WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapidly deployable chemical

  1. A rapidly deployable chemical sensing network for the real-time monitoring of toxic airborne contaminant releases in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Jason J.; Lloyd, David R.

    2010-04-01

    We present findings of the DYCE project, which addresses the needs of military and blue light responders in providing a rapid, reliable on-scene analysis of the dispersion of toxic airborne contaminants following their malicious or accidental release into a rural, urban or industrial environment. We describe the development of a small network of ad-hoc deployable chemical and meteorological sensors capable of identifying and locating the source of the contaminant release, as well as monitoring and estimating the dispersion characteristics of the plume. We further present deployment planning methodologies to optimize the data gathering mission given a constrained asset base.

  2. Metals Production Requirements for Rapid Photovoltaics Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Kavlak, Goksin; Jaffe, Robert L; Trancik, Jessika E

    2015-01-01

    If global photovoltaics (PV) deployment grows rapidly, the required input materials need to be supplied at an increasing rate. In this paper, we quantify the effect of PV deployment levels on the scale of metals production. For example, we find that if cadmium telluride {copper indium gallium diselenide} PV accounts for more than 3% {10%} of electricity generation by 2030, the required growth rates for the production of indium and tellurium would exceed historically-observed production growth rates for a large set of metals. In contrast, even if crystalline silicon PV supplies all electricity in 2030, the required silicon production growth rate would fall within the historical range. More generally, this paper highlights possible constraints to the rate of scaling up metals production for some PV technologies, and outlines an approach to assessing projected metals growth requirements against an ensemble of past growth rates from across the metals production sector. The framework developed in this paper may be...

  3. Rapid chemical separations

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, N

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the progress of fast chemical separation procedures during the last few years. Fast, discontinuous separation techniques are illustrated by a procedure for niobium. The use of such techniques for the chemical characterization of the heaviest known elements is described. Other rapid separation methods from aqueous solutions are summarized. The application of the high speed liquid chromatography to the separation of chemically similar elements is outlined. The use of the gas jet recoil transport method for nuclear reaction products and its combination with a continuous solvent extraction technique and with a thermochromatographic separation is presented. Different separation methods in the gas phase are briefly discussed and the attachment of a thermochromatographic technique to an on-line mass separator is shown. (45 refs).

  4. Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard S. Tuthill

    2004-06-10

    The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

  5. Rapid Airfield Damage Recovery: Deployable Saw Technology Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-29

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 17 -2 9 Rapid Airfield Damage Recovery: Deployable Saw Technology Evaluation G eo te ch ni ca l a nd S tr uc tu re s...Deployable Saw Technology Evaluation Haley P. Bell and Jay Rowland Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development...evaluation of selected saw technologies , tools, and methodologies for improving the efficiency of sawing around damaged pavement associated with crater

  6. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodgson, Ernest

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the human-metabolism and metabolic interactions of a subset of deployment-related chemicals, including chlorpyrifos, DEET, permethrin, pyridostigmine bromide, and sulfur mustard metabolites...

  7. LG-CONSTRUCTOR for rapid deployment of LG wargaming tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Vladimir; Umanskiy, Oleg

    2002-07-01

    LG-CONSTRUCTOR is a knowledge acquisition and construction component intended to facilitate rapid deployment of the LG- based tools. LG-CONSTRUCTOR will supply warfighters at all levels with the patterns of games. A warfighter will be able to consider and visualize the most viable patterns and quickly convert them into the LG hypergame, most adequate to the current mission. The adequacy of construction will be tested on the fly by playing and re-playing semi-finished hypergames. In order to construct a hypergame, LG- CONSTRUCTOR will define the board (with specific space-time scale), the pieces, the variety of legal movements and other activities of pieces, additional gaming constraints that define legal moves like winning conditions, rules of engagement, abort conditions, etc. LG-CONSTRUCTOR will store a number of pattern-ABG and complete pattern-hypergames developed earlier. After deployment to the mission, the military personnel will be able to play an appropriate pattern-hypergame. During this play, a military analyst will dynamically adjust this game to the real state of affairs. The required knowledge acquisition by pattern-game playing and game adjustment will be controlled by LG-CONSTRUCTOR. Step-by-step, by interacting with an analyst, LG-CONSTRUCTOR will generate a new hypergame, a network of interlinked ABG. For this generation, it may combine a number of pattern-ABG and complete pattern-hypergames. LG-CONSTRUCTOR will be capable of the real time construction due to transparency of LG game representation and high computational efficiency of LG-Strategist, an LG strategy-generating component. It will assist LG-CONSTRUCTOR in testing new games. This construction by playing and adjusting certain game-patterns will allow rapid deployment of LG-STRATEGIST during the mission. In this paper, we will consider the details of required knowledge acquisition and construction.

  8. Dynamic sensor deployment for the monitoring of chemical releases in urban environments (DYCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Jason J.; Lloyd, David R.; Robins, Alan; Rudd, Alison; Wilks, Ashley

    2011-05-01

    We present findings of the DYCE project, which addresses the needs of military and blue light responders to provide a rapid, reliable on-scene analysis of the dispersion of toxic airborne chemical threat agents following their release into the environment. We describe the development and experimental results for a small network of ad-hoc deployable chemical and meteorological sensors capable of identifying and locating the source of the contaminant release, as well as monitoring and estimating the dispersion characteristics of the plume. We further present deployment planning methodologies to optimize the data gathering mission given a constrained asset base.

  9. Human metabolism and metabolic interactions of deployment-related chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Ernest; Rose, Randy L

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that chemicals and, more specifically, chemical interactions, are involved as causative agents in deployment-related illnesses. Unfortunately, this hypothesis has proven difficult to test, because toxicological investigations of deployment-related chemicals are usually carried out on surrogate animals and are difficult to extrapolate to humans. Other parts of the problem, such as the definition of variation within human populations and the development of methods for designating groups or individuals at significantly greater risk, cannot be carried out on surrogate animals, and the data must be derived from humans. The relatively recent availability of human cell.fractions, such as microsomes, cytosol, etc., human cells such as primary hepatocytes, recombinant human enzymes, and their isoforms and polymorphic variants has enabled a significant start to be made in developing the human data needed. These initial studies have examined the human metabolism by cytochrome P450, other phase I enzymes, and their isoforms and, in some cases, their polymorphic variants of compounds such as chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, DEET, permethrin, and pyridostigmine bromide, and, to a lesser extent, other chemicals from the same chemical and use classes, including solvents, jet fuel components, and sulfur mustard metabolites. A number of interactions at the metabolic level have been described both with respect to other xenobiotics and to endogenous metabolites. Probably the most dramatic have been seen in the ability of chlorpyrifos to inhibit not only the metabolism of other xenobiotics such as carbaryl and DEET but also to inhibit the metabolism of steroid hormones.

  10. Rapid Chemical Exposure and Dose Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA evaluates the potential risks of the manufacture and use of thousands of chemicals. To assist with this evaluation, EPA scientists developed a rapid, automated model using off the shelf technology that predicts exposures for thousands of chemicals.

  11. 77 FR 35962 - Utilizing Rapidly Deployable Aerial Communications Architecture in Response to an Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... COMMISSION Utilizing Rapidly Deployable Aerial Communications Architecture in Response to an Emergency AGENCY... seeks comment on the role of deployable aerial communications architecture (DACA) in facilitating... eRulemaking Portal, or (3) by filing paper copies. Comments and reply comments may be filed...

  12. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program rapid accident assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chester, C.V.

    1990-08-01

    This report develops a scheme for the rapid assessment of a release of toxic chemicals resulting from an accident in one of the most chemical weapon demilitarization plants or storage areas. The system uses such inputs as chemical and pressure sensors monitoring the plant and reports of accidents radioed to the Emergency Operations Center by work parties or monitoring personnel. A size of release can be estimated from previous calculations done in the risk analysis, from back calculation from an open-air chemical sensor measurement, or from an estimated percentage of the inventory of agent at the location of the release. Potential consequences of the estimated release are calculated from real-time meteorological data, surrounding population data, and properties of the agent. In addition to the estimated casualties, area coverage and no-death contours vs time would be calculated. Accidents are assigned to one of four categories: community emergencies, which are involve a threat to off-site personnel; on-post emergencies, which involve a threat only to on-site personnel; advisory, which involves a potential for threat to on-site personnel; and chemical occurrence, which can produce an abnormal operating condition for the plant but no immediate threat to on-site personnel. 9 refs., 20 tabs.

  13. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodgson, Ernest; Brimfield, Alan A; Goldstein, Joyce E; Rose, Randy L; Wallace, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    .... The metabolism of chlorpyrifos, DEET, permethrin, pyridostigmine bromide, sulfur mustard, naphthalene and nonane as well as a number of their metabolites and related chemicals was investigated...

  14. Satellite Sensornet Gateway Technology Infusion Through Rapid Deployments for Environmental Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzel, T.; Silva, F.; Deschon, A.; Ye, W.; Cho, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Satellite Sensornet Gateway (SSG) is an ongoing ESTO Advanced Information Systems Technology project, at the University of Southern California. The major goal of SSG is to develop a turnkey solution for building environmental observation systems based on sensor networks. Our system has been developed through an iterative series of deployment-driven design, build, test, and revise which maximizes technology infusion to the earth scientist. We have designed a robust and flexible sensor network called Sensor Processing and Acquisition Network (SPAN). Our SPAN architecture emphasizes a modular and extensible design, such that core building blocks can be reused to develop different scientific observation systems. To support rapid deployment at remote locations, we employ satellite communications as the backhaul to relay in-situ sensor data to a central database. To easily support various science applications, we have developed a unified sensor integration framework that allows streamlined integration of different sensors to the system. Our system supports heterogeneous sets of sensors, from industry-grade products to research- specific prototypes. To ensure robust operation in harsh environments, we have developed mechanisms to monitor system status and recover from potential failures along with additional remote configuration and QA/QC functions. Here we briefly describe the deployments, the key science missions of the deployments and the role that the SSG technology played in each mission. We first deployed our SSG technology at the James Reserve in February 2007. In a joint deployment with the NEON project, SDSC, and UC Riverside, we set up a meteorological station, using a diverse set of sensors, with the objective of validating our basic technology components in the field. This system is still operational and streaming live sensor data. At Stunt Ranch, a UC Reserve near Malibu, CA, we partnered with UCLA biologist Phillip Rundel in order to study the drought

  15. The deployment of soviet chemical forces in Afghanistan and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'And let there be no doubt: if hostilities should break out, the Soviet Army would use chemical weapons against its opponents.'1. Col Oleg Penkovsky. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.5787/14-1-527 · AJOL African Journals ...

  16. International Symposium 100 Years of Chemical Warfare : Research, Deployment, Consequences

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Dieter; Renn, Jürgen; Schmaltz, Florian; Wolf, Martin; One hundred years of chemical warfare : research, deployment, consequences; 100 Jahre Giftgaskrieg : Forschung, Einsatz, Folgen chemischer Massenvernichtungswaffen

    2017-01-01

    On April 22, 1915, the German military released 150 tons of chlorine gas at Ypres, Belgium. Carried by a long-awaited wind, the chlorine cloud passed within a few minutes through the British and French trenches, leaving behind at least 1,000 dead and 4,000 injured. This chemical attack, which amounted to the first use of a weapon of mass destruction, marks a turning point in world history. The preparation as well as the execution of the gas attack was orchestrated by Fritz Haber, the director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry in Berlin-Dahlem. During World War I, Haber transformed his research institute into a center for the development of chemical weapons (and of the means of protection against them). Bretislav Friedrich and Martin Wolf (Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, the successor institution of Haber’s institute) together with Dieter Hoffmann, Jürgen Renn, and Florian Schmaltz (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science) organized an inte...

  17. Letter to the Editor : Rapidly-deployed small tent hospitals: lessons from the earthquake in Haiti.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, Y.; Gurman , P.; Verna, E.; Elman , N.; Labor, E. (Materials Science Division); (Superior NanoBioSystems LLC); (Fast Israeli Rescue & Search Team); (Clinique Adonai); (Mass. Inst. Tech.); (Univ. Haifa)

    2012-06-01

    The damage to medical facilities resulting form the January 2010 earthquake in haiti necessitated the establishment of field tent hospitals. Much of the local medical infrastructure was destroyed or limited operationally when the Fast Israel Rescue and Search Team (FIRST) arrived in Haiti shortly after the January 2010 earthquake. The FIRST deployed small tent hospitals in Port-au-Prince and in 11 remote areas outside of the city. Each tent was set up in less than a half hour. The tents were staffed with an orthopedic surgeon, gynecologists, primary care and emergency care physicians, a physician with previous experience in tropical medicine, nurses, paramedics, medics, and psychologists. The rapidly deployable and temporary nature of the effort allowed the team to treat and educate, as well as provide supplies for, thousands of refugees throughout Haiti. In addition, a local Haitian physician and his team created a small tent hospital to serve the Petion Refugee Camp and its environs. FIRST personnel also took shifts at this hospital.

  18. Sustaining global agriculture through rapid detection and deployment of genetic resistance to deadly crop diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Sambasivam

    2017-12-04

    Contents I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. References SUMMARY: Genetically encoded resistance is a major component of crop disease management. Historically, gene loci conferring resistance to pathogens have been identified through classical genetic methods. In recent years, accelerated gene cloning strategies have become available through advances in sequencing, gene capture and strategies for reducing genome complexity. Here, I describe these approaches with key emphasis on the isolation of resistance genes to the cereal crop diseases that are an ongoing threat to global food security. Rapid gene isolation enables their efficient deployment through marker-assisted selection and transgenic technology. Together with innovations in genome editing and progress in pathogen virulence studies, this creates further opportunities to engineer long-lasting resistance. These approaches will speed progress towards a future of farming using fewer pesticides. © 2017 Commonwealth of Australia. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Field-deployable, quantitative, rapid identification of active Ebola virus infection in unprocessed blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kavit; Bentley, Emma; Tyler, Adam; Richards, Kevin S R; Wright, Edward; Easterbrook, Linda; Lee, Diane; Cleaver, Claire; Usher, Louise; Burton, Jane E; Pitman, James K; Bruce, Christine B; Edge, David; Lee, Martin; Nazareth, Nelson; Norwood, David A; Moschos, Sterghios A

    2017-11-01

    The West African Ebola virus outbreak underlined the importance of delivering mass diagnostic capability outside the clinical or primary care setting in effectively containing public health emergencies caused by infectious disease. Yet, to date, there is no solution for reliably deploying at the point of need the gold standard diagnostic method, real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), in a laboratory infrastructure-free manner. In this proof of principle work, we demonstrate direct performance of RT-qPCR on fresh blood using far-red fluorophores to resolve fluorogenic signal inhibition and controlled, rapid freeze/thawing to achieve viral genome extraction in a single reaction chamber assay. The resulting process is entirely free of manual or automated sample pre-processing, requires no microfluidics or magnetic/mechanical sample handling and thus utilizes low cost consumables. This enables a fast, laboratory infrastructure-free, minimal risk and simple standard operating procedure suited to frontline, field use. Developing this novel approach on recombinant bacteriophage and recombinant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; Lentivirus), we demonstrate clinical utility in symptomatic EBOV patient screening using live, infectious Filoviruses and surrogate patient samples. Moreover, we evidence assay co-linearity independent of viral particle structure that may enable viral load quantification through pre-calibration, with no loss of specificity across an 8 log-linear maximum dynamic range. The resulting quantitative rapid identification (QuRapID) molecular diagnostic platform, openly accessible for assay development, meets the requirements of resource-limited countries and provides a fast response solution for mass public health screening against emerging biosecurity threats.

  20. A Rapid Deployment Seismological network (RaDeSeis) for real time aftershock studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hloupis, G.; Vallianatos, F.; Makris, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    The understanding of earthquake faulting process is one of the main factors that contribute to earthquake damage. One of the most valuable and essential tools for the understanding of faulting process in the analysis of aftershocks. The critical point for successful aftershock studies is the mobile seismological network that will deployed in order to provide the required data. The main problem that arise for these networks is how fast the recorded data are available to data centres in order to estimate the focal mechanisms, the source parameters estimation as well as to examine microseismic activity. The ideal situation is to have these data available in real time but this is limited by the different telemetry requirements for every individual installation. Based on the experience gained from several installations in Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete (HSNC) we propose a mobile network scheme (called RaDeSeis) capable of installed in a limited amount of time and provide real time seismological data. RaDeSeis is an hybrid network based on VSAT and WiFi communication links between seismological stations and data centre. The network is deployed in star topology where the central station is the communication hub at the same time. Dedicated point-to-point links between central station and border station established using WiFi links. Communication between central station and data centre is established by VSAT. With appropriate routing on central station the data centre is collecting, control and monitor all the stations from the area of interest in real time. In order to decrease the time needed for each installation a specific software (RaLiEs - Rapid Link Establishment) is originated for the quicker link establishment between border stations and central station (with an average distance of 40km LOS) as well as to data centre. By using this software each telecommunication installation needs less than half an hour to complete the necessary link adjustments

  1. Autonomous and rapid deployment of a compact taut-wire mooring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrand, T.; van Heerwaarden, J.; Laan, M.; Bakker, R.; Groenewegen, R.; van Haren, H.

    2011-01-01

    The deployment time of a taut-wire mooring is reduced to the time any transportation/hoisting device needs to put a payload at the sea surface. This is a matter of minutes rather than hours needed for deployment of long deep-ocean moorings in the regular way. It is achieved by extending the basic

  2. Sutureless, rapid deployment valves and stented bioprosthesis in aortic valve replacement: recommendations of an International Expert Consensus Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersak, Borut; Fischlein, Theodor; Folliguet, Thierry A; Meuris, Bart; Teoh, Kevin H T; Moten, Simon C; Solinas, Marco; Miceli, Antonio; Oberwalder, Peter J; Rambaldini, Manfredo; Bhatnagar, Gopal; Borger, Michael A; Bouchard, Denis; Bouchot, Olivier; Clark, Stephen C; Dapunt, Otto E; Ferrarini, Matteo; Laufer, Guenther; Mignosa, Carmelo; Millner, Russell; Noirhomme, Philippe; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Ruyra-Baliarda, Xavier; Shrestha, Malakh; Suri, Rakesh M; Troise, Giovanni; Diegeler, Anno; Laborde, Francois; Laskar, Marc; Najm, Hani K; Glauber, Mattia

    2016-03-01

    After a panel process, recommendations on the use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves in aortic valve replacement were given with special respect as an alternative to stented valves. Thirty-one international experts in both sutureless, rapid deployment valves and stented bioprostheses constituted the panel. After a thorough literature review, evidence-based recommendations were rated in a three-step modified Delphi approach by the experts. Literature research could identify 67 clinical trials, 4 guidelines and 10 systematic reviews for detailed text analysis to obtain a total of 28 recommendations. After rating by the experts, 12 recommendations were identified and degree of consensus for each was determined. Proctoring and education are necessary for the introduction of sutureless valves on an institutional basis as well as for the individual training of surgeons. Sutureless and rapid deployment should be considered as the valve prosthesis of first choice for isolated procedures in patients with comorbidities, old age, delicate aortic wall conditions such as calcified root, porcelain aorta or prior implantation of aortic homograft and stentless valves as well as for concomitant procedures and small aortic roots to reduce cross-clamp time. Intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography is highly recommended, and in case of right anterior thoracotomy, preoperative computer tomography is strongly recommended. Suitable annular sizes are 19-27 mm. There is a contraindication for bicuspid valves only for Type 0 and for annular abscess or destruction due to infective endocarditis. Careful but complete decalcification of the aortic root is recommended to avoid paravalvular leakage; extensive decalcification should be avoided not to create annular defects. Proximal anastomoses of concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting should be placed during a single aortic cross-clamp period or alternatively with careful side clamping. Available evidence suggests that the use

  3. A novel stent inflation protocol improves long-term outcomes compared with rapid inflation/deflation deployment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallurupalli, Srikanth; Kasula, Srikanth; Kumar Agarwal, Shiv; Pothineni, Naga Venkata K; Abualsuod, Amjad; Hakeem, Abdul; Ahmed, Zubair; Uretsky, Barry F

    2017-08-01

    High-pressure inflation for coronary stent deployment is universally performed. However, the duration of inflation is variable and does not take into account differences in lesion compliance. We developed a standardized "pressure optimization protocol" (POP) using inflation pressure stability rather than an arbitrary inflation time or angiographic balloon appearance for stent deployment. Whether this approach improves long-term outcomes is unknown. 792 patients who underwent PCI using either rapid inflation/deflation (n = 376) or POP (n = 416) between January 2009 and March 2014 were included. Exclusion criteria included PCI for acute myocardial infarction, in-stent restenosis, chronic total occlusion, left main, and saphenous vein graft lesions. Primary endpoint was target vessel failure [TVF = combined end point of target vessel revascularization (TVR), myocardial infarction, and cardiac death]. Outcomes were analyzed in the entire cohort and in a propensity analysis. Stent implantation using POP with a median follow-up of 1317 days was associated with lower TVF compared with rapid inflation/deflation (10.1 vs. 17.8%, P inflation/deflation (10 vs. 18%, P < 0.0001). Stent deployment using POP led to reduced TVF compared to rapid I/D. These results recommend this method to improve long-term outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Service platform for rapid development and deployment of context-Aware, mobile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pokraev, S.; Koolwaaij, J.; van Setten, M.; Broens, T.H.F.; Dockhorn Costa, P.; Wibbels, M.; Ebben, P.; Strating, P.; Strating, P.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a web services-based platform that facilitates and speeds up the development and deployment of context-aware, integrated mobile speech and data applications. The platform is capable of handling different types of context and offers sophisticated personalization mechanisms.

  5. A robustness screen for the rapid assessment of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karl D; Glorius, Frank

    2013-07-01

    In contrast to the rapidity with which scientific information is published, the application of new knowledge often remains slow, and we believe this to be particularly true of newly developed synthetic organic chemistry methodology. Consequently, methods to assess and identify robust chemical reactions are desirable, and would directly facilitate the application of newly reported synthetic methodology to complex synthetic problems. Here, we describe a simple process for assessing the likely scope and limitations of a chemical reaction beyond the idealized reaction conditions initially reported. Using simple methods and common analytical techniques we demonstrate a rapid assessment of an established chemical reaction, and also propose a simplified analysis that may be reported alongside new synthetic methodology.

  6. The Deployable Operations Group: A Model for a National Unified Interagency Rapid Response Command

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cooper, Eric M

    2008-01-01

    .... Since the attacks, nationwide preparedness efforts have established numerous federal rapid response teams, which are coordinated during a federal interagency response under the National Incident Management System...

  7. cl-dash: rapid configuration and deployment of Hadoop clusters for bioinformatics research in the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodor, Paul; Chawla, Amandeep; Clark, Andrew; Neal, Lauren

    2016-01-15

    : One of the solutions proposed for addressing the challenge of the overwhelming abundance of genomic sequence and other biological data is the use of the Hadoop computing framework. Appropriate tools are needed to set up computational environments that facilitate research of novel bioinformatics methodology using Hadoop. Here, we present cl-dash, a complete starter kit for setting up such an environment. Configuring and deploying new Hadoop clusters can be done in minutes. Use of Amazon Web Services ensures no initial investment and minimal operation costs. Two sample bioinformatics applications help the researcher understand and learn the principles of implementing an algorithm using the MapReduce programming pattern. Source code is available at https://bitbucket.org/booz-allen-sci-comp-team/cl-dash.git. hodor_paul@bah.com. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. cl-dash: rapid configuration and deployment of Hadoop clusters for bioinformatics research in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodor, Paul; Chawla, Amandeep; Clark, Andrew; Neal, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Summary: One of the solutions proposed for addressing the challenge of the overwhelming abundance of genomic sequence and other biological data is the use of the Hadoop computing framework. Appropriate tools are needed to set up computational environments that facilitate research of novel bioinformatics methodology using Hadoop. Here, we present cl-dash, a complete starter kit for setting up such an environment. Configuring and deploying new Hadoop clusters can be done in minutes. Use of Amazon Web Services ensures no initial investment and minimal operation costs. Two sample bioinformatics applications help the researcher understand and learn the principles of implementing an algorithm using the MapReduce programming pattern. Availability and implementation: Source code is available at https://bitbucket.org/booz-allen-sci-comp-team/cl-dash.git. Contact: hodor_paul@bah.com PMID:26428290

  9. Rapid and reliable protein structure determination via chemical shift threading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Berjanskii, Mark V; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2017-12-01

    Protein structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here we demonstrate how chemical shift threading can permit rapid, robust, and accurate protein structure determination using only chemical shift data. Threading is a relatively old bioinformatics technique that uses a combination of sequence information and predicted (or experimentally acquired) low-resolution structural data to generate high-resolution 3D protein structures. The key motivations behind using NMR chemical shifts for protein threading lie in the fact that they are easy to measure, they are available prior to 3D structure determination, and they contain vital structural information. The method we have developed uses not only sequence and chemical shift similarity but also chemical shift-derived secondary structure, shift-derived super-secondary structure, and shift-derived accessible surface area to generate a high quality protein structure regardless of the sequence similarity (or lack thereof) to a known structure already in the PDB. The method (called E-Thrifty) was found to be very fast (often structure) and to significantly outperform other shift-based or threading-based structure determination methods (in terms of top template model accuracy)-with an average TM-score performance of 0.68 (vs. 0.50-0.62 for other methods). Coupled with recent developments in chemical shift refinement, these results suggest that protein structure determination, using only NMR chemical shifts, is becoming increasingly practical and reliable. E-Thrifty is available as a web server at http://ethrifty.ca .

  10. Model-Driven Methodology for Rapid Deployment of Smart Spaces Based on Resource-Oriented Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredor, Iván; Bernardos, Ana M.; Iglesias, Josué; Casar, José R.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in electronics nowadays facilitate the design of smart spaces based on physical mash-ups of sensor and actuator devices. At the same time, software paradigms such as Internet of Things (IoT) and Web of Things (WoT) are motivating the creation of technology to support the development and deployment of web-enabled embedded sensor and actuator devices with two major objectives: (i) to integrate sensing and actuating functionalities into everyday objects, and (ii) to easily allow a diversity of devices to plug into the Internet. Currently, developers who are applying this Internet-oriented approach need to have solid understanding about specific platforms and web technologies. In order to alleviate this development process, this research proposes a Resource-Oriented and Ontology-Driven Development (ROOD) methodology based on the Model Driven Architecture (MDA). This methodology aims at enabling the development of smart spaces through a set of modeling tools and semantic technologies that support the definition of the smart space and the automatic generation of code at hardware level. ROOD feasibility is demonstrated by building an adaptive health monitoring service for a Smart Gym. PMID:23012544

  11. Model-driven methodology for rapid deployment of smart spaces based on resource-oriented architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredor, Iván; Bernardos, Ana M; Iglesias, Josué; Casar, José R

    2012-01-01

    Advances in electronics nowadays facilitate the design of smart spaces based on physical mash-ups of sensor and actuator devices. At the same time, software paradigms such as Internet of Things (IoT) and Web of Things (WoT) are motivating the creation of technology to support the development and deployment of web-enabled embedded sensor and actuator devices with two major objectives: (i) to integrate sensing and actuating functionalities into everyday objects, and (ii) to easily allow a diversity of devices to plug into the Internet. Currently, developers who are applying this Internet-oriented approach need to have solid understanding about specific platforms and web technologies. In order to alleviate this development process, this research proposes a Resource-Oriented and Ontology-Driven Development (ROOD) methodology based on the Model Driven Architecture (MDA). This methodology aims at enabling the development of smart spaces through a set of modeling tools and semantic technologies that support the definition of the smart space and the automatic generation of code at hardware level. ROOD feasibility is demonstrated by building an adaptive health monitoring service for a Smart Gym.

  12. Model-Driven Methodology for Rapid Deployment of Smart Spaces Based on Resource-Oriented Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. Casar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in electronics nowadays facilitate the design of smart spaces based on physical mash-ups of sensor and actuator devices. At the same time, software paradigms such as Internet of Things (IoT and Web of Things (WoT are motivating the creation of technology to support the development and deployment of web-enabled embedded sensor and actuator devices with two major objectives: (i to integrate sensing and actuating functionalities into everyday objects, and (ii to easily allow a diversity of devices to plug into the Internet. Currently, developers who are applying this Internet-oriented approach need to have solid understanding about specific platforms and web technologies. In order to alleviate this development process, this research proposes a Resource-Oriented and Ontology-Driven Development (ROOD methodology based on the Model Driven Architecture (MDA. This methodology aims at enabling the development of smart spaces through a set of modeling tools and semantic technologies that support the definition of the smart space and the automatic generation of code at hardware level. ROOD feasibility is demonstrated by building an adaptive health monitoring service for a Smart Gym.

  13. Next generation chemical proteomic tools for rapid enzyme profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttamchandani, Mahesh; Lu, Candy H S; Yao, Shao Q

    2009-08-18

    Sequencing of the human genome provided a wealth of information about the genomic blueprint of a cell. But genes do not tell the entire story of life and living processes; identifying the roles of enzymes and mapping out their interactions is also crucial. Enzymes catalyze virtually every cellular process and metabolic exchange. They not only are instrumental in sustaining life but also are required for its regulation and diversification. Diseases such as cancer can be caused by minor changes in enzyme activities. In addition, the unique enzymes of pathogenic organisms are ripe targets for combating infections. Consequently, nearly one-third of all current drug targets are enzymes. An estimated 18-29% of eukaryotic genes encode enzymes, but only a limited proportion of enzymes have thus far been characterized. Therefore, little is understood about the physiological roles, substrate specificity, and downstream targets of the vast majority of these important proteins. A key step toward the biological characterization of enzymes, as well as their adoption as drug targets, is the development of global solutions that bridge the gap in understanding these proteins and their interactions. We herein present technological advances that facilitate the study of enzymes and their properties in a high-throughput manner. Over the years, our group has introduced and developed a variety of such enabling platforms for many classes of enzymes, including kinases, phosphatases, and proteases. For each of these different types of enzymes, specific design considerations are required to develop the appropriate chemical tools to characterize each class. These tools include activity-based probes and chemical compound libraries, which are rapidly assembled using efficient combinatorial synthesis or "click chemistry" strategies. The resulting molecular assortments may then be screened against the target enzymes in high-throughput using microplates or microarrays. These techniques offer

  14. Kinect Technology Game Play to Mimic Quake Catcher Network (QCN) Sensor Deployment During a Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilb, D. L.; Yang, A.; Rohrlick, D.; Cochran, E. S.; Lawrence, J.; Chung, A. I.; Neighbors, C.; Choo, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Kinect technology allows for hands-free game play, greatly increasing the accessibility of gaming for those uncomfortable using controllers. How it works is the Kinect camera transmits invisible near-infrared light and measures its "time of flight" to reflect off an object, allowing it to distinguish objects within 1 centimeter in depth and 3 mm in height and width. The middleware can also respond to body gestures and voice commands. Here, we use the Kinect Windows SDK software to create a game that mimics how scientists deploy seismic instruments following a large earthquake. The educational goal of the game is to allow the players to explore 3D space as they learn about the Quake Catcher Network's (QCN) Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP). Many of the scenarios within the game are taken from factual RAMP experiences. To date, only the PC platform (or a Mac running PC emulator software) is available for use, but we hope to move to other platforms (e.g., Xbox 360, iPad, iPhone) as they become available. The game is written in programming language C# using Microsoft XNA and Visual Studio 2010, graphic shading is added using High Level Shader Language (HLSL), and rendering is produced using XNA's graphics libraries. Key elements of the game include selecting sensor locations, adequately installing the sensor, and monitoring the incoming data. During game play aftershocks can occur unexpectedly, as can other problems that require attention (e.g., power outages, equipment failure, and theft). The player accrues points for quickly deploying the first sensor (recording as many initial aftershocks as possible), correctly installing the sensors (orientation with respect to north, properly securing, and testing), distributing the sensors adequately in the region, and troubleshooting problems. One can also net points for efficient use of game play time. Setting up for game play in your local environment requires: (1) the Kinect hardware ( $145); (2) a computer

  15. Rapid determination of fumigant and industrial chemical residues in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daft, J L

    1988-01-01

    A gas chromatographic (GC) method is described for the determination of 22 fumigant and industrial chemical residues in a variety of foods. The fumigants and industrial chemicals determined are methyl bromide, methylene chloride, carbon disulfide, chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, ethylene dichloride, methyl chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, methylene bromide, propylene dichloride, 2,3-dichloropropene, trichloroethylene, 1,3-dichloropropylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, chloropicrin, ethylene dibromide, tetrachloroethylene, propylene dibromide, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, p-dichlorobenzene, o-dichlorobenzene, and 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane. Except for the latter three, the fumigants are determined at 90 degrees C on 3.6 m 20% loaded OV-101 columns with electron-capture and Hall-electroconductivity detectors. The other 3 compounds (o-dichlorobenzene, p-dichlorobenzene, and 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane), which elute beyond 30 min on the above columns, are determined at 90 degrees C on 1.8 m 5% loaded OV-101 columns with the same detectors. The ng/g-level fortifications have an overall mean analyte recovery of 70% and a coefficient of variation of 40%. The variety of foods examined includes both fatty and nonfatty food types (e.g., off-the-shelf cooked and uncooked grain-based items, dairy products, fresh and canned fruits and vegetables, and meats). Samples are extracted and cleaned up according to fat content and food type. Samples containing less than 71% fat are extracted by using an aqueous: nonaqueous shakeout (20% acetone solution under isooctane). Most extracts (isooctanes) are analyzed directly. Extracts from samples containing from 21 to 70% fat (e.g., ground beef, pecans, and corn chips) are cleaned up further on micro-Florisil columns to remove excess fat. A few other samples containing more than 71% fat or oil (e.g., butter, salad dressing, and vegetable oil) are diluted directly in isooctane and, depending on the degree of dilution, can be cleaned up further on

  16. Rapid mixing chemical oxidative polymerization: an easy route to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    (catalyst)-coated silicon wafer was used as the substrate. After placing the substrate in the furnace of the .... monomer. This type of interaction is evident from Raman analysis (red shift in C=N Raman band corresponding to. PANI). Remaining aniline molecules get dispersed in the aq. HCl suspension. At the moment of rapid ...

  17. Rapid neutron capture process in supernovae and chemical element formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baruah, Rulee; Duorah, Kalpana; Duorah, H. L.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid neutron capture process (r-process) is one of the major nucleosynthesis processes responsible for the synthesis of heavy nuclei beyond iron. Isotopes beyond Fe are most exclusively formed in neutron capture processes and more heavier ones are produced by the r-process. Approximately half

  18. Experimental setup for rapid crystallization using favoured chemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    tors (3005 type), the output of which drives the d.c. motor. M3. The solution of ... to motor M1 prevents rapid temperature fluctuations and hence ensures very good temperature control. The thermostatic bath is heated with an infrared lamp I at the base of the unit and ... through chains of hydrogen bonds and these polymers.

  19. Experimental setup for rapid crystallization using favoured chemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The rapid crystallization of KH2PO4 (KDP) from solution is demonstrated at a rate up to ≈7.5 mm/day along [100] and 22 mm/day along [001] in a crystallizer of 5 l capacity, using accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT) and simulated platform geometry for controlling the hydrodynamic conditions. On an experimental ...

  20. A Rapid Compression Expansion Machine (RCEM) for studying chemical kinetics: Experimental principle and first applications

    CERN Document Server

    Werler, Marc; Maas, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    A novel extension of a rapid compression machine (RCM), namely a Rapid Compression Expansion Machine (RCEM), is described and its use for studying chemical kinetics is demonstrated. Like conventional RCMs, the RCEM quickly compresses a fuel/air mixture by pushing a piston into a cylinder; the resulting high temperatures and pressures initiate chemical reactions. In addition, the machine can rapidly expand the compressed gas in a controlled way by pulling the piston outwards again. This freezes chemical activity after a pre-defined reaction duration, and therefore allows a convenient probe sampling and ex-situ gas analysis of stable species. The RCEM therefore is a promising instrument for studying chemical kinetics, including also partially reacted fuel/air mixtures. The setup of the RCEM, its experimental characteristics and its use for studying chemical reactions are outlined in detail. To allow comparisons of RCEM results with predictions of chemical reaction mechanisms, a simple numerical model of the RCE...

  1. MOFs for the Sensitive Detection of Ammonia: Deployment of fcu-MOF Thin Films as Effective Chemical Capacitive Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assen, Ayalew H; Yassine, Omar; Shekhah, Osama; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Salama, Khaled N

    2017-09-22

    This work reports on the fabrication and deployment of a select metal-organic framework (MOF) thin film as an advanced chemical capacitive sensor for the sensing/detection of ammonia (NH 3 ) at room temperature. Namely, the MOF thin film sensing layer consists of a rare-earth (RE) MOF (RE-fcu-MOF) deposited on a capacitive interdigitated electrode (IDE). Purposely, the chemically stable naphthalene-based RE-fcu-MOF (NDC-Y-fcu-MOF) was elected and prepared/arranged as a thin film on a prefunctionalized capacitive IDE via the solvothermal growth method. Unlike earlier realizations, the fabricated MOF-based sensor showed a notable detection sensitivity for NH 3 at concentrations down to 1 ppm, with a detection limit appraised to be around 100 ppb (at room temperature) even in the presence of humidity and/or CO 2 . Distinctly, the NDC-Y-fcu-MOF based sensor exhibited the required stability to NH 3 , in contrast to other reported MOFs, and a remarkable detection selectivity toward NH 3 vs CH 4 , NO 2 , H 2 , and C 7 H 8 . The NDC-Y-fcu-MOF based sensor exhibited excellent performance for sensing ammonia for simulated breathing system in the presence of the mixture of carbon dioxide and/or humidity (water vapor), with no major alteration in the detection signal.

  2. MOFs for the Sensitive Detection of Ammonia: Deployment of fcu-MOF Thin-Films as Effective Chemical Capacitive Sensors.

    KAUST Repository

    Assen, Ayalew Hussen Assen

    2017-08-15

    This work reports on the fabrication and deployment of a select metal-organic framework (MOF) thin film as an advanced chemical capacitive sensor for the sensing/detection of ammonia (NH3) at room temperature. Namely, the MOF thin film sensing layer consists of a rare-earth (RE) MOF (RE-fcu-MOF) deposited on a capacitive interdigitated electrode (IDE). Purposely, the chemically stable naphthalene-based RE-fcu-MOF (NDC-Y-fcu-MOF) was elected and prepared/arranged as a thin film on a pre-functionalized capacitive IDE via the solvothermal growth method. Unlike earlier realizations, the fabricated MOF-based sensor showed a notable detection sensitivity for NH3 at concentrations down to 1 ppm, with a detection limit appraised to be around 100 ppb (at room temperature) even in the presence of humidity and/or CO2. Distinctly, the NDC-Y-fcu-MOF based sensor exhibited the required stability to NH3, in contract to other reported MOFs, and a remarkable detection selectivity towards NH3 vs. CH4, NO2, H2 and C7H8. The NDC-Y-fcu-MOF based sensor exhibited excellent performance for sensing ammonia for simulated breathing system in the presence of the mixture of carbon dioxide and/or humidity (water vapor), with no major alteration in the detection signal.

  3. Deployment Threats to Rapid Deployment Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    sleep. However, don’t push milk and make sure that alternatives are available. A signifi- cant proportion of the troops are likely to be intolerant of...the lactose that milk contains and therefore be subject to G.I. distress if milk is consumed. Self-selection should be provided for and respected...their names, addresses, and phone numbers? b. Who has children ? What ages? Where do they go to school? c. Who works? d. What are the unit affiliations

  4. Development and deployment of a rapid recombinase polymerase amplification Ebola virus detection assay in Guinea in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Oumar; Faye, Ousmane; Soropogui, Barré; Patel, Pranav; El Wahed, Ahmed Abd; Loucoubar, Cheikh; Fall, Gamou; Kiory, Davy; Magassouba, N'Faly; Keita, Sakoba; Kondé, Mandy Kader; Diallo, Alpha Amadou; Koivogui, Lamine; Karlberg, Helen; Mirazimi, Ali; Nentwich, Oliver; Piepenburg, Olaf; Niedrig, Matthias; Weidmann, Manfred; Sall, Amadou Alpha

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of a vaccine or specific treatments for Ebola virus disease (EVD), early identification of cases is crucial for the control of EVD epidemics. We evaluated a new extraction kit (SpeedXtract (SE), Qiagen) on sera and swabs in combination with an improved diagnostic reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification assay for the detection of Ebola virus (EBOV-RT-RPA). The performance of combined extraction and detection was best for swabs. Sensitivity and specificity of the combined SE and EBOV-RT-RPA were tested in a mobile laboratory consisting of a mobile glovebox and a Diagnostics-in-a-Suitcase powered by a battery and solar panel, deployed to Matoto Conakry, Guinea as part of the reinforced surveillance strategy in April 2015 to reach the goal of zero cases. The EBOV-RT-RPA was evaluated in comparison to two real-time PCR assays. Of 928 post-mortem swabs, 120 tested positive, and the combined SE and EBOV-RT-RPA yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in reference to one real-time RT-PCR assay. Another widely used real-time RT-PCR was much less sensitive than expected. Results were provided very fast within 30 to 60 min, and the field deployment of the mobile laboratory helped improve burial management and community engagement.

  5. Development of a ROV Deployed Video Analysis Tool for Rapid Measurement of Submerged Oil/Gas Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savas, Omer [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-03

    Expanded deep sea drilling around the globe makes it necessary to have readily available tools to quickly and accurately measure discharge rates from accidental submerged oil/gas leak jets for the first responders to deploy adequate resources for containment. We have developed and tested a field deployable video analysis software package which is able to provide in the field sufficiently accurate flow rate estimates for initial responders in accidental oil discharges in submarine operations. The essence of our approach is based on tracking coherent features at the interface in the near field of immiscible turbulent jets. The software package, UCB_Plume, is ready to be used by the first responders for field implementation. We have tested the tool on submerged water and oil jets which are made visible using fluorescent dyes. We have been able to estimate the discharge rate within 20% accuracy. A high end WINDOWS laptop computer is suggested as the operating platform and a USB connected high speed, high resolution monochrome camera as the imaging device are sufficient for acquiring flow images under continuous unidirectional illumination and running the software in the field. Results are obtained over a matter of minutes.

  6. Automatically assessing properties of dynamic cameras for camera selection and rapid deployment of video content analysis tasks in large-scale ad-hoc networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Richard J. M.; Bouma, Henri; van Rest, Jeroen H. C.; ten Hove, Johan-Martijn; ter Haar, Frank B.; Burghouts, Gertjan J.

    2017-10-01

    Video analytics is essential for managing large quantities of raw data that are produced by video surveillance systems (VSS) for the prevention, repression and investigation of crime and terrorism. Analytics is highly sensitive to changes in the scene, and for changes in the optical chain so a VSS with analytics needs careful configuration and prompt maintenance to avoid false alarms. However, there is a trend from static VSS consisting of fixed CCTV cameras towards more dynamic VSS deployments over public/private multi-organization networks, consisting of a wider variety of visual sensors, including pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) cameras, body-worn cameras and cameras on moving platforms. This trend will lead to more dynamic scenes and more frequent changes in the optical chain, creating structural problems for analytics. If these problems are not adequately addressed, analytics will not be able to continue to meet end users' developing needs. In this paper, we present a three-part solution for managing the performance of complex analytics deployments. The first part is a register containing meta data describing relevant properties of the optical chain, such as intrinsic and extrinsic calibration, and parameters of the scene such as lighting conditions or measures for scene complexity (e.g. number of people). A second part frequently assesses these parameters in the deployed VSS, stores changes in the register, and signals relevant changes in the setup to the VSS administrator. A third part uses the information in the register to dynamically configure analytics tasks based on VSS operator input. In order to support the feasibility of this solution, we give an overview of related state-of-the-art technologies for autocalibration (self-calibration), scene recognition and lighting estimation in relation to person detection. The presented solution allows for rapid and robust deployment of Video Content Analysis (VCA) tasks in large scale ad-hoc networks.

  7. Facility monitoring of chemical warfare agent simulants in air using an automated, field-deployable, miniature mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonell N; Noll, Robert J; Cooks, R Graham

    2011-05-30

    Vapors of four chemical warfare agent (CWA) stimulants, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), diethyl malonate (DEM), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), and methyl salicylate (MeS), were detected, identified, and quantitated using a fully automated, field-deployable, miniature mass spectrometer. Samples were ionized using a glow discharge electron ionization (GDEI) source, and ions were mass analyzed with a cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer. A dual-tube thermal desorption system was used to trap compounds on 50:50 Tenax TA/Carboxen 569 sorbent before their thermal release. The sample concentrations ranged from low parts per billion [ppb] to two parts per million [ppm]. Limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.26 to 5.0 ppb. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are presented for each analyte. A sample of CEES at low ppb concentration was combined separately with two interferents, bleach (saturated vapor) and diesel fuel exhaust (1%), as a way to explore the capability of detecting the simulant in an environmental matrix. Also investigated was a mixture of the four CWA simulants (at concentrations in air ranging from 270 to 380 ppb). Tandem mass (MS/MS) spectral data were used to identify and quantify the individual components. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Field-Deployable Reverse Transcription-Insulated Isothermal PCR (RT-iiPCR) Assay for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambagala, A; Fisher, M; Goolia, M; Nfon, C; Furukawa-Stoffer, T; Ortega Polo, R; Lung, O

    2017-10-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals, which can decimate the livestock industry and economy of countries previously free of this disease. Rapid detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is critical to containing an FMD outbreak. Availability of a rapid, highly sensitive and specific, yet simple and field-deployable assay would support local decision-making during an FMDV outbreak. Here we report validation of a novel reverse transcription-insulated isothermal PCR (RT-iiPCR) assay that can be performed on a commercially available, compact and portable POCKIT™ analyser that automatically analyses data and displays '+' or '-' results. The FMDV RT-iiPCR assay targets the 3D region of the FMDV genome and was capable of detecting 9 copies of in vitro-transcribed RNA standard with 95% confidence. It accurately identified 63 FMDV strains belonging to all seven serotypes and showed no cross-reactivity with viruses causing similar clinical diseases in cloven-hoofed animals. The assay was able to identify FMDV RNA in multiple sample types including oral, nasal and lesion swabs, epithelial tissue suspensions, vesicular and oral fluid samples, even before the appearance of clinical signs. Clinical sensitivity of the assay was comparable or slightly higher than the laboratory-based real-time RT-PCR assay in use. The assay was able to detect FMDV RNA in vesicular fluid samples without nucleic acid extraction. For RNA extraction from more complex sample types, a commercially available taco™ mini transportable magnetic bead-based, automated extraction system was used. This assay provides a potentially useful field-deployable diagnostic tool for rapid detection of FMDV in an outbreak in FMD-free countries or for routine diagnostics in endemic countries with less structured laboratory systems. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.

  9. Rapid and sensitive detection of Mycoplasma synoviae by an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction-based assay on a field-deployable device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hung-Chih; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Chen, Chiou-Lin; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ping, Jia-Fong; Lee, Chien-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), causing respiratory diseases, arthritis, and eggshell apex abnormalities in avian species, is an important pathogen in the poultry industry. Implementation of a biosecurity plan is important in MS infection management. Working on a field-deployable POCKIT™ device, an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) assay has a potential for timely MS detection on the farm. The MS iiPCR assay had limit of detection 95% of about 9 genome equivalents by testing serial dilutions of a standard DNA. The detection endpoint of the assay for detection of MS genomic DNA was comparable to a reference real-time PCR. The assay did not crossreact with other important avian pathogens, including avian reovirus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, and Salmonella Pullorum. When 92 synovial fluid and respiratory tract swab samples collected from chickens, turkeys, and geese suspected of MS infection were tested, the clinical performance of the MS iiPCR had 97.8% agreement (Cohen's kappa value, 0.95) with that of the reference real-time PCR. In conclusion, the MS iiPCR/POCKIT™ system, working with field-deployable manual or automatic nucleic acid extraction methods, has potential to serve as a rapid and sensitive on-site tool to facilitate timely detection of MS. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  10. Evaluation of a field-deployable reverse transcription-insulated isothermal PCR for rapid and sensitive on-site detection of Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carossino, Mariano; Li, Yanqiu; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Tsai, Chuan-Fu; Chou, Pin-Hsing; Williams, Dennis; Skillman, Ashley; Frank Cook, R; Brown, Grayson; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2017-12-19

    The recent emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) in Brazil and its precipitous expansion throughout the Americas has highlighted the urgent need for a rapid and reliable on-site diagnostic assay suitable for viral detection. Such point-of-need (PON), low-cost diagnostics are essential for ZIKV control in vulnerable areas with limited resources. We developed and evaluated a ZIKV-specific field-deployable RT-iiPCR reagent set targeting the E gene for rapid detection of ZIKV in ZIKV-spiked human and mosquito specimens, and compared its performance to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) RT-qPCR assays targeting the E and NS2B genes, respectively. These assays demonstrated exclusive specificity for ZIKV (African and Asian lineages), had limits of detection ranging from 10 to 100 in vitro transcribed RNA copies/μl and detection endpoints at 10 plaque forming units/ml of infectious tissue culture fluid. Analysis of human whole blood, plasma, serum, semen, urine, and mosquito pool samples spiked with ZIKV showed an agreement of 90% (k = 0.80), 92% (k = 0.82), 95% (k = 0.86), 92% (k = 0.81), 90% (k = 0.79), and 100% (k = 1), respectively, between the RT-iiPCR assay and composite results from the reference RT-qPCR assays. Overall, the concurrence between the ZIKV RT-iiPCR and the reference RT-qPCR assays was 92% (k = 0.83). The ZIKV RT-iiPCR has a performance comparable to the reference CDC and PAHO RT-qPCR assays but provides much faster results (~1.5 h) with a field-deployable system that can be utilized as a PON diagnostic with the potential to significantly improve the quality of the health care system in vulnerable areas.

  11. Rapid chemical and topological ordering in supercooled liquid Cu46Zr54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, V.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Sahu, K. K.; Hyers, R. W.; Canepari, S. M.; Rogers, J. R.; Kramer, M. J.; Goldman, A. I.; Robinson, D.; Lee, J. W.; Morris, J. R.; Kelton, K. F.

    2011-03-01

    Evidence for rapid ordering in a supercooled Cu46Zr54 liquid, obtained from high-energy x-ray diffraction in a containerless processing environment, is presented. Relatively sudden changes were observed in the topological and chemical short-range order near 850 °C, a temperature that is 75 °C below the liquidus temperature and 465 °C above the glass transition temperature. A peak in the specific heat was observed with supercooling, with an onset near 850 °C (the same temperature as the onset of ordering) and a maximum near 700 °C, consistent with the prediction of a molecular-dynamics calculation using embedded atom potentials. The chemical and topological ordering measured here are in agreement with predictions of a rapid development of chemically ordered icosahedral clusters in the supercooled liquid.

  12. Rapid and Sensitive Reporter Gene Assays for Detection of Antiandrogenic and Estrogenic Effects of Environmental Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential...... antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effectivein vitroscreening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were......-on laboratory time. This assay is a powerful tool for the efficient and accurate determination and quantification of the effects of antiandrogens on reporter gene transcription. To extend the application of FuGene, the reagent was shown to be superior compared to Lipofectin for transfecting MCF7 human breast...

  13. Deployable antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  14. Rapid Prototyping of Chemical Microsensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Synthesized by Two-Photon Stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Laura Piedad Chia; Spangenberg, Arnaud; Ton, Xuan-Anh; Fuchs, Yannick; Bokeloh, Frank; Malval, Jean-Pierre; Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette; Thuau, Damien; Ayela, Cédric; Haupt, Karsten; Soppera, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Two-photon stereolithography is used for rapid prototyping of submicrometre molecularly imprinted polymer-based 3D structures. The structures are evaluated as chemical sensing elements and their specific recognition properties for target molecules are confirmed. The 3D design capability is exploited and highlighted through the fabrication of an all-organic molecularly imprinted polymeric microelectromechanical sensor. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Rapidly Deployable Mobile Security Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    receivers or direct API lockout. Manage wireless network interfaces (Wi- Fi, Bluetooth, etc.) Our application directly restricts access to WiFi and...application by Google or (2) approach Google for further expansion of their Device Policy Manager class and administrator API for inclusion of all 8 features...Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork

  16. Rapid Deployment Logistics: Lebanon, 1958

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    the doctrine of how we fight and how we sustain the fight. Although moving and supporting the force has tradicionally held’ less interest chan combat...Bat Critique," 3. 6. Ibid. 7. Gray manuscript, 26. 8 Oral history, Gen. (Ret.) Paul D. Adams Papers, U.S. Army Military History Institute, Carlisle...Barracks,’PA, 24.- 9. Gray manuscript, 48" 10. Oral history; Adams Papers, 24-25. 11. U.S. Army, 201st Logistical Command, TFSPO 250/16: "Mission

  17. A Rapidly Deployable Bridge System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Impact Factor 1.15 Primary - for speed < 15mph) 1.4 for speeds up to 25mph (Secondary) Factors of Safety 1.5 With respect to Ultimate Strength 1.33...vertical and longitudinal components to account for gravity (including impact) and braking effects. The specified impact factor of 1.35 is typically

  18. An insulated isothermal PCR method on a field-deployable device for rapid and sensitive detection of canine parvovirus type 2 at points of need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Tsai, Chuan-Fu; Chang, Hsiu-Hui; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T

    2015-08-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), including subtypes 2a, 2b and 2c, causes an acute enteric disease in both domestic and wild animals. Rapid and sensitive diagnosis aids effective disease management at points of need (PON). A commercially available, field-deployable and user-friendly system, designed with insulated isothermal PCR (iiPCR) technology, displays excellent sensitivity and specificity for nucleic acid detection. An iiPCR method was developed for on-site detection of all circulating CPV-2 strains. Limit of detection was determined using plasmid DNA. CPV-2a, 2b and 2c strains, a feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) strain, and nine canine pathogens were tested to evaluate assay specificity. Reaction sensitivity and performance were compared with an in-house real-time PCR using serial dilutions of a CPV-2b strain and 100 canine fecal clinical samples collected from 2010 to 2014, respectively. The 95% limit of detection of the iiPCR method was 13 copies of standard DNA and detection limits for CPV-2b DNA were equivalent for iiPCR and real-time PCR. The iiPCR reaction detected CPV-2a, 2b and 2c and FPV. Non-targeted pathogens were not detected. Test results of real-time PCR and iiPCR from 99 fecal samples agreed with each other, while one real-time PCR-positive sample tested negative by iiPCR. Therefore, excellent agreement (k = 0.98) with sensitivity of 98.41% and specificity of 100% in detecting CPV-2 in feces was found between the two methods. In conclusion, the iiPCR system has potential to serve as a useful tool for rapid and accurate PON, molecular detection of CPV-2. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid detection of chemical hazards (toxins, dioxins, and PCBs) in seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S; Kotsanopoulos, Konstantinos V; Papadopoulou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Among the various hazards occurring in fish and seafood chemical hazards and in particular toxins (ciguatera, scombroid fish poisoning, paralytic shellfish poisoning, neurotoxic (brevetoxic) shellfish poisoning, puffer fish poisoning, diarrhetic shellfish poisoning) have an important place in food poisoning cases. On the other hand, some of the chemical hazards are often due to the pollution of the environment (heavy metals, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons) and their detection is neither rapid nor facile. As a result there was a great need for developing new rapid and effective methods toward the chemical hazards determination mainly because of their high toxicity. The aim of this review is to provide the information about the new up-to-date detection techniques (Immunological, Chemical and Biochemical, and Molecular assays) in conjunction with detection limits. The latter is made possible by means of inclusion of seven comprehensive and, in most case cases, very extended tables. A reference is also made on the risk characterization of toxins as regards their importance to food contamination or poisoning.

  20. Development of a New Decision Tree to Rapidly Screen Chemical Estrogenic Activities of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Li, Weiying; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Lin, Zhifen; Kong, Deyang

    2014-02-01

    During the last past decades, there is an increasing number of studies about estrogenic activities of the environmental pollutants on amphibians and many determination methods have been proposed. However, these determination methods are time-consuming and expensive, and a rapid and simple method to screen and test the chemicals for estrogenic activities to amphibians is therefore imperative. Herein is proposed a new decision tree formulated not only with physicochemical parameters but also a biological parameter that was successfully used to screen estrogenic activities of the chemicals on amphibians. The biological parameter, CDOCKER interaction energy (Ebinding ) between chemicals and the target proteins was calculated based on the method of molecular docking, and it was used to revise the decision tree formulated by Hong only with physicochemical parameters for screening estrogenic activity of chemicals in rat. According to the correlation between Ebinding of rat and Xenopus laevis, a new decision tree for estrogenic activities in Xenopus laevis is finally proposed. Then it was validated by using the randomly 8 chemicals which can be frequently exposed to Xenopus laevis, and the agreement between the results from the new decision tree and the ones from experiments is generally satisfactory. Consequently, the new decision tree can be used to screen the estrogenic activities of the chemicals, and combinational use of the Ebinding and classical physicochemical parameters can greatly improves Hong's decision tree. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effective in vitro screening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were...... induction of luciferase activity. The classical antiandrogenic compounds hydroxy-flutamide, bicalutamide, spironolactone, and cyproterone acetate together with the pesticide(metabolite)s, vinclozolin, p,p'-DDE, and procymidone all potently inhibited the response to 0.1 nM R1881, Compared to the traditional...... cancer cells with an estrogen response element-luciferase vector. Thus, FuGene may prove to be valuable in diverse reporter gene assays involving transient transfections for screening of potential endocrine disrupters for (anti)androgenic and (anti)estrogenic properties....

  2. Rapid chemical shift encoding with single-acquisition single-slab 3D GRASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hahnsung; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Jaeseok

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of chemical shift encoded, single-slab 3D GRASE for rapid fat-water separation within a single acquisition. The proposed method incorporates signal-to-noise-ratio-optimal chemical shift encoding into single-slab 3D GRASE with variable flip angles. Chemical shift induced phase information was encoded in succession to different positions in k-space by inserting phase encoding blips between adjacent lobes of the oscillating readout gradients. To enhance imaging efficiency, signal prescription-based variable flip angles were used in the long refocusing pulse train. After echo-independent phase correction, missing signals in k-echo space were interpolated using convolution kernels that span over all echoes. Fat-water separation in a single acquisition was performed using both multi-echo fast spin echo and GRASE as compared to conventional multiacquisition fast spin echo with echo shifts. The proposed single-slab 3D GRASE shows superior performance in accurately delineating cartilage structures compared to its counterpart, multi-echo 3D fast spin echo. Compared with multiacquisition fast spin echo with three echo shifts (63 min), the proposed method substantially speeds up imaging time (7 min), and achieves 0.6 mm isotropic resolution in knee imaging with reduced artifacts and noise. We successfully demonstrated the feasibility of rapid chemical shift encoding and separation using the proposed, single-acquisition single-slab 3D GRASE for high resolution isotropic imaging within clinically acceptable time. Magn Reson Med 78:1852-1861, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Large area super-resolution chemical imaging via rapid dithering of a nanoprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Languirand, Eric R.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2015-05-01

    Super-resolution chemical imaging via Raman spectroscopy provides a significant ability to simultaneously or pseudosimultaneously monitor numerous label-free analytes while elucidating their spatial distribution on the surface of the sample. However, spontaneous Raman is an inherently weak phenomenon making trace detection and thus superresolution imaging extremely difficult, if not impossible. To circumvent this and allow for trace detection of the few chemical species present in any sub-diffraction limited resolution element of an image, we have developed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coherent fiber-optic imaging bundle probe consisting of 30,000 individual fiber elements. When the probes are tapered, etched and coated with metal, they provide circular Raman chemical images of a sample with a field of view of approximately 20μm (i.e. diameter) via the array of 30,000 individual 50 nm fiber elements. An acousto-optic tunable filter is used to rapidly scan or select discrete frequencies for multi- or hyperspectral analysis. Although the 50nm fiber element dimensions of this probe inherently provide spatial resolutions of approximately 100nm, further increases in the spatial resolution can be achieved by using a rapid dithering process. Using this process, additional images are obtained one-half fiber diameter translations in the x- and y- planes. A piezostage drives the movement, providing the accurate and reproducible shifts required for dithering. Optimal probability algorithms are then used to deconvolute the related images producing a final image with a three-fold increase in spatial resolution. This paper describes super-resolution chemical imaging using these probes and the dithering method as well as its potential applications in label-free imaging of lipid rafts and other applications within biology and forensics.

  4. Rapid Electrochemical Detection and Identification of Microbiological and Chemical Contaminants for Manned Spaceflight Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane; Botkin, Douglas; Gazda, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microbial control in the spacecraft environment is a daunting task, especially in the presence of human crew members. Currently, assessing the potential crew health risk associated with a microbial contamination event requires return of representative environmental samples that are analyzed in a ground-based laboratory. It is therefore not currently possible to quickly identify microbes during spaceflight. This project addresses the unmet need for spaceflight-compatible microbial identification technology. The electrochemical detection and identification platform is expected to provide a sensitive, specific, and rapid sample-to-answer capability for in-flight microbial monitoring that can distinguish between related microorganisms (pathogens and non-pathogens) as well as chemical contaminants. This will dramatically enhance our ability to monitor the spacecraft environment and the health risk to the crew. Further, the project is expected to eliminate the need for sample return while significantly reducing crew time required for detection of multiple targets. Initial work will focus on the optimization of bacterial detection and identification. The platform is designed to release nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from microorganisms without the use of harmful chemicals. Bacterial DNA or RNA is captured by bacteria-specific probe molecules that are bound to a microelectrode, and that capture event can generate a small change in the electrical current (Lam, et al. 2012. Anal. Chem. 84(1): 21-5.). This current is measured, and a determination is made whether a given microbe is present in the sample analyzed. Chemical detection can be accomplished by directly applying a sample to the microelectrode and measuring the resulting current change. This rapid microbial and chemical detection device is designed to be a low-cost, low-power platform anticipated to be operated independently of an external power source, characteristics optimal for manned spaceflight and areas where power

  5. Inflatable Wing Deployment Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator aircraft's wings begin deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight experiment conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Wing deployment time is typically on the order of a third of a second, almost faster than the human eye can see. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  6. Alloy composition dependence of formation of porous Ni prepared by rapid solidification and chemical dealloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi Zhen [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang Zhonghua [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China)], E-mail: zh_zhang@sdu.edu.cn; Jia Haoling [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China); Qu Yingjie [Shandong Labor Occupational Technology College, Jingshi Road 388, Jinan 250022 (China); Liu Guodong; Bian Xiufang [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2009-03-20

    In this paper, the effect of alloy composition on the formation of porous Ni catalysts prepared by chemical dealloying of rapidly solidified Al-Ni alloys has been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and N{sub 2} adsorption experiments. The experimental results show that rapid solidification and alloy composition have a significant effect on the phase constituent and microstructure of Al-Ni alloys. The melt spun Al-20 at.% Ni alloy consists of {alpha}-Al, NiAl{sub 3} and Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3}, while the melt spun Al-25 and 31.5 at.% Ni alloys comprise NiAl{sub 3} and Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3}. Moreover, the formation and microstructure of the porous Ni catalysts are dependent upon the composition of the melt spun Al-Ni alloys. The morphology and size of Ni particles in the Ni catalysts inherit from those of grains in the melt spun Al-Ni alloys. Rapid solidification can extend the alloy composition of Al-Ni alloys suitable for preparation of the Ni catalysts, and obviously accelerate the dealloying process of the Al-Ni alloys.

  7. A Novel UAS Rapid Deployment Platform for Targeted Gas Sampling and Meteorological Soundings at Altitudes up to 2,700 masl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rick M.; Greatwood, Colin; Richardson, Tom; Freer, Jim; MacKenzie, Rob; Brownlow, Rebecca; Lowry, David; Fisher, Rebecca E.; France, James; Nisbet, Euan G.

    2015-04-01

    This research project has developed Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) technologies for intelligent targeting and collection of atmospheric gas samples to investigate the so-called Southern Tropical Methane Anomaly, for which it is necessary to sample air below and above the trade-wind inversion. Air parcels above and below the South Atlantic trade-wind inversion can have markedly different trajectories and, hence, encounter very different methane source regions. The system is intelligent in that high resolution temperature and humidity sensors linked to the ground station characterise the atmospheric profile on the upward flight to ensure the platform targets the appropriate sample elevations on the downward trajectory. This capability has been proven to an altitude of 2,700 metres above sea level (masl; ca. 700 mb) at Ascension Island in the South Atlantic and shown that rapid and repeat deployment and sample collection is achievable. Three novel eight motor multirotor UAS (or octocopter) platforms were developed at Bristol Robotics Laboratory (BRL) using primarily off -the-shelf components with a custom-built main fuselage. Gas sampling and atmospheric sensor systems were designed by the University of Birmingham. Our paper explores the capability of this UAS and provides some initial results from the air sampling campaign conducted in September 2014. Thirty-eight sampling flights were conducted over 12 days and the resulting 47 samples analysed for their CH4 concentration using the high-precision Picarro Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer already installed at Ascension Island. A subset of samples were sent for δ13CCH4 analysis in Egham, UK. The flights were conducted up to an altitude of 2,700m with 2,000m being typical. There were no major incidents although variable zero and high wind situations above the trade wind inversion (typically at 1,800m) both presented unique challenges and required careful flight planning strategies and in flight trajectory changes. As a

  8. Smashing the Stovepipe: Leveraging the GMSEC Open Architecture and Advanced IT Automation to Rapidly Prototype, Develop and Deploy Next-Generation Multi-Mission Ground Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Satellite/Payload Ground Systems - Typically highly-customized to a specific mission's use cases - Utilize hundreds (or thousands!) of specialized point-to-point interfaces for data flows / file transfers Documentation and tracking of these complex interfaces requires extensive time to develop and extremely high staffing costs Implementation and testing of these interfaces are even more cost-prohibitive, and documentation often lags behind implementation resulting in inconsistencies down the road With expanding threat vectors, IT Security, Information Assurance and Operational Security have become key Ground System architecture drivers New Federal security-related directives are generated on a daily basis, imposing new requirements on current / existing ground systems - These mandated activities and data calls typically carry little or no additional funding for implementation As a result, Ground System Sustaining Engineering groups and Information Technology staff continually struggle to keep up with the rolling tide of security Advancing security concerns and shrinking budgets are pushing these large stove-piped ground systems to begin sharing resources - I.e. Operational / SysAdmin staff, IT security baselines, architecture decisions or even networks / hosting infrastructure Refactoring these existing ground systems into multi-mission assets proves extremely challenging due to what is typically very tight coupling between legacy components As a result, many "Multi-Mission" ops. environments end up simply sharing compute resources and networks due to the difficulty of refactoring into true multi-mission systems Utilizing continuous integration / rapid system deployment technologies in conjunction with an open architecture messaging approach allows System Engineers and Architects to worry less about the low-level details of interfaces between components and configuration of systems GMSEC messaging is inherently designed to support multi-mission requirements, and

  9. Path to Impact for Autonomous Field Deployable Chemical Sensors: A Case Study of in Situ Nitrite Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierenbeck, Tim M; Smith, Matthew C

    2017-05-02

    Natural freshwater systems have been severely affected by excess loading of macronutrients (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus) from fertilizers, fossil fuels, and human and livestock waste. In the USA, impacts to drinking water quality, biogeochemical cycles, and aquatic ecosystems are estimated to cost US$210 billion annually. Field-deployable nutrient sensors (FDS) offer potential to support research and resource management efforts by acquiring higher resolution data than are currently supported by expensive conventional sampling methods. Following nearly 40 years of research and development, FDS instruments are now starting to penetrate commercial markets. However, instrument uncertainty factors (high cost, reliability, accuracy, and precision) are key drivers impeding the uptake of FDS by the majority of users. Using nitrite sensors as a case study, we review the trends, opportunities, and challenges in producing and implementing FDS from a perspective of innovation and impact. We characterize the user community and consumer needs, identify trends in research approaches, tabulate state-of-the-art examples and specifications, and discuss data life cycle considerations. With further development of FDS through prototyping and testing in real-world applications, these tools can deliver information for protecting and restoring natural waters, enhancing process control for industrial operations and water treatment, and providing novel research insights.

  10. A portable photoelectrochemical probe for rapid determination of chemical oxygen demand in wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanqing; Li, Lihong; Zhao, Huijun

    2009-10-15

    A photoelectrochemical probe for rapid determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) is developed using a nanostructured mixed-phase TiO2 photoanode, namely PeCOD probe. A UV-LED light source and a USB mircroelectrochemical station are powered and controlled by a laptop computer, which makes the probe portable for onsite COD analyses. The photoelectrochemical measurement of COD was optimized in terms of light intensity, applied bias, and pH. Under the optimized conditions, the net steady state currents originated from the oxidation of organic compounds were found to be directly proportional to COD concentrations. A practical detection limit of 0.2 ppm COD and a linear range of 0-120 ppm COD were achieved. The analytical method using the portable PeCOD probe has the advantages of being rapid, low cost, robust, user-friendly, and environmental friendly. It has been successfully applied to determine the COD values of the synthetic samples consisting of potassium hydrogen phthalate, D-glucose, glutamic acid, glutaric acid, succinic acid, and malonic acid, and real samples from various industries, such as bakery, oil and grease manufacturer, poultry, hotel, fine food factory, and fresh food producer, commercial bread manufacturer. Excellent agreement between the proposed method and the conventional COD method (dichromate) was achieved.

  11. Learning to rapidly re-contact the lost plume in chemical plume tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Meng-Li; Meng, Qing-Hao; Wang, Jia-Ying; Luo, Bing; Jing, Ya-Qi; Ma, Shu-Gen

    2015-03-27

    Maintaining contact between the robot and plume is significant in chemical plume tracing (CPT). In the time immediately following the loss of chemical detection during the process of CPT, Track-Out activities bias the robot heading relative to the upwind direction, expecting to rapidly re-contact the plume. To determine the bias angle used in the Track-Out activity, we propose an online instance-based reinforcement learning method, namely virtual trail following (VTF). In VTF, action-value is generalized from recently stored instances of successful Track-Out activities. We also propose a collaborative VTF (cVTF) method, in which multiple robots store their own instances, and learn from the stored instances, in the same database. The proposed VTF and cVTF methods are compared with biased upwind surge (BUS) method, in which all Track-Out activities utilize an offline optimized universal bias angle, in an indoor environment with three different airflow fields. With respect to our experimental conditions, VTF and cVTF show stronger adaptability to different airflow environments than BUS, and furthermore, cVTF yields higher success rates and time-efficiencies than VTF.

  12. Learning to Rapidly Re-Contact the Lost Plume in Chemical Plume Tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Li Cao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining contact between the robot and plume is significant in chemical plume tracing (CPT. In the time immediately following the loss of chemical detection during the process of CPT, Track-Out activities bias the robot heading relative to the upwind direction, expecting to rapidly re-contact the plume. To determine the bias angle used in the Track-Out activity, we propose an online instance-based reinforcement learning method, namely virtual trail following (VTF. In VTF, action-value is generalized from recently stored instances of successful Track-Out activities. We also propose a collaborative VTF (cVTF method, in which multiple robots store their own instances, and learn from the stored instances, in the same database. The proposed VTF and cVTF methods are compared with biased upwind surge (BUS method, in which all Track-Out activities utilize an offline optimized universal bias angle, in an indoor environment with three different airflow fields. With respect to our experimental conditions, VTF and cVTF show stronger adaptability to different airflow environments than BUS, and furthermore, cVTF yields higher success rates and time-efficiencies than VTF.

  13. Learning to Rapidly Re-Contact the Lost Plume in Chemical Plume Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Meng-Li; Meng, Qing-Hao; Wang, Jia-Ying; Luo, Bing; Jing, Ya-Qi; Ma, Shu-Gen

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining contact between the robot and plume is significant in chemical plume tracing (CPT). In the time immediately following the loss of chemical detection during the process of CPT, Track-Out activities bias the robot heading relative to the upwind direction, expecting to rapidly re-contact the plume. To determine the bias angle used in the Track-Out activity, we propose an online instance-based reinforcement learning method, namely virtual trail following (VTF). In VTF, action-value is generalized from recently stored instances of successful Track-Out activities. We also propose a collaborative VTF (cVTF) method, in which multiple robots store their own instances, and learn from the stored instances, in the same database. The proposed VTF and cVTF methods are compared with biased upwind surge (BUS) method, in which all Track-Out activities utilize an offline optimized universal bias angle, in an indoor environment with three different airflow fields. With respect to our experimental conditions, VTF and cVTF show stronger adaptability to different airflow environments than BUS, and furthermore, cVTF yields higher success rates and time-efficiencies than VTF. PMID:25825974

  14. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  15. Deployment psychology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abel

    breaking fashion, brings into a single compendium the growing body of literatures, since Yerkes's work, which point to the ... [they] reflect on how they have changed”.3 From the outset of this text, there is a very real and palpable sense .... embedded and enmeshed. At times, Deployment psychology appears to ignore the.

  16. Rapid and sensitive detection of Mycoplasma synoviae by an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction-based assay on a field-deployable device

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Hung-Chih; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Chen, Chiou-Lin; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ping, Jia-Fong; Lee, Chien-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), causing respiratory diseases, arthritis, and eggshell apex abnormalities in avian species, is an important pathogen in the poultry industry. Implementation of a biosecurity plan is important in MS infection management. Working on a field-deployable POCKIT? device, an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) assay has a potential for timely MS detection on the farm. The MS iiPCR assay had limit of detection 95% of about 9 genome equivalents by testing se...

  17. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    environment. Zero shift errors  Part replacement after testing  Material damage, including damage to composite fibers and plastic deformation in...of motors or deployment drivers  Loss or redistribution of lubrication Hysteresis errors  Material creep due to time in storage and time in the...measurements can be made with fixed references within the room. The first solution is self -explanatory. The second solution requires regular reference

  18. Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition growth of nanometer-thin SiC on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckl, A.J.; Li, J.P. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1992-08-28

    Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition growth of [beta]-SiC ultrathin films on Si (100) was achieved using the carbonization reaction of the silicon substrate with C[sub 3]H[sub 8] gas. Growth rates of 0.5-2 nm s[sup -1] have been achieved at 1100-1300degC using C[sub 3]H[sub 8] flow rates of 7-9 standard cm[sup 3] min[sup -1]. X-ray and electron diffraction indicate single-crystal growth. Therefore nanometer-scale SiC films can be grown by controlling the reaction time to a few seconds. The activation energy at atmospheric pressure is 3.12 eV. The growth rate was found to decrease significantly at higher C[sub 3]H[sub 8] flow rates, leading to films of constant thickness beyond a certain critical reaction time. Using this regime of self-limiting growth, SiC films of 3-5 nm have been grown with relatively little sensitivity to the growth time. (orig.).

  19. Materials characterization of rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition of titanium disilicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden-Green, Dannellia Banay

    Technological advancements of novel processes and materials involving refractory metal silicides for ultra large scale integration is of paramount importance to the semiconductor industry. Scaling of devices to meet the demands for increased packing density and speed requires such novel processes and materials. Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) of titanium disilicide (TiSisb2) was investigated in an effort to meet some of the challenges of ultra large scale integration (ULSI) technology. Selective RTCVD of TiSisb2 offers an optimal technological vehicle for achieving contacts to ultra-shallow junctions. Of all of the metal silicides, TiSisb2 has the lowest resistivity and meets the microelectronics demands for a thermally stable contact. The research results presented in this dissertation explores the mechanisms of selective RTCVD of TiSisb2 in terms of thermodynamic trends and kinetic driving forces for nucleation and growth. The present research addresses the qualitative and quantitative parameters that affect the controlling mechanisms for nucleation and therefore the results provide significant data and theoretical insights into a state-of-the-art process. Just as the fundamental building block in understanding the kinetic constraints of a process lie in the realm of thermodynamic exploration, understanding the complex processes involved in RTCVD TiSisb2 begin with characterization of the mechanisms governing thin film nucleation. In this work, the early stages of growth are investigated as they offer insight into how process parameters are optimized to render desired silicide film properties. Equilibrium simulations have been used to model the CVD reaction with very good trend indicating accuracy. Empirical investigations of CVD TiSisb2 took place in a low-pressure rapid-thermal environment using the SiHsb4 + TiClsb4 gas system on silicon (100) substrates. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) has been used to qualify the benefits of vacuum and

  20. Microwave-assisted chemical insertion: a rapid technique for screening cathodes for Mg-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaveevivitchai, Watchareeya; Huq, Ashfia; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2016-12-19

    We report an ultrafast microwave-assisted solvothermal method for chemical insertion of Mg2+ ions into host materials using magnesium acetate [Mg(CH3COO)2] as a metal-ion source and diethylene glycol (DEG) as a reducing agent. For instance, up to 3 Mg ions per formula unit of a microporous host framework Mo2.5+yVO9+z could be inserted in as little as 30 min at 170–195 °C in air. This process is superior to the traditional method which involves the use of organometallic reagents, such as di-n-butylmagnesium [(C4H9)2Mg] and magnesium bis(2,6-di-tert-butylphenoxide) [Mg-(O-2,6-But2C6H3)2], and requires an inert atmosphere with extremely long reaction times. Considering the lack of robust electrolytes for Mg-ion batteries, this facile approach can be readily used as a rapid screening technique to identify potential Mg-ion electrode hosts without the necessity of fabricating electrodes and assembling electrochemical cells. Due to the mild reaction conditions, the overall structure and morphology of the Mg-ion inserted products are maintained and the compounds can be used successfully as a cathode in Mg-ion batteries. The combined synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction Rietveld analysis reveals the structure of the Mg-inserted compounds and gives an insight into the interactions between the Mg ions and the open-tunnel host framework.

  1. Broad target chemical screening approach used as tool for rapid assessment of groundwater quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laak, T.L.; Puijker, L.M.; van Leerdam, J.A.; Raat, K.J.; Kolkman, A.; de Voogt, P.; van Wezel, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    The chemical water quality is often assessed by screening for a limited set of target chemicals. This ‘conventional’ target analysis approach inevitably misses chemicals present in the samples. In this study a ‘broad’ target screening approach for water quality assessment using high resolution and

  2. The Application of Rapid Prototyping Technology and Quality Functional Deployment (QFD approach in enhancing the Endotracheal Tube Holder Model in Medical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Way Yusoff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a development of a current design the Endotracheal tube holding device. At present, the medical teams have faced a lot of problems when doing the endotracheal intubation. Misplacement of endotracheal tube into the esophagus and extubation due to patient’s movement are among the problems by surgeons during medical treatment. This is important as the successful management of the potential risk can reduce the number of patients who suffer a serious consequence of endtracheal tube therapy such as a potential risk to patient safety, with associated risks varying from minor complications to death. This paper presents a product design specification for endotracheal tube-holding device is translated from user’s requirements by employing Quality Functional Deployment (QFD. Several design concepts are generated by using CATIA software to be evaluated by endotracheal tube-holding device users for concept selection. Selection of design concept was done in two phases which are concept screening and concept scoring. For selecting the design concept for further development, a prototype of endotracheal tube was fabricated by using Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM.

  3. Optofluidic refractive-index sensors employing bent waveguide structures for low-cost, rapid chemical and biomedical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, I-Chen; Chen, Pin-Chuan; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Chang, Guo-En

    2018-01-08

    We propose and develop an intensity-detection-based refractive-index (RI) sensor for low-cost, rapid RI sensing. The sensor is composed of a polymer bent ridge waveguide (BRWG) structure on a low-cost glass substrate and is integrated with a microfluidic channel. Different-RI solutions flowing through the BRWG sensing region induce output optical power variations caused by optical bend losses, enabling simple and real-time RI detection. Additionally, the sensors are fabricated using rapid and cost-effective vacuum-less processes, attaining the low cost and high throughput required for mass production. A good RI solution of 5.31 10-4 × RIU-1 is achieved from the RI experiments. This study demonstrates mass-producible and compact RI sensors for rapid and sensitive chemical analysis and biomedical sensing.

  4. Rapid Electrochemical Detection and Identification of Microbiological and Chemical Contaminants for Manned Spaceflight Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A great deal of effort has gone into the development of point-of-use methods to meet the challenge of rapid bacterial identification for both environmental...

  5. Chemical Probes of Rapid Estrogen Signaling in Breast Cancer Treatment and Chemoprevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weatherman, Rose V

    2007-01-01

    .... Over the course of the project, we synthesized and tested approximately 15 new estrogen receptor modulators, some with novel activity in terms of both classic transcriptional and rapid response modulation...

  6. [Rapid detection of four antipertensive chemicals adulterated in traditional Chinese medicine for hypertension using TLC-SERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing-Xia; Cao, Yong-Bing; Cao, Ying-Ying; Lu, Feng

    2014-04-01

    A novel facile method for on-site detection of antipertensive chemicals (e. g. nicardipine hydrochloride, doxazosin mesylate, propranolol hydrochloride, and hydrochlorothiazide) adulterated in traditional Chinese medicine for hypertension using thin layer chromatography (TLC) combined with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was reported in the present paper. Analytes and pharmaceutical matrices was separated by TLC, then SERS method was used to complete qualitative identification of trace substances on TLC plate. By optimizing colloidal silver concentration and developing solvent, as well as exploring the optimal limits of detection (LOD), the initially established TLC-SERS method was used to detect real hypertension Chinese pharmaceuticals. The results showed that this method had good specificity for the four chemicals and high sensitivity with a limit of detection as lower as to 0.005 microg. Finally, two of the ten antipertensive drugs were detected to be adulterated with chemicals. This simple and fast method can realize rapid detection of chemicals illegally for doping in antipertensive Chinese pharmaceuticals, and would have good prospects in on-site detection of chemicals for doping in Chinese pharmaceuticals.

  7. Rapid continuous chemical methods for studies of nuclei far from stability

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, N; Eriksen, D; Gaggeler, H; Greulich, N; Hickmann, U; Kaffrell, N; Skarnemark, G; Stender, E; Zendel, M

    1981-01-01

    Fast continuous separation methods accomplished by combining a gas-jet recoil-transport system with a variety of chemical systems are described. Procedures for the isolation of individual elements from fission product mixtures with the multistage solvent extraction facility SISAK are presented. Thermochromatography in connection with a gas-jet has been studied as a technique for on-line separation of volatile fission halides. Based on chemical reactions in a gas-jet system itself separation procedures for tellurium, selenium and germanium from fission products have been worked out. All the continuous chemical methods can be performed within a few seconds. The application of such procedures to the investigation of nuclides far from the line of beta -stability is illustrated by a few examples. (16 refs).

  8. Developing, Applying, and Evaluating Models for Rapid Screening of Chemical Exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnot, J.; Shin, H.; Ernstoff, Alexi

    2015-01-01

    provides an introduction to underlying principles of some models used for exposure- and risk-based HTS for chemical prioritization for human health, including tools used in the ExpoDat project (USEtox, RAIDAR, CalTox) and other initiatives (SHEDS-HT). Case study examples of HTS include(i) model...

  9. Rapid Production of a Porous Cellulose Acetate Membrane for Water Filtration Using Readily Available Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Adrian; Stark, Wendelin J.; Grass, Robert N.

    2017-01-01

    A chemistry laboratory experiment using everyday items and readily available chemicals is described to introduce advanced high school students and undergraduate college students to porous polymer membranes. In a three-step manufacturing process, a membrane is produced at room temperature. The filtration principle of the membrane is then…

  10. Towards an integrated biosensor array for simultaneous and rapid multi-analysis of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scognamiglio, Viviana, E-mail: viviana.scognamiglio@mlib.ic.cnr.it [IC-CNR Istituto di Cristallografia, AdR1 Dipartimento Agroalimentare - Via Salaria Km 29.3 00015, Rome (Italy); Pezzotti, Italo; Pezzotti, Gianni; Cano, Juan; Manfredonia, Ivano [Biosensor S.r.l. - Via degli Olmetti 44 00060 Formello, Rome (Italy); Buonasera, Katia [IC-CNR Istituto di Cristallografia, AdR1 Dipartimento Agroalimentare - Via Salaria Km 29.3 00015, Rome (Italy); Arduini, Fabiana; Moscone, Danila; Palleschi, Giuseppe [Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche - Via della Ricerca Scientifica 00133, Rome (Italy); Giardi, Maria Teresa [IC-CNR Istituto di Cristallografia, AdR1 Dipartimento Agroalimentare - Via Salaria Km 29.3 00015, Rome (Italy)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A multitask biosensor for the detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sensing system employ an array of biological recognition elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amperometric and optical transduction methods are provided in an integrated biosensor together with flow control systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biosensing device results in an integrated, automatic and portable system for environmental and agrifood application. - Abstract: In this paper we propose the construction and application of a portable multi-purpose biosensor array for the simultaneous detection of a wide range of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), based on the recognition operated by various enzymes and microorganisms. The developed biosensor combines both electrochemical and optical transduction systems, in order to increase the number of chemical species which can be monitored. Considering to the maximum residue level (MRL) of contaminants established by the European Commission, the biosensor system was able to detect most of the chemicals analysed with very high sensitivity. In particular, atrazine and diuron were detected with a limit of detection of 0.5 nM, with an RSD% less than 5%; paraoxon and chlorpyrifos were revealed with a detection of 5 {mu}M and 4.5 {mu}M, respectively, with an RSD% less than 6%; catechol and bisphenol A were identified with a limit of detection of 1 {mu}M and 35 {mu}M respectively, with an RSD% less than 5%.

  11. Rapid Species-level Identification of Salvias by Chemometric Processing of Ambient Ionisation Mass Spectrometry-derived Chemical Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffen, Justine E; Lesiak, Ashton D; Dane, A John; Cody, Robert B; Musah, Rabi A

    2017-01-01

    The Salvia genus contains numerous economically important plants that have horticultural, culinary and nutraceutical uses. They are often similar in appearance, making species determination difficult. Species identification of dried Salvia products is also challenging since distinguishing plant morphological features are no longer present. The development of a simple high-throughput method of analysis of fresh and dried Salvia leaves that would permit rapid species-level identification and detection of diagnostic biomarkers. Plant leaves were analysed in their native form by DART-MS without the need for any sample preparation steps. This furnished chemical fingerprints characteristic of each species. In the same experiment, in-source collision-induced dissociation was used to identify biomarkers. Biomarker presence was also independently confirmed by GC-MS. Chemometric processing of DART-MS profiles was performed by kernel discriminant analysis (KDA) and soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) to classify the fingerprints according to species. The approach was successful despite the occurrence of diurnal cycle and plant-age related chemical profile variations within species. In a single rapid experiment, the presence of essential oil biomarkers such as 3-carene, α-pinene, β-pinene, β-thujone, β-caryophyllene, camphor and borneol could be confirmed. The method was applied to rapid identification and differentiation of Salvia apiana, S. dominica, S. elegans, S. officinalis, S. farinacea and S. patens. Species-level identification of Salvia plant material could be accomplished by chemometric processing of DART-HRMS-derived chemical profiles of both fresh and dried Salvia material. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Rapid yeast DNA extraction by boiling and freeze-thawing without using chemical reagents and DNA purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gildo Almeida da Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to study a rapid yeast DNA extraction by boiling and freeze-thawing processes without using chemical reagents or any purification procedures, to obtain a high grade PCR-product. A specific DNA fragment of the 18S region of Dekkera bruxellensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen. The described boiling and freeze-thawing protocols generated the PCR-grade product preparations and could be used to process many samples. The amplification of the fragments could be observed after 30 and 35 cycles. These processes of extraction without using any kind of chemical reagents, especial water, and purification procedures proved to be efficient, reproducible, simple, fast, and inexpensive.

  13. An improved technique for the rapid chemical characterisation of bacterial terpene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickschat, Jeroen S; Pahirulzaman, Khomaizon A K; Rabe, Patrick; Klapschinski, Tim A

    2014-04-14

    A derivative of the pET28c(+) expression vector was constructed. It contains a yeast replication system (2μ origin of replication) and a yeast selectable marker (URA3), and can be used for gene cloning in yeast by efficient homologous recombination, and for heterologous expression in E. coli. The vector was used for the expression and chemical characterisation of three bacterial terpene cyclases. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A rapid chemical method for lysing Arabidopsis cells for protein analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Takano Tetsuo; Liu Shenkui; Tsugama Daisuke

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein extraction is a frequent procedure in biological research. For preparation of plant cell extracts, plant materials usually have to be ground and homogenized to physically break the robust cell wall, but this step is laborious and time-consuming when a large number of samples are handled at once. Results We developed a chemical method for lysing Arabidopsis cells without grinding. In this method, plants are boiled for just 10 minutes in a solution containing a Ca2+ ...

  15. Rapid and highly efficient growth of graphene on copper by chemical vapor deposition of ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisi, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.lisi@enea.it [ENEA, Materials Technology Unit, Surface Technology Laboratory, Casaccia Research Centre, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Buonocore, Francesco; Dikonimos, Theodoros; Leoni, Enrico [ENEA, Materials Technology Unit, Surface Technology Laboratory, Casaccia Research Centre, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Faggio, Giuliana; Messina, Giacomo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell' Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Università “Mediterranea” di Reggio Calabria, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Morandi, Vittorio; Ortolani, Luca [CNR-IMM Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Capasso, Andrea [ENEA, Materials Technology Unit, Surface Technology Laboratory, Casaccia Research Centre, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy)

    2014-11-28

    The growth of graphene by chemical vapor deposition on metal foils is a promising technique to deliver large-area films with high electron mobility. Nowadays, the chemical vapor deposition of hydrocarbons on copper is the most investigated synthesis method, although many other carbon precursors and metal substrates are used too. Among these, ethanol is a safe and inexpensive precursor that seems to offer favorable synthesis kinetics. We explored the growth of graphene on copper from ethanol, focusing on processes of short duration (up to one min). We investigated the produced films by electron microscopy, Raman and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. A graphene film with high crystalline quality was found to cover the entire copper catalyst substrate in just 20 s, making ethanol appear as a more efficient carbon feedstock than methane and other commonly used precursors. - Highlights: • Graphene films were grown by fast chemical vapor deposition of ethanol on copper. • High-temperature/short-time growth produced highly crystalline graphene. • The copper substrate was entirely covered by a graphene film in just 20 s. • Addition of H{sub 2} had a negligible effect on the crystalline quality.

  16. Rapid stress system drives chemical transfer of fear from sender to receiver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper H B de Groot

    Full Text Available Humans can register another person's fear not only with their eyes and ears, but also with their nose. Previous research has demonstrated that exposure to body odors from fearful individuals elicited implicit fear in others. The odor of fearful individuals appears to have a distinctive signature that can be produced relatively rapidly, driven by a physiological mechanism that has remained unexplored in earlier research. The apocrine sweat glands in the armpit that are responsible for chemosignal production contain receptors for adrenalin. We therefore expected that the release of adrenalin through activation of the rapid stress response system (i.e., the sympathetic-adrenal medullary system is what drives the release of fear sweat, as opposed to activation of the slower stress response system (i.e., hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. To test this assumption, sweat was sampled while eight participants prepared for a speech. Participants had higher heart rates and produced more armpit sweat in the fast stress condition, compared to baseline and the slow stress condition. Importantly, exposure to sweat from participants in the fast stress condition induced in receivers (N = 31 a simulacrum of the state of the sender, evidenced by the emergence of a fearful facial expression (facial electromyography and vigilant behavior (i.e., faster classification of emotional facial expressions.

  17. Chemically synthesized PbS Nano particulate thin films for a rapid NO2 gas sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burungale Vishal V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid NO2 gas sensor has been developed based on PbS nanoparticulate thin films synthesized by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR method at different precursor concentrations. The structural and morphological properties were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscope. NO2 gas sensing properties of PbS thin films deposited at different concentrations were tested. PbS film with 0.25 M precursor concentration showed the highest sensitivity. In order to optimize the operating temperature, the sensitivity of the sensor to 50 ppm NO2 gas was measured at different operating temperatures, from 50 to 200 °C. The gas sensitivity increased with an increase in operating temperature and achieved the maximum value at 150 °C, followed by a decrease in sensitivity with further increase of the operating temperature. The sensitivity was about 35 % for 50 ppm NO2 at 150 °C with rapid response time of 6 s. T90 and T10 recovery time was 97 s at this gas concentration.

  18. Quantitative analysis of lipid droplet fusion: inefficient steady state fusion but rapid stimulation by chemical fusogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Murphy

    Full Text Available Lipid droplets (LDs are dynamic cytoplasmic organelles containing neutral lipids and bounded by a phospholipid monolayer. Previous studies have suggested that LDs can undergo constitutive homotypic fusion, a process linked to the inhibitory effects of fatty acids on glucose transporter trafficking. Using strict quantitative criteria for LD fusion together with refined light microscopic methods and real-time analysis, we now show that LDs in diverse cell types show low constitutive fusogenic activity under normal growth conditions. To investigate the possible modulation of LD fusion, we screened for agents that can trigger fusion. A number of pharmacological agents caused homotypic fusion of lipid droplets in a variety of cell types. This provided a novel cell system to study rapid regulated fusion between homotypic phospholipid monolayers. LD fusion involved an initial step in which the two adjacent membranes became continuous (<10 s, followed by the slower merging (100 s of the neutral lipid cores to produce a single spherical LD. These fusion events were accompanied by changes to the LD surface organization. Measurements of LDs undergoing homotypic fusion showed that fused LDs maintained their initial volume, with a corresponding decrease in surface area suggesting rapid removal of membrane from the fused LD. This study provides estimates for the level of constitutive LD fusion in cells and questions the role of LD fusion in vivo. In addition, it highlights the extent of LD restructuring which occurs when homotypic LD fusion is triggered in a variety of cell types.

  19. Quantitative analysis of lipid droplet fusion: inefficient steady state fusion but rapid stimulation by chemical fusogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Samantha; Martin, Sally; Parton, Robert G

    2010-12-23

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are dynamic cytoplasmic organelles containing neutral lipids and bounded by a phospholipid monolayer. Previous studies have suggested that LDs can undergo constitutive homotypic fusion, a process linked to the inhibitory effects of fatty acids on glucose transporter trafficking. Using strict quantitative criteria for LD fusion together with refined light microscopic methods and real-time analysis, we now show that LDs in diverse cell types show low constitutive fusogenic activity under normal growth conditions. To investigate the possible modulation of LD fusion, we screened for agents that can trigger fusion. A number of pharmacological agents caused homotypic fusion of lipid droplets in a variety of cell types. This provided a novel cell system to study rapid regulated fusion between homotypic phospholipid monolayers. LD fusion involved an initial step in which the two adjacent membranes became continuous (lipid cores to produce a single spherical LD. These fusion events were accompanied by changes to the LD surface organization. Measurements of LDs undergoing homotypic fusion showed that fused LDs maintained their initial volume, with a corresponding decrease in surface area suggesting rapid removal of membrane from the fused LD. This study provides estimates for the level of constitutive LD fusion in cells and questions the role of LD fusion in vivo. In addition, it highlights the extent of LD restructuring which occurs when homotypic LD fusion is triggered in a variety of cell types.

  20. Chemical Screening Method for the Rapid Identification of Microbial Sources of Marine Invertebrate-Associated Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell G. Kerr

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine invertebrates have proven to be a rich source of secondary metabolites. The growing recognition that marine microorganisms associated with invertebrate hosts are involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites offers new alternatives for the discovery and development of marine natural products. However, the discovery of microorganisms producing secondary metabolites previously attributed to an invertebrate host poses a significant challenge. This study describes an efficient chemical screening method utilizing a 96-well plate-based bacterial cultivation strategy to identify and isolate microbial producers of marine invertebrate-associated metabolites.

  1. Rapid identification and quantitative analysis of chemical constituents of Gentiana veitchiorum by UHPLC-PDA-QTOF-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Li

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Gentiana veitchiorum Hemsl., Gentianaceae, a traditional Tibetan medicine, was used for the treatment of liver jaundice with damp-heat pathogen, as well as for headache and chronic pharyngitis. A rapid ultra-performance liquid chromatography, photodiode array detector, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry method was developed for the fast and accurate identification and quantification of the chemical constituents of G. veitchiorum. In fact, eighteen compounds were detected and identified on the basis of their mass spectra, fragment characteristics and comparison with published data. Especially, the MS fragmentation pathways of iridoid glycosides and flavone C-glycosides were illustrated. Five compounds among them were quantified by UHPLC-PDA, including swertiamarin, gentiopicroside, sweroside, isoorientin, and isovitexin. The proposed method was then validated based on the analyses of linearity, accuracy, precision, and recovery. The overall recoveries for the five analytes ranged from 96.54% to 100.81%, with RSD from 1.05% to 1.82%. In addition, ten batches of G. veitchiorum from different areas were also analyzed. The developed method was rapid and reliable for both identification and quantification of the chemical constituents of G. veitchiorum, especially for simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of iridoid glycosides and flavone C-glycosides.

  2. Effectiveness of different chemical agents in rapid decontamination of gutta-percha cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Celso Luíz

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of seven disinfectant compounds used in dentistry for a rapid decontamination of 32 gutta-percha cones adhered with Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli strains or Bacillus subtilis spores was compared. Cones were treated with 2% glutaraldehyde, 1% sodium hypochlorite, 70% ethyl alcohol, 1% and 0.3% iodine alcohol, 2% chlorhexidine, 6% hydrogen peroxide, and 10% polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine, for 1, 5, 10, and 15 minutes. After treatment, each cone was transferred to thioglycollate broth and incubated at 37ºC for 7 days. The products were bactericidal after 1 to 5 minutes and, with exception of ethyl alcohol and iodine-alcohol, sporicidal after 1 to 15 minutes of exposure. Results suggest that chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite, polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine, hydrogen peroxide, and glutaraldehyde were the most effective products in the decontamination of gutta-percha cones.

  3. The evolution of structural and chemical heterogeneity during rapid solidification at gas atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golod, V. M.; Sufiiarov, V. Sh

    2017-04-01

    Gas atomization is a high-performance process for manufacturing superfine metal powders. Formation of the powder particles takes place primarily through the fragmentation of alloy melt flow with high-pressure inert gas, which leads to the formation of non-uniform sized micron-scale particles and subsequent their rapid solidification due to heat exchange with gas environment. The article presents results of computer modeling of crystallization process, simulation and experimental studies of the cellular-dendrite structure formation and microsegregation in different size particles. It presents results of adaptation of the approach for local nonequilibrium solidification to conditions of crystallization at gas atomization, detected border values of the particle size at which it is possible a manifestation of diffusionless crystallization.

  4. Fatigue Countermeasures for Rapid Deployment: Operation Pegasus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    French, Jon

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of slow-release caffeine (SRC) and melatonin (MLT) on sleep and daytime vigilance and SRC or MLT as chronobiotics after a 7-time zone eastbound flight...

  5. Field-deployable, quantitative, rapid identification of active Ebola virus infection in unprocessed blood† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc03281a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kavit; Bentley, Emma; Tyler, Adam; Richards, Kevin S. R.; Wright, Edward; Easterbrook, Linda; Lee, Diane; Cleaver, Claire; Usher, Louise; Burton, Jane E.; Pitman, James K.; Bruce, Christine B.; Edge, David; Lee, Martin; Nazareth, Nelson; Norwood, David A.

    2017-01-01

    The West African Ebola virus outbreak underlined the importance of delivering mass diagnostic capability outside the clinical or primary care setting in effectively containing public health emergencies caused by infectious disease. Yet, to date, there is no solution for reliably deploying at the point of need the gold standard diagnostic method, real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), in a laboratory infrastructure-free manner. In this proof of principle work, we demonstrate direct performance of RT-qPCR on fresh blood using far-red fluorophores to resolve fluorogenic signal inhibition and controlled, rapid freeze/thawing to achieve viral genome extraction in a single reaction chamber assay. The resulting process is entirely free of manual or automated sample pre-processing, requires no microfluidics or magnetic/mechanical sample handling and thus utilizes low cost consumables. This enables a fast, laboratory infrastructure-free, minimal risk and simple standard operating procedure suited to frontline, field use. Developing this novel approach on recombinant bacteriophage and recombinant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; Lentivirus), we demonstrate clinical utility in symptomatic EBOV patient screening using live, infectious Filoviruses and surrogate patient samples. Moreover, we evidence assay co-linearity independent of viral particle structure that may enable viral load quantification through pre-calibration, with no loss of specificity across an 8 log-linear maximum dynamic range. The resulting quantitative rapid identification (QuRapID) molecular diagnostic platform, openly accessible for assay development, meets the requirements of resource-limited countries and provides a fast response solution for mass public health screening against emerging biosecurity threats. PMID:29163915

  6. A tree-based method for the rapid screening of chemical fingerprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Christian NS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fingerprint of a molecule is a bitstring based on its structure, constructed such that structurally similar molecules will have similar fingerprints. Molecular fingerprints can be used in an initial phase of drug development for identifying novel drug candidates by screening large databases for molecules with fingerprints similar to a query fingerprint. Results In this paper, we present a method which efficiently finds all fingerprints in a database with Tanimoto coefficient to the query fingerprint above a user defined threshold. The method is based on two novel data structures for rapid screening of large databases: the kD grid and the Multibit tree. The kD grid is based on splitting the fingerprints into k shorter bitstrings and utilising these to compute bounds on the similarity of the complete bitstrings. The Multibit tree uses hierarchical clustering and similarity within each cluster to compute similar bounds. We have implemented our method and tested it on a large real-world data set. Our experiments show that our method yields approximately a three-fold speed-up over previous methods. Conclusions Using the novel kD grid and Multibit tree significantly reduce the time needed for searching databases of fingerprints. This will allow researchers to (1 perform more searches than previously possible and (2 to easily search large databases.

  7. UPLC-QTOF-MS with chemical profiling approach for rapidly evaluating chemical consistency between traditional and dispensing granule decoctions of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Erxin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present study, chemical consistency between traditional and dispensing granule decoctions of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction was rapidly evaluated by UPLC-QTOF-MS coupled with the MarkerLynx software. Two different kinds of decoctions, namely traditional decoction: water extract of mixed six constituent herbs of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction, and dispensing granules decoction: mixed water extract of each individual herbs of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction, were prepared. Results Chemical difference was found between traditional and dispensing granule decoctions, and albiflorin, paeoniflorin, gallic acid, amygdalin, and hydroxysafflor yellow A were identified as the significantly changed components during decocting Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction. All the peaks of mass spectrum from Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction and each herb were extracted and integration by using QuanLynx™. And the optimized data was used for linear regression analysis. The contribution of each herb in Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction, and the optimal compatibility proportion of dispensing granule decoction were derived from the linear regression equation. Conclusions The optimal dosage proportionality of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu dispensing granule decoction was obtained as 2.5:0.2:1:0.5:0.6:0.1 (DG : CX : BS : SD : TR : HH, which guided better clinic application of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction as dispensing granule decoctions usage, and it also provided some experimental data to reveal the compatibility rule of the relative TCM formulae.

  8. A Rapid Deposition of Fluorine Doped Zinc Oxide Using the Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapour Deposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Navid; Rozati, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    Fluorine-doped zinc oxide (FZO) (ZnO:F) thin films were manufactured by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) on glass substrates using zinc acetate dihydrate [C4H6O4Zn·2H2O, ZnAc] and ammonium fluoride (NH4F) as the source of fluorine with deposition duration of only 120 s for each sample. The effects of different amounts of fluorine as the dopant on the structural, electrical and optical properties of FZO thin films were investigated. The results show a polycrystalline structure at higher temperatures compared to amorphous structure at lower temperatures. The x-ray diffraction patterns of the polycrystalline films were identified as a hexagonal wurtzite structure of zinc oxide (ZnO) with the (002) preferred orientation. Also, the sheet resistance decreased from 17.8 MΩ/□ to 28.9 KΩ/□ for temperatures 325°C to 450°C, respectively. In order to further decrease the sheet resistance of the undoped ZnO thin films, fluorine was added using NH4F as the precursor, and again a drastic change in sheet resistance of only 17.7 Ω/□ was obtained. Based on the field emission scanning electron microscopy images, the fluorine concentration in CVD source is an important factor affecting the grain size and modifies electrical parameters. Ultraviolet-visible measurements revealed reduction of transparency of the layers with increasing fluorine as the dopant.

  9. A Rapid Deposition of Fluorine Doped Zinc Oxide Using the Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapour Deposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Navid; Rozati, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Fluorine-doped zinc oxide (FZO) (ZnO:F) thin films were manufactured by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) on glass substrates using zinc acetate dihydrate [C4H6O4Zn·2H2O, ZnAc] and ammonium fluoride (NH4F) as the source of fluorine with deposition duration of only 120 s for each sample. The effects of different amounts of fluorine as the dopant on the structural, electrical and optical properties of FZO thin films were investigated. The results show a polycrystalline structure at higher temperatures compared to amorphous structure at lower temperatures. The x-ray diffraction patterns of the polycrystalline films were identified as a hexagonal wurtzite structure of zinc oxide (ZnO) with the (002) preferred orientation. Also, the sheet resistance decreased from 17.8 MΩ/□ to 28.9 KΩ/□ for temperatures 325°C to 450°C, respectively. In order to further decrease the sheet resistance of the undoped ZnO thin films, fluorine was added using NH4F as the precursor, and again a drastic change in sheet resistance of only 17.7 Ω/□ was obtained. Based on the field emission scanning electron microscopy images, the fluorine concentration in CVD source is an important factor affecting the grain size and modifies electrical parameters. Ultraviolet-visible measurements revealed reduction of transparency of the layers with increasing fluorine as the dopant.

  10. Rapid determination of the chemical oxygen demand of water using a thermal biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Na; Wang, Jinqi; Zhou, Yikai

    2014-06-06

    In this paper we describe a thermal biosensor with a flow injection analysis system for the determination of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of water samples. Glucose solutions of different concentrations and actual water samples were tested, and their COD values were determined by measuring the heat generated when the samples passed through a column containing periodic acid. The biosensor exhibited a large linear range (5 to 3000 mg/L) and a low detection limit (1.84 mg/L). It could tolerate the presence of chloride ions in concentrations of 0.015 M without requiring a masking agent. The sensor was successfully used for detecting the COD values of actual samples. The COD values of water samples from various sources were correlated with those obtained by the standard dichromate method; the linear regression coefficient was found to be 0.996. The sensor is environmentally friendly, economical, and highly stable, and exhibits good reproducibility and accuracy. In addition, its response time is short, and there is no danger of hazardous emissions or external contamination. Finally, the samples to be tested do not have to be pretreated. These results suggest that the biosensor is suitable for the continuous monitoring of the COD values of actual wastewater samples.

  11. Thermal and chemical diffusion in the rapid solidification of binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti

    2000-01-01

    Solidification of binary alloys is characterized by the necessity to reject away from the advancing front two conserved quantities: the latent heat released at the solid-liquid interface and the solute atoms that cannot be accommodated in the solid phase. As thermal diffusion is much faster than chemical diffusion, the latter is generally assumed to be the rate limiting mechanism for the process, and the problem is addressed through the isothermal approximation. In the present paper we use the phase-field model to study the planar growth of a solid germ, nucleated in its undercooled melt. We focus on the effects of a noninstantaneous thermal relaxation. The steady growth predicted at large supersaturation in the isothermal limit is prevented. Depending on the value of the Lewis number the growth rate is limited by either mass or heat diffusion; in the latter case we observe a sharp transition between two different regimes, in which originates a nonmonotonic time dependence of the interface temperature. The effects of this transition reflect in the composition of the solidified alloy.

  12. Rapid screening of N-oxides of chemical warfare agents degradation products by ESI-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, L; Karthikraj, R; Lakshmi, V V S; Raju, N Prasada; Prabhakar, S

    2014-08-01

    Rapid detection and identification of chemical warfare agents and related precursors/degradation products in various environmental matrices is of paramount importance for verification of standards set by the chemical weapons convention (CWC). Nitrogen mustards, N,N-dialkylaminoethyl-2-chlorides, N,N-dialkylaminoethanols, N-alkyldiethanolamines, and triethanolamine, which are listed CWC scheduled chemicals, are prone to undergo N-oxidation in environmental matrices or during decontamination process. Thus, screening of the oxidized products of these compounds is also an important task in the verification process because the presence of these products reveals alleged use of nitrogen mustards or precursors of VX compounds. The N-oxides of aminoethanols and aminoethylchlorides easily produce [M + H](+) ions under electrospray ionization conditions, and their collision-induced dissociation spectra include a specific neutral loss of 48 u (OH + CH2OH) and 66 u (OH + CH2Cl), respectively. Based on this specific fragmentation, a rapid screening method was developed for screening of the N-oxides by applying neutral loss scan technique. The method was validated and the applicability of the method was demonstrated by analyzing positive and negative samples. The method was useful in the detection of N-oxides of aminoethanols and aminoethylchlorides in environmental matrices at trace levels (LOD, up to 500 ppb), even in the presence of complex masking agents, without the use of time-consuming sample preparation methods and chromatographic steps. This method is advantageous for the off-site verification program and also for participation in official proficiency tests conducted by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the Netherlands. The structure of N-oxides can be confirmed by the MS/MS experiments on the detected peaks. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method was developed for the separation of isomeric N-oxides of aminoethanols and

  13. Rapid monitoring of mercury in air from an organic chemical factory in China using a portable mercury analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Akira; Cheng, Jin Ping; Kiyono, Masako; Uraguchi, Shimpei; Liu, Xiaojie; Miura, Kyoko; Yasuda, Yoshiaki; Mashyanov, Nikolay

    2011-01-01

    A chemical factory, using a production technology of acetaldehyde with mercury catalysis, was located southeast of Qingzhen City in Guizhou Province, China. Previous research showed heavy mercury pollution through an extensive downstream area. A current investigation of the mercury distribution in ambient air, soils, and plants suggests that mobile mercury species in soils created elevated mercury concentrations in ambient air and vegetation. Mercury concentrations of up to 600 ng/m(3) in air over the contaminated area provided evidence of the mercury transformation to volatile Hg(0). Mercury analysis of soil and plant samples demonstrated that the mercury concentrations in soil with vaporized and plant-absorbable forms were higher in the southern area, which was closer to the factory. Our results suggest that air monitoring using a portable mercury analyzer can be a convenient and useful method for the rapid detection and mapping of mercury pollution in advanced field surveys.

  14. Rapid Monitoring of Mercury in Air from an Organic Chemical Factory in China Using a Portable Mercury Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yasutake

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A chemical factory, using a production technology of acetaldehyde with mercury catalysis, was located southeast of Qingzhen City in Guizhou Province, China. Previous research showed heavy mercury pollution through an extensive downstream area. A current investigation of the mercury distribution in ambient air, soils, and plants suggests that mobile mercury species in soils created elevated mercury concentrations in ambient air and vegetation. Mercury concentrations of up to 600 ng/m3 in air over the contaminated area provided evidence of the mercury transformation to volatile Hg(0. Mercury analysis of soil and plant samples demonstrated that the mercury concentrations in soil with vaporized and plant-absorbable forms were higher in the southern area, which was closer to the factory. Our results suggest that air monitoring using a portable mercury analyzer can be a convenient and useful method for the rapid detection and mapping of mercury pollution in advanced field surveys.

  15. Combination of Cooling Curve and Micro-Chemical Phase Analysis of Rapidly Quenched Magnesium AM60B Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchwica, P. C.; Gesing, A. J.; Sokolowski, J. H.; Blawert, C.; Jekl, J.; Berkmortel, R.

    Macro test samples of magnesium alloy AM60B were melted and quenched at maximum instantaneous cooling rates ranging from -5°C/s to -500°C/s and the resultant cooling curves were analyzed. Characteristic reactions on these curves corresponding to formation of individual phases were identified with the aid of literature data as well as metallographic and micro-chemical analysis. The results indicate that these phases, their size and location in the micro structure, their chemistry and their relative proportions all change in response to the increase in the cooling rate. These rapid cooling rates are typical of real industrial solidification processes such as die casting. These findings can be used to improve future computer models of casting solidification processes for magnesium and for other alloys.

  16. Rapid characterization of chemical compounds in liquid and solid states using thermal desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Zhou, Chi-Chang; Liu, De-Lin; Jhang, Siou-Sian; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Shiea, Jentaie

    2013-10-01

    Rapid characterization of thermally stable chemical compounds in solid or liquid states is achieved through thermal desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (TD-ESI/MS). A feature of this technique is that sampling, desorption, ionization, and mass spectrometric detection are four separate events with respect to time and location. A metal probe was used to sample analytes in their solid or liquid states. The probe was then inserted in a preheated oven to thermally desorb the analytes on the probe. The desorbed analytes were carried by a nitrogen gas stream into an ESI plume, where analyte ions were formed via interactions with charged solvent species generated in the ESI plume. The analyte ions were subsequently detected by a mass analyzer attached to the TD-ESI source. Quantification of acetaminophen in aqueous solutions using TD-ESI/MS was also performed in which a linear response for acetaminophen was obtained between 25 and 500 ppb (R(2) = 0.9978). The standard deviation for a reproducibility test for ten liquid samples was 9.6%. Since sample preparation for TD-ESI/MS is unnecessary, a typical analysis can be completed in less than 10 s. Analytes such as the active ingredients in over-the-counter drugs were rapidly characterized regardless of the different physical properties of said drugs, which included liquid eye drops, viscous cold syrup solution, ointment cream, and a drug tablet. This approach was also used to detect trace chemical compounds in illicit drugs and explosives, in which samples were obtained from the surfaces of a cell phone, piece of luggage made from hard plastic, business card, and wooden desk.

  17. Rapidly developed squamous cell carcinoma after laser therapy used to treat chemical burn wound: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyung-Rok; Kwon, Soon-Sung; Chung, Seum; Kie, Jeong-Hae

    2015-02-07

    In chronic wounds, especially burn scars, malignant tumors can arise. However, it is rare for a subacute burn injury to change to a malignant lesion within one month. Moreover, a case of squamous cell carcinoma arising from HeNe laser therapy after a chemical burn has never been reported. In this report, we examine a rare case of squamous cell carcinoma arising from HeNe laser therapy after a chemical burn. Because pathologic investigations were made from the first operation, both early detection of the squamous cell carcinoma and consideration of the HeNe laser therapy as a risk factor for the skin cancer were possible. The cancer was completely removed and reconstruction of the defect was successfully achieved in a timely manner. Although there has as yet been no reported case of squamous cell carcinoma induced by laser therapy, it is important for clinicians to recognize both the possibility of laser-induced cancer and the rapid change of cancer, so they can provide appropriate and timely treatment.

  18. Rapid chemical decontamination of infectious CJD and scrapie particles parallels treatments known to disrupt microbes and biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsios, Sotirios; Tittman, Sarah; Manuelidis, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative human CJD and sheep scrapie are diseases caused by several different transmissible encephalopathy (TSE) agents. These infectious agents provoke innate immune responses in the brain, including late-onset abnormal prion protein (PrP-res) amyloid. Agent particles that lack detectable PrP sequences by deep proteomic analysis are highly infectious. Yet these agents, and their unusual resistance to denaturation, are often evaluated by PrP amyloid disruption. To reexamine the intrinsic resistance of TSE agents to denaturation, a paradigm for less resistant viruses and microbes, we developed a rapid and reproducible high yield agent isolation procedure from cultured cells that minimized PrP amyloid and other cellular proteins. Monotypic neuronal GT1 cells infected with the FU-CJD or 22L scrapie agents do not have complex brain changes that can camouflage infectious particles and prevent their disruption, and there are only 2 reports on infectious titers of any human CJD strain treated with chemical denaturants. Infectious titers of both CJD and scrapie were reduced by >4 logs with Thiourea-urea, a treatment not previously tested. A mere 5 min exposure to 4M GdnHCl at 22°C reduced infectivity by >5 logs. Infectious 22L particles were significantly more sensitive to denaturation than FU-CJD particles. A protocol using sonication with these chemical treatments may effectively decontaminate complicated instruments, such as duodenoscopes that harbor additional virulent microbes and biofilms associated with recent iatrogenic infections. PMID:26556670

  19. Solar sail deployment experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Shimose, Shigeru; 下瀬 滋

    2006-01-01

    Solar Sail move by receiving momentum of photons in sunlight. This paper presents results of some Spin-Stabilized Solar Sail deployment experiment. ISAS has successfully deployed, for the first time in the world, the polyimide Solar Sail taking advantage of centrifugal force in space. Based on this result, the new deployment mechanism is being developed which retracts the 50 m diameter sail.

  20. Mastering Windows 7 Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Aidan; van Surksum, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Get professional-level instruction on Windows 7 deployment tools Enterprise-level operating system deployment is challenging and requires knowledge of specific tools. It is expected that Windows 7 will be extensively deployed in businesses worldwide. This comprehensive Sybex guide provides thorough coverage of the Microsoft deployment tools that were specifically created for Windows 7, preparing system administrators, MIS professionals, and corporate programmers to tackle the task effectively.Companies worldwide are expected to deploy Windows 7 as their enterprise operating system; system admi

  1. Rapid, Efficient and Versatile Strategies for Functionally Sophisticated Polymers and Nanoparticles: Degradable Polyphosphoesters and Anisotropic Distribution of Chemical Functionalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiyi

    conjugate by densely attaching the polyphosphoester block with azide-functionalized Paclitaxel by azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition. This Paclitaxel drug conjugate provides a powerful platform for combinational cancer therapy and bioimaging due to its ultra-high Paclitaxel loading (> 65 wt%), high water solubility (>6.2 mg/mL for PTX) and easy functionalization. Another polyphosphoester-based nanoparticle system has been developed by a programmable process for the rapid and facile preparation of a family of nanoparticles with different surface charges and functionalities. The non-ionic, anionic, cationic and zwitterionic nanoparticles with hydrodynamic diameters between 13 nm to 21 nm and great size uniformity could be rapidly prepared from small molecules in 6 h or 2 days. The anionic and zwitterionic nanoparticles were designed to load silver ions to treat pulmonary infections, while the cationic nanoparticles are being applied to regulate lung injuries by serving as a degradable iNOS inhibitor conjugates. In addition, a direct synthesis of acid-labile polyphosphoramidate by organobase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization and an improved two-step preparation of polyphosphoester ionomer by acid-assisted cleavage of phosphoramidate bonds on polyphosphoramidate were developed. Polyphosphoramidate and polyphosphoester ionomers may be applied to many applications, due to their unique chemical and physical properties.

  2. Rapid identification of regulated organic chemical compounds in toys using ambient ionization and a miniature mass spectrometry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiangyu; Bai, Hua; Lv, Yueguang; Xi, Guangcheng; Li, Junfang; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Ren, Yue; Ouyang, Zheng; Ma, Qiang

    2018-04-01

    Rapid, on-site analysis was achieved through significantly simplified operation procedures for a wide variety of toy samples (crayon, temporary tattoo sticker, finger paint, modeling clay, and bubble solution) using a miniature mass spectrometry system with ambient ionization capability. The labor-intensive analytical protocols involving sample workup and chemical separation, traditionally required for MS-based analysis, were replaced by direct sampling analysis using ambient ionization methods. A Mini β ion trap miniature mass spectrometer was coupled with versatile ambient ionization methods, e.g. paper spray, extraction spray and slug-flow microextraction nanoESI for direct identification of prohibited colorants, carcinogenic primary aromatic amines, allergenic fragrances, preservatives and plasticizers from raw toy samples. The use of paper substrates coated with Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles allowed a great increase in sensitivity for paper spray. Limits of detection as low as 5μgkg -1 were obtained for target analytes. The methods being developed based on the integration of ambient ionization with miniature mass spectrometer represent alternatives to current in-lab MS analysis operation, and would enable fast, outside-the-lab screening of toy products to ensure children's safety and health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. SiC/Si heterojunction diodes fabricated by self-selective and by blanket rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yih, P.H.; Li, J.P.; Steckl, A.J. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    SiC/Si heterojunction diodes have been fabricated by two different rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) processes: a localized self-selective growth and blanket growth. The self-selective growth of crystalline cubic ([beta]) SiC was obtained by propane carbonization of the Si substrate in regions unprotected by an SiO[sub 2] layer, producing planar diodes. Mesa diodes were fabricated using the blanket growth of polycrystalline [beta]-SiC produced by the decomposition of methylsilane (CH[sub 3]SiH[sub 3]). The SiC/Si heterojunction diodes show good rectifying properties for both device structures. Reverse breakdown voltage of 50 V was obtained with the self-selective SiC/Si diode. The mesa diodes exhibited even higher breakdown voltages (V[sub br]) of 150 V and excellent ideality factors of 1.06 at 25 C. The high V[sub br] and good forward rectifying characteristics indicate that the SiC/Si heterojunction diode represents a promising approach for the fabrication of wide-gap emitter SiC/Si heterojunction bipolar transistors.

  4. Towards rapid nanoscale chemical analysis using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with Ag-coated dielectric tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Boon-Siang; Schmid, Thomas; Zhang, Weihua; Zenobi, Renato

    2007-04-01

    The influence of dielectric substrates on the Raman scattering activities of Ag overlayers has been investigated. Materials with low refractive indices, such as SiO(2), SiO(x) and AlF(3), were found to provide suitable supporting platforms for Ag films to give strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering for dye molecules when illuminated at 488 nm. This finding was then extended to tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS). Huge enhancements of 70-80x, corresponding to net enhancements of >10(4), were observed for brilliant cresyl blue test analyte when Ag-coated tips made from or precoated with low refractive index materials were applied. The yield of fabricated tips that significantly enhance the Raman signals was found to be close to 100%. These findings provide crucial steps towards the use of TERS as a robust technique for rapid chemical imaging with nanometer spatial resolution. Figure Silver-coated dielectric tips for tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) are capable of more than 10,000-fold enhancement.

  5. Water-quality data from semipermeable-membrane devices and polar organic chemical integrative samplers deployed in the McKenzie River basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Alvarez, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Two types of passive samplers—the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS)—are being used to collect data from the McKenzie River, Oregon. The McKenzie River is the source of drinking water for the City of Eugene, Oregon, and passive-sampler data are part of an ongoing monitoring effort designed to help understand and protect the drinking water source. Data from the passive samplers are reported here. This data report is dynamic and will be appended with additional data as they become available.

  6. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  7. Adherent and Conformal Zn(S,O,OH) Thin Films by Rapid Chemical Bath Deposition with Hexamethylenetetramine Additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opasanont, Borirak; Van, Khoa T; Kuba, Austin G; Choudhury, Kaushik Roy; Baxter, Jason B

    2015-06-03

    ZnS is a wide band gap semiconductor whose many applications, such as photovoltaic buffer layers, require uniform and continuous films down to several nanometers thick. Chemical bath deposition (CBD) is a simple, low-cost, and scalable technique to deposit such inorganic films. However, previous attempts at CBD of ZnS have often resulted in nodular noncontinuous films, slow growth rates at low pH, and high ratio of oxygen impurities at high pH. In this work, ZnS thin films were grown by adding hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) to a conventional recipe that uses zinc sulfate, nitrilotriacetic acid trisodium salt, and thioacetamide. Dynamic bath characterization showed that HMTA helps the bath to maintain near-neutral pH and also acts as a catalyst, which leads to fast nucleation and deposition rates, continuous films, and less oxygen impurities in the films. Films deposited on glass from HMTA-containing bath were uniform, continuous, and 90 nm thick after 1 h, as opposed to films grown without HMTA that were ∼3 times thinner and more nodular. On Cu2(Zn,Sn)Se4, films grown with HMTA were continuous within 10 min. The films have comparatively few oxygen impurities, with S/(S+O) atomic ratio of 88%, and high optical transmission of 98% at 360 nm. The Zn(S,O,OH) films exhibit excellent adhesion to glass and high resistivity, which make them ideal nucleation layers for other metal sulfides. Their promise as a nucleation layer was demonstrated with the deposition of thin, continuous Sb2S3 overlayers. This novel HMTA chemistry enables rapid deposition of Zn(S,O,OH) thin films to serve as a nucleation layer, a photovoltaic buffer layer, or an extremely thin continuous coating for thin film applications. HMTA may also be applied in a similar manner for solution deposition of other metal chalcogenide and oxide thin films with superior properties.

  8. Deployment and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deployed parent returns, individual counseling and/or family counseling may help. Additional Information from HealthyChildren.org: Smooth School Transitions: Tips for Military Families Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments Helping Children Adjust to a Move A Message to ...

  9. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  10. Rapid screening of chemical warfare nerve agent metabolites in urine by atmospheric solids analysis probe-mass spectroscopy (ASAP-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydel, Frank; Smith, J Richard; Pagnotti, Vincent S; Lawrence, Richard J; McEwen, Charles N; Capacio, Benedict R

    2012-01-01

    Exposures to organophosphorus nerve agents (OPNA) remain a threat to both civilian and military populations. Verification of exposures typically involves determinations of urinary metabolites or adducted proteins in blood. Urinary alkyl methylphosphonic acid metabolites resulting from hydrolysis of OPNAs provide a convenient marker for OPNA exposure. In a military setting, urine is a relatively easy sample to obtain, and a rapid turnaround for analyses for the identification of metabolites is critical for field commanders. Timely information on use and identity of OPNAs facilitates decisions regarding employment of personal protective equipment and additional strategies to mitigate additional exposure(s). Herein, we report the development of a rapid mass spectrometric (MS) method to identify OPNA metabolites directly from urine with no sample preparation. Synthetic urine spiked with multiple OPNA metabolites was analyzed using an atmospheric solids analysis probe (ASAP) attached to a high resolution mass spectrometer. The alkyl methylphosphonic acid metabolites resulting from hydrolysis of sarin, cyclosarin, soman, and Russian VX were clearly detectable down to a level of 1.0 ng/ml. The ability to rapidly detect OPNA metabolites in unprepared urine allows for the design of a field-deployable device that could afford field personnel the ability to rapidly screen individuals for specific OPNA exposure. In addition, this provides proof-of-concept evidence that a fieldable ASAP-MS device could afford personnel the ability to rapidly detect OPNAs on skin, equipment, and other porous surfaces. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Rapid calculation of protein chemical shifts using bond polarization theory and its application to protein structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovkin, Igor; Klipfel, Marco; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Ulrich, Anne S; Luy, Burkhard; Sternberg, Ulrich

    2012-09-21

    Although difficult to analyze, NMR chemical shifts provide detailed information on protein structure. We have adapted the semi-empirical bond polarization theory (BPT) to protein chemical shift calculation and chemical shift driven protein structure refinement. A new parameterization for BPT amide nitrogen chemical shift calculation has been derived from MP2 ab initio calculations and successfully evaluated using crystalline tripeptides. We computed the chemical shifts of the small globular protein ubiquitin, demonstrating that BPT calculations can match the results obtained at the DFT level of theory at very low computational cost. In addition to the calculation of chemical shift tensors, BPT allows the calculation of chemical shift gradients and consequently chemical shift driven geometry optimizations. We applied chemical shift driven protein structure refinement to the conformational analysis of a set of Trypanosoma brucei (the causative agent of African sleeping sickness) tryparedoxin peroxidase Px III structures. We found that the interaction of Px III with its reaction partner Tpx seems to be governed by conformational selection rather than by induced fit.

  12. Rapid analysis of formic acid, acetic acid, and furfural in pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and ethanol in a bioethanol fermentation using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) offers advantages as a rapid analytical technique for the quantification of three biomass degradation products (acetic acid, formic acid and furfural) within pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and the analysis of ethanol during fermentation. The data we obtained using APCI-MS correlated significantly with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis whilst offering the analyst minimal sample preparation and faster sample throughput. PMID:21896164

  13. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  14. Stratospheric Deployment Parafoil Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Stratospheric Deployment Parafoil is a proposed technology that will be designed and tested to provide a greatly superior parachute precision delivery system...

  15. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  16. The Deployment Life Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Sarah O.; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Friedman, Esther M.; Trail, Thomas E.; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M.; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study, a longitudinal study of military families across a deployment cycle in order to assess family readiness. Family readiness refers to the state of being prepared to effectively navigate the challenges of daily living experienced in the unique context of military service. The study surveyed families at frequent intervals throughout a complete deployment cycle---before a service member deploys (sometimes months before), during the actual deployment, and after the service member returns (possibly a year or more after she or he redeployed). It assessed a number of outcomes over time, including: the quality of marital and parental relationships the psychological, behavioral, and physical health of family members child and teen well-being (e.g., emotional, behavioral, social, and academic) military integration (e.g., attitudes toward military service, retention intentions). This culminating paper briefly reviews the study design and data collection procedures, presents results from analyses of the longitudinal data collected from some 2,700 military families, and offers recommendations for programs and future research related to military families. The research was jointly sponsored by the Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army, and by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. PMID:28845345

  17. Deploying Renewables - Best and Future Policy Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-23

    The global energy system faces urgent challenges. Concerns about energy security are growing, as highlighted by the recent political turmoil in Northern Africa and the nuclear incident in Fukushima. At the same time, the need to respond to climate change is more critical than ever. Against this background, many governments have increased efforts to promote deployment of renewable energy -- low-carbon sources that can strengthen energy security. This has stimulated unprecedented rise in deployment, and renewables are now the fastest growing sector of the energy mix. This 'coming of age' of renewable energy also brings challenges. Growth is focused on a few of the available technologies, and rapid deployment is confined to a relatively small number of countries. In more advanced markets, managing support costs and system integration of large shares of renewable energy in a time of economic weakness and budget austerity has sparked vigorous political debate. The IEA's new report, Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice: - Provides a comprehensive review and analysis of renewable energy policy and market trends; - Analyses in detail the dynamics of deployment and provides best-practice policy principles for different stages of market maturity; - Assesses the impact and cost-effectiveness of support policies using new methodological tools and indicators; - Investigates the strategic reasons underpinning the pursuit of RE deployment by different countries and the prospects for globalisation of RE. This new book builds on and extends a 2008 IEA publication, drawing on recent policy and deployment experience world-wide. It provides guidance for policy makers and other stakeholders to avoid past mistakes, overcome new challenges and reap the benefits of deploying renewables -- today and tomorrow.

  18. Mining Available Data from the United States Environmental Protection Agency to Support Rapid Life Cycle Inventory Modeling of Chemical Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demands for quick and accurate life cycle assessments create a need for methods to rapidly generate reliable life cycle inventories (LCI). Data mining is a suitable tool for this purpose, especially given the large amount of available governmental data. These data are typically a...

  19. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  20. Deploying OpenStack

    CERN Document Server

    Pepple, Ken

    2011-01-01

    OpenStack was created with the audacious goal of being the ubiquitous software choice for building public and private cloud infrastructures. In just over a year, it's become the most talked-about project in open source. This concise book introduces OpenStack's general design and primary software components in detail, and shows you how to start using it to build cloud infrastructures. If you're a developer, technologist, or system administrator familiar with cloud offerings such as Rackspace Cloud or Amazon Web Services, Deploying OpenStack shows you how to obtain and deploy OpenStack softwar

  1. Implementing a Systematic Process for Rapidly Embedding Sustainability within Chemical Engineering Education: A Case Study of James Cook University, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Madoc; Schneider, Phil; Desha, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Sustainability has emerged as a primary context for engineering education in the 21st Century, particularly the sub-discipline of chemical engineering. However, there is confusion over how to go about integrating sustainability knowledge and skills systemically within bachelor degrees. This paper addresses this challenge, using a case study of an…

  2. Use of TSHβ:EGFP transgenic zebrafish as a rapid in vivo model for assessing thyroid-disrupting chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Cheng [Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Jin, Xia; He, Jiangyan [Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Yin, Zhan, E-mail: zyin@ihb.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2012-07-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates that a wide range of chemicals have the ability to interfere with the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid (HPT) axis. Novel endpoints should be evaluated in addition to existing methods in order to effectively assess the effects of these chemicals on the HPT axis. Thyroid-stimulating hormone subunit β (TSHβ) plays central regulatory roles in the HPT system. We identified the regulatory region that determines the expression level of zebrafish TSHβ in the anterior pituitary. In the transgenic zebrafish with EGFP driven by the TSHβ promoter, the similar responsive patterns between the expression levels of TSHβ:EGFP and endogenous TSHβ mRNA in the pituitary are observed following treatments with goitrogen chemicals and exogenous thyroid hormones (THs). These results suggest that the TSHβ:EGFP transgenic reporter zebrafish may be a useful alternative in vivo model for the assessment of chemicals interfering with the HPT system. Highlights: ► The promoter of zebrafish TSHβ gene has been identified. ► The stable TSHβ:EGFP transgenic zebrafish reporter germline has been generated. ► The EGFP in the transgenic fish recapitulated the pattern of pituitary TSHβ mRNA. ► The transgenic zebrafish may be an in vivo model for EDC assessment.

  3. Wing Deployment Sequence #1: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #1: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings begin deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  4. Wing Deployment Sequence #3: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #3: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings fully deployed during flight following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Californiaornia. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  5. Wing Deployment Sequence #2: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #2: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings continue deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  6. Rapid prototyping of nano- and micro-patterned substrates for the control of cell neuritogenesis by topographic and chemical cues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ajay V.; Gailite, Lasma; Vyas, Varun [European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM), IFOM-IEO Campus, Via Adamello 16, I-20139 Milano (Italy); CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Lenardi, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.lenardi@mi.infn.it [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari Applicate ai Biosistemi, Universita di Milano, via Trentacoste 2, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Fondazione Filarete, viale Ortles 22/4, I-20139 Milano (Italy); Forti, Stefania [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Matteoli, Michela [Dipartimento di Farmacologia, Chemioterapia e Tossicologia Medica, Universita di Milano, via Vanvitelli 32, I-20139 Milano (Italy); Fondazione Filarete, viale Ortles 22/4, I-20139 Milano (Italy); Milani, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.milani@mi.infn.it [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Fondazione Filarete, viale Ortles 22/4, I-20139 Milano (Italy)

    2011-07-20

    Rapid prototyping of titania substrates with micro and nanofeatures is obtained by combining nanosphere lithography with supersonic cluster beam deposition on protein-functionalized glass supports. The proliferation and differentiation of PC12 cells were studied on these substrates. The facile control and modification of the substrate structure at the micro- and nanoscale allowed us to characterize the role of functional and structural features on neuritogenesis and to control this phenomenon by identifying the optimal topography.

  7. Deployed Analyst Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    request ............................93 Figure 34. CAA Operations Analysis Division SharePoint Site...................................................98...organization assistance—maintains a SharePoint site (focused on current operations) on Non-secure Internet Protocol Router Network (NIPRNET) to...facilitate deployed ORSA operations and analytical reachback support. Vision. The CAA OA Division Current Operations Team SharePoint site identifies

  8. Deploying Node.js

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquali, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    If you are an intermediate or advanced developer deploying your Node.js applications, then this book is for you. If you have already built a Node application or module and want to take your knowledge to the next level, this book will help you find your way.

  9. Large, Easily Deployable Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agan, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    Study of concepts for large space structures will interest those designing scaffolding, radio towers, rescue equipment, and prefabricated shelters. Double-fold, double-cell module was selected for further design and for zero gravity testing. Concept is viable for deployment by humans outside space vehicle as well as by remotely operated manipulator.

  10. Solid-phase microextraction low temperature plasma mass spectrometry for the direct and rapid analysis of chemical warfare simulants in complex mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumlao, Morphy C; Jeffress, Laura E; Gooding, J Justin; Donald, William A

    2016-06-21

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) is directly integrated with low temperature plasma ionisation mass spectrometry to rapidly detect organophosphate chemical warfare agent simulants and their hydrolysis products in chemical mixtures, including urine. In this sampling and ionization method, the fibre serves: (i) to extract molecules from their native environment, and (ii) as the ionization electrode that is used to desorb and ionize molecules directly from the SPME surface. By use of a custom fabricated SPME fibre consisting of a stainless steel needle coated with a Linde Type A (LTA) zeolitic microporous material and low temperature plasma mass spectrometry, protonated dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), diethyl ethylphosphonate (DEEP) and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid (PinMPA) can be detected at less than 100 ppb directly in water and urine. Organophosphates were not readily detected by this approach using an uncoated needle in negative control experiments. The use of the LTA coating significantly outperformed the use of a high alumina Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) coating of comparable thickness that is significantly less polar than LTA. By conditioning the LTA probe by immersion in an aqueous CuSO4 solution, the ion abundance for protonated DMMP increased by more than 300% compared to that obtained without any conditioning. Sample recovery values were between 96 and 100% for each analyte. The detection of chemical warfare agent analogues and hydrolysis products required less than 2 min per sample. A key advantage of this sampling and ionization method is that analyte ions can be directly and rapidly sampled from chemical mixtures, such as urine and seawater, without sample preparation or chromatography for sensitive detection by mass spectrometry. This ion source should prove beneficial for portable mass spectrometry applications because relatively low detection limits can be obtained without the use of compressed gases, fluid pumps, and lasers. Moreover, the

  11. Microwave assisted rapid growth of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanosheet networks for ethanol chemical sensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hazmi, Faten [Department of Physics, College of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21569 (Saudi Arabia); Umar, Ahmad, E-mail: ahmadumar786@gmail.com [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED) and Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Research (CAMNR), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Dar, G.N. [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED) and Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Research (CAMNR), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Ghamdi, A.A.; Al-Sayari, S.A. [Department of Physics, College of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21569 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Hajry, A. [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED) and Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Research (CAMNR), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, College of Science and Arts, Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Kim, S.H. [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED) and Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Research (CAMNR), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Tuwirqi, Reem M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21569 (Saudi Arabia); Alnowaiserb, Fowzia [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); El-Tantawy, Farid [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2012-04-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A facile microwave-assisted synthesis and characterizations of magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}) nanosheet networks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fabrication of ethanol sensor based on (Mg(OH){sub 2}) nanosheet networks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good sensitivity ({approx}3.991 {mu}A cm{sup -2} mM{sup -1}) and lower detection limit (5 {mu}M). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This research opens a way to utilize Mg(OH){sub 2} nanostructures for chemical sensors applications. - Abstract: This paper reports a facile microwave-assisted synthesis of magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}) nanosheet networks and their utilization for the fabrication of efficient ethanol chemical sensor. The synthesized nanosheets networks were characterized in terms of their morphological, structural and optical properties using various analysis techniques such as field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The detailed morphological and structural investigations reveal that the synthesized (Mg(OH){sub 2}) products are nanosheet networks, grown in high density, and possessing hexagonal crystal structure. The optical band gap of as-synthesized Mg(OH){sub 2} nanosheet networks was examined by UV-Vis absorption spectrum, and found to be 5.76 eV. The synthesized nanosheet networks were used as supporting matrices for the fabrication of I-V technique based efficient ethanol chemical sensor. The fabricated ethanol sensor based on nanosheet networks exhibits good sensitivity ({approx}3.991 {mu}A cm{sup -2} mM{sup -1}) and lower detection limit (5 {mu}M), with linearity (R = 0.9925) in short response time (10.0 s). This work demonstrate that the simply synthesized Mg(OH){sub 2} nanosheet networks can effectively be used for the fabrication of efficient ethanol chemical sensors.

  12. Rapid Monitoring of Mercury in Air from an Organic Chemical Factory in China Using a Portable Mercury Analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Yasutake, Akira; Cheng, Jin Ping; Kiyono, Masako; Uraguchi, Shimpei; Liu, Xiaojie; Miura, Kyoko; Yasuda, Yoshiaki; Mashyanov, Nikolay

    2011-01-01

    A chemical factory, using a production technology of acetaldehyde with mercury catalysis, was located southeast of Qingzhen City in Guizhou Province, China. Previous research showed heavy mercury pollution through an extensive downstream area. A current investigation of the mercury distribution in ambient air, soils, and plants suggests that mobile mercury species in soils created elevated mercury concentrations in ambient air and vegetation. Mercury concentrations of up to 600 ng/m3 in air o...

  13. The Chemical Deposition Method for the Decoration of Palladium Particles on Carbon Nanofibers with Rapid Conductivity Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoik Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Palladium (Pd metal is well-known for hydrogen sensing material due to its high sensitivity and selectivity toward hydrogen, and is able to detect hydrogen at near room temperature. In this work, palladium-doped carbon nanofibers (Pd/CNFs were successfully produced in a facile manner via electrospinning. Well-organized and uniformly distributed Pd was observed in microscopic images of the resultant nanofibers. Hydrogen causes an increment in the volume of Pd due to the ability of hydrogen atoms to occupy the octahedral interstitial positions within its face centered cubic lattice structure, resulting in the resistance transition of Pd/CNFs. The resistance variation was around 400%, and it responded rapidly within 1 min, even in 5% hydrogen atmosphere conditions at room temperature. This fibrous hybrid material platform will open a new and practical route and stimulate further researches on the development of hydrogen sensing materials with rapid response, even to low concentrations of hydrogen in an atmosphere.

  14. Rapid screening and identification of chemical hazards in surface and drinking water using high resolution mass spectrometry and a case-control filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaserzon, Sarit L; Heffernan, Amy L; Thompson, Kristie; Mueller, Jochen F; Gomez Ramos, Maria Jose

    2017-09-01

    Access to clean, safe drinking water poses a serious challenge to regulators, and requires analytical strategies capable of rapid screening and identification of potentially hazardous chemicals, specifically in situations when threats to water quality or security require rapid investigations and potential response. This study describes a fast and efficient chemical hazard screening strategy for characterising trace levels of polar organic contaminants in water matrices, based on liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry with post-acquisition 'case-control' data processing. This method allowed for a rapid response time of less than 24 h for the screening of target, suspect and non-target unknown chemicals via direct injection analysis, and a second, more sensitive analysis option requiring sample pre-concentration. The method was validated by fortifying samples with a range of pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (n = 46); with >90% of target compounds positively screened in samples at 1 ng mL-1, and 46% at 0.1 ng mL-1 when analysed via direct injection. To simulate a contamination event samples were fortified with compounds not present in the commercial library (designated 'non-target compounds'; fipronil and fenitrothion), tentatively identified at 0.2 and 1 ng mL-1, respectively; and a compound not included in any known commercial library or public database (designated 'unknown' compounds; 8Cl- perfluorooctanesulfonic acid), at 0.8 ng mL-1. The method was applied to two 'real-case' scenarios: (1) the assessment of drinking water safety during a high-profile event in Brisbane, Australia; and (2) to screen treated, re-circulated drinking water and pre-treated (raw) water. The validated workflow was effective for rapid prioritisation and screening of suspect and non-target potential hazards at trace levels, and could be applied to a wide range of matrices and investigations where comparison of organic contaminants between

  15. Deployment Pulmonary Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-11

    respiratory pathogens. 114-117 Due to the use of improvised explosive devices and mines in OEF/OIF, Service members are also at risk for blast...121. Litz BT, Keane TM, Fisher L, Marx B, Monacol V. Physical health complaints in combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder: A preliminary report... devices (e.g., thermo luminescent dosimeter) as required by occupational specialty of personnel. X X Draw pre-deployment serum specimens. X

  16. Phoenix Deploying its Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animated gif shows a series of images taken by Phoenix's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) on Sol 3. It illustrates the actions that Phoenix's Robotic Arm took to deploy its wrist. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Deployable tensegrity towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinaud, Jean-Paul

    The design of a complete tensegrity system involves the analysis of static equilibria, the mechanical properties of the configuration, the deployment of the structure, and the regulation and dynamics of the system. This dissertation will explore these steps for two different types of structures. The first structure is the traditional Snelson Tower, where struts are disjointed, and is referred to as a Class 1 tensegrity. The second structure of interest is referred to as a Class 2 structure, where two struts come in contact at a joint. The first part of the thesis involves the dynamics of these tensegrity structures. Two complete nonlinear formulations for the dynamics of tensegrity systems are derived. In addition, a general formulation for the statics for an arbitrary tensegrity structure resulted from one of the dynamic formulations and is presented with symmetric and nonsymmetric tensegrity configurations. The second part of the thesis involves statics. The analysis of static equilibria and the implementation of this analysis into an open loop control law that will deploy the tensegrity structures along an equilibrium manifold are derived. The analysis of small stable tensegrity units allow for a modular design, where a collection of these units can be assembled into a larger structure that obeys the same control laws for deployment concepts. In addition, a loaded structure is analyzed to determine the optimal number of units required to obtain a minimal mass configuration. The third part of the thesis involves laboratory hardware that demonstrates the practical use of the methodology presented. A Class 2 symmetric structure is constructed, deployed, and stowed using the analysis from part two. In addition, the static equilibria of a Class 1 structure is computed to obtain nonsymmetric reconfigurations. The final part of the thesis involves the attenuation of white noise disturbances acting on nodes of both structures. The structures are simulated using linear

  18. Observing a Chemically and/or Climatically Important Volcano: Facilitating Rapid Response to an Unanticipated yet Inevitable Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    A large volcanic event has the potential to influence the chemical and/or physical state of the Earth's atmosphere in a significant way. In particular, changes in the trace constituent and/or particulate composition of the stratosphere, as well as the temperature distribution of the troposphere and stratosphere can both take place (and persist over a period of time), as has been observed in several eruptions in recent years (e.g., the Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1991). Characterizing the impacts of these eruptions and predicting their impacts on the evolution of the atmosphere requires observations of gas and particle distributions over time period from as soon after eruption as possible to the longer time period over which the Earth system is affected. This characterization may make use of observation capabilities from ongoing surface-based and existing satellite-based observing systems, and can also benefit significantly from focused airborne campaigns that make use of both in situ and remote sensing instrumentation. This presentation will review the relevant surface- and space-based observing capability operated by NASA in the broader context of the global observing capabilities of the international community, and and will discuss potential approaches to airborne campaigns (platforms, sensors, systems, logistical consideration) that would provide the data most useful for both characterization and forecasting of both the chemical and climatic forcing and impacts associated with the eruption.

  19. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rynearson, Michael Ardel; Plum, Martin Michael

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE -owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that the treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  20. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. A. Rynearson; M. M. Plum

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE-owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that a treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  1. An alternative chemical redox method for the production of bispecific antibodies: implication in rapid detection of food borne pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Owais

    Full Text Available Bi-functional antibodies with the ability to bind two unrelated epitopes have remarkable potential in diagnostic and bio-sensing applications. In the present study, bispecific antibodies that recognize human red blood cell (RBC and the food borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes were engineered. The procedure involves initial reduction of a mixture of anti-RBC and anti-Listeria antibodies followed by gradual re-oxidation of the reduced disulphides. This facilitates association of the separated antibody chains and formation of hybrid immunoglobulins with affinity for the L. monocytogenes and human RBC. The bispecific antibodies caused the agglutination of the RBCs only in the presence of L. monocytogenes cells. The agglutination process necessitated the specific presence of L. monocytogenes and the red colored clumps formed were readily visible with naked eyes. The RBC agglutination assay described here provides a remarkably simple approach for the rapid and highly specific screening of various pathogens in their biological niches.

  2. Rapidly induced chemical defenses in maize stems and their effects on short-term growth of Ostrinia nubilalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafoe, Nicole J; Huffaker, Alisa; Vaughan, Martha M; Duehl, Adrian J; Teal, Peter E; Schmelz, Eric A

    2011-09-01

    Plants damaged by insect herbivory often respond by inducing a suite of defenses that can negatively affect an insect's growth and fecundity. Ostrinia nubilalis (European corn borer, ECB) is one of the most devastating insect pests of maize, and in the current study, we examined the early biochemical changes that occur in maize stems in response to ECB herbivory and how these rapidly induced defenses influence the growth of ECB. We measured the quantities of known maize defense compounds, benzoxazinoids and the kauralexin class of diterpenoid phytoalexins. ECB herbivory resulted in decreased levels of the benzoxazinoid, 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one)-β-D-glucopyranose (DIMBOA-Glc), and a corresponding increase in 2-(2-hydroxy-4,7-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one)-β-D-glucopyranose (HDMBOA-Glc). Total quantities of benzoxazinoids and kauralexins were increased as early as 24 h after the initiation of ECB feeding. The plant hormones, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET), and the transcripts encoding their key biosynthetic enzymes also accumulated in response to ECB herbivory, consistent with a role in defense regulation. The combined pharmacological application of JA and the ET precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid to stem internode tissue likewise resulted in changes in benzoxazinoids similar to that observed with ECB damage. Despite the fact that maize actively mounts a defense response to ECB stem feeding, no differences in percent weight gain were observed between ECB larvae that fed upon non-wounded control tissues compared to tissues obtained from plants previously subjected to 24 h ECB stem herbivory. These rapid defense responses in maize stems do not appear to negatively impact ECB growth, thus suggesting that ECB have adapted to these induced biochemical changes.

  3. A physicochemical descriptor-based scoring scheme for effective and rapid filtering of kinase-like chemical space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The current chemical space of known small molecules is estimated to exceed 1060 structures. Though the largest physical compound repositories contain only a few tens of millions of unique compounds, virtual screening of databases of this size is still difficult. In recent years, the application of physicochemical descriptor-based profiling, such as Lipinski's rule-of-five for drug-likeness and Oprea's criteria of lead-likeness, as early stage filters in drug discovery has gained widespread acceptance. In the current study, we outline a kinase-likeness scoring function based on known kinase inhibitors. Results The method employs a collection of 22,615 known kinase inhibitors from the ChEMBL database. A kinase-likeness score is computed using statistical analysis of nine key physicochemical descriptors for these inhibitors. Based on this score, the kinase-likeness of four publicly and commercially available databases, i.e., National Cancer Institute database (NCI), the Natural Products database (NPD), the National Institute of Health's Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR), and the World Drug Index (WDI) database, is analyzed. Three of these databases, i.e., NCI, NPD, and MLSMR are frequently used in the virtual screening of kinase inhibitors, while the fourth WDI database is for comparison since it covers a wide range of known chemical space. Based on the kinase-likeness score, a kinase-focused library is also developed and tested against three different kinase targets selected from three different branches of the human kinome tree. Conclusions Our proposed methodology is one of the first that explores how the narrow chemical space of kinase inhibitors and its relevant physicochemical information can be utilized to build kinase-focused libraries and prioritize pre-existing compound databases for screening. We have shown that focused libraries generated by filtering compounds using the kinase-likeness score have, on average, better docking

  4. In situ DART-MS as a Versatile and Rapid Dereplication Tool in Lichenology: Chemical Fingerprinting of Ophioparma ventosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pogam, Pierre; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile; Legouin, Béatrice; Boustie, Joël; Rondeau, David

    2016-11-01

    Lichens widely occur all over the world and are known to produce unique secondary metabolites with various biological activities. To develop high-throughput screening approaches requiring little to no sample preparation to alleviate the dereplication holdup and accelerate the discovery workflow of new structures from lichens. The extracellular distribution of lichen metabolites is incentive for in situ chemical profiling of lichens using the ambient mass spectrometry DART-MS. For this purpose, the chlorolichen Ophioparma ventosa, producing an array of lichen polyphenolics that encompass the main structural classes associated to lichen chemodiversity, represented a relevant model to assess the versatility of this platform. The feasibility of this approach was first established by analysing the pure compounds known from this species prior to being extended to different solid organs of the lichen. All tested compounds could be detected in positive and negative ion modes, most often with prevalent protonated or deprotonated molecules. Only depsides underwent a significant in-source fragmentation in both ionisation modes, which should be regarded as an added value for their structural elucidation. In situ DART-MS analyses of Ophioparma ventosa provided an extensive chemical profile and noteworthy pinpointed miriquidic acid, an unusual lichen depside so far unknown within this species. At last, in situ DART-MS granted a first insight into the distribution of the metabolites within the lichen. DART-MS represents a versatile tool to the wide field of lichenology, facilitating accelerated and sharp analyses of lichens and bypassing costly and tedious procedures of solvent extraction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Strategies to Protect the Health of Deployed U.S. Forces. Analytical Framework for Assessing Risks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rhomberg, Lorenz

    2000-01-01

    .... By doing so, it is implicit that potential health risks exist in deployments because of possible exposures to multiple chemicals, drugs, and biologics under stressful environmental and occupational...

  6. A rapid chemical-genetic screen utilizing impaired movement phenotypes in C. elegans: Input into genetics of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, Kathrin; Fardghassemi, Yasmin; Parker, J Alex

    2017-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the most common neurodevelopmental disorder with a constantly increasing prevalence. Model organisms may be tools to identify underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, as well as aid the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. A simple animal such as the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans may provide insights into the extreme complexity of ASD genetics. Despite its potential, using C. elegans in ASD research is a controversial approach and has not yet been used extensively in this context. In this study, we present a screening approach of potential C. elegans mutants as potential ASD models. We screened these mutants for motor-deficiency phenotypes, which can be exploited to study underlying mechanisms of the disorder. Selected motor-deficient mutants were then used in a comprehensive drug screen of over 3900 compounds, including many FDA-approved and natural molecules, that were analyzed for their ability to suppress motility defects caused by ASD-associated gene orthologues. This genetic-chemical approach, i.e. establishing C. elegans models for ASD and screening of a well-characterized compound library, might be a promising first step to understand the mechanisms of how gene variations cause neuronal dysfunction, leading to ASD and other neurological disorders. Positively acting compounds could also be promising candidates for preclinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapid assessment of mid-infrared refractive index anisotropy using a prism coupler: chemical vapor deposited ZnS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, H A; Lipschultz, Kristen A; Anheier, N C; McCloy, J S

    2012-05-01

    A state-of-the-art mid-infrared prism coupler was used to study suspected anisotropy in the refractive index of forward-looking-infrared grade chemical vapor deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide. Samples were prepared with columnar grain structure in and perpendicular to the sample plane, as well as from different depths in the CVD growth body. This study was motivated by the growing industry concern among optical design engineers, as well as developers of mid-infrared systems, over the reliability of historically accepted index data. Prior photoluminescence and x-ray diffraction measurements have suggested that refractive index may vary according to sample orientation with respect to the grain structure. Measurements were conducted to provide optical dispersion and thermal index (dn/dT) data at discrete laser wavelengths between 0.633 and 10.591 μm at two temperature set points (30 °C and 90 °C). Refractive index measurements between samples exhibited an average standard deviation comparable to the uncertainty of the prism coupler measurement (0.0004 refractive index units), suggesting that the variation in refractive index as a function of sample orientation and CVD deposition time is negligible and should have no impact on subsequent optical designs. Measured dispersion data at mid-infrared wavelengths were also found to agree well with prior published measurements.

  8. Self-Deployable Membrane Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.; Willis, Paul B.; Tan, Seng C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently existing approaches for deployment of large, ultra-lightweight gossamer structures in space rely typically upon electromechanical mechanisms and mechanically expandable or inflatable booms for deployment and to maintain them in a fully deployed, operational configuration. These support structures, with the associated deployment mechanisms, launch restraints, inflation systems, and controls, can comprise more than 90 percent of the total mass budget. In addition, they significantly increase the stowage volume, cost, and complexity. A CHEM (cold hibernated elastic memory) membrane structure without any deployable mechanism and support booms/structure is deployed by using shape memory and elastic recovery. The use of CHEM micro-foams reinforced with carbon nanotubes is considered for thin-membrane structure applications. In this advanced structural concept, the CHEM membrane structure is warmed up to allow packaging and stowing prior to launch, and then cooled to induce hibernation of the internal restoring forces. In space, the membrane remembers its original shape and size when warmed up. After the internal restoring forces deploy the structure, it is then cooled to achieve rigidization. For this type of structure, the solar radiation could be utilized as the heat energy used for deployment and space ambient temperature for rigidization. The overall simplicity of the CHEM self-deployable membrane is one of its greatest assets. In present approaches to space-deployable structures, the stow age and deployment are difficult and challenging, and introduce a significant risk, heavy mass, and high cost. Simple procedures provided by CHEM membrane greatly simplify the overall end-to-end process for designing, fabricating, deploying, and rigidizing large structures. The CHEM membrane avoids the complexities associated with other methods for deploying and rigidizing structures by eliminating deployable booms, deployment mechanisms, and inflation and control systems

  9. Chemical-Induced Read-Through at Premature Termination Codons Determined by a Rapid Dual-Fluorescence System Based on S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Altamura

    Full Text Available Nonsense mutations generate in-frame stop codons in mRNA leading to a premature arrest of translation. Functional consequences of premature termination codons (PTCs include the synthesis of truncated proteins with loss of protein function causing severe inherited or acquired diseases. A therapeutic approach has been recently developed that is based on the use of chemical agents with the ability to suppress PTCs (read-through restoring the synthesis of a functional full-length protein. Research interest for compounds able to induce read-through requires an efficient high throughput large scale screening system. We present a rapid, sensitive and quantitative method based on a dual-fluorescence reporter expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to monitor and quantitate read-through at PTCs. We have shown that our novel system works equally well in detecting read-through at all three PTCs UGA, UAG and UAA.

  10. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  11. A rapid fabrication of C/C composites by a thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration method with vaporized kerosene as a precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jiping [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)]. E-mail: buickwang@hotmail.com; Qian Junmin [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Qiao Guanjun [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Jin Zhihao [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2007-01-15

    A thermal gradient, atmospheric pressure chemical vapor infiltration method with simultaneous vaporized kerosene as a precursor for rapid fabrication of C/C composites was studied. By this method, carbon felts (bulk density {approx}0.2 g cm{sup -3}) were densified to C/C composites with density of 1.67 and 1.71 g cm{sup -3} when prepared at 1050 and 1150 deg. C for 6 h, respectively. X-ray diffraction result indicates that the composites have a strong ability to graphitize and the higher deposition temperature leads to the increased graphitization degree. Polarized light microscope and scanning electron microscope images reveal that fibers of the composites prepared for 6 h are surrounded by ring-shaped pyrocarbon matrix with a thickness of {approx}20 {mu}m, and that the matrix is delaminated to 4-6 layer-like regions. The deposition process is analyzed by dividing the reactor into four regions associated with specific functions and the reasons for the rapid fabrication are proposed as the short convection and diffusion path for the precursor and the existing of thermal gradient across the preform.

  12. Rapid and automatic chemical identification of the medicinal flower buds of Lonicera plants by the benchtop and hand-held Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo; Guo, Baolin; Yan, Rui; Sun, Suqin; Zhou, Qun

    2017-07-01

    With the utilization of the hand-held equipment, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is a promising analytical technique to minimize the time cost for the chemical identification of herbal materials. This research examines the feasibility of the hand-held FT-IR spectrometer for the on-site testing of herbal materials, using Lonicerae Japonicae Flos (LJF) and Lonicerae Flos (LF) as examples. Correlation-based linear discriminant models for LJF and LF are established based on the benchtop and hand-held FT-IR instruments. The benchtop FT-IR models can exactly recognize all articles of LJF and LF. Although a few LF articles are misjudged at the sub-class level, the hand-held FT-IR models are able to exactly discriminate LJF and LF. As a direct and label-free analytical technique, FT-IR spectroscopy has great potential in the rapid and automatic chemical identification of herbal materials either in laboratories or in fields. This is helpful to prevent the spread and use of adulterated herbal materials in time.

  13. Concurrent engineering: effective deployment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unny Menon

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive insight into current trends and developments in Concurrent Engineering for integrated development of products and processes with the goal of completing the entire cycle in a shorter time, at lower overall cost and with fewer engineering design changes after product release. The evolution and definition of Concurrent Engineering are addressed first, followed by a concise review of the following elements of the concurrent engineering approach to product development: Concept Development: The Front-End Process, identifying Customer Needs and Quality Function Deployment, Establishing Product Specifications, Concept Selection, Product Architecture, Design for Manufacturing, Effective Rapid Prototyping, and The Economics of Product Development. An outline of a computer-based tutorial developed by the authors and other graduate students funded by NASA ( accessible via the world-wide-web . is provided in this paper. A brief discussion of teamwork for successful concurrent engineering is included, t'ase histories of concurrent engineering implementation at North American and European companies are outlined with references to textbooks authored by Professor Menon and other writers. A comprehensive bibliography on concurrent engineering is included in the paper.

  14. Complex Deployed Responsive Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Glenn; McLening, Marc; Caldwell, Nigel; Thompson, Rob

    A pizza restaurant must provide product, in the form of the food and drink, and service in the way this is delivered to the customer. Providing this has distinct operational challenges, but what if the restaurant also provides a home delivery service? The service becomes deployed as the customer is no-longer co-located with the production area. The business challenge is complicated as service needs to be delivered within a geographic region, to time or the pizza will be cold, and within a cost that is not ­prohibitive. It must also be responsive to short term demand; needing to balance the number of staff it has available to undertake deliveries against a forecast of demand.

  15. Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division advances transportation innovation by being leaders in infrastructure technology, including vehicles and...

  16. Urban Code/ Urban Code Deploy

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — COTS databases to support the automation of application deployments through different environments. It keeps track of software deliverables at various stages of SDLC...

  17. Rapid chemical evolution of tropospheric volcanic emissions from Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, based on observations of ozone and halogen-containing gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Cynthia A.; Kelly, Peter; Kern, Christoph; Roberts, T.J.; Aluppe, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report results from an observational and modeling study of reactive chemistry in the tropospheric plume emitted by Redoubt Volcano, Alaska. Our measurements include the first observations of Br and I degassing from an Alaskan volcano, the first study of O3 evolution in a volcanic plume, as well as the first detection of BrO in the plume of a passively degassing Alaskan volcano. This study also represents the first detailed spatially-resolved comparison of measured and modeled O3 depletion in a volcanic plume. The composition of the plume was measured on June 20, 2010 using base-treated filter packs (for F, Cl, Br, I, and S) at the crater rim and by an instrumented fixed-wing aircraft on June 21 and August 19, 2010. The aircraft was used to track the chemical evolution of the plume up to ~ 30 km downwind (2 h plume travel time) from the volcano and was equipped to make in situ observations of O3, water vapor, CO2, SO2, and H2S during both flights plus remote spectroscopic observations of SO2 and BrO on the August 19th flight. The airborne data from June 21 reveal rapid chemical O3 destruction in the plume as well as the strong influence chemical heterogeneity in background air had on plume composition. Spectroscopic retrievals from airborne traverses made under the plume on August 19 show that BrO was present ~ 6 km downwind (20 min plume travel time) and in situ measurements revealed several ppbv of O3 loss near the center of the plume at a similar location downwind. Simulations with the PlumeChem model reproduce the timing and magnitude of the observed O3 deficits and suggest that autocatalytic release of reactive bromine and in-plume formation of BrO were primarily responsible for the observed O3 destruction in the plume. The measurements are therefore in general agreement with recent model studies of reactive halogen formation in volcanic plumes, but also show that field studies must pay close attention to variations in the composition of

  18. Deploying the Mental Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Koenderink

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three observers performed a task designed to quantify their “pictorial relief” in visual awareness for a photograph of a piece of sculpture. In separate sessions, they were instructed to assume one of two “mental viewpoints.” The main objective was to investigate whether human observers have such command. All three observers could redirect their “mental view direction” by up to 20°. These observers experience “paradoxical monocular” stereopsis, whereas a sizable fraction of the population does not. Moreover, they had some experience in assuming various “viewing modes.” Whereas one cannot generalize to the population at large, these findings at least prove that it is possible to direct the mental viewpoint actively. This is of importance to the visual arts. For instance, academic drawings require one to be simultaneously aware of a “viewing” (for the drawing and an “illumination direction” (for the shading. Being able to mentally deploy various vantage points is a crucial step from the “visual field” to the “visual space.”

  19. Rapid and sensitive serum glucose determination using chemical labeling coupled with black phosphorus-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Yu, Lei; Qi, Chu-Bo; Ding, Jun; He, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Ren-Qi; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring the concentration of blood glucose in patients is a key component of good medical diagnoses. Therefore, developing an accurate, rapid and sensitive strategy for monitoring blood glucose is of vital importance. We proposed a strategy for serum glucose determination combining 2-(4-boronobenzyl) isoquinolin-2-ium bromide chemical labeling with black phosphorus assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (CL-BP/ALDI-TOF MS). The entire analytical process consisted of 1min of protein precipitation and 3min of chemical labeling in a microwave oven prior to the BP/ALDI-TOF MS analysis. The analysis can be completed in 5min with high throughput and extremely low sample consumption. Good linearity for glucose was obtained with a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.9986. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 11.5 fmol and 37.5 fmol, respectively. Satisfied reproducibility and reliability were gained by evaluation of the intra- and inter-day precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 7.2% and relative recoveries ranging from 87.1% to 108.1%, respectively. The proposed strategy was also applied for the analysis of endogenous glucose in various serum samples and the results were consistent with those obtained using the hexokinase method in a clinical laboratory. Considering the results, the proposed CL-BP/ALDI-TOF MS strategy has proven to be reliable, fast, and sensitive for quantitative analysis of serum glucose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of the gas feeding method on the properties of 3C-SiC/Si(111) grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Shim, H W; Suh, E K

    1998-01-01

    High-quality crystalline 3C-SiC thin films are grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) on Si(111) by using two different growth processes. The films are grown along the [111] direction at 1200 .deg. C. The quality of the films are investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and transmission electron diffraction. The SiC film grown by flowing the tetramethylsilane (TMS) gas before heating the substrate up to the growth temperature does not contain many voids at the SiC/Si interface, while the SiC grown by heating the substrate before supplying the TMS gas possesses many voids at the interface. The unintentionally doped SiC film grown by gas flow before heating the substrate appears to be n-type with a carrier concentration of 1.48 x 10 sup 1 sup 6 cm sup - sup 3 , a electron mobility of 884 cm sup 2 /V centre dot s, and a resistivity of 0.462 OMEGA centre dot cm. The physical properties, such as the electrical properties, the surface morphology, and the crystallinity, ...

  1. ZnO nanorod arrays prepared by chemical bath deposition combined with rapid thermal annealing: structural, photoluminescence and field emission characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Wei; Yang, Hsi-Wen; He, Hsin-Min; Lee, Yi-Mu

    2016-01-01

    ZnO nanorod arrays were prepared by low temperature chemical bath deposition (CBD) combined with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) under different ambient conditions. The structure and morphology of the synthesized ZnO have been characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained ZnO samples are highly crystalline with a hexagonal wurtzite phase and also display well-aligned array structure. A pronounced effect on increased nanorod length was found for the RTA-treated ZnO as compared to the as-grown ZnO. Analysis of XRD indicates that the (0 0 2) feature peak of the as-grown ZnO was shifted towards a lower angle as compared to the peaks of RTA-treated ZnO samples due to the reduction of tensile strain along the c-axis by RTA. Photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal that the ZnO nanorod arrays receiving RTA in an O2 environment have the sharpest UV emission band and greatest intensity ratio of near band-edge emission (NBE) to deep level emission (DLE). Additionally, the effects of RTA on the field emission properties were evaluated. The results demonstrate that RTA an O2 environment can lower the turn-on field and improve the field enhancement factor. The stability of the field emission current was also tested for 4 h.

  2. Chemical munitions dumped at sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Margo; Bełdowski, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    Modern chemical warfare is a byproduct of the industrial revolution, which created factories capable of rapidly producing artillery shells that could be filled with toxic chemicals such as chlorine, phosgene and mustard agent. The trench warfare of World War I inaugurated extensive deployments of modern chemical weapons in 1915. Concomitantly, the need arose to dispose of damaged, captured or excess chemical munitions and their constituents. Whereas today chemical warfare agents (CWA) are destroyed via chemical neutralization processes or high-temperature incineration in tandem with environmental monitoring, in the early to middle 20th century the options for CWA disposal were limited to open-air burning, burial and disposal at sea. The latter option was identified as the least likely of the three to impact mankind, and sea dumping of chemical munitions commenced. Eventually, the potential impacts of sea dumping human waste were recognized, and in 1972 an international treaty, the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter, was developed to protect the marine environment from pollution caused by the dumping of wastes and other matter into the ocean. By the time this treaty, referred to as the London Convention, was signed by a majority of nations, millions of tons of munitions were known to have been disposed throughout the world's oceans.

  3. Deployable Structural Booms for Large Deployable Solar Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a new generation of large, high power deployable solar arrays has been identified as the most significant challenge facing the development of...

  4. Reactor power system deployment and startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetch, J. R.; Nelin, C. J.; Britt, E. J.; Klein, G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses issues that should receive further examination in the near-term as concept selection for development of a U.S. space reactor power system is approached. The issues include: the economics, practicality and system reliability associated with transfer of nuclear spacecraft from low earth shuttle orbits to operational orbits, via chemical propulsion versus nuclear electric propulsion; possible astronaut supervised reactor and nuclear electric propulsion startup in low altitude Shuttle orbit; potential deployment methods for nuclear powered spacecraft from Shuttle; the general public safety of low altitude startup and nuclear safe and disposal orbits; the question of preferred reactor power level; and the question of frozen versus molten alkali metal coolant during launch and deployment. These issues must be considered now because they impact the SP-100 concept selection, power level selection, weight and size limits, use of deployable radiators, reliability requirements, and economics, as well as the degree of need for and the urgency of developing space reactor power systems.

  5. Rapid Deployment of a RESTful Service for Oceanographic Research Cruises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Linyun; Arko, Robert; Leadbetter, Adam

    2014-05-01

    The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP) seeks to increase data sharing across scientific domains and international boundaries, by providing a forum to harmonize diverse regional data systems. ODIP participants from the US include the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program, whose mission is to capture, catalog, and describe the underway/environmental sensor data from US oceanographic research vessels and submit the data to public long-term archives. R2R publishes information online as Linked Open Data, making it widely available using Semantic Web standards. Each vessel, sensor, cruise, dataset, person, organization, funding award, log, report, etc, has a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI). Complex queries that federate results from other data providers are supported, using the SPARQL query language. To facilitate interoperability, R2R uses controlled vocabularies developed collaboratively by the science community (eg. SeaDataNet device categories) and published online by the NERC Vocabulary Server (NVS). In response to user feedback, we are developing a standard programming interface (API) and Web portal for R2R's Linked Open Data. The API provides a set of simple REST-type URLs that are translated on-the-fly into SPARQL queries, and supports common output formats (eg. JSON). We will demonstrate an implementation based on the Epimorphics Linked Data API (ELDA) open-source Java package. Our experience shows that constructing a simple portal with limited schema elements in this way can significantly reduce development time and maintenance complexity.

  6. Last Mile Asset Monitoring; Low Cost Rapid Deployment Asset Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumr, Zdenek

    Installation and utilization of residential distribution transformers has not changed substantially over a long period of time. Utilities typically size their transformers based on a formula that takes into account broadly what types and how many dwellings will be connected. Most new residential dwellings feature 200 Amp service per household with an anticipated energy demand of under 20,000 kWh per year. Average electrical energy consumption varies from state to state but averages to 11,280 kWh per year. Energy demand is expected to fall into a typical residential load curve that shows increased demand early in the morning, then decreasing during the day and another peak early to late evening. Distribution transformers are sized at the limit of the combined evening peak with the assumption that the transformer has enough thermal mass to absorb short overloads that may occur when concurrent loading situations among multiple dwellings arise. The assumption that concurrent loading is of short duration and the transformer can cool off during the night time has been validated over the years and has become standard practice. This has worked well when dwelling loads follow an averaging scheme and low level of coincidence. With the arrival of electric vehicles (EV's) this assumption has to be reevaluated. The acquisition of an electric vehicle in a household can drive up energy demand by over 4000 kWh per year. Potentially problematic is the increased capacity of battery packs and the resulting proliferation of Level 2 chargers. The additional load of a single Level 2 charger concurring with the combined evening peak load will push even conservatively sized distribution transformers over their nameplate rating for a substantial amount of time. Additionally, unlike common household appliances of similar power requirements such as ovens or water heaters, a Level 2 battery charger will run at peak power consumption for several hours, and the current drawn by the EVs has very high levels of harmonic distortion. The excessive loading and harmonic profile can potentially result in damaging heat build-up resulting in asset degradation. In this thesis I present a device and method that monitors pole mounted distribution transformers for overheating, collect and wirelessly upload data and initiate commands to chargers to change output levels from Level 2 to Level 1 or shut down EV charging altogether until the transformer returns into safe operational range.

  7. Rapid Forward Deployment Made Easier with Composite Airfield Matting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    features should reduce the installation time to the accordance with ASTM D3039 will determine the ability of The AMPTIAC Quarterly, Volume 7, Number 1 21...PAGE ABSTRACT OF Gregg Hill PAGES U U U SAR 6 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 850-283-3745 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI...Capability of being cleared of snow and dirt using standard airfield plows, vacuum sweepers and towed sweepers- a Resistant to ultraviolet degradation

  8. Hydrographic and chemical data obtained during the SOCCOM float deployment expedition on-board R/V Investigator cruise IN2016_v02 in the Indian and Southern Ocean (14 March - 13 April, 2016) (NCEI Accession 0163191)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163191 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, optical, physical and profile data collected from Investigator in the Indian Ocean and South...

  9. Q-Deploy-Processor and FPGA Rapid-Deployment Platform Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For NASA and other organizations, development using reconfigurable technologies can be time consuming and difficult, with expensive to over-budget development cycles...

  10. Safety Pilot Model Deployment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data were collected during the Safety Pilot Model Deployment (SPMD). The data sets that these entities will provide include basic safety messages (BSM), vehicle...

  11. Deployable Entry-system Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Deployable Entry-system ProjecT (ADEPT) will develop requirements for the ADEPT flight test.  Prior entry systems used high mass thermal protection...

  12. The parenting cycle of deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Ellen R; Ross, Abigail

    2012-02-01

    Parents of dependent children comprise approximately 42% of Active Duty and National Guard/Reserve military members serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Recent estimates indicate that more than two million children have experienced parental deployment since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. This article seeks to characterize the impact of the deployment life cycle on parenting roles among service members and at-home partners/caregivers of dependent children. Specifically, a new conceptual framework is presented for considering the ways in which parenting and co-parenting processes are affected by the demands and transitions inherent in contemporary deployment to a war zone. Although the phase-based emotional cycle of deployment continues to offer an instructive description of the broad challenges faced by military couples, a parenting cycle of deployment model shifts the perspective to the critical and largely ignored processes of parenting in the context of deployment and war, and to the realities faced by parents serving in the U.S. military. Implications for prevention, intervention, and future research related to military families are addressed.

  13. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of In-Situ Chemical Oxidation Involving Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds - Design and Deployment Guidelines (Parris Island, SC, U.S. Marine Corp Recruit Depot, Site 45 Pilot Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot-scale in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) demonstration, involving subsurface injections of sodium permanganate (NaMnO4), was performed at the US Marine Corp Recruit Depot (MCRD), site 45 (Parris Island (PI), SC). The ground water was originally contaminated with perchloroe...

  14. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  15. IPv6 deployment and management

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A guide for understanding, deploying, and managing Internet Protocol version 6 The growth of the Internet has created a need for more addresses than are available with Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4)-the protocol currently used to direct almost all Internet traffic. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)-the new IP version intended to ultimately succeed IPv4-will expand the addressing capacity of the Internet to support the explosive growth of users and devices on the Internet as well as add flexibility to allocating addresses and efficiency for routing traffic. IPv6 Deploy

  16. Integrated personal health and care services deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villalba, E.; Casas, I.; Abadie, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The deployment and adoption of Integrated Personal Health and Care Services in Europe has been slow and fragmented. There have been many initiatives and projects of this kind in different European regions, many of which have not gone beyond the pilot stage. We investigated the necessary...... conditions for mainstreaming these services into care provision. Methods: We conducted a qualitative analysis of 27 Telehealth, Telecare and Integrated Personal Health System projects, implemented across 20 regions in eight European countries. The analysis was based on Suter’s ten key principles...... of Integrated Personal Health and Care Services in European regions has increased. Further research will reveal the weight of each facilitator and which combinations of facilitators lead to rapid adoption....

  17. Equipment compatibility and logistics assessment for containment foam deployment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McRoberts, Vincent M.; Martell, Mary-Alena; Jones, Joseph A.

    2005-09-01

    The deployment of the Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) is evolving toward a lean and mobile response team. As a result, opportunities to support more rapid mobilization are being investigated. This study investigates three specific opportunities including: (1) the potential of using standard firefighting equipment to support deployment of the aqueous foam concentrate (AFC-380); (2) determining the feasibility and needs for regional staging of equipment to reduce the inventory currently mobilized during a JTOT response; and (3) determining the feasibility and needs for development of the next generation AFC-380 to reduce the volume of foam concentrate required for a response. This study supports the need to ensure that requirements for alternative deployment schemes are understood and in place to support improved response activities.

  18. A scope of the problem: Post-deployment reintegration challenges in a National Guard Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Sherrie L; Oh, Hyunsung; Redmond, Sarah A; Chicas, Joseph; Hassan, Anthony M; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    More Reserve and Guard members have been activated in the past few years than in any other time in history. In addition to the high rates of psychological and behavioral challenges among military personnel, there are other equally important post-deployment reintegration challenges. Post-deployment reintegration challenges are particularly important to Reserve and Guard members, who transition rapidly from civilian-military-civilian. This study aims to describe the scope of challenges that a battalion of National Guard members (NGM) report experiencing after returning from a one-year deployment to Iraq. This article reports data from a sample of 126 NGM who recently returned from a one-year deployment to Iraq. The scope of post-deployment problems at baseline, 3- and 6-month post-deployment are presented. Overall, the rates of post-deployment psychological and behavioral problems were elevated upon returning from deployment and remained fairly constant for up to 6 months post-deployment. Approximately 30% of respondents were unsatisfied with their relationship and upwards of 30% reported family reintegration challenges. Comparisons with similar research and implications for prevention and improvement of post-deployment quality of life are addressed.

  19. Arusha Rover Deployable Medical Workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Tyrone; Hopson, Sonya; Marzette, Russell; Monroe, Gilena; Mustafa, Ruqayyah

    2014-01-01

    The NSBE Arusha rover concept offers a means of human transport and habitation during long-term exploration missions on the moon. This conceptual rover calls for the availability of medical supplies and equipment for crew members in order to aid in mission success. This paper addresses the need for a dedicated medical work station aboard the Arusha rover. The project team investigated multiple options for implementing a feasible deployable station to address both the medical and workstation layout needs of the rover and crew. Based on layout specifications and medical workstation requirements, the team has proposed a deployable workstation concept that can be accommodated within the volumetric constraints of the Arusha rover spacecraft

  20. Its deployment and transportation policies

    OpenAIRE

    YGNACE, JL; UNO, N

    2004-01-01

    Technology has driven the mobility needs of people and has been critical in the movement of goods. The newest wave of transportation technologies is the development and deployment of intelligent transportation systems. For the last 15 years, these systems have been promoted by the private industry and the public sector, mainly departments of transportation. The academia has also been involved as a developers and evaluators of technologies. However, the progress of its implementation has been ...

  1. Family Reintegration Following Guard Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    researchers have found that spouses were more likely to seek care for their mental health problems and were less concerned with the stigma of mental...Few Guard members had anticipated the degree of adjustments that would be required: When you have been in a foreign country, coming back is a...Changes in the children while the deployed member is gone can spur conflict, particularly when children make the transition from childhood to adolescence

  2. How Deployments Affect Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Interestingly, some service members welcomed the longer working days as a way to keep themselves busy and distracted from homesickness or thoughts of...want more-frequent communica- tion home. Some members with whom we spoke felt that talking to family while on deploy- ment only increased homesickness ...debt, to save for college , or to buy such items as cars. In this way, the rewards of a hard de- ployment can have long-term effects for military

  3. Laser-based detection of chemical contraband

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmer, Robert G.; Kelly, James F.; Martin, Steven W.; Mong, Gary M.; Sharpe, Steven W.

    1997-02-01

    The goal of our work is tow fold; 1) develop a portable and rapid laser based air sampler for detection of specific chemical contraband and 2) compile a spectral data base in both the near- and mid-IR of sufficiently high quality to be useful for gas phase spectroscopic identification of chemical contraband. During the synthesis or 'cooking' of many illicit chemical substances, relatively high concentrations of volatile solvents, chemical precursors and byproducts are unavoidably released to the atmosphere. In some instances, the final product may have sufficient vapor pressure to be detectable in the surrounding air. The detection of a single high-value effluent or the simultaneous detection of two or more low-value effluents can be used as reliable indicators of a nearby clandestine cooking operation. The designation of high- versus low-value effluent reflects both the commercial availability and legitimate usage of a specific chemical. This paper will describe PNNL's progress and efforts towards the development of a portable laser based air sampling system for the detection of clandestine manufacturing of methamphetamine. Although our current efforts ar focused on methamphetamine, we see no fundamental limitations on detection of other forms of chemical contraband manufacturing. This also includes the synthesis of certain classes of chemical weapons that have recently been deployed by terrorist groups.

  4. Lightweight, Self-Deployable Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Artur; Sokolowski, Witold; Rand, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight, self-deployable wheels made of polymer foams have been demonstrated. These wheels are an addition to the roster of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structural applications. Intended originally for use on nanorovers (very small planetary-exploration robotic vehicles), CHEM wheels could also be used for many commercial applications, such as in toys. The CHEM concept was reported in "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56. To recapitulate: A CHEM structure is fabricated from a shape-memory polymer (SMP) foam. The structure is compressed to a very small volume while in its rubbery state above its glass-transition temperature (Tg). Once compressed, the structure can be cooled below Tg to its glassy state. As long as the temperature remains shape. Once thus deployed, the CHEM structure can be rigidified by cooling below Tg to the glassy state. The structure could be subsequently reheated above Tg and recompacted. The compaction/deployment/rigidification cycle could be repeated as many times as needed.

  5. Test plan for the Rapid Geophysical Surveyor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roybal, L.G.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes the test plant for demonstrating and testing a set of optically pumped cesium-based total field magnetometers using the Rapid Geophysical Surveyor platform. The proposed testing will be used to assess the function of these magnetometers as deployed on the Rapid Geophysical Surveyor and evaluate the practical utility of high resolution magnetic data for supporting waste retrieval efforts.

  6. Artist concept of Drogue Chute Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Artist concept illustrating the drogue chute deployment as the Apollo Command Module returns to earth from a mission to the moon. The droge chutes serve to orient the Command Module properly for main chute deployment.

  7. Hierarchical Orbital Observatory Deployable Shroud (HOODS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large deployable telescopes such as NASA's 9.2m and 16.8m segmented ATLAST systems require commensurately large deployable sunshades for thermal control and to...

  8. Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments Page Content ... Deployment and Children Smooth School Transitions: Tips for Military Families Helping Children Adjust to a Move A ...

  9. Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Thomas B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) measures particle mass loading and chemical composition in real time for non-refractory sub-micron aerosol particles. The ACSM is designed for long-term unattended deployment and routine monitoring applications.

  10. Rapid Induction of Cerebral Organoids From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using a Chemically Defined Hydrogel and Defined Cell Culture Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindborg, Beth A; Brekke, John H; Vegoe, Amanda L; Ulrich, Connor B; Haider, Kerri T; Subramaniam, Sandhya; Venhuizen, Scott L; Eide, Cindy R; Orchard, Paul J; Chen, Weili; Wang, Qi; Pelaez, Francisco; Scott, Carolyn M; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Keirstead, Susan A; Dutton, James R; Tolar, Jakub; O'Brien, Timothy D

    2016-07-01

    Tissue organoids are a promising technology that may accelerate development of the societal and NIH mandate for precision medicine. Here we describe a robust and simple method for generating cerebral organoids (cOrgs) from human pluripotent stem cells by using a chemically defined hydrogel material and chemically defined culture medium. By using no additional neural induction components, cOrgs appeared on the hydrogel surface within 10-14 days, and under static culture conditions, they attained sizes up to 3 mm in greatest dimension by day 28. Histologically, the organoids showed neural rosette and neural tube-like structures and evidence of early corticogenesis. Immunostaining and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated protein and gene expression representative of forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain development. Physiologic studies showed responses to glutamate and depolarization in many cells, consistent with neural behavior. The method of cerebral organoid generation described here facilitates access to this technology, enables scalable applications, and provides a potential pathway to translational applications where defined components are desirable. Tissue organoids are a promising technology with many potential applications, such as pharmaceutical screens and development of in vitro disease models, particularly for human polygenic conditions where animal models are insufficient. This work describes a robust and simple method for generating cerebral organoids from human induced pluripotent stem cells by using a chemically defined hydrogel material and chemically defined culture medium. This method, by virtue of its simplicity and use of defined materials, greatly facilitates access to cerebral organoid technology, enables scalable applications, and provides a potential pathway to translational applications where defined components are desirable. ©AlphaMed Press.

  11. Rapid determination of chemical composition and classification of bamboo fractions using visible-near infrared spectroscopy coupled with multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong; Li, Kang; Zhang, Maomao; Xin, Donglin; Zhang, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    During conversion of bamboo into biofuels and chemicals, it is necessary to efficiently predict the chemical composition and digestibility of biomass. However, traditional methods for determination of lignocellulosic biomass composition are expensive and time consuming. In this work, a novel and fast method for quantitative and qualitative analysis of chemical composition and enzymatic digestibilities of juvenile bamboo and mature bamboo fractions (bamboo green, bamboo timber, bamboo yellow, bamboo node, and bamboo branch) using visible-near infrared spectra was evaluated. The developed partial least squares models yielded coefficients of determination in calibration of 0.88, 0.94, and 0.96, for cellulose, xylan, and lignin of bamboo fractions in raw spectra, respectively. After visible-near infrared spectra being pretreated, the corresponding coefficients of determination in calibration yielded by the developed partial least squares models are 0.994, 0.990, and 0.996, respectively. The score plots of principal component analysis of mature bamboo, juvenile bamboo, and different fractions of mature bamboo were obviously distinguished in raw spectra. Based on partial least squares discriminant analysis, the classification accuracies of mature bamboo, juvenile bamboo, and different fractions of bamboo (bamboo green, bamboo timber, bamboo yellow, and bamboo branch) all reached 100 %. In addition, high accuracies of evaluation of the enzymatic digestibilities of bamboo fractions after pretreatment with aqueous ammonia were also observed. The results showed the potential of visible-near infrared spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis in efficiently analyzing the chemical composition and hydrolysabilities of lignocellulosic biomass, such as bamboo fractions.

  12. Large space deployable antenna systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The design technology is described for manufacturing a 20 m or larger space erectable antenna with high thermal stability, high dynamic stiffness, and minimum stowed size. The selected approach includes a wrap rib design with a cantilever beam basic element and graphite-epoxy composite lenticular cross section ribs. The rib configuration and powered type operated deploying mechanism are described and illustrated. Other features of the parabolic reflector discussed include weight and stowed diameter characteristics, structural dynamics characteristics, orbit thermal aperture limitations, and equivalent element and secondary (on axis) patterns. A block diagram of the multiple beam pattern is also presented.

  13. Big Deployables in Small Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Bruce; Francis, William; Goff, Jonathan; Cross, Michael; Copel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The concept of utilizing small satellites to perform big mission objectives has grown from a distant idea to a demonstrated reality. One of the challenges in using small-satellite platforms for high-value missions is the packaging of long and large surface-area devices such as antennae, solar arrays and sensor positioning booms. One possible enabling technology is the slit-tube, or a deployable “tape-measure” boom which can be flattened and rolled into a coil achieving a high volumetric packa...

  14. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  15. Deployment Mechanism for Thermal Pointing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Kraig

    2014-01-01

    The Deployment Mechanism for the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is responsible for bringing the Thermal Pointing System (TPS) from its stowed, launch locked position to the on-orbit deployed, operational position. The Deployment Mechanism also provides structural support for the TSIS optical bench and two-axis gimbal. An engineering model of the Deployment Mechanism has been environmentally qualified and life tested. This paper will give an overview of the TSIS mission and then describe the development, design, and testing of the Deployment Mechanism.

  16. Chemical cardioversion of recent-onset atrial fibrillation in the emergency department using vernakalant hydrochloride achieves safe and rapid restoration of sinus rhythm and facilitates same day discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneman, P; Gilligan, P; Mahon, P; Sheahan, R

    2017-11-01

    Vernakalant hydrochloride is a rapid-acting antiarrhythmic drug licensed in the EU since 2010 for the conversion of recent-onset atrial fibrillation with proven efficacy and safety when compared with placebo and amiodarone in randomized clinical trials. The aim of our study was to determine the feasibility of same day discharge (following 2 h monitoring) from the emergency department after successful cardioversion using vernakalant hydrochloride. Patients with recent-onset atrial fibrillation treated in the emergency department of a large Dublin academic teaching hospital. Patients received a maximum of two weight based 10 min infusions of vernakalant. Hypotensive events (>30% initial blood pressure), arrhythmias, conversion rates, and time to conversion were recorded. Sinus rhythm was restored in 35 out of 42 patients (83%) in an average of 8.8 min (median 8 min), average CHA2DS2-VASc of 0.92, HAS-BLED of 0.21 and average symptoms duration of 12 h. There were no hypotensive or arrhythmogenic events. 41 out of 42 patients were discharged after 2 h of monitoring. Vernakalant hydrochloride has provided a quick, safe, and practical means of achieving rapid restoration of sinus rhythm in our ED population with stable recent-onset AF who would otherwise not have undergone routine electrically cardioversion and same day discharge.

  17. Green light for deployment of ESA's Mars Express radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    , the amount of energy involved, the nature of the materials, and the physical conditions in space. The board concluded that the risk of an impact on the spacecraft could not be ruled out, but that the impact energy would be low and the probability of a severe failure was very small. One credible failure case is that an antenna boom could become blocked during deployment, either by itself or by the spacecraft. Although means are available to unblock a deployment, in the worst case MARSIS would have to be considered partially or completely lost. However, the analyses have shown that the Mars Express control systems would be able to cope with such a configuration and minimise the consequences for the other scientific instruments. The ESA board recommended planning the deployment for the week beginning 2 May. However, should the remaining preparations proceed faster than planned, it might be feasible to start deployment during the week beginning 25 April. An early deployment is scientifically desirable, as the evolution of the Mars Express orbit will allow radar measurements of the most interesting scientific regions on Mars to start in May 2005. If, as expected, the deployment is successful, MARSIS will probe the secrets of Mars’s subsurface at least until 30 November 2005, the nominal end date of Mars Express operations, and beyond if the mission is further extended. Note to editors Mars Express was launched on 2 June 2003 and reached the planet on 25 December 2003. Since entering its operational orbit on 28 January 2004, it has been performing studies and global mapping of the atmosphere and surface, analysing their chemical composition, and delivering amazing images of Martian landscapes.

  18. Advances in Anesthesia Delivery in the Deployed Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John E; Barras, William P

    2016-01-01

    Lessons learned over the past decade and a half of combat casualty management has brought about numerous advances in trauma anesthesia practice. In the post-Vietnam era, deployable anesthesia equipment centered on the capability to provide a balanced anesthetic technique, utilizing a combination of volatile gas and intravenous anesthetic adjuncts. The evolution of the modern battlefield has forced anesthesia providers across the military to adapt to mission requirements that often dictate a surgical capability that is more rapidly mobile and less reliant on logistical support. Institutional medical equipment development has focused on fielding a lighter, more mobile volatile gas delivery method. Despite numerous advances in anesthetic gas delivery, many veteran anesthesia providers have come to recognize the value of alternative anesthetic techniques in the deployed setting. One of the most appealing advances in combat anesthesia practice is the emergence of total intravenous anesthetics (TIVA) for trauma management and resuscitation. Although there have been numerous developments in anesthetic equipment for use in the deployed setting, TIVA has many advantages over volatile gas administration. Future research, development, and education should focus on TIVA and the ability to provide this as an alternative safe anesthetic for patients in austere environments. It is imperative to retain the lessons we have learned in order to adapt more effectively in future conflicts. This accumulation of knowledge must inform future innovative solutions to the challenges of casualty management in a deployed setting.

  19. the deployment of soviet chemical forces in afghanistan and south

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    few minutes later and fired a rocket that ex- ploded about 20 metres overhead releasing a red smoke. Approximately. 230 people were killed almost immediately and only 19 or 20 sur- vived. All the animals died. The yellow and green powders made everyone feel dizzy, their move- ments became confused, their vision grew.

  20. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    reproductive organs, and infant liver but Guengerich, 1999). CYP3A4 is considered to be the predom- is also present in some adult livers (Kitada et al...drugs. o r, . Based on comparisons of the model of CYP3A4 with the+(C,,o)Po (W4) oPo crystal structure of CYP2C5, we would predict that the mu- (S Diethyl

  1. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodgson, Ernest

    2001-01-01

    ... isoforms of these enzymes HPLC analytical methods have been brought on line for chlorpyrifos, DEET, permethrin and methods for pyridostigmine bromide and sulfur mustard metabolites are being tested...

  2. IN-LINE CHEMICAL SENSOR DEPLOYMENT IN A TRITIUM PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovo, L.; Wright, J.; Torres, R.; Peters, B.

    2013-10-02

    The Savannah River Tritium Plant (TP) relies on well understood but aging sensor technology for process gas analysis. Though new sensor technologies have been brought to various readiness levels, the TP has been reluctant to install technologies that have not been tested in tritium service. This gap between sensor technology development and incorporating new technologies into practical applications demonstrates fundamental challenges that exist when transitioning from status quo to state-of-the-art in an extreme environment such as a tritium plant. These challenges stem from three root obstacles: 1) The need for a comprehensive assessment of process sensing needs and requirements; 2) The lack of a pick-list of process-compatible sensor technologies; and 3) The need to test technologies in a tritium-contaminated process environment without risking production. At Savannah River, these issues are being addressed in a two phase project. In the first phase, TP sensing requirements were determined by a team of process experts. Meanwhile, Savannah River National Laboratory sensor experts identified candidate technologies and related them to the TP processing requirements. The resulting roadmap links the candidate technologies to actual plant needs. To provide accurate assessments of how a candidate sensor technology would perform in a contaminated process environment, an instrument demonstration station was established within a TP glove box. This station was fabricated to TP process requirements and designed to handle high activity samples. The combination of roadmap and demonstration station provides the following assets: Creates a partnership between the process engineers and researchers for sensor selection, maturation, and insertion, Selects the right sensors for process conditions Provides a means for safely inserting new sensor technology into the process without risking production, and Provides a means to evaluate off normal occurrences where and when they occur. This paper discusses the process to identify and demonstrate new sensor technologies for the Savannah River TP.

  3. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    and Bcl-2 in rat brain. Neurosci . Lett. 2000; 284: 29-32. 39. Matsuda, T., Takuma, K., Asano, S., Kishida, Y., Nakamura, H., Mori, K., Maeda, S...weights and on pentobarbital hypnosis in rats. Toxicology 7:283–288. Hesse LM, Venkatakrishnan K, Court MH, von Moltke LL, Duan SX, Shader RI, and

  4. Rapid Data Assimilation in the Indoor Environment: theory and examples from real-time interpretation of indoor plumes of airborne chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadgil, Ashok; Sohn, Michael; Sreedharan, Priya

    2008-09-01

    Releases of acutely toxic airborne contaminants in or near a building can lead to significant human exposures unless prompt response measures are identified and implemented. Commonly, possible responses include conflicting strategies, such as shutting the ventilation system off versus running it in a purge (100percent outside air) mode, or having occupants evacuate versus sheltering in place. The right choice depends in part on quickly identifying the source locations, the amounts released, and the likely future dispersion routes of the pollutants. This paper summarizes recent developments to provide such estimates in real time using an approach called Bayesian Monte Carlo updating. This approach rapidly interprets measurements of airborne pollutant concentrations from multiple sensors placed in the building and computes best estimates and uncertainties of the release conditions. The algorithm is fast, capable of continuously updating the estimates as measurements stream in from sensors. The approach is employed, as illustration, to conduct two specific investigations under different situations.

  5. Rapid Data Assimilation in the Indoor Environment: Theory and Examples from Real-Time Interpretation of Indoor Plumes of Airborne Chemical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadgil, Ashok; Gadgil, Ashok; Sohn, Michael; Sreedharan, Priya

    2007-08-01

    Releases of acutely toxic airborne contaminants in or near a building can lead to significant human exposures unless prompt response measures are identified and implemented. Possible responses include conflicting options, such as shutting the ventilation system off versus running it in a purge (100 percent outside air) mode, or having occupants evacuate versus sheltering in place. The right choice depends in part on quickly identifying the source location, the amount released, and the likely future dispersion of the pollutant. This paper summarizes recent developments to provide such estimates in real time using an approach called Bayesian Monte Carlo updating. This approach rapidly interprets measurements of airborne pollutant concentrations from multiple sensors placed in the building, and computes best estimates and uncertainties of the release conditions. The algorithm is fast, and can continuously update the estimates as measurements stream in from sensors. As an illustration, two specific applications of the approach are described.

  6. Deploying Renewables -- principles for effective policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-09-29

    Renewable energy can play a fundamental role in tackling climate change, environmental degradation and energy security. As these challenges have become ever more pressing, governments and markets are seeking innovative solutions. Yet, what are the key factors that will determine the success of renewable energy policies? How can current policies be improved to encourage greater deployment of renewables? What impact can more effective policies have on renewables' share in the future global energy mix and how soon? This publication addresses these questions. Responding to the Gleneagles G8 call for a clean and secure energy future, it highlights key policy tools to fast-track renewables into the mainstream. This analysis illustrates good practices by applying the combined metrics of effectiveness and efficiency to renewable energy policies in the electricity, heating and transport sectors. It highlights significant barriers to accelerating renewables penetration, and argues that the great potential of renewables can be exploited much more rapidly and to a much larger extent if good practices are adopted. Carefully designed policy frameworks, customised to support technologies at differing stages of maturity, will deliver a strong portfolio of renewable energy technologies. The document provides recommendations on key principles for policy design as a template for decision makers.

  7. NEON's Mobile Deployment Platform: A Resource for Community Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclements, M.

    2015-12-01

    Here we provide an update on construction and validation of the NEON Mobile Deployment Platforms (MDPs) as well as a description of the infrastructure and sensors available to researchers in the future. The MDPs will provide the means to observe stochastic or spatially important events, gradients, or quantities that cannot be reliably observed using fixed location sampling (e.g. fires and floods). Due to the transient temporal and spatial nature of such events, the MDPs will be designed to accommodate rapid deployment for time periods up to ~ 1 year. Broadly, the MDPs will be comprised of infrastructure and instrumentation capable of functioning individually or in conjunction with one another to support observations of ecological change, as well as education, training and outreach.

  8. Security Support in Continuous Deployment Pipeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Faheem; Raft, Adam Johannes; Shahin, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Continuous Deployment (CD) has emerged as a new practice in the software industry to continuously and automatically deploy software changes into production. Continuous Deployment Pipeline (CDP) supports CD practice by transferring the changes from the repository to production. Since most of the C...... penetration tools. Our findings indicate that the applied tactics improve the security of the major components (i.e., repository, continuous integration server, main server) of a CDP by controlling access to the components and establishing secure connections....

  9. Deployable Debris Shields For Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Cour-Palais, Burton G.; Crews, Jeanne

    1993-01-01

    Multilayer shields made of lightweight sheet materials deployed from proposed Space Station Freedom for additional protection against orbiting debris. Deployment mechanism attached at each location on exterior where extra protection needed. Equipment withdraws layer of material from storage in manner similar to unfurling sail or extending window shade. Number of layers deployed depends on required degree of protection, and could be as large as five.

  10. Rigidizing Inflatable Deployable Dwelling (RIDD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — By combining thin thermoplastic films, woven Vectran reinforcements, and heat a reliable, deployable, rigidizing space habitat can be created. Although much research...

  11. Self-Deploying Gossamer Support Structure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I results demonstrated the feasibility of using shape memory polymer composites to deploy, tension and support gossamer antennas. Cornerstone Research Group,...

  12. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protective systems (TPS) panels to...

  13. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protection system (TPS) panels to...

  14. Rapid screening of anabolic steroids in horse urine with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry after chemical derivatisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Colton H F; Leung, David K K; Tang, Francis P W; Wong, Jenny K Y; Yu, Nola H; Wan, Terence S M

    2012-04-06

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has been successfully applied to the detection of anabolic steroids in biological samples. However, the sensitive detection of saturated hydroxysteroids, such as androstanediols, by electrospray ionisation (ESI) is difficult because of their poor ability to ionise. In view of this, chemical derivatisation has been used to enhance the detection sensitivity of hydroxysteroids by LC/MS. This paper describes the development of a sensitive ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS/MS) method for the screening of anabolic steroids in horse urine by incorporating a chemical derivatisation step, using picolinic acid as the derivatisation reagent. The method involved solid-phase extraction (SPE) of both free and conjugated anabolic steroids in horse urine using a polymer-based SPE cartridge (Abs Elut Nexus). The conjugated steroids in the eluate were hydrolysed by methanolysis and the resulting extract was further cleaned up by liquid-liquid extraction. The resulting free steroids in the extract were derivatised with picolinic acid to form the corresponding picolinoyl esters and analysed by UHPLC/MS/MS in the positive ESI mode with selected-reaction-monitoring. Separation of the targeted steroids was performed on a C18 UHPLC column. The instrument turnaround time was 10.5 min inclusive of post-run equilibration. A total of thirty-three anabolic steroids (including 17β-estradiol, 5(10)-estrene-3β,17α-diol, 5α-estrane-3β,17α-diol, 17α-ethyl-5α-estran-3α,17β-diol, 17α-methyl-5α-androstan-3,17β-diols, androstanediols, nandrolone and testosterone) spiked in negative horse urine at the QC levels (ranging from 0.75 to 30 ng/mL) could be consistently detected. The intra-day and inter-day precisions (% RSD) for the peak area ratios were around 7-51% and around 1-72%, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day precisions (% RSD) for the relative retention times were both less than 1% for

  15. Determination of red blood cell fatty acid profiles: Rapid and high-confident analysis by chemical ionization-gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Yvonne; Wahl, Hans Günther; Renz, Harald; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Cellular fatty acid (FA) profiles have been acknowledged as biomarkers in various human diseases. Nevertheless, common FA analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) requires long analysis time. Hence, there is a need for feasible methods for high throughput analysis in clinical studies. FA was extracted from red blood cells (RBC) and derivatized to fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A method using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) with ammonia-induced chemical ionization (CI) was developed for the analysis of FA profiles in human RBC. We compared this method with classical single GC-MS using electron impact ionization (EI). The FA profiles of 703 RBC samples were determined by GC-MS/MS. In contrast to EI ammonia-induced CI resulted in adequate amounts of molecular ions for further fragmentation of FAME. Specific fragments for confident quantification and fragmentation were determined for 45 FA. The GC-MS/MS method has a total run time of 9min compared to typical analysis times of up to 60min in conventional GC-MS. Intra and inter assay variations were Analysis of RBC FA composition revealed an age-dependent increase of the omega-3 eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid, and a decline of the omega-6 linoleic acid with a corresponding rise of the omega-3 index. The combination of ammonia-induced CI and tandem mass spectrometry after GC separation allows for high-throughput, robust and confident analysis of FA profiles in the clinical laboratory. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Combining a Clostridial enzyme exhibiting unusual active site plasticity with a remarkably facile sigmatropic rearrangement: rapid, stereocontrolled entry into densely functionalized fluorinated phosphonates for chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Kaushik; Applegate, Gregory A; Malik, Guillaume; Berkowitz, David B

    2015-03-18

    Described is an efficient stereocontrolled route into valuable, densely functionalized fluorinated phosphonates that takes advantage of (i) a Clostridial enzyme to set the absolute stereochemistry and (ii) a new [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of the thiono-Claisen variety that is among the fastest sigmatropic rearrangements yet reported. Here, a pronounced rate enhancement is achieved by distal fluorination. This rearrangement is completely stereoretentive, parlaying the enzymatically established β-C-O stereochemistry in the substrate into the δ-C-S stereochemistry in the product. The final products are of interest to chemical biology, with a platform for Zn-aminopeptidase A inhibitors being constructed here. The enzyme, Clostridium acetobutylicum (CaADH), recently expressed by our group, reduces a spectrum of γ,δ-unsaturated β-keto-α,α-difluorophosphonate esters (93-99% ee; 10 examples). The resultant β-hydroxy-α,α-difluorophosphonates possess the "L"-stereochemistry, opposite to that previously observed for the CaADH-reduction of ω-keto carboxylate esters ("D"), indicating an unusual active site plasticity. For the thiono-Claisen rearrangement, a notable structure-reactivity relationship is observed. Measured rate constants vary by over 3 orders of magnitude, depending upon thiono-ester structure. Temperature-dependent kinetics reveal an unusually favorable entropy of activation (ΔS(‡) = 14.5 ± 0.6 e.u.). Most notably, a 400-fold rate enhancement is seen upon fluorination of the distal arene ring, arising from favorable enthalpic (ΔΔH(‡) = -2.3 kcal/mol) and entropic (ΔΔS(‡) = 4 e.u., i.e. 1.2 kcal/mol at rt) contributions. The unusual active site plasticity seen here is expected to drive structural biology studies on CaADH, while the exceptionally facile sigmatropic rearrangement is expected to drive computational studies to elucidate its underlying entropic and enthalpic basis.

  17. Rapid adsorption of toxic Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution using multiwall carbon nanotubes synthesized by microwave chemical vapor deposition technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Nabisab Mujawar; Sahu, Jaya Narayan; Abdullah, Ezzat Chan; Jayakumar, Natesan Subramanian

    2016-07-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized using a tubular microwave chemical vapor deposition technique, using acetylene and hydrogen as the precursor gases and ferrocene as catalyst. The novel MWCNT samples were tested for their performance in terms of Pb(II) binding. The synthesized MWCNT samples were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) analysis, and the adsorption of Pb(II) was studied as a function of pH, initial Pb(II) concentration, MWCNT dosage, agitation speed, and adsorption time, and process parameters were optimized. The adsorption data followed both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. On the basis of the Langmuir model, Qmax was calculated to be 104.2mg/g for the microwave-synthesized MWCNTs. In order to investigate the dynamic behavior of MWCNTs as an adsorbent, the kinetic data were modeled using pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order equations. Different thermodynamic parameters, viz., ∆H(0), ∆S(0) and ∆G(0) were evaluated and it was found that the adsorption was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The statistical analysis revealed that the optimum conditions for the highest removal (99.9%) of Pb(II) are at pH5, MWCNT dosage 0.1g, agitation speed 160r/min and time of 22.5min with the initial concentration of 10mg/L. Our results proved that microwave-synthesized MWCNTs can be used as an effective Pb(II) adsorbent due to their high adsorption capacity as well as the short adsorption time needed to achieve equilibrium. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. The Issue of Calculating the Final Temperature of the Products of Rapid Exothermic Chemical Reactions with Significant Energy Release in a Closed Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, V.; Geidmanis, D.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical problem solved in this article is the calculation of thermodynamic parameters such as final temperature, distribution of the liquid and dry saturated vapour phases of the substance that are considered to be in thermodynamic equilibrium, and pressure of the system of several reaction products after adding to the system a certain amount of heat or the thermal effect released during rapid exothermic reaction in a closed volume that occurs so fast that it can be considered to be adiabatic, and when the volume of liquid reagents is several orders of magnitude less than the volume of the reactor. The general multi-substance problem is reduced to a theoretical problem for one substance of calculation thermodynamic parameters of system after adding a certain amount of heat that gives theoretically rigorous isochoric calculation. In this article, we substantiate our view that isochoric pass of calculation is more robust compared to seemingly more natural isobaric pass of calculation, if the later involves quite not trivial calculation of the adiabatic compression of a two-phase system (liquid - dry saturated vapour) that can pass itself into another kind of state (liquid - wet saturated vapour), which requires, apparently, more complex descriptions compared with isochoric calculation because the specific heat capacity of wet saturated vapour can be negative. The solved theoretical problem relates to a practical problem that has been a driver for our research as part of a design of the reactor of the titanium reduction from magnesium and titanium tetrachloride supplied into atmosphere of the reactor at high temperatures when both reagents are in gaseous state. The reaction is known to be exothermic with a high thermal effect, and estimate of the final temperature and pressure of the products of reaction, for instance, designing the reactor allows eliminating the possibility of the reaction products to penetrate backwards into supply tracts of the reagents

  19. Aircraft borne combined measurements of the Fukushima radionuclide Xe-133 and fossil fuel combustion generated pollutants in the TIL - implications for cyclone induced rapid lift and TIL physico-chemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlager, Hans; Aufmhoff, Heinfried; Baumann, Robert; Schumann, Ulrich [DLR IPA, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Arnold, Frank [MPI Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); DLR IPA, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Simgen, Hardy; Lindemann, Siegfried; Rauch, Ludwig; Kaether, Frank [MPI Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Pirjola, Liisa [University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-07-01

    The radionuclide Xe-133, released by the March 2011 nuclear disaster at Fukushima/Daiichi (hereafter FD), represents an ideal tracer for atmospheric transport. We report the, to our best knowledge, only aircraft borne measurements of FD Xe-133 in the Tropopause Inversion Layer (TIL), indicating rapid lift of polluted planetary boundary layer air to the TIL. On the same research aircraft (FALCON), we have also conducted on-line measurements of fossil fuel combustion generated pollutant gases (SO{sub 2} and other species), which had increased concentrations in the TIL. In addition, we have conducted supporting model simulations of transport, chemical processes, and aerosol processes. Our investigations reveal a potentially important impact of East-Asian cyclone induced pollutants transport to the TIL. This impact includes particularly aerosol formation.

  20. Deployable System for Crash-Load Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.

    2007-01-01

    An externally deployable honeycomb structure is investigated with respect to crash energy management for light aircraft. The new concept utilizes an expandable honeycomb-like structure to absorb impact energy by crushing. Distinguished by flexible hinges between cell wall junctions that enable effortless deployment, the new energy absorber offers most of the desirable features of an external airbag system without the limitations of poor shear stability, system complexity, and timing sensitivity. Like conventional honeycomb, once expanded, the energy absorber is transformed into a crush efficient and stable cellular structure. Other advantages, afforded by the flexible hinge feature, include a variety of deployment options such as linear, radial, and/or hybrid deployment methods. Radial deployment is utilized when omnidirectional cushioning is required. Linear deployment offers better efficiency, which is preferred when the impact orientation is known in advance. Several energy absorbers utilizing different deployment modes could also be combined to optimize overall performance and/or improve system reliability as outlined in the paper. Results from a series of component and full scale demonstration tests are presented as well as typical deployment techniques and mechanisms. LS-DYNA analytical simulations of selected tests are also presented.

  1. The purely functional software deployment model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolstra, E.

    2006-01-01

    Software deployment is the set of activities related to getting software components to work on the machines of end users. It includes activities such as installation, upgrading, uninstallation, and so on. Many tools have been developed to support deployment, but they all have serious

  2. Renewable Energy: Policy Considerations for Deploying Renewables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This information paper accompanies the IEA publication Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice (IEA, 2011a). It provides more detailed data and analysis on policies for Deploying Renewables, and is intended to complement the main publication. It provides an account of the strategic drivers underpinning renewable energy (RE) technology deployment (energy security, economic development and environment protection) and assesses RE technologies with respect to these drivers, including an estimate of GHG emissions reductions due to RE technologies. The paper also explores the different barriers to deploying renewables at a given stage of market maturity and discusses what tools policy makers can avail of to succeed in removing deployment barriers. An additional topical highlight explores the challenges associated with accelerating the diffusion of RE technologies in developing countries.

  3. Effects of rapid thermal annealing on structural, chemical, and electrical characteristics of atomic-layer deposited lanthanum doped zirconium dioxide thin film on 4H-SiC substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Way Foong, E-mail: wayfoong317@yahoo.com.sg [Institute of Nano Optoelectronics Research and Technology, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Centre for Research Initiatives (CRI) Natural Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Quah, Hock Jin, E-mail: jinquah1st@hotmail.com [Institute of Nano Optoelectronics Research and Technology, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Centre for Research Initiatives (CRI) Natural Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Lu, Qifeng, E-mail: Qifeng@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Mu, Yifei, E-mail: Y.mu@student.liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Ismail, Wan Azli Wan, E-mail: azli.ismail@mimos.my [Advance Analytical Services Lab, MIMOS Wafer Fab, MIMOS Berhad, Technology Park Malaysia, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Rahim, Bazura Abdul, E-mail: bazura@mimos.my [Advance Analytical Services Lab, MIMOS Wafer Fab, MIMOS Berhad, Technology Park Malaysia, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Esa, Siti Rahmah, E-mail: rahmah.esa@mimos.my [Advance Analytical Services Lab, MIMOS Wafer Fab, MIMOS Berhad, Technology Park Malaysia, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kee, Yeh Yee, E-mail: yy.kee@mimos.my [Advance Analytical Services Lab, MIMOS Wafer Fab, MIMOS Berhad, Technology Park Malaysia, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Zhao, Ce Zhou, E-mail: cezhou.zhao@xjtlu.edu.cn [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); and others

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Studies of RTA temperatures on La doped ZrO2 atomic layer deposited on 4HSiC. • Oxygen vacancies improved insulating and catalytic properties of La doped ZrO2. • 700 °C annealed sample showed the highest EB, k value, and sensitivity on O2. • La doped ZrO2 was proposed as a potential metal reactive oxide on 4H-SiC. - Abstract: Effects of rapid thermal annealing at different temperatures (700–900 °C) on structural, chemical, and electrical characteristics of lanthanum (La) doped zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) atomic layer deposited on 4H-SiC substrates have been investigated. Chemical composition depth profiling analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cross-sectional studies using high resolution transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy line scan analysis were insufficient to justify the presence of La in the investigated samples. The minute amount of La present in the bulk oxide was confirmed by chemical depth profiles of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The presence of La in the ZrO{sub 2} lattice led to the formation of oxygen vacancies, which was revealed through binding energy shift for XPS O 1s core level spectra of Zr−O. The highest amount of oxygen vacancies in the sample annealed at 700 °C has yielded the acquisition of the highest electric breakdown field (∼ 6.3 MV/cm) and dielectric constant value (k = 23) as well as the highest current–time (I–t) sensor response towards oxygen gas. The attainment of both the insulating and catalytic properties in the La doped ZrO{sub 2} signified the potential of the doped ZrO{sub 2} as a metal reactive oxide on 4H-SiC substrate.

  4. Deploying the AstroGrid: Science Use Ready

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, N. A.; Harrison, P. A.; Richards, A. M. S.; Hill, M. C.

    2005-12-01

    AstroGrid (see http://www.astrogrid.org), a UK eScience project with collaborating groups drawn from the major UK data archive centres, is creating the UK's Virtual Observatory. In order to ensure rapid user feedback AstroGrid is fully deploying each iteration release, connected to relevant data and application products, in such a fashion as to allow scientific use of that release. The early users are primarily the science advisory group and now the beta tester communities of the project. The scientific functionality of the current (Sep. 2004) deployment is highlighted. This includes access to a sophisticated workflow capability. Its use in allowing image extraction from multiple image datasets, input photometry file creation, redshift determination, and visualisation for the outputs to allow discovery of high redshift objects is described. Further examples show the use of the latest Astrophysical Data Query language standard and how it is being used to enable large data queries of remote databases in searching for low mass objects in the Pleiades with results returned to a virtual ``MySpace'' user storage area, where further visualisation and processing can be performed. We note how the deployed system is being tested by the science community, and how that comment and feedback is vital in informing the project as to future releases including the January 2005 ``AstroGrid Release 1''.

  5. Computational Modeling of Interventions and Protective Thresholds to Prevent Disease Transmission in Deploying Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Burgess

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Military personnel are deployed abroad for missions ranging from humanitarian relief efforts to combat actions; delay or interruption in these activities due to disease transmission can cause operational disruptions, significant economic loss, and stressed or exceeded military medical resources. Deployed troops function in environments favorable to the rapid and efficient transmission of many viruses particularly when levels of protection are suboptimal. When immunity among deployed military populations is low, the risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks increases, impacting troop readiness and achievement of mission objectives. However, targeted vaccination and the optimization of preexisting immunity among deployed populations can decrease the threat of outbreaks among deployed troops. Here we describe methods for the computational modeling of disease transmission to explore how preexisting immunity compares with vaccination at the time of deployment as a means of preventing outbreaks and protecting troops and mission objectives during extended military deployment actions. These methods are illustrated with five modeling case studies for separate diseases common in many parts of the world, to show different approaches required in varying epidemiological settings.

  6. Deployable wing model considering structural flexibility and aerodynamic unsteadiness for deployment system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Keisuke; Wang, Yinan; Makihara, Kanjuro

    2017-11-01

    In future, wings will be deployed in the span direction during flight. The deployment system improves flight ability and saves storage space in the airplane. For the safe design of the wing, the deployment motion needs to be simulated. In the simulation, the structural flexibility and aerodynamic unsteadiness should be considered because they may lead to undesirable phenomena such as a residual vibration after the deployment or a flutter during the deployment. In this study, the deployment motion is simulated in the time domain by using a nonlinear folding wing model based on multibody dynamics, absolute nodal coordinate formulation, and two-dimensional aerodynamics with strip theory. We investigate the effect of the structural flexibility and aerodynamic unsteadiness on the time-domain deployment simulation.

  7. Rapid resistome mapping using nanopore sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Helm, Eric; Imamovic, Lejla; Ellabaan, Mostafa M Hashim

    2017-01-01

    of bacterial infections. Yet, rapid workflows for resistome characterization are lacking. To address this challenge we developed the poreFUME workflow that deploys functional metagenomic selections and nanopore sequencing to resistome mapping. We demonstrate the approach by functionally characterizing the gut...

  8. Industrial biomanufacturing: The future of chemical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clomburg, James M; Crumbley, Anna M; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2017-01-06

    The current model for industrial chemical manufacturing employs large-scale megafacilities that benefit from economies of unit scale. However, this strategy faces environmental, geographical, political, and economic challenges associated with energy and manufacturing demands. We review how exploiting biological processes for manufacturing (i.e., industrial biomanufacturing) addresses these concerns while also supporting and benefiting from economies of unit number. Key to this approach is the inherent small scale and capital efficiency of bioprocesses and the ability of engineered biocatalysts to produce designer products at high carbon and energy efficiency with adjustable output, at high selectivity, and under mild process conditions. The biological conversion of single-carbon compounds represents a test bed to establish this paradigm, enabling rapid, mobile, and widespread deployment, access to remote and distributed resources, and adaptation to new and changing markets. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Use of Docker for deployment and testing of astronomy software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D.; Voutsinas, S.; Hambly, N. C.; Mann, R. G.

    2017-07-01

    We describe preliminary investigations of using Docker for the deployment and testing of astronomy software. Docker is a relatively new containerization technology that is developing rapidly and being adopted across a range of domains. It is based upon virtualization at operating system level, which presents many advantages in comparison to the more traditional hardware virtualization that underpins most cloud computing infrastructure today. A particular strength of Docker is its simple format for describing and managing software containers, which has benefits for software developers, system administrators and end users. We report on our experiences from two projects - a simple activity to demonstrate how Docker works, and a more elaborate set of services that demonstrates more of its capabilities and what they can achieve within an astronomical context - and include an account of how we solved problems through interaction with Docker's very active open source development community, which is currently the key to the most effective use of this rapidly-changing technology.

  10. Review of SERS Substrates for Chemical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela A. Mosier-Boss

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The SERS effect was initially discovered in the 1970s. Early research focused on understanding the phenomenon and increasing enhancement to achieve single molecule detection. From the mid-1980s to early 1990s, research started to move away from obtaining a fundamental understanding of the phenomenon to the exploration of analytical applications. At the same time, significant developments occurred in the field of photonics that led to the advent of inexpensive, robust, compact, field-deployable Raman systems. The 1990s also saw rapid development in nanoscience. This convergence of technologies (photonics and nanoscience has led to accelerated development of SERS substrates to detect a wide range of chemical and biological analytes. It would be a monumental task to discuss all the different kinds of SERS substrates that have been explored. Likewise, it would be impossible to discuss the use of SERS for both chemical and biological detection. Instead, a review of the most common metallic (Ag, Cu, and Au SERS substrates for chemical detection only is discussed, as well as SERS substrates that are commercially available. Other issues with SERS for chemical detection have been selectivity, reversibility, and reusability of the substrates. How these issues have been addressed is also discussed in this review.

  11. Modeling network technology deployment rates with different network models

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Yoo

    2011-01-01

    To understand the factors that encourage the deployment of a new networking technology, we must be able to model how such technology gets deployed. We investigate how network structure influences deployment with a simple deployment model and different network models through computer simulations. The results indicate that a realistic model of networking technology deployment should take network structure into account.

  12. A rapid and high-precision method for sulfur isotope δ(34)S determination with a multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer: matrix effect correction and applications for water samples without chemical purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, An-Jun; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Shao-Yong

    2014-04-15

    Previous studies have indicated that prior chemical purification of samples, although complex and time-consuming, is essential in obtaining precise and accurate results for sulfur isotope ratios using multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). In this study, we introduce a new, rapid and precise MC-ICP-MS method for sulfur isotope determination from water samples without chemical purification. The analytical work was performed on an MC-ICP-MS instrument with medium mass resolution (m/Δm ~ 3000). Standard-sample bracketing (SSB) was used to correct samples throughout the analytical sessions. Reference materials included an Alfa-S (ammonium sulfate) standard solution, ammonium sulfate provided by the lab of the authors and fresh seawater from the South China Sea. A range of matrix-matched Alfa-S standard solutions and ammonium sulfate solutions was used to investigate the matrix (salinity) effect (matrix was added in the form of NaCl). A seawater sample was used to confirm the reliability of the method. Using matrix-matched (salinity-matched) Alfa-S as the working standard, the measured δ(34)S value of AS (-6.73 ± 0.09‰) was consistent with the reference value (-6.78 ± 0.07‰) within the uncertainty, suggesting that this method could be recommended for the measurement of water samples without prior chemical purification. The δ(34)S value determination for the unpurified seawater also yielded excellent results (21.03 ± 0.18‰) that are consistent with the reference value (20.99‰), thus confirming the feasibility of the technique. The data and the results indicate that it is feasible to use MC-ICP-MS and matrix-matched working standards to measure the sulfur isotopic compositions of water samples directly without chemical purification. In comparison with the existing MC-ICP-MS techniques, the new method is better for directly measuring δ(34)S values in water samples with complex matrices; therefore, it can

  13. A high performance liquid chromatography fingerprinting and ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry chemical profiling approach to rapidly find characteristic chemical markers for quality evaluation of dispensing granules, a case study on Chuanxiong Rhizoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Li-Fang; Zhu, Ling-Ying; Bai, Ying-Jia; Mao, Qian; Li, Song-Lin; Chen, Shi-Lin; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2014-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector (HPLC-PDA) fingerprinting and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-PDA-QTOF-MS/MS) based chemical profiling approach was developed to rapidly find characteristic chemical markers for quality control of dispensing granules, taking Chuanxiong Rhizoma (CR) as a model herb. Firstly, CR crude drugs, their traditional decoctions and CR dispensing granules were analyzed by HPLC-PDA to rapidly establish the fingerprints and thereby generate the simulative median chromatograms of CR crude drugs, decoctions and dispensing granules, and by comparing the simulative median chromatograms, major characteristic peaks of CR decoctions and dispensing granules could be determined. Secondary, UHPLC-PDA-QTOF-MS/MS was used to identify the major characteristic peaks of CR decoctions and dispensing granules. The identities of three major peaks were elucidated and confirmed to be ferulic acid (1), senkyunolide I (2) and senkyunolide H (3) by comparing the mass/UV spectra and retention times with that of the reference compounds. Thirdly, an HPLC-PDA method was validated to quantify the three characteristic components in commercial CR dispensing granules. The average contents of ferulic acid and senkyunolide H were found to be less than 1.0mg/g, whereas that of senkyunolide I was 4.40mg/g in CR dispensing granules, which indicated that senkyunolide I might be chosen as a suitable quantitative marker, while ferulic acid and senkyunolide H as qualitative markers for the quality evaluation of CR dispensing granules. It is suggested that this newly established approach could be used to practically and rapidly find suitable marker compounds for quality control of dispensing granules derived from other medicinal herbs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1997-02-18

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Today markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies, to survive, have to be able to respond with quick-to-market, improved, high quality, cost efficient products. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies. The RRM project was established to leverage the expertise and resources of US private industries and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy new technologies that meet critical needs for effective product realization. The RRM program addressed a needed change in the US Manufacturing infrastructure that will ensure US competitiveness in world market typified by mass customization. This project provided the effort needed to define, develop and establish a customizable infrastructure for rapid response product development design and manufacturing. A major project achievement was the development of a broad-based framework for automating and integrating the product and process design and manufacturing activities involved with machined parts. This was accomplished by coordinating and extending the application of feature-based product modeling, knowledge-based systems, integrated data management, and direct manufacturing technologies in a cooperative integrated computing environment. Key technological advancements include a product model that integrates product and process data in a consistent, minimally redundant manner, an advanced computer-aided engineering environment, knowledge-based software aids for design and process planning, and new production technologies to make products directly from design application software.

  15. RadNet Air Quality (Deployable) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — RadNet Deployable Monitoring is designed to collect radiological and meteorological information and data asset needed to establish the impact of radiation levels on...

  16. Small cell networks deployment, management, and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Claussen, Holger; Ho, Lester; Razavi, Rouzbeh; Kucera, Stepan

    2018-01-01

    Small Cell Networks: Deployment, Management, and Optimization addresses key problems of the cellular network evolution towards HetNets. It focuses on the latest developments in heterogeneous and small cell networks, as well as their deployment, operation, and maintenance. It also covers the full spectrum of the topic, from academic, research, and business to the practice of HetNets in a coherent manner. Additionally, it provides complete and practical guidelines to vendors and operators interested in deploying small cells. The first comprehensive book written by well-known researchers and engineers from Nokia Bell Labs, Small Cell Networks begins with an introduction to the subject--offering chapters on capacity scaling and key requirements of future networks. It then moves on to sections on coverage and capacity optimization, and interference management. From there, the book covers mobility management, energy efficiency, and small cell deployment, ending with a section devoted to future trends and applicat...

  17. Field guide to quick deployment thermocouples

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Instructions for quick deployment of thermocouples to measure fire intensity at Kulm Wetland Management District as part of the Fire Intensity Monitoring survey....

  18. Maintenance decision support system deployment guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This is a guide for transportation professionals on why and how to deploy winter Maintenance Decision Support Systems (MDSS). Adverse winter weather can cause traffic delays and crashes. Treating the effects of winter weather can also have impacts on...

  19. Self-Deploying, Composite Habitats Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), proposes to develop self-deploying, composite structures for lunar habitats, based on CRG's VeritexTM materials. These...

  20. Self-Deploying, Composite Habitats Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), proposes to develop self-deploying, composite structures for lunar habitats, based on CRG's Veritex(TM) materials. These...

  1. Office of Civilian Response Deployment Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The purpose of OCR DTS is to establish, manage and track relevant Civilian Response Corps teams for deployment by sector experience, training, education etc.

  2. Optimizing the Deployment of Public Access Defibrillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, Timothy C.Y.; Demirtas, Derya; Kwon, Roy H.

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a significant public health issue, and treatment, namely, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, is very time sensitive. Public access defibrillation programs, which deploy automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for bystander use in an emergency, reduce

  3. Extreme Environment Sampling System Deployment Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future Venus or Comet mission architectures may feature robotic sampling systems comprised of a Sampling Tool and Deployment Mechanism. Since 2005, Honeybee has been...

  4. High Efficiency, Deployable Solar Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultrathin, lightweight, flexible, and easily deployable solar cell (SC) capable of specific power greater than 1kW/kg are at an early stage of development for...

  5. Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-05-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop, held on March 12–13, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory.

  6. Surface Optimization Techniques for Deployable Reflectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under this and several other programs, CTD has developed TEMBOREG deployable solid-surface reflectors (TEMBOREG Reflectors) to provide future NASA and Air Force...

  7. Capacitive chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  8. Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    frequented by military families and by emailing announcements to military family life administrators located in all 50 states. Military couples were...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0131 TITLE: Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Knobloch...Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-2-0131 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  9. State perspectives on clean coal technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, T. [State of Illinois Washington Office, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    State governments have been funding partners in the Clean Coal Technology program since its beginnings. Today, regulatory and market uncertainties and tight budgets have reduced state investment in energy R and D, but states have developed program initiatives in support of deployment. State officials think that the federal government must continue to support these technologies in the deployment phase. Discussions of national energy policy must include attention to the Clean Coal Technology program and its accomplishments.

  10. Iron Status of Deployed Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    Deployed Military Members 5b. GRANT NUMBER HU0001-10-1-TS10 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER N10-P20 Wilson...training literature of new recruits or accessions, the rate of ID and IDA was a significant health risk to these military members . It was surmised...study inform nurses and health care professionals that are involved in the deployment preparation of military members . They should target assessing

  11. DRAGON - 8U Nanosatellite Orbital Deployer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Marcin; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Kedziora, Bartosz; Tokarz, Marta; Borys, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences (SRC PAS) together with Astronika company have developed an Orbital Deployer called DRAGON for ejection of the Polish scientific nanosatellite BRITE-PL Heweliusz (Fig. 1). The device has three unique mechanisms including an adopted and scaled lock and release mechanism from the ESA Rosetta mission MUPUS instrument. This paper discusses major design restrictions of the deployer, unique design features, and lessons learned from development through testing.

  12. Offloading techniques for large deployable space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Levino; Golob, Alex

    1992-01-01

    The validation and verification of large deployable space structures are continual challenges which face the integration and test engineer today. Spar Aerospace Limited has worked on various programs in which such structure validation was required and faces similar tasks in the future. This testing is reported and the different offloading and deployment methods which were used, as well as the proposed methods which will be used on future programs, are described. Past programs discussed include the Olympus solar array ambient and thermal vacuum deployments, and the Anik-E array and reflector deployments. The proposed MSAT reflector and boom ambient deployment tests, as well as the proposed RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ambient and thermal vacuum deployment tests will also be presented. A series of tests relating to various component parts of the offloading equipment systems was required. These tests included the characterization and understanding of linear bearings and large (180 in-lbf) constant force spring motors in a thermal vacuum environment, and the results from these tests are presented.

  13. A gendered perspective on military deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia J; Nilsson, Johanna; Berkel, Laverne

    2014-01-01

    Military deployment, especially in combat or dangerous areas, can have a strong influence on subsequent mental health. This effect may be intensified as a result of the potential stigma that admission of mental health problems indicates weakness. Additional mental health issues exist for female soldiers from the National Guard who are pulled from non-military environments to work under dangerous conditions far from home and traditional social support. Minimal documentation is available about the day-to-day, gendered experiences of deployment for this group of female soldiers. To provide background for appropriate training and support, the aim of this study was to understand better the experiences of military deployment for women in the National Guard. We used content analysis to analyze individual, semi-structured interviews with a sample of 42 women from 7 U.S. National Guard units who were deployed in combat areas. Four general themes emerged about deployment experience: the general environment of stress, heterogeneous job responsibilities, home comes with you, and gendered stress. Military efforts are needed to address gender-specific issues associated with deployment and to develop resilience training that will optimize the mental health of female soldiers.

  14. Plant stress analysis technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring vegetation is an active area of laser-induced fluorescence imaging (LIFI) research. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) is assisting in the transfer of the LIFI technology to the agricultural private sector through a market survey. The market survey will help identify the key eco-agricultural issues of the nations that could benefit from the use of sensor technologies developed by the Office of Science and Technology (OST). The principal region of interest is the Western Hemisphere, particularly, the rapidly growing countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. The analysis of needs will assure that the focus of present and future research will center on economically important issues facing both hemispheres. The application of the technology will be useful to the agriculture industry for airborne crop analysis as well as in the detection and characterization of contaminated sites by monitoring vegetation. LIFI airborne and close-proximity systems will be evaluated as stand-alone technologies and additions to existing sensor technologies that have been used to monitor crops in the field and in storage.

  15. Water Quality Vocabulary Development and Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, B. A.; Yu, J.; Cox, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Semantic descriptions of observed properties and associated units of measure are fundamental to understanding of environmental observations, including groundwater, surface water and marine water quality. Semantic descriptions can be captured in machine-readable ontologies and vocabularies, thus providing support for the annotation of observation values from the disparate data sources with appropriate and accurate metadata, which is critical for achieving semantic interoperability. However, current stand-alone water quality vocabularies provide limited support for cross-system comparisons or data fusion. To enhance semantic interoperability, the alignment of water-quality properties with definitions of chemical entities and units of measure in existing widely-used vocabularies is required. Modern ontologies and vocabularies are expressed, organized and deployed using Semantic Web technologies. We developed an ontology for observed properties (i.e. a model for expressing appropriate controlled vocabularies) which extends the NASA/TopQuadrant QUDT ontology for Unit and QuantityKind with two additional classes and two properties (see accompanying paper by Cox, Simons and Yu). We use our ontology to populate the Water Quality vocabulary with a set of individuals of each of the four key classes (and their subclasses), and add appropriate relationships between these individuals. This ontology is aligned with other relevant stand-alone Water Quality vocabularies and domain ontologies. Developing the Water Quality vocabulary involved two main steps. First, the Water Quality vocabulary was populated with individuals of the ObservedProperty class, which was determined from a census of existing datasets and services. Each ObservedProperty individual relates to other individuals of Unit and QuantityKind (taken from QUDT where possible), and to IdentifiedObject individuals. As a large fraction of observed water quality data are classified by the chemical substance involved, the

  16. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  17. On Efficient Deployment of Wireless Sensors for Coverage and Connectivity in Constrained 3D Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase Q. Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensor networks have been used in a rapidly increasing number of applications in many fields. This work generalizes a sensor deployment problem to place a minimum set of wireless sensors at candidate locations in constrained 3D space to k-cover a given set of target objects. By exhausting the combinations of discreteness/continuousness constraints on either sensor locations or target objects, we formulate four classes of sensor deployment problems in 3D space: deploy sensors at Discrete/Continuous Locations (D/CL to cover Discrete/Continuous Targets (D/CT. We begin with the design of an approximate algorithm for DLDT and then reduce DLCT, CLDT, and CLCT to DLDT by discretizing continuous sensor locations or target objects into a set of divisions without sacrificing sensing precision. Furthermore, we consider a connected version of each problem where the deployed sensors must form a connected network, and design an approximation algorithm to minimize the number of deployed sensors with connectivity guarantee. For performance comparison, we design and implement an optimal solution and a genetic algorithm (GA-based approach. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed deployment algorithms consistently outperform the GA-based heuristic and achieve a close-to-optimal performance in small-scale problem instances and a significantly superior overall performance than the theoretical upper bound.

  18. Lightweight, Self-Deploying Foam Antenna Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; Levin, Steven; Rand, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Lightweight, deployable antennas for a variety of outer-space and terrestrial applications would be designed and fabricated according to the concept of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structures, according to a proposal. Mechanically deployable antennas now in use are heavy, complex, and unreliable, and they utilize packaging volume inefficiently. The proposed CHEM antenna structures would be simple and would deploy themselves without need for any mechanisms and, therefore, would be more reliable. The proposed CHEM antenna structures would also weigh less, could be packaged in smaller volumes, and would cost less, relative to mechanically deployable antennas. The CHEM concept was described in two prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56; and "Solar Heating for Deployment of Foam Structures" (NPO-20961), Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 36. To recapitulate from the cited prior articles: The CHEM concept is one of utilizing opencell foams of shape-memory polymers (SMPs) to make lightweight, reliable, simple, and inexpensive structures that can be alternately (1) compressed and stowed compactly or (2) expanded, then rigidified for use. A CHEM structure is fabricated at full size from a block of SMP foam in its glassy state [at a temperature below the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the SMP]. The structure is heated to the rubbery state of the SMP (that is, to a temperature above Tg) and compacted to a small volume. After compaction, the structure is cooled to the glassy state of the SMP. The compacting force can then be released and the structure remains compact as long as the temperature is kept below Tg. Upon subsequent heating of the structure above Tg, the simultaneous elastic recovery of the foam and its shape-memory effect cause the structure to expand to its original size and shape. Once thus deployed, the structure can be rigidified by

  19. Engineered spacecraft deployables influenced by nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, David; Wolpert, W. D.

    2009-08-01

    Northrop Grumman has been a leader in the space industry for over 50 years, and in fact was the first in the industry to produce a contractor-built spacecraft. Since the dawn of the Space Age and that Pioneer-1 spacecraft, every sub-system that makes up a spacecraft has grown in capability. One of the most visible changes to a spacecraft that enables these enhanced capabilities is the variety of appendages called deployable systems. These systems include solar arrays, antenna reflectors, telescopes and a current design for a tennis court sized sunshield. While the end product may look very different and perform different functions, all deployable systems share certain common attributes. Among these are: a latch mechanism for the deployable restraining it to the spacecraft for launch, an unlatching or release mechanism once orbit is achieved, an energy storage device or driving mechanism for deployment and a re-latching, or sometimes a repositioning device for orientation of the system during the mission. This paper describes these space-based systems and draws some comparisons with various natural analogs. While it may not be the case that the aerospace engineer is attempting to duplicate natural systems, it is almost certain that spacecraft deployable systems have been influenced by nature.

  20. Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

  1. Articulated Deployment System for Antenna Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, M.; Borst, G.; Grimminck, M.; Robroek, M.; Geuskens, F.

    2015-09-01

    An articulated deployment system is developed for the deployment and pointing of antenna reflectors with a larger diameter and extended focal length. The articulated boom can be folded in several configurations to stow on the spacecraft sidewall. The boom, made of carbon fibre that is configured for a low CTE of better than ±0.3μm/m-K, deploys by means of spring-driven hinges interconnected via synchronisation cables and is controlled by an actuator. When fully deployed the hinges are latched, providing a stiff structure essential for disturbance-free pointing of the antenna. For pointing, the existing ADTM Mk2 gimbal by Airbus Defence and Space UK is used. The arm is mounted (repeatably) to the spacecraft with an adjustable range of ±7mm in all axes for coarse adjustment and mounted (repeatably) to the reflector with fine adjustment range of ±2mm and ±1.5°.The reflector boom has a modular design, which allows a wide range of mission configurations by tuning only a few design parameters such as limb length, deployment angles, and the number of articulations required to stow the boom.

  2. Nuclear Power Learning and Deployment Rates; Disruption and Global Benefits Forgone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Lang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents evidence of the disruption of a transition from fossil fuels to nuclear power, and finds the benefits forgone as a consequence are substantial. Learning rates are presented for nuclear power in seven countries, comprising 58% of all power reactors ever built globally. Learning rates and deployment rates changed in the late-1960s and 1970s from rapidly falling costs and accelerating deployment to rapidly rising costs and stalled deployment. Historical nuclear global capacity, electricity generation and overnight construction costs are compared with the counterfactual that pre-disruption learning and deployment rates had continued to 2015. Had the early rates continued, nuclear power could now be around 10% of its current cost. The additional nuclear power could have substituted for 69,000–186,000 TWh of coal and gas generation, thereby avoiding up to 9.5 million deaths and 174 Gt CO2 emissions. In 2015 alone, nuclear power could have replaced up to 100% of coal-generated and 76% of gas-generated electricity, thereby avoiding up to 540,000 deaths and 11 Gt CO2. Rapid progress was achieved in the past and could be again, with appropriate policies. Research is needed to identify impediments to progress, and policy is needed to remove them.

  3. A Novel Geographical Information Systems Framework to Characterize Photovoltaic Deployment in the UK: Initial Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Westacott

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, deployment of grid-connected photovoltaics (PV has increased dramatically in recent years. The UK has seen rapid uptake reaching over 500,000 installations totalling 2.8 GWp by 2013. PV can be installed in different market segments (domestic rooftop, non-domestic rooftop and ground-mounted “solar-farms” covering a broad range of system sizes in a high number of locations. It is important to gain detailed understanding of what grid-connected PV deployment looks like (e.g., how it deployed across different geographic areas and market segments, and identify the major drivers behind it. This paper answers these questions by developing a novel geographical information systems (GIS-framework—the United Kingdom Photovoltaics Database (UKPVD—to analyze temporal and spatial PV deployment trends at high resolution across all market segments. Results show how PV deployment changed over time with the evolution of governmental PV policy support. Then spatial trends as function of local irradiation, rurality (as a proxy of building and population density and building footprint (as a proxy for roof-area are analyzed. We find in all market segments, PV deployment is strongly correlated with the level of policy support. Furthermore, all markets show a preference to deploy in rural areas and those with higher irradiation. Finally, local clustering of PV in all market segments was observed, revealing that PV is not spread evenly across areas. This work reveals the complex nature of PV deployment, both spatially and by market segment, reinforcing the need capture this through mapping.

  4. How Military Families Respond Before, During and After Deployment: Findings from the RAND Deployment Life Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    behavioral problems in children , a higher risk of divorce , and higher rates of suicide. Not surprisingly, service members and spouses regularly name...applied only to children younger than 11, not to teenagers. Neither teens’ parents nor the youths themselves reported behavioral difficulties. But... preparing for deployment (developing an emergency financial plan or buying life insurance), the higher their parenting satisfaction after deployment

  5. Research on lightweight passive deployment mechanism for the secondary mirror in the deployable space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Peifeng; Li, Chuang; Jing, Nan; Chong, Yaqin; Ren, Guorui

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a new type of lightweight passive deployment mechanism based on the tape spring and the shape memory alloy is presented for the secondary mirror of a deployable space telescope. In this passive deployment mechanism for the secondary mirror, the high elastic potential energy of the folded tape springs is used as driving force when the support structure is extended, and the high stiffness characteristics of the circular arc cross section of the tape spring can be used to achieve structure self-locking after deployment. Then a deployable space telescope combined with lightweight passive deployable mechanism for the secondary mirror is designed for applying to nanosatellite imaging. Furthermore, a lock-release device is designed to achieve the function of locking the folded structure and releasing on orbit by taking advantage of the phase transformation characteristics of shape memory alloy with temperature changing. Finally, the correction method for the deployment error of secondary mirror is discussed. The temperature of the tape springs is controlled respectively to make a required length change. This can achieve the purpose of adjusting the position of the secondary mirror and improve the deployment accuracy.

  6. Simulation of Locking Space Truss Deployments for a Large Deployable Sparse Aperture Reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A APPROVED FOR PUBLIC...6 Martin Marietta Box Truss Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Able Deployable Articulated Mast (ADAM...8 3. Martin Marietta Deployable Box Truss Design [2]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4

  7. Immediate deployment opportunities for negative emissions with BECCS: a Swedish case study

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Henrik; Delahaye, Timur; Johnsson, Filip; Kjärstad, Jan; Rootzén, Johan

    2017-01-01

    To meet the 2{\\deg}C target and, in particular the 1.5{\\deg}C target defined in the Paris Agreement, rapid scaling-up of BECCS (Bio-Energy with Carbon Capture and Storage) and other negative emissions technologies (NETs) is essential. Recent research on BECCS has mainly focused on biophysical and sustainability limitations to multi-Gigatonne deployment in the latter half of this century. However, this paper focuses on the critical short-term opportunities for immediate deployment, considering...

  8. Deploying Embodied AI into Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, David J. H.

    The last two years have seen the start of commercial activity within virtual worlds. Unlike computer games where Non-Player-Character avatars are common, in most virtual worlds they are the exception — and until recently in Second Life they were non-existent. However there is real commercial scope for Als in these worlds — in roles from virtual sales staff and tutors to personal assistants. Deploying an embodied AI into a virtual world offers a unique opportunity to evaluate embodied Als, and to develop them within an environment where human and computer are on almost equal terms. This paper presents an architecture being used for the deployment of chatbot driven avatars within the Second Life virtual world, looks at the challenges of deploying an AI within such a virtual world, the possible implications for the Turing Test, and identifies research directions for the future.

  9. Assessment of dynamic analyses for deploying space truss structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, D.; Housner, J.

    1984-01-01

    A selected list of references on the analysis of the deployment concepts for large space truss structures are reviewed. The stability of the deployment process is discussed, and stable methods of deployment mentioned. Analytical and experimental needs to assess feasibility and performance of proposed deployment concepts are outlined.

  10. Development of Norms for the Post-deployment Reintegration Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    perspective. Recognizing the importance of successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, Canadian military researchers...of successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, Canadian military researchers developed the Army Post- Deployment... successful post-deployment reintegration to optimal operational readiness, and attempting to address the gaps and limitations of existing

  11. Challenges to Deploy Service Design in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akasaka, Fumiya; Ohno, Takehiko; Jensen, Mika Yasuoka

    2016-01-01

    where success and failure factors of service design projects in organization are presented. By analysing the results, we construct a model that explains the “difficulties of deploying the service design approach in organization.” On the basis of the model, this paper discusses the challenges......More and more companies are applying service design approaches to develop services and products. Not every project, however, has achieved its goals. In many cases, difficulties arise from organizational issues such as organization structure and evaluation system. In this research, we held workshops...... to the deployment of the service design approach in organizations....

  12. Service Creation and Deployment in Converged Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soler, José

    This monograph (Early Experiences related to Service Creation & Deployment in Converged Networks) presents different experiences related to architectures and mechanisms for deployment of telephony services, understood as especial features complementing the basic voice service. The context...... and Future Converged Networks”, carried out at the Technical University of Denmark in the period [April 2002-April 2005]. Even though the technologies presented in the text have evolved from that period until now, the presented scenarios and setups are still valid as interesting initial steps in the realm....

  13. Techno-Economics of Residential Broadband Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Halldor Matthias

    2007-01-01

    og kombinerer en solid teknisk viden om telenet og tjenester med økonomisk teori og teori for regulering af telekommunikation. På grundlag heraf opstilles en tekno-økonomisk omkostningsmodel, der simulerer kapitaludgifter og ydelser. Som et særligt element i modellen benyttes spilteori til......-Economics of Residential Broadband Deployment. It investigates the current market situation of broadband services, where the electricity companies challenge the incumbent telecom operators by extensive deployment of optical fibres to the end users. Very often the old telecom operators have a well-developed infrastructure...

  14. Industrial deployment of system engineering methods

    CERN Document Server

    Romanovsky, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A formal method is not the main engine of a development process, its contribution is to improve system dependability by motivating formalisation where useful. This book summarizes the results of the DEPLOY research project on engineering methods for dependable systems through the industrial deployment of formal methods in software development. The applications considered were in automotive, aerospace, railway, and enterprise information systems, and microprocessor design.  The project introduced a formal method, Event-B, into several industrial organisations and built on the lessons learned to

  15. RFID Reader Anticollision Protocols for Dense and Mobile Deployments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoul Aziz Mbacke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification technology has allowed its large adoption and led to increasing deployments of RFID solutions in diverse environments under varying scenarios and constraints. The nature of these constraints ranges from the amount to the mobility of the readers deployed, which in turn highly affects the quality of the RFID system, causing reading collisions. Although several solutions were proposed to engage the issue of reading collision, few were ever concerned with the densification and/or mobility of readers. This paper proposes two distributed TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access approaches designed to reduce these collisions through local coordination between neighboring devices for different scenarios tested here. The first proposal is based on a reservation phase organized between readers with different priority levels given to readers depending on their previous success. The second one takes advantage of the particular case of RFID collisions, allowing a local and mutual decision of each reader to access or not tags in their vicinity. Simulations were run over different stressful environments in terms of tag/reader density and mobility, proving that our proposals achieved the best performance in terms of throughput, collision avoidance and coverage delay when compared to other collision reducing schemes.

  16. Deployment Environment for a Swarm of Heterogeneous Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Abukhalil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to develop a framework that can deploy and provide coordination between multiple heterogeneous agents when a swarm robotic system adopts a decentralized approach; each robot evaluates its relative rank among the other robots in terms of travel distance and cost to the goal. Accordingly, robots are allocated to the sub-tasks for which they have the highest rank (utility. This paper provides an analysis of existing swarm control environments and proposes a software environment that facilitates a rapid deployment of multiple robotic agents. The framework (UBSwarm exploits our utility-based task allocation algorithm. UBSwarm configures these robots and assigns the group of robots a particular task from a set of available tasks. Two major tasks have been introduced that show the performance of a robotic group. This robotic group is composed of heterogeneous agents. In the results, a premature example that has prior knowledge about the experiment shows whether or not the robots are able to accomplish the task.

  17. The production deployment of IPv6 on WLCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, J.; Campana, S.; Chadwick, K.; Chudoba, J.; Dewhurst, A.; Eliáš, M.; Fayer, S.; Finnern, T.; Grigoras, C.; Hartmann, T.; Hoeft, B.; Idiculla, T.; Kelsey, D. P.; López Muñoz, F.; Macmahon, E.; Martelli, E.; Millar, A. P.; Nandakumar, R.; Ohrenberg, K.; Prelz, F.; Rand, D.; Sciabà, A.; Tigerstedt, U.; Voicu, R.; Walker, C. J.; Wildish, T.

    2015-12-01

    The world is rapidly running out of IPv4 addresses; the number of IPv6 end systems connected to the internet is increasing; WLCG and the LHC experiments may soon have access to worker nodes and/or virtual machines (VMs) possessing only an IPv6 routable address. The HEPiX IPv6 Working Group has been investigating, testing and planning for dual-stack services on WLCG for several years. Following feedback from our working group, many of the storage technologies in use on WLCG have recently been made IPv6-capable. This paper presents the IPv6 requirements, tests and plans of the LHC experiments together with the tests performed on the group's IPv6 test-bed. This is primarily aimed at IPv6-only worker nodes or VMs accessing several different implementations of a global dual-stack federated storage service. Finally the plans for deployment of production dual-stack WLCG services are presented.

  18. Development and Deployment of NASA's Budget Execution Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the successful implementation of a highly visible company-wide management system and its potential to change managerial and accounting policies, processes and practices in support of organizational goals. Applying the conceptual framework of innovation in organizations, this paper describes the development and deployment process of the NASA Budget Execution Dashboard and the first two fiscal years of its use. It discusses the positive organizational changes triggered by the dashboard, like higher visibility of financial goals and variances between plans and actuals, increased involvement of all management levels in tracking and correcting of plan deviations, establishing comparable data standards across a strongly diversified organization, and enhanced communication between line organizations (NASA Centers) and product organizations (Mission Directorates). The paper also discusses the critical success factors experienced in this project: Strong leadership and division of management roles, rapid and responsive technology development, and frequent communication among stakeholders.

  19. Future wind deployment scenarios for South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, Jarrad G

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available expansion planning exercise is undertaken. The results of this show that a considerable deployment of wind into the future should be expected where in least-cost scenarios ˜15-25 GW of installed wind capacity by 2030 (˜10-20% of the energy mix), ˜40-60 GW...

  20. Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager advanced deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Coupland, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    If you are an experienced Configuration Manager administrator looking to advance your career or get more from your current environment, then this book is ideal for you. Prior experience of deploying and managing a Configuration Manager site would be helpful in following the examples throughout this book.

  1. Embedding Quality Function Deployment In Software Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Embedding Quality Function Deployment In Software Development: A Novel Approach. ... Therefore the software engineer has enormous task in engineering functional software that can work and be delivered on time..This paper focuses on how customers' voice can be heard in order to reduce development and ...

  2. Deploying Electronic Roadside Vehicle Identification Technology to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deploying Electronic Roadside Vehicle Identification Technology to Intercept Small Arms and Ammunition ... The present practice of stop and search fails to capture most vehicles conveying sensitive and dangerous security exhibits such as ..... transmitter and responder. Simply put, transponder is an electric device used to.

  3. Design, Implementation and Deployment of PAIRwise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Allan; Almeroth, Kevin; Bimber, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Increased access to the Internet has dramatically increased the sources from which students can deliberately or accidentally copy information. This article discusses our motivation to design, implement, and deploy an Internet based plagiarism detection system, called PAIRwise, to address this growing problem. We give details as to how we detect…

  4. Deploying Indigenous Knowledge for Sustainable Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development efforts that ignore IK would end up wasting enormous amounts of resources and might not achieve expected results. The need to deploy IK for sustainable development can be conceptualised when one observes the dynamics and total shift of Africans away from their culture towards western knowledge.

  5. Deployment Strategies and Clustering Protocols Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chérif Diallo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks face significant design challenges due to limited computing and storage capacities and, most importantly, dependence on limited battery power. Energy is a critical resource and is often an important issue to the deployment of sensor applications that claim to be omnipresent in the world of future. Thus optimizing the deployment of sensors becomes a major constraint in the design and implementation of a WSN in order to ensure better network operations. In wireless networking, clustering techniques add scalability, reduce the computation complexity of routing protocols, allow data aggregation and then enhance the network performance. The well-known MaxMin clustering algorithm was previously generalized, corrected and validated. Then, in a previous work we have improved MaxMin by proposing a Single- node Cluster Reduction (SNCR mechanism which eliminates single-node clusters and then improve energy efficiency. In this paper, we show that MaxMin, because of its original pathological case, does not support the grid deployment topology, which is frequently used in WSN architectures. The unreliability feature of the wireless links could have negative impacts on Link Quality Indicator (LQI based clustering protocols. So, in the second part of this paper we show how our distributed Link Quality based d- Clustering Protocol (LQI-DCP has good performance in both stable and high unreliable link environments. Finally, performance evaluation results also show that LQI-DCP fully supports the grid deployment topology and is more energy efficient than MaxMin.

  6. Supporting Children and Families throughout Military Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    A military deployment is a challenging time for all family members. Young children are especially vulnerable, because they often do not have skills to handle all of the change and uncertainty and are still learning to manage their emotions and behaviors. They do not have a wealth of past experiences to rely on as adults do. They also do not have…

  7. Embedding Quality Function Deployment In Software Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... product design, development, and manufacture. Traditionally, the house of quality has been used in the automobile industry and other factory environments, but the same challenge of managing design complexity that Quality Function. Deployment tackles in the product industry also plagues the software ...

  8. Diogenes, Dogfaced Soldiers, and Deployment Music Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Geoffrey; Williamson, Bill

    2010-01-01

    This webtext explores the cynical/kynical humor of soldier videos, suggesting that amateur videos paradoxically both undercut authority and honor effective leaders, both make light of and also publicly reveal deployment hardships, both distance the performers from military groupthink and celebrate unit camaraderie.

  9. ELFms deployment in- and outside CERN CC

    CERN Document Server

    Cancio, G

    2004-01-01

    ELFms (http://cern.ch/elfms) stands for Extremely Large Fabric management system, and comprises tools for fabric configuration and installation (Quattor), monitoring (Lemon), and hardware/state management (LEAF). In this talk, I will describe the ELFms modules and overall architecture, as well as the integration/deployment status at CERN-CC and other sites/projects.

  10. Optimum wireless sensor deployment scheme for structural health monitoring: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengyin; Fang, Kun; Teng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    With the rapid advancements in smart sensing technology and wireless communication technology, the wireless sensor network (WSN) offers an alternative solution to structural health monitoring (SHM). In WSNs, dense deployment of wireless nodes aids the identification of structural dynamic characteristics, while data transmission is a significant issue since wireless channels typically have a lower bandwidth and a limited power supply. This paper provides a wireless sensor deployment optimization scheme for SHM, in terms of both energy consumption and modal identification accuracy. A spherical energy model is established to formulate the energy consumption within a WSN. The optimal number of sensors and their locations are obtained through solving a multi-objective function with weighting factors on energy consumption and modal identification accuracy using a genetic algorithm (GA). Simulation and comparison results with traditional sensor deployment methods demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed optimization scheme.

  11. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P.; Williams, C.; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  12. Abstracting application deployment on Cloud infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiftimiei, D. C.; Fattibene, E.; Gargana, R.; Panella, M.; Salomoni, D.

    2017-10-01

    Deploying a complex application on a Cloud-based infrastructure can be a challenging task. In this contribution we present an approach for Cloud-based deployment of applications and its present or future implementation in the framework of several projects, such as “!CHAOS: a cloud of controls” [1], a project funded by MIUR (Italian Ministry of Research and Education) to create a Cloud-based deployment of a control system and data acquisition framework, “INDIGO-DataCloud” [2], an EC H2020 project targeting among other things high-level deployment of applications on hybrid Clouds, and “Open City Platform”[3], an Italian project aiming to provide open Cloud solutions for Italian Public Administrations. We considered to use an orchestration service to hide the complex deployment of the application components, and to build an abstraction layer on top of the orchestration one. Through Heat [4] orchestration service, we prototyped a dynamic, on-demand, scalable platform of software components, based on OpenStack infrastructures. On top of the orchestration service we developed a prototype of a web interface exploiting the Heat APIs. The user can start an instance of the application without having knowledge about the underlying Cloud infrastructure and services. Moreover, the platform instance can be customized by choosing parameters related to the application such as the size of a File System or the number of instances of a NoSQL DB cluster. As soon as the desired platform is running, the web interface offers the possibility to scale some infrastructure components. In this contribution we describe the solution design and implementation, based on the application requirements, the details of the development of both the Heat templates and of the web interface, together with possible exploitation strategies of this work in Cloud data centers.

  13. Rapid Active Sampling Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    A field-deployable, battery-powered Rapid Active Sampling Package (RASP), originally designed for sampling strong materials during lunar and planetary missions, shows strong utility for terrestrial geological use. The technology is proving to be simple and effective for sampling and processing materials of strength. Although this originally was intended for planetary and lunar applications, the RASP is very useful as a powered hand tool for geologists and the mining industry to quickly sample and process rocks in the field on Earth. The RASP allows geologists to surgically acquire samples of rock for later laboratory analysis. This tool, roughly the size of a wrench, allows the user to cut away swaths of weathering rinds, revealing pristine rock surfaces for observation and subsequent sampling with the same tool. RASPing deeper (.3.5 cm) exposes single rock strata in-situ. Where a geologist fs hammer can only expose unweathered layers of rock, the RASP can do the same, and then has the added ability to capture and process samples into powder with particle sizes less than 150 microns, making it easier for XRD/XRF (x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence). The tool uses a rotating rasp bit (or two counter-rotating bits) that resides inside or above the catch container. The container has an open slot to allow the bit to extend outside the container and to allow cuttings to enter and be caught. When the slot and rasp bit are in contact with a substrate, the bit is plunged into it in a matter of seconds to reach pristine rock. A user in the field may sample a rock multiple times at multiple depths in minutes, instead of having to cut out huge, heavy rock samples for transport back to a lab for analysis. Because of the speed and accuracy of the RASP, hundreds of samples can be taken in one day. RASP-acquired samples are small and easily carried. A user can characterize more area in less time than by using conventional methods. The field-deployable RASP used a Ni

  14. EDITORIAL Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaura, Elena; Roedig, Utz; Brusey, James

    2010-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are among the most promising technologies of the new millennium. The opportunities afforded by being able to program networks of small, lightweight, low-power, computation- and bandwidth-limited nodes have attracted a large community of researchers and developers. However, the unique set of capabilities offered by the technology produces an exciting but complex design space, which is often difficult to negotiate in an application context. Deploying sensing physical environments produces its own set of challenges, and can push systems into failure modes, thus revealing problems that can be difficult to discover or reproduce in simulation or the laboratory. Sustained efforts in the area of wireless networked sensing over the last 15 years have resulted in a large number of theoretical developments, substantial practical achievements, and a wealth of lessons for the future. It is clear that in order to bridge the gap between (on the one hand) visions of very large scale, autonomous, randomly deployed networks and (on the other) the actual performance of fielded systems, we need to view deployment as an essential component in the process of developing sensor networks: a process that includes hardware and software solutions that serve specific applications and end-user needs. Incorporating deployment into the design process reveals a new and different set of requirements and considerations, whose solutions require innovative thinking, multidisciplinary teams and strong involvement from end-user communities. This special feature uncovers and documents some of the hurdles encountered and solutions offered by experimental scientists when deploying and evaluating wireless sensor networks in situ, in a variety of well specified application scenarios. The papers specifically address issues of generic importance for WSN system designers: (i) data quality, (ii) communications availability and quality, (iii) alternative, low-energy sensing

  15. The Deployment Life Study: Longitudinal Analysis of Military Families Across the Deployment Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Meadows, Sarah O.; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Friedman, Esther M.; Trail, Thomas E.; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M.; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study to study military family readiness. This article presents analyses on marital relationships, family environment, psychological and behavioral health, child well-being, and military integration.

  16. Smart Brix—a continuous evolution framework for container application deployments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes M. Schleicher

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Container-based application deployments have received significant attention in recent years. Operating system virtualization based on containers as a mechanism to deploy and manage complex, large-scale software systems has become a popular mechanism for application deployment and operation. Packaging application components into self-contained artifacts has brought substantial flexibility to developers and operation teams alike. However, this flexibility comes at a price. Practitioners need to respect numerous constraints ranging from security and compliance requirements, to specific regulatory conditions. Fulfilling these requirements is especially challenging in specialized domains with large numbers of stakeholders. Moreover, the rapidly growing number of container images to be managed due to the introduction of new or updated applications and respective components, leads to significant challenges for container management and adaptation. In this paper, we introduce Smart Brix, a framework for continuous evolution of container application deployments that tackles these challenges. Smart Brix integrates and unifies concepts of continuous integration, runtime monitoring, and operational analytics. Furthermore, it allows practitioners to define generic analytics and compensation pipelines composed of self-assembling processing components to autonomously validate and verify containers to be deployed. We illustrate the feasibility of our approach by evaluating our framework using a case study from the smart city domain. We show that Smart Brix is horizontally scalable and runtime of the implemented analysis and compensation pipelines scales linearly with the number of container application packages.

  17. Engineering Smart Grids: Applying Model-Driven Development from Use Case Design to Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Pröstl Andrén

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The rollout of smart grid solutions has already started and new methods are deployed to the power systems of today. However, complexity is still increasing as focus is moving from a single system, to a system of systems perspective. The results are increasing engineering efforts and escalating costs. For this reason, new and automated engineering methods are necessary. This paper addresses these needs with a rapid engineering methodology that covers the overall engineering process for smart grid applications—from use case design to deployment. Based on a model-driven development approach, the methodology consists of three main parts: use case modeling, code generation, and deployment. A domain-specific language is introduced supporting the use case design according to the Smart Grid Architecture Model. It is combined with the IEC 61499 distributed control model to improve the function layer design. After a completed use case design, executable code and communication configurations (e.g., IEC 61850 are generated and deployed onto compatible field devices. This paper covers the proposed rapid engineering methodology and a corresponding prototypical implementation which is validated in a laboratory experiment. Compared to other methods the proposed methodology decreases the number of engineering steps and reduces the use case design and implementation complexity.

  18. NOC Liverpool Unit 117 Glider deployment report for the DEFRA MAREMAP Project, April - May 2012 deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Balfour, C.; Knight, P.

    2012-01-01

    This document summarises the extended deployment of a 200 metre depth rated Slocum Electric glider by the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, UK from the 2nd April to 17th May 2012. The deployment was aimed as a pilot study for the use of gliders by environment agencies to monitor marine conservation zones. Lithium expendable batteries were used inside the glider to provide an extended endurance. The glider had a series of science sensors installed to measure physical oceanographic and b...

  19. Persistent Identifiers for Field Deployments: A Missing Link in the Provenance Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko, R. A.; Ji, P.; Fils, D.; Shepherd, A.; Chandler, C. L.; Lehnert, K.

    2016-12-01

    Research in the geosciences is characterized by a wide range of complex and costly field deployments including oceanographic cruises, submersible dives, drilling expeditions, seismic networks, geodetic campaigns, moored arrays, aircraft flights, and satellite missions. Each deployment typically produces a mix of sensor and sample data, spanning a period from hours to decades, that ultimately yields a long tail of post-field products and publications. Publishing persistent, citable identifiers for field deployments will facilitate 1) preservation and reuse of the original field data, 2) reproducibility of the resulting publications, and 3) recognition for both the facilities that operate the platforms and the investigators who secure funding for the experiments. In the ocean domain, sharing unique identifiers for field deployments is a familiar practice. For example, the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) routinely links datasets to cruise identifiers published by the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program. In recent years, facilities have started to publish formal/persistent identifiers, typically Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs), for field deployments including seismic networks, oceanographic cruises, and moored arrays. For example, the EarthChem Library (ECL) publishes a DOI for each dataset which, if it derived from an oceanographic research cruise on a US vessel, is linked to a DOI for the cruise published by R2R. Work is underway to create similar links for the IODP JOIDES Resolution Science Operator (JRSO) and the Continental Scientific Drilling Coordination Office (CSDCO). We present results and lessons learned including a draft schema for publishing field deployments as DataCite DOI records; current practice for linking these DOIs with related identifiers such as Open Researcher and Contributor IDs (ORCIDs), Open Funder Registry (OFR) codes, and International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs); and consideration of other

  20. Optimization of equipment deployment on fire trucks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowicki Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the problem of deploying firemen’ equipment is discussed in order to achieve the best value of ergonomic indicators for fireman during anti-fire action. The equipment can be deployed on the fore truck in a different ways. We are looking for the best way to do it from the point of view of ergonomics. The multi-criterial optimization problem of equipment location on the vehicle has been formulated. It is linear integer programming problem with three criteria functions. It is able to solve that problem using formal method after some modifications. It is possible to receive several solutions from multi-criterial optimization problem and then evaluate them in a virtual simulation environment. It can then be taken into account a number of additional factors that are important for fireman and ergonomics.

  1. Community integration after deployment to Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Armour, Cherie; Andersen, Søren B.

    2015-01-01

    of Danish soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 (N = 743), we assessed community reintegration difficulties 2.5 years after home coming (study sample: N = 454). Furthermore, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were assessed before, during, and after deployment. Trajectories of PTSD symptoms...... from a previously published latent growth mixture modeling analysis were used to address whether community reintegration difficulties differ as a result of course and level of PTSD symptoms. RESULTS: Between 3.6 and 18.0 % reported to have some, a lot, or extreme difficulties in reintegration domains...... such as interpersonal functioning, productivity, community involvement, and self-care. Mean level of reintegration difficulties differed significantly across six PTSD symptom trajectories (range 6.35-36.00); with more symptomatic trajectories experiencing greater community reintegration difficulties. CONCLUSIONS...

  2. PEP Deployment and Bandwidth Management Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younghusband, Charles; Slade, Peter; Weaver, Jeff

    This paper will discuss current deployment scenarios for Performance Enhancement Proxies (PEP) technologies in broadband satellite access systems from the perspective of one PEP technology provider. Recent improvements such as DVB-S2 can provide substantial gains at the link layer. In order to achieve further efficiency gains, the satellite industry is now forced to look elsewhere - namely other layers in the data communications network stack. Satellite terminal manufacturers are now moving beyond basic TCP acceleration techniques to more comprehensive optimization techniques that incorporate advances in data compression and flexibility for more deployment scenarios. Some of the advances for PEP technology are in part due to CPU and memory technology advances, resulting in increasingly affordable access to computing power, allowing PEP manufacturers deliver substantial performance and bandwidth savings gains.

  3. Changing Family Roles - Across the Deployment Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    on the impact of technology-based communication during deployment on later psychological distress and role functioning. PROGRESS TO DATE...higher levels of warmth and lower levels of agonism also reported lower levels of externalizing behavior in their children. When at-home partners...reported their children’s relationship changed over the course of the study, so did their reports of externalizing behavior in their children. 15. SUBJECT

  4. Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Hill; Kenneth Nemeth; Gary Garrett; Kimberly Sams

    2009-01-31

    The Southern States Energy Board's (SSEB) 'Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies' program began on June 1, 2003, and was completed on January 31, 2009. The project proved beneficial in providing state decision-makers with information that assisted them in removing barriers or implementing incentives to deploy clean coal technologies. This was accomplished through two specific tasks: (1) domestic energy security and diversity; and (2) the energy-water interface. Milestones accomplished during the project period are: (1) Presentations to Annual Meetings of SSEB Members, Associate Member Meetings, and the Gasification Technologies Council. (2) Energy: Water reports - (A) Regional Efforts to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies: Impacts and Implications for Water Supply and Quality. June 2004. (B) Energy-Water Interface Challenges: Coal Bed Methane and Mine Pool Water Characterization in the Southern States Region. 2004. (C) Freshwater Availability and Constraints on Thermoelectric Power Generation in the Southeast U.S. June 2008. (3) Blackwater Interactive Tabletop Exercise - Decatur, Georgia April 2007. (4) Blackwater Report: Blackwater: Energy and Water Interdependency Issues: Best Practices and Lessons Learned. August 2007. (5) Blackwater Report: BLACKWATER: Energy Water Interdependency Issues REPORT SUMMARY. April 2008.

  5. An Innovative Design of a Microtab Deployment Mechanism for Active Aerodynamic Load Control

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo-Chang Tsai; Cheng-Tang Pan; Aubryn M. Cooperman; Johnson, Scott J.; C. P. van Dam

    2015-01-01

    This study presents an innovative design of a microtab system for aerodynamic load control on horizontal-axis wind-turbine rotors. Microtabs are small devices located near the trailing edge of the rotor blades and enable a rapid increase or decrease of the lift force through deployment of the tabs on the pressure or suction side of the airfoil, respectively. The new system has been designed to replace an earlier linearly-actuated microtab mechanism whose performance was limited by space restr...

  6. A framework for manufacturing execution system deployment in an advanced additive manufacturing process

    OpenAIRE

    D'ANTONIO, Gianluca; SEGONDS, Frédéric; LAVERNE, Floriane; Sauza-Bedolla, Joel; Chiabert, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The deployment of additive manufacturing (AM) processes had a rapid and broad increase in the last years, and the same trend is expected tohold in the near future. A way to better exploit the advantages of such technology is the use of appropriate information tools. However, today thereis a lack of software applications devoted to this innovative manufacturing process. To overcome this issue, in the present work the application of manufacturing execution systems (MES), a tool commonly used in...

  7. Deployable Wide-Aperture Array Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Lin, Greg Y.; Chu, Andrew; Scully, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Inexpensive, lightweight array antennas on flexible substrates are under development to satisfy a need for large-aperture antennas that can be stored compactly during transport and deployed to full size in the field. Conceived for use aboard spacecraft, antennas of this type also have potential terrestrial uses . most likely, as means to extend the ranges of cellular telephones in rural settings. Several simple deployment mechanisms are envisioned. One example is shown in the figure, where the deployment mechanism, a springlike material contained in a sleeve around the perimeter of a flexible membrane, is based on a common automobile window shade. The array can be formed of antenna elements that are printed on small sections of semi-flexible laminates, or preferably, elements that are constructed of conducting fabric. Likewise, a distribution network connecting the elements can be created from conventional technologies such as lightweight, flexible coaxial cable and a surface mount power divider, or preferably, from elements formed from conductive fabrics. Conventional technologies may be stitched onto a supporting flexible membrane or contained within pockets that are stitched onto a flexible membrane. Components created from conductive fabrics may be attached by stitching conductive strips to a nonconductive membrane, embroidering conductive threads into a nonconductive membrane, or weaving predetermined patterns directly into the membrane. The deployable antenna may comprise multiple types of antenna elements. For example, thin profile antenna elements above a ground plane, both attached to the supporting flexible membrane, can be used to create a unidirectional boresight radiation pattern. Or, antenna elements without a ground plane, such as bow-tie dipoles, can be attached to the membrane to create a bidirectional array such as that shown in the figure. For either type of antenna element, the dual configuration, i.e., elements formed of slots in a conductive

  8. Modular VO oriented Java EE service deployer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, Marco; Cepparo, Francesco; De Marco, Marco; Knapic, Cristina; Apollo, Pietro; Smareglia, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    The International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) has produced many standards and recommendations whose aim is to generate an architecture that starts from astrophysical resources, in a general sense, and ends up in deployed consumable services (that are themselves astrophysical resources). Focusing on the Data Access Layer (DAL) system architecture, that these standards define, in the last years a web based application has been developed and maintained at INAF-OATs IA2 (Italian National institute for Astrophysics - Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, Italian center of Astronomical Archives) to try to deploy and manage multiple VO (Virtual Observatory) services in a uniform way: VO-Dance. However a set of criticalities have arisen since when the VO-Dance idea has been produced, plus some major changes underwent and are undergoing at the IVOA DAL layer (and related standards): this urged IA2 to identify a new solution for its own service layer. Keeping on the basic ideas from VO-Dance (simple service configuration, service instantiation at call time and modularity) while switching to different software technologies (e.g. dismissing Java Reflection in favour of Enterprise Java Bean, EJB, based solution), the new solution has been sketched out and tested for feasibility. Here we present the results originating from this test study. The main constraints for this new project come from various fields. A better homogenized solution rising from IVOA DAL standards: for example the new DALI (Data Access Layer Interface) specification that acts as a common interface system for previous and oncoming access protocols. The need for a modular system where each component is based upon a single VO specification allowing services to rely on common capabilities instead of homogenizing them inside service components directly. The search for a scalable system that takes advantage from distributed systems. The constraints find answer in the adopted solutions hereafter sketched. The

  9. iFlorida model deployment final evaluation report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This document is the final report for the evaluation of the USDOT-sponsored Surface Transportation Security and Reliability Information System Model Deployment, or iFlorida Model Deployment. This report discusses findings in the following areas: ITS ...

  10. Elastic Deployable Composite Tubular Roll-Out Boom Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems (DSS) has developed an affordable and ultra-lightweight elastically self-deployable Roll-Out Boom technology that provides affordability and...

  11. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for

  12. Aum Shinrikyo's Chemical and Biological Weapons: More Than Sarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, A T

    2014-07-01

    The radical religious group Aum Shinrikyo was founded in Japan in the 1980s and grew rapidly in the 1990s. Aum members perpetrated a mass murder in Matsumoto City in 1994, where they used sarin as a chemical weapon to poison approximately 500 civilians. On March 20, 1995, Aum deployed sarin in an even larger terrorist attack on the Tokyo Subway System, which poisoned some 6,000 people. After the Tokyo Subway attack, the Japanese Police arrested the sect's senior members. From 2005 through 2011, 13 of these senior members were sentenced to death. In this article, aspects of Aum's chemical and biological terrorism are reviewed. Sarin production efforts by the sect are described, including how the degradation product of sarin in soil, methylphosphonic acid, enabled the detection of sarin production sites. Also, Aum's chemical-warfare agents other than sarin are described, as are its biological weapons. The author was permitted by the Japanese government to interview Dr. Tomomasa Nakagawa, one of the senior members of Aum Shinrikyo. From Dr. Nakagawa the author obtained valuable inside information about Aum's chemical and biological weapons programs. Copyright © 2014 Central Police University.

  13. The Deployment Life Study: Longitudinal Analysis of Military Families Across the Deployment Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Sarah O; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H; Friedman, Esther M; Trail, Thomas E; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study, a longitudinal study of military families across a deployment cycle in order to assess family readiness. Family readiness refers to the state of being prepared to effectively navigate the challenges of daily living experienced in the unique context of military service. The study surveyed families at frequent intervals throughout a complete deployment cycle---before a service member deploys (sometimes months before), during the actual deployment, and after the service member returns (possibly a year or more after she or he redeployed). It assessed a number of outcomes over time, including: the quality of marital and parental relationshipsthe psychological, behavioral, and physical health of family memberschild and teen well-being (e.g., emotional, behavioral, social, and academic)military integration (e.g., attitudes toward military service, retention intentions).This culminating paper briefly reviews the study design and data collection procedures, presents results from analyses of the longitudinal data collected from some 2,700 military families, and offers recommendations for programs and future research related to military families. The research was jointly sponsored by the Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army, and by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury.

  14. Supporting Military Families with Young Children throughout the Deployment Lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    attended the Safe and Healthy Kids Fair and the National Employment Disability Awareness event. Recruitment Strategies for Phase 1 Recruitment... psychosocial needs of OEF/OIF families with very young children throughout the deployment lifecycle during the pre-deployment and deployment phases. Aim

  15. Deployment-related risk factors of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Where much is known about the consequences of spinal and low back pain (LBP) during military deployments, there is lesser knowledge of risk factors for LBP among the deployed forces. The objective of this study was to identify deployment-related exposures associated with LBP. The study...

  16. Clean Coal Technologies - Accelerating Commerical and Policy Drivers for Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Coal is and will remain the world's most abundant and widely distributed fossil fuel. Burning coal, however, can pollute and it produces carbon dioxide. Clean coal technologies address this problem. The widespread deployment of pollution-control equipment to reduce sulphur dioxide, Nox and dust emissions from industry is just one example which has brought cleaner air to many countries. Since the 1970s, various policy and regulatory measures have created a growing commercial market for these clean coal technologies, with the result that costs have fallen and performance has improved. More recently, the need to tackle rising CO2 emissions to address climate change means that clean coal technologies now extend to include those for CO2 capture and storage (CCS). This short report from the IEA Coal Industry Advisory Board (CIAB) presents industry's considered recommendations on how to accelerate the development and deployment of this important group of new technologies and to grasp their very signifi cant potential to reduce emissions from coal use. It identifies an urgent need to make progress with demonstration projects and prove the potential of CCS through government-industry partnerships. Its commercialisation depends upon a clear legal and regulatory framework,public acceptance and market-based financial incentives. For the latter, the CIAB favours cap-and-trade systems, price supports and mandatory feed-in tariffs, as well as inclusion of CCS in the Kyoto Protocol's Clean Development Mechanism to create demand in developing economies where coal use is growing most rapidly. This report offers a unique insight into the thinking of an industry that recognises both the threats and growing opportunities for coal in a carbon constrained world.

  17. Deployment of IPv6-only CPU resources at WLCG sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babik, M.; Chudoba, J.; Dewhurst, A.; Finnern, T.; Froy, T.; Grigoras, C.; Hafeez, K.; Hoeft, B.; Idiculla, T.; Kelsey, D. P.; López Muñoz, F.; Martelli, E.; Nandakumar, R.; Ohrenberg, K.; Prelz, F.; Rand, D.; Sciabà, A.; Tigerstedt, U.; Traynor, D.

    2017-10-01

    The fraction of Internet traffic carried over IPv6 continues to grow rapidly. IPv6 support from network hardware vendors and carriers is pervasive and becoming mature. A network infrastructure upgrade often offers sites an excellent window of opportunity to configure and enable IPv6. There is a significant overhead when setting up and maintaining dual-stack machines, so where possible sites would like to upgrade their services directly to IPv6 only. In doing so, they are also expediting the transition process towards its desired completion. While the LHC experiments accept there is a need to move to IPv6, it is currently not directly affecting their work. Sites are unwilling to upgrade if they will be unable to run LHC experiment workflows. This has resulted in a very slow uptake of IPv6 from WLCG sites. For several years the HEPiX IPv6 Working Group has been testing a range of WLCG services to ensure they are IPv6 compliant. Several sites are now running many of their services as dual-stack. The working group, driven by the requirements of the LHC VOs to be able to use IPv6-only opportunistic resources, continues to encourage wider deployment of dual-stack services to make the use of such IPv6-only clients viable. This paper presents the working group’s plan and progress so far to allow sites to deploy IPv6-only CPU resources. This includes making experiment central services dual-stack as well as a number of storage services. The monitoring, accounting and information services that are used by jobs also need to be upgraded. Finally the VO testing that has taken place on hosts connected via IPv6-only is reported.

  18. Family systems and ecological perspectives on the impact of deployment on military families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Blair; Lester, Patricia; Mogil, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    The scope of sustained military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan has placed great demands on the Armed Forces of the United States, and accordingly, military families have been faced with deployments in more rapid succession than ever before. When military parents fulfill occupational duties during wartime, military children and families face multiple challenges, including extended separations, disruptions in family routines, and potentially compromised parenting related to traumatic exposure and subsequent mental health problems. Such challenges can begin to exert a significant toll on the well-being of both individuals and relationships (e.g., marital, parent-child) within military families. In order to respond more effectively to the needs of military families, it is essential that mental health clinicians and researchers have a better understanding of the challenges faced by military families throughout the entire deployment experience and the ways in which these challenges may have a cumulative impact over multiple deployments. Moreover, the mental health field must become better prepared to support service members and families across a rapidly evolving landscape of military operations around the world, including those who are making the transition from active duty to Veteran status and navigating a return to civilian life and those families in which parents will continue to actively serve and deploy in combat zones. In this article, we utilize family systems and ecological perspectives to advance our understanding of how military families negotiate repeated deployment experiences and how such experiences impact the well-being and adjustment of families at the individual, dyadic, and whole family level.

  19. Internet-based Spousal Communication during Deployment: Does it Increase Post-deployment Marital Satisfaction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren N. Ponder

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the question: Is a service member’s post-deployment marital satisfaction correlated with frequency and mode of communication during deployment? This study used an anonymous exploratory design with a sample of 119 Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF or Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF married veterans. Service members who communicated daily during deployment with their spouses had higher marital satisfaction scores than those who communicated less than once per week. Additionally, participants who used US mail had the highest marital satisfaction scores compared to telephone and internet-based communication. This study expands the overwhelmingly qualitative current literature to include quantitative analysis of this topic. This study also depicts the veterans’ experiences since many of the previous studies of this topic used samples of spouses.

  20. Formal evaluation of the ADVANCE targeted deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saricks, C.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research; Belella, P.A. [Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Koppelman, F.S.; Schofer, J.L. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). McCormick School of Engineering; Sen, A.K. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Urban Transportation Center

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation Concept (ADVANCE) advanced traveler information system (ATIS) demonstration project in northeastern Illinois was re-scoped in late 1994 from its originally-planned deployment of 3,000--5,000 in-vehicle navigation units to a so-called ``targeted`` deployment in which up to 75 vehicles were equipped with devices enabling them to receive real-time traffic information. These devices included (1) global positioning system (GPS) transmitters/receivers that enabled the vehicles while in the ADVANCE study area to serve as dynamic traffic probes as well as recipients of location data; and (2) navigation units that employed a comprehensive map data base and average (static) link travel times by time of day, stored on CD-ROM, which together computed efficient (least duration) routes between any origin and destination in the northwest portion of the Chicago metropolitan area. Experiments were designed to dispatch these equipped vehicles along links at headways or frequencies comparable to what would have been observed had full deployment actually occurred. Thus, within the limitations of this controlled environment, valuative experiments were conducted to assess the quality of several of the key sub-systems of ADVANCE in the context of structured performance hypotheses. Focused on-road tests began on June 1 and continued through December 14, 1995, followed by a period of data evaluation, documentation of results, and development of conclusions about the findings and usefulness of the project. This paper describes the tests, discusses development of the overall evaluation plan and the evaluation management concept which guided them, and reports on issuses and results of data analysis known at time of writing.

  1. Sepsis management in the deployed field hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Andrew McD; Easby, D; Ewington, I

    2013-09-01

    Sepsis, a syndrome caused by severe infection, affects a small proportion of military casualties but has a significant effect in increasing morbidity and mortality, including causing some preventable deaths. Casualties with abdominal trauma and those with significant tissue loss appear to be at a greater risk of sepsis. In this article, the diagnosis and management of sepsis in military casualties with reference to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines are examined. We discuss the management considerations specific to military casualties in the deployed setting and also discuss factors affecting evacuation by the UK Royal Air Force Critical Care Air Support Team.

  2. Reintegration Difficulty of Military Couples Following Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Teacher Education. 13 7. Participants and Other Collaborating Organizations Individuals who Have Worked on the Project Name Role Person...service members back into family life after deployment can be extremely challenging for military couples. Understanding the factors that contribute to the...10 6. Products …………………………………………………………………………….….…………………..………………….. 10 7. Participants and Other Collaborating Organizations

  3. ROBODEXS; Multi-robot Deployment & Extraction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    These ranged from a scissor lift underbelly “robot elevator”, to a side-mounted clamshell box, to a rear-mounted scoop that was developed in theater...damage to the robot during lifting and increases the risk of injury to the Soldier. ROBODEXS has been designed to automatically deploy and extract...actuator to clamp the robot to the tray and then lift it to a vertical stowed position over the stroke of the actuator (Figure 3, right). When the actuator

  4. Astronaut Edwin Aldrin deploying the EASEP on surface of moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, is photographed deploying the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP) during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity on the Moon. Here, he is deploying the Passive Seismic Experiments Package (PSEP). Already deployed is the Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector (LR-3), which can be seen to the left and further in the background. In the center background is the Lunar Module (LM). A flag of the United States is deployed near the LM. In the far left background is the deployed black and white lunar surface television camera. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with the 70mm lunar surface camera.

  5. NOC turbulence glider deployment report for the Liverpool Bay Coastal Observatory, June 2011 deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Balfour, C.; Knight, P; Mclaughlin, D.

    2011-01-01

    A summary of the NOC Liverpool turbulence glider deployment that occurred between Tuesday 28th June and Monday 4th July 2011 is provided in this document. The general objective of the deployment was to hold the glider on station at a nominal GPS location of 53o 48”N, -4o 00”W to provide a series of glider based turbulence probe and CTD data profiles. These profiles were initiated when the glider reached a nominal depth of 40 metres and continued until the glider approached the sea surface....

  6. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  7. SMUD Community Renewable Energy Deployment Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sison-Lebrilla, Elaine [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Tiangco, Valentino [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lemes, Marco [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ave, Kathleen [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-06-08

    This report summarizes the completion of four renewable energy installations supported by California Energy Commission (CEC) grant number CEC Grant PIR-11-005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Assistance Agreement, DE-EE0003070, and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CRED) program. The funding from the DOE, combined with funding from the CEC, supported the construction of a solar power system, biogas generation from waste systems, and anaerobic digestion systems at dairy facilities, all for electricity generation and delivery to SMUD’s distribution system. The deployment of CRED projects shows that solar projects and anaerobic digesters can be successfully implemented under favorable economic conditions and business models and through collaborative partnerships. This work helps other communities learn how to assess, overcome barriers, utilize, and benefit from renewable resources for electricity generation in their region. In addition to reducing GHG emissions, the projects also demonstrate that solar projects and anaerobic digesters can be readily implemented through collaborative partnerships. This work helps other communities learn how to assess, overcome barriers, utilize, and benefit from renewable resources for electricity generation in their region.

  8. Expert Oracle SQL optimization, deployment, and statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Hasler, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Expert Oracle SQL: Optimization, Deployment, and Statistics is about optimizing individual SQL statements, especially on production database systems. This Oracle-specific book begins by assuming you have already identified a particular SQL statement and are considering taking steps to improve its performance. The book describes a systematic process by which to diagnose a problem statement, identify a fix, and to implement that fix safely in a production system. You'll learn not only to improve performance when it is too slow, but also to stabilize performance when it is too variable. You'll learn about system statistics and how the Cost-Based Optimizer uses them to determine a suitable execution plan for a given statement. That knowledge provides the foundation from which to identify the root cause, and to stabilize and improve performance. Next after identifying a problem and the underlying root cause is to put in place a solution. Expert Oracle SQL: Optimization, Deployment, and Statistics explains how to ...

  9. Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2000-06-01

    The goal of this work is to create an integrated framework for forecasting the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER), both by electricity customers and by the various institutions within the industry itself, and for evaluating the effect of this adoption on the power system, particularly on the overall reliability and quality of electrical service to the end user. This effort and follow on contributions are intended to anticipate and explore possible patterns of DER deployment, thereby guiding technical work on microgrids towards the key technical problems. An early example of this process addressed is the question of possible DER adopting customer disconnection. A deployment scenario in which many customers disconnect from their distribution company (disco) entirely leads to a quite different set of technical problems than a scenario in which customers self generate a significant share or all of their on-site electricity requirements and additionally buy and sell energy and ancillary services (AS) locally and/or into wider markets. The exploratory work in this study suggests that the economics under which customers disconnect entirely are unlikely.

  10. Cross Deployment Networking and Systematic Performance Analysis of Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengxian; Song, Min; Yin, Guisheng; Wang, Hongbin; Ma, Xuefei; Song, Houbing

    2017-07-12

    Underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) have become a new hot research area. However, due to the work dynamics and harsh ocean environment, how to obtain an UWSN with the best systematic performance while deploying as few sensor nodes as possible and setting up self-adaptive networking is an urgent problem that needs to be solved. Consequently, sensor deployment, networking, and performance calculation of UWSNs are challenging issues, hence the study in this paper centers on this topic and three relevant methods and models are put forward. Firstly, the normal body-centered cubic lattice to cross body-centered cubic lattice (CBCL) has been improved, and a deployment process and topology generation method are built. Then most importantly, a cross deployment networking method (CDNM) for UWSNs suitable for the underwater environment is proposed. Furthermore, a systematic quar-performance calculation model (SQPCM) is proposed from an integrated perspective, in which the systematic performance of a UWSN includes coverage, connectivity, durability and rapid-reactivity. Besides, measurement models are established based on the relationship between systematic performance and influencing parameters. Finally, the influencing parameters are divided into three types, namely, constraint parameters, device performance and networking parameters. Based on these, a networking parameters adjustment method (NPAM) for optimized systematic performance of UWSNs has been presented. The simulation results demonstrate that the approach proposed in this paper is feasible and efficient in networking and performance calculation of UWSNs.

  11. Testing the Deployment Repeatability of a Precision Deployable Boom Prototype for the Proposed SWOT Karin Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnes, Gregory S.; Waldman, Jeff; Hughes, Richard; Peterson, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's proposed Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, scheduled to launch in 2020, would provide critical information about Earth's oceans, ocean circulation, fresh water storage, and river discharge. The mission concept calls for a dual-antenna Ka-band radar interferometer instrument, known as KaRIn, that would map the height of water globally along two 50 km wide swaths. The KaRIn antennas, which would be separated by 10 meters on either side of the spacecraft, would need to be precisely deployable in order to meet demanding pointing requirements. Consequently, an effort was undertaken to design build and prototype a precision deployable Mast for the KaRIn instrument. Each mast was 4.5-m long with a required dilitation stability of 2.5 microns over 3 minutes. It required a minimum first mode of 7 Hz. Deployment repeatability was less than +/- 7 arcsec in all three rotation directions. Overall mass could not exceed 41.5 Kg including any actuators and thermal blanketing. This set of requirements meant the boom had to be three times lighter and two orders of magnitude more precise than the existing state of the art for deployable booms.

  12. Rapid Deployment of International Tele-Intensive Care Unit Services in War-Torn Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moughrabieh, Anas; Weinert, Craig

    2016-02-01

    The conflict in Syria has created the largest humanitarian emergency of the twenty-first century. The 4-year Syrian conflict has destroyed hospitals and severely reduced the capacity of intensive care units (ICUs) and on-site intensivists. The crisis has triggered attempts from abroad to support the medical care of severely injured and acutely ill civilians inside Syria, including application of telemedicine. Within the United States, tele-ICU programs have been operating for more than a decade, albeit with high start-up costs and generally long development times. With the benefit of lessons drawn from those domestic models, the Syria Tele-ICU program was launched in December 2012 to manage the care of ICU patients in parts of Syria by using inexpensive, off-the-shelf video cameras, free social media applications, and a volunteer network of Arabic-speaking intensivists in North America and Europe. Within 1 year, 90 patients per month in three ICUs were receiving tele-ICU services. At the end of 2015, a network of approximately 20 participating intensivists was providing clinical decision support 24 hours per day to five civilian ICUs in Syria. The volunteer clinicians manage patients at a distance of more than 6,000 miles, separated by seven or eight time zones between North America and Syria. The program is implementing a cloud-based electronic medical record for physician documentation and a medication administration record for nurses. There are virtual chat rooms for patient rounds, radiology review, and trainee teaching. The early success of the program shows how a small number of committed physicians can use inexpensive equipment spawned by the Internet revolution to support from afar civilian health care delivery in a high-conflict country.

  13. Rapid Deployment of International Tele–Intensive Care Unit Services in War-Torn Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moughrabieh, Anas

    2016-01-01

    The conflict in Syria has created the largest humanitarian emergency of the twenty-first century. The 4-year Syrian conflict has destroyed hospitals and severely reduced the capacity of intensive care units (ICUs) and on-site intensivists. The crisis has triggered attempts from abroad to support the medical care of severely injured and acutely ill civilians inside Syria, including application of telemedicine. Within the United States, tele-ICU programs have been operating for more than a decade, albeit with high start-up costs and generally long development times. With the benefit of lessons drawn from those domestic models, the Syria Tele-ICU program was launched in December 2012 to manage the care of ICU patients in parts of Syria by using inexpensive, off-the-shelf video cameras, free social media applications, and a volunteer network of Arabic-speaking intensivists in North America and Europe. Within 1 year, 90 patients per month in three ICUs were receiving tele-ICU services. At the end of 2015, a network of approximately 20 participating intensivists was providing clinical decision support 24 hours per day to five civilian ICUs in Syria. The volunteer clinicians manage patients at a distance of more than 6,000 miles, separated by seven or eight time zones between North America and Syria. The program is implementing a cloud-based electronic medical record for physician documentation and a medication administration record for nurses. There are virtual chat rooms for patient rounds, radiology review, and trainee teaching. The early success of the program shows how a small number of committed physicians can use inexpensive equipment spawned by the Internet revolution to support from afar civilian health care delivery in a high-conflict country. PMID:26788827

  14. Rapidly Deployable Security System Final Report CRADA No. TC-2030-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlhepp, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whiteman, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKibben, M. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The ultimate objective of the LEADER and LLNL strategic partnership was to develop and commercialize_a security-based system product and platform for the use in protecting the substantial physical and economic assets of the government and commerce of the United States. The primary goal of this project was to integrate video surveillance hardware developed by LLNL with a security software backbone developed by LEADER. Upon completion of the project, a prototype hardware/software security system that is highly scalable was to be demonstrated.

  15. Reforming Military Command Arrangements: The Case of the Rapid Deployment Joint Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    protected. Organizational theory has identified actions that organizations normally pursue or avoid in order to increase—or at least preserve—their...thesis. See note 1 for details. 85 179. Jeffrey W. Taliaferro, Steven E. Lobell, and Norrin M. Ripsman, “Introduction: Neoclassical Realism, the State...and For- eign Policy,” in Steven E. Lobell, Norrin M. Ripsman and Jeffrey W. Taliaferro, eds., Neoclassical Realism, the State, and Foreign Poli- cy

  16. What was different about exposures reported by male Australian Gulf War veterans for the 1991 Persian Gulf War, compared with exposures reported for other deployments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Deborah C; Sim, Malcolm R; Kelsall, Helen L; Ikin, Jill F; McKenzie, Dean; Forbes, Andrew; Ittak, Peter

    2006-07-01

    This study identified chemical and environmental exposures specifically associated with the 1991 Persian Gulf War. Exposures were self-reported in a postal questionnaire, in the period of 2000-2002, by 1,424 Australian male Persian Gulf War veterans in relation to their 1991 Persian Gulf War deployment and by 625 Persian Gulf War veterans and 514 members of a military comparison group in relation to other active deployments. Six of 28 investigated exposures were experienced more frequently during the Persian Gulf War than during other deployments; these were exposure to smoke (odds ratio [OR], 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 3.0-6.6), exposure to dust (OR, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 2.6-5.3), exposure to chemical warfare agents (OR, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-7.9), use of respiratory protective equipment (OR, 13.6; 95% confidence interval, 7.6-26.8), use of nuclear, chemical, and biological protective suits (OR, 8.9; 95% confidence interval, 5.4-15.4), and entering/inspecting enemy equipment (OR, 3.1; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-4.8). Other chemical and environmental exposures were not specific to the Persian Gulf War deployment but were also reported in relation to other deployments. The number of exposures reported was related to service type and number of deployments but not to age or rank.

  17. Toward the Development and Deployment of Large-Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Conversion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Zhihong; Eden, Mario R.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    In light of the depletion of fossil fuels and the increased daily requirements for liquid fuels and chemicals, CO2 should indeed be regarded as a valuable C-1. additional feedstock for sustainable manufacturing of liquid fuels and chemicals. Development and deployment of CO2 capture and chemical...... conversion processes are among the grand challenges faced by today's scientists and engineers. Very few of the reported CO2 capture and conversion technologies have been employed for industrial installations on a large scale, where high-efficiency, cost/energy-effectiveness, and environmental friendliness...... are three keys factors. The CO2 capture technologies from stationary sources and ambient air based on solvents, solid sorbents, and membranes are discussed first. Transforming CO2 to liquid fuels and chemicals, which are presently produced from petroleum, through thermochemical, electrochemical...

  18. Deployment and post-deployment experiences in OEF/OIF veterans: relationship to gray matter volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L Aupperle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combat-related PTSD has been associated with reduced gray matter volume in regions of the prefrontal and temporal cortex, hippocampus, insula, and amygdala. However, the relationship between gray matter volume and specific deployment and post-deployment experiences has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to delineate how such experiences may contribute to structural brain changes for combat veterans. METHODS: Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom veterans (N = 32 completed magnetic resonance imaging, the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, and Clinical Administered PTSD Scale. Voxel-wise Huber robust multiple regressions were used to quantify the relationship between gray matter volume and deployment experiences (combat experiences, military social support and post-deployment symptoms (PTSD, alcohol use. RESULTS: There was an interaction between severity of combat experiences and military social support for orbitofrontal gyrus gray matter volume. Specifically, individuals with more orbitofrontal gyrus gray matter volume reported less combat experiences and higher unit support. Individuals with more severe PTSD symptoms showed reduced gray matter volume within a large temporal region (inferior temporal and parahippocampal gyrus. CONCLUSIONS: The identified association between unit support and orbitofrontal gyrus volume supports two potential resilience mechanisms to be delineated with future longitudinal studies. First, individuals with larger orbitofrontal gyrus may engage in greater quality of social interactions and thus experience combat as less stressful. Second, individuals who experience greater unit support may preserve a larger orbitofrontal gyrus, serving to "protect" them from aversive consequences of combat.

  19. The effect of military deployment on mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyk-Jensen, Stéphanie; Weatherall, Cecilie Dohlmann; W. Jepsen, Peter

    In this paper we estimate the causal effect of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health. To handle the selection bias problem, we use longitudinal data for deployed and non-deployed eligible men in a difference-in-differences setting. Using pair-wise matching, we impute deployment dates for...... - First evidence relying on administrative records of measures of mental health service use - Significant adverse effects of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health service use.......In this paper we estimate the causal effect of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health. To handle the selection bias problem, we use longitudinal data for deployed and non-deployed eligible men in a difference-in-differences setting. Using pair-wise matching, we impute deployment dates...... for the non-deployed eligible men, and our results hold to various robustness checks. Our administrative records provide objective measures of mental health service use in the form of psychiatric diagnoses and purchase of mental health-related medication. The very rich data makes it possible to control...

  20. Finding Their Way Back In: Family Reintegration Following Guard Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messecar, Deborah C

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe deployed National Guard members' and their families' perceptions of their experience with family reintegration, and the causes and conditions of challenges reintegration presents after deployment. A total of 26 National Guard members and 19 family members participated in individual (n = 22), couples (n = 6), or focus group (n = 17) interviews. In-depth interviews were used to assess needs and maximize input from military families regarding deployment-related experiences and reintegration issues. Qualitative coding and analysis of data were completed using NVivo. Finding their way back in is the key process that the military members must complete to successfully reestablish their desired social connections with the family and reclaim their place within the family. Several conditions shape the degree of challenges with reintegration that veterans and their family will encounter. These include preparation for deployment, length and type of deployment, communication during deployment, and finally, awareness of how deployment changes the military member and the family. Support resources dedicated to providing National Guard members and their families with assistance in preparing for deployments and educating them about the importance of communication during deployment should be maintained and expanded. Broader educational efforts that increase awareness of what to expect regarding how deployment changes the military member and the family are needed. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  1. Perceived effect of deployment on families of UK military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thandi, G; Greenberg, N; Fear, N T; Jones, N

    2017-10-01

    In the UK, little is known about the perceived effects of deployment, on military families, from military personnel in theatre. To investigate military personnel's perceptions of the impact of deployment on intimate relationships and children. Deployed service personnel who were in a relationship, and who had children, completed a survey while deployed on combat operations. Data were taken from four mental health surveys carried out in Iraq in 2009 and Afghanistan in 2010, 2011 and 2014. Among 4265 participants, after adjusting for military and social-demographic covariates, perceiving that deployment had a negative impact on intimate relationships and children was associated with psychological distress, and traumatic stress symptoms. Military personnel who reported being in danger of being injured or killed during deployment, were more likely to report a perceived negative effect of deployment on their intimate relationships. Reservists were less likely to report a perceived negative impact of deployment on their children compared with regulars. Military personnel who themselves planned to separate from their partner were more likely to report psychological distress, and stressors at home. Perceived insufficient support from the Ministry of Defence was associated with poor mental health, and holding a junior rank. Deployed UK military personnel with symptoms of psychological distress, who experienced stressors at home, were especially likely to perceive that their family were inadequately supported by the military. Those planning to separate from their partner were at increased risk of suffering with mental health problems while deployed.

  2. Understanding the elevated suicide risk of female soldiers during deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, A. E.; Gilman, S. E.; Rosellini, A. J.; Stein, M. B.; Bromet, E. J.; Cox, K. L.; Colpe, L. J.; Fullerton, C. S.; Gruber, M. J.; Heeringa, S. G.; Lewandowski-Romps, L.; Little, R. J. A.; Naifeh, J. A.; Nock, M. K.; Sampson, N. A.; Schoenbaum, M.; Ursano, R. J.; Zaslavsky, A. M.; Kessler, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) has found that the proportional elevation in the US Army enlisted soldier suicide rate during deployment (compared with the never-deployed or previously deployed) is significantly higher among women than men, raising the possibility of gender differences in the adverse psychological effects of deployment. Method Person-month survival models based on a consolidated administrative database for active duty enlisted Regular Army soldiers in 2004–2009 (n = 975 057) were used to characterize the gender × deployment interaction predicting suicide. Four explanatory hypotheses were explored involving the proportion of females in each soldier’s occupation, the proportion of same-gender soldiers in each soldier’s unit, whether the soldier reported sexual assault victimization in the previous 12 months, and the soldier’s pre-deployment history of treated mental/behavioral disorders. Results The suicide rate of currently deployed women (14.0/100 000 person-years) was 3.1–3.5 times the rates of other (i.e. never-deployed/previously deployed) women. The suicide rate of currently deployed men (22.6/100 000 person-years) was 0.9–1.2 times the rates of other men. The adjusted (for time trends, sociodemographics, and Army career variables) female:male odds ratio comparing the suicide rates of currently deployed v. other women v. men was 2.8 (95% confidence interval 1.1–6.8), became 2.4 after excluding soldiers with Direct Combat Arms occupations, and remained elevated (in the range 1.9–2.8) after adjusting for the hypothesized explanatory variables. Conclusions These results are valuable in excluding otherwise plausible hypotheses for the elevated suicide rate of deployed women and point to the importance of expanding future research on the psychological challenges of deployment for women. PMID:25359554

  3. Large-N Seismic Deployment at the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.; Snelson, C. M.; Mellors, R. J.; Pitarka, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary project that consists of a series of chemical explosion experiments at the Nevada National Security Site. The goal of SPE is to understand the complicated effect of earth structures on source energy partitioning and seismic wave propagation, develop and validate physics-based monitoring, and ultimately better discriminate low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity. Deployment of a large number of seismic sensors is planned for SPE to image the full 3-D wavefield with about 500 three-component sensors and 500 vertical component sensors. This large-N seismic deployment will operate near the site of SPE-5 shot for about one month, recording the SPE-5 shot, ambient noise, and additional controlled-sources. This presentation focuses on the design of the large-N seismic deployment. We show how we optimized the sensor layout based on the geological structure and experiment goals with a limited number of sensors. In addition, we will also show some preliminary record sections from deployment. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Deploying a knowledge management system for well construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Stephen; Soffried, Klaus; Sousa, Tadeu V. de; Tatro, Matt [Landmark Graphics, Houston, TX (United States); Rocha, Luiz A. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The overall E and P workforce is rapidly aging since companies have been recruiting fewer and fewer new hires. Should such trends continue, we could lose more than half of our current knowledge workers over the next five to seven years as J. W. Gibson pointed out in his article in World Energy. One obvious remedy is to start recruiting more staff, but as older people retire and younger people enter the company, the workforce will become increasingly dominated by inexperienced professionals. Without implementation of an effective knowledge management system, the industry will likely incur costly mistakes in the future. This paper will highlight an advanced software-based solution being designed to successfully offset this continuous drain of intellectual capital to achieve 'Excellence in Drilling'. The solutions concept includes the deployment of an advanced, user-friendly workflow management system within a web-based portal environment to support both well planning and operations. The system provides capabilities for remote access to databases, data input forms, software applications, best practices, lessons learned, technical references, and experts, all within the context of user configurable workflow maps. The integrated system will enable asset teams to work more effectively together and become 'learning organizations' by taking full advantage of the knowledge gained on previous wells during the design of new wells. (author)

  5. [German military surgeons in deployment abroad: life and working conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, T; von Lübken, F; Johann, M; Schreyer, C; Hartmann, V; Kollig, E; Willy, C

    2010-02-01

    Since 1992 the German Bundeswehr has been deployed for securing peace and peacekeeping abroad. Since then 83 German soldiers have been killed and overall 129 wounded in action as of 07.12.2009. In Northern Afghanistan the German Bundeswehr runs a combat support hospital (role 3) in Mazar-e-Sharif providing a multidisciplinary capability profile. Furthermore, there are two role 2 medical treatment facilities for primary surgical trauma care located in Kunduz and Feyzabad. In these role 2 facilities life saving procedures and damage control operations are performed in order to enable rapid evacuation to a higher level of care. Thereby military surgeons are often confronted with various medical and logistic challenges. The German Navy also has two equivalent role 2 medical treatment facilities (Naval Rescue Centers) aboard its two combat support ships (CSS) "Berlin" and "Frankfurt am Main" to support maritime task groups operating worldwide. These floating field hospitals provide an indispensable asset in the medical emergency care of naval operations with difficult space-time factors. Due to the specific operating alliance between CSS and Naval Rescue Center, special operations as well as evacuation and humanitarian missions following disasters near the coastline can be effectively accomplished.

  6. Stochastic Optimization for Nuclear Facility Deployment Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Ross Daniel

    Single-use, low-enriched uranium oxide fuel, consumed through several cycles in a light-water reactor (LWR) before being disposed, has become the dominant source of commercial-scale nuclear electric generation in the United States and throughout the world. However, it is not without its drawbacks and is not the only potential nuclear fuel cycle available. Numerous alternative fuel cycles have been proposed at various times which, through the use of different reactor and recycling technologies, offer to counteract many of the perceived shortcomings with regards to waste management, resource utilization, and proliferation resistance. However, due to the varying maturity levels of these technologies, the complicated material flow feedback interactions their use would require, and the large capital investments in the current technology, one should not deploy these advanced designs without first investigating the potential costs and benefits of so doing. As the interactions among these systems can be complicated, and the ways in which they may be deployed are many, the application of automated numerical optimization to the simulation of the fuel cycle could potentially be of great benefit to researchers and interested policy planners. To investigate the potential of these methods, a computational program has been developed that applies a parallel, multi-objective simulated annealing algorithm to a computational optimization problem defined by a library of relevant objective functions applied to the Ver ifiable Fuel Cycle Simulati on Model (VISION, developed at the Idaho National Laboratory). The VISION model, when given a specified fuel cycle deployment scenario, computes the numbers and types of, and construction, operation, and utilization schedules for, the nuclear facilities required to meet a predetermined electric power demand function. Additionally, it calculates the location and composition of the nuclear fuels within the fuel cycle, from initial mining through

  7. Scientific data management challenges, technology and deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Rotem, Doron

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with the volume, complexity, and diversity of data currently being generated by scientific experiments and simulations often causes scientists to waste productive time. Scientific Data Management: Challenges, Technology, and Deployment describes cutting-edge technologies and solutions for managing and analyzing vast amounts of data, helping scientists focus on their scientific goals. The book begins with coverage of efficient storage systems, discussing how to write and read large volumes of data without slowing the simulation, analysis, or visualization processes. It then focuses on the efficient data movement and management of storage spaces and explores emerging database systems for scientific data. The book also addresses how to best organize data for analysis purposes, how to effectively conduct searches over large datasets, how to successfully automate multistep scientific process workflows, and how to automatically collect metadata and lineage information. This book provides a comprehensive u...

  8. OpenFlow Deployment and Concept Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Hegr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Terms such as SDN and OpenFlow (OF are often used in the research and development of data networks. This paper deals with the analysis of the current state of OpenFlow protocol deployment options as it is the only real representative protocol that enables the implementation of Software Defined Networking outside an academic world. There is introduced an insight into the current state of the OpenFlow specification development at various levels is introduced. The possible limitations associated with this concept in conjunction with the latest version (1.3 of the specification published by ONF are also presented. In the conclusion there presented a demonstrative security application addressing the lack of IPv6 support in real network devices since most of today's switches and controllers support only OF v1.0.

  9. Reconfigurability Function Deployment in Software Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian BRAD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the forthcoming highly dynamic and complex business environment high-speed and cost-effective development of software applications for targeting a precise, unique and momentary set of requirements (no more-no less associated to a customized business case will bring sig-nificant benefits both for producers and users. This requires a life cycle change-oriented ap-proach in software development. In this respect, designing software with intrinsic evolutionary resources for reconfiguration represents the sound approach. A methodology for concurrent deployment of reconfigurability characteristics in software applications is introduced in this paper. Its potential is exemplified in a case study dealing with web-based software tools to support systematic product innovation projects.

  10. Modeling thermal burns due to airbag deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, G N; Sidhu, H S

    2005-12-01

    Automotive airbags are now a widely accepted safety measure designed to reduce morbidity associated with motor vehicle accidents. Their usage is increasing with multiple airbags (driver, passenger and side curtain) being fitted to many vehicles. However the deployment of airbags has been identified as causing injuries in some instances including minor burns. There are three mechanisms for thermal burns due to an airbag; contact with the hot expelled gases from the airbag, contact with the hot airbag itself and melting of clothing from either of these contacts. A mathematical model is used here to predict the likelihood and severity of the first two types of burns. It is shown that direct contact with high temperature exhaust gases venting from the airbag can indeed lead to burns and that burns from contacting the hot airbag material are possible but far less likely to occur.

  11. ROSMOD: A Toolsuite for Modeling, Generating, Deploying, and Managing Distributed Real-time Component-based Software using ROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Srinivas Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Robot Operating System Model-driven development tool suite, (ROSMOD an integrated development environment for rapid prototyping component-based software for the Robot Operating System (ROS middleware. ROSMOD is well suited for the design, development and deployment of large-scale distributed applications on embedded devices. We present the various features of ROSMOD including the modeling language, the graphical user interface, code generators, and deployment infrastructure. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with a real-world case study: an Autonomous Ground Support Equipment (AGSE robot that was designed and prototyped using ROSMOD for the NASA Student Launch competition, 2014–2015.

  12. Airbag deployment-related eye injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koisaari, Tapio; Leivo, Tiina; Sahraravand, Ahmad; Haavisto, Anna-Kaisa; Sulander, Pekka; Tervo, Timo M T

    2017-07-04

    We studied the correlation between airbag deployment and eye injuries using 2 different data sets. The registry of the Finnish Road Accident (FRA) Investigation Teams was analyzed to study severe head- and eyewear-related injuries. All fatal passenger car or van accidents that occurred during the years 2009-2012 (4 years) were included (n = 734). Cases in which the driver's front airbag was deployed were subjected to analysis (n = 409). To determine the proportion of minor, potentially airbag-related eye injuries, the results were compared to the data for all new eye injury patients (n = 1,151) recorded at the Emergency Clinic of the Helsinki University Eye Hospital (HUEH) during one year, from May 1, 2011, to April 30, 2012. In the FRA data set, the unbelted drivers showed a significantly higher risk of death (odds ratio [OR] = 5.89, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.33-10.9, P = 2.6E-12) or of sustaining head injuries (OR = 2.50, 95% CI, 1.59-3.97, P = 3.8E-5). Only 4 of the 1,151 HUEH patients were involved in a passenger car accident. In one of the crashes, the airbag operated, and the belted driver received 2 sutured eye lid wounds and showed conjunctival sugillation. No permanent eye injuries were recorded during the follow-up. The calculated annual airbag-related eye injury incidence was less than 1/1,000,000 people, 4/100,000 accidents, and 4/10,000 injured occupants. Airbag-related eye injuries occurred very rarely in car accidents in cases where the occupant survived and the restraint system was appropriately used. Spectacle use did not appear to increase the risk of eye injury in restrained occupants.

  13. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  14. A new digestion and chemical separation technique for rapid and highly reproducible determination of Lu/Hf and Hf isotope ratios in geological materials by mc-ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Baker, J.A.; Ulfbeck, D.

    2003-01-01

    A new digestion procedure and chemical separation technique has been developed for measurement of Lu/Hf and Hf isotope ratios that does not require high-pressure bombs or use of HF or HClO acids. Samples are digested in dilute HCl or HNO after flux-fusion at 1100 °C in the presence of lithium...

  15. A report on FY06 IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang

    2006-06-01

    Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. IPv6 deployment in government network backbones has been mandated to occur by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories' network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint, work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

  16. The I2000, a deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft, leaves the gro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft leaves the ground during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  17. Engineers Jim Murray and Joe Pahle prepare a deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator exp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Engineers Jim Murray and Joe Pahle prepare a deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment flown by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  18. The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft looks good during a flig

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft looks good during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  19. The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft maintains a steady attit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft maintains a steady attitude following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  20. Inflatable Wing project personnel prepare a deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator expe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Inflatable Wing project personnel prepare a deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment flown by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  1. An Innovative Design of a Microtab Deployment Mechanism for Active Aerodynamic Load Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chang Tsai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an innovative design of a microtab system for aerodynamic load control on horizontal-axis wind-turbine rotors. Microtabs are small devices located near the trailing edge of the rotor blades and enable a rapid increase or decrease of the lift force through deployment of the tabs on the pressure or suction side of the airfoil, respectively. The new system has been designed to replace an earlier linearly-actuated microtab mechanism whose performance was limited by space restrictions and stiction. The newly-designed microtab system is based on a four-bar linkage that overcomes the two drawbacks. Its improved kinematics allows for the tab height to increase from 1.0% to 1.7% of the airfoil chord when fully deployed, thereby making it more effective in terms of aerodynamic load control. Furthermore, the modified four-bar link mechanism provides a more robust and reliable mechanical structure.

  2. The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Cosmo, Mario L.; Estes, Robert D.; Sanmartin, Juan; Pelaez, Jesus; Ruiz, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    This Final Report covers the following main topics: 1) Brief Description of ProSEDS; 2) Mission Analysis; 3) Dynamics Reference Mission; 4) Dynamics Stability; 5) Deployment Control; 6) Updated System Performance; 7) Updated Mission Analysis; 8) Updated Dynamics Reference Mission; 9) Updated Deployment Control Profiles and Simulations; 10) Updated Reference Mission; 11) Evaluation of Power Delivered by the Tether; 12) Deployment Control Profile Ref. #78 and Simulations; 13) Kalman Filters for Mission Estimation; 14) Analysis/Estimation of Deployment Flight Data; 15) Comparison of ED Tethers and Electrical Thrusters; 16) Dynamics Analysis for Mission Starting at a Lower Altitude; 17) Deployment Performance at a Lower Altitude; 18) Satellite Orbit after a Tether Cut; 19) Deployment with Shorter Dyneema Tether Length; 20) Interactive Software for ED Tethers.

  3. Early identification of posttraumatic stress following military deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Statnikov, Alexander; Andersen, Søren B

    2015-01-01

    by application of machine learning (ML) methods. METHODS: ML feature selection and prediction algorithms were applied to a prospective cohort of 561 Danish soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 to identify unique risk indicators and forecast long-term posttraumatic stress responses. RESULTS: Robust pre......BACKGROUND: Pre-deployment identification of soldiers at risk for long-term posttraumatic stress psychopathology after home coming is important to guide decisions about deployment. Early post-deployment identification can direct early interventions to those in need and thereby prevents...... the development of chronic psychopathology. Both hold significant public health benefits given large numbers of deployed soldiers, but has so far not been achieved. Here, we aim to assess the potential for pre- and early post-deployment prediction of resilience or posttraumatic stress development in soldiers...

  4. Scalable Contents Delivery System with Dynamic Server Deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Yuko Kamiya; Toshihiko Shimokawa; Fuminori Tanizaki; Norihiko Yoshida

    2010-01-01

    On providing broadband contents, to provide enough network bandwidth is an important. Existing Contents Delivery Network has mainly focused on increasing network bandwidth statically. Therefore, it is not flexible. In this paper, we propose Soarin, a novel contents delivery system to increase network bandwidth dynamically by deploying delivery servers in a wide area. Moreover Soarin can use various server deployment policy to deploy delivery servers, it can decide which server is suitable for...

  5. Design and deployment of secure, robust, and resilient SDN Controllers

    OpenAIRE

    Scott-Hayward, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The scale of the Software-Defined Network (SDN) Controller design problem has become apparent with the expansion of SDN deployments. Initial SDN deployments were small-scale, single controller environments for research and usecase testing. Today, enterprise deployments requiring multiple controllers are gathering momentum e.g. Google’s backbone network, Microsoft’s public cloud, and NTT’s edge gateway. Third-party applications are also becoming available e.g. HP SDN App Store. The increase in...

  6. Flight qualification of mortar-actuated parachute deployment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasants, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief discussion outlines background of mortar use in parachute deployment systems. A description of the system operation is presented. Effects of the environment on performance are discussed as well as the instrumentation needed to assess this performance. Power unit qualification and lot qualification for shear pins and cartridges is delineated. Functional mortar system tests are described. Finally, bridle deployment and parachute deployment are discussed.

  7. Missile launch pad: an unusual consequence of airbag deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnie, Davies; Emecheta, Ikechukwu E; Kevin, Hancock

    2011-02-17

    Vehicle airbags significantly reduce vehicle occupant injuries and fatalities in road accidents. However, a number of injuries are recognised as being directly attributable to airbag deployment. The majority of these are blunt injuries due to the high force of airbag deployment and include ocular injuries, burns, chest trauma and, rarely, fatalities. The authors describe a case of mixed blunt ocular and penetrating facial trauma as a result of airbag deployment.

  8. 2D wireless sensor network deployment based on Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliodromitis, Athanasios; Pantazis, George; Vescoukis, Vasileios

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have rapidly evolved and now comprise a powerful tool in monitoring and observation of the natural environment, among other fields. The use of WSNs is critical in early warning systems, which are of high importance today. In fact, WSNs are adopted more and more in various applications, e.g. for fire or deformation detection. The optimum deployment of sensors is a multi-dimensional problem, which has two main components; network and positioning approach. Although lots of work has dealt with the issue, most of it emphasizes on mere network approach (communication, energy consumption) and not on the topography (positioning) of the sensors in achieving ideal geometry. In some cases, it is hard or even impossible to achieve perfect geometry in nodes' deployment. The ideal and desirable scenario of nodes arranged in square or hexagonal grid would raise extremely the cost of the network, especially in unfriendly or hostile environments. In such environments the positions of the sensors have to be chosen among a list of possible points, which in most cases are randomly distributed. This constraint has to be taken under consideration during the WSN planning. Full geographical coverage is in some applications of the same, if not of greater, importance than the network coverage. Cost is a crucial factor at network planning and given that resources are often limited, what matters, is to cover the whole area with the minimum number of sensors. This paper suggests a deployment method for nodes, in large scale and high density WSNs, based on Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation (CVT). It approximates the solution through the geometry of the random points and proposes a deployment plan, for the given characteristics of the study area, in order to achieve a deployment as near as possible to the ideal one.

  9. Concept of Deployable Network Operations Center (DNOC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bordetsky, Alex; Thiry, Jeff; Johnson, Shawn

    2005-01-01

    ...) to support their efforts. Whether co-located or virtual, the DNOC must support tactical units by supplying them with the right information, at the right time, and in the right format. This platform must also provide a rapid, reliable, and secure communications network so forces can collaborate in a manner which builds quality interaction and trust.

  10. Deployment of vendor capabilities and competences throughout the outsourcing process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perunovic, Zoran; Christoffersen, Mads; Mefford, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    utilization of different portfolios of competences (balanced, unit-dominant, and versatile) and capabilities (permanent and temporary) which need to be deployed in the right combination (deployment strategy) adequate for the stage of the industry dynamics in which vendors operate. The research also indicated...... their deployment strategies to new, more dynamic and volatile environments. The paper proposes three different deployment strategies for three different operational contexts. Originality/value - In contrast with the existing static approach towards studying vendor's capabilities in outsourcing, the paper...

  11. Deployment Testing of the De-Orbit Sail Flight Hardware

    OpenAIRE

    Hillebrandt, Martin; Meyer, Sebastian; Zander, Martin; Hühne, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the results of the deployment testing of the De-Orbit Sail flight hardware, a drag sail for de-orbiting applications, performed by DLR. It addresses in particular the deployment tests of the fullscale sail subsystem and deployment force tests performed on the boom deployment module. For the fullscale sail testing a gravity compensation device is used which is described in detail. It allows observations of the in-plane interaction of the booms with the sail membrane and the...

  12. Market and Policy Barriers to Energy Storage Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Currier, Aileen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hernandez, Jacquelynne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ma, Ookie [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Kirby, Brendan [Consultant

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies can provide numerous grid services; there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, cross-cutting barriers and technology barriers.

  13. Multiobjective Shape Optimization for Deployment and Adjustment Properties of Cable-Net of Deployable Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang You

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on structural features of cable-net of deployable antenna, a multiobjective shape optimization method is proposed to help to engineer antenna’s cable-net structure that has better deployment and adjustment properties. In this method, the multiobjective optimum mathematical model is built with lower nodes’ locations of cable-net as variables, the average stress ratio of cable elements and strain energy as objectives, and surface precision and natural frequency of cable-net as constraints. Sequential quadratic programming method is used to solve this nonlinear mathematical model in conditions with different weighting coefficients, and the results show the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method and model.

  14. Six policy actions for accelerated deployment of renewable energy. READy Renewable Energy Action on Deployment. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-03-15

    The READy book presents a kaleidoscope of policy options that have proven to accelerate the deployment of renewable energy technologies, based on experiences around the world at the local and national levels. Lessons learned from successful cases are distilled into six essential action points. Together these categories of policy actions compose the ACTION Star, a guide for taking action now while preparing for growth over the long term.

  15. Swarm Deployable Boom Assembly (DBA) Development of a Deployable Magnetometer Boom for the Swarm Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Paul; Jung, Hans-Juergen; Edwards, Jeff

    2013-09-01

    The Swarm programme consists of 3 magnetically clean satellites flying in close formation designed to measure the Earth's magnetic field using 2 Magnetometers mounted on a 4.3m long deployable boom.Deployment is initiated by releasing 3 HDRMs, once released the boom oscillates back and forth on a pair of pivots, similar to a restaurant kitchen door hinge, for around 120 seconds before coming to rest on 3 kinematic mounts which are used to provide an accurate reference location in the deployed position. Motion of the boom is damped through a combination of friction, spring hysteresis and flexing of the 120+ cables crossing the hinge. Considerable development work and accurate numerical modelling of the hinge motion was required to predict performance across a wide temperature range and ensure that during the 1st overshoot the boom did not damage itself, the harness or the spacecraft.Due to the magnetic cleanliness requirements of the spacecraft no magnetic materials could be used in the design of the hardware.

  16. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2011-11-08

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are beinglhave been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan [1]. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2012-01-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are being/have been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  18. Technology Deployment Annual Report 2014 December

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arterburn, George K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report is a summary of key Technology Deployment activities and achievements for 2014, including intellectual property, granted copyrights, royalties, license agreements, CRADAs, WFOs and Technology-Based Economic Development. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. INL employees also work cooperatively with researchers and technical staff from the university and industrial sectors to further develop emerging technologies. In our multinational global economy, INL is contributing to the development of the next generation of engineers and scientists by licensing software to educational instiutitons throughout the world. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically

  19. Lightweight Deployable Mirrors with Tensegrity Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiders, Glenn W.; Bradford, Larry J.; Cleve, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    The upper part of Figure 1 shows a small-scale prototype of a developmental class of lightweight, deployable structures that would support panels in precise alignments. In this case, the panel is hexagonal and supports disks that represent segments of a primary mirror of a large telescope. The lower part of Figure 1 shows a complete conceptual structure containing multiple hexagonal panels that hold mirror segments. The structures of this class are of the tensegrity type, which was invented five decades ago by artist Kenneth Snelson. A tensegrity structure consists of momentfree compression members (struts) and tension members (cables). The structures of this particular developmental class are intended primarily as means to erect large segmented primary mirrors of astronomical telescopes or large radio antennas in outer space. Other classes of tensegrity structures could also be designed for terrestrial use as towers, masts, and supports for general structural panels. An important product of the present development effort is the engineering practice of building a lightweight, deployable structure as an assembly of tensegrity modules like the one shown in Figure 2. This module comprises two octahedral tensegrity subunits that are mirror images of each other joined at their plane of mirror symmetry. In this case, the plane of mirror symmetry is both the upper plane of the lower subunit and the lower plane of the upper subunit, and is delineated by the midheight triangle in Figure 2. In the configuration assumed by the module to balance static forces under mild loading, the upper and lower planes of each sub-unit are rotated about 30 , relative to each other, about the long (vertical) axis of the structure. Larger structures can be assembled by joining multiple modules like this one at their sides or ends. When the module is compressed axially (vertically), the first-order effect is an increase in the rotation angle, but by virtue of the mirror arrangement, the net

  20. Transportation Deployment; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    Automakers, commercial fleet operators, component manufacturers, and government agencies all turn to the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to help put more green vehicles on the road. The lab’s independent analysis and evaluation pinpoint fuel-efficient and low-emission strategies to support economic and operational goals, while breaking down barriers to widespread adoption. Customized assessment of existing equipment and practices, energy-saving alternatives, operational considerations, and marketplace realities factor in the multitude of variables needed to ensure meaningful performance, financial, and environmental benefits. NREL provides integrated, unbiased, 360-degree sustainable transportation deployment expertise encompassing alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and related infrastructure. Hands-on support comes from technical experts experienced in advanced vehicle technologies, fleet operations, and field data collection coupled with extensive modeling and analysis capabilities. The lab’s research team works closely with automakers and vehicle equipment manufacturers to test, analyze, develop, and evaluate high-performance fuel-efficient technologies that meet marketplace needs.

  1. Methods for deploying ultra-clean detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Alexis

    2008-04-01

    Next-generation underground experiments, such as searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter experiments, will perform high-sensitivity measurements that require extremely low backgrounds. The Majo-ra-na Collaboration ootnotetextF.T. Avignone III (2007) arXiv:0711.4808v1 proposes such an experiment to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay using an array of germanium crystals enriched in ^76Ge. The design of the Majo-ra-na experiment must minimize backgrounds while meeting criteria for electrical signal quality, structural integrity, and thermal cooling characteristics. Recent work has addressed detector deployment in ultra low-background environments. Advances have been made in fabrication of radiologically pure copper parts. Prototype designs for detector support structures reduce backgrounds by minimizing component mass and making use of ultra-pure materials. This talk will describe the design and use of cryostat test-stands to investigate the performance of prototype designs for detector strings. While Majo-ra-na uses germanium detectors, the design considerations and progress made by the collaboration are applicable to other detector technologies and fields of research.

  2. Rapid detection of fluoride in potable water using a novel fluorogenic compound 7-O-tert-butyldiphenylsilyl-4-methylcoumarin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Chavali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we have synthesized a new water soluble colorless chemical compound 7-O-tert-butyldiphenylsilyl-4-methylcoumarin (TBDPSC that releases fluorescent molecules imparting blue fluorescence to the solution, upon interaction with fluoride ions in water. The blue fluorescence can be visualized using simple hand held ultraviolet (UV lamps. TBDPSC has excellent sensitivity and selectivity towards fluoride and our results indicate that fluoride concentrations as low as 0.2 mg/L can be accurately detected within a few seconds. Fluoride testing with TBDPSC is simple and rapid compared to the conventional methodologies without the requirement of trained personnel. Hence, the present fluoride detection method can be easily field deployable and particularly useful for monitoring water quality in limited resource communities.

  3. Deployment Technology of a Heliogyro Solar Sail for Long Duration Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerawan, Wiwattananon; Bryant, Robert G.; Edmonson, William W.; Moore, William B.; Bell, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary, multi-mission, station-keeping capabilities will require that a spacecraft employ a highly efficient propulsion-navigation system. The majority of space propulsion systems are fuel-based and require the vehicle to carry and consume fuel as part of the mission. Once the fuel is consumed, the mission is set, thereby limiting the potential capability. Alternatively, a method that derives its acceleration and direction from solar photon pressure using a solar sail would eliminate the requirement of onboard fuel to meet mission objectives. MacNeal theorized that the heliogyro-configured solar sail architecture would be lighter, less complex, cheaper, and less risky to deploy a large sail area versus a masted sail. As sail size increases, the masted sail requires longer booms resulting in increased mass, and chaotic uncontrollable deployment. With a heliogyro, the sail membrane is stowed as a roll of thin film forming a blade when deployed that can extend up to kilometers. Thus, a benefit of using a heliogyro-configured solar sail propulsion technology is the mission scalability as compared to masted versions, which are size constrained. Studies have shown that interplanetary travel is achievable by the heliogyro solar sail concept. Heliogyro solar sail concept also enables multi-mission missions such as sample returns, and supply transportation from Earth to Mars as well as station-keeping missions to provide enhanced warning of solar storm. This paper describes deployment technology being developed at NASA Langley Research Center to deploy and control the center-of-mass/center-of-pressure using a twin bladed heliogyro solar sail 6-unit (6U) CubeSat. The 6U comprises 2x2U blade deployers and 2U for payload. The 2U blade deployers can be mounted to 6U or larger scaled systems to serve as a non-chemical in-space propulsion system. A single solar sail blade length is estimated to be 2.4 km with a total area from two blades of 720 m2; total allowable weight

  4. Innovative Defense Acquisition Concept Deployer Equipment Bundle (DEB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    METHODOLOGY This project reviewed a substantial amount of literature , to include applicable concept plans, memorandums, cost benefit analyses, organizational...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT INNOVATIVE DEFENSE ACQUISITION CONCEPT DEPLOYER...ACQUISITION CONCEPT DEPLOYER EQUIPMENT BUNDLE (DEB) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Frederic Albesa, Isaac J. Ortman, and Stephen F. Kirouac 7

  5. 78 FR 77550 - Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... Federal Highway Administration Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants AGENCY: Federal... is extending the application period for the Integrated Corridor Management Deployment Planning Grants... questions, please contact Adam Sleeter, Attorney Advisor, FHWA Office of the Chief Counsel, (202) 366-8839...

  6. Dengue Virus Exposures Among Deployed U.S. Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Elisabeth M.; Martinez, Luis J.; Jarman, Richard G.; Lyons, Arthur G.; Eckels, Kenneth H.; De La Barrera, Rafael A.; Thomas, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Dengue virus infections have adversely impacted U.S. military operations since the Spanish–American War. The erosion of mission capabilities and lost duty days are underestimated. Appreciating the incidence and prevalence of dengue infections in U.S. military personnel is important to inform disease prevention strategies. Banked pre- and post-deployment serum samples from 1,000 U.S. military personnel with a single deployment to a dengue-endemic region were tested using a screening microneutralization assay to detect anti-dengue-virus-neutralizing antibodies. A total of 76 (7.6%) post-deployment samples were positive and 15 of the pre-deployment samples were negative. These figures represent an infection incidence of 1.5% and total of 17.6 seroconversions per 10,000 deployment months. These data represent a deploying military population with a relatively high background rate of dengue seropositivity, a low level of infection during deployment compared with background infection rates in the local populations, and the potential for worsening clinical attack rates with increased frequency of deployment. Additional studies are required to more clearly elucidate the dengue infection and disease risk in U.S. military personnel. PMID:28193746

  7. Longitudinal measures of hostility in deployed military personnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesink, Lieke; Rademaker, Arthur; Vermetten, Eric; Geuze, Elbert; Kleber, Rolf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069316929

    2015-01-01

    Increases in anger and hostility are commonly found after military deployment. However, it is unknown how anger and hostility develop over time, and which veterans are more at risk for developing these complaints. Data of 745 veterans one month before deployment to Afghanistan and one, six, twelve

  8. Post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology workstation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; Dierckx, Rudi; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van Ooijen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usability of a radiology workstation after deployment in a hospital. Significance In radiology, it is difficult to perform valid pre-deployment usability evaluations due to the heterogeneity of the user group, the complexity of the radiological workflow, and the complexity

  9. The Impact of Deployment on U.S. Military Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Sean C.; Malatras, Jennifer Weil; Israel, Allen C.

    2010-01-01

    Several recent articles have explored the effects of military deployment on U.S. service members' mental health outcomes. Although increased attention has also begun to focus on the effects of deployment on military families, providing a conceptualization for the mechanisms of this process can help organize existing information and inform future…

  10. Educators Supporting Families in Times of Crisis: Military Reserve Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Judy; Vannest, Kimberly J.

    2008-01-01

    With the large number of National Guard members and reservists being deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, public educators find themselves endeavoring to support the emotional and academic needs of military children and their families. Military children may exhibit behavioral and emotional difficulties during these deployments. Educator awareness of…

  11. Is Military Deployment a Risk Factor for Maternal Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Nielsen PE, Deering SH. Effects of deployment on depression screening scores in pregnancy at an Army military treatment facility. Obstet Gynecol 2010;116...children and pediatricians. Curr Opin Pediatr 1994;6:525–529. Address correspondence to: Cynthia A. LeardMann, MPH Department of Deployment Health

  12. Release and deployment at Planon: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Jansen (Remy); G.C. Ballintijn (Gerco); S. Brinkkemper

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis case study report describes the research results of a case study at Planon into the processes of development, release, and deployment. The research was done to document the release and deployment processes at Planon, to uncover strengths and weaknesses in these processes, and to

  13. Release and Deployment at Planon: A Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.R.L.; Ballintijn, G.; Brinkkemper, S.

    2005-01-01

    This case study report describes the research results of a case study at Planon into the processes of development, release, and deployment. The research was done to document the release and deployment processes at Planon, to uncover strengths and weaknesses in these processes, and to compare

  14. Accommodating Thickness in Origami-Based Deployable Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirbel, Shannon A.; Magleby, Spencer P.; Howell, Larry L.; Lang, Robert J.; Thomson, Mark W.; Sigel, Deborah A.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Trease, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to create deployment systems with a large ratio of stowed-to-deployed diameter. Deployment from a compact form to a final flat state can be achieved through origami-inspired folding of panels. There are many models capable of this motion when folded in a material with negligible thickness; however, when the application requires the folding of thick, rigid panels, attention must be paid to the effect of material thickness not only on the final folded state, but also during the folding motion (i.e., the panels must not be required to flex to attain the final folded form). The objective is to develop new methods for deployment from a compact folded form to a large circular array (or other final form). This paper describes a mathematical model for modifying the pattern to accommodate material thickness in the context of the design, modeling, and testing of a deployable system inspired by an origami six-sided flasher model. The model is demonstrated in hardware as a 1/20th scale prototype of a deployable solar array for space applications. The resulting prototype has a ratio of stowed-to-deployed diameter of 9.2 (or 1.25 m deployed outer diameter to 0.136 m stowed outer diameter).

  15. Dengue Virus Exposures Among Deployed U.S. Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Elisabeth M; Martinez, Luis J; Jarman, Richard G; Lyons, Arthur G; Eckels, Kenneth H; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Thomas, Stephen J

    2017-05-01

    AbstractDengue virus infections have adversely impacted U.S. military operations since the Spanish-American War. The erosion of mission capabilities and lost duty days are underestimated. Appreciating the incidence and prevalence of dengue infections in U.S. military personnel is important to inform disease prevention strategies. Banked pre- and post-deployment serum samples from 1,000 U.S. military personnel with a single deployment to a dengue-endemic region were tested using a screening microneutralization assay to detect anti-dengue-virus-neutralizing antibodies. A total of 76 (7.6%) post-deployment samples were positive and 15 of the pre-deployment samples were negative. These figures represent an infection incidence of 1.5% and total of 17.6 seroconversions per 10,000 deployment months. These data represent a deploying military population with a relatively high background rate of dengue seropositivity, a low level of infection during deployment compared with background infection rates in the local populations, and the potential for worsening clinical attack rates with increased frequency of deployment. Additional studies are required to more clearly elucidate the dengue infection and disease risk in U.S. military personnel.

  16. Integrating place-specific livelihood and equity outcomes into global assessments of bioenergy deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creutzig, Felix; Corbera, Esteve; Bolwig, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Integrated assessment models suggest that the large-scale deployment of bioenergy could contribute to ambitious climate change mitigation efforts. However, such a shift would intensify the global competition for land, with possible consequences for 1.5 billion smallholder livelihoods....... However, a rapidly developing body of social science literature is advancing the understanding of these interactions. In this letter we link human geography research on the interaction between biofuel crops and livelihoods in developing countries to integrated assessments on biofuels. We review case...

  17. Enabling rapid behavioral ecotoxicity studies using an integrated lab-on-a-chip systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yushi; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-12-01

    Behavioral ecotoxicity tests are gaining an increasing recognition in environmental toxicology. Behavior of sensitive bioindicator species can change rapidly in response to an acute exposure to contaminants and thus has a much higher sensitivity as compared to conventional LC50 mortality tests. Furthermore, behavioral endpoints seems to be very good candidates to develop early-warning biomonitoring systems needed for rapid chemical risk assessment. Behavioral tests are non-invasive, fast, do not harm indicator organisms (behavioural changes are very rapid) and are thus fully compatible with 3R (Replacement - Reduction - Refinement) principle encouraging alternatives to conventional animal testing. These characteristics are essential when designing improved ecotoxicity tests for chemical risk assessment. In this work, we present a pilot development of miniaturized Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices for studying toxin avoidance behaviors of small aquatic crustaceans. As an investigative tool, LOCs represent a new direction that may miniaturize and revolutionize behavioral ecotoxicology. Specifically our innovative microfluidic prototype: (i) enables convening "caging" of specimens for real-time videomicroscopy; (ii) eliminates the evaporative water loss thus providing an opportunity for long-term behavioral studies; (iii) exploits laminar fluid flow under low Reynolds numbers to generate discrete domains and gradients enabling for the first time toxin avoidance studies on small aquatic crustaceans; (iv) integrates off-the-chip mechatronic interfaces and video analysis algorithms for single animal movement analysis. We provide evidence that by merging innovative bioelectronic and biomicrofluidic technologies we can deploy inexpensive and reliable systems for culture, electronic tracking and complex computational analysis of behavior of bioindicator organisms.

  18. Clinical Predictive Modeling Development and Deployment through FHIR Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilia, Mohammed; Choi, Myung; Henderson, Amelia; Iyengar, Sneha; Braunstein, Mark; Sun, Jimeng

    2015-01-01

    Clinical predictive modeling involves two challenging tasks: model development and model deployment. In this paper we demonstrate a software architecture for developing and deploying clinical predictive models using web services via the Health Level 7 (HL7) Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard. The services enable model development using electronic health records (EHRs) stored in OMOP CDM databases and model deployment for scoring individual patients through FHIR resources. The MIMIC2 ICU dataset and a synthetic outpatient dataset were transformed into OMOP CDM databases for predictive model development. The resulting predictive models are deployed as FHIR resources, which receive requests of patient information, perform prediction against the deployed predictive model and respond with prediction scores. To assess the practicality of this approach we evaluated the response and prediction time of the FHIR modeling web services. We found the system to be reasonably fast with one second total response time per patient prediction. PMID:26958207

  19. Military deployment and reintegration: a systematic review of child coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Utu, Cindy F; DeSocio, Janiece E

    2015-02-01

    Child coping with parent military deployment and family reintegration. A systematic review of research literature was conducted to examine the effects of deployment and family reintegration on children in military families. A search of CINAHL, PubMed, Psyc-INFO, and SocINDEX databases was performed using the terms "military family," "military child," "child coping," "deployment," and "reintegration." The search was limited to publications between 2001 and 2014 to focus on the effects of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), and Operation New Dawn (OND). Twenty-seven research reports met inclusion criteria. Three themes were extracted: A child's coping is influenced by (a) the child's age and development, (b) the mental health and coping of the non-deployed parent during deployment, and the mental health of both parents during family reintegration, and (c) the pre-existing resilience/vulnerability, cumulative risks, and resources of the child and family. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Clinical Predictive Modeling Development and Deployment through FHIR Web Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilia, Mohammed; Choi, Myung; Henderson, Amelia; Iyengar, Sneha; Braunstein, Mark; Sun, Jimeng

    2015-01-01

    Clinical predictive modeling involves two challenging tasks: model development and model deployment. In this paper we demonstrate a software architecture for developing and deploying clinical predictive models using web services via the Health Level 7 (HL7) Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard. The services enable model development using electronic health records (EHRs) stored in OMOP CDM databases and model deployment for scoring individual patients through FHIR resources. The MIMIC2 ICU dataset and a synthetic outpatient dataset were transformed into OMOP CDM databases for predictive model development. The resulting predictive models are deployed as FHIR resources, which receive requests of patient information, perform prediction against the deployed predictive model and respond with prediction scores. To assess the practicality of this approach we evaluated the response and prediction time of the FHIR modeling web services. We found the system to be reasonably fast with one second total response time per patient prediction.

  1. Heterogeneous Deployment Analysis for Cost-Effective Mobile Network Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coletti, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    -powered base stations is a promising cost-effective solution to considerably enhance user experience. In such a network topology, which is denoted as heterogeneous deployment, the macro layer is expected to provide wider coverage but lower average data speeds whereas small cells are targeted at extending...... network coverage and boosting network capacity in traffic hot-spot areas. The thesis deals with the deployment of both outdoor small cells and indoor femto cells. Amongst the outdoor solution, particular emphasis is put on relay base stations as backhaul costs can be reduced by utilizing LTE spectrum...... statistical models of deployment areas, the performance analysis is carried out in the form of operator case studies for large-scale deployment scenarios, including realistic macro network layouts and inhomogeneous spatial traffic distributions. Deployment of small cells is performed by means of proposed...

  2. The effects of military deployment on early child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dana R; Ee, Juliana; Berry-Cabán, Cristobal S; Hoedebecke, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this observational, point prevalence study is to determine if parental deployment affects the cognitive, social and emotional development of preschool age children in the military family. Demographic information was collected and an age-appropriate Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ-3) and Ages and Stages Social-Emotional Inventory (ASQ:SE) were administered. The primary outcome measure was the failure rates on the developmental instruments. We identified 151 parents of eligible children; 95 children had a parent that deployed during their lifetime. We found a significant difference in ASQ-3 failure rates for children in the deployed group compared to those in the nondeployed group. Children of deployed parents were at least twice as often to fail the ASQ-3 or ASQ:SE developmental screen compared to children whose parents did not deploy. 30.5% of children in the deployed group failed the ASQ-3 screen while 12.5% of children who did not have a deployed parent failed (P=.009). On the ASQ:SE developmental screen, 16.8% of children who had a parent deploy failed versus 5.4% of children who did not have a parent deploy (P=.031). This study suggests that parental deployment is related to adverse risk for developmental delays in children in military families. The psychological burden on military children could be life-long or require significant resources to address. These adverse outcomes could be possibly mitigated by early detection of developmental delay and firm attention to aggressive screening techniques in military communities.

  3. Technology Deployment Annual Report 2013 December

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2014-01-01

    available to the INL’s Office of Technology Deployment. However, the accomplishments cataloged in the report reflect the achievements and creativity of the researchers, technicians, support staff, and operators of the INL workforce.

  4. A report on IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories:FY2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang; Maestas, Joseph H.

    2007-06-01

    Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. As the emerging Internet network protocol, SNL needs to prepare for its eventual deployment in international, national, customer, and local networks. Additionally, the United States Office of Management and Budget has mandated that IPv6 deployment in government network backbones occurs by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution, the Communication & Network Systems, and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

  5. Rapid mixing kinetic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen R; Schilstra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Almost all of the elementary steps in a biochemical reaction scheme are either unimolecular or bimolecular processes that frequently occur on sub-second, often sub-millisecond, time scales. The traditional approach in kinetic studies is to mix two or more reagents and monitor the changes in concentrations with time. Conventional spectrophotometers cannot generally be used to study reactions that are complete within less than about 20 s, as it takes that amount of time to manually mix the reagents and activate the instrument. Rapid mixing techniques, which generally achieve mixing in less than 2 ms, overcome this limitation. This chapter is concerned with the use of these techniques in the study of reactions which reach equilibrium; the application of these methods to the study of enzyme kinetics is described in several excellent texts (Cornish-Bowden, Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics. Portland Press, 1995; Gutfreund, Kinetics for the life sciences. Receptors, transmitters and catalysis. Cambridge University Press, 1995).There are various ways to monitor changes in concentration of reactants, intermediates and products after mixing, but the most common way is to use changes in optical signals (absorbance or fluorescence) which often accompany reactions. Although absorbance can sometimes be used, fluorescence is often preferred because of its greater sensitivity, particularly in monitoring conformational changes. Such methods are continuous with good time resolution but they seldom permit the direct determination of the concentrations of individual species. Alternatively, samples may be taken from the reaction volume, mixed with a chemical quenching agent to stop the reaction, and their contents assessed by techniques such as HPLC. These methods can directly determine the concentrations of different species, but are discontinuous and have a limited time resolution.

  6. The psychosocial effects of deployment on military children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flake, Eric M; Davis, Beth Ellen; Johnson, Patti L; Middleton, Laura S

    2009-08-01

    The impact of the Global War on Terror on two million U.S. military children remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to describe the psychosocial profile of school age children during parental deployment utilizing standardized psychosocial health and stress measures, and to identify predictors of children at "high risk" for psychosocial morbidity during wartime deployment. Army spouses with a deployed service member and a child aged 5-12 years completed a deployment packet consisting of demographic and psychosocial questions. The psychosocial health measures included the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC), the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form and the Perceived Stress Scale-4. Overall, 32% of respondents exceeded the PSC cut off score for their child, indicating "high risk" for psychosocial morbidity and 42% reported "high risk" stress on the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. Parenting stress significantly predicted an increase in child psychosocial morbidity (odds ratio 7.41, confidence interval 2.9-19.0, p military support reported less child psychosocial morbidity (odds ratio 0.32, confidence interval 0.13-0.77, p military rank, child gender, child age, and race or ethnic background did not reach statistical significance. Families in this study experiencing deployment identified one-third of military children at "high risk" for psychosocial morbidity. The most significant predictor of child psychosocial functioning during wartime deployment was parenting stress. Military, family and community supports help mitigate family stress during periods of deployment.

  7. Systematic review: deployment length and the mental health of diplomats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R; Williams, R; Kemp, V; Patel, D; Greenberg, N

    2015-01-01

    While there has been considerable research into the psychosocial consequences of tour length for military personnel, this subject has not been studied in other occupational groups who also deploy staff to high-threat areas. To carry out a comprehensive review of relevant published literature to inform diplomatic organizations that deploy staff in high-threat postings (HTPs). We searched appropriate scientific databases for studies relevant to deployment length, mental health and well-being for diplomats. A systematic review related to military personnel was found and used as the foundation for the literature review. Other relevant papers identified by the search have also been included. The majority of identified papers had examined military personnel. Results suggested that longer deployments were associated with poorer mental health including post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and alcohol problems and this was most likely to be a function of increased exposure to potentially traumatic events. Exceeding a threshold of 6-12 months within a 3 year period, for military personnel, appeared to elevate the risk of psychosocial problems. Furthermore, diplomats deploying on their first HTP, and those whose tour length is altered after deployment, could be especially vulnerable. While further research of this topic is required, this review provides an evidence-based insight into the increased risks of developing mental health problems when deployed to HTPs. This information is relevant to generating policies, which may reduce the impacts of adverse psychosocial effects on diplomatic staff and their families. © Crown copyright 2014.

  8. The effect of motor vehicle airbag deployment on tooth surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashar, A; James, H; Higgins, D; Kaidonis, J; Anderson, R W G

    2009-12-01

    Motor vehicle airbag technology is directed at the reduction of injury to drivers and passengers however a number of researchers have reported cases of injuries caused by airbags. Injuries to tooth surfaces, particularly tooth wear following the deployment of motor vehicle airbags, have never been studied. A review of the literature and clinical experience does not suggest tooth enamel abrasion to be a likely outcome following airbag deployment. This in vitro pilot study was conducted to assess the effect on tooth surfaces following the deployment of motor vehicle airbags, and in particular to attempt to reproduce the injuries claimed in a case report published in the Journal of Forensic Odonto- Stomatology in December 2007. A sample of extracted upper anterior teeth (n = 20) were analyzed using unaided visual observation, photographic and microscopic observation pre- and post- airbag deployment. Teeth were mounted on a fabricated head form (similar to those used in crash test dummies) using dental putty. The tests were performed using a modified airbag test rig with airbags deployed in 5 different positions relative to the head, with respect to distance and angulations. The result of the tests showed no changes to the teeth with unaided observation, macro photography or under the microscope. Tooth wear patterns described in the case report were not observed. Although accurate reproduction of an in vivo situation is not possible, this study has given some insight into the effects of motor vehicle airbag deployment, and suggests that significant tooth wear is an unlikely outcome from airbag deployment.

  9. Photovoltaic Capacity Additions: The optimal rate of deployment with sensitivity to time-based GHG emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplican Ravikumar, Dwarakanath

    Current policies subsidizing or accelerating deployment of photovoltaics (PV) are typically motivated by claims of environmental benefit, such as the reduction of CO2 emissions generated by the fossil-fuel fired power plants that PV is intended to displace. Existing practice is to assess these environmental benefits on a net life-cycle basis, where CO2 benefits occurring during use of the PV panels is found to exceed emissions generated during the PV manufacturing phase including materials extraction and manufacture of the PV panels prior to installation. However, this approach neglects to recognize that the environmental costs of CO2 release during manufacture are incurred early, while environmental benefits accrue later. Thus, where specific policy targets suggest meeting CO2 reduction targets established by a certain date, rapid PV deployment may have counter-intuitive, albeit temporary, undesired consequences. Thus, on a cumulative radiative forcing (CRF) basis, the environmental improvements attributable to PV might be realized much later than is currently understood. This phenomenon is particularly acute when PV manufacture occurs in areas using CO2 intensive energy sources (e.g., coal), but deployment occurs in areas with less CO 2 intensive electricity sources (e.g., hydro). This thesis builds a dynamic Cumulative Radiative Forcing (CRF) model to examine the inter-temporal warming impacts of PV deployments in three locations: California, Wyoming and Arizona. The model includes the following factors that impact CRF: PV deployment rate, choice of PV technology, pace of PV technology improvements, and CO2 intensity in the electricity mix at manufacturing and deployment locations. Wyoming and California show the highest and lowest CRF benefits as they have the most and least CO2 intensive grids, respectively. CRF payback times are longer than CO2 payback times in all cases. Thin film, CdTe PV technologies have the lowest manufacturing CO2 emissions and

  10. The Cryo-Thermochromatographic Separator (CTS) A new rapid separation and alpha-detection system for on-line chemical studies of highly volatile osmium and hassium (Z=108) tetroxides

    CERN Document Server

    Kirbach, U W; Gregorich, K E; Lee, D M; Ninov, V; Omtvedt, J P; Patin, J B; Seward, N K; Strellis, D A; Sudowe, R; Türler, A; Wilk, P A; Zielinski, P M; Hoffman, D C; Nitsche, H

    2002-01-01

    The Cryo-Thermochromatographic Separator (CTS) was designed and constructed for rapid, continuous on-line separation and simultaneous detection of highly volatile compounds of short-lived alpha-decaying isotopes of osmium and hassium (Hs, Z=108). A flowing carrier gas containing the volatile species is passed through a channel formed by two facing rows of 32 alpha-particle detectors, cooled to form a temperature gradient extending from 247 K at the channel entrance down to 176 K at the exit. The volatile species adsorb onto the SiO sub 2 -coated detector surfaces at a characteristic deposition temperature and are identified by their observed alpha-decay energies. The CTS was tested on-line with OsO sub 4 prepared from sup 1 sup 6 sup 9 sup - sup 1 sup 7 sup 3 Os isotopes produced in sup 1 sup 1 sup 8 sup , sup 1 sup 2 sup 0 Sn( sup 5 sup 6 Fe, 3,4,5n) reactions. An adsorption enthalpy for OsO sub 4 of -40.2+-1.5 kJ/mol on SiO sub 2 was deduced by comparing the measured deposition distribution with Monte Carlo...

  11. Principles of chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    House, James E

    2007-01-01

    James House's revised Principles of Chemical Kinetics provides a clear and logical description of chemical kinetics in a manner unlike any other book of its kind. Clearly written with detailed derivations, the text allows students to move rapidly from theoretical concepts of rates of reaction to concrete applications. Unlike other texts, House presents a balanced treatment of kinetic reactions in gas, solution, and solid states. The entire text has been revised and includes many new sections and an additional chapter on applications of kinetics. The topics covered include quantitative rela

  12. Global economic consequences of deploying bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Matteo; Calvin, Katherine; Wise, Marshall; Kyle, Page; Edmonds, Jae

    2016-09-01

    Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) is considered a potential source of net negative carbon emissions and, if deployed at sufficient scale, could help reduce carbon dioxide emissions and concentrations. However, the viability and economic consequences of large-scale BECCS deployment are not fully understood. We use the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) integrated assessment model to explore the potential global and regional economic impacts of BECCS. As a negative-emissions technology, BECCS would entail a net subsidy in a policy environment in which carbon emissions are taxed. We show that by mid-century, in a world committed to limiting climate change to 2 °C, carbon tax revenues have peaked and are rapidly approaching the point where climate mitigation is a net burden on general tax revenues. Assuming that the required policy instruments are available to support BECCS deployment, we consider its effects on global trade patterns of fossil fuels, biomass, and agricultural products. We find that in a world committed to limiting climate change to 2 °C, the absence of CCS harms fossil-fuel exporting regions, while the presence of CCS, and BECCS in particular, allows greater continued use and export of fossil fuels. We also explore the relationship between carbon prices, food-crop prices and use of BECCS. We show that the carbon price and biomass and food crop prices are directly related. We also show that BECCS reduces the upward pressure on food crop prices by lowering carbon prices and lowering the total biomass demand in climate change mitigation scenarios. All of this notwithstanding, many challenges, both technical and institutional, remain to be addressed before BECCS can be deployed at scale.

  13. Counter-Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-26

    or large- scale pharmaceutical or fermentation facilities. Thus, as with chemical weapons, biological weapon production and proliferation can be...complicated by the dual-use nature of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear materials. Pharmaceutical and petrochemical factories can mask...In fact, treatment-in-place using contagious casualty management ( CCM ) capabilities is preferred. This is normally accomplished via deployed

  14. Prevention is the key to maintaining gynecologic health during deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trego, Lori L

    2012-03-01

    Researchers have indicated that since Operation Desert Storm, the majority of gynecologic problems exhibited during deployment are from vaginal and urinary tract infections and menstrual disorders. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of military women's health issues during military operations and summarize current knowledge and recommendations to promote their gynecologic health needs while deployed. Military women would benefit from predeployment health-promotion programs that focus on preventive measures to enhance gynecologic health while deployed. © 2012 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  15. Coming home revisited: family life and military deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Steven L; Smith, Donald G

    2012-07-01

    The war in Iraq and Afghanistan has involved the deployment of hundreds of thousands of American soldiers, many of whom are married and have children. The experience of one military family living through a deployment in Iraq in 2011 is discussed and interpreted in light of Parse's humanbecoming family model. The model provides a useful way for nurses, and others, to understand families, in a way that honors their values and struggles in an everchanging and unpredictable world. Included is a brief discussion on how communication technologies are changing the experience of military deployment for families.

  16. CONTINUOUS DEPLOYMENT WORKFLOW : Case Lego Mindstorms EV3

    OpenAIRE

    Alatalo, Janne

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was created for N4S@JAMK project. The N4S@JAMK project is part of Need4Speed program run by DIGILE. The assignment for this thesis had two focuses: to create a continuous deployment chain that would deploy software to a Lego Mindstorms EV3 device, and to study ways to unit test the software of EV3 device on a normal computer. The continuous deployment chain was implemented using GitLab, Jenkins programs and Fabric python framework. Lego Mindstorms EV3 device had a third party ...

  17. Pneumothorax, without chest wall fracture, following airbag deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Parsons

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Air bags are an automatic crash protection system. They have been shown to reduce mortality from motor vehicle accidents by 31% following direct head-on impacts, by 19% following any frontal impact and by 11% overall. Despite obvious benefits there has been a corresponding increase in the number of injuries resulting from their deployment. We describe a case of a pneumothorax in the absence of chest wall pathology associated with airbag deployment, in a belted driver. There has been one previous description of pneumothorax associated with airbag deployment, in an unbelted driver.

  18. Chemical use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of research and activities related to chemical use on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. The chemicals used on the Refuge...

  19. Deployable laboratory response to influenza pandemic; PCR assay field trials and comparison with reference methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J J Inglis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The influenza A/H1N1/09 pandemic spread quickly during the Southern Hemisphere winter in 2009 and reached epidemic proportions within weeks of the official WHO alert. Vulnerable population groups included indigenous Australians and remote northern population centres visited by international travellers. At the height of the Australian epidemic a large number of troops converged on a training area in northern Australia for an international exercise, raising concerns about their potential exposure to the emerging influenza threat before, during and immediately after their arrival in the area. Influenza A/H1N1/09 became the dominant seasonal variant and returned to Australia during the Southern winter the following year. METHODS: A duplex nucleic acid amplification assay was developed within weeks of the first WHO influenza pandemic alert, demonstrated in northwestern Australia shortly afterwards and deployed as part of the pathology support for a field hospital during a military exercise during the initial epidemic surge in June 2009. RESULTS: The nucleic acid amplification assay was twice as sensitive as a point of care influenza immunoassay, as specific but a little less sensitive than the reference laboratory nucleic acid amplification assay. Repetition of the field assay with blinded clinical samples obtained during the 2010 winter influenza season demonstrated a 91.7% congruence with the reference laboratory method. CONCLUSIONS: Rapid in-house development of a deployable epidemic influenza assay allowed a flexible laboratory response, effective targeting of limited disease control resources in an austere military environment, and provided the public health laboratory service with a set of verification tools for resource-limited settings. The assay method was suitable for rapid deployment in time for the 2010 Northern winter.

  20. Chemical genomics in plant biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Ayan; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Chemical genomics is a newly emerged and rapidly progressing field in biology, where small chemical molecules bind specifically and reversibly to protein(s) to modulate their function(s), leading to the delineation and subsequent unravelling of biological processes. This approach overcomes problems like lethality and redundancy of classical genetics. Armed with the powerful techniques of combinatorial synthesis, high-throughput screening and target discovery chemical genomics expands its scope to diverse areas in biology. The well-established genetic system of Arabidopsis model allows chemical genomics to enter into the realm of plant biology exploring signaling pathways of growth regulators, endomembrane signaling cascades, plant defense mechanisms and many more events.

  1. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  2. Multi-Purpose Interplanetary Deployable Aerocapture System (MIDAS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Altius Space Machines and MSNW LLC propose the development of a cubesat-scale Multipurpose Interplanetary Deployable Aerocapture System (MIDAS), to provide cubesats...

  3. Beyond Continuous Delivery: An Empirical Investigation of Continuous Deployment Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahin, Mojtaba; Ali Babar, Muhammad; Zahedi, Mansooreh

    2017-01-01

    Context: A growing number of software organizations have been adopting Continuous DElivery (CDE) and Continuous Deployment (CD) practices. Researchers have started investing significant efforts in studying different aspects of CDE and CD. Many studies refer to CDE (i.e., where an application...... of interviewing 21 software practitioners, followed by a survey with 98 respondents. Results: Our study reveals 11 confounding factors that limit or demotivate software organizations to push changes automatically and continuously to production. The most important ones are "lack of automated (user) acceptance test......", "manual quality check", "deployment as business decision", "insufficient level of automated test coverage", and "highly bureaucratic deployment process". Conclusion: Our findings highlight several areas for future research and provide suggestions for practitioners to streamline deployment process....

  4. Pre-Positioning Deployment System for Small Unmanned Underwater Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ansay, Michael T

    2005-01-01

    .... A transporter deploys to and releases the assembly proximate to the desired location. Once the assembly has fallen a safe distance after release, spring bands of the assembly are released by the action of lanyards of the transporter...

  5. New Analysis and Theory of Deployable Folded Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recently developed mathematical theory has great value for deployable space structures and in situ manufacture of large beams, panels, cylinders and other...

  6. Operation United Assistance: infectious disease threats to deployed military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Clinton K; Yun, Heather C; Markelz, Ana Elizabeth; Okulicz, Jason F; Vento, Todd J; Burgess, Timothy H; Cardile, Anthony P; Miller, R Scott

    2015-06-01

    As part of the international response to control the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the Department of Defense has deployed military personnel to train Liberians to manage the disease and build treatment units and a hospital for health care volunteers. These steps have assisted in providing a robust medical system and augment Ebola diagnostic capability within the affected nations. In order to prepare for the deployment of U.S. military personnel, the infectious disease risks of the regions must be determined. This evaluation allows for the establishment of appropriate force health protection posture for personnel while deployed, as well as management plans for illnesses presenting after redeployment. Our objective was to detail the epidemiology and infectious disease risks for military personnel in West Africa, particularly for Liberia, along with lessons learned from prior deployments. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ADEPT Project is developing a mechanically deployable low-ballistic coefficient aeroshell entry system to perform entry descent landing (EDL) functions for...

  8. Accelerating the deployment of offshore renewable energy technologies. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Mott

    2011-02-15

    Offshore wind energy and ocean energy (i.e. wave and tidal) are at different stages of technology development and deployment, and, as such, they require different approaches for successful deployment. However, regardless of their deployment stage, these technologies may face common hurdles in their way to market competitiveness. IEA-RETD has completed a study with the overall objective to assist policy makers and project developers in a better understanding of these barriers and the specifics of offshore renewable energy and to give them practical guidelines. These include an offshore energy deployment framework, substantiated by evidence-based analyses, and recommendations for future policies design, including best practices for allocation of seafloor rights.

  9. Astronaut-Deployable Geophysical and Environmental Monitoring Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzewich, S. D.; Bleacher, J. E.; Smith, M. D.; Khayat, A.; Conrad, P.

    2017-06-01

    Geophysical and environmental monitoring stations could be deployed by astronauts exploring Mars to create a broad network that would collect high-value scientific information while also enhancing astronaut safety.

  10. The effects of military deployment on early child development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nguyen, Dana R; Ee, Juliana; Berry-Cabán, Cristobal S; Hoedebecke, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this observational, point prevalence study is to determine if parental deployment affects the cognitive, social and emotional development of preschool age children in the military family...

  11. Elastic Deployable Composite Tubular Roll-Out Boom Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DSS's innovative Elastic Deployable Composite Tubular Roll-Out Boom will provide revolutionary performance when compared to conventional state-of-the-art...

  12. An Outrigger Component for a Deployable Occulter System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Roccor, LLC, propose the development of a highly novel and structurally efficient outrigger strut design feature that efficiently integrates with a large deployable...

  13. Design and Deployment of Mobile FSO Communication System

    KAUST Repository

    Alheadary, Wael Ghazy

    2017-05-08

    As a potential solution to many applications, we developed a mobile free-space optical (FSO) system that achieves 1Gbps with transmission distance of 70 m. This system needs minimal preparation to be deployed within an hour.

  14. Design and Analysis Tools for Deployable Solar Array Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large, lightweight, deployable solar array structures have been identified as a key enabling technology for NASA with analysis and design of these structures being...

  15. An Outrigger Component for a Deployable Occulter System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II, Roccor proposes to build upon the results of Phase I to increase the technology readiness level (TRL) of the NASA JPL deployable external occulter. An...

  16. Learning, Deployment and R and D-induced Technological Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wene, Clas-Otto

    2005-11-21

    To celebrate its 50th anniversary, ECN gathered a group of 30 high-level energy experts to discuss climate change mitigation strategies and their implications for energy technology development. This summary reports the main findings of the international scientific symposium. It also gives an account of the principal lessons learned, and formulates recommendations for energy innovation policy-making in the European Union. In this presentation the focus is on two questions on R and D choices and deployment strategies: Balance Government R and D and Deployment?; and Efficient Deployment Strategies? The reflections are based on experience curves: Relations between R and D and Deployment made for the purpose to bring new, clean technologies to the markets; Useful concepts and distinctions to address the two questions.

  17. Deployable Engine Air-Brake for Drag Management Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc, proposes an SBIR program to demonstrate an innovative engine air-brake (EAB) technology that uses a deployable swirl vane mechanism to switch...

  18. University of Tennessee deploys force10 switch for CERN work

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Force20 networks, the pioneer in building and securing reliable networks, today announced that the University of Tennessee physics department has deployed the C300 resilient switch to analyze data form CERN's Large Hadron Collider." (1/2 page)

  19. Design and Testing of CPAS Main Deployment Bag Energy Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollmann, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    During the developmental testing program for CPAS (Capsule Parachute Assembly System), the parachute system for the NASA Orion Crew Module, simulation revealed that high loads may be experienced by the pilot risers during the most devere deployment conditions. As the role of the pilot parachutes is to deploy the main parachutes, these high loads introduced the possibility of main deployment failure. In order to mitigate these high loads, a set of energy modulators was incorporated between the pilot riser and the main deployment bag. An extensive developmental program was implemented to ensure the adequacy of these energy modulators. After initial design comparisons, the energy modulator design was validated through slow-speed joint tests as well as through high-speed bungee tests. This paper documents the design, development, and results of multiple tests completed on the final design.

  20. EOP CRITTERCAM Deployments on French Frigate Shoals monk seals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRITTERCAMs, were deployed on a 42 monk seals at French Frigate Shoals Hawaii. Sixty nine hours of video comprised of 3192 recording segments collected at...

  1. New Analysis and Theory of Deployable Folded Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recently developed mathematical folding theory has great value for deployable space structures and in situ manufacture of large beams, panels and cylinders. The...

  2. Deployable Engine Air-Brake for Drag Management Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc., (ATA) proposes a Phase II SBIR program to demonstrate an innovative engine air-brake (EAB) technology that uses a deployable swirl vane...

  3. Creating a Comprehensive Solar Water Heating Deployment Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Focus Marketing Services

    1999-08-18

    This report details the results of a research conducted in 1998 and 1999 and outlines a marketing deployment plan designed for businesses interested in marketing solar water heaters in the new home industry.

  4. Novel Heat Flow Probe Design and Deployment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a novel method for deploying heat flow sensors/heaters in a hole and also a novel approach to subsurface access using a percussive method. The...

  5. Passive sampling of perfluorinated acids and sulfonates using polar organic chemical integrative samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Ganna; Golovko, Oksana; Randak, Tomas; Grabic, Roman

    2013-03-01

    The applicability of a polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) for detection and determination of perfluorinated acids and sulfonates in water was studied under field conditions. Standard POCIS configurations (i.e., pharmaceutical and pesticide) were deployed in effluent from a wastewater treatment plant for 1, 2, and 3 weeks. Ten of 15 target compounds were found in POCIS, five of which were quantified in wastewater. Pest-POCIS appeared more effective for the sampling, while Pharm-POCIS had a more rapid uptake kinetic, which leads to faster saturation or equilibrium. The results showed that the pesticide configuration is probably more suitable for the sampling of this class of compounds. Based on average concentration in water over the sampling period and amount of compound adsorbed in the POCIS, we calculated sampling rates for five studied compounds and obtained values of 0.034 to 0.222 L day(-1).

  6. Airbag-induced chemical eye injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subash, Malavika; Manzouri, Bita; Wilkins, Mark

    2010-02-01

    Chemical injuries of the eye are a rare complication of airbag deployment and result from seepage of the chemical, causing inflation through vents in the airbag. We describe a severe case of bilateral alkali eye injury upon airbag contact in a road traffic accident. Delayed recognition and irrigation of the eyes exacerbated the injury with a resultant poor healing response of the left eye. Consequently, a left amniotic membrane graft was performed to promote corneal epithelial healing. The use of an amniotic membrane graft in the acute period after a chemical keratitis is unusual and reflects the severity of the corneal injuries sustained by this patient. This case illustrates the vision-threatening risk of alkali keratitis secondary to airbag deployment and highlights the importance of early recognition and management.

  7. The Effects of Multiple Deployments on Army Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Deep Communication. Communication between the war zone and the homefront has evolved from postal letters to email to cell phones to Skype webcam ... adults and children.16 A second dependent variable was the overall ability of Army adolescents to cope with repeated deployments. This measure...concerning the effects of deployments. We cannot predict how these children will negotiate the often difficult transition to adult - hood. Nor do we

  8. Changing Family Roles-Across the Deployment Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    MacDermid Wadsworth chaired the annual meeting for her discipline, the National Council on Family Relations . The theme she chose was Conflict, Violence ... family roles during deployment cycles, and b) on the impact of technology-based communication during deployment on later psychological distress and...during predeployment. Paper presented at the 2015 National Council on Family Relations Annual Conference, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.  Marini

  9. NOC turbulence glider deployment report for the OSMOSIS Project

    OpenAIRE

    Balfour, C.; Knight, P.; McLaughlin, D.

    2011-01-01

    This document summarises the three deployments of the NOC Liverpool Teledyne Webb Research Slocum glider fitted with an external Rockland Scientific International micro-Rider turbulence probe during September 2011. The general aim of these glider deployments was to generate underwater turbulence and glider based CTD measurements for comparison with other sensor systems. This information will be used for evaluation of the performance of other measurement systems that are required for the Ocean...

  10. University of Cambridge deploys Procket Networks' PRO/8801

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Procket Networks, a provider of high performance Internet Protocol (IP) technology and products has announced that the University of Cambridge has deployed the PRO/8801(TM) router into its research network to develop industry-leading deep packet inspection applications. The major application for this deployment is to identify and understand new traffic patterns created by large scale scientific computations and downloads such as the GRID (1 page).

  11. One False Move: Training Deployers in Cross-Cultural Negotiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-28

    There is now a focus on cultural and national identity. Assimilation is frowned upon. “This basic competition of cultural norms resulted in a...AU/ACSC/2016 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY ONE FALSE MOVE: TRAINING DEPLOYERS IN CROSS- CULTURAL NEGOTIATIONS by...Air Force Deborah Lee James directed that members of the Air Force be trained in cross- cultural negotiation skills before deploying. The next step

  12. A Lightweight Vertical Rosette for Deployment in Ice Covered Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smethie, W. M.; Chayes, D. N.; Perry, R. S.; Schlosser, P.

    2009-12-01

    Although remote sensing technology provides measurement capability for a number of water properties, there are important substances for which this technology does not currently exist and the only way to measure these substances is to collect water samples and return the samples to the lab. In the Arctic Ocean water samples are difficult to obtain from ships because of the extensive ice cover and thick pressure ridges. However, the ice provides a landing platform for aircraft, which can rapidly cover long distances. Aircraft have been used for sampling the Arctic Ocean for the past half-century using bottles and internally recording CTDs attached to a cable and lowered through leads or holes drilled in the ice. The routine CTD/rosette technology used for sampling from ships measures profiles of temperature, salinity, oxygen as well as other substances in situ, displays the data in real time for choosing depths to obtain water samples and the water samples are then collected with the rosette. These systems are too heavy and bulky to deploy from aircraft. We have developed a lightweight modular CTD/rosette system that is deployed through a 12-inch diameter hole drilled in the ice. The modules are connected together physically and electrically with the water bottle modules, which contain four 4-liter bottles each, stacked on top of the CTD module. The CTD traces are displayed on a laptop computer and the bottles are tripped using modified Seabird controllers and a melt-lanyard tripping mechanism. We have used this system for several years with Twin Otter fixed wing aircraft as part of the Switchyard Project, sampling a line of stations annually in the heavily ice covered region between Alert and the North Pole. Casts are carried out in a tent connected to the airplane using a lightweight winch mounted in the airplane. At the completion of a cast, the water modules are placed in a cooler with bags of snow to provide thermal stability at about 0°C and the end caps

  13. 78 FR 775 - Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Alpharetta, GA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... Employment and Training Administration Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Alpharetta, GA; Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Hunt Valley, MD; Goodman Networks, Inc. Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division...

  14. 78 FR 12359 - Goodman Networks, Inc., Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Including...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Employment and Training Administration Goodman Networks, Inc., Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division Including Workers in the Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division in... of Goodman Networks, Inc., Core Network Engineering (Deployment Engineering) Division, including...

  15. Cognitive ability and risk of post-traumatic stress disorder after military deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars R; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Vedtofte, Mia S

    2017-01-01

    Background: Studies of the association between pre-deployment cognitive ability and post-deployment post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have shown mixed results. Aims: To study the influence of pre-deployment cognitive ability on PTSD symptoms 6-8 months post-deployment in a large population...... while controlling for pre-deployment education and deployment-related variables. Method: Study linking prospective pre-deployment conscription board data with post-deployment self-reported data in 9695 Danish Army personnel deployed to different war zones in 1997-2013. The association between pre......-deployment cognitive ability and post-deployment PTSD was investigated using repeated-measure logistic regression models. Two models with cognitive ability score as the main exposure variable were created (model 1 and model 2). Model 1 was only adjusted for pre-deployment variables, while model 2 was adjusted for both...

  16. Using Deduplicating Storage for Efficient Disk Image Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Lin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many clouds and network testbeds use disk images to initialize local storage on their compute devices. Large facilities must manage thousands or more images, requiring significant amounts of storage. At the same time, to provide a good user experience, they must be able to deploy those images quickly. Driven by our experience in operating the Emulab site at the University of Utah---a long-lived and heavily-used testbed---we have created a new service for efficiently storing and deploying disk images. This service exploits the redundant data found in similar images, using deduplication to greatly reduce the amount of physical storage required. In addition to space savings, our system is also designed for highly efficient image deployment---it integrates with an existing highly-optimized disk image deployment system, Frisbee, without significantly increasing the time required to distribute and install images. In this paper, we explain the design of our system and discuss the trade-offs we made to strike a balance between efficient storage and fast disk image deployment. We also propose a new chunking algorithm, called AFC, which enables fixed-size chunking for deduplicating allocated disk sectors. Experimental results show that our system reduces storage requirements by up to 3x while imposing only a negligible runtime overhead on the end-to-end disk-deployment process.

  17. Applications of Dynamic Deployment of Services in Industrial Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido, Gonçalo; Barata, José; Jammes, François; Colombo, Armando W.

    Service-oriented Architecture (SOA) is becoming a de facto paradigm for business and enterprise integration. SOA is expanding into several domains of application envisioning a unified solution suitable across all different layers of an enterprise infrastructure. The application of SOA based on open web standards can significantly enhance the interoperability and openness of those devices. By embedding a dynamical deployment service even into small field de- vices, it would be either possible to allow machine builders to place built- in services and still allow the integrator to deploy on-the-run the services that best fit his current application. This approach allows the developer to keep his own preferred development language, but still deliver a SOA- compliant application. A dynamic deployment service is envisaged as a fundamental framework to support more complex applications, reducing deployment delays, while increasing overall system agility. As use-case scenario, a dynamic deployment service was implemented over DPWS and WS-Management specifications allowing designing and programming an automation application using IEC61131 languages, and deploying these components as web services into devices.

  18. A Bayesian Framework for Reliability Analysis of Spacecraft Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John W.; Gallo, Luis; Kaminsky, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Deployable subsystems are essential to mission success of most spacecraft. These subsystems enable critical functions including power, communications and thermal control. The loss of any of these functions will generally result in loss of the mission. These subsystems and their components often consist of unique designs and applications for which various standardized data sources are not applicable for estimating reliability and for assessing risks. In this study, a two stage sequential Bayesian framework for reliability estimation of spacecraft deployment was developed for this purpose. This process was then applied to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Sunshield subsystem, a unique design intended for thermal control of the Optical Telescope Element. Initially, detailed studies of NASA deployment history, "heritage information", were conducted, extending over 45 years of spacecraft launches. This information was then coupled to a non-informative prior and a binomial likelihood function to create a posterior distribution for deployments of various subsystems uSing Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampling. Select distributions were then coupled to a subsequent analysis, using test data and anomaly occurrences on successive ground test deployments of scale model test articles of JWST hardware, to update the NASA heritage data. This allowed for a realistic prediction for the reliability of the complex Sunshield deployment, with credibility limits, within this two stage Bayesian framework.

  19. Renal lithiasis: addressing the risks of austere desert deployments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, J Steven; Forrest, Kelly

    2006-06-01

    Renal lithiasis affects approximately 5% of the general population, with higher risks for men and increasing risks with increasing age. The forward deployment of the Air Force into austere desert environments with integration of the active duty, Reserves, and Guard presents increasing risks to mission accomplishment with the increased risk of developing renal lithiasis. This paper describes seven cases of presumed renal lithiasis in a deployed desert setting in Air Force personnel on flying status. Their status and the location of the base acted as a focus for a review of the literature on kidney stone causation, prevention, diagnosis, and management. A review of the literature revealed that current military recommendations to hydrate in the field may not be sufficient for the primary prevention of kidney stones. Beverage choice may prove more useful for prevention. Situations precipitating voluntary dehydration need to be prevented. Although there are superior ways to diagnose renal lithiasis, in the deployed setting patient history and physical examination are usually the only available means. Ultrasound is a viable diagnostic option for use in the deployed setting based on its portability, affordability, and ease of use. Additions to the standard management of renal lithiasis, such as subcutaneous Lidocaine and heat may have value in the deployed setting if the supply of narcotics is limited. In the deployed setting, hydration choices, the addition of portable ultrasound to the diagnostic process, and pain management with nontraditional therapies need to be explored.

  20. Deployment Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life and Use of Support Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandeker, Christopher; French, Claire; Birtles, Catherine; Wessely, S

    2006-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: During deployments, Service wives have to adapt to being alone and taking sole responsibility for their families and house-holds whilst dealing with the additional stress about whether their loved ones will return...

  1. Next generation sensing platforms for extended deployments in large-scale, multidisciplinary, adaptive sampling and observational networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. N.; Meinig, C.; Mordy, C. W.; Lawrence-Slavas, N.; Cokelet, E. D.; Jenkins, R.; Tabisola, H. M.; Stabeno, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    New autonomous sensors have dramatically increased the resolution and accuracy of oceanographic data collection, enabling rapid sampling over extremely fine scales. Innovative new autonomous platofrms like floats, gliders, drones, and crawling moorings leverage the full potential of these new sensors by extending spatiotemporal reach across varied environments. During 2015 and 2016, The Innovative Technology for Arctic Exploration Program at the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory tested several new types of fully autonomous platforms with increased speed, durability, and power and payload capacity designed to deliver cutting-edge ecosystem assessment sensors to remote or inaccessible environments. The Expendable Ice-Tracking (EXIT) gloat developed by the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) is moored near bottom during the ice-free season and released on an autonomous timer beneath the ice during the following winter. The float collects a rapid profile during ascent, and continues to collect critical, poorly-accessible under-ice data until melt, when data is transmitted via satellite. The autonomous Oculus sub-surface glider developed by the University of Washington and PMEL has a large power and payload capacity and an enhanced buoyancy engine. This 'coastal truck' is designed for the rapid water column ascent required by optical imaging systems. The Saildrone is a solar and wind powered ocean unmanned surface vessel (USV) developed by Saildrone, Inc. in partnership with PMEL. This large-payload (200 lbs), fast (1-7 kts), durable (46 kts winds) platform was equipped with 15 sensors designed for ecosystem assessment during 2016, including passive and active acoustic systems specially redesigned for autonomous vehicle deployments. The senors deployed on these platforms achieved rigorous accuracy and precision standards. These innovative platforms provide new sampling capabilities and cost efficiencies in high-resolution sensor deployment

  2. Telephone Support During Overseas Deployment for Military Spouses Formerly: Telephone Support During Deployment for OEF/OIF Spouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    perspective kind of like that book What to Expect When You Are Expecting, it was just kind of a walk through for the deployment.” Although skills...support group sessions. Information and skills were highlighted in each recorded didactic presentation that included slides. Education participants...of like that book What to Expect When You Are Expecting, it was just kind of a walk through for the deployment.” Although skills for themselves

  3. Turnbull - Early Detection and Rapid Response Team 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Biocontrol agents and chemicals to facilitate the rapid response phase of the project will be purchased and applied and a Washington Service Corps AmeriCorps member...

  4. Turnbull - Early Detection and Rapid Response Team 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Funding from this grant will allow for the purchase of biocontrol agents and chemicals to facilitate the rapid response phase of the project and to provide funds to...

  5. Turnbull - Early Detection and Rapid Response Team 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Funding from this grant will allow for the purchase of biocontrol agents and chemicals to facilitate the rapid response phase of the project and to provide match for...

  6. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary.

  7. After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools: 1-Year Outcomes of an Evidence-Based Parenting Program for Military Families Following Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; DeGarmo, David S; Zamir, Osnat

    2017-09-15

    Despite significant stressors facing military families over the past 15 years of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, no parenting programs adapted or developed for military families with school-aged children have been rigorously tested. We present outcome data from the first randomized controlled trial of a behavioral parent training program for families with a parent deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. In the present study, 336 primarily National Guard and Reserve families with 4-12-year-old children were recruited from a Midwestern state. At least one parent in each family had deployed to the recent conflicts: Operations Iraqi or Enduring Freedom, or New Dawn (OIF/OEF/OND). Families were randomized to a group-based parenting program (After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT)) or web and print resources-as-usual. Using a social interaction learning framework, we hypothesized an indirect effects model: that the intervention would improve parenting, which, in turn, would be associated with improvements in child outcomes. Applying intent-to-treat analyses, we examined the program's effect on observed parenting, and children's adjustment at 12-months post baseline. Controlling for demographic (marital status, length, child gender), deployment variables (number of deployments), and baseline values, families randomized to the ADAPT intervention showed significantly improved observed parenting compared to those in the comparison group. Observed parenting, in turn, was associated with significant improvements in child adjustment. These findings present the first evidence for the effectiveness of a parenting program for deployed military families with school-aged children.

  8. Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Willie; Cavanagh, Richard; Turk, Gregory; Winchester, Michael; Travis, John; Smith, Melody; Derose, Paul; Choquette, Steven; Kramer, Gary; Sieber, John; Greenberg, Robert; Lindstrom, Richard; Lamaze, George; Zeisler, Rolf; Schantz, Michele; Sander, Lane; Phinney, Karen; Welch, Michael; Vetter, Thomas; Pratt, Kenneth; Scott, John; Small, John; Wight, Scott; Stranick, Stephan

    Measurements of the chemical compositions of materials and the levels of certain substances in them are vital when assessing and improving public health, safety and the environment, are necessary to ensure trade equity, and are required when monitoring and improving industrial products and services. Chemical measurements play a crucial role in most areas of the economy, including healthcare, food and nutrition, agriculture, environmental technologies, chemicals and materials, instrumentation, electronics, forensics, energy, and transportation.

  9. Chemical Debridement of Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Stanley M.; Kan, Dorinne; Gruber, Charles; Crowley, Leo V.; Lent, Richard; Watford, Alvin; Seifter, Eli

    1974-01-01

    The development of effective, non-toxic (local and systemic) methods for the rapid chemical (enzymatic and non-enzymatic) debridement of third degree burns would dramatically reduce the morbidity and mortality of severely burned patients. Sepsis is still the major cause of death of patients with extensive deep burns. The removal of the devitalized tissue, without damage to unburned skin or skin only partially injured by burning, and in ways which would permit immediate (or very prompt) skin grafting, would lessen substantially the problems of sepsis, speed convalescence and the return of these individuals to society as effective human beings, and would decrease deaths. The usefulness and limitations of surgical excision for patients with extensive third degree burns are discussed. Chemical debridement lends itself to complementary use with surgical excision and has the potential advantage over surgical excision in not requiring anesthesia or a formal surgical operation. The authors' work with the chemical debridement of burns, in particular the use of Bromelain, indicates that this approach will likely achieve clinical usefulness. The experimental studies indicate that rapid controlled debridement, with minimal local and systemic toxicity, is possible, and that effective chemotherapeutic agents may be combined with the Bromelain without either interfering with the actions of the other. The authors believe that rapid (hours) debridement accomplished by the combined use of chemical debriding and chemotherapeutic agents will obviate the possibility of any increase in infection, caused by the use of chemical agents for debridement, as reported for Paraenzyme21 and Travase.39,48 It is possible that the short term use of systemic antibiotics begun just before and continued during, and for a short time after, the rapid chemical debridement may prove useful for the prevention of infection, as appears to be the case for abdominal operations of the clean-contaminated and

  10. Chemical oceanography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Millero, F.J

    1996-01-01

    Chemical Oceanography presents a comprehensive examination of the chemistry of oceans through discussions of such topics as descriptive physical oceanography, the composition of seawater and the major...

  11. Post-deployment usability evaluation of a radiology workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; Dierckx, Rudi A; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Van Ooijen, Peter M A

    2016-01-01

    To determine the number, nature and severity of usability issues radiologists encounter while using a commercially available radiology workstation in clinical practice, and to assess how well the results of a pre-deployment usability evaluation of this workstation generalize to clinical practice. The usability evaluation consisted of semi-structured interviews and observations of twelve users using the workstation during their daily work. Usability issues and positive usability findings were documented. Each issue was given a severity rating and its root cause was determined. Results were compared to the results of a pre-deployment usability evaluation of the same workstation. Ninety-two usability issues were identified, ranging from issues that cause minor frustration or delay, to issues that cause significant delays, prevent users from completing tasks, or even pose a potential threat to patient safety. The results of the pre-deployment usability evaluation had limited generalizability to clinical practice. This study showed that radiologists encountered a large number and a wide variety of usability issues when using a commercially available radiology workstation in clinical practice. This underlines the need for effective usability engineering in radiology. Given the limitations of pre-deployment usability evaluation in radiology, which were confirmed by our finding that the results of a pre-deployment usability evaluation of this workstation had limited generalizability to clinical practice, it is vital that radiology workstation vendors devote significant resources to usability engineering efforts before deployment of their workstation, and to continue these efforts after the workstation is deployed in a hospital. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  13. Accelerated deployment of nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts. Final CRADA Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libera, J.A.; Snyder, S.W.; Mane, A.; Elam, J.W.; Cronauer, D.C.; Muntean, J.A.; Wu, T.; Miller, J.T. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); ( ES)

    2012-08-27

    Nanomanufacturing offers an opportunity to create domestic jobs and facilitate economic growth. In response to this need, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy issued a Research Call to develop nanomanufacturing capabilities at the National Laboratories. High performance catalysts represent a unique opportunity to deploy nanomanufacturing technologies. Re-refining of used lube oil offers an opportunity to create manufacturing jobs and decrease dependence on imported petroleum. Improved catalysts are required to produce a better quality product, decrease environmental impact, extend catalyst life, and improve overall economics of lube oil re-refining. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) in cooperation with Universal Lubricants, Inc. (ULI) and Chemical Engineering Partners (CEP) have carried out a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to prepare nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to exhibit superior performance for the re-refining of used lube oil. We investigated the upgrading of recycled lube oil by hydrogenation using commercial, synthetically-modified commercial catalysts, and synthesized catalysts. A down-flow (trickle bed) catalytic unit was used for the hydrogenation experiments. In addition to carrying out elemental analyses of the various feed and product fractions, characterization was undertaken using H{sup 1} and C{sup 13} NMR. Initially commercial were evaluated. Second these commercial catalysts were promoted with precious metals using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Performance improvements were observed that declined with catalyst aging. An alternate approach was undertaken to deeply upgrade ULI product oils. Using a synthesized catalyst, much lower hydrogenation temperatures were required than commercial catalysts. Other performance improvements were also observed. The resulting lube oil fractions were of high purity even at low reaction severity. The

  14. Deployment of Performance Management Methodology as part of Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River Site - 12178

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prod' homme, A.; Drouvot, O.; Gregory, J. [AREVA, Paris (France); Barnes, B.; Hodges, B.; Hart, M. [SRR, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In 2009, Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR) assumed the management lead of the Liquid Waste (LW) Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The four SRR partners and AREVA, as an integrated subcontractor are performing the ongoing effort to safely and reliably: - Close High Level Waste (HLW) storage tanks; - Maximize waste throughput at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF); - Process salt waste into stable final waste form; - Manage the HLW liquid waste material stored at SRS. As part of these initiatives, SRR and AREVA deployed a performance management methodology based on Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) at the DWPF in order to support the required production increase. This project took advantage of lessons learned by AREVA through the deployment of Total Productive Maintenance and Visual Management methodologies at the La Hague reprocessing facility in France. The project also took advantage of measurement data collected from different steps of the DWPF process by the SRR team (Melter Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering, Laboratory Operations, Plant Operations). Today the SRR team has a standard method for measuring processing time throughout the facility, a reliable source of objective data for use in decision-making at all levels, and a better balance between engineering department goals and operational goals. Preliminary results show that the deployment of this performance management methodology to the LW program at SRS has already significantly contributed to the DWPF throughput increases and is being deployed in the Saltstone facility. As part of the liquid waste program on Savannah River Site, SRR committed to enhance production throughput of DWPF. Beyond technical modifications implemented at different location of the facility, SRR deployed performance management methodology based on OEE metrics. The implementation benefited from the experience gained by AREVA in its own facilities in France. OEE proved to be a valuable tool in order

  15. Modelling of Spacecraft Dynamics at Deployment of Large Elastic Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Khoroshilov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new approach to the modelling of the deployment dynamics of a flexible multi-body system with the time dependent configurations is demonstrated in the frame of the study the dynamics of a spacecraft with the gyro-gravitational system of stabilization. Primarily the gravitational stabilizer that is made as a pantograph structure is in a compact form. The deployment of a flexible pantograph structure is performed after placing the spacecraft into orbit and completion of the preliminary damping by a special jet-propelled system, and after uncaging the gyros. After its deployment, the pantograph turns into an elongated structure that serves as a gravitational stabilizer and carrier of solar batteries. The objective of the study is the creation of the generalized mathematical model and the conducting of the computational modelling of the spacecraft dynamics. The equations of motion are derived with the use of the Eulerian-LaGrangian formalism and symbolic computing. Numerical simulations of the typical operational mode of the system are conducted taking into account various control profiles for the deployment. Numerical results indicate that the system used for attitude stabilization ensures the shape of the deployed design and prescribed accuracy of the orientation.

  16. Deployment-Related Insomnia in Military Personnel and Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramoweth, Adam D.

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent disorder that greatly impacts military personnel, especially those deployed in support of combat efforts. Deployment-related stressors like combat exposure, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) irregular sleep-wake schedules, and adjustment to the return home all contribute to insomnia. However, insomnia can also exacerbate the deployment experience and is a risk factor for traumatic stress reactions such as PTSD, depression, and suicide. Military personnel with mTBI are significantly impacted by insomnia; the majority experience sleep disruption and this can impede recovery and rehabilitation. As more service members return home from deployment, treatment is vital to reduce the impact of insomnia. Preliminary outcome data, showing positive results for reduction of sleep disruption, has been found with treatments such as combined cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia (CBTI) and imagery rehearsal therapy (IRT), preference-based interventions, as well as efforts to broadly disseminate CBTI. The recent literature on the impact and treatment of deployment-related insomnia is reviewed. PMID:24005883

  17. Post-deployment family violence among UK military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Jamie; Jones, Margaret; Somaini, Greta; Hull, Lisa; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T; MacManus, Deirdre

    2017-12-19

    Research into violence among military personnel has not differentiated between stranger- and family-directed violence. While military factors (combat exposure and post-deployment mental health problems) are risk factors for general violence, there has been limited research on their impact on violence within the family environment. This study aims to compare the prevalence of family-directed and stranger-directed violence among a deployed sample of UK military personnel and to explore risk factors associated with both family- and stranger-directed violence. This study utilised data from a large cohort study which collected information by questionnaire from a representative sample of randomly selected deployed UK military personnel (n = 6711). The prevalence of family violence immediately following return from deployment was 3.6% and 7.8% for stranger violence. Family violence was significantly associated with having left service, while stranger violence was associated with younger age, male gender, being single, having a history of antisocial behaviour as well as having left service. Deployment in a combat role was significantly associated with both family and stranger violence after adjustment for confounders [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.92 (1.25-2.94), p = 0.003 and aOR = 1.77 (1.31-2.40), p military personnel. Further research using a validated measurement tool for family violence would improve comparability with other research.

  18. Standardization of transportation classes for object-oriented deployment simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J. F., Jr.; Howard, D. L.; Jackson, J.; Macal, C. M.; Nevins, M. R.; Van Groningen, C. N.

    1999-07-30

    Many recent efforts to integrate transportation and deployment simulations, although beneficial, have lacked a feature vital for seamless integration: a common data class representation. It is an objective of the Department of Defense (DoD) to standardize all classes used in object-oriented deployment simulations by developing a standard class attribute representation and behavior for all deployment simulations that rely on an underlying class representation. The Extensive Hierarchy and Object Representation for Transportation Simulations (EXHORT) is a collection of three hierarchies that together will constitute a standard and consistent class attribute representation and behavior that could be used directly by a large set of deployment simulations. The first hierarchy is the Transportation Class Hierarchy (TCH), which describes a significant portion of the defense transportation system; the other two deal with infrastructure and resource classes. EXHORT will allow deployment simulations to use the same set of underlying class data, ensure transparent exchanges, reduce the effort needed to integrate simulations, and permit a detailed analysis of the defense transportation system. This paper describes EXHORT's first hierarchy, the TCH, and provides a rationale for why it is a helpful tool for modeling major portions of the defense transportation system.

  19. Variations in the modal characteristics of a telescopically deploying beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Anthony K.

    1994-01-01

    The equations of motion for a two-segment deploying telescopic beam are derived through application of Lagrange's equation. The outer tube of the beam is fixed at one end and the inner tube slides freely relative to the fixed segment. The resulting nonlinear, non-autonomous set of equations is linearized and simplified to the standard Euler-Bernoulli partial differential equations for an elastic beam by freezing the deployment process at various stages of deployment, and examining the small amplitude and natural modes of vibration of the resulting configuration. Application of the natural boundary conditions and compatibility of motion relations for the two segments in their common region of overlap leads to a transcendental characteristic equation in the frequency parameter Beta(L). Numerical solution of the equation for the characteristic roots determines the modal frequencies, and the corresponding mode shapes are obtained from the general solution of the Euler-Bernoulli equation tailored to the natural boundary conditions. Sample results of modal frequencies and shapes are presented for various stages of deployment and discussed. It is shown that for all intermediate stages of deployment (between 0 and 100 percent) the spectral distribution is drastically altered by the appearance of regions of very closely spaced modal frequencies. The sources of this modal agglomeration are explored.

  20. Biomarkers of post-deployment resilience among military service members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista B. Highland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of PTSD after military deployment is influenced by a combination of biopsychosocial risk and resilience factors. In particular, physiological factors may mark risk for symptom progression or resiliency. Research in civilian populations suggests elevated catecholamines after trauma are associated with PTSD months following the trauma. However, less is known regarding physiological markers of PTSD resilience among post-deployment service members (SM. We therefore assessed whether catecholamines obtained shortly after deployment were associated with combat-related PTSD symptoms three months later. Eighty-seven SMs completed the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-IV and blood draws within two months after return from deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan (“Time 1” or “T1” and three months later (“Time 2” or “T2”. Linear regression analyses demonstrated that lower norepinephrine at T1 was associated with lower PTSD symptoms at T2. In particular, T1 norepinephrine was positively associated with T2 symptom intensity and avoidance symptoms. The present findings represent a biologically-informed method of assessing PTSD resilience after deployment, which may aid clinicians in providing tailored treatments for those in the greatest need. Further research is needed to validate these findings and incorporate physiological measures within an assessment battery.