’s theory of social classes outlined in the “Social classes and morphology” (1942: the concept of class is revealed as the object of collective representation, the main characteristics of classes, the criteria for its selection and conditions for classes formation are analyzed.

  1. Integration of full-spectrum metrology and polishing for rapid production of large aspheres Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Integration of three proven, non-contact, optical metrology techniques with an emerging new polishing approach in a single machine will enable the rapid production...

  2. Rapid Response to Decision Making for Complex Issues - How Technologies of Cooperation Can Help

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saveri, Andrea; Vian, Kathi; Rheingold, Howard

    2005-01-01

    .... A new capacity for rapid, ad hoc, and distributed decision making is emerging from the intersection of technologies of cooperation and new knowledge about the nature of cooperation and cooperative strategies...

  3. The shape and size of the sella turcica in skeletal Class I, Class II, and Class III Saudi subjects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alkofide, Eman A

    2007-01-01

    ...; 60 Class I, 60 Class II, and 60 Class III. The sella turcica on each radiograph was analysed and measured to determine the shape of the sella, in addition to the linear dimensions of length, depth, and diameter...

  4. Rapid Active Sampling Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    A field-deployable, battery-powered Rapid Active Sampling Package (RASP), originally designed for sampling strong materials during lunar and planetary missions, shows strong utility for terrestrial geological use. The technology is proving to be simple and effective for sampling and processing materials of strength. Although this originally was intended for planetary and lunar applications, the RASP is very useful as a powered hand tool for geologists and the mining industry to quickly sample and process rocks in the field on Earth. The RASP allows geologists to surgically acquire samples of rock for later laboratory analysis. This tool, roughly the size of a wrench, allows the user to cut away swaths of weathering rinds, revealing pristine rock surfaces for observation and subsequent sampling with the same tool. RASPing deeper (.3.5 cm) exposes single rock strata in-situ. Where a geologist fs hammer can only expose unweathered layers of rock, the RASP can do the same, and then has the added ability to capture and process samples into powder with particle sizes less than 150 microns, making it easier for XRD/XRF (x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence). The tool uses a rotating rasp bit (or two counter-rotating bits) that resides inside or above the catch container. The container has an open slot to allow the bit to extend outside the container and to allow cuttings to enter and be caught. When the slot and rasp bit are in contact with a substrate, the bit is plunged into it in a matter of seconds to reach pristine rock. A user in the field may sample a rock multiple times at multiple depths in minutes, instead of having to cut out huge, heavy rock samples for transport back to a lab for analysis. Because of the speed and accuracy of the RASP, hundreds of samples can be taken in one day. RASP-acquired samples are small and easily carried. A user can characterize more area in less time than by using conventional methods. The field-deployable RASP used a Ni

  5. Classes subalternas, lutas de classe e hegemonia: uma abordagem gramsciana Subaltern classes, class struggles and hegemony: a gramscian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Simionatto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo procura resgatar, no pensamento de Antonio Gramsci, a concepção de classes subalternas e a sua relação com outras categorias, especialmente, o Estado, a sociedade civil e a hegemonia, como suportes da luta de classes na realidade contemporânea. Aborda, ainda, as relações entre classes subalternas, senso comum e ideologia, bem como as formas de superação tematizadas por Gramsci, através da cultura e da filosofia da práxis. Nesse sentido, num movimento de totalidade, busca recuperar a discussão das classes subalternas, a partir da original formulação gramsciana no âmbito do marxismo, mediante a interação dialética entre estrutura e superestrutura, economia e política. Além do resgate conceitual, apontam-se alguns elementos como subsídios à discussão das formas de subalternidade presentes na realidade contemporânea e as possibilidades de fortalecimento das lutas de tais camadas de classe, sobretudo em momentos de forte desmobilização da participação popular.This article sought to revive the concept of subaltern classes and their relation with other categories, particularly the State, civil society and hegemony in the thinking of Antonio Gramsci, as a support for contemporary class struggles. It also analyzes the relations between subaltern classes, common sense and ideology, as well as the forms of "overcoming" conceptualized by Gramsci, through the culture and philosophy of praxis. The paper revives the discussion of the subaltern classes, based on the original Gramscian formulation in the realm of Marxism, through the dialectic interaction between structure and superstructure, economy and politics. In addition to the conceptual revival, it indicates some elements that can support the discussion of the forms of subalternity found in contemporary reality and the possibilities for strengthening the struggles of these class layers, above all in moments of strong demobilization of popular participation.

  6. Rapid Robot Design Validation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Energid Technologies will create a comprehensive software infrastructure for rapid validation of robotic designs. The software will support push-button validation...

  7. Rapid Robot Design Validation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Energid Technologies will create a comprehensive software infrastructure for rapid validation of robot designs. The software will support push-button validation...

  8. Connecting network properties of rapidly disseminating epizoonotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel L Rivas

    Full Text Available To effectively control the geographical dissemination of infectious diseases, their properties need to be determined. To test that rapid microbial dispersal requires not only susceptible hosts but also a pre-existing, connecting network, we explored constructs meant to reveal the network properties associated with disease spread, which included the road structure.Using geo-temporal data collected from epizoonotics in which all hosts were susceptible (mammals infected by Foot-and-mouth disease virus, Uruguay, 2001; birds infected by Avian Influenza virus H5N1, Nigeria, 2006, two models were compared: 1 'connectivity', a model that integrated bio-physical concepts (the agent's transmission cycle, road topology into indicators designed to measure networks ('nodes' or infected sites with short- and long-range links, and 2 'contacts', which focused on infected individuals but did not assess connectivity.THE CONNECTIVITY MODEL SHOWED FIVE NETWORK PROPERTIES: 1 spatial aggregation of cases (disease clusters, 2 links among similar 'nodes' (assortativity, 3 simultaneous activation of similar nodes (synchronicity, 4 disease flows moving from highly to poorly connected nodes (directionality, and 5 a few nodes accounting for most cases (a "20:80" pattern. In both epizoonotics, 1 not all primary cases were connected but at least one primary case was connected, 2 highly connected, small areas (nodes accounted for most cases, 3 several classes of nodes were distinguished, and 4 the contact model, which assumed all primary cases were identical, captured half the number of cases identified by the connectivity model. When assessed together, the synchronicity and directionality properties explained when and where an infectious disease spreads.Geo-temporal constructs of Network Theory's nodes and links were retrospectively validated in rapidly disseminating infectious diseases. They distinguished classes of cases, nodes, and networks, generating information usable

  9. Simbolic boundaries and middle classes. Social mobility in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayarí Castillo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available After more than three decades of the implementation of the policies of structural adjustment in Chile, the middle classes increased their weight in the social structure and changed their economic sector, occupation and trajectories of social mobility. This article analyzes the perceptionof symbolic boundaries, which emerging of these macro-processes and shapes the subjectivity of middle class subjects into upward mobility processes and modifies their perceptions of inequality. Whit this objective the paper presents a qualitative analysis of cases in which discursive components like meritocracy, the effort and the idea of “barriers/obstacles” became a key discursive axis. This article is inscribed within the recent studies on middle classes for the Chilean case, which focus specially on the cultural aspects after reproduction of stratification and inequality in Chile.

  10. A benefit-risk assessment of class III antiarrhythmic agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brendorp, Bente; Pedersen, Oledyg; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2002-01-01

    With beta-blockers as the exception, increasing doubt is emerging on the value of antiarrhythmic drug therapy following a series of trials that have either shown no mortality benefit or even an excess mortality. Vaughan Williams class I drugs are generally avoided in patients with structural heart...... prevention of ventricular arrhythmias and in treatment of atrial fibrillation or flutter. Based on existing evidence there is no routine indication for antiarrhythmic drug therapy other than beta-blockers in patients at high risk of sudden death. Subgroup analyses of trials with amiodarone and dofetilide......-intervals or - in the future - from genetic testing. Class III drugs are effective in converting atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm and for the maintenance of sinus rhythm after conversion. This is currently by far the most important indication for this class of drugs. As defined by recent guidelines, amiodarone...

  11. Rapid Color Test Identification System for Screening of Counterfeit Fluoroquinolone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Singh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The protocol of rapid identification system consists of three chemical color reactions; two group tests for fluoroquinolone class and a compound specific test each for norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and sparfloxacin. The group color reactions are based on (a Oxidizing behavior of quinolone and (b Fluorine functional groups, both of which are characteristic of fluoroquinolone class. The compound specific color reactions are developed taking into consideration unique chemical behavior of each compound. The proposed chemical color tests have high selectivity⁄specificity, are ideal for screening purpose. The color of each test was defined by two standard color systems namely CIE lab and Munsell color. A suspected counterfeit tablet of any of the above mentioned drugs can be identified within 10-15 min using this rapid identification system.

  12. Emerging drugs for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Paul H; Gayed, Bishoy A; Thoreson, Gregory R; Raj, Ganesh V

    2013-12-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the mainstay treatment for patients with prostate cancer who are not candidates for definitive treatment, are diagnosed with advanced disease on initial presentation or progress after primary treatment. Patients who stop responding to androgen deprivation therapy develop castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Emerging drugs undergoing clinical evaluation and drugs that have recently received FDA approval for the treatment of CRPC are reviewed. As the natural history and signaling pathways of prostate cancer are better understood, new treatments and targeted therapies will be developed. The FDA recently approved 5 medications that increase survival in patients with CRPC. Additional medications and drug classes are being explored that may eventually lead to new treatment options. Articles were identified using a PubMed database search. Recent FDA medication approvals and the development of emerging treatments are promising for the future of patients with prostate cancer. The addition of new medications challenges physicians to identify the optimal sequence and/or combination in which newer and older medications should be administered. Physicians treating patients with prostate cancer have a growing responsibility to keep pace with these new medications so that they may counsel and treat patients appropriately.

  13. A Rapidly Evolving Active Region NOAA 8032 observed on April ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1997-04-15

    The active region NOAA 8032 of April 15, 1997 was observed to evolve rapidly. The GOES X-ray data showed a number of sub-flares and two C-class flares during the 8-9 hours of its evolution. The magnetic evolution of this region is studied to ascertain its role in flare production. Large changes were observed in magnetic ...

  14. Research on Intersection Signal Switching Model under Emergency Situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zongping

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequent occurrence of the city emergency leads to rapid development of emergency traffic management which is an important part in the Emergency Rescue System. In the intersection with heavy traffic, the emergency rescue vehicles often with increased delay, reduced safety, and sometimes even with a collision, which restrict the efficiency of the rescue. This paper established the intersection signal control optimization model based on detail analysis of emergency rescue vehicles traffic characteristics and traffic signal control. The models, on one hand, were able to guarantee the emergency vehicles through the intersection quickly and without delay; on the other hand, could ensure the minimum impact to other vehicles in the process of the emergency vehicles through the intersection. Finally, the model’s practicality was verified by real cases.

  15. An emerging view of scientific collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hara, Noriko; Solomon, Paul; Kim, Seung Lye

    2003-01-01

    -disciplinary research groups. Each group had 14 to 34 members, including faculty, postdoctoral fellows and students, at four geographically dispersed universities. To investigate challenges that emerge in establishing scientific collaboration, data were collected about members' previous and current collaborative......Collaboration is often a critical aspect of scientific research, which is dominated by complex problems, rapidly changing technology, dynamic growth of knowledge, and highly specialized areas of expertise. An individual scientist can seldom provide all of the expertise and resources necessary...

  16. Understanding the Emergence of Public Debt

    OpenAIRE

    Fochmann, Martin; Sadrieh, Abdolkarim; Weimann, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We use a controlled laboratory experiment with and without overlapping generations to study the emergence of public debt. Public debt is chosen by popular vote, pays for public goods, and is repaid with general taxes. With a single generation, public debt is accumulated prudently, never leading to over-indebtedness. With multiple generations, public debt is accumulated rapidly as soon as the burden of debt and the risk of over-indebtedness can be shifted to future generations. Debt ceiling me...

  17. Pan-specific MHC class I predictors: A benchmark of HLA class I pan-specific prediction methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hao; Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    emerging pathogens. Methods have recently been published that are able to predict peptide binding to any human MHC class I molecule. In contrast to conventional allele-specific methods, these methods do allow for extrapolation to un-characterized MHC molecules. These pan-specific HLA predictors have...... not previously been compared using independent evaluation sets. Results: A diverse set of quantitative peptide binding affinity measurements was collected from IEDB, together with a large set of HLA class I ligands from the SYFPEITHI database. Based on these data sets, three different pan-specific HLA web......-accessible predictors NetMHCpan, Adaptive-Double-Threading (ADT), and KISS were evaluated. The performance of the pan-specific predictors was also compared to a well performing allele-specific MHC class I predictor, NetMHC, as well as a consensus approach integrating the predictions from the NetMHC and Net...

  18. Rapid prototyping in medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ákos Márk Horváth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Even if it sound a bit incredible rapid prototyping (RPT as production method has been used for decades in other professions. Nevertheless medical science just started discover the possibilities of this technology and use the offered benefits of 3D printing. In this paper authors have investigated the pharmaceutical usage of rapid prototyping.

  19. Energy emergency handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This Handbook identifies selected state and federal measures available to mitigate the impact of an energy emergency, and provides a comprehensive energy emergency communications directory. In the case of state remedial actions, particular emphasis has been placed on typical implementation procedures and likely impacts. The discussions of federal actions focus on initation and implementation procedures. The directory is designed to facilitate communications of all types (telephone, Telex, TWX, or facsimile) among key energy emergency officials in the federal and state governments.

  20. Flux Emergence (Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C. M. Cheung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  1. Thermodynamics and emergent universe

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Saumya; Gangopadhyay, Sunandan

    2016-01-01

    We show that in the isentropic scenario the first order thermodynamical particle creation model gives an emergent universe solution even when the chemical potential is non-zero. However there exists no emergent universe scenario in the second order non-equilibrium theory for the particle creation model. We then point out a correspondence between the particle creation model with barotropic equation of state and the equation of state giving rise to an emergent universe without particle creation...

  2. Rapid Glass Refiner Development Program, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-20

    A rapid glass refiner (RGR) technology which could be applied to both conventional and advanced class melting systems would significantly enhance the productivity and the competitiveness of the glass industry in the United States. Therefore, Vortec Corporation, with the support of the US Department of Energy (US DOE) under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-90ID12911, conducted a research and development program for a unique and innovative approach to rapid glass refining. To provide focus for this research effort, container glass was the primary target from among the principal glass types based on its market size and potential for significant energy savings. Container glass products represent the largest segment of the total glass industry accounting for 60% of the tonnage produced and over 40% of the annual energy consumption of 232 trillion Btu/yr. Projections of energy consumption and the market penetration of advanced melting and fining into the container glass industry yield a potential energy savings of 7.9 trillion Btu/yr by the year 2020.

  3. Tuberculosis in complex emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coninx, Rudi

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the key factors and remaining challenges for tuberculosis (TB) control programmes in complex emergencies. A complex emergency is "a humanitarian crisis in a country, region or society where there is total or considerable breakdown of authority resulting from internal or external conflict and which requires an international response that goes beyond the mandate or capacity of any single agency and/or the ongoing United Nations country programme." Some 200 million people are believed to live in countries affected by complex emergencies; almost all of these are developing countries that also bear the main burden of TB. The effects of complex emergencies impact on TB control programmes, interfering with the goals of identifying and curing TB patients and possibly leading to the emergence of MDR-TB. There are many detailed descriptions of aid interventions during complex emergencies; yet TB control programmes are absent from most of these reports. If TB is neglected, it may quickly result in increased morbidity and mortality, as was demonstrated in Bosnia and Herzegovina and in Somalia. TB is a major disease in complex emergencies and requires an appropriate public health response. While there is no manual to cover complex emergencies, the interagency manual for TB control in refugee and displaced populations provides valuable guidance. These programmes contribute to the body of evidence needed to compile such a manual, and should ensure that the experiences of TB control in complex emergencies lead to the establishment of evidence-based programmes.

  4. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  5. Emergency care of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Jimenez, David; Hernandez-Divers, Stephen J

    2007-05-01

    Most reptile emergencies are the result of improper husbandry and nutrition. Reptiles are good at masking disease, and owners, failing to recognize early signs of illness, only seek veterinary assistance when issues are advanced and near terminal. The veterinarian should be familiar with reptile species-specific husbandry and nutritional requirements and basic clinical techniques. The same principles and techniques used in small animal medicine can be applied to reptile emergencies. This article reviews general emergency principles that apply to the reptilian patient and common emergency presentations. The main areas of discussion focus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation, fluid therapy, and analgesia.

  6. EMERGE-ing from the Shadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Terry B.

    2014-01-01

    Houston school officials noticed their best performing low-income students weren't applying to Ivy League and selective colleges. In response, they created EMERGE, a program that develops and guides talented youths toward a top-college path.

  7. Honoring Class: Working-Class Sensitivities in Honors Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, William H.

    2005-01-01

    The issue of social class rarely injects itself into assignments in honors English composition courses. The students take few chances with structure, analysis, voice, or audience invocation. Clearly bright students, they seemed baffled when asked for complication in their thinking or to take a chance with an unconventional structure. It was time…

  8. Signal transduction by HLA class II antigens expressed on activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L

    1991-01-01

    Human T cells express HLA class II antigens upon activation. Although activated, class II+ T cells can present alloantigens under certain circumstances, the functional role of class II antigens on activated T cells remains largely unknown. Here, we report that cross-linking of HLA-DR molecules...... after cross-linking CD4. Ligation of CD4 and class II molecules generated a synergistic effect of the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration response that required an interaction between the molecules on the cell surface. Since class II is the natural ligand for CD4, the present data suggest that class...... expressed on allospecific, CD4+ T clones and cell lines can function as transduction elements that trigger rapid cellular responses including tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins and mobilization of Ca2+ from internal stores. The proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine were distinct from those observed...

  9. Emergências hipertensivas Hypertensive emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Soares Feitosa-Filho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available As urgências e as emergências hipertensivas são ocorrências clínicas que podem representar mais de 25% dos atendimentos a urgências médicas. O médico deverá estar habilitado a diferenciá-las, pois o prognóstico e o tratamento são distintos. Estima-se que 3% de todas as visitas às salas de emergência decorrem de elevações significativas da pressão arterial. Nos quadros relacionados a estes atendimentos, a emergência hipertensiva é a entidade clínica mais grave que merece cuidados intensivos. É caracterizada por pressão arterial marcadamente elevada e sinais de lesões de órgãos-alvo (encefalopatia, infarto agudo do miocárdio, angina instável, edema agudo de pulmão, eclâmpsia, acidente vascular encefálico. O objetivo deste estudo foi apresentar os principais pontos sobre o seu apropriado diagnóstico e tratamento. Foi realizada busca por artigos originais com os unitermos "crise hipertensiva" e "emergência hipertensiva" nas bases de dados Pubmed e MedLine nos últimos dez anos. As referências disponíveis destes artigos foram verificadas. Os artigos foram identificados e revisados e o presente estudo condensa os principais resultados descritos. Para esta revisão foram considerados ensaios clínicos em língua inglesa, estudos retrospectivos e artigos de revisão. A crise hipertensiva é a entidade clínica com aumento súbito da PA (> 180 x 120 mmHg, acompanhada por sintomas, que podem ser leves (cefaléia, tontura, zumbido ou graves (dispnéia, dor precordial, coma e até morte, com ou sem lesão aguda de órgãos-alvo. Se os sintomas forem leves e sem lesão aguda de órgãos alvos, define-se a urgência hipertensiva. Se o quadro clínico apresentar risco de vida e refletir lesão aguda de órgãos-alvo têm-se, então, a emergência hipertensiva. Muitos pacientes também apresentam uma PA elevada demais, por não usarem suas medicações, tratando-se apenas de hipertensão arterial sistêmica crônica n

  10. Two classes of metric spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Garrido

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The class of metric spaces (X,d known as small-determined spaces, introduced by Garrido and Jaramillo, are properly defined by means of some type of real-valued Lipschitz functions on X. On the other hand, B-simple metric spaces introduced by Hejcman are defined in terms of some kind of bornologies of bounded subsets of X. In this note we present a common framework where both classes of metric spaces can be studied which allows us to see not only the relationships between them but also to obtain new internal characterizations of these metric properties.

  11. Enzymatic Browning: a practical class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Pedrosa Silva Clerici

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a practical class about the enzymes polyphenol oxidases, which have been shown to be responsible for the enzymatic browning of fruits and vegetables. Vegetables samples were submitted to enzymatic inactivation process with chemical reagents, as well as by bleaching methods of applying heat by conventional oven and microwave oven. Process efficiency was assessed qualitatively by both observing the guaiacol peroxidase activity and after the storage period under refrigeration or freezing. The practical results obtained in this class allow exploring multidisciplinary knowledge in food science, with practical applications in everyday life.

  12. Mappings on Neutrosophic Soft Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawkat Alkhazaleh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1995 Smarandache introduced the concept of neutrosophic set which is a mathematical tool for handling problems involving imprecise, indeterminacy and inconsistent data. In 2013 Maji introduced the concept of neutrosophic soft set theory as a general mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. In this paper we define the notion of a mapping on classes where the neutrosophic soft classes are collections of neutrosophic soft set. We also define and study the properties of neutrosophic soft images and neutrosophic soft inverse images of neutrosophic soft sets.

  13. Chiral algebras of class S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beem, Christopher [Institute for Advanced Study,Einstein Dr., Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Peelaers, Wolfger; Rastelli, Leonardo [C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, SUNY,Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States); Rees, Balt C. van [Theory Group, Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-05-05

    Four-dimensional N=2 superconformal field theories have families of protected correlation functions that possess the structure of two-dimensional chiral algebras. In this paper, we explore the chiral algebras that arise in this manner in the context of theories of class S. The class S duality web implies nontrivial associativity properties for the corresponding chiral algebras, the structure of which is best summarized in the language of generalized topological quantum field theory. We make a number of conjectures regarding the chiral algebras associated to various strongly coupled fixed points.

  14. Early treatment protocol for skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; de Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues; Fernandes, Leandra Sant'Anna Ferreira Parron

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal Class III malocclusion, with its unpredictable and unfavorable nature, has been characterized by a growth pattern with doubtful prognosis regarding orthodontic mechanics, even when performed early. For a long time, Class III malocclusion was regarded as a synonym of mandibular prognathism, regardless of the affected skeletal structures. Mandibular growth, essentially determined by genetic factors, could barely be controlled by early orthodontic interventions. Therefore, the treatment choice was to wait for the patient to grow, and then make an orthodontic intervention associated with an orthognathic surgery. Maxillary involvement in the etiology of Class III malocclusion was conclusive to change orthodontic therapeutics. Maxillary intramembranous growth has a better response to orthopedic treatment, based on growth control and redirection, thus contributing for early intervention success. In several cases, excellent results have been achieved with rapid maxillary expansion and protraction. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss the treatment of a patient with Class III malocclusion, whose treatment planning comprised two phases: interceptive (mechanical orthopedic appliances) and comprehensive (fixed orthodontic appliance). The results of this case showed that Class III malocclusion should be intercepted as early as possible to permit growth redirection, mainly when the maxilla is the primary etiologic factor or dental and/or functional factors are involved. Diagnosis, treatment planning and prognosis depend on patient age, growth potential and severity of malocclusion. Early intervention, adequate indication of appliances, and patient compliance are key factors for good outcomes.

  15. Rapid and generic identification of influenza A and other respiratory viruses with mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majchrzykiewicz-Koehorst, J.A.; Heikens, E.; Trip, H.; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Viveen, M.C.; Sedee, N.J.A.; van der Plas, J.; Coenjaerts, F.E.J.; Paauw, A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid identification of existing and emerging respiratory viruses is crucial in combating outbreaks and epidemics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a rapid and reliable identification method in bacterial diagnostics, but has not been

  16. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified in...

  17. Emerging arboviral human diseases in Southern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Southern Europe is characterized by unique landscape and climate which attract tourists, but also arthropod vectors, some of them carrying pathogens. Among several arboviral diseases that emerged in the region during the last decade, West Nile fever accounted for high number of human cases and fatalities, while Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever expanded its geographic distribution, and is considered as a real threat for Europe. Viruses evolve rapidly and acquire mutations making themselves stronger and naive populations more vulnerable. In an effort to tackle efficiently the emerging arboviral diseases, preparedness and strategic surveillance are needed for the early detection of the pathogen and containment and mitigation of probable outbreaks. In this review, the main human arboviral diseases that emerged in Southern Europe are described. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A latent class analysis of brief postpartum psychiatric hospital admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlomi Polachek, Inbal; Fung, Kinwah; Putnam, Karen; Brody, Samantha Meltzer; Vigod, Simone N

    2017-09-11

    Almost 40% of postpartum psychiatric hospital admissions are brief, lasting 72h or less. We aimed to identify unique subgroups of women within this group to inform better intervention. All women in Ontario, Canada with a brief postpartum psychiatric admission (≤ 72h) (2007-2012)(N = 631) were studied using latent class analysis. We identified distinct subtypes of women and compared women within each subtype on post-discharge mental health indicators: physician visits, emergency department (ED) visits and readmissions. We identified four clinically distinct classes: (1)women with no diagnosed mental illness (2 years before delivery) (n = 179; 28.4% of the sample); (2)women with pre-existing history of severe mental illness (i.e. psychosis) (n = 161; 25.5%); (3)women with pre-existing history of non-psychotic mental illness (n = 211; 33.4%); and (4)adolescent rural-dwelling women with alcohol and substance use disorders (n = 80; 12.7%). In the 1 year post-discharge, women in classes 1-3 were more likely to have post-discharge physician visit than women in class 4 (p class 2 were most likely to be readmitted (p planning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparing for Emergency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchiors, Jacob; Todsen, Tobias; Nilsson, Philip

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Emergency cricothyrodotomy (EC) is a lifesaving procedure. Evidence-based assessment of training effects and competency levels is relevant to all departments involved in emergency airway management. As most training uses low-fidelity models, the predictive value of good performance on ...

  20. Emerging wind energy technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Flemming; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Faber, Michael Havbro

    2014-01-01

    This chapter will discuss emerging technologies that are expected to continue the development of the wind sector to embrace new markets and to become even more competitive.......This chapter will discuss emerging technologies that are expected to continue the development of the wind sector to embrace new markets and to become even more competitive....