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Sample records for rapidly declining spectroscopically

  1. Abundance stratification in Type Ia supernovae - II. The rapidly declining, spectroscopically normal SN2004eo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzali, Paolo A.; Sauer, D. N.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2008-06-01

    The variation in properties of Type Ia supernovae, the thermonuclear explosions of Chandrasekhar-mass carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, is caused by different nucleosynthetic outcomes of these explosions, which can be traced from the distribution of abundances in the ejecta. The composition stratification of the spectroscopically normal but rapidly declining SN2004eo is studied by performing spectrum synthesis of a time-series of spectra obtained before and after maximum, and of one nebular spectrum obtained about eight months later. Early-time spectra indicate that the outer ejecta are dominated by oxygen and silicon, and contain other intermediate-mass elements, implying that the outer part of the star was subject only to partial burning. In the inner part, nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) material dominates, but the production of 56Ni was limited to ~0.43 +/- 0.05 Msolar. An innermost zone containing ~0.25 Msolar of stable Fe-group material is also present. The relatively small amount of NSE material synthesized by SN2004eo explains both the dimness and the rapidly evolving light curve of this supernova.

  2. Abundance stratification in Type Ia Supernovae - II: The rapidly declining, spectroscopically normal SN 2004eo

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzali, P A; Pastorello, A; Benetti, S; Hillebrandt, W

    2008-01-01

    The variation of properties of Type Ia supernovae, the thermonuclear explosions of Chandrasekhar-mass carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, is caused by different nucleosynthetic outcomes of these explosions, which can be traced from the distribution of abundances in the ejecta. The composition stratification of the spectroscopically normal but rapidly declining SN2004eo is studied performing spectrum synthesis of a time-series of spectra obtained before and after maximum, and of one nebular spectrum obtained about eight months later. Early-time spectra indicate that the outer ejecta are dominated by oxygen and silicon, and contain other intermediate-mass elements (IME), implying that the outer part of the star was subject only to partial burning. In the inner part, nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) material dominates, but the production of 56Ni was limited to ~0.43 \\pm 0.05 Msun. An innermost zone containing ~0.25 Msun of stable Fe-group material is also present. The relatively small amount of NSE material synthes...

  3. Rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. Consensus paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, M E; Andrieu, S; Arbus, C; Ceccaldi, M; Couratier, P; Dantoine, T; Dartigues, J-F; Gillette-Guyonnet, S; Nourhashemi, F; Ousset, P-J; Poncet, M; Portet, F; Touchon, J; Vellas, B

    2008-12-01

    The rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD) varies considerably between individuals, with some subjects showing substantial deterioration and others showing little or no change over the course of the disease. These wide variations support the relatively new concept of Rapid Cognitive Decline (RCD). Patients with an accelerated rate of cognitive decline have showed to present a worse evolution in terms of mortality, loss of autonomy and institutionalisation. The conclusions from RCD studies conducted in the past years remain very heterogeneous and sometimes contradictory. This is possibly due to methodological differences, mainly the different "a priori" definitions of RCD used to identify rapid decliners. Consequently of this, there is considerable variation in reported frequency of patients with RCD which may vary from 9.5% to 54%. The lack of both consensus definition and consensual clinical assessment tools is one of the major barriers for establishing an appropriated management of rapid decliners in clinical practice. Presently, management of rapid decliners in AD remains to be a challenge waiting to better know predictive factors of a RCD. To date no specific guidelines exist to follow-up or to treat patients with this condition. This consensus paper proposes the loss of 3 points or greater in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) during six months as an empirical definition of rapid cognitive decline to be used in routine medical practice and to be relevant for clinical-decision making in patients with mild to moderately-severe AD.

  4. Invasive alien predator causes rapid declines of native European ladybirds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Helen E.; Adriaens, Tim; Isaac, Nick J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Aim Invasive alien species (IAS) are recognized as major drivers of biodiversity loss, but few causal relationships between IAS and species declines have been documented. In this study, we compare the distribution (Belgium and Britain) and abundance (Belgium, Britain and Switzerland) of formerly...... common and widespread native ladybirds before and after the arrival of Harmonia axyridis, a globally rapidly expanding IAS. Location Europe Methods We used generalized linear mixed-effects models (GLMMs) to assess the distribution trends of eight conspicuous and historically widespread and common species...... surveys of deciduous trees in Belgium, Britain and Switzerland. Results Five (Belgium) and seven (Britain) of eight species studied show substantial declines attributable to the arrival of H. axyridis. Indeed, the two-spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata, declined by 30% (Belgium) and 44% (Britain) over 5...

  5. Factors of Rapid Cognitive Decline in Late Onset Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskas, Pierre; Henry-Feugeas, Marie Cecile; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Ou, Phalla; Drunat, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Rapid Cognitive Decline (RCD) in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is associated with a worse disease progression. There is no consensual predictor of RCD and only a few studies have focused on RCD in late-onset dementia, the most common form of AD. To identify the predictors of RCD, in a population of community-dwelling patients with recently diagnosed late onset AD. Community-dwelling subjects aged >75 consulting for the first time in Old Age Memory outpatient center from 2009 to 2012 were considered. All patients underwent a standardized clinical dementia investigation. Patients were classified as rapid decliners when they demonstrated a loss of 3 points or greater in MMSE during the first six months. 130 patients were included (42 males, 88 females, mean ages 82.7±4.58). The average baseline MMSE score was 23.36±3.78. In regression analysis, the Free Recall Scores, categorical fluency scores were the most highly predictive of RCD. These results are important for the design of clinical trials and also, in clinical practice, for both physicians and families in planning long-term care. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Rapid decline of dissolved nitrogen in Finnish lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekolainen, Seppo; Mitikka, Sari; Vuorenmaa, Jussi; Johansson, Matti

    2005-03-01

    Since 1960s, phosphorus (P) has been considered to be most often the limiting factor for algal growth in freshwater lakes. Due to that, pollution control measures have been targeted to reduce P loading to lakes. In many countries these efforts have been successful: the P loadings, particularly through municipal waste waters have been reduced substantially, which has resulted in reduced P concentration of lake waters, and improvements in ecological quality of numerous lakes. Nitrogen reductions in wastewater treatment plants have started only in very recent years, and usually only in cities along the seashore. Analysis of the long-term lake monitoring data in Finland show a sharp decline of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, expressed as a sum of NO 2-N, NO 3-N and NH 4-N) during the 1990s. Most of these lakes are oligotrophic lakes with low human impact. Due to this, the relative contribution of air-borne nitrogen loading (deposition directly to the lake surface) is often higher than in lakes located in densely populated or in intensive agricultural regions. The DIN deposition monitoring results show approximately a 40% reduction during the same period as the decreasing DIN trend is observed in lakes. These trends in deposition can probably be explained by reductions in nitrogen emissions in Europe, in connection to air pollution control conventions, and in Eastern Europe also in connection to economical collapse at the beginning of 1990s. In many of the lakes with a significant decreasing trend, DIN concentrations in late summer are approaching very low levels (<20 μg l -1), indicating that nitrogen is possibly limiting algal growth at least seasonally. The observed trends are an example of how pollution control measures may result in a quick response, in this case unexpected, though not necessarily undesirable.

  7. Renal dysfunctions in glomerulonephropathy with rapidly declined renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrakul, N; Pochanugool, C; Sitprija, V; Singkhwa, V; Futrakul, P; Yenrudi, S; Sensirivatana, R; Watana, D; Poshyachinda, M

    1996-07-01

    Eight patients aged between 5 and 26 years developed rapid deterioration of renal function and became oliguric/anuric with duration ranging from 1 to 21 days. The initial functional assessment revealed severe degree of glomerular, tubular, and vascular dysfunctions. The magnitude of renal dysfunction was quantified and expressed in terms of a clinical score. The degree of glomerular and tubular dysfunctions were inversely proportional to the renal plasma flow and peritubular capillary blood flow (PTCB), respectively. Similar findings have been observed in a variety of severe glomerulonephropathies. In this aspect, it is likely that the reduction of peritubular capillary blood flow and tubulointerstitial disease are interrelated. Further evidence to support the primary role of reduction of PTCB in inducing tubulointerstitial disease is provided by the following: (a) Reduction of PTCB is documented in mesangial proliferative nephrosis with steroid resistance prior to the detection of tubulointerstitial disease. (b) Ischemic insult can induce tubulointerstitial disease in experimental setting of renal artery occlusion in animal, (c) Improved tubular function can be achieved following the increase in PTCB with the enhanced renal perfusion therapy.

  8. Rapid MR spectroscopic imaging of lactate using compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidya Shankar, Rohini; Agarwal, Shubhangi; Geethanath, Sairam; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.

    2015-03-01

    Imaging lactate metabolism in vivo may improve cancer targeting and therapeutics due to its key role in the development, maintenance, and metastasis of cancer. The long acquisition times associated with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), which is a useful technique for assessing metabolic concentrations, are a deterrent to its routine clinical use. The objective of this study was to combine spectral editing and prospective compressed sensing (CS) acquisitions to enable precise and high-speed imaging of the lactate resonance. A MRSI pulse sequence with two key modifications was developed: (1) spectral editing components for selective detection of lactate, and (2) a variable density sampling mask for pseudo-random under-sampling of the k-space `on the fly'. The developed sequence was tested on phantoms and in vivo in rodent models of cancer. Datasets corresponding to the 1X (fully-sampled), 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X, and 10X accelerations were acquired. The under-sampled datasets were reconstructed using a custom-built algorithm in MatlabTM, and the fidelity of the CS reconstructions was assessed in terms of the peak amplitudes, SNR, and total acquisition time. The accelerated reconstructions demonstrate a reduction in the scan time by up to 90% in vitro and up to 80% in vivo, with negligible loss of information when compared with the fully-sampled dataset. The proposed unique combination of spectral editing and CS facilitated rapid mapping of the spatial distribution of lactate at high temporal resolution. This technique could potentially be translated to the clinic for the routine assessment of lactate changes in solid tumors.

  9. An analysis of social consequences of rapid fertility decline in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Liu, L

    1988-12-01

    Rapid fertility decline in China has brought about 2 direct effects: 1) the natural increase of the population has slowed down, and 2) the age structure has changed from the young to the adult type. These 2 effects have caused a series of economic and social consequences. Rapid fertility decline increases the gross national product per capita and accelerates the improvement of people's lives. Rapid fertility decline slows population growth and speeds up the accumulation of capital and the development of the economy. Since 1981, accumulation growth has exceeded consumption growth. Fertility decline alleviates the enrollment pressure on primary and secondary schools, raises the efficiency of education funds, and promotes the popularization of education. The family planning program strengthens the maternal and child health care and the medical care systems. As the result of economic development, the people's nutritional levels are improving. The physical quality of teenagers has improved steadily. The change in the age structure will alleviate the tension of rapid population growth and benefit population control in the next century. Fertility decline forces the traditional attitude toward childbearing from "more children, more happiness" to improved quality of children. The rapid fertility decline has caused a great deal of concern both inside and outside China about the aging of the population. The labor force, however, will continue to grow for the next 60 years. At present, China's population problems are still those of population growth.

  10. Risks of rapid decline renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Jing; Sheen; Wayne; HH; Sheu

    2014-01-01

    Progressive rising population of diabetes and related nephropathy, namely, diabetic kidney disease and associated end stage renal disease has become a major global public health issue. Results of observational studies indicate that most diabetic kidney disease progresses over decades; however, certain diabetes patients display a rapid decline in renal function, which may lead to renal failure within months. Although the definition of rapid renal function decline remained speculative, in general,it is defined by the decrease of estimated glomerular filtration rate(e GFR) in absolute rate of loss or percent change. Based on the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes 2012 clinical practice guidelines, a rapid decline in renal function is defined as a sustained declinein e GFR of > 5 m L/min per 1.73 m2 per year. It has been reported that potential factors contributing to a rapid decline in renal function include ethnic/genetic and demographic causes, smoking habits, increased glycated hemoglobin levels, obesity, albuminuria, anemia, low serum magnesium levels, high serum phosphate levels, vitamin D deficiency, elevated systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity values, retinopathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. This article reviews current literatures in this area and provides insight on the early detection of diabetic subjects who are at risk of a rapid decline in renal function in order to develop a more aggressive approach to renal and cardiovascular protection.

  11. Consensus-based recommendations for the management of rapid cognitive decline due to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianping; Gauthier, Serge; Pallotta, Sarah; Ji, Yong; Wei, Wenshi; Xiao, Shifu; Peng, Dantao; Guo, Qihao; Wu, Liyong; Chen, Shengdi; Kuang, Weihong; Zhang, Junjian; Wei, Cuibai; Tang, Yi

    2017-05-01

    Rapid cognitive decline (RCD) occurs in dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Literature review, consensus meetings, and a retrospective chart review of patients with probable AD were conducted. Literature review showed that RCD definitions varied. Mini-Mental State Examination scores RCD risk factors. Chart review showed that RCD (Mini-Mental State Examination score decline ≥3 points/year) is more common in moderate (43.2%) than in mild patients (20.1%; P RCD is sufficiently common to interfere with randomized clinical trials. We propose a 6-month prerandomization determination of the decline rate or use of an RCD risk score to ensure balanced allocation among treatment groups. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid decline of a grassland system and its ecological and conservation implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Ceballos

    Full Text Available One of the most important conservation issues in ecology is the imperiled state of grassland ecosystems worldwide due to land conversion, desertification, and the loss of native populations and species. The Janos region of northwestern Mexico maintains one of the largest remaining black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus colony complexes in North America and supports a high diversity of threatened and endangered species. Yet, cattle grazing, agriculture, and drought have greatly impacted the region. We evaluated the impact of human activities on the Janos grasslands, comparing changes in the vertebrate community over the last two decades. Our results reveal profound, rapid changes in the Janos grassland community, demonstrating large declines in vertebrate abundance across all taxonomic groups. We also found that the 55,000 ha prairie dog colony complex has declined by 73% since 1988. The prairie dog complex has become increasingly fragmented, and their densities have shown a precipitous decline over the years, from an average density of 25 per ha in 1988 to 2 per ha in 2004. We demonstrated that prairie dogs strongly suppressed woody plant encroachment as well as created open grassland habitat by clearing woody vegetation, and found rapid invasion of shrubland once the prairie dogs disappeared from the grasslands. Comparison of grasslands and shrublands showed markedly different species compositions, with species richness being greatest when both habitats were considered together. Our data demonstrate the rapid decline of a grassland ecosystem, and documents the dramatic loss in biodiversity over a very short time period concomitant with anthropogenic grassland degradation and the decline of a keystone species.

  13. Rapid declines of large mammal populations after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragina, Eugenia V; Ives, A R; Pidgeon, A M; Kuemmerle, T; Baskin, L M; Gubar, Y P; Piquer-Rodríguez, M; Keuler, N S; Petrosyan, V G; Radeloff, V C

    2015-06-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that socioeconomic shocks strongly affect wildlife populations, but quantitative evidence is sparse. The collapse of socialism in Russia in 1991 caused a major socioeconomic shock, including a sharp increase in poverty. We analyzed population trends of 8 large mammals in Russia from 1981 to 2010 (i.e., before and after the collapse). We hypothesized that the collapse would first cause population declines, primarily due to overexploitation, and then population increases due to adaptation of wildlife to new environments following the collapse. The long-term Database of the Russian Federal Agency of Game Mammal Monitoring, consisting of up to 50,000 transects that are monitored annually, provided an exceptional data set for investigating these population trends. Three species showed strong declines in population growth rates in the decade following the collapse, while grey wolf (Canis lupus) increased by more than 150%. After 2000 some trends reversed. For example, roe deer (Capreolus spp.) abundance in 2010 was the highest of any period in our study. Likely reasons for the population declines in the 1990s include poaching and the erosion of wildlife protection enforcement. The rapid increase of the grey wolf populations is likely due to the cessation of governmental population control. In general, the widespread declines in wildlife populations after the collapse of the Soviet Union highlight the magnitude of the effects that socioeconomic shocks can have on wildlife populations and the possible need for special conservation efforts during such times. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. Polar bear and walrus response to the rapid decline in Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, K.; Whalen, M.; Douglas, D.; Udevitz, M.; Atwood, T.; Jay, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than other regions of the world due to positive climate feedbacks associated with loss of snow and ice. One highly visible consequence has been a rapid decline in Arctic sea ice over the past 3 decades - a decline projected to continue and result in ice-free summers likely as soon as 2030. The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) and the Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) are dependent on sea ice over the continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean's marginal seas. The continental shelves are shallow regions with high biological productivity, supporting abundant marine life within the water column and on the sea floor. Polar bears use sea ice as a platform for hunting ice seals; walruses use sea ice as a resting platform between dives to forage for clams and other bottom-dwelling invertebrates. How have sea ice changes affected polar bears and walruses? How will anticipated changes affect them in the future?

  15. P wave dispersion and maximum P wave duration are independently associated with rapid renal function decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ming Su

    Full Text Available The P wave parameters measured by 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG are commonly used as noninvasive tools to assess for left atrial enlargement. There are limited studies to evaluate whether P wave parameters are independently associated with decline in renal function. Accordingly, the aim of this study is to assess whether P wave parameters are independently associated with progression to renal end point of ≥25% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. This longitudinal study included 166 patients. The renal end point was defined as ≥25% decline in eGFR. We measured two ECG P wave parameters corrected by heart rate, i.e. corrected P wave dispersion (PWdisperC and corrected P wave maximum duration (PWdurMaxC. Heart function and structure were measured from echocardiography. Clinical data, P wave parameters, and echocardiographic measurements were compared and analyzed. Forty-three patients (25.9% reached renal end point. Kaplan-Meier curves for renal end point-free survival showed PWdisperC > median (63.0 ms (log-rank P = 0.004 and PWdurMaxC > median (117.9 ms (log-rank P<0.001 were associated with progression to renal end point. Multivariate forward Cox-regression analysis identified increased PWdisperC (hazard ratio [HR], 1.024; P = 0.001 and PWdurMaxC (HR, 1.029; P = 0.001 were independently associated with progression to renal end point. Our results demonstrate that increased PWdisperC and PWdurMaxC were independently associated with progression to renal end point. Screening patients by means of PWdisperC and PWdurMaxC on 12 lead ECG may help identify a high risk group of rapid renal function decline.

  16. Emerging infectious disease leads to rapid population declines of common British birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Robinson

    Full Text Available Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly cited as threats to wildlife, livestock and humans alike. They can threaten geographically isolated or critically endangered wildlife populations; however, relatively few studies have clearly demonstrated the extent to which emerging diseases can impact populations of common wildlife species. Here, we report the impact of an emerging protozoal disease on British populations of greenfinch Carduelis chloris and chaffinch Fringilla coelebs, two of the most common birds in Britain. Morphological and molecular analyses showed this to be due to Trichomonas gallinae. Trichomonosis emerged as a novel fatal disease of finches in Britain in 2005 and rapidly became epidemic within greenfinch, and to a lesser extent chaffinch, populations in 2006. By 2007, breeding populations of greenfinches and chaffinches in the geographic region of highest disease incidence had decreased by 35% and 21% respectively, representing mortality in excess of half a million birds. In contrast, declines were less pronounced or absent in these species in regions where the disease was found in intermediate or low incidence. Also, populations of dunnock Prunella modularis, which similarly feeds in gardens, but in which T. gallinae was rarely recorded, did not decline. This is the first trichomonosis epidemic reported in the scientific literature to negatively impact populations of free-ranging non-columbiform species, and such levels of mortality and decline due to an emerging infectious disease are unprecedented in British wild bird populations. This disease emergence event demonstrates the potential for a protozoan parasite to jump avian host taxonomic groups with dramatic effect over a short time period.

  17. FAST CARS Developing a Laser Spectroscopic Technique for Rapid Identification of Bacterial Spores

    CERN Document Server

    Scully, M O; Lucht, R P; Opatrny, T; Pilloff, H; Rebane, A; Sokolov, A V; Zubairy, M S

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time consuming microscopic, chemical and biological assays. Current research into real time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g. resonant Raman spectroscopy. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. The connection with previous studies based on "Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy" (CARS) is to be noted. However generating and utilizing maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is much more challenging. This extension of the CARS technique is called FAST CARS (Femtosecond Adaptive Spectroscopic Techniques for Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy), and the present paper proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify pre-selected molecules in real time.

  18. Rapid decline in lung function is temporally associated with greater metabolically active adiposity in a longitudinal study of healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moualla, Maan; Qualls, Clifford; Arynchyn, Alexander; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Kalhan, Ravi; Smith, Lewis J; Carr, John J; Jacobs, David R; Sood, Akshay

    2017-07-20

    Adiposity is associated with low lung function, but the longitudinal relationship between lung function and adiposity is inadequately studied. To examine the bidirectional longitudinal associations between rapid decline in lung function and adiposity phenotypes in healthy adults. This secondary analysis used a 25-year longitudinal dataset from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study that enrolled 5115 participants. In the first analysis, metabolic syndrome at or before CARDIA year (Y) 10 (Y10) was the predictor, and subsequent rapid decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) or forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) between Y10 and Y20 was the outcome. In the second analysis, rapid decline was the predictor, and incident metabolic syndrome at Y20 and/or Y25 was the outcome. In the third analysis, rapid decline was the predictor, and subsequent CT-assessed regional fat depots at Y25 were the outcome. Metabolic syndrome at or before Y10 is temporally associated with rapid decline in FVC between Y10 and Y20 (adjusted p=0.04), but this association was explained by body mass index (BMI) at Y10. Rapid decline in FVC or FEV1 is temporally associated with greater incident metabolic syndrome at Y20 and/or Y25 (adjusted OR 2.10 (1.69, 2.61); prapid decline in lung function are at risk for developing metabolic syndrome and for disproportionate accumulation of intrathoracic visceral fat. Metabolic abnormalities may be an early extrapulmonary manifestation of lung impairment that may be preventable by improving lung health. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Weight loss and rapid cognitive decline in community-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Maria E; Secher, Marion; Gillette-Guyonnet, Sophie; Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Andrieu, Sandrine; Nourhashemi, Fati; Rolland, Yves; Vellas, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Weight loss is a frequent complication of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a strong predictor of adverse outcomes in patients suffering from this disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether weight loss was a predictor of rapid cognitive decline (RCD) in AD. Four hundred fourteen community-dwelling ambulatory patients with a diagnosis of probable AD and a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score between 10 and 26 from the REAL.FR (REseau sur la maladie d'ALzheimer FRançais) cohort were studied and followed up during 4 years. Patients were classified in 2 groups according to weight loss defined by a loss of 4% or more during the first year of follow-up. RCD was defined as the loss of 3 points or more in MMSE over 6 months. The incidence of RCD was determined among both groups over the last 3 years of follow-up. MMSE, Katz's Activity of Daily Living scale, Mini-Nutritional Assessment scale, co-morbidities, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, medication, level of education, living arrangement, and caregiver's burden were assessed every 6 months. Eighty-seven patients (21.0%) lost 4% or more of their initial weight during the first year. The incidence of RCD for all patients was 57.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 51.6-64.8) per 100 person-year (median follow-up of 15.1 months). In Cox proportional hazards models, after controlling for potential confounders, weight loss was a significant predictor factor of RCD (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.04-2.17). In conclusion, weight loss predicted RCD in this cohort. Whether the prevention of weight loss (by improving nutritional status) impacts cognitive decline remains an open question.

  20. Losing a jewel—Rapid declines in Myanmar’s intact forests from 2002-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horning, Ned; Khaing, Thiri; Thein, Zaw Min; Aung, Kyaw Moe; Aung, Kyaw Htet; Phyo, Paing; Tun, Ye Lin; Oo, Aung Htat; Neil, Anthony; Thu, Win Myo; Songer, Melissa; Huang, Qiongyu; Connette, Grant; Leimgruber, Peter

    2017-01-01

    New and rapid political and economic changes in Myanmar are increasing the pressures on the country’s forests. Yet, little is known about the past and current condition of these forests and how fast they are declining. We mapped forest cover in Myanmar through a consortium of international organizations and environmental non-governmental groups, using freely-available public domain data and open source software tools. We used Landsat satellite imagery to assess the condition and spatial distribution of Myanmar’s intact and degraded forests with special focus on changes in intact forest between 2002 and 2014. We found that forests cover 42,365,729 ha or 63% of Myanmar, making it one of the most forested countries in the region. However, severe logging, expanding plantations, and degradation pose increasing threats. Only 38% of the country’s forests can be considered intact with canopy cover >80%. Between 2002 and 2014, intact forests declined at a rate of 0.94% annually, totaling more than 2 million ha forest loss. Losses can be extremely high locally and we identified 9 townships as forest conversion hotspots. We also delineated 13 large (>100,000 ha) and contiguous intact forest landscapes, which are dispersed across Myanmar. The Northern Forest Complex supports four of these landscapes, totaling over 6.1 million ha of intact forest, followed by the Southern Forest Complex with three landscapes, comprising 1.5 million ha. These remaining contiguous forest landscape should have high priority for protection. Our project demonstrates how open source data and software can be used to develop and share critical information on forests when such data are not readily available elsewhere. We provide all data, code, and outputs freely via the internet at (for scripts: https://bitbucket.org/rsbiodiv/; for the data: http://geonode.themimu.info/layers/geonode%3Amyan_lvl2_smoothed_dec2015_resamp) PMID:28520726

  1. Non-Destructive and rapid evaluation of staple foods quality by using spectroscopic techniques: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wen-Hao; He, Hong-Ju; Sun, Da-Wen

    2017-03-24

    Staple foods, including cereals, legumes, and root/tuber crops, dominate the daily diet of humans by providing valuable proteins, starch, oils, minerals, and vitamins. Quality evaluation of staple foods is primarily carried out on sensory (e.g. external defect, color), adulteration (e.g. species, origin), chemical (e.g. starch, proteins), mycotoxin (e.g. Fusarium toxin, aflatoxin), parasitic infection (e.g. weevil, beetle), and internal physiological (e.g. hollow heart, black heart) aspects. Conventional methods for the quality assessment of staple foods are always laborious, destructive, and time-consuming. Requirements for online monitoring of staple foods have been proposed to encourage the development of rapid, reagentless, and noninvasive techniques. Spectroscopic techniques, such as visible-infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and spectral imaging, have been introduced as promising analytical tools and applied for the quality evaluation of staple foods. This review summarizes the recent applications and progress of such spectroscopic techniques in determining various qualities of staple foods. Besides, challenges and future trends of these spectroscopic techniques are also presented.

  2. FAST CARS: engineering a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid identification of bacterial spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, M O; Kattawar, G W; Lucht, R P; Opatrny, T; Pilloff, H; Rebane, A; Sokolov, A V; Zubairy, M S

    2002-08-20

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is challenging. In particular, the short dephasing times and rapid internal conversion rates are major obstacles. However, adiabatic fast passage techniques and the ability to generate combs of phase-coherent femtosecond pulses provide tools for the generation and utilization of maximal quantum coherence in large molecules and biopolymers. We call this technique FAST CARS (femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy), and the present article proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify preselected molecules in real time.

  3. Rapid decline of the CO2 buffering capacity in the North Sea and implications for the North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, Helmuth; Prowe, A. E. Friederike; van Heuven, Steven; Bozec, Yann; de Baar, Hein J. W.; Schiettecatte, Laure-Sophie; Suykens, Kim; Kone, Mathieu; Borges, Alberto V.; Lima, Ivan D.; Doney, Scott C.

    2007-01-01

    New observations from the North Sea, a NW European shelf sea, show that between 2001 and 2005 the CO2 partial pressure (pCO(2)) in surface waters rose by 22 mu atm, thus faster than atmospheric pCO(2), which in the same period rose approximately 11 matm. The surprisingly rapid decline in air-sea par

  4. Rapid decline of the CO2 buffering capacity in the North Sea and implications for the North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, Helmuth; Prowe, A. E. Friederike; van Heuven, Steven; Bozec, Yann; de Baar, Hein J. W.; Schiettecatte, Laure-Sophie; Suykens, Kim; Kone, Mathieu; Borges, Alberto V.; Lima, Ivan D.; Doney, Scott C.

    2007-01-01

    New observations from the North Sea, a NW European shelf sea, show that between 2001 and 2005 the CO2 partial pressure (pCO(2)) in surface waters rose by 22 mu atm, thus faster than atmospheric pCO(2), which in the same period rose approximately 11 matm. The surprisingly rapid decline in air-sea

  5. Common European birds are declining rapidly while less abundant species' numbers are rising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inger, Richard; Gregory, Richard; Duffy, James P; Stott, Iain; Voříšek, Petr; Gaston, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity is undergoing unprecedented global decline. Efforts to slow this rate have focused foremost on rarer species, which are at most risk of extinction. Less interest has been paid to more common species, despite their greater importance in terms of ecosystem function and service provision. How rates of decline are partitioned between common and less abundant species remains unclear. Using a 30-year data set of 144 bird species, we examined Europe-wide trends in avian abundance and biomass. Overall, avian abundance and biomass are both declining with most of this decline being attributed to more common species, while less abundant species showed an overall increase in both abundance and biomass. If overall avian declines are mainly due to reductions in a small number of common species, conservation efforts targeted at rarer species must be better matched with efforts to increase overall bird numbers, if ecological impacts of birds are to be maintained. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  6. Spectroscopic measurements and terahertz imaging of the cornea using a rapid scanning terahertz time domain spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Quan, Liu; Yuan-Fu, Lu; Guo-Hua, Jiao; Xian-Feng, Chen; Zhi-Sheng, Zhou; Rong-Bin, She; Jin-Ying, Li; Si-Hai, Chen; Yu-Ming, Dong; Jian-Cheng, Lv

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic measurements and terahertz imaging of the cornea are carried out by using a rapid scanning terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system. A voice coil motor stage based optical delay line (VCM-ODL) is developed to provide a rather simple and robust structure with both the high scanning speed and the large delay length. The developed system is used for THz spectroscopic measurements and imaging of the corneal tissue with different amounts of water content, and the measurement results show the consistence with the reported results, in which the measurement time using VCM-ODL is a factor of 360 shorter than the traditional motorized optical delay line (MDL). With reducing the water content a monotonic decrease of the complex permittivity of the cornea is observed. The two-term Debye relaxation model is employed to explain our experimental results, revealing that the fast relaxation time of a dehydrated cornea is much larger than that of a hydrated cornea and its dielectric behavior can be affected by the presence of the biological macromolecules. These results demonstrate that our THz spectrometer may be a promising candidate for tissue hydration sensing and practical application of THz technology. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205101), the Shenzhen Municipal Research Foundation, China (Grant Nos. GJHZ201404171134305 and JCYJ20140417113130693), and the Marie Curie Actions-International Research Staff Exchange Scheme (IRSES) (Grant No. FP7 PIRSES-2013-612267).

  7. Further Results from the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey: Rapidly Rotating Late ON Giants

    CERN Document Server

    Walborn, Nolan R; Sota, Alfredo; Alfaro, Emilio J; Morrell, Nidia I; Barba, Rodolfo H; Arias, Julia I; Gamen, Roberto C

    2011-01-01

    With new data from the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey, we confirm and expand the ONn category of late-O, nitrogen-enriched (N), rapidly rotating (n) giants. In particular, we have discovered two "clones" (HD 102415 and HD 117490) of one of the most rapidly rotating O stars previously known (HD 191423, "Howarth's Star"). We compare the locations of these objects in the theoretical HR Diagram to those of slowly rotating ON dwarfs and supergiants. All ON giants known to date are rapid rotators, whereas no ON dwarf or supergiant is; but all ON stars are small fractions of their respective spectral-type/luminosity-class/rotational subcategories. The ONn giants, displaying both substantial processed material and high rotation at an intermediate evolutionary stage, may provide significant information about the development of those properties. They may have preserved high initial rotational velocities or been spun up by TAMS core contraction; but alternatively and perhaps more likely, they may be products of bi...

  8. Predictive value of rapid decline in mini mental state examination in clinical practice for prognosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Maria E; Andrieu, Sandrine; Cantet, Christelle; Reynish, Emma; Ousset, Pierre-Jean; Arbus, Christophe; Gillette-Guyonnet, Sophie; Nourhashémi, Fati; Vellas, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Given the poorer prognosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with rapid cognitive decline (RCD), there is a need for a clinical assessment tool to detect these patients. To investigate if there is a Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) threshold of decline during 6 months of follow-up which predicts a worse disease progression at the 2-year follow-up. Then, to propose a feasible definition of RCD for routine clinical practice. Data from 565 community-dwelling AD patients recruited in a multi-centre prospective observational study were assessed. All patients had MMSE scores between 10 and 26 at inclusion and were followed up 6-monthly using a standardised clinical assessment. Patients were classified as rapid and non-rapid decliners according to 2 MMSE decline thresholds tested: >or=3 points and >or=4 points for decline over the first 6 months of the study. Worse disease outcome was defined as attainment of 1 of 4 clinical end points 18 months later: institutionalisation, death, increased physical dependence or worsening of behavioural and psychological symptoms. 135 patients (23.9%) lost >or=3 points during the first 6 months of follow-up in the MMSE score and 77 patients (13.6%) lost >or=4 points. Patients with moderate disease and a loss of >or=4 points showed a significantly increased risk of mortality (HR = 5.6, 95% CI 2.0-15.9) and institutionalisation (HR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.8-8.1) at the 2-year follow-up. The same MMSE threshold was associated with a higher risk of physical decline (HR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.3). The loss of >or=4 points in MMSE during the first 6 months of follow-up seems to be a predictor of worse clinical course, and thus it could be used to define the category of AD patients presenting a RCD. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Slow Gait Speed and Rapid Renal Function Decline Are Risk Factors for Postoperative Delirium after Urological Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tendo Sato

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with postoperative delirium in patients undergoing urological surgery.We prospectively evaluated pre- and postoperative risk factors for postoperative delirium in consecutive 215 patients who received urological surgery between August 2013 and November 2014. Preoperative factors included patient demographics, comorbidities, and frailty assessment. Frailty was measured by handgrip strength, fatigue scale of depression, fall risk assessment, and gait speed (the timed Get-up and Go test. Postoperative factors included types of anesthesia, surgical procedure, renal function and serum albumin decline, blood loss, surgery time, highest body temperature, and complications. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess pre- and postoperative predictors for the development of postoperative delirium.Median age of this cohort was 67 years. Ten patients (4.7% experienced postoperative delirium. These patients were significantly older, had weak handgrip strength, a higher fall risk assessment score, slow gait speed, and greater renal function decline compared with patients without delirium. Multivariate analysis revealed slow gait speed (>13.0 s and rapid renal function decline (>30% were independent risk factors for postoperative delirium.Slow gait speed and rapid renal function decline after urological surgery are significant factors for postoperative delirium. These data will be helpful for perioperative patient management. This study was registered as a clinical trial: UMIN: R000018809.

  10. Lion (Panthera leo) populations are declining rapidly across Africa, except in intensively managed areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Hans; Chapron, Guillaume; Nowell, Kristin; Henschel, Philipp; Funston, Paul; Hunter, Luke T B; Macdonald, David W; Packer, Craig

    2015-12-01

    We compiled all credible repeated lion surveys and present time series data for 47 lion (Panthera leo) populations. We used a Bayesian state space model to estimate growth rate-λ for each population and summed these into three regional sets to provide conservation-relevant estimates of trends since 1990. We found a striking geographical pattern: African lion populations are declining everywhere, except in four southern countries (Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe). Population models indicate a 67% chance that lions in West and Central Africa decline by one-half, while estimating a 37% chance that lions in East Africa also decline by one-half over two decades. We recommend separate regional assessments of the lion in the World Conservation Union (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species: already recognized as critically endangered in West Africa, our analysis supports listing as regionally endangered in Central and East Africa and least concern in southern Africa. Almost all lion populations that historically exceeded ∼ 500 individuals are declining, but lion conservation is successful in southern Africa, in part because of the proliferation of reintroduced lions in small, fenced, intensively managed, and funded reserves. If management budgets for wild lands cannot keep pace with mounting levels of threat, the species may rely increasingly on these southern African areas and may no longer be a flagship species of the once vast natural ecosystems across the rest of the continent.

  11. Nondestructive and rapid concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form using raman spectroscopic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargi R Lakhwani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, nondestructive Raman spectroscopic method was developed for quantitative estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form. A Raman univariate calibration model was developed by measuring the peak intensities of paracetamol and nimesulide at 853 cm−1 and 1336 cm−1 , respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for in situ, concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage and method was also validated according to International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. Thus, the developed Raman spectroscopic method can be applied for simultaneous estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form as a process analytical technology tool by pharmaceutical industries for routine quality control.

  12. Rapid warming accelerates tree growth decline in semi-arid forests of Inner Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyan; Park Williams, A; Allen, Craig D; Guo, Dali; Wu, Xiuchen; Anenkhonov, Oleg A; Liang, Eryuan; Sandanov, Denis V; Yin, Yi; Qi, Zhaohuan; Badmaeva, Natalya K

    2013-08-01

    Forests around the world are subject to risk of high rates of tree growth decline and increased tree mortality from combinations of climate warming and drought, notably in semi-arid settings. Here, we assess how climate warming has affected tree growth in one of the world's most extensive zones of semi-arid forests, in Inner Asia, a region where lack of data limits our understanding of how climate change may impact forests. We show that pervasive tree growth declines since 1994 in Inner Asia have been confined to semi-arid forests, where growing season water stress has been rising due to warming-induced increases in atmospheric moisture demand. A causal link between increasing drought and declining growth at semi-arid sites is corroborated by correlation analyses comparing annual climate data to records of tree-ring widths. These ring-width records tend to be substantially more sensitive to drought variability at semi-arid sites than at semi-humid sites. Fire occurrence and insect/pathogen attacks have increased in tandem with the most recent (2007-2009) documented episode of tree mortality. If warming in Inner Asia continues, further increases in forest stress and tree mortality could be expected, potentially driving the eventual regional loss of current semi-arid forests.

  13. Large cross-sectional study of presbycusis reveals rapid progressive decline in auditory temporal acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmeral, Erol J; Eddins, Ann C; Frisina, D Robert; Eddins, David A

    2016-07-01

    The auditory system relies on extraordinarily precise timing cues for the accurate perception of speech, music, and object identification. Epidemiological research has documented the age-related progressive decline in hearing sensitivity that is known to be a major health concern for the elderly. Although smaller investigations indicate that auditory temporal processing also declines with age, such measures have not been included in larger studies. Temporal gap detection thresholds (TGDTs; an index of auditory temporal resolution) measured in 1071 listeners (aged 18-98 years) were shown to decline at a minimum rate of 1.05 ms (15%) per decade. Age was a significant predictor of TGDT when controlling for audibility (partial correlation) and when restricting analyses to persons with normal-hearing sensitivity (n = 434). The TGDTs were significantly better for males (3.5 ms; 51%) than females when averaged across the life span. These results highlight the need for indices of temporal processing in diagnostics, as treatment targets, and as factors in models of aging.

  14. Rapid bursts and slow declines: on the possible evolutionary trajectories of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Matilda S; Arcus, Vickery L; Patrick, Wayne M

    2015-06-06

    The evolution of enzymes is often viewed as following a smooth and steady trajectory, from barely functional primordial catalysts to the highly active and specific enzymes that we observe today. In this review, we summarize experimental data that suggest a different reality. Modern examples, such as the emergence of enzymes that hydrolyse human-made pesticides, demonstrate that evolution can be extraordinarily rapid. Experiments to infer and resurrect ancient sequences suggest that some of the first organisms present on the Earth are likely to have possessed highly active enzymes. Reconciling these observations, we argue that rapid bursts of strong selection for increased catalytic efficiency are interspersed with much longer periods in which the catalytic power of an enzyme erodes, through neutral drift and selection for other properties such as cellular energy efficiency or regulation. Thus, many enzymes may have already passed their catalytic peaks.

  15. Carbon system measurements and potential climatic drivers at a site of rapidly declining ocean pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, J Timothy; Pfister, Catherine A

    2012-01-01

    We explored changes in ocean pH in coastal Washington state, USA, by extending a decadal-scale pH data series, by reporting independent measures of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), spectrophotometric pH, and total alkalinity (TA), by exploring pH patterns over larger spatial scales, and by probing for long-term trends in environmental variables reflecting potentially important drivers of pH. We found that pH continued to decline in this area at a rapid rate, that pH exhibited high natural variability within years, that our measurements of pH corresponded well to spectrophotometric pH measures and expected pH calculated from DIC/TA, and that TA estimates based on salinity predicted well actual alkalinity. Multiple datasets reflecting upwelling, including water temperature, nutrient levels, phytoplankton abundance, the NOAA upwelling index, and data on local wind patterns showed no consistent trends over the period of our study. Multiple datasets reflecting precipitation change and freshwater runoff, including precipitation records, local and regional river discharge, salinity, nitrate and sulfate in rainwater, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rivers also showed no consistent trends over time. Dissolved oxygen did not decline over time, indicating that long-term changes did not result from shifts in contributions of respiration to pH levels. These tests of multiple potential drivers of the observed rapid rate of pH decline indicate a primary role for inorganic carbon and suggest that geochemical models of coastal ocean carbon fluxes need increased investigation.

  16. Rapid ongoing decline of Baird's tapir in Cusuco National Park, Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Niall P; Wheeler, Phil M; Coles, Tim; Bruford, Michael W

    2012-12-01

    During the International Tapir Symposium 16-21 Oct 2011, the conservation of Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) in Honduras received a boost with the signing of a memorandum of understanding between the Minister Director of the Honduran Institute of Conservation and Forestry (ICF) and the Tapir Specialist Group (TSG). Despite this agreement, accelerating levels of hunting and habitat loss continue to pose a threat to Baird's tapir in Honduras. An ongoing study in Cusuco National Park in northwestern Honduras has been monitoring changes in population dynamics of Baird's tapir since 2006 through the collection of occupancy data. The study has identified an increase in hunting pressure, coinciding with a drastic decline in the encounter rate with Baird's tapir spoor. Here, we examine the significance of a range of demographic variables on Baird's tapir occupancy in Cusuco National Park using the software PRESENCE, and simulate the effects of different management strategies on the future dynamics of the population using the stochastic simulation software VORTEX. The predictions of the theoretical population models are compared to observed changes in occupancy levels. We found that non-intervention resulted in the local extinction of Baird's tapir within a very short time frame, but that various intervention models enabled the population to recover to near carrying capacity. Occupancy and extinction probability were shown to respond markedly to the increase in hunting pressure; and occupancy models supported the future population predictions generated by VORTEX. Our study suggests that immediate intervention is required to reduce hunting pressure to near historical levels to prevent the imminent local extinction of the species.

  17. Rapid increases and time-lagged declines in amphibian occupancy after wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, Blake R.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Corn, Paul Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and severity of drought and wildfire. Aquatic and moisture-sensitive species, such as amphibians, may be particularly vulnerable to these modified disturbance regimes because large wildfires often occur during extended droughts and thus may compound environmental threats. However, understanding of the effects of wildfires on amphibians in forests with long fire-return intervals is limited. Numerous stand-replacing wildfires have occurred since 1988 in Glacier National Park (Montana, U.S.A.), where we have conducted long-term monitoring of amphibians. We measured responses of 3 amphibian species to fires of different sizes, severity, and age in a small geographic area with uniform management. We used data from wetlands associated with 6 wildfires that burned between 1988 and 2003 to evaluate whether burn extent and severity and interactions between wildfire and wetland isolation affected the distribution of breeding populations. We measured responses with models that accounted for imperfect detection to estimate occupancy during prefire (0-4 years) and different postfire recovery periods. For the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), occupancy was not affected for 6 years after wildfire. But 7-21 years after wildfire, occupancy for both species decreased ≥ 25% in areas where >50% of the forest within 500 m of wetlands burned. In contrast, occupancy of the boreal toad (Anaxyrus boreas) tripled in the 3 years after low-elevation forests burned. This increase in occupancy was followed by a gradual decline. Our results show that accounting for magnitude of change and time lags is critical to understanding population dynamics of amphibians after large disturbances. Our results also inform understanding of the potential threat of increases in wildfire frequency or severity to amphibians in the region.

  18. Rapid increases and time-lagged declines in amphibian occupancy after wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, Blake R; Lowe, Winsor H; Corn, Paul Stephen

    2013-02-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and severity of drought and wildfire. Aquatic and moisture-sensitive species, such as amphibians, may be particularly vulnerable to these modified disturbance regimes because large wildfires often occur during extended droughts and thus may compound environmental threats. However, understanding of the effects of wildfires on amphibians in forests with long fire-return intervals is limited. Numerous stand-replacing wildfires have occurred since 1988 in Glacier National Park (Montana, U.S.A.), where we have conducted long-term monitoring of amphibians. We measured responses of 3 amphibian species to fires of different sizes, severity, and age in a small geographic area with uniform management. We used data from wetlands associated with 6 wildfires that burned between 1988 and 2003 to evaluate whether burn extent and severity and interactions between wildfire and wetland isolation affected the distribution of breeding populations. We measured responses with models that accounted for imperfect detection to estimate occupancy during prefire (0-4 years) and different postfire recovery periods. For the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), occupancy was not affected for 6 years after wildfire. But 7-21 years after wildfire, occupancy for both species decreased ≥ 25% in areas where >50% of the forest within 500 m of wetlands burned. In contrast, occupancy of the boreal toad (Anaxyrus boreas) tripled in the 3 years after low-elevation forests burned. This increase in occupancy was followed by a gradual decline. Our results show that accounting for magnitude of change and time lags is critical to understanding population dynamics of amphibians after large disturbances. Our results also inform understanding of the potential threat of increases in wildfire frequency or severity to amphibians in the region.

  19. Primates decline rapidly in unprotected forests: evidence from a monitoring program with data constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovero, Francesco; Mtui, Arafat; Kitegile, Amani; Jacob, Philipo; Araldi, Alessandro; Tenan, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Growing threats to primates in tropical forests make robust and long-term population abundance assessments increasingly important for conservation. Concomitantly, monitoring becomes particularly relevant in countries with primate habitat. Yet monitoring schemes in these countries often suffer from logistic constraints and/or poor rigor in data collection, and a lack of consideration of sources of bias in analysis. To address the need for feasible monitoring schemes and flexible analytical tools for robust trend estimates, we analyzed data collected by local technicians on abundance of three species of arboreal monkey in the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania (two Colobus species and one Cercopithecus), an area of international importance for primate endemism and conservation. We counted primate social groups along eight line transects in two forest blocks in the area, one protected and one unprotected, over a span of 11 years. We applied a recently proposed open metapopulation model to estimate abundance trends while controlling for confounding effects of observer, site, and season. Primate populations were stable in the protected forest, while the colobines, including the endemic Udzungwa red colobus, declined severely in the unprotected forest. Targeted hunting pressure at this second site is the most plausible explanation for the trend observed. The unexplained variability in detection probability among transects was greater than the variability due to observers, indicating consistency in data collection among observers. There were no significant differences in both primate abundance and detectability between wet and dry seasons, supporting the choice of sampling during the dry season only based on minimizing practical constraints. Results show that simple monitoring routines implemented by trained local technicians can effectively detect changes in primate populations in tropical countries. The hierarchical Bayesian model formulation adopted provides a flexible

  20. Declining agricultural production in rapidly urbanizing semi-arid regions: policy tradeoffs and sustainability indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, André Q.; Arabi, Mazdak; Wostoupal, Benjamin C.; Goemans, Christopher G.; Zhang, Yao; Paustian, Keith

    2017-08-01

    In rapidly urbanizing semi-arid regions, increasing amounts of historically irrigated cropland lies permanently fallowed due to water court policies as agricultural water rights are voluntarily being sold to growing cities. This study develops an integrative framework for assessing the effects of population growth and land use change on agricultural production and evaluating viability of alternative management strategies, including alternative agricultural transfer methods, regional water ownership restrictions, and urban conservation. A partial equilibrium model of a spatially-diverse regional water rights market is built in application of the framework to an exemplary basin. The model represents agricultural producers as profit-maximizing suppliers and municipalities as cost-minimizing consumers of water rights. Results indicate that selling an agricultural water right today is worth up to two times more than 40 years of continued production. All alternative policies that sustain agricultural cropland and crop production decrease total agricultural profitability by diminishing water rights sales revenue, but in doing so, they also decrease municipal water acquisition costs. Defining good indicators and incorporating adequate spatial and temporal detail are critical to properly analyzing policy impacts. To best improve agricultural profit from production and sale of crops, short-term solutions include alternative agricultural transfer methods while long-term solutions incorporate urban conservation.

  1. Rapid declines in FEV1 and subsequent respiratory symptoms, illnesses, and mortality in coal miners in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeckman, L.A.F.; Wang, M.L.; Petsonk, E.L.; Wagner, G.R. [NIOSH, Morgantown, WV (USA). Division of Respiratory District Studies, Center for District Control and Prevention and Human Services

    2001-03-01

    Coal mine dust exposure is associated with accelerated loss of lung function. The authors assessed long-term health outcomes in two groups of underground coal miners who during previous mine surveys had shown either high rates of FEV1 decline (cases, n = 310) or relatively stable lung function (referents, n = 324). Cases and referents were matched initially for age, height, smoking status, and FEV,. The authors determined vital status for 561 miners, and obtained a follow-up questionnaire for 121 cases and 143 referents. Responses on the follow-up questionnaire were compared with those on the last previous mine health survey questionnaire. Cases showed a greater incidence of symptoms than did referents for cough, phlegm production, Grades II and III dyspnea, and wheezing, and greater incidences than referents of chronic bronchitis and self-reported asthma and emphysema. More cases than referents (15% versus 4%) left mining before retirement because of chest illnesses. After controls were applied for age and smoking, cases had twice the risk of dying of cardiovascular and nonmalignant respiratory diseases and a 3.2-fold greater risk of dying of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease than did referents. Rapid declines in FEV1 experienced by some coal miners are associated with subsequent increases in respiratory symptoms, illnesses, and mortality from cardiovascular and nonmalignant respiratory diseases.

  2. FAST CARS: Engineering a Laser Spectroscopic Technique for Rapid Identification of Bacterial Spores

    OpenAIRE

    Scully, M. O.; Kattawar, G. W.; Lucht, R. P.; Opatrný, T.; Pilloff, H.; Rebane, A.; Sokolov, A.V.(Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia); Zubairy, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromole...

  3. Rapid, broadband spectroscopic temperature measurement of CO2 using VIPA spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Klose, Andrew; Cruz, Flavio C; Maser, Daniel L; Diddams, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic temperature measurements of a sealed carbon dioxide sample cell were realized with an optical frequency comb combined with a two-dimensional dispersive spectrometer. A supercontinuum laser source based on an erbium fiber mode-locked laser was employed to generate coherent light around 2000 nm (5000 cm-1). The laser was passed through a 12-cm long cell containing CO2, and the transmitted light was analyzed in a virtually imaged phased array- (VIPA-) based spectrometer. Broadband spectra spanning more than 100 cm-1 with a spectral resolution of roughly 0.075 cm-1 (2.2 GHz) were acquired with an integration period of 2 ms. The temperature of the CO2 sample was deduced from fitting a modeled spectrum to the line intensities of the experimentally acquired spectrum. Temperature dynamics on the time scale of milliseconds were observed with a temperature resolution of 2.6 K. The spectroscopically-deduced temperatures agreed with temperatures of the sample cell measured with a thermistor. P...

  4. Rapid, broadband spectroscopic temperature measurement of hbox {CO}_2 using VIPA spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Andrew; Ycas, Gabriel; Cruz, Flavio C.; Maser, Daniel L.; Diddams, Scott A.

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic temperature measurements of a sealed carbon dioxide sample cell were realized with an optical frequency comb combined with a two-dimensional dispersive spectrometer. A supercontinuum laser source based on an erbium fiber mode-locked laser was employed to generate coherent light around 2000 nm (5000hbox { cm}^{-1}). The laser was passed through a 12-cm-long cell containing hbox {CO}_2, and the transmitted light was analyzed in a virtually imaged phased array-based spectrometer. Broadband spectra spanning more than 100hbox { cm}^{-1 } with a spectral resolution of roughly 0.075hbox { cm}^{-1} (2.2 GHz) were acquired with an integration period of 2 ms. The temperature of the hbox {CO}_2 sample was deduced from fitting a modeled spectrum to the line intensities of the experimentally acquired spectrum. Temperature dynamics on the timescale of milliseconds were observed with a temperature resolution of 2.6 K. The spectroscopically deduced temperatures agreed with temperatures of the sample cell measured with a thermistor. Potential applications of this technique include quantitative measurement of carbon dioxide concentration and temperature dynamics in gas-phase chemical reactions (e.g., combustion) and plasma diagnostics.

  5. Portable optical fiber probe-based spectroscopic scanner for rapid cancer diagnosis: a new tool for intraoperative margin assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Niyom; Kang, Jeon Woong; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Feld, Michael S; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2012-01-01

    There continues to be a significant clinical need for rapid and reliable intraoperative margin assessment during cancer surgery. Here we describe a portable, quantitative, optical fiber probe-based, spectroscopic tissue scanner designed for intraoperative diagnostic imaging of surgical margins, which we tested in a proof of concept study in human tissue for breast cancer diagnosis. The tissue scanner combines both diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS), and has hyperspectral imaging capability, acquiring full DRS and IFS spectra for each scanned image pixel. Modeling of the DRS and IFS spectra yields quantitative parameters that reflect the metabolic, biochemical and morphological state of tissue, which are translated into disease diagnosis. The tissue scanner has high spatial resolution (0.25 mm) over a wide field of view (10 cm × 10 cm), and both high spectral resolution (2 nm) and high spectral contrast, readily distinguishing tissues with widely varying optical properties (bone, skeletal muscle, fat and connective tissue). Tissue-simulating phantom experiments confirm that the tissue scanner can quantitatively measure spectral parameters, such as hemoglobin concentration, in a physiologically relevant range with a high degree of accuracy (tissues showed that the tissue scanner can detect small foci of breast cancer in a background of normal breast tissue. This tissue scanner is simpler in design, images a larger field of view at higher resolution and provides a more physically meaningful tissue diagnosis than other spectroscopic imaging systems currently reported in literatures. We believe this spectroscopic tissue scanner can provide real-time, comprehensive diagnostic imaging of surgical margins in excised tissues, overcoming the sampling limitation in current histopathology margin assessment. As such it is a significant step in the development of a platform technology for intraoperative management of cancer, a

  6. Portable optical fiber probe-based spectroscopic scanner for rapid cancer diagnosis: a new tool for intraoperative margin assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyom Lue

    Full Text Available There continues to be a significant clinical need for rapid and reliable intraoperative margin assessment during cancer surgery. Here we describe a portable, quantitative, optical fiber probe-based, spectroscopic tissue scanner designed for intraoperative diagnostic imaging of surgical margins, which we tested in a proof of concept study in human tissue for breast cancer diagnosis. The tissue scanner combines both diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS, and has hyperspectral imaging capability, acquiring full DRS and IFS spectra for each scanned image pixel. Modeling of the DRS and IFS spectra yields quantitative parameters that reflect the metabolic, biochemical and morphological state of tissue, which are translated into disease diagnosis. The tissue scanner has high spatial resolution (0.25 mm over a wide field of view (10 cm × 10 cm, and both high spectral resolution (2 nm and high spectral contrast, readily distinguishing tissues with widely varying optical properties (bone, skeletal muscle, fat and connective tissue. Tissue-simulating phantom experiments confirm that the tissue scanner can quantitatively measure spectral parameters, such as hemoglobin concentration, in a physiologically relevant range with a high degree of accuracy (<5% error. Finally, studies using human breast tissues showed that the tissue scanner can detect small foci of breast cancer in a background of normal breast tissue. This tissue scanner is simpler in design, images a larger field of view at higher resolution and provides a more physically meaningful tissue diagnosis than other spectroscopic imaging systems currently reported in literatures. We believe this spectroscopic tissue scanner can provide real-time, comprehensive diagnostic imaging of surgical margins in excised tissues, overcoming the sampling limitation in current histopathology margin assessment. As such it is a significant step in the development of a

  7. Rapid decline in 51Cr-EDTA measured renal function during the first weeks following lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, M.; Iversen, M.; Steffensen, I.;

    2009-01-01

    We previously described a 54% decline in renal function at 6 months after lung transplantation (LTx). We hypothesized that this decline is a very early event following LTx. Thirty-one consecutive patients (16 females/15 males), mean age 49 (+/-13) years, with emphysema, cystic fibrosis/bronchiect...

  8. Identification of Novel Circulating Biomarkers Predicting Rapid Decline in Renal Function in Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kirsten E; Davis, Wendy A; Ito, Jun; Winfield, Kaye; Stoll, Thomas; Bringans, Scott D; Lipscombe, Richard J; Davis, Timothy M E

    2017-08-29

    To assess the ability of plasma apolipoprotein (apo) A-IV (apoA4), apo C-III, CD5 antigen-like (CD5L), complement C1q subcomponent subunit B (C1QB), complement factor H-related protein 2, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IBP3) to predict rapid decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in type 2 diabetes. Mass spectrometry was used to measure baseline biomarkers in 345 community-based patients (mean age 67.0 years, 51.9% males) from the Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine clinical predictors of rapid eGFR decline trajectory defined by semiparametric group-based modeling over a 4-year follow-up period. The incremental benefit of each biomarker was then assessed. Similar analyses were performed for a ≥30% eGFR fall, incident chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), and eGFR decline of ≥5 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/year. Based on eGFR trajectory analysis, 35 participants (10.1%) were defined as "rapid decliners" (mean decrease 2.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/year). After adjustment for clinical predictors, apoA4, CD5L, and C1QB independently predicted rapid decline (odds ratio 2.40 [95% CI 1.24-4.61], 0.52 [0.29-0.93], and 2.41 [1.14-5.11], respectively) and improved model performance and fit (P < 0.001), discrimination (area under the curve 0.75-0.82, P = 0.039), and reclassification (net reclassification index 0.76 [0.63-0.89]; integrated discrimination improvement 6.3% [2.1-10.4%]). These biomarkers and IBP3 contributed to improved model performance in predicting other indices of rapid eGFR decline. The current study has identified novel plasma biomarkers (apoA4, CD5L, C1QB, and IBP3) that may improve the prediction of rapid decline in renal function independently of recognized clinical risk factors in type 2 diabetes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Injecting drug use is associated with a more rapid CD4 cell decline among treatment naïve HIV-positive patients in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinta Meijerink

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It remains unclear whether the natural course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV differs in subjects infected through injecting drug use (IDU and no data have been published from low- or middle-income countries. We addressed this question in an urban cohort in Indonesia, which is experiencing a rapidly growing HIV epidemic strongly driven by IDU. Methods: All antiretroviral treatment (ART naïve HIV-positive patients who had at least two subsequent CD4 cell counts available before starting ART were included in this study. We examined the association between IDU and CD4 cell decline using a linear mixed model, with adjustment for possible confounders such as HIV viral load and hepatitis C antibodies. Results: Among 284 HIV-positive ART naïve patients, the majority were male (56% with a history of IDU (79% among men. People with a history of IDU had a statistically significant faster decline in CD4 cells (p<0.001. Based on our data, patients with a history of IDU would have an average 33% decline in CD4 cells after one year without ART, compared with a 22% decline among non-users. At two years, the decline would average 66 and 40%, respectively. No other factor was significantly associated with CD4 cell decline. Conclusions: We show that a history of IDU is associated with a more rapid CD4 cell natural decline among HIV-positive individuals in Indonesia. These findings have implications for monitoring ART naïve patients with a history of IDU and for starting ART in this group.

  10. Freeze-quench magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic study of the very rapid intermediate in xanthine oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.M.; Inscore, F.E.; Hille, R.; Kirk, M.L.

    1999-11-01

    Freeze-quench magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (MCD) has been used to trap and study the excited-state electronic structure of the Mo(V) active site in a xanthine oxidase intermediate generated with substoichiometric concentrations of the slow substrate 2-hydroxy-6-methylpurine. EPR spectroscopy has shown that the intermediate observed in the MCD experiment is the very rapid intermediate, which lies on the main catalytic pathway. The observed in the MCD experiment is the very rapid intermediate, which lies on the main catalytic pathway. The low-energy ({lt}{approximately}30,000 cm{sup {minus}1}) C-term MCD of this intermediate is remarkably similar to that of the model compound LMoO(bdt)(L = hydrotris(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)borate; bdt = 1,2-benzenedithiolate), and the MCD bands have been assigned as dithiolate S{sub ip} {yields} Mo d{sub xy} and S{sub op} {yields} Mo d{sub xz,yz} LMCT transitions. These transitions result from a coordination geometry of the intermediate where the Mo{double{underscore}bond}O bond is oriented cis to the ene-1,2-dithiolate of the pyranopterin. Since X-ray crystallography has indicated that a terminal sulfido ligand is oriented cis to the ene-1,2-dithiolate in oxidized xanthine oxidase related Desulfovibrio gigas aldehyde oxidoreductase, the authors have suggested that a conformational change occurs upon substrate binding. The substrate-mediated conformational change is extremely significant with respect to electron-transfer regeneration of the active site, as covalent interactions between the redox-active Mo d{sub xy} orbital and the S{sub ip} orbitals of the ene-1,2-dithiolate are maximized when the oxo ligand is oriented cis to the dithiolate plane. This underlies the importance of the ene-1,2-dithiolate portion of the pyranopterin in providing an efficient superexchange pathway for electron transfer. The results of this study indicate that electron-transfer regeneration of the active site may be gated by the orientation

  11. Using rapid diagnostic tests as source of malaria parasite DNA for molecular analyses in the era of declining malaria prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishengoma, Deus S; Lwitiho, Sudi; Madebe, Rashid A

    2011-01-01

    Malaria prevalence has recently declined markedly in many parts of Tanzania and other sub-Saharan African countries due to scaling-up of control interventions including more efficient treatment regimens (e.g. artemisinin-based combination therapy) and insecticide-treated bed nets. Although contin...

  12. Rapid decline in 51Cr-EDTA measured renal function during the first weeks following lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mads; Iversen, Martin; Steffensen, Ida

    2009-01-01

    We previously described a 54% decline in renal function at 6 months after lung transplantation (LTx). We hypothesized that this decline is a very early event following LTx. Thirty-one consecutive patients (16 females/15 males), mean age 49 (+/-13) years, with emphysema, cystic fibrosis/bronchiect......We previously described a 54% decline in renal function at 6 months after lung transplantation (LTx). We hypothesized that this decline is a very early event following LTx. Thirty-one consecutive patients (16 females/15 males), mean age 49 (+/-13) years, with emphysema, cystic fibrosis....../bronchiectasis or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis were included in an analysis of renal function before and after LTx. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured using the (51)Cr-ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid plasma clearance single injection technique (mGFR) at baseline before transplantation and at 1, 2, 3 and 12...... renal failure within 2 weeks post-LTx (p = 0.0003), use of heart and lung machine (p = 0.04), and the use of ephedrine (p = 0.048), as well as increasing age, older than 18 years at LTx (p = 0.006). These data demonstrate that renal function, measured with an isotope method, decreases dramatically...

  13. Rapid population decline in red knots : fitness consequences of decreased refuelling rates and late arrival in Delaware Bay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, AJ; Gonzalez, PM; Piersma, T; Niles, LJ; do Nascimento, IDS; Atkinson, PW; Clark, NA; Minton, CDT; Peck, MK; Aarts, G

    2004-01-01

    Most populations of migrant shorebirds around the world are in serious decline, suggesting that vital condition-dependent rates such as fecundity and annual survival are being affected globally. A striking example is the red knot (Calidris canutus rufa) population wintering in Tierra del Fuego, whic

  14. Rapid population decline in red knots: fitness consequences of decreased refuelling rates and late arrival in Delaware Bay

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, AJ; Gonzalez, PM; Piersma, T; Niles, LJ; do Nascimento, IDS; Atkinson, PW; Clark, NA; Minton, CDT; Peck, MK; Aarts, G.

    2004-01-01

    Most populations of migrant shorebirds around the world are in serious decline, suggesting that vital condition-dependent rates such as fecundity and annual survival are being affected globally. A striking example is the red knot (Calidris canutus rufa) population wintering in Tierra del Fuego, which undertakes marathon 30,000 km hemispheric migrations annually. In spring, migrant birds forage voraciously on horseshoe crab eggs in Delaware Bay in the eastern USA before departing to breed in A...

  15. Rapid population decline in red knots: fitness consequences of decreased refuelling rates and late arrival in Delaware Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Allan J; González, Patricia M; Piersma, Theunis; Niles, Lawrence J; do Nascimento, Inês de Lima Serrano; Atkinson, Philip W; Clark, Nigel A; Minton, Clive D T; Peck, Mark K; Aarts, Geert

    2004-04-22

    Most populations of migrant shorebirds around the world are in serious decline, suggesting that vital condition-dependent rates such as fecundity and annual survival are being affected globally. A striking example is the red knot (Calidris canutus rufa) population wintering in Tierra del Fuego, which undertakes marathon 30,000 km hemispheric migrations annually. In spring, migrant birds forage voraciously on horseshoe crab eggs in Delaware Bay in the eastern USA before departing to breed in Arctic polar deserts. From 1997 to 2002 an increasing proportion of knots failed to reach threshold departure masses of 180-200 g, possibly because of later arrival in the Bay and food shortage from concurrent over-harvesting of crabs. Reduced nutrient storage, especially in late-arriving birds, possibly combined with reduced sizes of intestine and liver during refuelling, had severe fitness consequences for adult survival and recruitment of young in 2000-2002. From 1997 to 2002 known survivors in Delaware Bay were heavier at initial capture than birds never seen again, annual survival of adults decreased by 37% between May 2000 and May 2001, and the number of second-year birds in wintering flocks declined by 47%. Population size in Tierra del Fuego declined alarmingly from 51,000 to 27,000 in 2000-2002, seriously threatening the viability of this subspecies. Demographic modelling predicts imminent endangerment and an increased risk of extinction of the subspecies without urgent risk-averse management.

  16. Rapid decrease in horn size of bighorn sheep: environmental decline, inbreeding depression, or evolutionary response to trophy hunting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Philip W

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous examples demonstrating that selection has greatly influenced phenotypes in wild-harvested species. Here, a significant reduction in horn size in trophy desert bighorn sheep rams over 30 years in a reintroduced population in Aravaipa Canyon, Arizona is documented. After examining the potential effects of a detrimental change in the environment, inbreeding depression, and hunter-caused evolutionary change, it appears that environmental deterioration, apparently from the effects of drought, may be a major cause of the decline in horn size. In particular, the reduction in ram horn size is positively associated with reduced winter lifetime rainfall over the 3 decades. Over the same period, the demographic indicator lamb-to-ewe ratio has also declined in the Aravaipa population. On the other hand, lamb-to-ewe ratio has not declined statewide in Arizona, and the population size in Aravaipa appears to be increasing, suggesting local- and trait-specific effects. Using a theoretical context, neither inbreeding depression nor hunter selection by themselves appear to the sole causes of the lower horn size. However, some combination of environmental factors, inbreeding depression, and hunter selection may have caused the decrease in observed horn size. It is not clear what management actions might be successful in countering the environmental effects on horn size, but supplemental feeding and cattle removal are suggested while translocation is suggested to counter the effects of inbreeding depression and reduced hunting and translocation are suggested to counter the effects of hunter selection.

  17. Nephrotic range proteinuria as a strong risk factor for rapid renal function decline during pre-dialysis phase in type 2 diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitai, Yuichiro; Doi, Yohei; Osaki, Keisuke; Sugioka, Sayaka; Koshikawa, Masao; Sugawara, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Proteinuria is an established risk factor for progression of renal disease, including diabetic nephropathy. The predictive power of proteinuria, especially nephrotic range proteinuria, for progressive renal deterioration has been well demonstrated in diabetic patients with normal to relatively preserved renal function. However, little is known about the relationship between severity of proteinuria and renal outcome in pre-dialysis diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function. 125 incident dialysis patients with type 2 diabetes were identified. This study was aimed at retrospectively evaluating the impact of nephrotic range proteinuria (urinary protein-creatinine ratio above 3.5 g/gCr) on renal function decline during the 3 months just prior to dialysis initiation. In total, 103 patients (82.4 %) had nephrotic range proteinuria. The median rate of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in this study population was 0.98 (interquartile range 0.51-1.46) ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month. Compared to patients without nephrotic range proteinuria, patients with nephrotic range proteinuria showed significantly faster renal function decline (0.46 [0.24-1.25] versus 1.07 [0.64-1.54] ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month; p = 0.007). After adjusting for gender, age, systolic blood pressure, serum albumin, calcium-phosphorus product, hemoglobin A1c, and use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker, patients with nephrotic range proteinuria showed a 3.89-fold (95 % CI 1.08-14.5) increased risk for rapid renal function decline defined as a decline in eGFR ≥0.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month. Nephrotic range proteinuria is the predominant renal risk factor in type 2 diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function receiving pre-dialysis care.

  18. The Increase of the Ice-free Season as Further Indication of the Rapid Decline of the Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, J.

    2008-12-01

    The unprecedented depletion of sea ice in large sectors of the Arctic Ocean in the summer of 2007 has been the subject of many publications which highlight the spectacular disappearance of the sea ice at the time of minimum ice cover or emphasise the losses at very high latitudes. However, minimum values can be strongly affected by specific circumstances occurring in a comparatively short time interval. The unusually clear skies and the presence of a particular wind pattern over the Arctic Ocean may partly explain the record minimum attained in September 2007. In this contribution, instead of limiting ourselves to the September minimum or the March maximum, we consider the ice conditions throughout the year, opting for a less used, and hopefully more convenient approach. We chose as variables to describe the evolution of the sea ice situation in the Arctic Ocean and peripheral seas in the 1979-2007 period the length of the ice- free season (LIFS) and the inverse sea ice index (ISII). The latter is a quantity that measures the degree of absence of sea ice in a year and varies between zero (when there is a perennial ice cover) and one (when there is open water all year round). We used sea ice concentration data obtained from passive microwave satellite imagery and processed with the Bootstrap algorithm for the SMMR and SSM/I periods, and with the Enhanced NASA Team algorithm for the AMSR-E period. From a linear fit of the observed data, we found that the average LIFS in the Arctic went from 118 days in the late 1970s to 148 days in 2006, which represents an average rate of increase of 1.1 days/year. In the period 2001-2007 the LIFS increased monotonically at an average rate of 5.5 days/year, in good agreement with the general consensus that the Arctic sea ice is currently in an accelerated decline. We also found that 2007 was the longest ice- free season on record (168 days). The ISII also reached a maximum in 2007 . We also investigated what happened at the regional

  19. Declination Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Declination is calculated using the current International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model. Declination is calculated using the current World Magnetic Model...

  20. Rapid CD4 decline after interruption of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watcharananan Siriorn

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI with stavudine and lamivudine is widely used as the first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART in resource-limited settings. Lipodystrophy is common and options for switching ART regimen are limited; this situation can lead to patients' poor adherence and antiretroviral resistance. Treatment interruption (TI in patients with high CD4 cell counts, lipodystrophy, and limited options may be an alternative in resource-limited settings. This study aimed to determine time to resume ART after TI and predictors for early resumption of ART in a resource-limited setting. Methods A prospective study was conducted in January 2005 to December 2006 and enrolled HIV-infected patients with HIV-1 RNA 350 cells/mm3, and willing to interrupt ART. CD4 cell count, HIV-1 RNA, lipid profile, and lipodystrophy were assessed at baseline and every 3 months. ART was resumed when CD4 declined to 3 or developed HIV-related symptoms. Patients were grouped based on ART regimens [NNRTI or protease inhibitor (PI] prior to TI. Results There were 99 patients, 85 in NNRTI group and 14 in PI group. Mean age was 40.6 years; 46% were males. Median duration of ART was 47 months. Median nadir CD4 and baseline CD4 were 151 and 535 cells/mm3, respectively. Median CD4 change at 3 months after TI were -259 (NNRTI and -105 (PI cells/mm3 (p = 0.038. At 13-month median follow-up, there was no AIDS-defining illness; 38% (NNRTI and 29% (PI of patients developed HIV-related symptoms. ART was resumed in 51% (NNRTI and 36% (PI of patients (p = 0.022. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, median time to resume ART was 5.5 (NNRTI and 14.2 (PI months (log rank test, p = 0.026. By Cox's regression analysis, NNRTI-based ART (HR 4.9; 95%CI, 1.5–16.3, nadir CD4 3 (HR 2.7; 95%CI 1.4–5.3 and baseline CD4 3 (HR 1.6; 95%CI, 1.2–3.1 were predictors for early ART resumption. Conclusion TI of NNRTI-based ART leads to rapid CD4 decline and high

  1. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of spin-on dopant layers used in proximity rapid thermal diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Borja, Fernando; Grabiec, Piotr B.; Zagozdzon-Wasik, Wanda; Wood, Lowell L.

    1994-01-01

    A new rapid thermal diffusion (proximity RTD) method, utilizing spin-on dopant (SOD) layers, was reported recently. This technique is based on an evaporation-gas phase diffusion- adsorption-surface reaction-diffusion in Si scheme. In this paper we use FTIR spectroscopy to investigate a relationship between the SOD layer structure/composition and its doping efficiency, as determined by sheet resistance (RS) measurements, for a phosphorus diffusion case.

  2. Fat and Moisture Content in Chinese Fried Bread Sticks: Assessment and Rapid Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Method Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuqing Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fried bread sticks (FBS are one of the most widely consumed deep fried food products in China. Understanding the fat and moisture content in FBS will help consumers make healthy food choices as well as assist food processors to provide FBS with desirable quality. Rapid Fourier transform near-infrared methods (FT-NIR were developed for determining fat and moisture content in FBS collected from 123 different vendors in Shanghai, China. FBS samples with minimum sample preparation (either finely or coarsely ground were used for NIR analyses. Spectra of FBS were treated with different mathematic pretreatments before being used to build models between the spectral information and fat (7.71%–30.89% or moisture (17.39%–32.65% content in FBS. Finely ground samples may lead to slightly more robust PLS models, but the particle sizes of ground FBS samples did not seriously affect the predictability of the models with appropriate mathematical treatments. The fat and moisture content in FBS predicted by FT-NIR methods had very good correlation with their values determined via traditional methods (fat, R2=0.965; moisture, R2=0.983, which clearly indicated that FT-NIR methods could be used as an effective tool for rapid determination of fat and moisture content in FBS.

  3. Rapid Detection of Melamine in Tap Water and Milk Using Conjugated "One-Step" Molecularly Imprinted Polymers-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaxi; Lu, Xiaonan

    2016-05-01

    An innovative "one-step" sensor conjugating molecularly imprinted polymers and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic-active substrate (MIPs-SERS) was investigated for simultaneous extraction and determination of melamine in tap water and milk. This sensor was fabricated by integrating silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with MIPs synthesized by bulk polymerization of melamine (template), methacrylic acid (functional monomer), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (cross-linking agent), and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator). Static and kinetic adsorption tests validated the specific affinity of MIPs-AgNPs to melamine and the rapid adsorption equilibration rate. Principal component analysis segregated SERS spectral features of tap water and milk samples with different melamine concentrations. Partial least squares regression models correlated melamine concentrations in tap water and skim milk with SERS spectral features. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of melamine in tap water were determined as 0.0019 and 0.0064 mmol/L, while the LOD and LOQ were 0.0165 and 0.055 mmol/L for the determination of melamine in skim milk. However, this sensor is not ideal to quantify melamine in tap water and skim milk. By conjugating MIPs with SERS-active substrate (that is, AgNPs), reproducibility of SERS spectral features was increased, resulting in more accurate detection. The time required to determine melamine in tap water and milk were 6 and 25 min, respectively. The low LOD, LOQ, and rapid detection confirm the potential of applying this sensor for accurate and high-throughput detection of melamine in tap water and milk.

  4. Does a Rapid Decline in the Hematological and Biochemical Parameters Induced by Interferon and Ribavirin Combination Therapy for the Hepatitis C Virus Predict a Sustained Viral Response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Turbide

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To analyze whether rapid myelosuppression and a decrease in alanine aminotransferase (ALT induced by standard interferon (IFN and ribavirin (RBV combination therapy predict a sustained viral response (SVR in hepatitis C virus patients.

  5. A draft de novo genome assembly for the northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus reveals evidence for a rapid decline in effective population size beginning in the Late Pleistocene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette A Halley

    Full Text Available Wild populations of northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus; hereafter bobwhite have declined across nearly all of their U.S. range, and despite their importance as an experimental wildlife model for ecotoxicology studies, no bobwhite draft genome assembly currently exists. Herein, we present a bobwhite draft de novo genome assembly with annotation, comparative analyses including genome-wide analyses of divergence with the chicken (Gallus gallus and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata genomes, and coalescent modeling to reconstruct the demographic history of the bobwhite for comparison to other birds currently in decline (i.e., scarlet macaw; Ara macao. More than 90% of the assembled bobwhite genome was captured within 14,000 unique genes and proteins. Bobwhite analyses of divergence with the chicken and zebra finch genomes revealed many extremely conserved gene sequences, and evidence for lineage-specific divergence of noncoding regions. Coalescent models for reconstructing the demographic history of the bobwhite and the scarlet macaw provided evidence for population bottlenecks which were temporally coincident with human colonization of the New World, the late Pleistocene collapse of the megafauna, and the last glacial maximum. Demographic trends predicted for the bobwhite and the scarlet macaw also were concordant with how opposing natural selection strategies (i.e., skewness in the r-/K-selection continuum would be expected to shape genome diversity and the effective population sizes in these species, which is directly relevant to future conservation efforts.

  6. A draft de novo genome assembly for the northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) reveals evidence for a rapid decline in effective population size beginning in the Late Pleistocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Yvette A; Dowd, Scot E; Decker, Jared E; Seabury, Paul M; Bhattarai, Eric; Johnson, Charles D; Rollins, Dale; Tizard, Ian R; Brightsmith, Donald J; Peterson, Markus J; Taylor, Jeremy F; Seabury, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Wild populations of northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus; hereafter bobwhite) have declined across nearly all of their U.S. range, and despite their importance as an experimental wildlife model for ecotoxicology studies, no bobwhite draft genome assembly currently exists. Herein, we present a bobwhite draft de novo genome assembly with annotation, comparative analyses including genome-wide analyses of divergence with the chicken (Gallus gallus) and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genomes, and coalescent modeling to reconstruct the demographic history of the bobwhite for comparison to other birds currently in decline (i.e., scarlet macaw; Ara macao). More than 90% of the assembled bobwhite genome was captured within 14,000 unique genes and proteins. Bobwhite analyses of divergence with the chicken and zebra finch genomes revealed many extremely conserved gene sequences, and evidence for lineage-specific divergence of noncoding regions. Coalescent models for reconstructing the demographic history of the bobwhite and the scarlet macaw provided evidence for population bottlenecks which were temporally coincident with human colonization of the New World, the late Pleistocene collapse of the megafauna, and the last glacial maximum. Demographic trends predicted for the bobwhite and the scarlet macaw also were concordant with how opposing natural selection strategies (i.e., skewness in the r-/K-selection continuum) would be expected to shape genome diversity and the effective population sizes in these species, which is directly relevant to future conservation efforts.

  7. Response of a coastal hydrogeological system to a rapid decline in sea level; the case of Zuqim springs - The largest discharge area along the Dead Sea coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Avihu; Yechieli, Yoseph; Galili, Udi

    2016-05-01

    The almost instantaneous response of a natural on-shore groundwater system to an extremely rapid drop in the level of an adjacent lake is described in this study. The study is focused on the Zuqim (Feshcha) spring complex located on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea, which exhibits a drop of tens of meters in its water level over the last few decades. In this exceptional "field lab", fluctuations and trends in the flow regime are recognized, as well as the contemporaneous geochemical variations. Lithological facies variations have a pronounced effect on the underground flow regime. The following main processes were recognized: (a) slight shifting of the long-standing springs eastward, following the retreating shore; (b) extension of the hydrologic system southward without significant change in the total discharge of the entire spring complex. The new seepages are characterized by high variability in salinity; and (c) continuous refreshing of the spring water as a result of prolonged flushing of old trapped brines. The water of the Zuqim springs lie on mixing lines between two local brine types and diluted brine of the Lisan Lake - the precursor of the Dead Sea. Based on our findings, future development processes in the spring complex are predicted, which is essential because of their impact on the endemic ecosystem that relies on this water. In addition, continuation of the rapid drop in lake level is expected to cause intensification of erosional processes, such as deepening of flow gullies. Shifting of the entire hydrological system southward and migration along with the retreating shore is also expected to continue, as well as the continuous decrease in the water salinity.

  8. A genetic algorithm-Bayesian network approach for the analysis of metabolomics and spectroscopic data: application to the rapid identification of Bacillus spores and classification of Bacillus species

    OpenAIRE

    Goodacre Royston; Correa Elon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The rapid identification of Bacillus spores and bacterial identification are paramount because of their implications in food poisoning, pathogenesis and their use as potential biowarfare agents. Many automated analytical techniques such as Curie-point pyrolysis mass spectrometry (Py-MS) have been used to identify bacterial spores giving use to large amounts of analytical data. This high number of features makes interpretation of the data extremely difficult We analysed Py-...

  9. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of three rapidly rotating late-type stars: EY Dra, V374 Peg and GSC 02038-00293

    CERN Document Server

    Korhonen, H; Husarik, M; Mahajan, S; Szczygiel, D; Olah, K

    2010-01-01

    Here, BV(RI)c broad band photometry and intermediate resolution spectroscopy in Halpha region are presented for two rapidly rotating late-type stars: EY Dra and V374 Peg. For a third rapid rotator, GSC 02038-00293, intermediate resolution Halpha spectroscopy and low resolution spectroscopy are used for spectral classification and stellar parameter investigation of this poorly known object. The low resolution spectrum of GSC 02038-00293 clearly indicates that it is a K-type star. Its intermediate resolution spectrum can be best fitted with a model with Teff=4750K and vsini=90km/s, indicating a very rapidly rotating mid-K star. The Halpha line strength is variable, indicating changing chromospheric emission on GSC 02038-00293. In the case of EY Dra and V374 Peg, the stellar activity in the photosphere is investigated from the photometric observations, and in the chromosphere from the Halpha line. The enhanced chromospheric emission in EY Dra correlates well with the location of the photospheric active regions, ...

  10. Spectroscopic data

    CERN Document Server

    Melzer, J

    1976-01-01

    During the preparation of this compilation, many people contributed; the compilers wish to thank all of them. In particular they appreciate the efforts of V. Gilbertson, the manuscript typist, and those of K. C. Bregand, J. A. Kiley, and W. H. McPherson, who gave editorial assistance. They would like to thank Dr. J. R. Schwartz for his cooperation and encouragement. In addition, they extend their grati­ tude to Dr. L. Wilson of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, who gave the initial impetus to this project. v Contents I. I ntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. Organization ofthe Spectroscopic Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Methods of Production and Experimental Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Band Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2...

  11. Assessment of relevant hepatic steatosis in obese adolescents by rapid fat-selective GRE imaging with spatial-spectral excitation: a quantitative comparison with spectroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Fabian; Schick, Fritz [University Hospital Tuebingen, Section on Experimental Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Ehehalt, Stefan; Binder, Gerhard [University Children' s Hospital Tuebingen, Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Tuebingen (Germany); Sommer, Julia; Ballweg, Verena; Machann, Juergen [University Hospital Tuebingen, Section on Experimental Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, Claus D. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    To test the feasibility of fat-selective GRE imaging using a spectral-spatial excitation technique for determination of intrahepatic lipid content (IHL) in obese adolescents. Fat-selective MR imaging (1.5 T) was applied to record a single axial slice through a representative liver region within a single breath-hold. The sequence uses six equidistant slice-selective excitation pulses with binomial amplitude ratios to achieve high selectivity for lipid signals after appropriate shimming. IHL{sub MRI} content was quantified using signal intensity of adjacent subcutaneous adipose tissue. As the gold standard for IHL quantification, single-voxel stimulated echo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was applied. IHL{sub MRS} was quantified using the water peak as a reference. Forty-five MR examinations could be performed, and IHL{sub MRS} content ranged from 0.7% to 19.1%. Results from MRS and fat-selective imaging correlated well with Spearman coefficients between r = 0.78 and r = 0.86. There were no relevant regional differences in IHL within the liver parenchyma (p > 0.6359). Fat-selective imaging was able to reliably identify patients with IHL content above 5% with positive/negative likelihood ratio of 11.8 and 0.05, respectively. Fat-selective MR imaging provides both a reliable and a convenient method of rapidly quantifying IHL content in obese adolescents. (orig.)

  12. Status and trends of amphibian declines and extinctions worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Simon N; Chanson, Janice S; Cox, Neil A; Young, Bruce E; Rodrigues, Ana S L; Fischman, Debra L; Waller, Robert W

    2004-12-01

    The first global assessment of amphibians provides new context for the well-publicized phenomenon of amphibian declines. Amphibians are more threatened and are declining more rapidly than either birds or mammals. Although many declines are due to habitat loss and overutilization, other, unidentified processes threaten 48% of rapidly declining species and are driving species most quickly to extinction. Declines are nonrandom in terms of species' ecological preferences, geographic ranges, and taxonomic associations and are most prevalent among Neotropical montane, stream-associated species. The lack of conservation remedies for these poorly understood declines means that hundreds of amphibian species now face extinction.

  13. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH FREQUENCIES IN {delta} SCUTI STARS: PHOTOMETRIC KEPLER AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF THE RAPID ROTATOR KIC 8054146

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breger, M.; Robertson, P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Fossati, L. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Balona, L. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Kurtz, D. W. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Bohlender, D. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Lenz, P. [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); Mueller, I.; Lueftinger, Th. [Institut fuer Astronphysik der Universitaet Wien, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria); Clarke, Bruce D. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Hall, Jennifer R.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A. [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Two years of Kepler data of KIC 8054146 ({delta} Sct/{gamma} Dor hybrid) revealed 349 statistically significant frequencies between 0.54 and 191.36 cycles day{sup -1} (6.3 {mu}Hz to 2.21 mHz). The 117 low frequencies cluster in specific frequency bands, but do not show the equidistant period spacings predicted for gravity modes of successive radial order, n, and reported for at least one other hybrid pulsator. The four dominant low frequencies in the 2.8-3.0 cycles day{sup -1} (32-35 {mu}Hz) range show strong amplitude variability with timescales of months and years. These four low frequencies also determine the spacing of the higher frequencies in and beyond the {delta} Sct pressure-mode frequency domain. In fact, most of the higher frequencies belong to one of three families with spacings linked to a specific dominant low frequency. In the Fourier spectrum, these family regularities show up as triplets, high-frequency sequences with absolutely equidistant frequency spacings, side lobes (amplitude modulations), and other regularities in frequency spacings. Furthermore, within two families the amplitude variations between the low and high frequencies are related. We conclude that the low frequencies (gravity modes, rotation) and observed high frequencies (mostly pressure modes) are physically connected. This unusual behavior may be related to the very rapid rotation of the star: from a combination of high- and low-resolution spectroscopy we determined that KIC 8054146 is a very fast rotator ({upsilon} sin i = 300 {+-} 20 km s{sup -1}) with an effective temperature of 7600 {+-} 200 K and a surface gravity log g of 3.9 {+-} 0.3. Several astrophysical ideas explaining the origin of the relationship between the low and high frequencies are explored.

  14. Standard and rapid scan infrared spectroscopic studies of o-xylene transformations in terms of pore arrangement of 10-ring zeolites - 2D COS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołąbek, Kinga; Tarach, Karolina A; Góra-Marek, Kinga

    2017-08-01

    This study attempts to offer an insight into o-xylene isomerization process in terms of steric constraints of 10-ring zeolites. The zeolites under investigation, i.e. ZSM-5, IM-5 and TNU-9, have purely microporous structures and crystals with the same shape and offer comparable protonic functionality, both in manner of amount and strength of Si(OH)Al groups. Under these conditions, micropore topology is recognised to deliver differentiated catalytic performance of each zeolitic structure. Moreover, 10-ring zeolites of reduced dimensionality, i.e. TNU-10 and ZSM-22, are chosen as reference materials. The 2D COS analysis of IR spectra reveal that interaction and catalytic activity in o-xylene isomerization process are strongly influenced by diffusion of reagents in rigid microporous environment and the formation of intermediate species is characterised by IR bands at 1485 and 1455 cm(-1). With a prolonged time of the reaction (15 min), the formation of the latter species is observed for zeolite IM-5 characterised by limited 3-dimensionality. Rapid scan experiments show that in a shorter reaction time (4 min), these intermediate moieties are present for all the structure studied. The intermediate species are believed to originate from arenium ions such as methylbenzenium CH3-C6H5(+)-CH3 and/or methyl-substituted cycloheptatrienyl ions CH3-C7H7(+). Their amount is strictly related to the rigidity of the microporous system: the most spacious environment for o-xylene transformation, e.g. TNU-9, is characterised by the lowest population of intermediates, whereas structures offering sufficiently tight geometry, e.g. TNU-10, can accommodate intermediate species in higher quantities, finally leading to the production of p-xylene with high selectivity.

  15. HD 164492C: a rapidly rotating, Hα-bright, magnetic early B star associated with a 12.5 d spectroscopic binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, G. A.; Shultz, M.; Sikora, J.; Bernier, M.-É.; Rivinius, Th.; Alecian, E.; Petit, V.; Grunhut, J. H.; BinaMIcS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We employ high-resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry to derive the physical properties and magnetic characteristics of the multiple system HD 164492C, located in the young open cluster M20. The spectrum reveals evidence of three components: a broad-lined early B star (HD 164492C1), a narrow-lined early B star (HD 164492C2) and a late B star (HD 164492C3). Components C2 and C3 exhibit significant (>100 km s-1) bulk radial velocity variations with a period of 12.5351(7) d that we attribute to eccentric binary motion around a common centre-of-mass. Component C1 exhibits no detectable radial velocity variations. Using constraints derived from modelling the orbit of the C2+C3 binary and from synthesis of the combined spectrum, we determine the approximate physical characteristics of the components. We conclude that a coherent evolutionary solution consistent with the published age of M20 implies a distance to M20 of 0.9 ± 0.2 kpc, corresponding to the smallest published values. We confirm the detection of a strong magnetic field in the combined spectrum. The field is clearly associated with the broad-lined C1 component of the system. Repeated measurement of the longitudinal magnetic field allows the derivation of the rotation period of the magnetic star, Prot = 1.369 86(6) d. We derive the star's magnetic geometry, finding i=63± 6°, β =33± 6° and a dipole polar strength B_d=7.9^{+1.2}_{-1.0} kG. Strong emission - varying according to the magnetic period - is detected in the Hα profile. This is consistent with the presence of a centrifugal magnetosphere surrounding the rapidly rotating magnetic C1 component.

  16. A genetic algorithm-Bayesian network approach for the analysis of metabolomics and spectroscopic data: application to the rapid identification of Bacillus spores and classification of Bacillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodacre Royston

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid identification of Bacillus spores and bacterial identification are paramount because of their implications in food poisoning, pathogenesis and their use as potential biowarfare agents. Many automated analytical techniques such as Curie-point pyrolysis mass spectrometry (Py-MS have been used to identify bacterial spores giving use to large amounts of analytical data. This high number of features makes interpretation of the data extremely difficult We analysed Py-MS data from 36 different strains of aerobic endospore-forming bacteria encompassing seven different species. These bacteria were grown axenically on nutrient agar and vegetative biomass and spores were analyzed by Curie-point Py-MS. Results We develop a novel genetic algorithm-Bayesian network algorithm that accurately identifies sand selects a small subset of key relevant mass spectra (biomarkers to be further analysed. Once identified, this subset of relevant biomarkers was then used to identify Bacillus spores successfully and to identify Bacillus species via a Bayesian network model specifically built for this reduced set of features. Conclusions This final compact Bayesian network classification model is parsimonious, computationally fast to run and its graphical visualization allows easy interpretation of the probabilistic relationships among selected biomarkers. In addition, we compare the features selected by the genetic algorithm-Bayesian network approach with the features selected by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA. The classification accuracy results show that the set of features selected by the GA-BN is far superior to PLS-DA.

  17. Predicting cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease: an integrated analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Oscar L; Schwam, Elias; Cummings, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined.......Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined....

  18. Predicting cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease: an integrated analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Oscar L; Schwam, Elias; Cummings, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined.......Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined....

  19. What Makes Clusters Decline?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark....... The longitudinal study on the high-tech cluster reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to decline. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on the cluster’s adaptive capabilities, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing in new resources to the cluster...

  20. US Historic Declination Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This programs derives a table of secular change in magnetic declination for a specified point in the conterminous United States. It utilizes the USD polynomial and...

  1. ROBUST DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutawanir Darwis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Empirical decline curve analysis of oil production data gives reasonable answer in hyperbolic type curves situations; however the methodology has limitations in fitting real historical production data in present of unusual observations due to the effect of the treatment to the well in order to increase production capacity. The development ofrobust least squares offers new possibilities in better fitting production data using declinecurve analysis by down weighting the unusual observations. This paper proposes a robustleast squares fitting lmRobMM approach to estimate the decline rate of daily production data and compares the results with reservoir simulation results. For case study, we usethe oil production data at TBA Field West Java. The results demonstrated that theapproach is suitable for decline curve fitting and offers a new insight in decline curve analysis in the present of unusual observations.

  2. Cluster Decline and Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    -2011. Our longitudinal study reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to impairment of the cluster’s resilience in adapting to disruptions. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on cluster resilience, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing......Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark, 1963...

  3. Well production decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovic, Branimir

    2008-12-15

    Effective rate-time analysis during a declining production in an oil or gas wells is an important tool for establishing a successful management. The reasons behind the production decline include reservoir, fracture and well conditions. A well's decline rate is transient, signifying that the pressure wave propagates freely from the wellbore, leading to depletion when the outer boundary for the well is reached and to the wave propagation coming to a halt. This thesis studies the transient decline, with emphasis on a horizontal well with fracture wellbore responses. It also deals with the depletion decline, investigating the wellbore pressure responses for a vertical well producing under variable rate conditions of Arps decline. The well decline model solutions are analytical, and the modelling itself is carried out in two steps. The first step involves modelling the transient well responses of a multi fractured horizontal well. These responses originate from an infinitive reservoir and are considered as full-time rate-time responses. Multi-fractured horizontal well rate-time responses represent the solutions to a diffusion equation with varying boundary conditions and different fracture options (i.e., with or without fracture, a variety of fracture orientations, various fracture lengths, etc). The transient model calculates individual fracture rates, productivity indexes and an equivalent wellbore radius for the multi-fractured well. For the transient decline of a fractured-horizontal well model, well data is matched and the reservoir diagnosis and production prognosis are improved through the individual fracture production, with a model screening ability, and novel model features that can handle wellbore conditions changing from rate-to-pressure. Screening analyses can generate valuable information for fracture diagnosis in addition to a well and fracture production prognosis. Further model runs are carried out to match the real well data. The model solution is

  4. The fertility decline in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, W C; Harbison, S F

    1995-01-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa Kenya is a prime example of a country experiencing a rapid decline in fertility and greater contraceptive prevalence. These changes have occurred since 1980 when fertility was high at 8.0 children per woman. In 1993 the total fertility rate (TFR) was 5.4, and the growth rate declined to about 2.0%. This transition is swifter than any country in contemporary Asia or historical Europe. The likely projection for Kenya is attainment of replacement level fertility during the 2020s and a leveling of population at about 100 million persons. Fertility has declined the most in urban areas and central and eastern regions. Bongaarts' proximate determinants (TFR, total marital fertility rate, total natural marital fertility rate, and total fecundity) are reduced to the proportion of currently married women using contraception, the proportion in lactational nonfecund status, and the proportion currently married. Actual fertility change is accounted for by total fertility change of 3.0 children. Lactational infecundability accounts for 0.5 potential births, and changes in marital fertility account for 1.0 reduced births per woman. About 70% of fertility reduction is accounted for by contraception and abortion. During 1977-78 80% of fertility control was due to lactational nonfecundity, 10% to nonmarriage, and 10% to contraception. In 1993 lactational nonfecundity accounted for 50% of the reduction, nonmarriage for 20%, and abortion about 30%. Future fertility is expected to be dependent on contraceptive prevalence. Kenya has experienced the Coale paradigm of preconditions necessary for demographic transition (willing, ready, and able). High fertility in Africa is not intractable. Creating the change in attitudes that leads to readiness is linked to education, health, and exposure to modernizing media and urban lifestyles. The public sector family planning program in Kenya has created the opportunity for access and availability of contraception. The key

  5. Does Child Labor Decline with Improving Economic Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Eric V.

    2005-01-01

    The rapid economic growth of Vietnam provides an interesting insight into the sharp decline in child labor. A study of the rising economic status of the population across Vietnam shows that children returned to school or stopped working as their family incomes grew. The decline in child labor is steep in poor households as they emerged from…

  6. Does Child Labor Decline with Improving Economic Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Eric V.

    2005-01-01

    The rapid economic growth of Vietnam provides an interesting insight into the sharp decline in child labor. A study of the rising economic status of the population across Vietnam shows that children returned to school or stopped working as their family incomes grew. The decline in child labor is steep in poor households as they emerged from…

  7. Spectroscopic analysis and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate; , James D.; Reed, Christopher J.; Domke, Christopher H.; Le, Linh; Seasholtz, Mary Beth; Weber, Andy; Lipp, Charles

    2017-04-18

    Apparatus for spectroscopic analysis which includes a tunable diode laser spectrometer having a digital output signal and a digital computer for receiving the digital output signal from the spectrometer, the digital computer programmed to process the digital output signal using a multivariate regression algorithm. In addition, a spectroscopic method of analysis using such apparatus. Finally, a method for controlling an ethylene cracker hydrogenator.

  8. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  9. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ide

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  10. Fertility decline in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kanako; Stupp, Paul; Melian, Mercedes

    2009-09-01

    Recent reproductive health surveys show that the fertility rate in Paraguay decreased precipitously from 4.3 lifetime births per woman in 1995-98 to 2.9 births in 2001-04. In this study, we establish data consistency between the 1998 and 2004 surveys by comparing a series of cohort-specific period rates and use the Bongaarts framework of proximate determinants of fertility to demonstrate that an increase in the contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) between 1998 and 2004 fully accounts for the fertility decline. Decomposition of rates shows that changes in group-specific CPRs explain a greater proportion of the change in the overall CPR than do changes in population composition by educational attainment, urban residence, region, and language spoken at home. Finally, we show that younger cohorts of women in 2004 reported ideal completed fertility desires of less than 2.9 births, suggesting that the fertility rate is likely to continue to decrease.

  11. Mangrove forest decline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malik, Abdul; Mertz, Ole; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Mangrove forests in the tropics and subtropics grow in saline sediments in coastal and estuarine environments. Preservation of mangrove forests is important for many reasons, including the prevention of coastal erosion and seawater intrusion; the provision of spawning, nursery, and feeding grounds...... and severe mangrove loss with serious consequences. The mangrove forests of the Takalar District, South Sulawesi, are studied here as a case area that has suffered from degradation and declining spatial extent during recent decades. On the basis of a post-classification comparison of change detection from...... satellite imagery and a survey of households, we provide an estimate of the mangrove change in the Takalar District during 1979–2011 and the consequences of those changes. Mangrove forest areas were reduced by 66.05 % (3344 hectares) during the 33-year period of analysis, and the biggest annual negative...

  12. Mobility decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantakokko, Merja; Mänty, Minna Regina; Rantanen, Taina

    2013-01-01

    Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways to pro...... to promote mobility in old age.......Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways...

  13. ASASSN-15oi: A Rapidly Evolving, Luminous Tidal Disruption Event at 216 Mpc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Prieto, J. L.; Grupe, D.; Chen, Ping; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Stanek, K. Z.; Shappee, B. J.; Dong, Subo; Brown, J. S.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Bersier, D.; Brimacombe, J.; Carlson, E. K.; Falco, E.; Johnston, E.; Madore, B. F.; Pojmanski, G.; Seibert, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present ground-based and Swift photometric and spectroscopic observations of the tidal disruption event (TDE) ASASSN-15oi, discovered at the center of 2MASX J20390918-3045201 (d ≃ 216 Mpc) by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). The source peaked at a bolometric luminosity of L ≃ 1.3 × 1044 ergs s-1 and radiated a total energy of E ≃ 6.6 × 1050 ergs over the first ˜3.5 months of observations. The early optical/UV emission of the source can be fit by a blackbody with temperature increasing from T ˜ 2 × 104 K to T ˜ 4 × 104 K while the luminosity declines from L ≃ 1.3 × 1044 ergs s-1 to L ≃ 2.3 × 1043 ergs s-1, requiring the photosphere to be shrinking rapidly. The optical/UV luminosity decline during this period is most consistent with an exponential decline, L∝ e^{-(t-t_0)/τ}, with τ ≃ 46.5 days for t0 ≃ 57241.6 (MJD), while a power-law decline of L∝(t - t0)-α with t0 ≃ 57212.3 and α = 1.62 provides a moderately worse fit. ASASSN-15oi also exhibits roughly constant soft X-ray emission that is significantly weaker than the optical/UV emission. Spectra of the source show broad helium emission lines and strong blue continuum emission in early epochs, although these features fade rapidly and are not present ˜3 months after discovery. The early spectroscopic features and color evolution of ASASSN-15oi are consistent with a TDE, but the rapid spectral evolution is unique among optically-selected TDEs.

  14. Spectroscopic Dosimeter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analysis of Phase I test data demonstrates that the Photogenics Spectroscopic Dosimeter will detect neutron energies from 0.8 up to 600 MeV. The detector...

  15. The availability of research data declines rapidly with article age

    CERN Document Server

    Vines, Timothy; Andrew, Rose; Debarré, Florence; Bock, Dan; Franklin, Michelle; Gilbert, Kimberley; Moore, Jean-Sébastien; Renaut, Sébastien; Rennison, Diana J

    2013-01-01

    Policies ensuring that research data are available on public archives are increasingly being implemented at the government [1], funding agency [2-4], and journal [5,6] level. These policies are predicated on the idea that authors are poor stewards of their data, particularly over the long term [7], and indeed many studies have found that authors are often unable or unwilling to share their data [8-11]. However, there are no systematic estimates of how the availability of research data changes with time since publication. We therefore requested datasets from a relatively homogenous set of 516 articles published between 2 and 22 years ago, and found that availability of the data was strongly affected by article age. For papers where the authors gave the status of their data, the odds of a dataset being extant fell by 17% per year. In addition, the odds that we could find a working email address for the first, last or corresponding author fell by 7% per year. Our results reinforce the notion that, in the long te...

  16. [Concentration or decline in Puebla?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Becerra, V

    1993-04-01

    Some doubts have been expressed over whether the slowing pace of urbanization suggested by the 1990 census of Mexico was an accurate reflection of changing conditions, or whether it resulted from some intentional or unintended bias. Comparison of data from succeeding censuses indicates that the growth rate of the city of Puebla declined from 6.32% in 1980 to 2.63% in 1990. This work argues that, in Puebla, a trend to deconcentration of the population within the city of Puebla during the 1980s was accompanied by rapid growth in smaller and medium sized nearby cities, resulting in increased overall concentration in Puebla's metropolitan area. The absolute population of the city of Puebla increased from 772,908 in 1980 to 1,007,170 in 1990. The central area of the state of Puebla, which surrounds the city, increased its share of the state population from 51.67% in 1980 to 52.21% in 1990. The number of places with over 5000 inhabitants in the area surrounding the city of Puebla increased from 27 in 1980 to 39 in 1990. Construction of the Puebla-Atlixco highway will undoubtedly attract growth to the area southwest of Puebla. Small cities to the east of Puebla have shown significant growth although their region remains strongly rural. The same process of deconcentration of population in Puebla and concentration in its surrounding metropolitan regions can probably also be detected in patterns of investment of public funds. The trend is likely to continue through the 1990s.

  17. Canton Fair: Decline, but Optimistic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The Canton Fair, long regarded as an important weather vane for China's foreign trade, this year faced bitter, cold winds. Trade volume of main "export products such as machines and light industrial products all saw a decline, although the degree of decline differed in different sectors. The total trade volume in this Canton Fair dropped 16.9% below the previous one.

  18. Fast renal decline to end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Skupien, Jan; Rossing, Peter

    2017-01-01

    A new model of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes emerged from our studies of Joslin Clinic patients. The dominant feature is progressive renal decline, not albuminuria. This decline is a unidirectional process commencing while patients have normal renal function and, in the majority, progre...... for markers predictive of the rate of renal decline yield findings that may make detection of fast decliners feasible. Identifying such patients will be the foundation for developing effective individualized methods to prevent or delay onset of ESRD in diabetes....... progression as rate of eGFR declines > 5 ml/min/year, a value exceeded by 80% of patients in Joslin's type 1 diabetes ESRD cohort. The extraordinary range of slopes within the rapid progression category prompted us to partition it into “very fast,” “fast” and “moderate” decline. We showed, for the first time......, that very fast and fast decline from normal eGFR to ESRD within 2 to 10 years constitutes 50% of the Joslin cohort. In this review we present data about frequency of fast decliners in both diabetes types, survey some mechanisms underlying fast renal decline, discuss methods of identifying patients at risk...

  19. Post-mortem pH decline in different ostrich muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, J; Mellett, F D

    1996-01-01

    Post-mortem glycolysis, as described by muscle pH decline, was investigated in several ostrich muscles. While the gastrocnemius pars interna, femorotibialis medius, iliotibialis lateralis and iliofemoralis showed the normal descending pH decline pattern, the ambiens as well as the iliofibularis showed a very rapid pH decline until 2 hr post mortem whereafter pH increased.

  20. Rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christian; Wolff, Martin; Weitz, Michael; Bartlau, Thomas; Korth, Carsten; Zerr, Inga

    2011-09-01

    Different rates of progression have been observed among patients with Alzheimer disease. Risk factors that accelerate deterioration have been identified and some are being discussed, such as genetics, comorbidity, and the early appearance of Alzheimer disease motor signs. Progressive forms of Alzheimer disease have been reported with rapid cognitive decline and disease duration of only a few years. This short review aims to provide an overview of the current knowledge of rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease. Furthermore, we suggest that rapid, in this context, should be defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination score decrease of 6 points per year.

  1. The Spectroscopic Diversity of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Blondin, S; Kirshner, R P; Mandel, K S; Berlind, P; Calkins, M; Challis, P; Garnavich, P M; Jha, S W; Modjaz, M; Riess, A G; Schmidt, B P

    2012-01-01

    We present 2603 spectra of 462 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) obtained during 1993-2008 through the Center for Astrophysics Supernova Program. Most of the spectra were obtained with the FAST spectrograph at the FLWO 1.5m telescope and reduced in a consistent manner, making data set well suited for studies of SN Ia spectroscopic diversity. We study the spectroscopic and photometric properties of SN Ia as a function of spectroscopic class using the classification schemes of Branch et al. and Wang et al. The width-luminosity relation appears to be steeper for SN Ia with broader lines. Based on the evolution of the characteristic Si II 6355 line, we propose improved methods for measuring velocity gradients, revealing a larger range than previously suspected, from ~0 to ~400 km/s/day considering the instantaneous velocity decline rate at maximum light. We find a weaker and less significant correlation between Si II velocity and intrinsic B-V color at maximum light than reported by Foley et al., owing to a more ...

  2. Shell model and spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poves, P. [Madrid Univ. Autonoma and IFT, UAM/CSIC, E-28049 (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    In these lectures, I introduce the notion of spectroscopic factor in the shell model context. A brief review is given of the present status of the large scale applications of the Interacting Shell Model. The spectroscopic factors and the spectroscopic strength are discussed for nuclei in the vicinity of magic closures and for deformed nuclei. (author)

  3. Cognitive decline affects diabetic women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perzyński Adam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: DM provokes peripheral complications and changes in central nervous system. Central changes in the course of diabetes mellitus (DM include changes in brain tissue structure, electrophysiological abnormalities but also disturbances in neurotransmission leading to cognitive decline.

  4. A rapid method for the differentiation of yeast cells grown under carbon and nitrogen-limited conditions by means of partial least squares discriminant analysis employing infrared micro-spectroscopic data of entire yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowski, Julia; Quintás, Guillermo; Herwig, Christoph; Lendl, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    This paper shows the ease of application and usefulness of mid-IR measurements for the investigation of orthogonal cell states on the example of the analysis of Pichia pastoris cells. A rapid method for the discrimination of entire yeast cells grown under carbon and nitrogen-limited conditions based on the direct acquisition of mid-IR spectra and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) is described. The obtained PLS-DA model was extensively validated employing two different validation strategies: (i) statistical validation employing a method based on permutation testing and (ii) external validation splitting the available data into two independent sub-sets. The Variable Importance in Projection scores of the PLS-DA model provided deeper insight into the differences between the two investigated states. Hence, we demonstrate the feasibility of a method which uses IR spectra from intact cells that may be employed in a second step as an in-line tool in process development and process control along Quality by Design principles. PMID:22967595

  5. Bibliography on Decline and Retrenchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, Boulder, CO.

    A bibliography on decline and retrenchment in higher education is presented that includes publications from the fields of higher education, the organization sciences, and public administration. The objective is to make available the reference tools that have been useful in conducting the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems'…

  6. Declining Enrollment--A Blessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Howard E.

    This report describes how a New York school district took advantage of a decline in elementary school enrollment to restructure the district's educational program, reduce staff requirements, and eliminate double shifting at the district's junior high and high school. The district's plan involved closing one of the three elementary schools and…

  7. Strong families and declining fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilevych, Yuliya

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the role of family and social relationships in individuals’ reproductive careers during the fertility decline in Soviet Ukraine from around 1950 to 1975. These three decades after the Second World War signified the end of the First Demographic Transition in Ukraine

  8. Declining Efficiency in the Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses the concept of resource efficiency in the economy as a whole. This implies some unfoldings of the simple definition of efficiency as human satisfaction over throughput of resources. It is suggested, that the efficiency of the economic systems is declining in the countries...

  9. French Wines on the Decline?:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Bodo

    2004-01-01

    French wines, differentiated by geographic origin, served for many decades as a basis for the French success in the British wine market. However in the early 1990s, market share began to decline. This article explores the values that market participants placed on labelling information on French...

  10. Chinese culture and fertility decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C; Jia, S

    1992-01-01

    Coale has suggested that cultural factors exert a significant influence on fertility reduction; countries in the "Chinese cultural circle" would be the first to show fertility decline. In China, the view was that traditional Chinese culture contributed to increased population. This paper examines the nature of the relationship between Chinese culture and fertility. Attention was directed to a comparison of fertility rates of developing countries with strong Chinese cultural influence and of fertility within different regions of China. Discussion was followed by an explanation of the theoretical impact of Chinese culture on fertility and direct and indirect beliefs and practices that might either enhance or hinder fertility decline. Emigration to neighboring countries occurred after the Qing dynasty. Fertility after the 1950s declined markedly in Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, and mainland China: all countries within the Chinese cultural circle. Other countries within the Chinese circle which have higher fertility, yet lower fertility than other non-Chinese cultural countries, are Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia. Within China, regions with similar fertility patterns are identified as coastal regions, central plains, and mountainous and plateau regions. The Han ethnic group has lower fertility than that of ethnic minorities; regions with large Han populations have lower fertility. Overseas Chinese in East Asian countries also tend to have lower fertility than their host populations. Chinese culture consisted of the assimilation of other cultures over 5000 years. Fertility decline was dependent on the population's desire to limit reproduction, favorable social mechanisms, and availability of contraception: all factors related to economic development. Chinese culture affects fertility reduction by affecting reproductive views and social mechanisms directly, and indirectly through economics. Confucianism emphasizes collectivism, self

  11. Decline of radionuclides in Columbia River biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, C.E.; Watson, D.G.; Scott, A.J.; Gurtisen, J.M.

    1980-03-01

    In January 1971, the last of nine plutonium production reactors using direct discharge of once-through cooling waters into the Columbia River was closed. Sampling was initiated at three stations on the Columbia River to document the decline of the radionuclide body burdens in the biota of the Columbia River ecosystem. The data show that in a river-reservoir complex, the measurable body burden of fission-produced radionuclides decreased to essentially undetectable levels within 18 to 24 mo after cessation of discharge of once-through cooling water into the river. On the basis of data from the free-flowing station, we believe that this decrease would be even more rapid in an unimpounded river.

  12. Declining suburbs in Europe and Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audirac, Ivonne; Cunningham-Sabot, Emmanuèle; Fol, Sylvie; Moraes, Sergio Torres

    2012-01-01

    Suburban shrinkage, understood as a degenerative urban process stemming from the demise of the Fordist mode of urbanism, is generally manifested in a decline in population, industry and employment. It is also intimately linked to the global restructuring of industrial organization associated with the rise of the post-Fordist mode of urbanism and, more recently, the thrust of Asian industrialization. Framed in the discourse of industrial urbanism, this article examines the first ring of industrial suburbs that developed around large cities in their most rapid Fordist urbanization phase. These industrial suburbs, although they were formed at different times, are today experiencing specific mutations and undergoing profound restructuring on account of their particular spatial position between the central area and the expanding peripheries of the post-Fordist metropolis. This article describes and compares suburban decline in two European cities (Glasgow and Paris) and two Latin American Cities (São Paulo, Brazil and Guadalajara, Mexico), as different instances of places asymmetrically and fragmentarily integrated into the geography of globalization.

  13. Cardiovascular Prevention of Cognitive Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Monsuez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Midlife cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipemia, and an unhealthy lifestyle, have been linked to subsequent incidence, delay of onset, and progression rate of Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia. Conversely, optimal treatment of cardiovascular risk factors prevents and slows down age-related cognitive disorders. The impact of antihypertensive therapy on cognitive outcome in patients with hypertension was assessed in large trials which demonstrated a reduction in progression of MRI white matter hyperintensities, in cognitive decline and in incidence of dementia. Large-scale database correlated statin use and reduction in the incidence of dementia, mainly in patients with documented atherosclerosis, but clinical trials failed to reach similar conclusions. Whether a multitargeted intervention would substantially improve protection, quality of life, and reduce medical cost expenditures in patients with lower risk profile has not been ascertained. This would require appropriately designed trials targeting large populations and focusing on cognitive decline as a primary outcome endpoint.

  14. Extracting spectroscopic factors from direct reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kate

    2009-10-01

    Direct reactions have been used to probe the structure of the nucleus for decades. After some decline in the 80's and 90's these methods have more recently had a surge in popularity, and new techniques have been added to the experimentalists toolbox. One goal of direct reaction experiments is to extract spectroscopic factors (SFs), related to the shell occupancy. SFs extracted from neutron knockout reactions show reductions, compared to the theoretical value, that are related to the neutron separation energy [1], whereas SFs from the well-established (e,e'p) reaction on stable nuclei are consistently 50% - 60% lower than those expected from the independent-particle shell model [2] over a wide range of masses. pardAs the extraction of spectroscopic factors from direct reaction measurements requires the comparison of data with calculated differential cross sections, the results are by nature model dependent. The influence of different scattering (commonly optical), and bound state potentials, should not be over-looked. Recent attempts to reanalyze single-neutron transfer data using a consistent approach have shown agreement with large basis shell model calculations [3], clearly conflicting with both the (e,e'p) and the knockout data. It has been suggested that the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient (ANC) is a more valid quantity to extract when the reaction is peripheral [4]. spectroscopic factors are, how they are extracted and what they really mean will be discussed in this talk.[4pt] [1] Alexandra Gade, and Thomas Glasmacher, Prog Part. Nucl. Phys. 60 (2008) 161-224.[0pt] [2] G.J. Kramer, H.P. Blok, and L. Lapik'as, Nucl. Phys. A679 (2001) 267-286.[0pt] [3] Jenny Lee, M.B. Tsang, and W.G. Lynch, Phys. Rev C 75, (2007), 064320.[0pt] [4] D.Y. Pan, F.M. Nunes, and A.M. Mukhamedzhanov, Phys. Rev. C 75, (2007) 024601.

  15. Spectroscopic and chemometric exploration of food quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dorthe Kjær

    2002-01-01

    The desire to develop non-invasive rapid measurements of essential quality parameters in foods is the motivation of this thesis. Due to the speed and noninvasive properties of spectroscopic techniques, they have potential as on-line or atline methods and can be employed in the food industry...... in order to control the quality of the end product and to continuously monitor the production. In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of the application of spectroscopy and chemometrics in rapid control of food quality are discussed and demonstrated by the examples in the eight included...... publications. Different aspects of food quality are covered, but the focus is mainly on the development of multivariate calibrations for predictions of rather complex attributes such as the water-holding capacity of meat, ethical quality of the slaughtering procedure, protein content of single wheat kernels...

  16. Updated Results from the COS Spectroscopic Sensitivity Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, Rachel A.; Massa, Derck; Bostroem, Azalee; Aloisi, Alessandra; Proffitt, Charles

    2011-06-01

    We report updated results from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectroscopic sensitivity monitoring programs utilizing data taken through the end of Cycle 17 and beginning of Cycle 18. Earlier results (reported in Osten et al. 2010) had indicated a wavelengthdependent decline of the FUV sensitivity which was worse at longer wavelengths. Since mid-March 2010, the rate of this sensitivity decline has become much smaller and mostly wavelength independent, and the rate of decline is now between 2 and 5%/year for all Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) gratings with sufficient signal to characterize. The characteristics of the FUV sensitivity decline are consistent with degradation of the quantum efficiency of the CsI photocathode of the FUV detector. The initial steep decline may have been caused by water vapor outgassing after COS's installation, while the subsequent decline may be due to exposure to ambient atomic oxygen present at HST's orbital altitude. New FUV Time-Dependent Sensitivity (TDS) reference files have been delivered to correct the pipeline flux calibration, however, even after the application of these TDS corrections there remain discrepancies in the absolute flux calibration which appear to depend on central wavelength and FP-POS, and can be up to 5-10%. Further investigation reveals that some of this discrepancy may be due to additional sensitivity degradation during initial on-orbit operations. As reported in Osten et al. (2010), the two NUV bare-aluminum gratings (G225M and G285M) are also showing sensitivity declines, which appear to continue trends seen during ground testing, and which may be due to ongoing evolution of an oxide layer. In contrast, the throughputs of the NUV gratings coated with MgF2 (G185M and G230L) remain stable, showing little to no sensitivity decline. The NUV bare-aluminum sensitivity decline appears to be a continuing trend from that seen on the ground.

  17. Declining Efficiency in the Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses the concept of resource efficiency in the economy as a whole. This implies some unfoldings of the simple definition of efficiency as human satisfaction over throughput of resources. It is suggested, that the efficiency of the economic systems is declining in the countries...... with a high material standard of living. Examples are presented as are suggestions for how to improve the efficiency. These improvements, however, have a tendency to reduce the gross domestic product and hence are conflicting with the conventional political goals of growing GDP....

  18. Changes in Endopeptidase Activity during Photosynthetic Declination in Rice Leaf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENGZhi-rui; ZHANGRong-xian

    2004-01-01

    Two japonica rice varieties, Wuyujing 3 and 97-7, were used to study the changes in contents of soluble protein, free amino acids and endopeptidase activity, during photosynthetic declination. The content of soluble protein in flag leaf of cv.Wuyujing 3 was higher than that of cv. 97-7, but decreased rapidly in Wuyujing 3. Free amino acids in flag leaf and the thirteenth leaf of Wuyujing 3 started to increase 10 days before the turning point of photosynthetic declination (TPPD), while it occurred just 1-2 days before TPPD in the flag leaf and the thirteenth leaf of 97-7. During reversible phase of photosynthetic declination,endopeptidase activity remained at a low level and increased slightly only in the later part of this phase. Then it rose up rapidly at irreversible decline phase and reached a vety high level. For Wuyujing 3, the change in endopeptidase activity in the thirteenth leaf was parallel to that in flag leaf. However, for 97-7, the rapid increase of endopeptidase activity in the thirteenth leaf started later than that of flag leaf. The results implied that the rate of protein breakdown and conversion to transportable nitrogen in leaves of 97-7 was slower than that in leaves of Wuyujing 3 during photosynthetic declination and it led to relativeh" lower seed setting rate and fully filling grains rate in 97-7. This may be one of the important reasons why 97-7 could not bring the high yicld potentiality into play and the findings may be taken into consideration while breeding for high potential varieties in future.

  19. Changes in Endopeptidase Activity during Photosynthetic Declination in Rice Leaf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Zhi-rui; ZHANG Rong-xian

    2004-01-01

    Two japonica rice varieties, Wuyujing 3 and 97-7, were used to study the changes in contents of soluble protein, free amino acids and endopeptidase activity during photosynthetic declination. The content of soluble protein in flag leaf of cv.Wuyujing 3 was higher than that of cv. 97-7, but decreased rapidly in Wuyujing 3. Free amino acids in flag leaf and the thirteenth leaf of Wuyujing 3 started to increase 10 days before the turning point of photosynthetic declination (TPPD), while it occurred just 1-2 days before TPPD in the flag leaf and the thirteenth leaf of 97-7. During reversible phase of photosynthetic declination,endopeptidase activity remained at a low level and increased slightly only in the later part of this phase. Then it rose up rapidly at irreversible decline phase and reached a very high level. For Wuyujing 3, the change in endopeptidase activity in the thirteenth leaf was parallel to that in flag leaf. However, for 97-7, the rapid increase of endopeptidase activity in the thirteenth leaf started later than that of flag leaf. The results implied that the rate of protein breakdown and conversion to transportable nitrogen in leaves of 97-7 was slower than that in leaves of Wuyujing 3 during photosynthetic declination and it led to relatively lower seed setting rate and fully filling grains rate in 97-7. This may be one of the important reasons why 97-7 could not bring the high yield potentiality into play and the findings may be taken into consideration while breeding for high potential varieties in future.

  20. Fertility Decline in Rural China: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Stevan; Yuesheng, Wang; Hua, Han; Santos, Gonçalo D.; Yingying, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Many models have been proposed to explain both the rapidity of China’s fertility decline after the 1960s and the differential timing of the decline in different places. In particular, scholars argue over whether deliberate policies of fertility control, institutional changes, or general modernization factors contribute most to changes in fertility behavior. Here the authors adopt an ethnographically grounded behavioral–institutional approach to analyze qualitative and quantitative data from three different rural settings: Xiaoshan County in Zhejiang (East China), Ci County in Hebei (North China), and Yingde County in Guangdong (South China). The authors show that no one set of factors explains the differential timing and rapidity of the fertility decline in the three areas; rather they must explain differential timing by a combination of differences in social–cultural environments (e.g., spread of education, reproductive ideologies, and gender relations) and politico-economic conditions (e.g., economic development, birth planning campaigns, and collective systems of labor organization) during the early phases of the fertility decline. PMID:21319442

  1. ASASSN-15oi: A Rapidly Evolving, Luminous Tidal Disruption Event at 216 Mpc

    CERN Document Server

    Holoien, T W -S; Prieto, J L; Grupe, D; Chen, Ping; Godoy-Rivera, D; Stanek, K Z; Shappee, B J; Dong, Subo; Brown, J S; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Brimacombe, J; Carlson, E K; Falco, E; Johnston, E; Madore, B F; Pojmanski, G; Seibert, M

    2016-01-01

    We present ground-based and Swift photometric and spectroscopic observations of the tidal disruption event (TDE) ASASSN-15oi, discovered at the center of 2MASX J20390918-3045201 ($d\\simeq216$ Mpc) by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). The source peaked at a bolometric luminosity of $L\\simeq1.9\\times10^{44}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ and radiated a total energy of $E\\simeq5.0\\times10^{50}$ ergs over the $\\sim3.5$ months of observations. The early optical/UV emission of the source can be fit by a blackbody with temperature increasing from $T\\sim2\\times10^4$ K to $T\\sim6\\times10^4$ K while the luminosity declines from $L\\simeq1.9\\times10^{44}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ to $L\\simeq2.8\\times10^{43}$ ergs s$^{-1}$, requiring the photosphere to be shrinking rapidly. The optical/UV luminosity decline is broadly consistent with an exponential decline, $L\\propto e^{-t/t_0}$, with $t_0\\simeq35$ days. ASASSN-15oi also exhibits roughly constant soft X-ray emission that is significantly weaker than the optical/UV emission. Spe...

  2. Can Occupational Therapy Slow Alzheimer's Decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_162135.html Can Occupational Therapy Slow Alzheimer's Decline? Patients, caregivers may reap some benefits, but ... slow down the physical decline that comes with Alzheimer's disease, a new clinical trial suggests. The study ...

  3. Who fears and who welcomes population decline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik P. Van Dalen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available European countries are experiencing population decline and the tacit assumption in most analyses is that the decline may have detrimental welfare effects. In this paper we use a survey among the population in the Netherlands to discover whether population decline is always met with fear. A number of results stand out: population size preferences differ by geographic proximity: at a global level the majority of respondents favors a (global population decline, but closer to home one supports a stationary population. Population decline is clearly not always met with fear: 31 percent would like the population to decline at the national level and they generally perceive decline to be accompanied by immaterial welfare gains (improvement environment as well as material welfare losses (tax increases, economic stagnation. In addition to these driving forces it appears that the attitude towards immigrants is a very strong determinant at all geographical levels: immigrants seem to be a stronger fear factor than population decline.

  4. Menopause Is Associated with Accelerated Lung Function Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebner, Kai; Matulonga, Bobette; Johannessen, Ane; Suske, Sandra; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Demoly, Pascal; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Franklin, Karl A; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gullón Blanco, José Antonio; Heinrich, Joachim; Holm, Mathias; Jarvis, Debbie; Jõgi, Rain; Lindberg, Eva; Moratalla Rovira, Jesús Martínez; Muniozguren Agirre, Nerea; Pin, Isabelle; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Puggini, Luca; Raherison, Chantal; Sánchez-Ramos, José Luis; Schlünssen, Vivi; Sunyer, Jordi; Svanes, Cecilie; Hustad, Steinar; Leynaert, Bénédicte; Gómez Real, Francisco

    2017-04-15

    Menopause is associated with changes in sex hormones, which affect immunity, inflammation, and osteoporosis and may impair lung function. Lung function decline has not previously been investigated in relation to menopause. To study whether lung function decline, assessed by FVC and FEV1, is accelerated in women who undergo menopause. The population-based longitudinal European Community Respiratory Health Survey provided serum samples, spirometry, and questionnaire data about respiratory and reproductive health from three study waves (n = 1,438). We measured follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone and added information on menstrual patterns to determine menopausal status using latent class analysis. Associations with lung function decline were investigated using linear mixed effects models, adjusting for age, height, weight, pack-years, current smoking, age at completed full-time education, spirometer, and including study center as random effect. Menopausal status was associated with accelerated lung function decline. The adjusted mean FVC decline was increased by -10.2 ml/yr (95% confidence interval [CI], -13.1 to -7.2) in transitional women and -12.5 ml/yr (95% CI, -16.2 to -8.9) in post-menopausal women, compared with women menstruating regularly. The adjusted mean FEV1 decline increased by -3.8 ml/yr (95% CI, -6.3 to -2.9) in transitional women and -5.2 ml/yr (95% CI, -8.3 to -2.0) in post-menopausal women. Lung function declined more rapidly among transitional and post-menopausal women, in particular for FVC, beyond the expected age change. Clinicians should be aware that respiratory health often deteriorates during reproductive aging.

  5. Functional network integrity presages cognitive decline in preclinical Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Rachel F; Schultz, Aaron P; Hedden, Trey; Papp, Kathryn V; Hanseeuw, Bernard J; Marshall, Gad; Sepulcre, Jorge; Smith, Emily E; Rentz, Dorene M; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Chhatwal, Jasmeer P

    2017-07-04

    To examine the utility of resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) measurements of network integrity as a predictor of future cognitive decline in preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD). A total of 237 clinically normal older adults (aged 63-90 years, Clinical Dementia Rating 0) underwent baseline β-amyloid (Aβ) imaging with Pittsburgh compound B PET and structural and rs-fcMRI. We identified 7 networks for analysis, including 4 cognitive networks (default, salience, dorsal attention, and frontoparietal control) and 3 noncognitive networks (primary visual, extrastriate visual, motor). Using linear and curvilinear mixed models, we used baseline connectivity in these networks to predict longitudinal changes in preclinical Alzheimer cognitive composite (PACC) performance, both alone and interacting with Aβ burden. Median neuropsychological follow-up was 3 years. Baseline connectivity in the default, salience, and control networks predicted longitudinal PACC decline, unlike connectivity in the dorsal attention and all noncognitive networks. Default, salience, and control network connectivity was also synergistic with Aβ burden in predicting decline, with combined higher Aβ and lower connectivity predicting the steepest curvilinear decline in PACC performance. In clinically normal older adults, lower functional connectivity predicted more rapid decline in PACC scores over time, particularly when coupled with increased Aβ burden. Among examined networks, default, salience, and control networks were the strongest predictors of rate of change in PACC scores, with the inflection point of greatest decline beyond the fourth year of follow-up. These results suggest that rs-fcMRI may be a useful predictor of early, AD-related cognitive decline in clinical research settings. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Decline in breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Schwartz, Walter; Blichert-Toft, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: When estimating the decline in breast cancer mortality attributable to screening, the challenge is to provide valid comparison groups and to distinguish the screening effect from other effects. In Funen, Denmark, multidisciplinary breast cancer management teams started before screening...... was introduced; both activities came later in the rest of Denmark. Because Denmark had national protocols for breast cancer treatment, but hardly any opportunistic screening, Funen formed a "natural experiment", providing valid comparison groups and enabling the separation of the effect of screening from other...... factors. METHODS: Using Poisson regression we compared the observed breast cancer mortality rate in Funen after implementation of screening with the expected rate without screening. The latter was estimated from breast cancer mortality in the rest of Denmark controlled for historical differences between...

  7. Declining Sunshine for Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The yellow line on this graphic indicates the number of hours of sunlight each sol, or Martian day, at the Phoenix landing site's far-northern latitude, beginning with the entire Martian day (about 24 hours and 40 minutes) for the first 90 sols, then declining to no sunlight by about sol 300. The blue tick mark indicates that on Sol 124 (Sept. 29, 2008), the sun is above the horizon for about 20 hours. The brown vertical bar represents the period from Nov. 18 to Dec. 24, 2008, around the 'solar conjunction,' when the sun is close to the line between Mars and Earth, affecting communications. The green vertical rectangle represents the period from February to November 2009 when the Phoenix lander is expected to be encased in carbon-dioxide ice.

  8. Declining caries trends: are we satisfied?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D. Lagerweij; C. van Loveren

    2015-01-01

    WHO data suggest that all over the world the prevalence of caries has declined at the end of the previous and in the first decade of the present century. This decline started wherever the use of effective fluoride toothpaste became commonplace. Even though the decline is considerable with a 90 % red

  9. Declining caries trends: are we satisfied?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerweij, M.D.; van Loveren, C.

    2015-01-01

    WHO data suggest that all over the world the prevalence of caries has declined at the end of the previous and in the first decade of the present century. This decline started wherever the use of effective fluoride toothpaste became commonplace. Even though the decline is considerable with a 90 %

  10. A Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Survey of High-Declination Dwarf Novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-20

    spectroscopy (albeit of NLs alone) does not show any correlation at all ( Puebla et al. 2007). 1.3. The White Dwarf Temperature: The Case for Dwarf Novae...A. 2006, MNRAS, 368, 361 Price, A. 2006, AAN, 339, 1 Puebla , R. E., Diaz, M. P., & Hubeny, I. 2007, AJ, 134, 1923 Rappaport, S., Joss, P. C

  11. Spectroscopic analysis of optoelectronic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with standard spectroscopic techniques which can be used to analyze semiconductor samples or devices, in both, bulk, micrometer and submicrometer scale. The book aims helping experimental physicists and engineers to choose the right analytical spectroscopic technique in order to get specific information about their specific demands. For this purpose, the techniques including technical details such as apparatus and probed sample region are described. More important, also the expected outcome from experiments is provided. This involves also the link to theory, that is not subject of this book, and the link to current experimental results in the literature which are presented in a review-like style. Many special spectroscopic techniques are introduced and their relationship to the standard techniques is revealed. Thus the book works also as a type of guide or reference book for people researching in optical spectroscopy of semiconductors.

  12. Perioperative Cognitive Decline in the Aging Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrando, Niccolò; Brzezinski, Marek; Degos, Vincent; Eriksson, Lars I.; Kramer, Joel H.; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Miller, Bruce L.; Seeley, William W.; Vacas, Susana; Weiner, Michael W.; Yaffe, Kristine; Young, William L.; Xie, Zhongcong; Maze, Mervyn

    2011-01-01

    Elderly patients who have an acute illness or who undergo surgery often experience cognitive decline. The pathophysiologic mechanisms that cause neurodegeneration resulting in cognitive decline, including protein deposition and neuroinflammation, also play a role in animal models of surgery-induced cognitive decline. With the aging of the population, surgical candidates of advanced age with underlying neurodegeneration are encountered more often, raising concerns that, in patients with this combination, cognitive function will precipitously decline postoperatively. This special article is based on a symposium that the University of California, San Francisco, convened to explore the contributions of surgery and anesthesia to the development of cognitive decline in the aged patient. A road map to further elucidate the mechanisms, diagnosis, risk factors, mitigation, and treatment of postoperative cognitive decline in the elderly is provided. PMID:21878601

  13. Review on Causes of Forest Decline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIMMINS; J; P

    2008-01-01

    Site degradation and yield decline of forest have attracted increasing attention from forest managers and scientists. Studies conducted by researchers from a variety of disciplines and perspectives have led to a variety of competing hypotheses concerning the causes of the problem. In this paper we review evidence of such a yield decline and examine the problem and its possible way to identify the individual contributions of the many determinants of yield decline, and their interactions.

  14. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  15. Rapid orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bhagyalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Every orthodontic patient requires that the treatment be completed in a short duration. During orthodontic treatment, wearing of orthodontic braces, besides being unaesthetic will also restrict patients from eating certain food; it would also make it difficult for patient to maintain good oral hygiene. Because of these reasons many patients decline for orthodontic treatment. But recently there are many techniques in orthodontics like distraction osteogenesis, corticotomy, etc. where treatment can be completed in a very short duration when compared to conventional treatment. This article discusses one of such technique known as "Wilkodontics" which helps in faster orthodontic tooth movement, thus helping the clinician to complete the treatment at the earliest.

  16. Declining resilience of ecosystem functions under biodiversity loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Tom H; Isaac, Nick J B; August, Tom A; Woodcock, Ben A; Roy, David B; Bullock, James M

    2015-12-08

    The composition of species communities is changing rapidly through drivers such as habitat loss and climate change, with potentially serious consequences for the resilience of ecosystem functions on which humans depend. To assess such changes in resilience, we analyse trends in the frequency of species in Great Britain that provide key ecosystem functions--specifically decomposition, carbon sequestration, pollination, pest control and cultural values. For 4,424 species over four decades, there have been significant net declines among animal species that provide pollination, pest control and cultural values. Groups providing decomposition and carbon sequestration remain relatively stable, as fewer species are in decline and these are offset by large numbers of new arrivals into Great Britain. While there is general concern about degradation of a wide range of ecosystem functions, our results suggest actions should focus on particular functions for which there is evidence of substantial erosion of their resilience.

  17. Decline of spectacled eiders nesting in western Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehn, Robert A.; Dau, Christian P.; Conant, Bruce; Butler, William I.

    1993-01-01

    Spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) populations in western Alaska are now less than 4% of the numbers estimated in the early 1970s. In 1992, an estimated 1721 nesting pairs remained on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Causes of this rapid and continuing decline of -14% per year are undocumented. Many aspects of spectacled eider biology remain unknown, including their marine foraging habitats, food items, migratory movements, and population ecology. A review of some biological characteristics and possible threats to the species suggests the importance of quantifying potential impacts from parasites and disease, subsistence harvest, predation during brood rearing, and alteration of Bering Sea food resources. Factors causing the population decline of spectacled eiders must be determined and appropriate actions taken to reverse the trend.

  18. The lognormal handwriter: learning, performing and declining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Réjean ePlamondon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The generation of handwriting is a complex neuromotor skill requiring the interaction of many cognitive processes. It aims at producing a message to be imprinted as an ink trace left on a writing medium. The generated trajectory of the pen tip is made up of strokes superimposed over time. The Kinematic Theory of rapid human movements and its family of lognormal models provide analytical representations of these strokes, often considered as the basic unit of handwriting. This paradigm has not only been experimentally confirmed in numerous predictive and physiologically significant tests but it has also been shown to be the ideal mathematical description for the impulse response of a neuromuscular system. This latter demonstration suggests that the lognormality of the velocity patterns can be interpreted as reflecting the behaviour of subjects who are in perfect control of their movements. To illustrate this interpretation, we present a short overview of the main concepts behind the Kinematic Theory and briefly describe how its models can be exploited, using various software tools, to investigate these ideal lognormal behaviors. We emphasize that the parameters extracted during various tasks can be used to analyze some underlying processes associated with their realization. To investigate the operational convergence hypothesis, we report on two original studies. First, we focus on the early steps of the motor learning process as seen as a converging behaviour toward the production of more precise lognormal patterns as young children practicing handwriting start to become more fluent writers. Second, we illustrate how aging affects handwriting by pointing out the increasing departure from the ideal lognormal behaviour as the control of the fine motricity begins to decline. Overall, the paper highlights this developmental process of merging toward a lognormal behaviour with learning, mastering this behaviour to succeed in performing a given task

  19. Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer: Scientific Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara; Ninkov, Zoran; Robberto, Massimo; Hull, Tony; Purves, Lloyd

    2016-01-01

    GESE is a mission concept consisting of a 1.5-m space telescope and UV multi-object slit spectrograph designed to help understand galaxy evolution in a critical era in the history of the universe, where the rate of star-formation stopped increasing and started to decline. To isolate and identify the various processes driving the evolution of these galaxies, GESE will obtain rest-frame far-UV spectra of 100,000 galaxies at redshifts, z approximately 1-2. To obtain such a large number of spectra, multiplexing over a wide field is an absolute necessity. A slit device such as a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) or a micro-shutter array (MSA) enables spectroscopy of a hundred or more sources in a single exposure while eliminating overlapping spectra of other sources and blocking unwanted background like zodiacal light. We find that a 1.5-m space telescope with a MSA slit device combined with a custom orbit enabling long, uninterrupted exposures (approximately 10 hr) are optimal for this spectroscopic survey. GESE will not be operating alone in this endeavor. Together with x-ray telescopes and optical/near-IR telescopes like Subaru/Prime Focus Spectrograph, GESE will detect "feedback" from young massive stars and massive black holes (AGN's), and other drivers of galaxy evolution.

  20. Galaxy evolution spectroscopic explorer: scientific rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara; Ninkov, Zoran; Robberto, Massimo; Hull, Tony; Purves, Lloyd

    2016-07-01

    GESE is a mission concept consisting of a 1.5-m space telescope and UV multi-object slit spectrograph designed to help understand galaxy evolution in a critical era in the history of the universe, where the rate of star-formation stopped increasing and started to decline. To isolate and identify the various processes driving the evolution of these galaxies, GESE will obtain rest-frame far-UV spectra of 100,000 galaxies at redshifts, z 1-2. To obtain such a large number of spectra, multiplexing over a wide field is an absolute necessity. A slit device such as a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) or a micro-shutter array (MSA) enables spectroscopy of a hundred or more sources in a single exposure while eliminating overlapping spectra of other sources and blocking unwanted background like zodiacal light. We find that a 1.5-m space telescope with a MSA slit device combined with a custom orbit enabling long, uninterrupted exposures ( 10 hr) are optimal for this spectroscopic survey. GESE will not be operating alone in this endeavor. Together with x-ray telescopes and optical/near-IR telescopes like Subaru/Prime Focus Spectrograph, GESE will detect "feedback" from young massive stars and massive black holes (AGN's), and other drivers of galaxy evolution.

  1. Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer: Scientific Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara; Ninkov, Zoran; Robberto, Massimo; Hull, Tony; Purves, Lloyd

    2016-01-01

    GESE is a mission concept consisting of a 1.5-m space telescope and UV multi-object slit spectrograph designed to help understand galaxy evolution in a critical era in the history of the universe, where the rate of star-formation stopped increasing and started to decline. To isolate and identify the various processes driving the evolution of these galaxies, GESE will obtain rest-frame far-UV spectra of 100,000 galaxies at redshifts, z approximately 1-2. To obtain such a large number of spectra, multiplexing over a wide field is an absolute necessity. A slit device such as a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) or a micro-shutter array (MSA) enables spectroscopy of a hundred or more sources in a single exposure while eliminating overlapping spectra of other sources and blocking unwanted background like zodiacal light. We find that a 1.5-m space telescope with a MSA slit device combined with a custom orbit enabling long, uninterrupted exposures (approximately 10 hr) are optimal for this spectroscopic survey. GESE will not be operating alone in this endeavor. Together with x-ray telescopes and optical/near-IR telescopes like Subaru/Prime Focus Spectrograph, GESE will detect "feedback" from young massive stars and massive black holes (AGN's), and other drivers of galaxy evolution.

  2. Aging, Terminal Decline, and Terminal Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, Erdman; Cleveland, William

    1976-01-01

    Data from a 20-year longitudinal study of persons over 60 were analyzed by step-wise multiple regression to test for declines in function with age, for terminal decline (linear relationship to time before death), and for terminal drop (curvilinear relationship to time before death). There were no substantial terminal drop effects. (Author)

  3. NIDI scenario. Strong population decline in China

    OpenAIRE

    de Beer, J.A.A.

    2016-01-01

    United Nations projections assume that by the end of this century one third of the world population will live in India, China or Nigeria. While population growth in India will slow down and the population size of China will decline, population growth in Nigeria will accelerate. A new NIDI scenario projects less population growth in Nigeria and sharp population decline in China.

  4. How China Survives a Global Economic Decline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Dark clouds are looming over the global economy. The Euro zone may only manage a paltry 1.5 percent growth next year. Meanwhile in the United States, labor, residential and consumer markets have all experienced a decline in growth. With rising fuel prices, a growing debt burden and a negative savings rate, the United States also is poised for further decline in consumption.

  5. Population decline is linked to migration route in the Common Cuckoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Chris M; Thorup, Kasper; Pearce-Higgins, James W; Atkinson, Philip W

    2016-07-19

    Migratory species are in rapid decline globally. Although most mortality in long-distance migrant birds is thought to occur during migration, evidence of conditions on migration affecting breeding population sizes has been completely lacking. We addressed this by tracking 42 male Common Cuckoos from the rapidly declining UK population during 56 autumn migrations in 2011-14. Uniquely, the birds use two distinct routes to reach the same wintering grounds, allowing assessment of survival during migration independently of origin and destination. Mortality up to completion of the Sahara crossing (the major ecological barrier encountered in both routes) is higher for birds using the shorter route. The proportion of birds using this route strongly correlates with population decline across nine local breeding populations. Knowledge of variability in migratory behaviour and performance linked to robust population change data may therefore be necessary to understand population declines of migratory species and efficiently target conservation resources.

  6. Amphibian and reptile declines over 35 years at La Selva, Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Steven M; Bell, Kristen E; Philippi, Thomas; Sasa, Mahmood; Bolaños, Federico; Chaves, Gerardo; Savage, Jay M; Donnelly, Maureen A

    2007-05-15

    Amphibians stand at the forefront of a global biodiversity crisis. More than one-third of amphibian species are globally threatened, and over 120 species have likely suffered global extinction since 1980. Most alarmingly, many rapid declines and extinctions are occurring in pristine sites lacking obvious adverse effects of human activities. The causes of these "enigmatic" declines remain highly contested. Still, lack of long-term data on amphibian populations severely limits our understanding of the distribution of amphibian declines, and therefore the ultimate causes of these declines. Here, we identify a systematic community-wide decline in populations of terrestrial amphibians at La Selva Biological Station, a protected old-growth lowland rainforest in lower Central America. We use data collected over 35 years to show that population density of all species of terrestrial amphibians has declined by approximately 75% since 1970, and we show identical trends for all species of common reptiles. The trends we identify are neither consistent with recent emergence of chytridiomycosis nor the climate-linked epidemic hypothesis, two leading putative causes of enigmatic amphibian declines. Instead, our data suggest that declines are due to climate-driven reductions in the quantity of standing leaf litter, a critical microhabitat for amphibians and reptiles in this assemblage. Our results raise further concerns about the global persistence of amphibian populations by identifying widespread declines in species and habitats that are not currently recognized as susceptible to such risks.

  7. Asymmetric disassembly and robustness in declining networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Uzzi, Brian

    2008-10-28

    Mechanisms that enable declining networks to avert structural collapse and performance degradation are not well understood. This knowledge gap reflects a shortage of data on declining networks and an emphasis on models of network growth. Analyzing >700,000 transactions between firms in the New York garment industry over 19 years, we tracked this network's decline and measured how its topology and global performance evolved. We find that favoring asymmetric (disassortative) links is key to preserving the topology and functionality of the declining network. Based on our findings, we tested a model of network decline that combines an asymmetric disassembly process for contraction with a preferential attachment process for regrowth. Our simulation results indicate that the model can explain robustness under decline even if the total population of nodes contracts by more than an order of magnitude, in line with our observations for the empirical network. These findings suggest that disassembly mechanisms are not simply assembly mechanisms in reverse and that our model is relevant to understanding the process of decline and collapse in a broad range of biological, technological, and financial networks.

  8. Early-Transition Output Decline Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crt Kostevc

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we revisit the issue of aggregate output decline that took place in the early transition period. We propose an alternative explanation of output decline that is applicable to Central- and Eastern-European countries. In the first part of the paper we develop a simple dynamic general equilibrium model that builds on work by Gomulka and Lane (2001. In particular, we consider price liberalization, interpreted as elimination of distortionary taxation, as a trigger of the output decline. We show that price liberalization in interaction with heterogeneous adjustment costs and non-employment benefits lead to aggregate output decline and surge in wage inequality. While these patterns are consistent with actual dynamics in CEE countries, this model cannot generate output decline in all sectors. Instead sectors that were initially taxed even exhibit output growth. Thus, in the second part we consider an alternative general equilibrium model with only one production sector and two types of labor and distortion in a form of wage compression during the socialist era. The trigger for labor mobility and consequently output decline is wage liberalization. Assuming heterogeneity of workers in terms of adjustment costs and non-employment benefits can explain output decline in all industries.

  9. Drivers and moderators of business decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Pretorius

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Reports of business failure elicit various reactions, while research in this domain often appears to be limited by a lack of access to information about failure and by the negativity that surrounds it. Those who have experienced failure do not readily talk about it, or they disappear from the radar screen of researchers. Yet failure is preceded by decline which, when focused on strategically, can reduce eventual failures if early action is taken. The main purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual framework or typology of the drivers and moderators of business decline. Design/methodology/approach: After applying the "grounded theory" approach to the academic literature on decline and failure, a conceptual framework for the variables that drive and moderate business decline is proposed. Findings: The study proposes that decline has three core drivers, three peripheral drivers and four moderators. The core drivers identified are: resource munificence; leadership as origin; and causality (strategic versus operational origin of decline. The three peripheral drivers are: unique preconditions; continuous decisions impact; and extremes dichotomy. The study describes four moderators of the drivers: life cycle stage; stakeholder perspective; quantitative versus qualitative nature of signs and causes; and finally the age and size effects. Research limitations/implications: The proposed conceptual framework is based on literature only, although it has found support during discussions with practitioners. It is proposed to readers of this journal for scrutiny and validation. Practical implications: Strategists need to understand what drives decline in order to act timeously; practitioners who have an insight into the moderators with their impacts could make better decisions in response to decline in organisations and possibly avoid business failure. Originality/Value: Understanding business decline is still a huge theoretical challenge, which

  10. The decline of hysterectomy for benign disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horgan, R P

    2012-01-31

    Hysterectomy is one of the most common gynaecological surgical procedures performed but there appears to be a decline in the performance of this procedure in Ireland in recent times. We set out to establish the extent of the decline of hysterectomy and to explore possible explanations. Data for hysterectomy for benign disease from Ireland was obtained from the Hospital In-Patient Enquiry Scheme (HIPE) section of the Economic and Social Research Institute for the years 1999 to 2006. The total number of hysterectomies performed for benign disease showed a consistent decline during this time. There was a 36% reduction in the number of abdominal hysterectomy procedures performed.

  11. An empirical evaluation of three vibrational spectroscopic methods for detection of aflatoxins in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Davis, Jessica; Herrman, Timothy J; Murray, Seth C; Deng, Youjun

    2015-04-15

    Three commercially available vibrational spectroscopic techniques, including Raman, Fourier transform near infrared reflectance (FT-NIR), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) were evaluated to help users determine the spectroscopic method best suitable for aflatoxin analysis in maize (Zea mays L.) grain based on their relative efficiency and predictive ability. Spectral differences of Raman and FTIR spectra were more marked and pronounced among aflatoxin contamination groups than those of FT-NIR spectra. From the observations and findings in our current and previous studies, Raman and FTIR spectroscopic methods are superior to FT-NIR method in terms of predictive power and model performance for aflatoxin analysis and they are equally effective and accurate in predicting aflatoxin concentration in maize. The present study is considered as the first attempt to assess how spectroscopic techniques with different physical processes can influence and improve accuracy and reliability for rapid screening of aflatoxin contaminated maize samples.

  12. The 1997 spectroscopic GEISA databank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Arie, E.; Ballard, J.; Barbe, A.; Bjoraker, G.; Bonnet, B.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Champion, J. P.; Chedin, A.; Chursin, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Duxbury, G.; Flaud, J.-M.; Fourrie, N.; Fayt, A.; Graner, G.; Gamache, R.; Goldman, A.; Golovko, V.; Guelachvili, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hilico, J. C.; Hillman, J.; Lefevre, G.; Lellouch, E.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nemtchinov, V.; Newnham, D. A.; Nikitin, A.; Orphal, J.; Perrin, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rosenmann, L.; Rothman, L. S.; Scott, N. A.; Selby, J.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sirota, J. M.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, K. M.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Tipping, R. H.; Urban, S.; Varanasi, P.; Weber, M.

    1999-05-01

    The current version GEISA-97 of the computer-accessible database system GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) is described. This catalogue contains 1,346,266 entries. These are the spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located between 0 and 22656 cm-1. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the giant planets. GEISA-97 contains also a catalog of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. The modifications and improvements made to the earlier edition (GEISA-92) and the data management software are described.

  13. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haw [Moraga, CA; Cang, Hu [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Cangshan [Berkeley, CA; Wong, Chung M [San Gabriel, CA

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  14. Trajectories of cognitive decline in different types of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, L L; van Harten, A C; Pijnenburg, Y A L; Koedam, E L G E; Bouwman, F H; Sistermans, N; Reuling, I E W; Prins, N D; Lemstra, A W; Scheltens, P; van der Flier, W M

    2015-04-01

    To investigate trajectories of cognitive decline in patients with different types of dementia compared to controls in a longitudinal study. In 199 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 10 with vascular dementia (VaD), 26 with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 20 with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 15 with language variant frontotemporal dementia (lvFTD) and 112 controls we assessed five cognitive domains: memory, language, attention, executive and visuospatial functioning, and global cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE). All subjects had at least two neuropsychological assessments (median 2, range 2-7). Neuropsychological data were standardized into z scores using baseline performance of controls as reference. Linear mixed models (LMMs) were used to estimate baseline cognitive functioning and cognitive decline over time for each group, adjusted for age, gender and education. At baseline, patients with dementia performed worse than controls in all cognitive domains (p cognitive domains (p cognitive domain except language and global cognition. bvFTD showed rapid decline in memory, language, attention and executive functioning (all p cognitive trajectories of different types of dementia. These estimations of natural disease course have important value for the design of clinical trials as neuropsychological measures are increasingly being used as outcome measures.

  15. Ectomycorrhizal fungal richness declines towards the host species' range edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankau, Richard A; Keymer, Daniel P

    2016-07-01

    Plant range boundaries are generally considered to reflect abiotic conditions; however, a rise in negative or decline in positive species interactions at range margins may contribute to these stable boundaries. While evidence suggests that pollinator mutualisms may decline near range boundaries, little is known about other important plant mutualisms, including microbial root symbionts. Here, we used molecular methods to characterize root-associated fungal communities in populations of two related temperate tree species from across the species' range in the eastern United States. We found that ectomycorrhizal fungal richness on plant roots declined with distance from the centre of the host species range. These patterns were not evident in nonmycorrhizal fungal communities on roots nor in fungal communities in bulk soil. Climatic and soil chemical variables could not explain these biogeographic patterns, although these abiotic gradients affected other components of the bulk soil and rhizosphere fungal community. Depauperate ectomycorrhizal fungal communities may represent an underappreciated challenge to marginal tree populations, especially as rapid climate change pushes these populations outside their current climate niche.

  16. Multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehle, Jean-Louis [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Samartzis, Peter C., E-mail: sama@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Stamataki, Katerina [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Piel, Jean-Philippe [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Katsoprinakis, George E.; Papadakis, Vassilis [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Schimowski, Xavier [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Rakitzis, T. Peter [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Loppinet, Benoit [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece)

    2014-03-31

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is an established technique, particularly useful for thickness measurements of thin films. It measures polarization rotation after a single reflection of a beam of light on the measured substrate at a given incidence angle. In this paper, we report the development of multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry where the light beam reflects multiple times on the sample. We have investigated both theoretically and experimentally the effect of sample reflectivity, number of reflections (passes), angles of incidence and detector dynamic range on ellipsometric observables tanΨ and cosΔ. The multiple pass approach provides increased sensitivity to small changes in Ψ and Δ, opening the way for single measurement determination of optical thickness T, refractive index n and absorption coefficient k of thin films, a significant improvement over the existing techniques. Based on our results, we discuss the strengths, the weaknesses and possible applications of this technique. - Highlights: • We present multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry (MPSE), a multi-pass approach to ellipsometry. • Different detectors, samples, angles of incidence and number of passes were tested. • N passes improve polarization ratio sensitivity to the power of N. • N reflections improve phase shift sensitivity by a factor of N. • MPSE can significantly improve thickness measurements in thin films.

  17. Atrial Fibrillation, Cognitive Decline And Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Alvaro; Arenas de Larriva, Antonio P.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia. Growing evidence supports a role for AF as a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia. In this review, we summarize epidemiologic observations linking AF with cognitive outcomes, describe potential mechanisms, and explore the impact of AF treatments on cognitive decline and dementia. Community-based, observational studies show a consistent higher rate of cognitive decline and risk of dementia in persons with AF. These associations are partly due to the increased risk of clinical stroke in AF, but other mechanisms, including incidence of silent cerebral infarcts, microbleeds, and cerebral hypoperfusion, are likely additional contributors. Adequate oral anticoagulation and improved management of the overall cardiovascular risk profile in persons with AF offer the promise of reducing the impact of AF on cognitive decline and dementia. PMID:27547248

  18. Understanding Amphibian Declines Through Geographic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Alisa

    2006-01-01

    Growing concern over worldwide amphibian declines warrants serious examination. Amphibians are important to the proper functioning of ecosystems and provide many direct benefits to humans in the form of pest and disease control, pharmaceutical compounds, and even food. Amphibians have permeable skin and rely on both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems during different seasons and stages of their lives. Their association with these ecosystems renders them likely to serve as sensitive indicators of environmental change. While much research on amphibian declines has centered on mysterious causes, or on causes that directly affect humans (global warming, chemical pollution, ultraviolet-B radiation), most declines are the result of habitat loss and habitat alteration. Improving our ability to characterize, model, and monitor the interactions between environmental variables and amphibian habitats is key to addressing amphibian conservation. In 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) to address issues surrounding amphibian declines.

  19. Global pollinator declines: trends, impacts and drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Simon G; Biesmeijer, Jacobus C; Kremen, Claire; Neumann, Peter; Schweiger, Oliver; Kunin, William E

    2010-06-01

    Pollinators are a key component of global biodiversity, providing vital ecosystem services to crops and wild plants. There is clear evidence of recent declines in both wild and domesticated pollinators, and parallel declines in the plants that rely upon them. Here we describe the nature and extent of reported declines, and review the potential drivers of pollinator loss, including habitat loss and fragmentation, agrochemicals, pathogens, alien species, climate change and the interactions between them. Pollinator declines can result in loss of pollination services which have important negative ecological and economic impacts that could significantly affect the maintenance of wild plant diversity, wider ecosystem stability, crop production, food security and human welfare. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The global financial crisis and neighborhood decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, M.D.; Bolt, G.; Van Ham, M.; Van Kempen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Neighborhood decline is a complex and multidimensional process. National and regional variations in economic and political structures (including varieties in national welfare state arrangements), combined with differences in neighborhood history, development, and population composition, make it impo

  1. Problems Associated with Declining National Oil Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Forecasts of peak oil production have focussed on the global impacts of declining production. Meanwhile, national oil production has declined in 20 countries, leading to local problems that receive little comment outside of the effected regions. Two problems deserve wider recognition: declining state revenues and fuel substitution. Most oil producing countries with large reserves adopted licensing practices that provide significant revenues to the host governments such that oil revenues generate from 40 to 80 percent of total government funds. Typically these governments allocate a fraction of this revenue to their state oil companies, utilizing the remainder for other activities. As oil revenues decline with falling production, host governments face a dilemma: either to increase state oil company budgets in order to stem the decline, or to starve the state oil company while maintaining other government programs. The declining oil revenues in these states can significantly reduce the government's ability to address important national issues. Mexico, Indonesia, and Yemen illustrate this situation in its early phases. Fuel substitution occurs whenever one fuel proves less expensive than another. The substitution of coal for wood in the eighteenth century and oil for coal in the twentieth century are classic examples. China and India appear to be at peak oil production, while their economies generate increasing demand for energy. Both countries are substituting coal and natural gas for oil with attendant environmental impacts. Coal-to-liquids projects are proposed in in both China, which will require significant water resources if they are executed. These examples suggest that forecasting the impact of peak oil at a regional level requires more than an assessment of proven-probable-possible reserves and a forecast of supply-demand scenarios. A range of government responses to declining oil income scenarios must also be considered, together with scenarios describing

  2. Climate change, multiple stressors, and the decline of ectotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Jason R; Palmer, Brent D

    2013-08-01

    Climate change is believed to be causing declines of ectothermic vertebrates, but there is little evidence that climatic conditions associated with declines have exceeded critical (i.e., acutely lethal) maxima or minima, and most relevant studies are correlative, anecdotal, or short-term (hours). We conducted an 11-week factorial experiment to examine the effects of temperature (22 °C or 27 °C), moisture (wet or dry), and atrazine (an herbicide; 0, 4, 40, 400 μg/L exposure as embryos and larvae) on the survival, growth, behavior, and foraging rates of postmetamorphic streamside salamanders (Ambystoma barbouri), a species of conservation concern. The tested climatic conditions were between the critical maxima and minima of streamside salamanders; thus, this experiment quantified the long-term effects of climate change within the noncritical range of this species. Despite a suite of behavioral adaptations to warm and dry conditions (e.g., burrowing, refuge use, huddling with conspecifics, and a reduction in activity), streamside salamanders exhibited significant loss of mass and significant mortality in all but the cool and moist conditions, which were closest to the climatic conditions in which they are most active in nature. A temperature of 27 °C represented a greater mortality risk than dry conditions; death occurred rapidly at this temperature and more gradually under cool and dry conditions. Foraging decreased under dry conditions, which suggests there were opportunity costs to water conservation. Exposure to the herbicide atrazine additively decreased water-conserving behaviors, foraging efficiency, mass, and time to death. Hence, the hypothesis that moderate climate change can cause population declines is even more plausible under scenarios with multiple stressors. These results suggest that climate change within the noncritical range of species and pollution may reduce individual performance by altering metabolic demands, hydration, and foraging effort

  3. Spectroscopic Feedback for High Density Data Storage and Micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Christopher W.; Demos, Stavros; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    2008-09-16

    Optical breakdown by predetermined laser pulses in transparent dielectrics produces an ionized region of dense plasma confined within the bulk of the material. Such an ionized region is responsible for broadband radiation that accompanies a desired breakdown process. Spectroscopic monitoring of the accompanying light in real-time is utilized to ascertain the morphology of the radiated interaction volume. Such a method and apparatus as presented herein, provides commercial realization of rapid prototyping of optoelectronic devices, optical three-dimensional data storage devices, and waveguide writing.

  4. Spectroscopic properties of chlorophyll f.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqiong; Cai, Zheng-Li; Chen, Min

    2013-09-26

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of chlorophyll f (newly discovered in 2010) have been measured in acetone and methanol at different temperatures. The spectral analysis and assignment are compared with the spectra of chlorophyll a and d under the same experimental conditions. The spectroscopic properties of these chlorophylls have further been studied by the aid of density functional CAM-B3LYP and high-level symmetric adapted coupled-cluster configuration interaction calculations. The main Q and Soret bands and possible sidebands of chlorophylls have been determined. The photophysical properties of chlorophyll f are discussed.

  5. A spectroscopic analysis of the chemically peculiar star HD207561

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, S; Martinez, P; Sachkov, M; Joshi, Y C; Seetha, S; Chakradhari, N K; Mary, D L; Girish, V; Ashoka, B N

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a high-resolution spectroscopic analysis of the chemically peculiar star HD207561. During a survey programme to search for new roAp stars in the Northern hemisphere, Joshi et al. (2006) observed significant photometric variability on two consecutive nights in the year 2000. The amplitude spectra of the light curves obtained on these two nights showed oscillations with a frequency of 2.79 mHz [P~6-min]. However, subsequent follow-up observations could not confirm any rapid variability. In order to determine the spectroscopic nature of HD207561, high-resolution spectroscopic and spectro-polarimetric observations were carried out. A reasonable fit of the calculated Hbeta line profile to the observed one yields the effective temperature (Teff) and surface gravity (log g) as 7300 K and 3.7 dex, respectively. The derived projected rotational velocity (vsin i) for HD207561 is 74 km/sec indicative of a relatively fast rotator. The position of HD207561 in the H-R diagram implies that this is s...

  6. Biomarkers of cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Hsien; Wu, Ruey-Meei

    2015-05-01

    Cognitive impairment is a frequent and devastating non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Impaired cognition has a major impact on either quality of life or mortality in patients with PD. Notably, the rate of cognitive decline and pattern of early cognitive deficits in PD are highly variable between individuals. Given that the underlying mechanisms of cognitive decline or dementia associated with PD remain unclear, there is currently no mechanism-based treatment available. Identification of biological markers, including neuroimaging, biofluids and common genetic variants, that account for the heterogeneity of PD related cognitive decline could provide important insights into the pathological processes that underlie cognitive impairment in PD. These combined biomarker approaches will enable early diagnosis and provide indicators of cognitive progression in PD patients. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of biomarkers for cognitive impairments in PD.

  7. Identifying functional decline: a methodological challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimmer K

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Karen Grimmer, Kate Beaton, Kevan Hendry International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia Background: Functional decline (FD in older people has commonly been measured in the hospital setting with instruments which have been validated on decrease over time in capacity to undertake basic activities of daily living (ADL. In a nonhospitalized sample of older people (independently community dwelling, but potentially on the cusp of FD, it is possible that other measures could be used to predict decline. Early, accurate, and efficient identification of older community-dwelling people who are on the cusp of FD can assist in identifying appropriate interventions to slow the rate of decline. Methods: This paper reports on associations between four outcome measures which have been associated with FD (instrumental ADLs [IADLs], quality of life, hospitalizations and falls. The sample was older individuals who were discharged from one large metropolitan emergency department (ED during 2011–2012, without an inpatient admission. Results: Of 597 individuals aged 65+ who provided baseline information, 148 subjects provided four outcome measures at both 1 and 3 months follow up. Overall, approximately 24% demonstrated decreased IADL scores over the 3 months, with domains of home activities, laundry, shopping, and getting places declining the most. Over this time, 18% fell often, and 11% were consistently hospitalized. Between 1 and 3 months follow up, 41% declined in mental component scores, and 50% declined in physical component scores. Low mental and physical component quality of life scores were associated with downstream increased falls and hospitalizations, and decreased quality of life and IADLs. However, change in the four outcome measures was largely independent in factor analysis. Conclusion: Measuring the four outcome measures over 3 months post-discharge from an ED presentation, showed that

  8. Prognostic Significance of Left Ventricular Mass Index and Renal Function Decline Rate in Chronic Kidney Disease G3 and G4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiun-Chi; Chen, Szu-Chia; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kuo, I-Ching; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2017-01-01

    The effect of left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline rate on outcome prediction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. We included 306 CKD G3 and G4 patients with LVMI assessed through echocardiography. Rapid decline in renal function was defined as the eGFR slope <−3 mL/min/1.73 m2/year. Patients were stratified into four groups using sex-specific median values of LVMI and rapid eGFR decline. The composite outcome was progression to maintenance dialysis or death. 32 patients had the composite outcome during a median follow-up of 2.7 years. In multivariate Cox analysis, compared with patients with non-rapid eGFR decline and lower LVMI, those with non-rapid eGFR decline and higher LVMI (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.908, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.304–26.780), rapid eGFR decline and lower LVMI (HR: 12.737, 95% CI = 2.297–70.636), and rapid eGFR decline and higher LVMI (HR: 15.249, 95% CI = 3.365–69.097) had an increased risk of progression to adverse outcomes. LVMI and eGFR decline synergistically effect the prognostic implications in CKD G3 and G4 patients. PMID:28195182

  9. Lung function decline and blood lead among residents nearby to industrial complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Yun-Suk; Oh, Aeri; Kho, Young Lim; Paek, Domyung

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: This study was to ascertain the risk factors of pulmonary function decline (forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV(1)], forced vital capacity [FVC]) among those exposed to lead in the vicinity of industrial complex. METHODS: In total, 263 men and women, aged over 30, were recruited from two cities during a 2-year follow-up. Spirometry testing was conducted first at baseline and then after 2-years of follow-up. The change in FVC and FEV(1) during the study period was analyzed according to blood lead (BPb), urinary cotinine, and 1-hydroxypyrene, after controlling for sex, height, baseline FVC or FEV(1), and airway hyperresponsiveness. RESULTS: With increase in age, both FEV(1) and FVC declined. More marked decline in FVC was noted for men than for women (p variables, especially height (p variables, blood lead level was also significantly associated with the decline of FVC. CONCLUSIONS: Even though the decline in FEV(1) and FVC with aging was within a normal range, people with smaller height were more vulnerable to the decline of both FEV(1) and FVC and especially higher level of BPb was accompanied with larger decline of FVC. Oxidative stress in relation to lead accumulation in adult may contribute to rapid aging of pulmonary function.

  10. Spectroscopic study of photo and thermal destruction of riboflavin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astanov, Salikh; Sharipov, Mirzo Z.; Fayzullaev, Askar R.; Kurtaliev, Eldar N.; Nizomov, Negmat

    2014-08-01

    Influence of temperature and light irradiation on the spectroscopic properties of aqueous solutions of riboflavin was studied using linear dichroism method, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was established that in a wide temperature range 290-423 K there is a decline of absorbance and fluorescence ability, which is explained by thermodestruction of riboflavin. It is shown that the proportion of molecules, which have undergone degradation, are in the range of 4-28%, and depends on the concentration and quantity of temperature effects. Introduction of hydrochloric and sulfuric acids, as well as different metal ions leads to an increase in the photostability of riboflavin solutions by 2-2.5 times. The observed phenomena are explained by the formation protonation form of riboflavin and a complex between the metal ions and oxygen atoms of the carbonyl group of riboflavin, respectively.

  11. Political Factors in Public School Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzman, Sam

    1993-01-01

    Teacher unionization, centralization of financial control, desegregation, and weakening in business involvement are among the political factors that have contributed to the decline in public school performance between 1965 and 1980. Research into these factors confirms the importance of political influences on schooling and suggests that…

  12. Why Do Patients with COPD Decline Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathar, Helle; Fastholm, Pernille; Hansen, Ida Rode

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This paper aimed to suggest possible answers to the question: Why do patients with COPD decline pulmonary rehabilitation (PR)? METHOD: The study is a metasynthesis inspired by Noblit of the existing qualitative research on the area. The data were collected during 2014. Six studies were found...

  13. Afterword: The Management and Consequences of Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, William Lowe

    1983-01-01

    Stresses the need for aggressive, farsighted management of decline and for more Federal and State aid to local school administrators to combat the negative effects of school closures and retrenchment, and to ensure that retrenched school systems still serve children effectively. (Author/MJL)

  14. The Decline of Literature: A Public Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albalawi, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    After centuries of dominance, literature has not been in a robust health for the last few decades. Several scholars have addressed the decline of literature in a number of books and articles attributing it to institutional and economic reasons. However, a major factor has not been taken into account. It is the larger audience who receives and…

  15. Prevalence of Hunger Declines in Rural Households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Mark; Winicki, F. Joshua

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence of hunger in rural households declined slightly from 1995 to 1998, and food insecurity rates stayed constant. Food insecurity was almost three times as prevalent among rural Blacks as among rural Whites. For rural Hispanics, the rate was about twice that of Whites. Food insecurity was higher in single-parent families than in any…

  16. NIDI scenario. Strong population decline in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, J.A.A.

    2016-01-01

    United Nations projections assume that by the end of this century one third of the world population will live in India, China or Nigeria. While population growth in India will slow down and the population size of China will decline, population growth in Nigeria will accelerate. A new NIDI scenario

  17. Student Writing: Strategies to Reverse Ongoing Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Michael J.; Harper, Heather

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the decline in writing ability skills in secondary and higher education students. The author discusses changes that have affected student writing skills over the recent decades and offers recommendations for improving these skills, such as: implementing intensive freshman writing courses; adjusting existing course…

  18. The Decline in China Textile Exports Narrowed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This is a crucial moment for China’s textile export industry, which is in the midst of deep economic downturn. In the January-Novem- ber 2009 period, the decline in accumulated textile and apparel exports was being constantly reduced and the tendency of rebound is

  19. Episodic memory decline and healthy aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, W.C.; Daselaar, S.M.; Cabeza, R.

    2017-01-01

    One of the cognitive functions most affected by the aging process is our memory for personally experienced past events or episodic memory (EM). The advent of functional neuroimaging has greatly advanced our knowledge of the neural basis of EM and its decline with age. The current chapter revi

  20. Exploring the Global Decline of Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aróstegui, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    This article seeks to explain the disjuncture between the decline of music education in schools and the importance music has in popular youth culture and in creativity within the new knowledge economy. The data discussed in this article have been derived from analyses of major documents on curriculum reform as well as e-mail responses from music…

  1. Why Employee Motivation Has Declined in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Philip C.

    1982-01-01

    Examines possible reasons for declining employee motivation: greater instability and diversity of values; more guaranteed rewards; inability of rewards to satisfy emerging needs; disappearing work ethic; reduced costs of failure; rising income and progressive taxation; more group production and problem solving; decreased employee loyalty; less…

  2. Cholesterol and late-life cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Peter

    2012-01-01

    High cholesterol levels are a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but their role in dementia and cognitive decline is less clear. This review highlights current knowledge on the role of cholesterol in late-life cognitive function, cognitive decline, and dementia. When measured in midlife, high cholesterol levels associate with an increased risk of late-life dementia and cognitive decline. However, when measured in late-life, high cholesterol levels show no association with cognitive function, or even show an inverse relation. Although statin treatment has been shown to associate with a lower risk of dementia and cognitive decline in observational studies, randomized controlled trials show no beneficial effect of statin treatment on late-life cognitive function. Lowering cholesterol levels may impair brain function, since cholesterol is essential for synapse formation and maturation and plays an important role in the regulation of signal transduction through its function as a component of the cell membrane. However, membrane cholesterol also plays a role in the formation and aggregation of amyloid-β. Factors that influence cholesterol metabolism, such as dietary intake, are shown to play a role in late-life cognitive function and the risk of dementia. In conclusion, cholesterol associates with late-life cognitive function, but the association is strongly age-dependent. There is no evidence that treatment with statins in late-life has a beneficial effect on cognitive function.

  3. Migratory diversity predicts population declines in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, James J; Gill, Jennifer A; Butchart, Stuart H M; Jones, Victoria R; Franco, Aldina M A

    2016-03-01

    Declines in migratory species are a pressing concern worldwide, but the mechanisms underpinning these declines are not fully understood. We hypothesised that species with greater within-population variability in migratory movements and destinations, here termed 'migratory diversity', might be more resilient to environmental change. To test this, we related map-based metrics of migratory diversity to recent population trends for 340 European breeding birds. Species that occupy larger non-breeding ranges relative to breeding, a characteristic we term 'migratory dispersion', were less likely to be declining than those with more restricted non-breeding ranges. Species with partial migration strategies (i.e. overlapping breeding and non-breeding ranges) were also less likely to be declining than full migrants or full residents, an effect that was independent of migration distance. Recent rates of advancement in Europe-wide spring arrival date were greater for partial migrants than full migrants, suggesting that migratory diversity may also help facilitate species responses to climate change. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  4. The Decline of Direct Newspaper Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosse, James N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the decline of direct newspaper competition in terms of the loss of effective newspaper market segmentation. Examines the following influences on market segmentation: shift in advertising demand, advertiser preferences for differentiated audiences, shift in subscriber demand, growth of alternative media, increasing production costs, and…

  5. The TNG EROs Spectroscopic Identification Survey (TESIS)

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Ceca, R D; Severgnini, P; Braito, V; Bender, R; Drory, N; Feulner, G; Hopp, U; Mannucci, F; Maraston, C

    2003-01-01

    We are carrying on a near-IR very low resolution spectroscopic follow-up in parallel with XMM-Newton observations of a complete sample of ~30 bright (K'<18.5) Extremely Red Objects (EROs) selected over an area of 360 arcmin^2 of the MUNICS survey. We here present the preliminary results of the spectroscopic and X-ray data analysis.

  6. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  7. [Forest degradation/decline: research and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiao-Jun; Li, Feng-Qin

    2007-07-01

    As one of the most critical environmental problems in the 21st century, forest degradation has been facing worldwide. There are many definitions about forest degradation, but its common features are the permanent loss of forests, stand structure destructed, forest quality decreased, and forest functions lowered. Forest decline or tree decline in fact is one of the causes of forest degradation, which includes the general reduction of trees in vigor, low level growth of trees in productivity, death of trees, and even, decline of soil fertility. Many researches indicated that deforestation is the permanent loss of forests in area, which is shifted to other land uses. Deforestation is the product of the interactions between environmental, social, economic, cultural, and political forces at work in any given country/region, and thus, more and more attention is focused on the negative socioeconomic and environmental effects after forest degradation, especially on the reduction of forest area induced by deforestation. The effects of any decisions or policies in national and international levels on forest degradation induced by deforestation have been paid attention as well. How to make efforts and strengthen the worldwide cooperation to combat the forest degradation induced by deforestation must be challenged to find appropriate solutions. There are many researches on forest decline, because of its complexity and uncertainties. The major causes of forest decline include: 1) pollution from both industry and agriculture, 2) stress factors, e.g., desiccation, 3) changes in stand dynamics, 4) decline disease of forest or diseases of complex etiology, 5) degradation of productivity and/or soil fertility in pure plantation forests. Forest degradation in China is similar to that all over the world, but with the characteristics in forest components, i.e., 1) secondary forests are the major forest resources, 2) China has the most plantation forests in the world, some of which have

  8. Large Decadal Decline of the Arctic Multiyear Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2012-01-01

    The perennial ice area was drastically reduced to 38% of its climatological average in 2007 but recovered slightly in 2008, 2009, and 2010 with the areas being 10%, 24%, and 11% higher than in 2007, respectively. However, trends in extent and area remained strongly negative at -12.2% and -13.5% decade (sup -1), respectively. The thick component of the perennial ice, called multiyear ice, as detected by satellite data during the winters of 1979-2011 was studied, and results reveal that the multiyear ice extent and area are declining at an even more rapid rate of -15.1% and -17.2% decade(sup -1), respectively, with a record low value in 2008 followed by higher values in 2009, 2010, and 2011. Such a high rate in the decline of the thick component of the Arctic ice cover means a reduction in the average ice thickness and an even more vulnerable perennial ice cover. The decline of the multiyear ice area from 2007 to 2008 was not as strong as that of the perennial ice area from 2006 to 2007, suggesting a strong role of second-year ice melt in the latter. The sea ice cover is shown to be strongly correlated with surface temperature, which is increasing at about 3 times the global average in the Arctic but appears weakly correlated with the Arctic Oscillation (AO), which controls the atmospheric circulation in the region. An 8-9-yr cycle is apparent in the multiyear ice record, which could explain, in part, the slight recovery in the last 3 yr.

  9. Rapid Measurement of Spectral Characteristics by Correlation Matching Method

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chol-Sun; Im, Song-Jin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have established the couple system of a spectroscope, CCD and computer and proposed a method of the rapid measurement on spectral characteristics such as central wavelengths, relative intensities, sensitivity lines and the wavelength range and image pixel of the spectral images of a material by using the correlation matching method for the image discernment of digital spectra.

  10. Spectroscopic signatures of quantum friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Juliane; Bennett, Robert; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-12-01

    We present a formula for the spectroscopically accessible level shifts and decay rates of an atom moving at an arbitrary angle relative to a surface. Our Markov formulation leads to an intuitive analytic description whereby the shifts and rates are obtained from the coefficients of the Heisenberg equation of motion for the atomic flip operators but with complex Doppler-shifted (velocity-dependent) transition frequencies. Our results conclusively demonstrate that for the limiting case of parallel motion the shifts and rates are quadratic or higher in the atomic velocity. We show that a stronger, linear velocity dependence is exhibited by the rates and shifts for perpendicular motion, thus opening the prospect of experimentally probing the Markovian approach to the phenomenon of quantum friction.

  11. Sick, the spectroscopic inference crank

    CERN Document Server

    Casey, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives which remain severely under-utilised. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analysing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this Article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbour estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimised point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalise on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-di...

  12. Dynamic distributions and population declines of Golden-winged Warblers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Kenneth V.; Will, Tom; Buehler, David A.; Barker Swarthout, Sara; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Chandler, Richard

    2016-01-01

    hybrid zone, but the future of northern populations in the Great Lakes states and Canada (where >80% of the species occurs at present) is highly uncertain because of continued northward expansion of Blue-winged Warblers and hybridization. A second, now-disjunct band of Golden-winged Warbler populations exists in the Appalachian Mountains from southeastern New York to northern Georgia, surrounded at lower elevations by Blue-winged Warblers. Important concentrations of Golden-winged Warblers persist in the Allegheny Mountains region of West Virginia, the Cumberland Mountains in Tennessee, Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina, Allegheny Plateau and Pocono Mountains in Pennsylvania, and in the Hudson Highlands of southern New York. These high-elevation Appalachian populations have escaped contact with Blue-winged Warblers until very recently and represent important refugia for conservation and management; other Appalachian populations are rapidly declining. In addition, based on historical records and standardized surveys across the wintering grounds, we identified three regions of concentration: highlands and Caribbean slopes from Guatemala and Belize to northwestern Nicaragua; middle elevations (both slopes) in Costa Rica and western Panama; and in an arc of the northern Andes from central Colombia to northern Venezuela. It is possible that the winter range has been shifting towards the northwest in recent decades, paralleling shifts in the breeding distribution. Future conservation efforts for Golden-winged Warbler need to include close monitoring of the dynamic phenotypic and genetic distributional shifts, and may need to consider the “winged warbler” complex together as a highly adaptable evolutionary unit.

  13. Inferring species decline from collection records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpaneto, Giuseppe Maria; Mazziotta, Adriano; Valerio, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The decline of roller dung beetles (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae) in Italy, at national and regional level, was described using a database of both literature and unpublished data, since the late of 19th century. The probability of finding roller species was assessed for each decade of the 20th century...... UTM cells dropped by 23%. Six roller species showed a significant decline in Italy from the first to the second part of the 20th century, and nine in the last 30years. Other two species disappeared from the majority of the northern regions. Finally, the values of all the extinction indexes were...... strongly correlated and detected a high risk of extinction in Italy for six species. A gradual change in land use during the last three decades, consisting of a reduced extension of grasslands in favour of either intensive agriculture or reforestation after abandonment of livestock raising, was likely...

  14. The Rise and Decline of Japanese Pacifism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Cai

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese pacifist constitution has been a symbol of Japan’s commitment to peace and more importantly its renunciation of wartime militarism. There has been strong support for its continuing existence amongst the Japanese populace despite persistent attempts by the Japanese government to amend it. However, the prevalent pacifist sentiment is showing signs of fading vitality in recent times. This article purports to examine the underlying forces that contributed to the development and the decline of Japanese pacifism. A host of domestic and international factors were responsible for the growth of pacifism and its subsequent decline, but only three important domestic factors will be examined in detail: the concept of victimhood in the development of pacifism and its implication for its continuing strength, the importance of peace education and the role played by the influential Japan’s Teachers’ Union on the formation of pacifist conscience and finally, the influence of leftist organisations on the organised peace movement.

  15. Inferring species decline from collection records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpaneto, Giuseppe Maria; Mazziotta, Adriano; Valerio, Laura

    2007-01-01

    increased clearly as a consequence of the escalation of entomological surveys. Nevertheless, comparing R species (rollers) with all the scarab dung beetles from the first to the last quarter of the 20th century, the relative frequency of roller records decreased by 31%, while the relative number of occupied......The decline of roller dung beetles (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae) in Italy, at national and regional level, was described using a database of both literature and unpublished data, since the late of 19th century. The probability of finding roller species was assessed for each decade of the 20th century...... UTM cells dropped by 23%. Six roller species showed a significant decline in Italy from the first to the second part of the 20th century, and nine in the last 30years. Other two species disappeared from the majority of the northern regions. Finally, the values of all the extinction indexes were...

  16. Functional and cognitive decline in hospitalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EUGÉNIA MENDES

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Aim – Understand if functional and cognitive decline is accentuated during hospitalization in elderly patients. Method – It was design a descriptive and correlational study. The Functional Independence Measure (FIM and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE were used. Results – Were evaluated at admission and discharge 51 elderly (75.53 ± 7.16 years, 53% women, admitted in an internal medicine unit with a length of stay of 14.27±6.45 days. For FIM and MMSE were found statistically significant differences with lower scores from admission to discharge. Negative correlations between age and length of stay and the scores of all measures were found. Except for the Cognitive FIM at admission, all elderly residents at home fared better than the institutionalized in all measures. Conclusions – The hospitalization contributes to a greater weakness/frailty of the elderly and is considered high risk for decline in physical fitness and cognitive function.

  17. The rise (and decline?) of biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinch, Michael S

    2014-11-01

    Since the 1970s, biotechnology has been a key innovator in drug development. An analysis of FDA-approved therapeutics demonstrates pharmaceutical companies outpace biotechs in terms of new approvals but biotechnology companies are now responsible for earlier-stage activities (patents, INDs or clinical development). The number of biotechnology organizations that contributed to an FDA approval began declining in the 2000s and is at a level not seen since the 1980s. Whereas early biotechnology companies had a decade from first approval until acquisition, the average acquisition of a biotechnology company now occurs months before their first FDA approval. The number of hybrid organizations that arise when pharmaceutical companies acquire biotechnology is likewise declining, raising questions about the sustainability of biotechnology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of production decline in geothermal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zais, Elliot J.; Bodvarsson, Gunnar

    1980-09-01

    The major objectives of the Decline Curve project were to: (1) test the decline analysis methods used in the petroleum industry on geothermal production data; (2) examine and/or develop new analysis methods; and (3) develop a standard operating procedure for analyzing geothermal production data. Various analysis methods have long been available but they have not been tested on geothermal data because of the lack of publicly available data. The recent release to publication of substantial data sets from Wairakei, New Zealand, Cerro Prieto, Mexico and The Geysers, USA has made this study possible. Geothermal reservoirs are quite different from petroleum reservoirs in many ways so the analysis methods must be tested using geothermal data.

  19. Lithuania: Fertility decline and its determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiva Jasilioniene

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the 1990s, Lithuania has been undergoing significant transformations in family life and has experienced a precipitous decline in fertility. The determinants of the changes are diverse in character and are associated with socioeconomic transformations, economic difficulties faced by the post-Soviet society, inadequate social and family policies and changing value orientations and life styles. This article traces the fertility trends in Lithuania from the period and cohort perspective, providing adjusted TFR estimates that reveal the significance of the tempo effect on the recent decline in fertility. Furthermore, the main factors leading to the recently observed changes in family and fertility are identified and analysed. Finally, the characteristic features and necessary improvements of current Lithuanian family policy and its possible effects on individual behaviour and fertility trends are discussed.

  20. Dehydroepiandrosterone and age-related cognitive decline

    OpenAIRE

    Sorwell, Krystina G.; Urbanski, Henryk F.

    2009-01-01

    In humans the circulating concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) decrease markedly during aging, and have been implicated in age-associated cognitive decline. This has led to the hypothesis that DHEA supplementation during aging may improve memory. In rodents, a cognitive anti-aging effect of DHEA and DHEAS has been observed but it is unclear whether this effect is mediated indirectly through conversion of these steroids to estradiol. Moreover, despite the de...

  1. MIND diet slows cognitive decline with aging

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Martha Clare; Tangney, Christy C.; Wang, Yamin; Sacks, Frank Martin; Barnes, Lisa L.; Bennett, David William; Aggarwal, Neelum T

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Mediterranean and dash diets have been shown to slow cognitive decline; however, neither diet is specific to the nutrition literature on dementia prevention. METHODS: We devised the Mediterranean-Dietary Approach to Systolic Hypertension (DASH) diet intervention for neurodegenerative delay (MIND) diet score that specifically captures dietary components shown to be neuroprotective and related it to change in cognition over an average 4.7 years among 960 participants ...

  2. The Decline of Air Assault Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    criticality of mission focus to the success of air assaults . However, 31 1st Infantry Division, AAR—Operation Junction City for 22 February 1967 to 15...product life cycle theory is a great way to visualize the fifty-year life of air assault operations; however, its explanatory powers are limited. The 1962...The Decline of Air Assault Operations A Monograph by MAJ Jason S. Raub United States Army School of

  3. The role of medicine in the decline of post-War infant mortality in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Tanihara, Shinichi; Inoue, Sachiko; Takao, Soshi; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2011-11-01

    The infant mortality rate (IMR) in Japan declined dramatically in the immediate post-War period (1947-60) in Japan. We compared the time trends in Growth Domestic Product (GDP) in Japan against declines in IMR. We then conducted a prefecture-level ecological analysis of the rate of decline in IMR and post-neonatal mortality from 1947 to 1960, focusing on variations in medical resources and public health strategies. IMR in Japan started to decline after World War II, even before the era of rapid economic growth and the introduction of a universal health insurance system in the 1960s. The mortality rates per 1000 infants in 2009 were 2.38 for IMR, 1.17 for neonatal mortality and 1.21 for post-neonatal mortality. The rate of decline in IMR and preventable IMR (PIMR) during the post-War period was strongly correlated with prefectural variations in medical resources (per capita physicians, nurses, and proportion of in-hospital births). The correlation coefficients comparing the number of physicians in 1955 with the declines in IMR and PIMR from 1947 to 1960 were 0.46 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19, 0.66] and 0.39 [95% CI 0.11, 0.61], respectively. By contrast, indicators of public health strategies were not associated with IMR decline. The IMR in Japan has been decreasing and seems to be entering a new era characterised by lower neonatal compared with post-neonatal mortality. Furthermore, the post-War history of Japan illustrates that improvement in infant mortality is attributable to the influence of medical care, even in the absence of rapid economic development.

  4. Family planning programs and fertility decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuca, R

    1980-01-01

    A recently completed World Bank statistical study of family planning in 63 developing countries indicated that countries which experienced a large decline in birth rates between 1960-1977 were more likely to have a family planning program, an official population policy aimed at decreasing the birth rate, and a relatively high level of development than countries which experienced smaller or no decline in birth rates. The 65 countries represented 95% of the population of the developing world. Birth rate declines of 10% or more between 1960-1977 were experienced by: 1) 10 of the 26 countries which had a family planning program and a policy aimed at reducing the birth rate; 2) 6 of the 19 countries which had a family planning program but lacked clearly defined population objectives; and 3) 2 of the 18 countries without any population policy or program. Furthermore, the implementation of a family planning program and the adoption of a population policy were directly related to the development level of the country. This finding suggested that countries need to reach a certain level of development before they have the capacity to develop population programs and policies. When a country is sufficiently advanced to collect population data, awareness of population problems increases and they are more likely to adopt a population policy. In addition, government efficiency increases as development proceeds and governments must have a certain level of efficiency before they can implement effective programs.

  5. Farmer's lung is now in decline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Arya, A

    2012-02-03

    Farmer\\'s lung incidence in Ireland was constant until 1996, even though hay making methods were revolutionised in late 1980\\'s. We undertook this study to find out the incidence of farmer\\'s lung in Ireland from 1982-2002 and its correlation with rainfall and the effect of changing farm practices. The primary cases of farmer\\'s lung were identified from Hospital in Patients Enquiry (HIPE) unit of the national Economic & Social Research Institute (ESRI) Dublin. Rainfall data were obtained from Met Eireann whereas population, hay production and silage production were obtained from the Central Statistics Office, Dublin. As the farming population is in decline, we used the annual working unit (AWU), which reflects the true population at risk. An AWU is the equivalent of 1800 hours per farm worker per year. The incidence rates were constant from 1982-1996, but from 1997-2002 a marked decline was observed. There was strong positive correlation with hay production (r = 0.81) and strong negative correlation with silage production (r = -0.82). This study indicates that the incidence of farmer\\'s lung is now in decline.

  6. Long-term decline of radiocaesium in Fennoscandian reindeer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Norwegian Reindeer Husbandry Administration (Norway)); AAhman, B. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden)); Solatie, D. (STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)); Gaare, E. (Norwegian Institute for Nature Researc (Norway))

    2009-06-15

    The NKS-B project REIN was established to synthesize the available information on contamination levels and effective half-times for 137Cs in reindeer in Finland, Sweden and Norway. Several studies of radiocaesium contamination in reindeer have been carried out in the Nordic countries over the last 50 years. However, the current slow decline in concentrations, which will maintain the consequences of the Chernobyl deposition for Swedish and Norwegian reindeer husbandry for at least another 10-20 years, have not previously been observed nor predicted. In the Chernobyl affected areas 137Cs concentrations in reindeer initially declined by effective half-times of 3-4 years, whereas the current decline appears to be mainly governed by the nuclide's physical half-life (30 years). The review of effective half-times of 137Cs in reindeer across Fennoscandia suggests that concentrations declined more rapidly in the northernmost areas. The reason(-s) remains unclear, and demonstrates the need for more long-term sampling of the various components of reindeer's diet. Such sampling should aim at covering climatically different areas, as climate may influence transfer of radiocaesium to reindeer via lichen growth and weathering rates, composition of plant communities and lichen availability, as well as soil-to-plant radiocaesium uptake. The lack of long-term data on radiocaesium in natural vegetation in the Nordic countries is one of the main limitations for the development of mechanistic models for radiocaesium in reindeer, and for further elucidation of the observed long-term trends in 137Cs concentrations in reindeer. Currently our understanding of the long-term trends observed in various areas is not good enough to predict how future radiocaesium deposition will behave. The high transfer of nuclides to reindeer, the geographical extension of reindeer herding and the special position of the Sami population in Finland, Sweden and Norway, demonstrates the need for

  7. Determinants of the Declining Share of Agricultural Labour Force to Total Labour Force in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    KHALID HAMEED SHEIKH; ZAFAR IQBAL

    1988-01-01

    The agricultural labour force in Pakistan has been increasing rapidly due to population growth as well as a declining mortality rate. However, the share of the agricultural labour force to total labour force has been decreasing. The objective of this paper is to search for the factors responsible for this decline. The period covered is from 1959-60 to 1986-87. The development process is characterised as one which brings about a fundamental change in the structure of an economy. In this proces...

  8. The potential effects of meditation on age-related cognitive decline: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Tim; Hölzel, Britta K; Lazar, Sara W

    2014-01-01

    With a rapidly aging society it becomes increasingly important to counter normal age-related decline in cognitive functioning. Growing evidence suggests that cognitive training programs may have the potential to counteract this decline. On the basis of a growing body of research that shows that meditation has positive effects on cognition in younger and middle-aged adults, meditation may be able to offset normal age-related cognitive decline or even enhance cognitive function in older adults. In this paper, we review studies investigating the effects of meditation on age-related cognitive decline. We searched the Web of Science (1900 to present), PsycINFO (1597 to present), MEDLINE (1950 to present), and CABI (1910 to present) to identify original studies investigating the effects of meditation on cognition and cognitive decline in the context of aging. Twelve studies were included in the review, six of which were randomized controlled trials. Studies involved a wide variety of meditation techniques and reported preliminary positive effects on attention, memory, executive function, processing speed, and general cognition. However, most studies had a high risk of bias and small sample sizes. Reported dropout rates were low and compliance rates high. We conclude that meditation interventions for older adults are feasible, and preliminary evidence suggests that meditation can offset age-related cognitive decline.

  9. Gaia16apd -- a link between fast-and slowly-declining type I superluminous supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kangas, T; Mattila, S; Lundqvist, P; Fraser, M; Hardy, L K; Stritzinger, M D; Cappellaro, E; Elias-Rosa, N; Harmanen, J; Hsiao, E Y; Kankare, E; Nielsen, M B; Reynolds, T M; Rhodes, L; Somero, A; Wyrzykowski, L

    2016-01-01

    We present ultraviolet, optical and infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of the type Ic superluminous supernova (SLSN) Gaia16apd, covering its evolution from 27 d before the $g$-band peak to the nebular phase, including the latest spectrum ever obtained for a fast-declining type Ic SLSN at 150.9 d. Gaia16apd is one of the closest SLSNe known ($z = 0.102\\pm0.001$), with detailed optical and \\emph{Swift} ultraviolet (UV) band observations covering the peak. Gaia16apd is a spectroscopically typical type Ic SLSN, exhibiting the characteristic blue early spectra with O {\\sc ii} absorption, and reaches a peak $M_{g} = -21.8 \\pm 0.1$ mag. However, photometrically it exhibits an evolution intermediate between the fast- and slowly-declining type Ic SLSNe, with an early evolution closer to the fast-declining events. It is unusually UV-bright even for a SLSN, reaching a non-$K$-corrected $M_{uvm2} \\simeq -23.2$ mag, the only other type Ic SLSN with similar UV brightness being SN 2010gx. This event highlights the...

  10. The runoff declining process and water quality in songhuajiang river catchment, China under global climatic change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Xingmin; Gao, Peng; Wang, Fei [Northwest A and F University, Yangling (China); Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Yangling (China); Li, Ying [Northwest A and F University, Yangling (China); Shao, Hongbo [The CAS/Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes, Yantai Institute of Costal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Yantai (China); Institute for Life Sciences, Qingdao University of Science and Technology (QUST), Qingdao (China)

    2012-04-15

    The runoff in Songhuajiang River catchment has experienced a decreasing trend during the second half of the 20th century. Serially complete daily rainfall data of 42 rainfall stations from 1959 to 2002 and daily runoff data of five meteorological stations from 1953 to 2005 were obtained. The Mann-Kendall trend test and the sequential version of Mann-Kendall test were employed in this study to test the monthly and annual trends for both rainfall and runoff, to determine the start point of abrupt runoff declining, and to identify the main driving factors of runoff decline. The results showed an insignificant increasing trend in rainfall but a significant decreasing trend in runoff in the catchment. For the five meteorological stations, abrupt runoff decline occurred during 1957-1963 and the middle 1990s. Through Mann-Kendall comparisons for the area-rainfall and runoff for the two decreasing periods, human activity, rather than climatic change, is identified as the main driving factor of runoff decline. Analysis of land use/cover shows that farmland is most related with runoff decline among all the land use/cover change in Nenjiang catchment. From 1986 to 1995, the area of farmland increased rapidly from 6.99 to 7.61 million hm{sup 2}. Hydraulic engineering has a significant influence on the runoff decline in the second Songhuajiang catchment. Many large-scale reservoirs and hydropower stations have been built in the upstream of the Second Songhuajiang and lead to the runoff decline. Nenjiang and the Second Songhuajiang are the two sources of mainstream of Songhuajiang. Decreased runoff in these two sub-catchments then results in runoff decrease in mainstream of Songhuajiang catchment. It is, therefore, concluded that high percent agricultural land and hydraulic engineering are the most probable driving factors of runoff decline in Songhuajiang River catchment, China. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. MDM OSMOS Spectroscopic classification of Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Subhash; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Klusmeyer, J.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Shappee, B.; Shields, J.; Brown, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C.

    2016-11-01

    We report optical spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates 2016hgd (ATel #9651), 2016hli (ATel #9685), CSS161013:015319+171853 and CSS161013:020130+141534 (http://nesssi.cacr.caltech.edu/catalina/AllSN.html).

  12. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, U.; Szeghalmi, A.; Schmitt, M.; Kiefer, W.; Popp, J.; Holzgrabe, U.

    2005-05-01

    Quinolones are important gyrase inhibitors. Even though they are used as active agents in many antibiotics, the detailed mechanism of action on a molecular level is so far not known. It is of greatest interest to shed light on this drug-target interaction to provide useful information in the fight against growing resistances and obtain new insights for the development of new powerful drugs. To reach this goal, on a first step it is essential to understand the structural characteristics of the drugs and the effects that are caused by the environment in detail. In this work we report on Raman spectroscopical investigations of a variety of gyrase inhibitors (nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, enoxacin, sarafloxacin and moxifloxacin) by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy excited with various excitation wavelengths, both in the off-resonance region (532, 633, 830 and 1064 nm) and in the resonance region (resonance Raman spectroscopy at 244, 257 and 275 nm). Furthermore DFT calculations were performed to assign the vibrational modes, as well as for an identification of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. The effect of small changes in the drug environment was studied by adding successively small amounts of water until physiological low concentrations of the drugs in aqueous solution were obtained. At these low concentrations resonance Raman spectroscopy proved to be a useful and sensitive technique. Supplementary information was obtained from IR and UV/vis spectroscopy.

  13. Spectroscopic studies of copper enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, D.M.; Moog, R.; Zumft, W.; Koenig, S.H.; Scott, R.A.; Cote, C.E.; McGuirl, M.

    1986-05-01

    Several spectroscopic methods, including absorption, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, NMR, and quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, have been used to probe the structures of copper-containing amine oxidases, nitrite reductase, and nitrous oxide reductase. The basic goals are to determine the copper site structure, electronic properties, and to generate structure-reactivity correlations. Collectively, the results on the amine oxidases permit a detailed model for the Cu(II) sites in these enzymes to be constructed that, in turn, rationalizes the ligand-binding chemistry. Resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazine and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase and models for its organic cofactor, e.g. pyridoxal, methoxatin, are most consistent with methoxatin being the intrinsic cofactor. The structure of the Cu(I) forms of the amine oxidases have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS); the copper coordination geometry is significantly different in the oxidized and reduced forms. Some anomalous properties of the amine oxidases in solution are explicable in terms of their reversible aggregation, which the authors have characterized via light scattering. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases display several novel spectral properties. The data suggest that new types of copper sites are present.

  14. SDSS spectroscopic survey of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Z; Uomoto, A; Bond, N; Beers, T; Allende-Prieto, C; Wilhelm, R; Lee, Y S; Sivarani, T; Juric, M; Lupton, R; Rockosi, C M; Knapp, G; Gunn, J; Yanny, B; Jester, S; Kent, S; Pier, J; Munn, J A; Richards, G; Newberg, H; Blanton, M; Eisenstein, D; Hawley, S; Anderson, S; Harris, H; Kiuchi, F; Chen, A; Bushong, J; Sohi, H; Haggard, D; Kimball, A; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A

    2007-01-01

    In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. We discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. We show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, we find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Zo]~ -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Zo] -1.3 sample. We also find that the low-metallicity sample has ~2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at ...

  15. Asiago spectroscopic classification of transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.

    2017-08-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2017giq, discovered by Zhijian Xu et al. in SDSS J235754.69+283007.1, and the observations of AT 2017ghp and AT 2017gio discovered by Torny et al (ATLAS) The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82 m Copernico Telescope equipped with AFOSC (range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm). Survey Name | IAU Name | Discovery date (UT) | Discovery mag | Observation (UT) | Type | z | Notes| PTSS-17vkg | SN 2017giq | 2017-08-27 15:15:18 | 18.8 |2017-08-29 22:09:09 | SN Ic | 0.029813| (1) | ATLAS17juy | AT 2017ghp | 2017-08-23 14:00:57 | 17.53 |2017-08-29 23:49:52 | ? | ? | (2) | (1) The spectrum is consistent with that of Type Ic SN events around maximum light, at a redshift 0.0298, according to the redshift of the host galaxy SDSS J235754.69+283007.1 (Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 13 as obtained Jan. 31, 2017 from http://www.sdss.org/dr13/data_access/bulk/); (2) Featureless, blue continuum.

  16. Automated pipelines for spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende Prieto, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Gaia mission will have a profound impact on our understanding of the structure and dynamics of the Milky Way. Gaia is providing an exhaustive census of stellar parallaxes, proper motions, positions, colors and radial velocities, but also leaves some glaring holes in an otherwise complete data set. The radial velocities measured with the on-board high-resolution spectrograph will only reach some 10 % of the full sample of stars with astrometry and photometry from the mission, and detailed chemical information will be obtained for less than 1 %. Teams all over the world are organizing large-scale projects to provide complementary radial velocities and chemistry, since this can now be done very efficiently from the ground thanks to large and mid-size telescopes with a wide field-of-view and multi-object spectrographs. As a result, automated data processing is taking an ever increasing relevance, and the concept is applying to many more areas, from targeting to analysis. In this paper, I provide a quick overview of recent, ongoing, and upcoming spectroscopic surveys, and the strategies adopted in their automated analysis pipelines.

  17. Spectroscopic Detection of Caries Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Ruohonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A caries lesion causes changes in the optical properties of the affected tissue. Currently a caries lesion can be detected only at a relatively late stage of development. Caries diagnosis also suffers from high interobserver variance. Methods. This is a pilot study to test the suitability of an optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for caries diagnosis. Reflectance visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (VIS/NIRS was used to measure caries lesions and healthy enamel on extracted human teeth. The results were analysed with a computational algorithm in order to find a rule-based classification method to detect caries lesions. Results. The classification indicated that the measured points of enamel could be assigned to one of three classes: healthy enamel, a caries lesion, and stained healthy enamel. The features that enabled this were consistent with theory. Conclusions. It seems that spectroscopic measurements can help to reduce false positives at in vitro setting. However, further research is required to evaluate the strength of the evidence for the method’s performance.

  18. Intraguild predation and native lady beetle decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary M Gardiner

    Full Text Available Coccinellid communities across North America have experienced significant changes in recent decades, with declines in several native species reported. One potential mechanism for these declines is interference competition via intraguild predation; specifically, increased predation of native coccinellid eggs and larvae following the introduction of exotic coccinellids. Our previous studies have shown that agricultural fields in Michigan support a higher diversity and abundance of exotic coccinellids than similar fields in Iowa, and that the landscape surrounding agricultural fields across the north central U.S. influences the abundance and activity of coccinellid species. The goal of this study was to quantify the amount of egg predation experienced by a native coccinellid within Michigan and Iowa soybean fields and explore the influence of local and large-scale landscape structure. Using the native lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata as a model, we found that sentinel egg masses were subject to intense predation within both Michigan and Iowa soybean fields, with 60.7% of egg masses attacked and 43.0% of available eggs consumed within 48 h. In Michigan, the exotic coccinellids Coccinella septempunctata and Harmonia axyridis were the most abundant predators found in soybean fields whereas in Iowa, native species including C. maculata, Hippodamia parenthesis and the soft-winged flower beetle Collops nigriceps dominated the predator community. Predator abundance was greater in soybean fields within diverse landscapes, yet variation in predator numbers did not influence the intensity of egg predation observed. In contrast, the strongest predictor of native coccinellid egg predation was the composition of edge habitats bordering specific fields. Field sites surrounded by semi-natural habitats including forests, restored prairies, old fields, and pasturelands experienced greater egg predation than fields surrounded by other croplands. This study shows

  19. Antihypertensive treatments, cognitive decline, and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duron, Emmanuelle; Hanon, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Chronic hypertension is associated with an increased risk of both vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this context, the role of anti-hypertensive therapy for the prevention and delay of cognitive decline and dementia is of central importance. Most longitudinal studies have shown a significant inverse association between anti-hypertensive therapies and dementia incidence and for some of these, particularly in AD. Seven randomized, double blind placebo-controlled trials have evaluated the benefit of antihypertensive treatments on cognition. Three of them found positive results in term of prevention of dementia (SYST-EUR) or cognitive decline (PROGRESS, HOPE). Others disclosed non-significant results (MRC, SHEP, SCOPE, HYVET-COG). This discrepancy emphasizes the difficulty to perform such trials: the follow-up has to be long enough to disclose a benefit, a large number of patients is needed for these studies, and because of ethical reasons some anti-hypertensive treatments are often prescribed in the placebo group. Results of the two more recent meta-analyses are inconsistent, possibly due to methodological issues. Antihypertensive treatments could be beneficial to cognitive function by lowering blood pressure and/or by specific neuroprotective effect. Three main antihypertensive subclasses have been associated with a beneficial effect on cognitive function beyond blood pressure reduction (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin-AT1-receptor-blockers). Further long-term randomized trials, designed especially to assess a link between antihypertensive therapy and cognitive decline or dementia are therefore needed with cognition as the primary outcome. A low blood pressure threshold that could be deleterious for cognitive function should also be determined.

  20. Could there have been substantial declines in sexual risk behavior across sub-Saharan Africa in the mid-1990s?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne F. Awad

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The hypothesis that HIV prevalence declines in SSA have been driven by declines in sexual risk behavior is self-consistent and provides a convincing narrative for an evolving HIV epidemiology in this region. The hypothesized declines must have been remarkable in their intensity, rapidity, and synchronicity to explain the temporal trends in HIV prevalence. These findings provide contextual support for the hypothesis that changes in sexual behavior that materialized in the 1990s are a dominant driver of the recent decreases in HIV prevalence.

  1. Rapid decline of Lyα emission toward the reionization era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilvi, V.; Papovich, C. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Finkelstein, S. L.; Song, M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Long, J. [Department of Statistics, Texas A and M, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Dickinson, M. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Ferguson, H. C.; Koekemoer, A. M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Giavalisco, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Mobasher, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    The observed deficit of strongly Lyα emitting galaxies at z > 6.5 is attributed to increasing neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) and/or to the evolving galaxy properties. To investigate this we have performed very deep near-IR spectroscopy of z ≳ 7 galaxies using MOSFIRE on the Keck-I Telescope. We measure the Lyα fraction at z ∼ 8 using two methods. First, we derived N {sub Lyα}/N {sub tot} directly, using extensive simulations to correct for incompleteness. Second, we used a Bayesian formalism (introduced by Treu et al.) that compares the z > 7 galaxy spectra to models of the Lyα equivalent width (W {sub Lyα}) distribution at z ∼ 6. We explored two simple evolutionary scenarios: pure number evolution where Lyα is blocked in some fraction of galaxies (perhaps due to the IGM being opaque along only some fraction of sightlines) and uniform dimming evolution where Lyα is attenuated in all galaxies by a constant factor (perhaps owing to processes from galaxy evolution or a slowly increasing IGM opacity). The Bayesian formalism places stronger constraints compared with the direct method. Combining our data with that in the literature, we find that at z ∼ 8 the Lyα fraction has dropped by a factor of >3 (84% confidence interval) using both the dimming and number evolution scenarios, compared to the z ∼ 6 values. Furthermore, we find a tentative positive Bayesian evidence favoring the number evolution scenario over dimming evolution, extending trends observed at z ≲ 7 to higher redshift. A comparison of our results with theoretical models implies the IGM volume averaged neutral hydrogen fraction ≳ 0.3, suggesting that we are likely witnessing reionization in progress at z ∼ 8.

  2. Rapid Decline of Follicular Lymphoma-Associated Chylothorax after Low Dose Radiotherapy to Retroperitoneal Lymphoma Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien Van De Voorde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chylothorax is caused by disruption or obstruction of the thoracic duct or its tributaries that results in the leakage of chyle into the pleural space. A number of interventions have been used to treat chylothorax including the treatment of the underlying disease. Lymphoma is found in 70% of cases with nontraumatic malignant aetiology. Although patients usually have advanced lymphoma, supradiaphragmatic disease is not always present. We discuss the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with progressive respiratory symptoms due to chylothorax. She was diagnosed with a stage IIE retroperitoneal grade 1 follicular lymphoma extending from the coeliac trunk towards the pelvic inlet. Despite thoracocentesis and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT, diet chylothorax reoccurred. After low dose radiotherapy (2×2 Gy to the abdominal lymphoma there was a marked decrease in lymphadenopathy at the coeliac trunk and a complete regression of the pleural fluid. In this case, radiotherapy was shown to be an effective nontoxic treatment option for lymphoma-associated chylothorax with long-term remission of pleural effusion.

  3. Quantitative muscle ultrasound measures rapid declines over time in children with SMA type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kay W; Connolly, Anne M; Zaidman, Craig M

    2015-11-15

    Muscles are small in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). It is not known if muscle size changes over time in SMA type 1. We quantified changes over time in muscle size and echointensity during two repeated ultrasound examinations of unilateral proximal (biceps brachii/brachialis and quadriceps) and distal (anterior forearm flexors and tibialis anterior) muscles in three children with SMA type 1. We compared muscle thickness (MT) to body weight-dependent normal reference values. Children were 1, 6, and 11months old at baseline and had 2, 2 and 4 months between ultrasound examinations, respectively. At baseline, MT was normal for weight in all muscles except an atrophic quadriceps in the oldest child. MT decreased and echointensity increased (worsened) over time. At follow up, MT was below normal for weight in the quadriceps in all three children, in the biceps/brachioradialis in two, and in the anterior forearm in one. Tibialis anterior MT remained normal for weight in all three children. Muscle echointensity increased over time in all muscles and, on average, more than doubled in two children. In children with SMA type 1, muscle atrophies and becomes hyperechoic over time. Quantitative muscle ultrasound measures disease progression in SMA type 1 that warrants additional study in more children. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Rapid decline of follicular lymphoma-associated chylothorax after low dose radiotherapy to retroperitoneal lymphoma localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Voorde, Lien; Vanneste, Ben; Borger, Jacques; Troost, Esther G C; Werner, Philo

    2014-01-01

    Chylothorax is caused by disruption or obstruction of the thoracic duct or its tributaries that results in the leakage of chyle into the pleural space. A number of interventions have been used to treat chylothorax including the treatment of the underlying disease. Lymphoma is found in 70% of cases w

  5. THE RAPID DECLINE IN METALLICITY OF DAMPED Lyα SYSTEMS AT z ∼ 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafelski, Marc [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Neeleman, Marcel; Wolfe, Arthur M. [Department of Physics and Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Fumagalli, Michele [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Prochaska, J. Xavier [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, 1156 High Street, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    We present evidence that the cosmological mean metallicity of neutral atomic hydrogen gas shows a sudden decrease at z > 4.7 down to 〈Z〉=−2.03{sub −0.11}{sup +0.09}, which is 6σ deviant from that predicted by a linear fit to the data at lower redshifts. This measurement is made possible by the chemical abundance measurements of eight new damped Lyα (DLA) systems at z > 4.7 observed with the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager on the Keck II Telescope, doubling the number of measurements at z > 4.7 to 16. Possible explanations for this sudden decrease in metallicity include a change in the physical processes that enrich the neutral gas within disks, or an increase of the covering factor of neutral gas outside disks due to a lower ultraviolet radiation field and higher density at high redshift. The later possibility would result in a new population of presumably lower metallicity DLAs, with an increased contribution to the DLA population at higher redshifts resulting in a reduced mean metallicity. Furthermore, we provide evidence of a possible decrease at z > 4.7 in the comoving metal mass density of DLAs, ρ{sub metals}(z){sub DLA}, which is flat out to z ∼ 4.3. Such a decrease is expected, as otherwise most of the metals from star-forming galaxies would reside in DLAs by z ∼ 6. While the metallicity is decreasing at high redshift, the contribution of DLAs to the total metal budget of the universe increases with redshift, with DLAs at z ∼ 4.3 accounting for ∼20% as many metals as produced by Lyman break galaxies.

  6. The Rapid Decline in Metallicity of Damped Ly-$\\alpha$ Systems at $z\\sim5$

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Marc; Fumagalli, Michele; Wolfe, Arthur M; Prochaska, J Xavier

    2013-01-01

    We present evidence that the cosmological mean metallicity of neutral atomic hydrogen gas shows a sudden decrease at $z>4.7$ down to $=-2.03^{+0.09}_{-0.11}$, which is $6\\sigma$ deviant from that predicted by a linear fit to the data at lower redshifts. This measurement is made possible by the chemical abundance measurements of 8 new damped Ly-$\\alpha$ (DLA) systems at $z>4.7$ observed with the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager on the Keck II telescope, doubling the number of measurements at $z>4.7$ to 16. The sudden decrease in metallicity is possibly due to the lower ultra-violet radiation field and higher density at high redshift increasing the neutral fraction of gas inside halos, such as cold flows. This would result in a new population of presumably lower metallicity DLAs, with an increased contribution to the DLA population at higher redshifts resulting in a reduced mean metallicity. While the comoving metal mass density of DLAs, $\\rho_{\\rm metals}(z)_{\\rm DLA}$, is flat out to $z\\sim4.3$, there is ev...

  7. Rapid decline in glomerular filtration rate during the first weeks following heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, M; Andersen, M; Gustafsson, F

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that a decrease in renal function is seen immediately after heart transplantation (HTX) with little recovery over time. Twelve consecutive patients had their glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measured using (51)Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) measured GFR (mGFR) before...... transplantation and at 1, 2, 3, and 26 weeks after transplantation. The mGFR decreased by 28% and 24% during the first 3 and 26 weeks, respectively, with mean blood cyclosporine concentration as an independent risk factor for the decrease in mGFR. The identification of cyclosporine A (CsA) as the most important...

  8. Rapid decline in glomerular filtration rate during the first weeks following heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, M; Andersen, Mads Jønsson; Gustafsson, F

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that a decrease in renal function is seen immediately after heart transplantation (HTX) with little recovery over time. Twelve consecutive patients had their glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measured using (51)Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) measured GFR (mGFR) before tr...

  9. Differentiated decline in Danish outskirt areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lea Louise Holst; Andersson, Lasse

    2011-01-01

    The latest figures show that minor Danish villages and rural areas through the last 20 years have suffered from depopulation and economical decline, and it is a development that seems to accelerate. The negative consequences of this development are low house prizes, a higher unemployment rate tha...... life by rethinking existing structures into new landscape based spaces. This paper argues that a process oriented approach in landscape urbanism (Waldheim 2006, Corner 1999) and cultural planning (Evans 2001, Bianchini 1993) is useful when operating in smaller Danish communities....

  10. Decline in male circumcision in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim DaiSik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the changing circumcision rate in South Korea in the last decade and to propose underlying causes for this change, in the context of the present fluctuating world-wide trends in circumcision. Methods From 2009 to 2011, 3,296 South Korean males (or their parents aged 0–64 years were asked about their circumcision status, their age at circumcision, and their information level regarding circumcision. We employed non-probability sampling considering the sensitive questions on the study theme. Results Currently the age-standardized circumcision rate for South Korean males aged 14–29 is found to be 75.8%. In an earlier study performed in 2002, the rate for the same age group was 86.3%. Of particular interest, males aged 14–16 show a circumcision rate of 56.4%, while the same age group 10 years ago displayed a much higher percentage, at 88.4%. In addition, the extraordinarily high circumcision rate of 95.2% found 10 years ago for the 17–19 age group is now reduced to 74.4%. Interestingly, of the circumcised males, the percentage circumcised in the last decade was only 25.2%; i.e., the majority of the currently circumcised males had undergone the operation prior to 2002, indicating that the actual change in the last decade is far greater. Consistent with this conjecture, the 2002 survey showed that the majority of circumcised males (75.7% had undergone the operation in the decade prior to that point. Focusing on the flagship age group of 14–16, this drop suggests that, considering the population structure of Korean males, approximately one million fewer circumcision operations have been performed in the last decade relative to the case of non-decline. This decline is strongly correlated with the information available through internet, newspapers, lectures, books, and television: within the circumcised population, both the patients and their parents had less prior knowledge regarding circumcision, other than

  11. Ecological consequences of sea-ice decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Eric; Bhatt, Uma S; Bitz, Cecilia M; Brodie, Jedediah F; Fulton, Tara L; Hebblewhite, Mark; Kerby, Jeffrey; Kutz, Susan J; Stirling, Ian; Walker, Donald A

    2013-08-02

    After a decade with nine of the lowest arctic sea-ice minima on record, including the historically low minimum in 2012, we synthesize recent developments in the study of ecological responses to sea-ice decline. Sea-ice loss emerges as an important driver of marine and terrestrial ecological dynamics, influencing productivity, species interactions, population mixing, gene flow, and pathogen and disease transmission. Major challenges in the near future include assigning clearer attribution to sea ice as a primary driver of such dynamics, especially in terrestrial systems, and addressing pressures arising from human use of arctic coastal and near-shore areas as sea ice diminishes.

  12. The smooth cyclotron line in her x-1 as seen with nuclear spectroscopic telescope array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Staubert, Ruediger;

    2013-01-01

    Her X-1, one of the brightest and best studied X-ray binaries, shows a cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) near 37 keV. This makes it an ideal target for detailed study with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), taking advantage of its excellent hard X-ray spectral resoluti...... in the hot corona of the accretion disk. The average, luminosity-corrected CRSF energy is lower than in past observations and follows a secular decline. The excellent data quality of NuSTAR provides the best constraint on the CRSF energy to date.......Her X-1, one of the brightest and best studied X-ray binaries, shows a cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) near 37 keV. This makes it an ideal target for detailed study with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), taking advantage of its excellent hard X-ray spectral resolution...

  13. Determinates of the decline In the income-velocity of money In China: a new perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Liuyan; WANG Yiming

    2006-01-01

    s The income velocity of money in China has been declining since the country's reform.By studying the money demand behavior in the agricultural and non-agricultural sectors,we found that the marginal propensity to money demand is much higher in the non-agricultural sector.This implies that as the share of the agricultural sector in national income declines,monetary expansion is expected to meet not only the needs of income growth,but also the rapid structural shifts in the sectoral composition of income.Hence,non-inflationary monetary expansion is possible as development proceeds.This provides a new perspective in understanding the decline in the income-velocity of money in China.

  14. The impact of freedom on fertility decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Martha M; Prata, Ndola; Potts, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Although fertility decline often correlates with improvements in socioeconomic conditions, many demographers have found flaws in demographic transition theories that depend on changes in distal factors such as increased wealth or education. Human beings worldwide engage in sexual intercourse much more frequently than is needed to conceive the number of children they want, and for women who do not have access to the information and means they need to separate sex from childbearing, the default position is a large family. In many societies, male patriarchal drives to control female reproduction give rise to unnecessary medical rules constraining family planning (including safe abortion) or justifying child marriage. Widespread misinformation about contraception makes women afraid to adopt modern family planning. The barriers to family planning can be so deeply infused that for many women the idea of managing their fertility is not considered an option. Conversely, there is evidence that once family planning is introduced into a society, then it is normal consumer behaviour for individuals to welcome a new technology they had not wanted until it became realistically available. We contend that in societies free from child marriage, wherever women have access to a range of contraceptive methods, along with correct information and backed up by safe abortion, family size will always fall. Education and wealth can make the adoption of family planning easier, but they are not prerequisites for fertility decline. By contrast, access to family planning itself can accelerate economic development and the spread of education.

  15. The Decline of Traditional Banking Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Cornelia Piciu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The decline of traditional banking activities raise the issue of efficiency of financial stability, in terms ofquantitative and qualitative aspects – the increasing danger of banking failures as well as of susceptibility due toincreased propensity of banking institutions to assume additional to risks either in the form of riskier loans offer orengaging in other "non-traditional" financial activities which give a promise for greater profitability, but also higherrisks. Non-traditional activities of banking as financial products dealers (financial derivatives, generate an increasingrisks and vulnerabilities in the form of moral hazard issues. That is the reason why and these activities should beregulated as well as are the traditional activities. Challenges posed by the decline of traditional banking activities istwofold: the stability of the banking system must be maintained, while the banking system needs to be restructured toachieve financial stability in the long run. One possible way is an appropriate regulatory framework to encourage atransition period of changing the structure of banking activity(reduction of traditional activities and expanding nontraditional activities to enable banking institutions to perform a deep methodic analysis of non traditional activities,oriented to the financial banking efficiency.

  16. Dehydroepiandrosterone and age-related cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorwell, Krystina G; Urbanski, Henryk F

    2010-03-01

    In humans the circulating concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) decrease markedly during aging, and have been implicated in age-associated cognitive decline. This has led to the hypothesis that DHEA supplementation during aging may improve memory. In rodents, a cognitive anti-aging effect of DHEA and DHEAS has been observed but it is unclear whether this effect is mediated indirectly through conversion of these steroids to estradiol. Moreover, despite the demonstration of correlations between endogenous DHEA concentrations and cognitive ability in certain human patient populations, such correlations have yet to be convincingly demonstrated during normal human aging. This review highlights important differences between rodents and primates in terms of their circulating DHEA and DHEAS concentrations, and suggests that age-related changes within the human DHEA metabolic pathway may contribute to the relative inefficacy of DHEA replacement therapies in humans. The review also highlights the value of using nonhuman primates as a pragmatic animal model for testing the therapeutic potential of DHEA for age-associate cognitive decline in humans.

  17. The cultural evolution of fertility decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleran, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Cultural evolutionists have long been interested in the problem of why fertility declines as populations develop. By outlining plausible mechanistic links between individual decision-making, information flow in populations and competition between groups, models of cultural evolution offer a novel and powerful approach for integrating multiple levels of explanation of fertility transitions. However, only a modest number of models have been published. Their assumptions often differ from those in other evolutionary approaches to social behaviour, but their empirical predictions are often similar. Here I offer the first overview of cultural evolutionary research on demographic transition, critically compare it with approaches taken by other evolutionary researchers, identify gaps and overlaps, and highlight parallel debates in demography. I suggest that researchers divide their labour between three distinct phases of fertility decline—the origin, spread and maintenance of low fertility—each of which may be driven by different causal processes, at different scales, requiring different theoretical and empirical tools. A comparative, multi-level and mechanistic framework is essential for elucidating both the evolved aspects of our psychology that govern reproductive decision-making, and the social, ecological and cultural contingencies that precipitate and sustain fertility decline. PMID:27022079

  18. Musculoskeletal health, frailty and functional decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milte, R; Crotty, M

    2014-06-01

    Frailty in older people is associated with a vulnerability to adverse events. While ageing is associated with a loss of physiological reserves, identifying those with the syndrome of frailty has the potential to assist clinicians to tailor treatments to those at the risk of future decline into disability with an increased risk of complications, morbidity and mortality. Sarcopenia is a key component of the frailty syndrome and on its own puts older people at risk of fragility fractures; however, the clinical syndrome of frailty affects the musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal systems. Hip fractures are becoming a prototype condition in the study of frailty. Following a hip fracture, many of the interventions are focused on limiting mobility disability and restoring independence with activities of daily living, but there are multiple factors to be addressed including osteoporosis, sarcopenia, delirium and weight loss. Established techniques of geriatric evaluation and management allow systematic assessment and intervention on multiple components by multidisciplinary teams and deliver the best outcomes. Using the concept of frailty to identify older people with musculoskeletal problems as being at the risk of a poor outcome assists in treatment planning and is likely to become more important as effective pharmacological treatments for sarcopenia emerge. This review will focus on the concept of frailty and its relationship with functional decline, as well as describing its causes, prevalence, risk factors, potential clinical applications and treatment strategies.

  19. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  20. High definition infrared spectroscopic imaging for lymph node histopathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Suzanne Leslie

    Full Text Available Chemical imaging is a rapidly emerging field in which molecular information within samples can be used to predict biological function and recognize disease without the use of stains or manual identification. In Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging, molecular absorption contrast provides a large signal relative to noise. Due to the long mid-IR wavelengths and sub-optimal instrument design, however, pixel sizes have historically been much larger than cells. This limits both the accuracy of the technique in identifying small regions, as well as the ability to visualize single cells. Here we obtain data with micron-sized sampling using a tabletop FT-IR instrument, and demonstrate that the high-definition (HD data lead to accurate identification of multiple cells in lymph nodes that was not previously possible. Highly accurate recognition of eight distinct classes - naïve and memory B cells, T cells, erythrocytes, connective tissue, fibrovascular network, smooth muscle, and light and dark zone activated B cells was achieved in healthy, reactive, and malignant lymph node biopsies using a random forest classifier. The results demonstrate that cells currently identifiable only through immunohistochemical stains and cumbersome manual recognition of optical microscopy images can now be distinguished to a similar level through a single IR spectroscopic image from a lymph node biopsy.

  1. Atmospheric trace gases monitoring by UV-vis spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Pinhua; Li, Ang; Wu, Fengcheng; Qin, Min; Hu, Rezhi; Xu, Jin; Si, Fuqi; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    Due to rapidly economic development, air pollution has become an important issue in China. Phenomena such as regional haze in winter and high O3 concentration in summer are strongly related to increasing trace species. For better understanding the air pollution formation, it is necessary to know spatial and temporal distribution of trace species in the atmosphere. UV-vis spectroscopic techniques are of great advantages for trace species monitoring to meet several requirements, e.g. versatility, high sensitivity, good temporal resolution and field applicability. We have studied and developed various trace gases monitoring techniques and instruments based on UV-vis spectroscopic technique for in-situ measurements and remote sensing, e.g. LP-DOAS, IBBCEAS, CRDS, MAX-DOAS and mobile DOAS for NO2, SO2, HCHO, HONO, NO3, and N2O5 etc. The principle, instrumentation and inversion algorithm are presented. As typical applications of these techniques, investigation of the evolution of HONO and NO3 radicals over Beijing area, measurements of regional pollution in NCP and YRD are discussed in the aspects of HONO and nocturnal NO3 radical characteristics, trace gases (NO2, SO2 etc.) temporal and spatial distribution, pollution transport pathway, emission sources.

  2. Rapid determination of pork sensory quality using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Lonergan, Steven M; Yu, Chenxu

    2012-07-01

    Existing objective methods to predict sensory attributes of pork in general do not yield satisfactory correlation to panel evaluations, and their applications in meat industry are limited. In this study, a Raman spectroscopic method was developed to evaluate and predict tenderness, juiciness and chewiness of fresh, uncooked pork loins from 169 pigs. Partial Least Square Regression models were developed based on Raman spectroscopic characteristics of the pork loins to predict the values of the sensory attributes. Furthermore, binary barcodes were created based on spectroscopic characteristics of the pork loins, and subjected to multivariate statistical discriminant analysis (i.e., Support Vector Machine) to differentiate and classify pork loins into quality grades ("good" and "bad" in terms of tenderness and chewiness). Good agreement (>83% correct predictions) with sensory panel results was obtained. The method developed in this report has the potential to become a rapid objective assay for tenderness and chewiness of pork products that may find practical applications in pork industry.

  3. Benzodiazepine use and risk of incident dementia or cognitive decline: prospective population based study

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether higher cumulative use of benzodiazepines is associated with a higher risk of dementia or more rapid cognitive decline. Design Prospective population based cohort. Setting Integrated healthcare delivery system, Seattle, Washington. Participants 3434 participants aged ≥65 without dementia at study entry. There were two rounds of recruitment (1994-96 and 2000-03) followed by continuous enrollment beginning in 2004. Main outcomes measures The cognitive abilities scr...

  4. With BlackBerry in Decline, RIM Will Shed 2,000 Jobs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ As it struggles with the declining popularity of the BlackBerry line of smartphones, Research in Motion said on Monday that it would begin laying off about 2,000 employees, 10.5 percent of its work force, this week. While the company had previously announced that it planned to cut employees, the number of jobs lost was higher than some analysts expected, perhaps suggesting that the company's situation was deteriorating more rapidly than earlier thought.

  5. FACTORS IMPLICATED IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN THE UNITED STATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study identified the factors responsible for the decline of native amphibians in the U.S. The type of land use, the introduction of exotic animal species, and chemical contamination were identified as the most likely causes of decline.

  6. Steeper declines in forest photosynthesis than respiration explain age-driven decreases in forest growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianwu; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Richardson, Andrew D; Kutsch, Werner; Janssens, Ivan A

    2014-06-17

    The traditional view of forest dynamics originated by Kira and Shidei [Kira T, Shidei T (1967) Jap J Ecol 17:70-87] and Odum [Odum EP (1969) Science 164(3877):262-270] suggests a decline in net primary productivity (NPP) in aging forests due to stabilized gross primary productivity (GPP) and continuously increased autotrophic respiration (Ra). The validity of these trends in GPP and Ra is, however, very difficult to test because of the lack of long-term ecosystem-scale field observations of both GPP and Ra. Ryan and colleagues [Ryan MG, Binkley D, Fownes JH (1997) Ad Ecol Res 27:213-262] have proposed an alternative hypothesis drawn from site-specific results that aboveground respiration and belowground allocation decreased in aging forests. Here, we analyzed data from a recently assembled global database of carbon fluxes and show that the classical view of the mechanisms underlying the age-driven decline in forest NPP is incorrect and thus support Ryan's alternative hypothesis. Our results substantiate the age-driven decline in NPP, but in contrast to the traditional view, both GPP and Ra decline in aging boreal and temperate forests. We find that the decline in NPP in aging forests is primarily driven by GPP, which decreases more rapidly with increasing age than Ra does, but the ratio of NPP/GPP remains approximately constant within a biome. Our analytical models describing forest succession suggest that dynamic forest ecosystem models that follow the traditional paradigm need to be revisited.

  7. Delta smelt: Life history and decline of a once abundant species in the San Francisco Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Peter B.; Brown, Larry R.; Durand, John R; Hobbs, James A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews what has been learned about Delta Smelt and its status since the publication of The State of Bay-Delta Science, 2008 (Healey et al. 2008). The Delta Smelt is endemic to the upper San Francisco Estuary. Much of its historic habitat is no longer available and remaining habitat is increasingly unable to sustain the population. As a listed species living in the central node of California’s water supply system, Delta Smelt has been the focus of a large research effort to understand causes of decline and identify ways to recover the species. Since 2008, a remarkable record of innovative research on Delta Smelt has been achieved, which is summarized here. Unfortunately, research has not prevented the smelt’s continued decline, which is the result of multiple, interacting factors. A major driver of decline is change to the Delta ecosystem from water exports, resulting in reduced outflows and high levels of entrainment in the large pumps of the South Delta. Invasions of alien species, encouraged by environmental change, have also played a contributing role in the decline. Severe drought effects have pushed Delta Smelt to record low levels in 2014–2015. The rapid decline of the species and failure of recovery efforts demonstrate an inability to manage the Delta for the “co-equal goals” of maintaining a healthy ecosystem and providing a reliable water supply for Californians. Diverse and substantial management actions are needed to preserve Delta Smelt.

  8. The global decline of cheetah Acinonyx jubatus and what it means for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Sarah M; Mitchell, Nicholas; Groom, Rosemary; Pettorelli, Nathalie; Ipavec, Audrey; Jacobson, Andrew P; Woodroffe, Rosie; Böhm, Monika; Hunter, Luke T B; Becker, Matthew S; Broekhuis, Femke; Bashir, Sultana; Andresen, Leah; Aschenborn, Ortwin; Beddiaf, Mohammed; Belbachir, Farid; Belbachir-Bazi, Amel; Berbash, Ali; Brandao de Matos Machado, Iracelma; Breitenmoser, Christine; Chege, Monica; Cilliers, Deon; Davies-Mostert, Harriet; Dickman, Amy J; Ezekiel, Fabiano; Farhadinia, Mohammad S; Funston, Paul; Henschel, Philipp; Horgan, Jane; de Iongh, Hans H; Jowkar, Houman; Klein, Rebecca; Lindsey, Peter Andrew; Marker, Laurie; Marnewick, Kelly; Melzheimer, Joerg; Merkle, Johnathan; M'soka, Jassiel; Msuha, Maurus; O'Neill, Helen; Parker, Megan; Purchase, Gianetta; Sahailou, Samaila; Saidu, Yohanna; Samna, Abdoulkarim; Schmidt-Küntzel, Anne; Selebatso, Eda; Sogbohossou, Etotépé A; Soultan, Alaaeldin; Stone, Emma; van der Meer, Esther; van Vuuren, Rudie; Wykstra, Mary; Young-Overton, Kim

    2017-01-17

    Establishing and maintaining protected areas (PAs) are key tools for biodiversity conservation. However, this approach is insufficient for many species, particularly those that are wide-ranging and sparse. The cheetah Acinonyx jubatus exemplifies such a species and faces extreme challenges to its survival. Here, we show that the global population is estimated at ∼7,100 individuals and confined to 9% of its historical distributional range. However, the majority of current range (77%) occurs outside of PAs, where the species faces multiple threats. Scenario modeling shows that, where growth rates are suppressed outside PAs, extinction rates increase rapidly as the proportion of population protected declines. Sensitivity analysis shows that growth rates within PAs have to be high if they are to compensate for declines outside. Susceptibility of cheetah to rapid decline is evidenced by recent rapid contraction in range, supporting an uplisting of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List threat assessment to endangered. Our results are applicable to other protection-reliant species, which may be subject to systematic underestimation of threat when there is insufficient information outside PAs. Ultimately, conserving many of these species necessitates a paradigm shift in conservation toward a holistic approach that incentivizes protection and promotes sustainable human-wildlife coexistence across large multiple-use landscapes.

  9. Spectroscopic Signatures Related to a Sunquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S. A.; Harra, L. K.; Zharkov, S.; Green, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    The presence of flare-related acoustic emission (sunquakes (SQs)) in some flares, and only in specific locations within the flaring environment, represents a severe challenge to our current understanding of flare energy transport processes. In an attempt to contribute to understanding the origins of SQs we present a comparison of new spectral observations from Hinode’s EUV imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona above an SQ, and compare them to the spectra observed in a part of the flaring region with no acoustic signature. Evidence for the SQ is determined using both time-distance and acoustic holography methods, and we find that unlike many previous SQ detections, the signal is rather dispersed, but that the time-distance and 6 and 7 mHz sources converge at the same spatial location. We also see some evidence for different evolution at different frequencies, with an earlier peak at 7 mHz than at 6 mHz. Using EIS and IRIS spectroscopic measurements we find that in this location, at the time of the 7 mHz peak the spectral emission is significantly more intense, shows larger velocity shifts and substantially broader profiles than in the location with no SQ, and there is a good correlation between blueshifted, hot coronal, hard X-ray (HXR), and redshifted chromospheric emission, consistent with the idea of a strong downward motion driven by rapid heating by nonthermal electrons and the formation of chromospheric shocks. Exploiting the diagnostic potential of the Mg ii triplet lines, we also find evidence for a single large temperature increase deep in the atmosphere, which is consistent with this scenario. The time of the 6 mHz and time-distance peak signal coincides with a secondary peak in the energy release process, but in this case we find no evidence of HXR emission in the quake location, instead finding very broad spectral lines, strongly shifted to the red, indicating

  10. SICK: THE SPECTROSCOPIC INFERENCE CRANK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Andrew R., E-mail: arc@ast.cam.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambdridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives that remain severely under-utilized. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analyzing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick is agnostic to the wavelength coverage, resolving power, or general data format, allowing any user to easily construct a generative model for their data, regardless of its source. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbor estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimized point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalize on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-dimensional interpolation, or a Cannon-based model. Additional phenomena that transform the data (e.g., redshift, rotational broadening, continuum, spectral resolution) are incorporated as free parameters and can be marginalized away. Outlier pixels (e.g., cosmic rays or poorly modeled regimes) can be treated with a Gaussian mixture model, and a noise model is included to account for systematically underestimated variance. Combining these phenomena into a scalar-justified, quantitative model permits precise inferences with credible uncertainties on noisy data. I describe the common model features, the implementation details, and the default behavior, which is balanced to be suitable for most astronomical applications. Using a forward model on low-resolution, high signal

  11. Depressed Mood Mediates Decline in Cognitive Processing Speed in Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaliano, Peter P.; Zhang, Jianping; Young, Heather M.; Caswell, Lisa W.; Scanlan, James M.; Echeverria, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Very few studies have examined cognitive decline in caregivers versus noncaregivers, and only 1 study has examined mediators of such decline. We evaluated the relationship between caregiver status and decline on the digit symbol test (DST; a measure of processing speed, attention, cognitive-motor translation, and visual scanning) and…

  12. 32 CFR 776.35 - Declining or terminating representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Declining or terminating representation. 776.35... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.35 Declining or terminating representation. (a) Declining or terminating representation: (1) Except as stated in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, a covered...

  13. Sewing Machine Manufacturing Enterprises Saw Serious Profit Declines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The raw materials that sewing machinery manufacturing required saw a decline in prices decline this year, but the market demand for sewing machinery falls sharply as well as the reduced demand in the international market, prices of the sewing machine parts are in a downturn trend. Therefore, the corporate profits decline seriously.

  14. The Test Score Decline: A Review and Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    J.R., The Test Score Decline: Are the Public Schools the Scapegoat? Part Two =129. K%’apfer. P., Kapfer , M., & Woodruff, A., Declining Test Scores...Michigan State University, August 1976. 129. Kapfer , P.F., Kapfer , M.B., & Woodruff, A.D., Declining test scores: Inter- pretations, issues, and relationship

  15. The Gulf: A young sea in decline

    OpenAIRE

    Sheppard, Charles (Charles R. C.); Al-Husiani, Mohsen; Al-Jamali, F.; Al-yamani, Faiza; Baldwin, Rob; Bishop, James; Benzoni, Francesca; Dutrieux, Eric; Dulvy, Nicholas K.; Durvasulah, Subba Rao V.; Jonesi, David A.; Loughland, Ron; Mediok, David; Nithyanandan, M.; Pilling, Graham M.

    2009-01-01

    This review examines the substantial changes that have taken place in marine habitats and resources of the Gulf over the past decade. The habitats are especially interesting because of the naturally high levels of temperature and salinity stress they experience, which is important in a changing world climate. However, the extent of all natural habitats is changing and their condition deteriorating because of the rapid development of the region and, in some cases from severe, episodic warming ...

  16. Spectroscopic analysis of irradiated erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selim, Nabila S. [Biophysics Lab, Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), AEA, P.O. Box 29, Madinat Nasr, Cairo (Egypt); Desouky, Omar S., E-mail: omardesouky@yahoo.com [Biophysics Lab, Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), AEA, P.O. Box 29, Madinat Nasr, Cairo (Egypt); Ismail, Nagla M.; Dakrory, Amira Z. [Physics Department, Faculty of Girls for Arts, Sciences and Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-12-15

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of gamma radiation on the lipid part of the erythrocyte membrane, and to test the efficiency of lipoic acid as a radioprotector. This effect was evaluated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The results showed an increase in the number of spin density by 14%, 22% and 65% after exposure to 25, 50 and 100 Gy respectively; whereas there was a decline in the obtained density after incubation with lipoic acid by a factor of approximately 32%. The FT-IR spectra of the irradiated erythrocytes samples showed a marked decrease in the intensity of all characteristic peaks, which increased as the irradiation dose increased. The second-derivative of these spectra, allow the conformationally sensitive membrane acyl chain methylene stretching modes to be separated from the protein (mostly hemoglobin) vibrations that dominate the spectra of intact cells. The 2850 cm{sup -1} band showed changes in the band shape and position after exposure to 50 and 100 Gy. Therefore it can be concluded that the band at 2850 cm{sup -1} only is useful in monitoring the radiation effect of the lipids cell membrane intact cells. - Highlights: > Effect of {gamma} radiation on erythrocyte membrane was studied using EPR and FT-IR. > Efficiency of {alpha}-lipoic acid as radioprotector was tested. > Lipoic acid diminished the free radicals number after gamma irradiation by 32%. > FT-IR spectra of the irradiated erythrocyte showed a decrease in their intensity. > Lipoic acid enhances the membrane to resist the action of gamma radiation.

  17. Birthspacing and fertility decline in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Gómez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENEste trabajo utiliza datos de las Encuestas Comparativas de Fecundidad de América Latina, así como de la Encuesta Mundial de Fecundidad para estudiar las tendencias y diferenciales en el espaciamiento de los nacimientos entre las mujeres alguna vez casadas en Costa Rica durante el período 1945-1974. Una buena parte de la atención se pone en el ritmo de la fecundidad en las etapas umbral, temprana y tardía de la disminución de la fecundidad que este país experimentó durante los años sesenta y principios de los setenta. Los resultados muestran bastante similitud en el tempo de la reproducción en los diferentes niveles paridez y áreas geográficas. Sin embargo, un análisis de las variables del entorno que afectan espaciamiento de los nacimientos muestra diferencias entre las zonas urbanas y rurales. Por último, se postula que el reciente estancamiento en las tasas de período puede ser una consecuencia de los cambios en el tempo de construcción de la familia, con mujeres de baja paridez que postergan los nacimientos, lo que contrarresta las tendencias de descenso que generan las mujeres de mayor paridez quienes aún pueden estar restringiendo su reproducción.ABSTRACTThis paper uses data from the Latin American Comparative Fertility Surveys as well as from the World Fertility Survey to study trends and differentials in birthspacing among ever married women in Costa Rica during the period 1945-1974. A good deal of attention is placed on the pace of fertility in threshold, early and late stages of the fertility decline that this country experienced during the sixties and early seventies. The results show a good deal of similarity in the tempo of reproduction across parities and geographical areas.However, an analysis of the background variables affecting birthspacing shows differences between urban and rural zones. Finally, it is postulated that the recent plateau in period rates may be a consequence of changes in the tempo of

  18. Declining death rates reflect progress against cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmedin Jemal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The success of the "war on cancer" initiated in 1971 continues to be debated, with trends in cancer mortality variably presented as evidence of progress or failure. We examined temporal trends in death rates from all-cancer and the 19 most common cancers in the United States from 1970-2006. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed trends in age-standardized death rates (per 100,000 for all cancers combined, the four most common cancers, and 15 other sites from 1970-2006 in the United States using joinpoint regression model. The age-standardized death rate for all-cancers combined in men increased from 249.3 in 1970 to 279.8 in 1990, and then decreased to 221.1 in 2006, yielding a net decline of 21% and 11% from the 1990 and 1970 rates, respectively. Similarly, the all-cancer death rate in women increased from 163.0 in 1970 to 175.3 in 1991 and then decreased to 153.7 in 2006, a net decline of 12% and 6% from the 1991 and 1970 rates, respectively. These decreases since 1990/91 translate to preventing of 561,400 cancer deaths in men and 205,700 deaths in women. The decrease in death rates from all-cancers involved all ages and racial/ethnic groups. Death rates decreased for 15 of the 19 cancer sites, including the four major cancers, with lung, colorectum and prostate cancers in men and breast and colorectum cancers in women. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Progress in reducing cancer death rates is evident whether measured against baseline rates in 1970 or in 1990. The downturn in cancer death rates since 1990 result mostly from reductions in tobacco use, increased screening allowing early detection of several cancers, and modest to large improvements in treatment for specific cancers. Continued and increased investment in cancer prevention and control, access to high quality health care, and research could accelerate this progress.

  19. Invasive lionfish drive Atlantic coral reef fish declines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Green

    Full Text Available Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans and P. miles have spread swiftly across the Western Atlantic, producing a marine predator invasion of unparalleled speed and magnitude. There is growing concern that lionfish will affect the structure and function of invaded marine ecosystems, however detrimental impacts on natural communities have yet to be measured. Here we document the response of native fish communities to predation by lionfish populations on nine coral reefs off New Providence Island, Bahamas. We assessed lionfish diet through stomach contents analysis, and quantified changes in fish biomass through visual surveys of lionfish and native fishes at the sites over time. Lionfish abundance increased rapidly between 2004 and 2010, by which time lionfish comprised nearly 40% of the total predator biomass in the system. The increase in lionfish abundance coincided with a 65% decline in the biomass of the lionfish's 42 Atlantic prey fishes in just two years. Without prompt action to control increasing lionfish populations, similar effects across the region may have long-term negative implications for the structure of Atlantic marine communities, as well as the societies and economies that depend on them.

  20. Flux Decline in Protein Microfiltration: Influence of Operative Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero; Pradanos; Calvo; Tejerina; Hernandez

    1997-03-15

    The flux decline, is studied in typical experiments with dead-end microfiltration of BSA solutions (1, 3, 5 and 10 g/L) through Cyclopore track-etched polycarbonate membranes (nominal pore size 0.1 μm) at several pH values and two ionic strengths. Results have been analyzed in terms of the common blocking laws and correlated with the operation parameters. Variations of pressure, concentration, pH, and ionic strength have shown great influence on the kinetics of protein deposition. In any case, the process of membrane fouling can be divided in two steps, clearly separated in all the experiments: a rapid initial internal blocking, strongly dependent on operation parameters, and a final stage of external blocking with lower sensitivity of the flux behavior on operation conditions. Finally, the amount of adsorbed protein and its influence on pore size distribution have been analyzed by desorption with a SDS-solution and by an extended bubble point method. These results show that the initial internal pore blocking can be attributed to protein adsorption while the long-time fouling should be caused mainly by solute-solute interactions.

  1. Rapid Determination of Componential Contents and Calorific Value of Selected Agricultural Biomass Feedstocks Using Spectroscopic Technology%基于光谱技术的农林生物质原料组分和热值的快速测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛奎川; 沈莹莹; 杨海清; 王文金; 罗威强

    2012-01-01

    快速检测生物质原料特性对生产高品质压缩成型燃料具有重要意义.利用光谱技术建立松木、杉木和棉杆三类农林生物质组分(水分、灰分、挥发分和固定碳)和热值预测模型.相比原始光谱,基于一阶导数光谱的偏最小二乘回归(PLS)模型预测精度较高.灰分、挥发分和水分PLS模型交叉校验决定系数(R2)分别为0.97,0.94和0.90,预测偏差比率(RPD)分别为6.57,4.00和3.01.固定碳和热值PLS模型精度一般,R2分别为0.85和0.87,RPD分别为2.55和2.73.实验结果表明,利用可见-近红外光谱技术完全可以替代传统工业分析方法,从而实现农林生物质原料组分和热值的快速测定.%Rapid determination of biomass feedstock properties is of value for the production of biomass densification briquetting fuel with high quality. In the present study, visible and near-infrared (Vis-NIR) spectroscopy was employed to build prediction models of componential contents, i. e. moisture, ash, volatile matter and fixed-carbon, and calorific value of three selected species of agricultural biomass feedstock, i. e. pine wood,cedar wood, and cotton stalk. The partial least squares (PLS) cross validation results showed that compared with original reflection spectra, PLS regression models developed for first derivative spectra produced higher prediction accuracy with coefficients of determination (R2) of 0. 97, 0. 94 and 0. 90, and residual prediction deviation (RPD) of 6. 57, 4. 00 and 3. 01 for ash, volatile matter and moisture, respectively. Good prediction accuracy was achieved with R2 of 0. 85 and RPD of 2. 55 for fixed carbon, and R2 of 0. 87 and RPD of 2. 73 for calorific value. It is concluded that the Vis-NIR spectroscopy is promising as an alternative of traditional proximate analysis for rapid determination of componential contents and calorific value of agricultural biomass feedstock.

  2. Devil declines and catastrophic cascades: is mesopredator release of feral cats inhibiting recovery of the eastern quoll?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancourt, Bronwyn A; Hawkins, Clare E; Cameron, Elissa Z; Jones, Menna E; Nicol, Stewart C

    2015-01-01

    The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) is a medium-sized Australian marsupial carnivore that has recently undergone a rapid and severe population decline over the 10 years to 2009, with no sign of recovery. This decline has been linked to a period of unfavourable weather, but subsequent improved weather conditions have not been matched by quoll recovery. A recent study suggested another mechanism: that declines in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) populations, due to the spread of the fatal Devil Facial Tumour Disease, have released feral cats (Felis catus) from competitive suppression, with eastern quoll declines linked to a subsequent increase in cat sightings. Yet current evidence of intraguild suppression among devils, cats and quolls is scant and equivocal. We therefore assessed the influences of top-down effects on abundance and activity patterns among devils, feral cats and eastern quolls. Between 2011 and 2013, we monitored four carnivore populations using longitudinal trapping and camera surveys, and performed camera surveys at 12 additional sites throughout the eastern quoll's range. We did not find evidence of a negative relationship between devil and cat abundance, nor of higher cat abundance in areas where devil populations had declined the longest. Cats did not appear to avoid devils spatially; however, there was evidence of temporal separation of cat and devil activity, with reduced separation and increasing nocturnal activity observed in areas where devils had declined the longest. Cats and quolls used the same areas, and there was no evidence that cat and quoll abundances were negatively related. Temporal overlap in observed cat and quoll activity was higher in summer than in winter, but this seasonal difference was unrelated to devil declines. We suggest that cats did not cause the recent quoll decline, but that predation of juvenile quolls by cats could be inhibiting low density quoll populations from recovering their former abundance

  3. The growth and decline of cryonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sanders Stodolsky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryogenic storage has become known as an alternative to burial. While a substantial fraction of the public finds cryonics acceptable, enrollment remains miniscule. One of the greatest unknowns is whether cryonics companies will be able to operate continuously until reanimation of those in storage becomes possible. Two failure modes are considered; organizational decline and political attack. The cryonics industry has adopted a strategy that implicitly targets atheist millionaires and alienates women. This is a result of neglecting science in its marketing efforts. American cryonics organizations have also incurred an avoidable political risk by refusing to use the funeral industry as a sales channel. Two alternative strategies are suggested that could minimize failure risk by reversing the stagnation of the industry. A “repackaging” of cryonics could accelerate growth and improve services, as well as the political position of the industry. This repackaging includes a restructuring of the channels for funding cryonics. Integration with the mainstream assumes using the funeral industry as a sales channel. While both political experiences and research results have made the need for these developments apparent, pioneers of the industry have resisted them.

  4. Electrical stimulation counteracts muscle decline in seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Helmut; Barberi, Laura; Löfler, Stefan; Sbardella, Simona; Burggraf, Samantha; Fruhmann, Hannah; Carraro, Ugo; Mosole, Simone; Sarabon, Nejc; Vogelauer, Michael; Mayr, Winfried; Krenn, Matthias; Cvecka, Jan; Romanello, Vanina; Pietrangelo, Laura; Protasi, Feliciano; Sandri, Marco; Zampieri, Sandra; Musaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The loss in muscle mass coupled with a decrease in specific force and shift in fiber composition are hallmarks of aging. Training and regular exercise attenuate the signs of sarcopenia. However, pathologic conditions limit the ability to perform physical exercise. We addressed whether electrical stimulation (ES) is an alternative intervention to improve muscle recovery and defined the molecular mechanism associated with improvement in muscle structure and function. We analyzed, at functional, structural, and molecular level, the effects of ES training on healthy seniors with normal life style, without routine sport activity. ES was able to improve muscle torque and functional performances of seniors and increased the size of fast muscle fibers. At molecular level, ES induced up-regulation of IGF-1 and modulation of MuRF-1, a muscle-specific atrophy-related gene. ES also induced up-regulation of relevant markers of differentiating satellite cells and of extracellular matrix remodeling, which might guarantee shape and mechanical forces of trained skeletal muscle as well as maintenance of satellite cell function, reducing fibrosis. Our data provide evidence that ES is a safe method to counteract muscle decline associated with aging.

  5. Cognitive decline and the default American lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirowsky, John

    2011-07-01

    Upward trends in IQ, education, and mental work suggest that cognitive function among seniors should be rising strongly across cohorts. There is little sign of such improvement in recent decades, and some analyses find poorer function in the newer cohorts. This essay explores possible explanations of the anomaly. Major long-term trends that might increase cognitive impairment are reviewed, and their implications are considered. Physical activity is declining, food is increasingly manufactured, body fat is increasing, diabetes and metabolic syndrome are on the rise, the number of prescription drugs per person is increasing, and the proportion of the population either old or obese is growing. Technological and economic development may lower the cognitive function needed for survival. They also lower physical activity in daily life. Sedentary work, transportation, and leisure undermine the aerobic and metabolic fitness required for the brain to perform well. Some prescription drugs impair cognitive function, and others do so when taken for many years or in combination with others. The growing fraction of the population that is either old or obese may further lower physical activity norms and requirements and substitute medical intervention for health, accelerating a trend toward cognitive impairment.

  6. Neotropical Amphibian Declines Affect Stream Ecosystem Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, S.; Pringle, C. M.; Bixby, R. J.; Whiles, M. R.; Lips, K. R.; Brenes, R.; Colon-Gaud, J. C.; Kilham, S.; Hunte-Brown, M.

    2005-05-01

    Global declines of amphibians are well documented, yet effects of these dramatic losses on ecosystem structure and function are poorly understood. As part of a larger collaborative project, we compared two upland Panamanian streams. Both streams are biologically and geologically similar; however, one stream (Fortuna) has recently experienced almost complete extirpation of stream-dwelling frogs, while the other (Cope) still has intact populations. We experimentally excluded tadpoles from localized areas in each stream. We then compared chlorophyll a, algal community composition, ash-free dry mass (AFDM), inorganic matter, and insect assemblages in control and exclusion areas. Additionally, we sampled the natural substrate of both streams monthly for chlorophyll a, algal community composition, AFDM, and inorganic matter. At Cope, chlorophyll a, AFDM, and inorganic matter were greater in areas where tadpoles were excluded than in their presence. Numbers of dominant algal species (e.g., Nupela praecipua and Eunotia siolii) were greater in the exclusion versus control treatments. Monthly sampling of natural substrate indicated higher chlorophyll a and AFDM at Cope compared to Fortuna. Our data suggest that stream-dwelling anuran larvae have significant impacts on algal communities. These results also have implications for predicting the relevance of short-term experimental manipulations to long-term, whole-stream processes.

  7. Rhodamine B piperazinoacetohydrazine: a water-soluble spectroscopic reagent for pyruvic acid labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jia; Wang, Ke; Shi, Wen; Chen, Suming; Li, Xiaohua; Ma, Huimin

    2010-06-11

    A new water-soluble reagent, rhodamine B piperazinoacetohydrazine (RBPH), with improved spectroscopic and reaction properties, has been developed and characterized for pyruvic acid labeling. The reagent RBPH is designed and synthesized by using rhodamine B as a spectroscopic unit, and hydrazine as a carbonyl-specific labeling unit; the two units are connected by a well-chosen linker of piperazine, which prohibits the formation of the nonfluorescent spirocyclic structure of rhodamine B, thereby keeping the spectroscopic response of the reagent in a stable state. Such a design enables RBPH not only to maintain its excellent spectroscopic properties over a wide pH range, but also to exist as a stable cation with high water solubility. Moreover, the hydrazino group of RBPH is expected to react selectively with carbonyl compounds under mild conditions through the rapid formation of hydrazones. These important features make RBPH of great potential use in the labeling of aldehydes or ketones in various biosystems, and such an application of RBPH as a precolumn derivatizing reagent has been successfully demonstrated on the analysis of pyruvic acid in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography with common UV/Vis detection.

  8. Urban versus rural: fertility decline in the cities and rural districts of Prussia, 1875 to 1910.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, P R; Lee, R D; Hammel, E A

    1998-09-01

    This study examined the level and pace of fertility decline in 54 large cities in Prussia during 1875-1910. Data were obtained from census records for 1875, 1880, 1885, 1890, 1895, 1900, 1905, and 1910. Analysis was based on pooled cross sectional time series methods and theories that structural socioeconomic change was a key factor in the decline of fertility in Prussian cities. During 1875-1910, city population grew from 3.8 to 9.6 million. The general marital fertility rate (GMFR) in the 54 cities declined from 281 to 164 during 1875-1910. Catholicism, female labor force participation (FLFP), manufacturing, mining, banking, and communication were statistically positively related to urban fertility level. Pace of decline was related significantly to language, education, FLFP, income, communications, insurance, population size, infant mortality, and married sex ratio. Population size was related to pace but not level. Education and banking had a stronger impact in rural areas. In the city equation, the variables plus dummies accounted for 90% of the variance. A very important variable explaining change in fertility level in Prussia was Catholicism. The most important variables for explaining fertility change in Prussia were infant mortality rate and insurance. Infant mortality, communications, insurance, and income increased in importance over time. FLFP declined over time, but contributed the most to predicted change in GMFR throughout the period, especially in nontraditional occupations. The analysis explained both rapid and slow urban fertility declines and closely approximated predicted fertility. Prussia differs from present developing country contexts in that the population was largely agrarian but literate.

  9. Asiago spectroscopic classification of two SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; OAPd, M. Turatto (INAF

    2016-09-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of two transients. The targets are supplied by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNOvae (ASAS-SN) and the TNS (https://wis-tns.weizmann.ac.il).

  10. Asiago spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-15db

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.

    2015-02-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-15db in NGC 5996. The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82m Copernico Telescope (+AFOSC; range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm), equipped with the CCD Andor IKON L936.

  11. Asiago spectroscopic classification of 2 SNe candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2017lf and SN 2017ms. The targets were supplied by the Tsinghua-NAOC Transient Survey (TNTS) and the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS).

  12. Crystallization and spectroscopic studies of manganese malonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varghese Mathew; Jochan Joseph; Sabu Jacob; K E Abraham

    2010-08-01

    The preparation of manganese malonate crystals by gel method and its spectroscopic studies are reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern reveals the crystalline nature. The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the crystals are recorded and the vibrational assignments are given with possible explanations. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is used to measure the bandgap (g) of the material.

  13. Nanoantenna-Enhanced Infrared Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühner, Lucca; Hentschel, Mario; Zschieschang, Ute; Klauk, Hagen; Vogt, Jochen; Huck, Christian; Giessen, Harald; Neubrech, Frank

    2017-05-26

    Spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging is ideally suited for label-free and spatially resolved characterization of molecular species, but often suffers from low infrared absorption cross sections. Here, we overcome this limitation by utilizing confined electromagnetic near-fields of resonantly excited plasmonic nanoantennas, which enhance the molecular absorption by orders of magnitude. In the experiments, we evaporate microstructured chemical patterns of C60 and pentacene with nanometer thickness on top of homogeneous arrays of tailored nanoantennas. Broadband mid-infrared spectra containing plasmonic and vibrational information were acquired with diffraction-limited resolution using a two-dimensional focal plane array detector. Evaluating the enhanced infrared absorption at the respective frequencies, spatially resolved chemical images were obtained. In these chemical images, the microstructured chemical patterns are only visible if nanoantennas are used. This confirms the superior performance of our approach over conventional spectroscopic infrared imaging. In addition to the improved sensitivity, our technique provides chemical selectivity, which would not be available with plasmonic imaging that is based on refractive index sensing. To extend the accessible spectral bandwidth of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic imaging, we employed nanostructures with dual-band resonances, providing broadband plasmonic enhancement and sensitivity. Our results demonstrate the potential of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging for spatially resolved characterization of organic layers with thicknesses of several nanometers. This is of potential interest for medical applications which are currently hampered by state-of-art infrared techniques, e.g., for distinguishing cancerous from healthy tissues.

  14. TESIS - The TNG EROs Spectroscopic Identification Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Severgnini, P; Ceca, R D; Bender, R; Drory, N; Feulner, G; Ghinassi, F; Hopp, U; Mannucci, F; Maraston, C

    2002-01-01

    A near-IR low-resolution spectroscopic follow-up of a complete sample of K1.2 and at estimating their spatial density to put constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution models. In this proceeding, the preliminary analysis of the first spectra obtained is presented.

  15. The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Asplund, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey has begun and will obtain high quality spectroscopy of some 100000 Milky Way stars, in the field and in open clusters, down to magnitude 19, systematically covering all the major components of the Milky Way. This survey will provide the first homogeneous o...

  16. Asiago spectroscopic classification of two transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turatto, M.; Benetti, S.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Terreran, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of Gaia16bzi, AT2016isl. The targets were supplied by the ESA Gaia Photometric Science Alerts Team and DPAC (http://gsaweb.ast.cam.ac.uk/alerts), the Tsinghua-NAOC Transient Survey (TNTS) and by Kunihiro Shima..

  17. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN 2017fof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.

    2017-07-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of AT 2017fof, discovered by S. Leonini, M. Conti, L.M. Tinjaca Ramirez and P. Rosi (Italian Supernovae Search Project, ISSP) in UGC 10602.

  18. Pulsating variable stars and large spectroscopic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cat, Peter

    2017-09-01

    In the past decade, the research of pulsating variable stars has taken a giant leap forward thanks to the photometric measurements provided by space missions like Most, CoRoT, Kepler/K2, and Brite. These missions have provided quasi uninterrupted photometric time-series with an ultra-high quality and a total length that is not achievable from Earth. However, many of the success stories could not have been told without ground-based spectroscopic follow-up observations. Indeed, spectroscopy has some important assets as it can provide (more) accurate information about stellar parameters (like the effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and abundances that are mandatory parameters for an in-depth asteroseismic study), the radial velocity (that is important for the detection of binaries and for the confirmation of cluster membership, if applicable), and the projected rotational velocity (that allows the study of the effects of rotation on pulsations). Fortunately, several large spectroscopic surveys are (becoming) available that can be used for these purposes. For some of these surveys, sub-projects have been initiated with the specific goal to complement space-based photometry. In this review, several spectroscopic surveys are introduced and compared with each other. We show that a large amount of spectroscopic data is (becoming) available for a large variety of objects.

  19. Synthesis and Spectroscopic Investigation of Azoporphyrins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of new covalently-connected azoporphyrin derivatives is described and the photochemical properties of the new compounds are discussed. The two chromophores of these derivatives exhibit their absorption spectroscopic properties respectively.In the fluorescence emission spectra, intermolecular fluorescence quenching is detected.

  20. Spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, S; Tabosa, J W R; Failache, H; Lezama, A

    2006-09-15

    We report on the first spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler shift associated with light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. The effect is evidenced as the broadening of a Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency coherence resonance on Rb vapor when the two incident Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams have opposite topological charges. The observations closely agree with theoretical predictions.

  1. The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Asplund, M.;

    2012-01-01

    The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey has begun and will obtain high quality spectroscopy of some 100000 Milky Way stars, in the field and in open clusters, down to magnitude 19, systematically covering all the major components of the Milky Way. This survey will provide the first homogeneous o...

  2. Spectroscopic Confirmation of Two Lyman Break Galaxies at Redshift Beyond 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzella, E.; Pentericci, L.; Fontana, A.; Grazian, A.; Castellano, M.; Boutsia, K.; Cristiani, S.; Dickinson, M.; Gallozzi, S.; Giallongo, E.; Giavalisco, M.; Maiolino, R.; Moorwood, A.; Paris, D.; Santini, P.

    2011-04-01

    We report the spectroscopic confirmation of two Lyman break galaxies at redshift >7. The galaxies were observed as part of an ultra-deep spectroscopic campaign with FORS2 at the ESO/VLT for the confirmation of z ~= 7 "z-band dropout" candidates selected from our VLT/Hawk-I imaging survey. Both galaxies show a prominent emission line at 9735 Å and 9858 Å, respectively: the lines have fluxes of ~(1.6-1.2) × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 and exhibit a sharp decline on the blue side and a tail on the red side. The asymmetry is quantitatively comparable to the observed asymmetry in z ~ 6 Lyα lines, where absorption by neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) truncates the blue side of the emission-line profile. We carefully evaluate the possibility that the galaxies are instead at lower redshift and we are observing either [O II], [O III], or Hα emission: however from the spectroscopic and the photometric data we conclude that there are no other plausible identifications, except for Lyα at redshift >7, implying that these are two of the most robust redshift determination for galaxies in the reionization epoch. Based on their redshifts and broadband photometry, we derive limits on the star formation rate and on the ultraviolet spectral slopes of the two galaxies. We argue that these two galaxies alone are unlikely to have ionized the IGM in their surroundings.

  3. Spectroscopic confirmation of two Lyman break galaxies at redshift beyond 7

    CERN Document Server

    Vanzella, E; Fontana, A; Grazian, A; Castellano, M; Boutsia, K; Cristiani, S; Dickinson, M; Gallozzi, S; Giallongo, E; Giavalisco, M; Maiolino, R; Moorwood, A; Paris, D; Santini, P

    2010-01-01

    We report the spectroscopic confirmation of two Lyman break galaxies at redshift > 7. The galaxies were observed as part of an utra-deep spectroscopic campaign with FORS2 at the ESO/VLT for the confirmation of z~7 "z--band dropout'' candidates selected from our VLT/Hawk-I imaging survey. Both galaxies show a prominent emission line at 9735A and 9858A respectively: the lines have fluxes around ~ 1-1.2 x 10^(-17) erg/s/cm2 and exhibit a sharp decline on the blue side and a tail on the red side. The asymmetry is quantitatively comparable to the observed asymmetry in z~6 Lya lines, where absorption by neutral hydrogen in the IGM truncates the blue side of the emission line profile. We carefully evaluate the possibility that the galaxies are instead at lower redshift and we are observing either [OII], [OIII] or Ha emission: however from the spectroscopic and the photometric data we conclude that there are no other plausible identifications, except for Lya at redshift > 7, making these the first robust Lyman break ...

  4. Conifer Decline and Mortality in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, V.; Im, S.; Ranson, K.

    2015-12-01

    "Dark needle conifer" (DNC: Abies sibirica, Pinus sibirica and Picea obovata) decline and mortality increase were documented in Russia during recent decades. Here we analyzed causes and scale of Siberian pine and fir mortality in Altai-Sayan and Baikal Lake Regions and West Siberian Plane based on in situdata and remote sensing (QuickBird, Landsat, GRACE). Geographically, mortality began on the margins of the DNC range (i.e., within the forest-steppe and conifer-broadleaf ecotones) and on terrain features with maximal water stress risk (narrow-shaped hilltops, convex steep south facing slopes, shallow well-drained soils). Within ridges, mortality occurred mainly along mountain passes, where stands faced drying winds. Regularly mortality was observed to decrease with elevation increase with the exception of Baikal Lake Mountains, where it was minimal near the lake shore and increased with elevation (up to about 1000 m a.s.l.). Siberian pine and fir mortality followed a drying trend with consecutive droughts since the 1980s. Dendrochronology analysis showed that mortality was correlated with vapor pressure deficit increase, drought index, soil moisture decrease and occurrence of late frosts. In Baikal region Siberian pine mortality correlated with Baikal watershed meteorological variables. An impact of previous year climate conditions on the current growth was found (r2 = 0.6). Thus, water-stressed trees became sensitive to bark beetles and fungi impact (including Polygraphus proximus and Heterobasidion annosum). At present, an increase in mortality is observed within the majority of DNC range. Results obtained also showed a primary role of water stress in that phenomenon with a secondary role of bark beetles and fungi attacks. In future climate with increased drought severity and frequency Siberian pine and fir will partly disappear from its current range, and will be substituted by drought-tolerant species (e.g., Pinus silvestris, Larix sibirica).

  5. [The decline in population growth, income distribution, and economic recession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banguero, H

    1983-05-01

    This work uses Keynesian principles and an analysis of the Colombian population in the 1970s to argue that the Colombian policy of slowing population growth, which was adopted with the aim of improving the general welfare of the population, has had shortterm negative effects on effective demand and thus on the level of employment and welfare. These negative effects were caused by the inflexibility of income distribution, which prevented expansion of the internal market, complicated by the stagnant condition of the external sector and the budget deficit. The results of the Colombian case study demonstrate how the deceleration of population growth beginning in the 1960s had a significant impact on the levels of consumption and savings and on the patterns of consumption, leading to low levels of investment and little dynamism. Although the current Colombian economic recession is aggravated by contextual factors such as the world economic recession, the high cost of capital, the industrial recession, and declining food production among others, at the core of the crisis are longer term structural determinants such as the decline in the rate of population growth and the highly unequal distribution of income and wealth, which have contributed to a shrinking of the internal market for some types of goods. Given the unlikelihood of renewed rapid population growth, the Keynesian model suggests that the only alternative for increasing aggregate demand is state intervention through public spending and investment and reorientation of the financial system to achieve a dynamic redistribution of income. Based on these findings and on proposals of other analysts, a stragegy for revitalization is proposed which would imply a gradual income redistribution to allow increased consumption of mass produced goods by the low income groups. Direct consumption subsidies would be avoided because of their inflationary and import-expanding tendencies; rather, incentives and support would be

  6. Seleno-auranofin (Et3PAuSe-tagl): synthesis, spectroscopic (EXAFS, 197Au Mössbauer, 31P, 1H, 13C, and 77Se NMR, ESI-MS) characterization, biological activity, and rapid serum albumin-induced triethylphosphine oxide generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David T; Isab, Anvarhusein A; Griswold, Don E; DiMartino, Michael J; Matz, Elizabeth D; Figueroa, Angel L; Wawro, Joyce E; DeBrosse, Charles; Reiff, William M; Elder, Richard C; Jones, Benjamin; Webb, James W; Shaw, C Frank

    2010-09-06

    Seleno-auranofin (SeAF), an analogue of auranofin (AF), the orally active antiarthritic gold drug in clinical use, was synthesized and has been characterized by an array of physical techniques and biological assays. The Mössbauer and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) parameters of the solid compound demonstrate a linear P-Au-Se coordination environment at a gold(I) center, analogous to the structure of auranofin. The (31)P, (13)C, and (1)H NMR spectra of SeAF in chloroform solution closely resemble those of auranofin. The (77)Se spectrum consists of a singlet at 481 ppm, consistent with a metal-bound selenolate ligand. The absence of (2)J(PSe) coupling in the (31)P and (77)Se spectra may arise from dynamic processes occurring in solution or because the (2)J(PSe) coupling constants are smaller than the observed bandwidths. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) spectra of SeAF in 50:50 methanol-water exhibited strong signals for [(Et(3)P)(2)Au](+), [(Et(3)PAu)(2)-mu-Se-tagl](+), and [Au(Se-tagl)(2)](-), which arise from ligand scrambling reactions. Three assays of the anti-inflammatory activity of SeAF allowed comparison to AF. SeAF exhibited comparable activity in the topically administered murine arachadonic acid-induced and phorbol ester-induced anti-inflammatory assays but was inactive in the orally administered carrageenan-induced assay in rats. However, in vivo serum gold levels were comparable in the rat, suggesting that differences between the in vivo metabolism of the two compounds, leading to differences in transport to the inflamed site, may account for the differential activity in the carrageenan-induced assay. Reactions of serum albumin, the principal transport protein of gold in the serum, demonstrated formation of AlbSAuPEt(3) at cysteine 34 and provided evidence for facile reduction of disulfide bonds at cysteine 34 and very rapid formation of Et(3)P=O, a known metabolite of auranofin.

  7. Rapid screening test for porphyria diagnosis using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, A.; Stepp, H.; Homann, C.; Hennig, G.; Brittenham, G. M.; Vogeser, M.

    2015-07-01

    Porphyrias are rare genetic metabolic disorders, which result from deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Depending on the enzyme defect, different types of porphyrins and heme precursors accumulate for the different porphyria diseases in erythrocytes, liver, blood plasma, urine and stool. Patients with acute hepatic porphyrias can suffer from acute neuropathic attacks, which can lead to death when undiagnosed, but show only unspecific clinical symptoms such as abdominal pain. Therefore, in addition to chromatographic methods, a rapid screening test is required to allow for immediate identification and treatment of these patients. In this study, fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were conducted on blood plasma and phantom material, mimicking the composition of blood plasma of porphyria patients. Hydrochloric acid was used to differentiate the occurring porphyrins (uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III) spectroscopically despite their initially overlapping excitation spectra. Plasma phantom mixtures were measured using dual wavelength excitation and the corresponding concentrations of uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III were determined. Additionally, three plasma samples of porphyria patients were examined and traces of coproporphyrin-III and uroporphyrin-III were identified. This study may therefore help to establish a rapid screening test method with spectroscopic differentiation of the occurring porphyrins, which consequently allows for the distinction of different porphyrias. This may be a valuable tool for clinical porphyria diagnosis and rapid or immediate treatment.

  8. Heat wave flash droughts in decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Kingtse C.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2015-04-01

    Flash drought is a term that was popularized during rapidly evolving droughts in the Central U.S. in 2012 that were associated with heat waves. We posit that there are two kinds of flash droughts, and we will focus on heat wave flash droughts, of which the 2012 events were typical. We find, based on an analysis of temperature observations and model-reconstructed soil moisture (SM) and evapotranspiration from 1916 to 2013, that heat wave flash droughts in the conterminous U.S. (CONUS) are most likely to occur over the Midwest and the Pacific Northwest during the growing season. We also find that the number of such events across the CONUS has been decreasing over the last century but rebounded after 2011. The long-term downward trends appear to be associated with generally increasing trends in SM resulting from increasing trends in precipitation over the areas where heat wave flash droughts are most likely to occur.

  9. Rapid response systems update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbottom, Fiona; Castex, Julie; Campbell, Anita

    2013-06-01

    Rapid response is a mature concept that is undergoing metamorphosis. The ideal structure and function of these safety teams has not yet been realized but new developments in the field of rapid response systems are evolving.

  10. Flattening of Caribbean coral reefs: region-wide declines in architectural complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Gill, Jennifer A; Côté, Isabelle M; Watkinson, Andrew R

    2009-08-22

    Coral reefs are rich in biodiversity, in large part because their highly complex architecture provides shelter and resources for a wide range of organisms. Recent rapid declines in hard coral cover have occurred across the Caribbean region, but the concomitant consequences for reef architecture have not been quantified on a large scale to date. We provide, to our knowledge, the first region-wide analysis of changes in reef architectural complexity, using nearly 500 surveys across 200 reefs, between 1969 and 2008. The architectural complexity of Caribbean reefs has declined nonlinearly with the near disappearance of the most complex reefs over the last 40 years. The flattening of Caribbean reefs was apparent by the early 1980s, followed by a period of stasis between 1985 and 1998 and then a resumption of the decline in complexity to the present. Rates of loss are similar on shallow (20 m) reefs and are consistent across all five subregions. The temporal pattern of declining architecture coincides with key events in recent Caribbean ecological history: the loss of structurally complex Acropora corals, the mass mortality of the grazing urchin Diadema antillarum and the 1998 El Nino Southern Oscillation-induced worldwide coral bleaching event. The consistently low estimates of current architectural complexity suggest regional-scale degradation and homogenization of reef structure. The widespread loss of architectural complexity is likely to have serious consequences for reef biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and associated environmental services.

  11. Nonrandom seedling establishment corresponds with distance-dependent decline in mycorrhizal abundance in two terrestrial orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waud, Michael; Wiegand, Thorsten; Brys, Rein; Lievens, Bart; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2016-07-01

    In plant species that critically rely on mycorrhizal symbionts for germination and seedling establishment, distance-dependent decline of mycorrhizal fungi in the soil can be hypothesized to lead to significant spatial clustering as a result of nonrandom spatial patterns of seedling establishment. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the abundance and distribution of mycorrhizal fungi in the soil and how they relate to spatial patterns of adults and seedling recruitment in two related orchid species. We combined assessments of spatial variation in fungal abundance using quantitative PCR (qPCR) with spatial point pattern analyses based on long-term demographic data and cluster point process models. qPCR analyses showed that fungal abundance declined rapidly with distance from the adult host plants. Spatial point pattern analyses showed that successful recruitment in both species was clustered significantly around adult plants and that the decline in the neighborhood density of recruits around adults coincided with the decline of fungal abundance around adult plants. Overall, these results indicate that the distribution and abundance of fungal associates in the soil may have a strong impact on the aboveground distribution of its partner.

  12. Is basic science disappearing from medicine? The decline of biomedical research in the medical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin E; Goldenberg, Neil M; Fairn, Gregory D; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Slutsky, Arthur S; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Explosive growth in our understanding of genomics and molecular biology have fueled calls for the pursuit of personalized medicine, the notion of harnessing biologic variability to provide patient-specific care. This vision will necessitate a deep understanding of the underlying pathophysiology in each patient. Medical journals play a pivotal role in the education of trainees and clinicians, yet we suspected that the amount of basic science in the top medical journals has been in decline. We conducted an automated search strategy in PubMed to identify basic science articles and calculated the proportion of articles dealing with basic science in the highest impact journals for 8 different medical specialties from 1994 to 2013. We observed a steep decline (40-60%) in such articles over time in almost all of the journals examined. This rapid decline in basic science from medical journals is likely to affect practitioners' understanding of and interest in the basic mechanisms of disease and therapy. In this Life Sciences Forum, we discuss why this decline may be occurring and what it means for the future of science and medicine. © FASEB.

  13. Rapid Reading, Yes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, Harvey

    1971-01-01

    Recommends instruction in rapid reading fo high school and college students and asserts that flexibility of speed and reasoning provide the foundation for effective rapid reading. Describes the components of rapid reading as orientation, selection, clarification, arrangement, review, and study. (RW)

  14. Loneliness and the rate of motor decline in old age: the rush memory and aging project, a community-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Steven E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being alone, as measured by less frequent social interactions, has been reported to be associated with a more rapid rate of motor decline in older persons. We tested the hypothesis that feeling alone is associated with the rate of motor decline in community-dwelling older persons. Methods At baseline, loneliness was assessed with a 5-item scale in 985 persons without dementia participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a longitudinal community-based cohort study. Annual detailed assessment of 9 measures of muscle strength and 9 motor performances were summarized in a composite measure of global motor function. Results Linear mixed-effects models which controlled for age, sex and education, showed that the level of loneliness at baseline was associated with the rate of motor decline (Estimate, -0.016; S.E. 0.006, p = 0.005. For each 1-point higher level of loneliness at baseline, motor decline was 40% more rapid; this effect was similar to the rate of motor decline observed in an average participant 4 years older at baseline. Furthermore, this amount of motor decline per year was associated with about a 50% increased risk of death. When terms for both feeling alone (loneliness and being alone were considered together in a single model, both were relatively independent predictors of motor decline. The association between loneliness and motor decline persisted even after controlling for depressive symptoms, cognition, physical and cognitive activities, chronic conditions, as well as baseline disability or a history of stroke or Parkinson's disease. Conclusions Among community-dwelling older persons, both feeling alone and being alone are associated with more rapid motor decline, underscoring the importance of psychosocial factors and motor decline in old age.

  15. What distinguishes passive recipients from active decliners of sales flyers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Orquin, Jacob Lund; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2014-01-01

    While sales flyer ad spending in Denmark has increased over the last decade ,the proportion of consumers declining to receive such flyers has been ever-increasing. To address this paradox, attitudinal and behavioural factors distinguishing passive recipients from active decliners of sales flyers...... on the Internet.To reach the decliners, retailers could focus on the possibilities of the Internet, but to stop the trend of escalating numbers of decliners, retailers will have to address the perceived inconvenience and uselessness of sales flyers....

  16. The Decline in Black Teenage Employment: 1950-1970

    OpenAIRE

    Cogan, John F.

    1981-01-01

    This paper examines the causes of the decline in black male teenage employment from 1950 to 1970. During this period, the employment-to-population ratio of black youth (age 16-19) declined from 46.8 percent to 27 percent. The white teenage employment ratio, in contrast, remained constant. The primary source of the decline is traced to the virtual demise of the market for low-skilled agricultural labor. All of the black teenage employment decline during this period occurs in the South. The emp...

  17. Evaluating the Association between Diabetes, Cognitive Decline and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omorogieva Ojo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review the association between diabetes mellitus, cognitive decline and dementia, including the effects of cognitive decline and dementia on self management of diabetes. This is a literature review of primary research articles. A number of contemporary research articles that met the inclusion criteria were selected for this review paper. These articles were selected using a number of search strategies and electronic databases, such as EBSCOhost Research and SwetsWise databases. The duration of diabetes, glycated haemoglobin levels and glycaemic fluctuations were associated with cognitive decline and dementia. Similarly, hypoglycaemia was significantly related to increased risk of developing cognitive decline and dementia. Furthermore, cognitive decline and dementia were associated with poorer diabetes management. There is evidence of the association between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia including the shared pathogenesis between diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the self management of diabetes is affected by dementia and cognitive decline. It could be suggested that the association between diabetes and dementia is bidirectional with the potential to proceed to a vicious cycle. Further studies are needed in order to fully establish the relationship between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia. Patients who have diabetes and dementia could benefit from structured education strategies, which should involve empowerment programmes and lifestyle changes. The detection of cognitive decline should highlight the need for education strategies.

  18. Pooling optimal combinations of energy thresholds in spectroscopic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Hamann, Elias; Runz, Armin; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-03-01

    Photon counting detectors used in spectroscopic CT are often based on small pixels and therefore offer only limited space to include energy discriminators and their associated counters in each pixel cell. For this reason, it is important to make efficient use of the available energy discriminators in order to achieve an optimized material contrast at a radiation dose as low as possible. Unfortunately, the complexity of evaluating every possible combination of energy thresholds, given a fixed number of counters, rapidly increases with the resolution at which this search is performed, and makes brute-force approaches to this problem infeasible. In this work, we introduce methods from machine learning, in particular sparse regression, to perform a feature selection to determine optimal combinations of energy thresholds. We will demonstrate how methods enforcing row-sparsity on a linear regression's coefficient matrix can be applied to the multiple response problem in spectroscopic CT, i.e. the case in which a single set of energy thresholds is sought to simultaneously retrieve concentrations pertaining to a multitude of materials in an optimal way. These methods are applied to CT images experimentally obtained with a Medipix3RX detector operated in charge summing mode and with a CdTe sensor at a pixel pitch of 110μm. We show that the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso), generalized to the multiple response case, chooses four out of 20 possible threshold positions that allow discriminating PMMA, iodine and gadolinium in a contrast agent phantom at a higher accuracy than with equally spaced thresholds. Finally, we illustrate why it might be unwise to use a higher number of energy thresholds than absolutely necessary.

  19. Fines stabilizing agent reduces production decline rates in steam injected wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo de Castillo, Milagros; Fernandez Andrades, Jarvi [PDVSA - Petroleos de Venezuela S.A., Caracas (Venezuela); Navarro Cornejo, Willian; Curtis, James [BJ Services do Brasil Ltda., RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The Bachaquero Lago heavy oil field, located in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela, with an area of 9800 ha, in which more than 1800 wells have been drilled. The Lagunillas formation in this field is a mature, clastic, unconsolidated sandstone of Miocene age with good permeability. Clays are present, in laminated form or dispersed within the productive sandstones. Heavy oil, less than 12 deg API, is produced by cyclic steam injection. Wells are completed with cased-hole gravel packs to prevent sand and fines production. Rapid production decline rates are typically observed after the steam injection cycles, due to fines migration and plugging of the reservoir and gravel pack. This paper describes the methodology used to treat the wells with a fines stabilizing agent during the steam injection cycles in order to successfully reduce the subsequent production decline rate. Results from a multi-well pilot project are presented and analyzed. (author)

  20. Stress and decline with forest trees. Stress und Decline bei Waldbaeumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesche, M. (Technische Univ. Dresden, Tharandt (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Forstwirtschaft)

    1991-03-01

    Stress and decline are two terms used in a different manner in connection with current forest damages. Using examples, it is demonstrated that effects of complex environmental stress do not only depend upon the genotypic reaction capability of plants and the intensity of stress, but also on the combination and constellation as well as the way of influence exerted by individual stressors; low stress intensities lasting for a limited time can result in an adaption stimulation for plants, which should be called eustress and complex stress situations do not necessarily lead to an intensification of the effect caused by individual stressors and thus not to distress. Investigations carried out during or immediately after the impact of stress (instant effects) are not sufficient for diagnosing defence or adaptation reactions. Effects of this kind (memory effects) can only be identified in long-term experiments. From the results one can conclude that the 'decline-spiral-model' by MANION (1981) simplifies things too much, because it does not consider the defence and adaptation potential of plants. (orig.).

  1. The identification of post-starburst galaxies at z~1 using multiwavelength photometry: a spectroscopic verification

    CERN Document Server

    Maltby, David T; Wild, Vivienne; Hatch, Nina A; Hartley, William G; Simpson, Chris; McLure, Ross J; Dunlop, James; Rowlands, Kate; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of study, we still do not fully understand why some massive galaxies abruptly switch off their star formation in the early Universe, and what causes their rapid transition to the red sequence. Post-starburst galaxies provide a rare opportunity to study this transition phase, but few have currently been spectroscopically identified at high redshift ($z>1$). In this paper we present the spectroscopic verification of a new photometric technique to identify post-starbursts in high-redshift surveys. The method classifies the broad-band optical-near--infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies using three spectral shape parameters (super-colours), derived from a principal component analysis of model SEDs. When applied to the multiwavelength photometric data in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS), this technique identified over 900 candidate post-starbursts at redshifts $0.55 Ang.) and Balmer break, characteristic of post-starburst galaxies. We conclude that photometric methods can be us...

  2. Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis Methods and Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  3. Spectroscopic study of solar twins and analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Datson, Juliet; Portinari, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Context. Many large stellar surveys have been and are still being carried out, providing huge amounts of data, for which stellar physical parameters will be derived. Solar twins and analogues provide a means to test the calibration of these stellar catalogues because the Sun is the best-studied star and provides precise fundamental parameters. Solar twins should be centred on the solar values. Aims. This spectroscopic study of solar analogues selected from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) at a resolution of 48,000 provides effective temperatures and metallicities for these stars. We test whether our spectroscopic parameters, as well as the previous photometric calibrations, are properly centred on the Sun. In addition, we search for more solar twins in our sample. Methods. The methods used in this work are based on literature methods for solar twin searches and on methods we developed in previous work to distinguish the metallicity-temperature degeneracies in the differential comparison of spectra of solar ...

  4. Spectroscopic Imaging of Strongly Correlated Electronic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Ali; da Silva Neto, Eduardo H.; Aynajian, Pegor

    2016-03-01

    The study of correlated electronic systems from high-Tc cuprates to heavy-fermion systems continues to motivate the development of experimental tools to probe electronic phenomena in new ways and with increasing precision. In the past two decades, spectroscopic imaging with scanning tunneling microscopy has emerged as a powerful experimental technique. The combination of high energy and spatial resolutions provided by this technique reveals unprecedented detail of the electronic properties of strongly correlated metals and superconductors. This review examines specific experiments, theoretical concepts, and measurement methods that have established the application of these techniques to correlated materials. A wide range of applications, such as the study of collective responses to single atomic impurities, the characterization of quasiparticle-like excitations through their interference, and the identification of competing electronic phases using spectroscopic imaging, are discussed.

  5. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using...... high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations...

  6. Are your spectroscopic data being used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Iouli E.; Potterbusch, Megan R.; Bouquin, Daina; Erdmann, Christopher C.; Wilzewski, Jonas S.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-09-01

    The issue of availability of data and their presentation in spectroscopic publications is discussed. Different current practices are critically reviewed from the point of view of potential users, government policies, and merit of success of the authors. Indeed, properly providing the data benefits not only users but also the authors of the spectroscopic research. We will show that this increases citations to the spectroscopy papers and visibility of the research groups. Examples based on the statistical analyses of the articles published in the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy will be shown. We will discuss different methods including supplementary materials to the Journals, public-curated databases and also new tools that can be utilized by spectroscopists.

  7. Structural and spectroscopic studies of surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Laitenberger, P

    1996-01-01

    and on a 10ML thick Ar spacer layer, a remarkable substrate dependence is revealed. A new STM-based technique for fabricating simple metal-structures with dimensions in the 10-100nm regime which are partially electrically isolated from their environment was developed in collaboration with Dr. L. A. Silva. This technique employs the STM tip as a mechanical nanofabrication tool to machine gaps into a thin metallic film deposited on an insulating substrate, which laterally confine and electrically isolate the desired metal regions. Several metal structures, such as nanoscale wires and pads, were successfully created. Finally, the conceptual basis and present stage of construction of a new surface analytical tool, the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer (SPELS), is discussed. The SPELS offers the exciting prospect of collecting structural as well as spectroscopic information with a spatial resolution of a few nanometres. Once successfully developed, it will be ideally suited for spectroscopic studies of nanos...

  8. The Gulf: a young sea in decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Charles; Al-Husiani, Mohsen; Al-Jamali, F; Al-Yamani, Faiza; Baldwin, Rob; Bishop, James; Benzoni, Francesca; Dutrieux, Eric; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Durvasula, Subba Rao V; Jones, David A; Loughland, Ron; Medio, David; Nithyanandan, M; Pilling, Graham M; Polikarpov, Igor; Price, Andrew R G; Purkis, Sam; Riegl, Bernhard; Saburova, Maria; Namin, Kaveh Samimi; Taylor, Oliver; Wilson, Simon; Zainal, Khadija

    2010-01-01

    This review examines the substantial changes that have taken place in marine habitats and resources of the Gulf over the past decade. The habitats are especially interesting because of the naturally high levels of temperature and salinity stress they experience, which is important in a changing world climate. However, the extent of all natural habitats is changing and their condition deteriorating because of the rapid development of the region and, in some cases from severe, episodic warming episodes. Major impacts come from numerous industrial, infrastructure-based, and residential and tourism development activities, which together combine, synergistically in some cases, to cause the observed deterioration in most benthic habitats. Substantial sea bottom dredging for material and its deposition in shallow water to extend land or to form a basis for huge developments, directly removes large areas of shallow, productive habitat, though in some cases the most important effect is the accompanying sedimentation or changes to water flows and conditions. The large scale of the activities compared to the relatively shallow and small size of the water body is a particularly important issue. Important from the perspective of controlling damaging effects is the limited cross-border collaboration and even intra-country collaboration among government agencies and large projects. Along with the accumulative nature of impacts that occur, even where each project receives environmental assessment or attention, each is treated more or less alone, rarely in combination. However, their combination in such a small, biologically interacting sea exacerbates the overall deterioration. Very few similar areas exist which face such a high concentration of disturbance, and the prognosis for the Gulf continuing to provide abundant natural resources is poor. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Is the gender wage gap declining in the Netherlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I try to answer the question whether the gender wage gap in the Netherlands is declining. I posed this question because on several other indicators labour market differences between men and women in the Netherlands declined or disappeared altogether. First of all the labour market part

  10. Did the Decline in Social Connections Depress Americans' Happiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Stefano; Bilancini, Ennio; Pugno, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    During the last 30 years US citizens experienced, on average, a decline in reported happiness, social connections, and confidence in institutions. We show that a remarkable portion of the decrease in happiness is predicted by the decline in social connections and confidence in institutions. We carry out our investigation in three steps. First, we…

  11. Serum cholesterol decline and depression in the postpartum period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van R.M.; Schuit, A.J.; Schouten, E.G.; Vader, H.L.; Pop, V.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the relation between total serum cholesterol decline and depression in the postpartum period in a prospective study of 266 Dutch women, who were followed until 34 weeks after delivery. The decline in serum cholesterol between week 32 of pregnancy and week 10 postpartum was similar for wo

  12. Creative Management in a Time of Economic Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, John D.

    Economic decline is indicated by productivity per man-hour of work, per capita real personal income, and real gross national product. Unless new technology overcomes the force of a stable population and develops new sources of raw materials and of energy, economic decline seems a likely possibility. Creative management is a process of planning,…

  13. AMPHIBIAN DECLINE, ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION AND LOCAL POPULATION ADAPTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amphibian population declines have been noted on both local and global scales. Causes for these declines are unknown although many hypotheses have been offered. In areas adjacent to human development, loss of habitat is a fairly well accepted cause. However in isolated, seemingl...

  14. Identification of older hospitalized patients at risk for functional decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerduijn, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Between 30% and 60% of older patients experience functional decline after hospitalization, resulting in a decline in health-related quality of life and autonomy. This is associated with increased risk of readmission, nursing home placement and mortality, increased length of hospital stay and

  15. Did the Decline in Social Connections Depress Americans' Happiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Stefano; Bilancini, Ennio; Pugno, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    During the last 30 years US citizens experienced, on average, a decline in reported happiness, social connections, and confidence in institutions. We show that a remarkable portion of the decrease in happiness is predicted by the decline in social connections and confidence in institutions. We carry out our investigation in three steps. First, we…

  16. ELEPHANT DECLINE IN LAKE-MANYARA-NATIONAL-PARK, TANZANIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PRINS, HHT; VANDERJEUGD, HP; BEEKMAN, JH

    1994-01-01

    The population of African elephant (Loxodonta africana (Blumenbach)) in Lake Manyara National Park, northern Tanzania, declined from about 500 individuals in 1984, to about 150 in 1988 due to poaching (mortality rate about 60% p.a.). In 1991 the population had declined further to about 60 individual

  17. Assessment of Loblolly Pine Decline in Central Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan J. Hess; William J. Otrosina; Emily A. Carter; Jim R. Steinman; John P. Jones; Lori G. Eckhardt; Ann M. Weber; Charles H. Walkinshaw

    2002-01-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) decline has been prevalent on upland sites of central Alabama since the 1960's. The purpose of this study was to compare Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) standards and protocols with root health evaluations relative to crown, stem, and site measurements. Thirty-nine 1/6 acre plots were established on loblolly decline...

  18. Relapse in FEV1 Decline After Steroid Withdrawal in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, Lisette I. Z.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Klooster, Karin; Lapperre, Therese S.; Vonk, Judith M.; Sont, Jacob K.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Snoeck-Stroband, Jiska B.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sterk, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously observed that 30 months of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) treatment can attenuate FEV1 decline in COPD, but it is unclear whether withdrawal induces a relapse. We hypothesized that FEV1 decline, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and quality of life (QOL) deteriorate after ICS

  19. Declining Trends in Student Performance in Lower Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijsman, Lindy A.; Warrens, Matthijs J.; Saab, Nadira; van Driel, Jan H.; Westenberg, P. Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Student performance is related to motivation to learn. As motivation generally declines during lower secondary education, one might expect performance to decline as well during this period. Though, until now, it has been unclear whether this pattern exists. In the present study, we examined student performance during the early years of secondary…

  20. Declination, Radial Distance, and Phases of the Moon for the Years 1961 to 1971 for Use in Trajectory Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolston, Donald S.

    1961-01-01

    As a byproduct of the preparation of solar and lunar coordinates for use in trajectory calculations a time history has been obtained of the radial distance and declination of the moon and its phases. Results are intended for use as an aid in the selection of launch dates. Results are presented for the years 1961 to 1971 in a form which permits a rapid approximate determination of the combination of declination and lighting for any calendar date. The information provides a time basis for entering tables of the moon's coordinates to obtain more precise data for use in computing insertion conditions.

  1. Spectroscopic studies of ion implanted PPV films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, C. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Friend, R.H. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Sarnecki, G.J. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Lucas, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Moliton, A. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Ratier, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Belorgeot, C. (Lab. de Physique Moleculaire, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France))

    1993-03-15

    The main results of the spectroscopic analyses (infrared and ultraviolet - visible - near infrared) carried out on PPV films before and after ion implantation with halogen and alkali ions are presented in this paper. The influence of both ions nature and implantation parameters on optical properties of this polymer have been pointed out and the appearance of a weak band due to doping has been observed by infrared spectroscopy. (orig.)

  2. Studying Young Stars with Large Spectroscopic Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Martell, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Galactic archaeology is the study of the history of star formation and chemical evolution in the Milky Way, based on present-day stellar populations. Studies of young stars are a key anchor point for Galactic archaeology, since quantities like the initial mass function and the star formation rate can be studied directly in young clusters and star forming regions. Conversely, massive spectroscopic Galactic archaeology surveys can be used as a data source for young star studies.

  3. Spectroscopic Characterisation of SWNT Polymer Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Keogh, Sinead

    2006-01-01

    In this study hybrid systems of the conjugated organic polymer poly(p-phenylene vinylene-co-2,5-dioctyloxy-m-phenylene vinylene) (PmPV) with single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesised by the Arc discharge method and by gas-phase catalytic decomposition of carbon monoxide at high pressure (HiPco process) are explored using a wide variety of spectroscopic, microscopic and thermal techniques. Diameter dependent solubilisation has been previously shown in solutions of such composites. Firstly the...

  4. SPECTROSCOPIC GRADIENTS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Buzzoni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We review some relevant properties of the observed changes of H , Mg2, and Fei Lick indices across the surface of 25 bright elliptical galaxies. The impact of these spectroscopic gradients is brie y discussed, in the framework of the leading physical mechanisms that led to galaxy formation. In particular, three relevant evolutionary scenarios are sketched, each one able, in principle, to consistently match galaxy spectral properties and e ectively constrain the composing stellar populations in these systems.

  5. Spectroscopic Gradients in Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzoni, A.; Battistini, C.; Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.

    2009-11-01

    We review some relevant properties of the observed changes of Hβ, Mg_2, and FeI Lick indices across the surface of 25 bright elliptical galaxies. The impact of these spectroscopic gradients is briefly discussed, in the framework of the leading physical mechanisms that led to galaxy formation. In particular, three relevant evolutionary scenarios are sketched, each one able, in principle, to consistently match galaxy spectral properties and effectively constrain the composing stellar populations in these systems.

  6. Association of incidental emphysema with annual lung function decline and future development of airflow limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo HK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyeon-Kyoung Koo,1 Kwang Nam Jin,2 Deog Kyeom Kim,3 Hee Soon Chung,3 Chang-Hoon Lee3,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, College of Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-Do, 2Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government – Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea Objectives: Emphysema is one of the prognostic factors for rapid lung function decline in patients with COPD, but the impact of incidentally detected emphysema on population without spirometric abnormalities has not been evaluated. This study aimed to determine whether emphysema detected upon computed tomography (CT screening would accelerate the rate of lung function decline and influence the possibility of future development of airflow limitation in a population without spirometric abnormalities.Materials and methods: Subjects who participated in a routine screening for health checkup and follow-up pulmonary function tests for at least 3 years between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively enrolled. The percentage of low-attenuation area below −950 Hounsfield units (%LAA−950 was calculated automatically. A calculated value of %LAA−950 that exceeded 10% was defined as emphysema. Adjusted annual lung function decline was analyzed using random-slope, random-intercept mixed linear regression models.Results: A total of 628 healthy subjects within the normal range of spriometric values were included. Multivariable analysis showed that the emphysema group exhibited a faster decline in forced vital capacity (−33.9 versus −18.8

  7. Declining financial capacity in patients with mild Alzheimer disease: a one-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roy; Griffith, H Randall; Belue, Katherine; Harrell, Lindy; Zamrini, Edward; Anderson, Britt; Bartolucci, Alfred; Marson, Daniel

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate change over time in financial abilities in patients with mild Alzheimer disease (AD). The authors conducted a prospective 1-year longitudinal study at a large southern U.S. metropolitan-area medical school university. Participants included healthy older adults (N=63) and patients with mild AD (N=55). The authors conducted a standardized performance measure of financial capacity. Performance was assessed on 18 financial tasks, nine domains of financial activity, and overall financial capacity. Capacity outcomes classifications (capable, marginally capable, or incapable) for domains and overall performance were made using cut scores referenced to comparison group performance. At baseline, patients with mild AD performed significantly below healthy older adults on 16 of 18 tasks, on all nine domains, and on overall financial capacity. At one-year follow up, comparison group performance was stable on all variables. In contrast, patients with mild AD showed substantial declines in overall financial capacity, on eight of nine domains, and on 12 of 18 tasks. Similarly, the proportion of the mild AD group classified as marginally capable and incapable increased substantially over one year for the two overall scores and for five financial domains. Financial capacity is already substantially impaired in patients with mild AD at baseline and undergoes rapid additional decline over one year. Relative to the comparison group, overall financial capacity performance in the AD group declined 10%, from approximately 80% of the comparison group performance at baseline to 70% at follow up. Financial skills showed differential rates of decline on both simple and complex tasks. Of clinical and public policy interest was the declining judgment of patients with mild AD regarding simple fraud schemes. The study supports the importance of prompt financial supervision and planning for patients newly diagnosed with AD.

  8. Blood Pressure, Proteinuria, and Renal Function Decline: Associations in a Large Community-Based Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Atsushi; Konta, Tsuneo; Kamei, Keita; Suzuki, Kazuko; Ichikawa, Kazunobu; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Kenjiro; Narita, Ichiei; Kondo, Masahide; Asahi, Koichi; Kurahashi, Issei; Ohashi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension and proteinuria are risk factors for adverse renal outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease. This study investigated the associations of blood pressure and proteinuria on renal function in a community-based population. We analyzed data from a nationwide database of 141,514 subjects who participated in the annual "Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan" checkup in 2008 and 2010. The study subjects were aged between 29 and 74 years, and the cohort comprised 40% men. We examined relationships between blood pressure levels, proteinuria at baseline, and the 2-year change in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), which was determined using the Japanese equation. After adjusting for possible confounders, the change in the eGFR was inversely correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP), but not diastolic blood pressure (DBP), at baseline, irrespective of the presence of proteinuria. Compared with the lowest SBP sixtile (≤118mm Hg), eGFRs declined significantly at SBPs ≥ 134mm Hg in subjects with proteinuria, while eGFRs declined significantly at SBPs ≥ 141mm Hg in those without proteinuria. At the same SBPs, renal function decline was faster and the risk for incident renal insufficiency was higher in subjects with proteinuria compared with those without proteinuria. This study showed that a difference in SBP, but not DBP, is independently associated with a rapid eGFR decline in the general Japanese population, and that the association of SBP on the decline of renal function was greater in subjects with proteinuria compared with those without proteinuria. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaugher, Brenna; Bebek, Chris

    2014-07-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar spectroscopic redshift survey. The DESI instrument consists of a new wide-field (3.2 deg. linear field of view) corrector plus a multi-object spectrometer with up to 5000 robotically positioned optical fibers and will be installed at prime focus on the Mayall 4m telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona. The fibers feed 10 three-arm spectrographs producing spectra that cover a wavelength range from 360-980 nm and have resolution of 2000-5500 depending on the wavelength. The DESI instrument is designed for a 14,000 sq. deg. multi-year survey of targets that trace the evolution of dark energy out to redshift 3.5 using the redshifts of luminous red galaxies (LRGs), emission line galaxies (ELGs) and quasars. DESI is the successor to the successful Stage-III BOSS spectroscopic redshift survey and complements imaging surveys such as the Stage-III Dark Energy Survey (DES, currently operating) and the Stage-IV Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST, planned start early in the next decade).

  10. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Spectroscopic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, A M; Brough, S; Owers, M S; Bauer, A E; Gunawardhana, M L P; Cluver, M E; Colless, M; Foster, C; Lara-Lopez, M A; Roseboom, I; Sharp, R; Steele, O; Thomas, D; Baldry, I K; Brown, M J I; Liske, J; Norberg, P; Robotham, A S G; Bamford, S; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Drinkwater, M J; Loveday, J; Meyer, M; Peacock, J A; Tuffs, R; Agius, N; Alpaslan, M; Andrae, E; Cameron, E; Cole, S; Ching, J H Y; Christodoulou, L; Conselice, C; Croom, S; Cross, N J G; De Propris, R; Delhaize, J; Dunne, L; Eales, S; Ellis, S; Frenk, C S; Graham, A; Grootes, M W; Haussler, B; Heymans, C; Hill, D; Hoyle, B; Hudson, M; Jarvis, M; Johansson, J; Jones, D H; van Kampen, E; Kelvin, L; Kuijken, K; Lopez-Sanchez, A; Maddox, S; Madore, B; Maraston, C; McNaught-Roberts, T; Nichol, R C; Oliver, S; Parkinson, H; Penny, S; Phillipps, S; Pimbblet, K A; Ponman, T; Popescu, C C; Prescott, M; Proctor, R; Sadler, E M; Sansom, A E; Seibert, M; Staveley-Smith, L; Sutherland, W; Taylor, E; Van Waerbeke, L; Vazquez-Mata, J A; Warren, S; Wijesinghe, D B; Wild, V; Wilkins, S

    2013-01-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is a multiwavelength photometric and spectroscopic survey, using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain spectra for up to ~300000 galaxies over 280 square degrees, to a limiting magnitude of r_pet < 19.8 mag. The target galaxies are distributed over 0spectroscopic reduction and analysis pipeline. We present the steps involved in taking the raw two-dimensional spectroscopic images through to flux-calibrated one-dimensional spectra. The resulting GAMA spectra cover an observed wavelength range of 3750

  11. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  12. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  13. Rapid Prototyping: State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-23

    Consumer products 25.5% Aerospace 8.6% Motor vehicles 23.8% Government/ military 6.9% Other 8.7% Source: Wohlers Report 2002 Figure 6. Industrial... Wohlers Report 2002 Figure 7. Purchases and Installations of RP Systems by Country 7 1.4 Number of Models Being Produced Despite a decline in overall...1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 1998 1999 2000 2001 Source: Wohlers Report 2002 Figure 8. Number of RP Models Produced 1.5 Rapid Tooling Methods, processes, and

  14. Cognitive decline is associated with risk aversion and temporal discounting in older adults without dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D James

    Full Text Available Risk aversion and temporal discounting are preferences that are strongly linked to sub-optimal financial and health decision making ability. Prior studies have shown they differ by age and cognitive ability, but it remains unclear whether differences are due to age-related cognitive decline or lower cognitive abilities over the life span. We tested the hypothesis that cognitive decline is associated with higher risk aversion and temporal discounting in 455 older persons without dementia from the Memory and Aging Project, a longitudinal cohort study of aging in Chicago. All underwent repeated annual cognitive evaluations using a detailed battery including 19 tests. Risk aversion was measured using standard behavioral economics questions: participants were asked to choose between a certain monetary payment versus a gamble in which they could gain more or nothing; potential gamble gains varied across questions. Temporal discounting: participants were asked to choose between an immediate, smaller payment and a delayed, larger one; two sets of questions addressed small and large stakes based on payment amount. Regression analyses were used to examine whether prior rate of cognitive decline predicted level of risk aversion and temporal discounting, controlling for age, sex, and education. Over an average of 5.5 (SD=2.9 years, cognition declined at an average of 0.016 units per year (SD=0.03. More rapid cognitive decline predicted higher levels of risk aversion (p=0.002 and temporal discounting (small stakes: p=0.01, high stakes: p=0.006. Further, associations between cognitive decline and risk aversion (p=0.015 and large stakes temporal discounting (p=0.026 persisted in analyses restricted to persons without any cognitive impairment (i.e., no dementia or mild cognitive impairment; the association of cognitive decline and small stakes temporal discounting was no longer statistically significant (p=0.078. These findings are consistent with the

  15. Parenting and the decline of physical activity from age 9 to 15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader P

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a rapid decline in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA during middle childhood and adolescence. Information on the environmental factors implicated in this decline is limited. This study focuses on family factors associated with the rate of decline in objectively measured physical activity during middle childhood and adolescence. Methods Longitudinal analysis of 801 participants from 10 US sites in the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development whose data included accelerometer-determined levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA between ages 9 and 15 years, as well as family process, BMI and demographic information. The sample included an even split of boys (49% and girls (51%, was predominantly white (77%, and contained about 26% low income and 19% single parent families. The outcome measure was mean MVPA. It was based on 4 to 7 days of monitored physical activity. Results Boys with lower parental monitoring scores and more days of parental encouragement had significantly more minutes of MVPA at age 9 years. The effect of parental monitoring, however, was moderated by early puberty. High parental monitoring was associated with decreased activity levels for boys experiencing later puberty and increased activity for boy experiencing early puberty. Minutes of MVPA for boys living in the Midwest decreased at significantly faster rates than boys living in any other region; and boys in the South declined faster than boys in the West. Girls in the Midwest and South declined faster than girls in the West and Northeast. Among girls, more days of parental exercise and transportation to activities were associated with more MVPA per day at age 9. However, more parental transportation to activities and less monitoring was associated with faster linear declines in daughters' MVPA between the ages of 9 and 15 years. For girls who experienced puberty early, parental encouragement was associated

  16. Tree decline and the future of Australian farmland biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Joern; Zerger, Andre; Gibbons, Phil; Stott, Jenny; Law, Bradley S

    2010-11-09

    Farmland biodiversity is greatly enhanced by the presence of trees. However, farmland trees are declining worldwide, including in North America, Central America, and parts of southern Europe. We show that tree decline and its likely consequences are particularly severe in Australia's temperate agricultural zone, which is a threatened ecoregion. Using field data on trees, remotely sensed imagery, and a demographic model for trees, we predict that by 2100, the number of trees on an average farm will contract to two-thirds of its present level. Statistical habitat models suggest that this tree decline will negatively affect many currently common animal species, with predicted declines in birds and bats of up to 50% by 2100. Declines were predicted for 24 of 32 bird species modeled and for all of six bat species modeled. Widespread declines in trees, birds, and bats may lead to a reduction in economically important ecosystem services such as shade provision for livestock and pest control. Moreover, many other species for which we have no empirical data also depend on trees, suggesting that fundamental changes in ecosystem functioning are likely. We conclude that Australia's temperate agricultural zone has crossed a threshold and no longer functions as a self-sustaining woodland ecosystem. A regime shift is occurring, with a woodland system deteriorating into a treeless pasture system. Management options exist to reverse tree decline, but new policy settings are required to encourage their widespread adoption.

  17. Healthy eating and reduced risk of cognitive decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Mahshid; O'Donnell, Martin; Anderson, Craig; Teo, Koon; Gao, Peggy; Sleight, Peter; Dagenais, Gilles; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the association of dietary factors and risk of cognitive decline in a population at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods: Baseline dietary intake and measures of the Mini-Mental State Examination were recorded in 27,860 men and women who were enrolled in 2 international parallel trials of the ONTARGET (Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial) and TRANSCEND (Telmisartan Randomised Assessment Study in ACE Intolerant Subjects with Cardiovascular Disease) studies. We measured diet quality using the modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to determine the association between diet quality and risk of ≥3-point decline in Mini-Mental State Examination score, and reported as hazard ratio with 95% confidence intervals with adjustment for covariates. Results: During 56 months of follow-up, 4,699 cases of cognitive decline occurred. We observed lower risk of cognitive decline among those in the healthiest dietary quintile of modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index compared with lowest quintile (hazard ratio 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.66–0.86, Q5 vs Q1). Lower risk of cognitive decline was consistent regardless of baseline cognitive level. Conclusion: We found that higher diet quality was associated with a reduced risk of cognitive decline. Improved diet quality represents an important potential target for reducing the global burden of cognitive decline. PMID:25948720

  18. Rapid Estimation of Microfibril Angle of Increment Cores of Chinese Fir by Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscope and X-ray diffractometry have been used for rapid prediction of the microfibril angle (MFA) which is one of the important factors affecting wood properties. Wood property evaluation in breeding and resource evaluation requires effective and rapid analysis methods for thousands of samples. In the experiment, all samples from increment cores with moisture content of 60% to 150% were used for measuring MFA by X-ray scanning diffractometry. Then, a partial least squares regressi...

  19. The story of a 'maverick': Bulgaria's fertility decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botev, N

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the fertility decline in Bulgaria shows that the perception of Bulgaria as an 'anomaly' in terms of its demographic development is based on a conservative interpretatiion of the demographic transition theory. The features that distinguish Bulgaria from the western European countries (faster decline, persistence of early and universal marriages, etc.) are generally accounted for by the specific social, economic, cultural, and political conditions. These findings suggest that the speed of the fertility decline and the means through which it is achieved are affected by a complex interaction between cultural and economic factors that are often difficult to distinguish in terms of primacy.

  20. A New Comprehensive Approach for Predicting Injectivity Decline during Waterflooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Shapiro, Alexander

    Injectivity decline during sea waterflooding or produced water re-injection is widely observed in North Sea, Gulf of Mexico and Campos Basin fields. The formation damage occurs mainly due to the deposition of suspended solids around injectors and the build-up the external filter cakes in the well...... injectivity decline during water flooding is proposed. The deep bed filtration is described by novel stochastic random walk equations. The injectivity decline model takes into account the reservoir heterogeneity and the distribution of solid particles by sizes. It also accounts for the later formation...

  1. Financial Declines, Financial Behaviors, and Relationship Satisfaction during the Recession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P. Dew

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Using nationally-representative data collected during the summer of 2009 (N = 575, this study examines how reports of financial declines are associated with financial behaviors and how financial behaviors are associated with relationship satisfaction among cohabiting and married participants. Findings suggested that financial declines were only negatively associated with sound financial management behavior if participants also experienced feelings of economic pressure. Sound financial management behavior was found to be positively associated with marital satisfaction. Finally, sound financial management behavior also moderated the association between financial declines, economic pressure, and relationship satisfaction.

  2. Ginkgo Biloba Extract and Long-Term Cognitive Decline: A 20-Year Follow-Up Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amieva, Hélène; Meillon, Céline; Helmer, Catherine; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Dartigues, Jean François

    2013-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have looked at the potential benefits of various nootropic drugs such as Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb761®; Tanakan®) and piracetam (Nootropyl®) on age-related cognitive decline often leading to inconclusive results due to small sample sizes or insufficient follow-up duration. The present study assesses the association between intake of EGb761® and cognitive function of elderly adults over a 20-year period. Methods and Findings The data were gathered from the prospective community-based cohort study ‘Paquid’. Within the study sample of 3612 non-demented participants aged 65 and over at baseline, three groups were compared: 589 subjects reporting use of EGb761® at at least one of the ten assessment visits, 149 subjects reporting use of piracetam at one of the assessment visits and 2874 subjects not reporting use of either EGb761® or piracetam. Decline on MMSE, verbal fluency and visual memory over the 20-year follow-up was analysed with a multivariate mixed linear effects model. A significant difference in MMSE decline over the 20-year follow-up was observed in the EGb761® and piracetam treatment groups compared to the ‘neither treatment’ group. These effects were in opposite directions: the EGb761® group declined less rapidly than the ‘neither treatment’ group, whereas the piracetam group declined more rapidly (β = −0.6). Regarding verbal fluency and visual memory, no difference was observed between the EGb761® group and the ‘neither treatment’ group (respectively, β = 0.21 and β = −0.03), whereas the piracetam group declined more rapidly (respectively, β = −1.40 and β = −0.44). When comparing the EGb761® and piracetam groups directly, a different decline was observed for the three tests (respectively β = −1.07, β = −1.61 and β = −0.41). Conclusion Cognitive decline in a non-demented elderly population was lower in subjects who reported using EGb761® than in

  3. Ginkgo biloba extract and long-term cognitive decline: a 20-year follow-up population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Amieva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have looked at the potential benefits of various nootropic drugs such as Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb761®; Tanakan® and piracetam (Nootropyl® on age-related cognitive decline often leading to inconclusive results due to small sample sizes or insufficient follow-up duration. The present study assesses the association between intake of EGb761® and cognitive function of elderly adults over a 20-year period. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The data were gathered from the prospective community-based cohort study 'Paquid'. Within the study sample of 3612 non-demented participants aged 65 and over at baseline, three groups were compared: 589 subjects reporting use of EGb761® at at least one of the ten assessment visits, 149 subjects reporting use of piracetam at one of the assessment visits and 2874 subjects not reporting use of either EGb761® or piracetam. Decline on MMSE, verbal fluency and visual memory over the 20-year follow-up was analysed with a multivariate mixed linear effects model. A significant difference in MMSE decline over the 20-year follow-up was observed in the EGb761® and piracetam treatment groups compared to the 'neither treatment' group. These effects were in opposite directions: the EGb761® group declined less rapidly than the 'neither treatment' group, whereas the piracetam group declined more rapidly (β = -0.6. Regarding verbal fluency and visual memory, no difference was observed between the EGb761® group and the 'neither treatment' group (respectively, β = 0.21 and β = -0.03, whereas the piracetam group declined more rapidly (respectively, β = -1.40 and β = -0.44. When comparing the EGb761® and piracetam groups directly, a different decline was observed for the three tests (respectively β = -1.07, β = -1.61 and β = -0.41. CONCLUSION: Cognitive decline in a non-demented elderly population was lower in subjects who reported using EGb761® than in those who did

  4. Caries decline before fluoride toothpaste was available: earlier and greater decline in the rural north than in southwestern Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, J M; Haugejorden, O

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors related to caries in 6-17-year-olds in 2 groups of Norwegian counties between 1966 and 1983. The average number of surfaces filled and permanent teeth extracted due to caries declined in the 4 northern counties from 1967. An increase was recorded in the 7 southwestern counties until 1971, then a decline. In the 1960s significantly more surfaces were filled and teeth extracted in the north compared to the southwest. Based on intra-county comparisons, the decline in surfaces treated was greater in the north between 1967 and 1983; 5.4 +/- 0.4 vs 3.7 +/- 0.7, P Higher infant mortality, lower percentage of people with completed senior secondary education, and more inhabitants per doctor and per dentist in the north indicate a less favorable situation than in the southwest. School-based fluoride programs had been implemented in both groups from the mid-1960s and around 60% participated when fluoride toothpaste became freely marketed in 1971. More fluoride programs and more fluoride tablets were available to children in the north; this may indicate a preventive attitude among dentists. The decline of caries started at different times in different parts of Norway. In the rural north with the most unfavorable situation, the decline was greater and started years before fluoride toothpaste came on to the market. The early decline may partly be ascribed to the school-based fluoride programs, the continued decline to several factors.

  5. Differential timing of C4 plant decline and grassland retreat during the penultimate deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Juan; Jia, Guodong; Li, Li; Wang, Pinxian

    2017-09-01

    Compound-specific stable carbon isotope composition of terrestrial leaf wax n-alkyl lipids (δ13Calk) was measured in sediments from the northern South China Sea (SCS), allowing assessment of vegetation change in the source area within the penultimate glacial cycle during 60-160 kyr. Our δ13Calk record suggested a prominent vegetation contrast between the glacial and the interglacial, with more C4 plant developing during the glaciation and a rapid decline during the glacial termination. This deglacial change in δ13Calk was attributed to an increase in humidity caused by the enhancement of the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM). However, the inferred deglacial C4 decline lagged by 4 kyr behind the grass retreat inferred from published pollen record. We argue that the time discrepancy in the two terrestrial plant proxies may have resulted from their differential responses to regional climate change, with grass community structure more sensitive to temperature rise and plant photosynthetic pathway more sensitive to humidity increase. Therefore, an earlier penultimate deglacial warming relative to humidity increase can be inferred from the lead of grass retreat relative to C4 decline, which implies that EASM may be delayed during the deglacial warming.

  6. Declining Segregation of Same-Sex Partners: Evidence from Census 2000 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Amy L

    2013-10-01

    Despite recent media and scholarly attention describing the "disappearance" of traditionally gay neighborhoods, urban scholars have yet to quantify the segregation of same-sex partners and determine whether declining segregation from different-sex partners is a wide-spread trend. Focusing on the 100 most populous places in the United States, I use data from the 2000 and 2010 Decennial Census to examine the segregation of same-sex partners over time and its place-level correlates. I estimate linear regression models to examine the role of four place characteristics in particular: average levels of education, aggregate trends in the family life cycle of same-sex partners, violence and social hostility motivated by sexual orientation bias, and representation of same-sex partners in the overall population. On average, same-sex partners were less segregated from different-sex partners in 2010 than in 2000, and the vast majority of same-sex partners lived in environments of declining segregation. Segregation was lower and declined more rapidly in places that had a greater percentage of graduate degree holders. In addition, segregation of female partners was lower in places that had a greater share of female partner households with children. These findings suggest that sexual orientation should be considered alongside economic status, race, and ethnicity as an important factor that contributes to neighborhood differentiation and urban spatial inequality.

  7. PRIMitive Asteroids Spectroscopic Survey - PRIMASS: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Julia; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Campins, Humberto; Lorenzi, Vania; Licandro, Javier; Morate, David; Tanga, Paolo; Cellino, Alberto; Delbo, Marco

    2015-11-01

    NASA OSIRIS-REx and JAXA Hayabusa 2 sample-return missions have targeted two near-Earth asteroids: (101955) Bennu and (162173) 1999 JU3, respectively. These are primitive asteroids that are believed to originate in the inner belt, where five distinct sources have been identified: four primitive collisional families (Polana, Erigone, Sulamitis, and Clarissa), and a population of low-albedo and low-inclination background asteroids. Identifying and characterizing the populations from which these two NEAs might originate will enchance the science return of the two missions.With this main objective in mind, we initiated in 2010 a spectroscopic survey in the visible and the near-infrared to characterize the primitive collisional families in the inner belt and the low-albedo background population. This is the PRIMitive Asteroids Spectroscopic Survey - PRIMASS. So far we have obtained more than 200 spectra using telescopes located at different observatories. PRIMASS uses a variety of ground based facilities. Most of the spectra have been obtained using the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), and the 3.6m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), both located at the El Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (La Palma, Spain), and the 3.0m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea (Hawai, USA).We present the first results from our on-going survey (de Leon et al. 2015; Pinilla-Alonso et al. 2015; Morate et al. 2015), focused on the Polana and the Erigone primitive families, with visible and near-infrared spectra of more than 200 objects, most of them with no previous spectroscopic data. Our survey is already the largest database of primitive asteroids spectra, and we keep obtaining data on the Sulamitis and the Clarissa families, as well as on the background low-albedo population.

  8. Enhancing forensic science with spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Camilla; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    This presentation outlines the research we are developing in the area of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging with the focus on materials of forensic interest. FTIR spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a powerful tool for characterisation of heterogeneous materials. FTIR imaging relies on the ability of the military-developed infrared array detector to simultaneously measure spectra from thousands of different locations in a sample. Recently developed application of FTIR imaging using an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) mode has demonstrated the ability of this method to achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of infrared light in air. Chemical visualisation with enhanced spatial resolution in micro-ATR mode broadens the range of materials studied with FTIR imaging with applications to pharmaceutical formulations or biological samples. Macro-ATR imaging has also been developed for chemical imaging analysis of large surface area samples and was applied to analyse the surface of human skin (e.g. finger), counterfeit tablets, textile materials (clothing), etc. This approach demonstrated the ability of this imaging method to detect trace materials attached to the surface of the skin. This may also prove as a valuable tool in detection of traces of explosives left or trapped on the surfaces of different materials. This FTIR imaging method is substantially superior to many of the other imaging methods due to inherent chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy and fast acquisition times of this technique. Our preliminary data demonstrated that this methodology will provide the means to non-destructive detection method that could relate evidence to its source. This will be important in a wider crime prevention programme. In summary, intrinsic chemical specificity and enhanced visualising capability of FTIR spectroscopic imaging open a window of opportunities for counter-terrorism and crime-fighting, with applications ranging

  9. Diode pumped solid-state laser oscillators for spectroscopic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, R. L.; Basu, S.; Fan, T. Y.; Kozlovsky, W. J.; Nabors, C. D.; Nilsson, A.; Huber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The rapid improvement in diode laser pump sources has led to the recent progress in diode laser pumped solid state lasers. To date, electrical efficiencies of greater than 10 percent were demonstrated. As diode laser costs decrease with increased production volume, diode laser and diode laser array pumped solid state lasers will replace the traditional flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser sources. The use of laser diode array pumping of slab geometry lasers will allow efficient, high peak and average power solid state laser sources to be developed. Perhaps the greatest impact of diode laser pumped solid state lasers will be in spectroscopic applications of miniature, monolithic devices. Single-stripe diode-pumped operation of a continuous-wave 946 nm Nd:YAG laser with less than 10 m/w threshold was demonstrated. A slope efficiency of 16 percent near threshold was shown with a projected slope efficiency well above a threshold of 34 percent based on results under Rhodamine 6G dye-laser pumping. Nonlinear crystals for second-harmonic generation of this source were evaluated. The KNbO3 and periodically poled LiNbO3 appear to be the most promising.

  10. Spectroscopic amplitudes and microscopic substructure effects in nucleon capture reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, J; Sherif, H S; Escher, Jutta; Jennings, Byron K.; Sherif, Helmy S.

    2001-01-01

    Spectroscopic amplitudes play an important role in nuclear capture reactions. These amplitudes are shown to include both single-particle and polarization effects: the former through their spatial dependence and the latter through their normalization (the spectroscopic factors). Coupled-channels equations are developed for the spectroscopic amplitudes. These equations serve as a convenient starting point for the derivation of several approximations: Hartree, Hartree-Fock and two different single-particle models. The single-particle models include antisymmetry in different ways, but both miss many-body effects. Therefore, cross sections calculated with either of these models need to be multiplied by the spectroscopic factor.

  11. Declining amphibian populations: a global phenomenon in conservation biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardner, T.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the recent reductions in the Earth's biodiversity can be attributed to direct human impacts on the environment. An increasing number of studies over the last decade have reported declines in amphibian populations in areas of pristine habitat. Such reports suggest the role of indirect factors and a global effect of human activities on natural systems. Declines in amphibian populations bear significant implications for the functioning of many terrestrial ecosystems, and may signify important implications for human welfare. A wide range of candidates have been proposed to explain amphibian population declines. However, it seems likely that the relevance of each factor is dependent upon the habitat type and species in question, and that complex synergistic effects between a number of environmental factors is of critical importance. Monitoring of amphibian populations to assess the extent and cause of declines is confounded by a number of ecological and methodological limitations.

  12. When can the cause of a population decline be determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefley, Trevor J.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Drake, John M.; Russell, Robin E.; Walsh, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Inferring the factors responsible for declines in abundance is a prerequisite to preventing the extinction of wild populations. Many of the policies and programmes intended to prevent extinctions operate on the assumption that the factors driving the decline of a population can be determined. Exogenous factors that cause declines in abundance can be statistically confounded with endogenous factors such as density dependence. To demonstrate the potential for confounding, we used an experiment where replicated populations were driven to extinction by gradually manipulating habitat quality. In many of the replicated populations, habitat quality and density dependence were confounded, which obscured causal inference. Our results show that confounding is likely to occur when the exogenous factors that are driving the decline change gradually over time. Our study has direct implications for wild populations, because many factors that could drive a population to extinction change gradually through time.

  13. Neighborhood Decline and the Economic Crisis (discussion paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, M.D.; Bolt, G.; Van Ham, M.; Van Kempen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Neighborhood decline is a complex and multidimensional process. National and regional variation in economic and political structures (including variety in national welfare state arrangements), combined with differences in neighborhood history, development and population composition, makes it

  14. U.S. Cancer Deaths Decline Over Three Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163212.html U.S. Cancer Deaths Decline Over Three Decades But clusters ... Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More Health ...

  15. Where Medical Pot Is Legal, Fatal Car Crashes Often Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 162675.html Where Medical Pot Is Legal, Fatal Car Crashes Often Decline It's possible that these state ... and Human Services. More Health News on: Marijuana Motor Vehicle Safety Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health ...

  16. Episodic Memory Decline in Huntington's Disease, A Binding Deficit?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Haj, M.; Caillaud, M.; Fasotti, L.; Verny, C.; Allain, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by episodic memory deterioration. Objective: Our paper investigates the cognitive mechanisms that might underlie this decline. To this aim, we tested two executive hypotheses, the binding and the inhibition hypotheses. Methods: Fifteen HD patien

  17. ALIEN SPECIES: THEIR ROLE IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES AND RESTORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alien species (also referred to as exotic, invasive, introduced, or normative species) have been implicated as causal agents in population declines of many amphibian species. Herein, we evaluate the relative contributions of alien species and other factors in adversely affecting ...

  18. Molecular survey of the Texas Phoenix decline phytoplasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    symptoms of Texas Phoenix decline (TPD) in West Central Florida. The IGS region was .... DNA from a healthy plant, and a water control (no DNA template). The PCR .... supplement sequencing data which may be subject to sequencing errors.

  19. Longitudinal Decline in Lung Function Measurements among Saskatchewan Grain Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punam Pahwa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between the long term effects of grain dust and decline in lung function among grain elevator workers in Saskatchewan, studied over a 15-year period.

  20. UV Spectroscopic Indices of Galactic Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Hernández, J.; Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Bressan, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present the calculation of a set of 12 mid-ultraviolet (1900-3200 Å) spectroscopic indices for a sample of 15 galactic globular clusters (GGC) observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). We explore the dependence of the indices on age and metal abundance. We found that five indices (BL 2538, Fe II 2609, Mg II 2800, Mg I 2852 and Mg Wide) display a remarkably good correlation with [Fe/H]. With respect to age, only one index (BL 2740) shows a good correlation. Results from theoretical simple stellar populations well reproduce the global trends of indices vs. [Fe/H].

  1. Spectroscopic detection and characterisation of planetary atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier Cameron A.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Space based broadband infrared observations of close orbiting extrasolar giant planets at transit and secondary eclipse have proved a successful means of determining atmospheric spectral energy distributions and molecular composition. Here, a ground-based spectroscopic technique to detect and characterise planetary atmospheres is presented. Since the planet need not be transiting, this method enables a greater sample of systems to be studied. By modelling the planetary signature as a function of phase, high resolution spectroscopy has the potential to recover the signature of molecules in planetary atmospheres.

  2. Spectroscopic observation of 5 SN candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias-Rosa, N.; Pursimo, T.; Korhonen, H.; Pastorello, A.; Derlopa, the NEON school PhD students S.; Marian, V.; Scognamiglio, D.; Szigeti, L.; Cabezas, M.; Fernandes, C. S.; McWhirter, P. R.; Zervas, K.

    2017-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of SNe 2017gla, 2017glz, 2017gop, and 2017gqq, and the verification of SN2017gmr. The targets were supplied by the following surveys: ATLAS survey, see Tonry et al. (2011, PASP, 123, 58) and Tonry et al. (ATel #8680); Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (Chambers et al. 2016, arXiv:1612.05560, and http://pswww.ifa.hawaii.edu ), the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/ ); and the D The observations were performed with the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope equipped with ALFOSC (range 350-950 nm; resolution 1.4 nm FWHM).

  3. Spectroscopic diagnostics of tritium recycling in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.H.; Stotler, D.P.; Adler, H.; Ramsey, A.T.

    1995-03-01

    The authors present the first spectroscopic measurements of tritium Balmer-alpha (T{sub {alpha}}) emission from a fusion plasma. A Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to measure the H{sub {alpha}}, D{sub {alpha}}, T{sub {alpha}} spectrum in the current D-T a experimental campaign on TFTR and the contributions of H, D and T are separated by spectral analysis. The T{sub {alpha}} line was measurable at concentrations T{sub {alpha}}/(H{sub {alpha}} + D{sub {alpha}} + T{sub {alpha}}) down to 2%.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of star forming regions

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the results of studies of star forming regions, carried out at the Konkoly Observatory in the last two decades. The studies involved distance determination of star-forming dark clouds, search for candidate pre-main sequence stars, and determination of the masses and ages of the candidates by spectroscopic follow-up observations. The results expanded the list of the well-studied star forming regions in our galactic environment. Data obtained by this manner may be useful in a...

  5. Hospital marketing: strategy reassessment in a declining market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doren, D C; Spielman, A P

    1989-03-01

    Despite continued significant increases in the nation's spending for health care, use of inpatient hospital services has declined. The authors use the product life cycle to analyze the market for inpatient hospital services and to examine competitive strategies for hospital marketing success. The product life cycle literature suggests at least four strategies for products in decline. The authors analyze the advantages and disadvantages of these strategies as they relate to the hospital market.

  6. The Soviet economic decline : historical and republican data

    OpenAIRE

    Easterly, William; Fischer, Stanley; DEC

    1994-01-01

    Soviet growth for 1960-89 was the worst in the world, after controlling for investment and human capital. And relative performance worsens over time. The authors explain the declining Soviet growth rate from 1950 to 1987 by the declining marginal product of capital. The rate of total factor productivity growth is roughly constant over that period. Although the Soviet slowdown has conventionally been attributed to extensive growth (rising capital-to-output ratios), extensive growth is also a f...

  7. The Soviet Economic Decline: Historical and Republican Data

    OpenAIRE

    William Easterly; Stanley Fischer

    1994-01-01

    Soviet growth over 1960-89 was the worst in the world after we control for investment and human capital; the relative performance worsens over time. The declining Soviet growth rate over 1950-87 is explained by the declining marginal product of capital; the rate of TFP growth is roughly constant over that period. While the Soviet slowdown has conventionally been attributed to extensive growth (rising capital to output ratios), extensive growth is also a feature of market-oriented economies li...

  8. Wild Pigs: inciting factor in southern pine decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori G. Eckhardt; Roger D. Menard; Stephen S. Ditchkoff

    2016-01-01

    During an investigation into southern pine decline at Fort Benning Georgia, the possibility of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) as an inciting factor became evident. Their rooting activity caused significant root damage on sites showing symptoms of pine decline. It was thought that perhaps the pigs may be moving around pathogenic fungi during their rooting activity in Pinus...

  9. The historical decline of fertility in Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leasure, J W

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative data from the Princeton European Fertility Project were used to explain the determinants of change in attitudes which lead to use of birth control within marriage and fertility decline in terms of the growth of autonomy over one's political, personal, religious, economic, and reproductive life. The following countries, which are arranged by their chronological order of marital fertility decline, were used in the primarily quantitative analysis: Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Greece, Yugoslavia, Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, and Albania. Prior research had identified an association between a decline in the birth rate and the presence of revolutions nationalist independence movements, or democratic reform movements. The connection is that once control over one's political and economic destiny is made, there is an extension into one's reproductive behavior. Further refinement has occurred. Autonomy is grounded in reason, the natural rights of individuals, and independence of thought. Reflective of this autonomous spirit were affiliations with Congregational, Presbyterian, Quaker, Unitarian, and Universalist religions. The present analysis is historical and describes the events surrounding the decline in marital fertility. These events might have preceded, been concurrent with, or followed the decline, but the thesis remains that the growth in autonomy contributes to political changes and fertility decline. The primary measure of fertility is Ig developed by Coale, and sustained decline maps of Coale and Watkins. Crude birth rate and total fertility rate were also used. the provincial analysis was impeded by lack of long time series for some countries and boundary changes. The hypothesis is generally supported, except in the case of Yugoslavia which varies too much. Support for the thesis was stronger in some countries than in others. Sustained decline occurred by each country in different periods, e.g., in Hungary it began between 1850-60 while in Albania it began

  10. Economic reasons behind the decline of the Ottoman empire

    OpenAIRE

    Duranoglu, Erkut; Okutucu, Guzide

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses the economic reasons of the decline and fall of the Ottoman Empire. On the contrary to the previous researches, by undertaking both global and domestic developments, the paper examines the decline of the empire from an economical point of perspective. Although international developments such as industrialization in European countries, pressure on the Ottomans in terms of integrating with the world economy, global economic factors like depressions and war...

  11. The Dynamics of Son Preference, Technology Diffusion, and Fertility Decline Underlying Distorted Sex Ratios at Birth: A Simulation Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Ridhi; Villavicencio, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    We present a micro-founded simulation model that formalizes the "ready, willing, and able" framework, originally used to explain historical fertility decline, to the practice of prenatal sex selection. The model generates sex ratio at birth (SRB) distortions from the bottom up and attempts to quantify plausible levels, trends, and interactions of son preference, technology diffusion, and fertility decline that underpin SRB trajectories at the macro level. Calibrating our model for South Korea, we show how even as the proportion with a preference for sons was declining, SRB distortions emerged due to rapid diffusion of prenatal sex determination technology combined with small but growing propensities to abort at low birth parities. Simulations reveal that relatively low levels of son preference (about 20 % to 30 % wanting one son) can result in skewed SRB levels if technology diffuses early and steadily, and if fertility falls rapidly to encourage sex-selective abortion at low parities. Model sensitivity analysis highlights how the shape of sex ratio trajectories is particularly sensitive to the timing and speed of prenatal sex-determination technology diffusion. The maximum SRB levels reached in a population are influenced by how the readiness to abort rises as a function of the fertility decline.

  12. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  13. Autobiographical memory decline in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL HAJ, Mohamad; Antoine, Pascal; Nandrino, Jean-Louis; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Autobiographical memory, or memory for personal experiences, allows individuals to define themselves and construct a meaningful life story. Decline of this ability, as observed in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), results in an impaired sense of self and identity. We present a critical review of theories and findings regarding cognitive and neuroanatomical underpinnings of autobiographical memory and its decline in AD and highlight studies on its clinical rehabilitation. We propose that autobiographical recall in AD is mainly characterized by loss of associated episodic information, which leads to de-contextualisation of autobiographical memories and a shift from reliving past events to a general sense of familiarity. This decline refers to retrograde, but also anterograde amnesia that affects newly acquired memories besides remote ones. One consequence of autobiographical memory decline in AD is decreased access to memories that shape self-consciousness, self-knowledge, and self-images, leading to a diminished sense of self and identity. The link between autobiographical decline and compromised sense of self in AD can also manifest itself as low correspondence and coherence between past memories and current goals and beliefs. By linking cognitive, neuroanatomical, and clinical aspects of autobiographical decline in AD, our review provides a theoretical foundation, which may lead to better rehabilitation strategies. PMID:26876367

  14. The cause of global amphibian declines: a developmental endocrinologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, T B; Falso, P; Gallipeau, S; Stice, M

    2010-03-15

    Greater than 70% of the world's amphibian species are in decline. We propose that there is probably not a single cause for global amphibian declines and present a three-tiered hierarchical approach that addresses interactions among and between ultimate and proximate factors that contribute to amphibian declines. There are two immediate (proximate) causes of amphibian declines: death and decreased recruitment (reproductive failure). Although much attention has focused on death, few studies have addressed factors that contribute to declines as a result of failed recruitment. Further, a great deal of attention has focused on the role of pathogens in inducing diseases that cause death, but we suggest that pathogen success is profoundly affected by four other ultimate factors: atmospheric change, environmental pollutants, habitat modification and invasive species. Environmental pollutants arise as likely important factors in amphibian declines because they have realized potential to affect recruitment. Further, many studies have documented immunosuppressive effects of pesticides, suggesting a role for environmental contaminants in increased pathogen virulence and disease rates. Increased attention to recruitment and ultimate factors that interact with pathogens is important in addressing this global crisis.

  15. Minimal models of growth and decline of microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juška, Alfonsas

    2011-01-21

    Dynamics of growth and decline of microbial populations were analysed and respective models were developed in this investigation. Analysis of the dynamics was based on general considerations concerning the main properties of microorganisms and their interactions with the environment which was supposed to be affected by the activity of the population. Those considerations were expressed mathematically by differential equations or systems of the equations containing minimal sets of parameters characterizing those properties. It has been found that: (1) the factors leading to the decline of the population have to be considered separately, namely, accumulation of metabolites (toxins) in the medium and the exhaustion of resources; the latter have to be separated again into renewable ('building materials') and non-renewable (sources of energy); (2) decline of the population is caused by the exhaustion of sources of energy but no decline is predicted by the model because of the exhaustion of renewable resources; (3) the model determined by the accumulation of metabolites (toxins) in the medium does not suggest the existence of a separate 'stationary phase'; (4) in the model determined by the exhaustion of energy resources the 'stationary' and 'decline' phases are quite discernible; and (5) there is no symmetry in microbial population dynamics, the decline being slower than the rise. Mathematical models are expected to be useful in getting insight into the process of control of the dynamics of microbial populations. The models are in agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Trajectory of Mobility Decline by Type of Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolea, Magdalena I; Morris, John C; Galvin, James E

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive and physical aspects of functionality are closely related. However, whether physical decline differs by dementia type and progression rate is debatable. To address these issues, we conducted a longitudinal study of 766 older adults whose physical performance and cognitive status were assessed annually with standard assessment tools [eg, Physical Performance Test, Clinical Dementia Rate (CDR)] for 8 years. Compared with participants who remained cognitively normal, those progressing to later-stage dementia (CDR=1) declined in their mobility by a factor of 2.82 (Pdementia (slope=-1.20, Pdementia (slope=-0.39, P=0.038) suggesting a steeper physical decline with dementia progression, particularly in those with the fastest disease progression. Although all types of dementia experienced mobility decline, those progressing to non-Alzheimer disease (AD) dementias, especially vascular dementia declined faster than those who remained normal (slope=-2.70, Pdementia patients particularly those with non-AD subtypes should be targeted for interventions to maintain or improve gait/balance and prevent functional decline and disability although AD patients may also benefit.

  17. Association of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease with Cognitive Decline in Very Elderly Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Zhou

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the change in cognitive function in very elderly men with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD over a 3-year period relative to age- and education-matched controls. Methods: In this hospital-based, prospective case-control study, we evaluated a consecutive series of 110 very elderly men with COPD and 110 control subjects who were hospitalized between January and December 2007. All the subjects performed cognitive tests at baseline and underwent annual evaluations (for 3 years, which included the Mini-Mental State Examination, word list recall, delayed recall, animal category fluency, and the symbol digit modalities test. Results: In mixed-effects models adjusted for hypertension and coronary heart disease, COPD was associated with a more rapid rate of cognitive decline based on the Mini-Mental State Examination, word list recall, delayed recall, animal category fluency, and the symbol digit modalities test (all p Conclusion: COPD is associated with a more rapid rate of cognitive decline in very elderly persons.

  18. Do pathogens become more virulent as they spread? Evidence from the amphibian declines in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Ben L; Puschendorf, Robert

    2013-09-01

    The virulence of a pathogen can vary strongly through time. While cyclical variation in virulence is regularly observed, directional shifts in virulence are less commonly observed and are typically associated with decreasing virulence of biological control agents through coevolution. It is increasingly appreciated, however, that spatial effects can lead to evolutionary trajectories that differ from standard expectations. One such possibility is that, as a pathogen spreads through a naive host population, its virulence increases on the invasion front. In Central America, there is compelling evidence for the recent spread of pathogenic Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and for its strong impact on amphibian populations. Here, we re-examine data on Bd prevalence and amphibian population decline across 13 sites from southern Mexico through Central America, and show that, in the initial phases of the Bd invasion, amphibian population decline lagged approximately 9 years behind the arrival of the pathogen, but that this lag diminished markedly over time. In total, our analysis suggests an increase in Bd virulence as it spread southwards, a pattern consistent with rapid evolution of increased virulence on Bd's invading front. The impact of Bd on amphibians might therefore be driven by rapid evolution in addition to more proximate environmental drivers.

  19. Testing The Cas A Neutron Star Temperature Decline With Other Chandra Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshamouty, Khaled; Heinke, C. O.; Ho, W. C. G.; Patnaude, D. J.; Shternin, P. S.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    The neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant is 330 years old, making it the youngest neutron star in the Milky Way. Heinke & Ho (2010) reported a rapid cooling drop of 4% in its surface temperature (21% drop in observed flux) from Chandra ACIS-S archival data between 2000 and 2009. This opened the suggestion of enhanced neutrino emission due to a superfluid transition in the core to account for the observed rapid cooling (Page et al. 2011, Shternin et al. 2011). Here we present analysis of archival Chandra ACIS-I, HRC-I and HRC-S data over the same time period to test the rate. We used the best ACIS-S carbon atmosphere spectral fits to infer the countrates corresponding to various temperatures, along with current (CALDB 4.4.6) estimates of the effective area and its changes over time for these cameras, to calculate the temperature drops in each instrument. We find that the HRC-I data are consistent with the ACIS-S result, though tending to smaller declines. The ACIS-I data suggest a slightly larger drop. The HRC-S data (with the longest exposures) indicate a marginal temperature decline of 0.9+0.7-0.7 % (90% conf.) over 9 years.

  20. Declining trends in prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection by birth-year in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Miki; Ito, Hidemi; Hosono, Satoyo; Oze, Isao; Ashida, Chieko; Tajima, Kazuo; Katoh, Hisato; Matsuo, Keitaro; Tanaka, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    Gastric cancer incidence and mortality have been decreasing in Japan. These decreases are likely due to a decrease in prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Our aim was to characterize the trends in prevalence of H. pylori infection focused on birth-year. We carried out a cross-sectional study that included 4285 subjects who were born from 1926 to 1989. We defined H. pylori infection by the serum H. pylori antibody titer. Individuals having H. pylori infection and those with negative H. pylori antibody titer and positive pepsinogen test were defined as high-risk individuals for gastric cancer. We estimated the birth-year percent change (BPC) of the prevalence by Joinpoint regression analysis. The prevalence of H. pylori infection among the subjects born from 1927 to 1949 decreased from 54.0% to 42.0% with a BPC of -1.2%. It was followed by a rapid decline in those born between 1949 (42.0%) and 1961 (24.0%) with a BPC of -4.5%, which was followed by those born between 1961 (24.0%) and 1988 (14.0%) with a BPC of -2.1%. The proportion of high-risk individuals for gastric cancer among the subjects born from 1927 to 1942 decreased from 62.0% to 55.0% with a BPC of -0.8%. A subsequent rapid declining trend was observed in those born between 1942 (55.0%) and 1972 (18.0%) with a BPC of -3.6%, and then it became stable. These remarkable declining trends in the prevalence of H. pylori infection by birth-year would be useful to predict the future trend in gastric cancer incidence in Japan.

  1. Hydropower RAPID Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-01

    This fact sheet provides a brief overview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydropower Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit including its capabilities, features, and benefits.

  2. SAP Sector Develops Rapidly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Chengwang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stable demand growth internationally Super absorbent polymers (SAP) feature high water absorption, high water retention, rapid water absorption, great expanding power,strong thickening, strong anchoring and excellent elasticity.

  3. Rapid Lead Screening Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vitro Diagnostics Tests Used In Clinical Care Rapid Lead Screening Test Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... reducing the need for a follow-up visit. Lead Risk Links Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( ...

  4. Trophic cascades following the disease-induced decline of an apex predator, the Tasmanian devil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollings, Tracey; Jones, Menna; Mooney, Nick; McCallum, Hamish

    2014-02-01

    As apex predators disappear worldwide, there is escalating evidence of their importance in maintaining the integrity and diversity of the ecosystems they inhabit. The largest extant marsupial carnivore, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is threatened with extinction from a transmissible cancer, devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). The disease, first observed in 1996, has led to apparent population declines in excess of 95% in some areas and has spread to more than 80% of their range. We analyzed a long-term Tasmania-wide data set derived from wildlife spotlighting surveys to assess the effects of DFTD-induced devil decline on populations of other mammals and to examine the relative strength of top-down and bottom-up control of mesopredators between 2 regions with different environmental conditions. Collection of the data began >10 years before DFTD was first observed. A decrease in devil populations was immediate across diseased regions following DFTD arrival, and there has been no indication of population recovery. Feral cats (Felis catus) increased in areas where the disease was present the longest, and feral cat occurrence was significantly and negatively associated with devils. The smallest mesopredator, the eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus), declined rapidly following DFTD arrival. This result suggests the species was indirectly protected by devils through the suppression of larger predators. Rainfall deficiency was also a significant predictor of their decline. Environmental variables determined the relative importance of top-down control in the population regulation of mesopredators. In landscapes of low rainfall and relatively higher proportions of agriculture and human settlement, top-down forces were dampened and bottom-up forces had the most effect on mesopredators. For herbivore prey species, there was evidence of population differences after DFTD arrival, but undetected environmental factors had greater effects. The unique opportunity to

  5. Amyloid is linked to cognitive decline in patients with Parkinson disease without dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomperts, Stephen N.; Locascio, Joseph J.; Rentz, Dorene; Santarlasci, Andrea; Marquie, Marta; Johnson, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine whether amyloid burden, as indexed by Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) retention, identifies patients with Parkinson disease with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) compared to those with normal cognition (PD-nl). A related aim is to determine whether amyloid burden predicts cognitive decline in a cohort of subjects with PD without dementia. Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we examined 46 subjects with PD without dementia, of whom 35 had normal cognition and 11 met criteria for PD-MCI at study baseline. All subjects underwent standardized neurologic and neuropsychological examinations and PiB PET at baseline, and clinical examinations were conducted annually for up to 5 years. Results: At baseline, precuneus PiB retention did not distinguish PD-MCI from PD-nl. Subjects with PD-MCI declined more rapidly than PD-nl subjects on cognitive tests of memory, executive function, and activation retrieval. Of the 35 PD-nl subjects, 8 progressed to PD-MCI and 1 to dementia; of the 11 PD-MCI subjects, 5 converted to dementia. Both higher PiB retention and a diagnosis of PD-MCI predicted a greater hazard of conversion to a more severe diagnosis. Baseline PiB retention predicted worsening in executive function over time. The APOE ε4 allele also related to worsening in executive function, as well as visuospatial function, activation retrieval, and performance on the Mini-Mental State Examination. In contrast to its relation to cognitive decline, PiB retention did not affect progression of motor impairment. Conclusions: At baseline measurements, amyloid burden does not distinguish between cognitively impaired and unimpaired subjects with PD without dementia, but our data suggest that amyloid contributes to cognitive, but not motor, decline over time. PMID:23243071

  6. Unusual forest growth decline in boreal North America covaries with the retreat of Arctic sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardin, Martin P; Guo, Xiao Jing; De Jong, Rogier; Kinnard, Christophe; Bernier, Pierre; Raulier, Frédéric

    2014-03-01

    The 20th century was a pivotal period at high northern latitudes as it marked the onset of rapid climatic warming brought on by major anthropogenic changes in global atmospheric composition. In parallel, Arctic sea ice extent has been decreasing over the period of available satellite data records. Here, we document how these changes influenced vegetation productivity in adjacent eastern boreal North America. To do this, we used normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data, model simulations of net primary productivity (NPP) and tree-ring width measurements covering the last 300 years. Climatic and proxy-climatic data sets were used to explore the relationships between vegetation productivity and Arctic sea ice concentration and extent, and temperatures. Results indicate that an unusually large number of black spruce (Picea mariana) trees entered into a period of growth decline during the late-20th century (62% of sampled trees; n = 724 cross sections of age >70 years). This finding is coherent with evidence encoded in NDVI and simulated NPP data. Analyses of climatic and vegetation productivity relationships indicate that the influence of recent climatic changes in the studied forests has been via the enhanced moisture stress (i.e. greater water demands) and autotrophic respiration amplified by the declining sea ice concentration in Hudson Bay and Hudson Strait. The recent decline strongly contrasts with other growth reduction events that occurred during the 19th century, which were associated with cooling and high sea ice severity. The recent decline of vegetation productivity is the first one to occur under circumstances related to excess heat in a 300-year period, and further culminates with an intensifying wildfire regime in the region. Our results concur with observations from other forest ecosystems about intensifying temperature-driven drought stress and tree mortality with ongoing climatic changes.

  7. [A decline in the French demographic situation in the context of a Europe also in demographic decline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calot, G

    1994-01-01

    The author analyzes the decline in French fertility which has occurred over the past two years using data from official sources. Some comparisons are made with fertility trends in other European countries.

  8. Grating Spectroscopes and How to Use Them

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Ken M

    2012-01-01

    Transmission grating spectroscopes look like simple filters and are designed to screw into place on the eyepiece tube of a telescope for visual use, or into a camera adapter for digicam or CCD imaging. They are relatively inexpensive and by far the easiest type of astronomical spectroscope to use, and so are the starting point for most beginners. Using the most popular commercially made filter gratings - from Rainbow Optics in the United States to Star Analyser in the United Kingdon - as examples, the book provides all the information needed to set up and use the grating to obtain stellar spectra. It also presents methods of analyzing the results. No heavy mathematics or formulas are involved, although a reasonable level of proficiency in using an astronomic telescope and, if relevant, imaging camera, is assumed. This book contains many practical hints and tips - something that is almost essential to success when starting out. It encourages new users to get quick results, and by following the worked examples,...

  9. Science capabilities of the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devost, Daniel; McConnachie, Alan; Flagey, Nicolas; Cote, Patrick; Balogh, Michael; Driver, Simon P.; Venn, Kim

    2017-01-01

    The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE) project will transform the CFHT 3.6m optical telescope into a 10m class dedicated multiobject spectroscopic facility, with an ability to simultaneously measure thousands of objects with a spectral resolution range spanning 2,000 to 20,000. The project is currently in design phase, with full science operations nominally starting in 2025. MSE will enable transformational science in areas as diverse as exoplanetary host characterization; stellar monitoring campaigns; tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of the distant Galaxy; connecting galaxies to the large scale structure of the Universe; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, eROSITA, SKA, and WFIRST, and is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT. I will give an update on the status of the project and review some of the most exciting scientific capabilities of the observatory.

  10. Exploring the spectroscopic properties of relic radiogalaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Capetti, Alessandro; Baldi, Ranieri D; Buttiglione, Sara; Axon, David J; Celotti, Annalisa; Chiaberge, Marco

    2013-01-01

    From an optical spectroscopic survey of 3CR radiogalaxies (RGs) with z<0.3, we discovered three objects characterized by an extremely low level of gas excitation and a large deficit of line emission with respect to RGs of similar radio luminosity. We interpreted these objects as relic active galactic nuclei (AGN), i.e., sources observed after a large drop in their nuclear activity. We here present new spectroscopic observations for these three galaxies and for a group of "candidate" relics. None of the candidates can be convincingly confirmed. From the new data for the three relics, we estimate the density of the line-emitting gas. This enables us to explore the temporal evolution of the line ratios after the AGN "death". The characteristic timescale is the light-crossing time of the emission line region, a few thousand years, too short to correspond to a substantial population of relic RGs. Additional mechanisms of gas ionization, such as "relic shocks" from their past high power phase or stellar sources,...

  11. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging: The Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging seemingly matured as a technology in the mid-2000s, with commercially successful instrumentation and reports in numerous applications. Recent developments, however, have transformed our understanding of the recorded data, provided capability for new instrumentation, and greatly enhanced the ability to extract more useful information in less time. These developments are summarized here in three broad areas— data recording, interpretation of recorded data, and information extraction—and their critical review is employed to project emerging trends. Overall, the convergence of selected components from hardware, theory, algorithms, and applications is one trend. Instead of similar, general-purpose instrumentation, another trend is likely to be diverse and application-targeted designs of instrumentation driven by emerging component technologies. The recent renaissance in both fundamental science and instrumentation will likely spur investigations at the confluence of conventional spectroscopic analyses and optical physics for improved data interpretation. While chemometrics has dominated data processing, a trend will likely lie in the development of signal processing algorithms to optimally extract spectral and spatial information prior to conventional chemometric analyses. Finally, the sum of these recent advances is likely to provide unprecedented capability in measurement and scientific insight, which will present new opportunities for the applied spectroscopist. PMID:23031693

  12. Spectroscopic investigations of carious tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thareja, R K; Sharma, A K; Shukla, Shobha

    2008-11-01

    We report on the elemental composition of healthy and infected part of human tooth using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). We have used prominent constituent transitions in laser-excited tooth to diagnose the state of the tooth. A nanosecond laser pulse (355nm, 5ns) was used as an ablating pulse and the sodium (3s2S-3p2P) at 588.99 and (3s2S-3p2P) at 589.99nm, strontium (5s21S-1s5P) at 460.55nm, and calcium (3d3D-4f 3F0) at 452.55nm transitions for spectroscopic analysis. The spectroscopic observations in conjunction with discriminate analysis showed that calcium attached to the hydroxyapatite structure of the tooth was affected severely at the infected part of the tooth. The position-time plots generated from two-dimensional (2D) images conclusively showed a decrease in calcium concentration in the infected region of the irradiated tooth. Using the technique, we could distinguish between the healthy and carious parts of the tooth with significant accuracy.

  13. The HITRAN 2004 molecular spectroscopic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, L.S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)]. E-mail: lrothman@cfa.harvard.edu; Jacquemart, D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Barbe, A. [Universite de Reims-Champagne-Ardenne, Groupe de Spectrometrie Moleculaire et Atmospherique, 51062 Reims (France)] (and others)

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2004 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are unresolvable; individual line parameters and absorption cross-sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols; tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for 39 molecules including many of their isotopologues. The format of the section of the database on individual line parameters of HITRAN has undergone the most extensive enhancement in almost two decades. It now lists the Einstein A-coefficients, statistical weights of the upper and lower levels of the transitions, a better system for the representation of quantum identifications, and enhanced referencing and uncertainty codes. In addition, there is a provision for making corrections to the broadening of line transitions due to line mixing.

  14. The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer: Science and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, A.; McConnachie, A.; MSE Team

    2016-10-01

    MSE is a project to replace the current 3.6 m CFHT with a 10 m class, segmented, wide-field telescope that will feed a dedicated suite of multi-object spectrographs, operating at resolutions from R˜2000 to R>20000, and obtaining >3000 spectra per pointing (>> 5 million spectra/yr). It will use much of the existing infrastructure of the current CFHT, including the pier, and will closely approximate the envelope of the existing facility. MSE will be the only fully dedicated, 10 m class, wide-field spectroscopic telescope at first light in ˜ 2025. It will fill arguably the single biggest "missing link" in the international network of astronomical facilities. At optical wavelengths, LSST, WFIRST, Euclid, and Gaia will identify many millions of astrophysically interesting targets that otherwise lack the dedicated, large aperture, spectroscopic followup facilities required to probe their chemodynamical properties. Elsewhere, SKA, eRosita and others will provide a revolution in our understanding of the multiwavelength Universe. Among this capability, MSE will be an essential tool by providing the optical data that will otherwise be chronically absent.

  15. A Spectroscopic Study of Kepler Asteroseismic Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Latham, D W; Jerzykiewicz, M

    2009-01-01

    Reported are spectroscopic observations of 15 candidates for Kepler primary asteroseismic targets and 14 other stars in the Kepler field, carried out at three observatories (see the footnote). For all these stars, the radial velocities, effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and the projected rotational velocity are derived from two separate sets of data by means of two independent methods. In addition, MK type is estimated from one of these sets of data. Three stars, HIP 94335, HIP 94734, and HIP 94743, are found to have variable radial-velocity. For HIP 94335 = FL Lyr, a well-known Algol-type eclipsing variable and a double-lined spectroscopic binary, the orbital elements computed from our data agree closely with those of Popper et al. For HIP 94734 and HIP 94743 = V2077 Cyg, which we discover to be single-lined systems, orbital elements are derived. In addition, from our value of the orbital period and the Hipparcos epoch photometry, HIP 94743 is demonstrated to be a detached eclipsing binary...

  16. Spectroscopic Instrumentation in Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovici, Dominic; Mutel, Robert Lucien; Lang, Cornelia C.

    2017-01-01

    We have designed and built two spectrographs for use in undergraduate astronomy laboratories at the University of Iowa. The first, a low cost (appx. $500) low resolution (R ~ 150 - 300) grating-prism (grism) spectrometer consists of five optical elements and is easily modified to other telescope optics. The grism spectrometer is designed to be used in a modified filter wheel. This type of spectrometer allows students to undertake projects requiring sensitive spectral measurements, such as determining the redshifts of quasars. The second instrument is a high resolution (R ~ 8000), moderate cost (appx. $5000) fiber fed echelle spectrometer. The echelle spectrometer will allow students to conduct Doppler measurements such as those used to study spectroscopic binaries. Both systems are designed to be used with robotic telescope systems. The availability of 3D printing enables both of these spectrographs to be constructed in hands-on instrumentation courses where students build and commission their own instruments. Additionally, these instruments enable introductory majors and non-majors laboratory students to gain experience conducting their own spectroscopic observations.

  17. Photometric and polarimetric observations of fast declining Type II supernovae 2013hj and 2014G

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Subhash; Misra, Kuntal; Matsumoto, Katsura; Kumar, Brajesh; Singh, Mridweeka; Fukushima, Daiki; Kawabata, Miho

    2015-01-01

    We present broadband photometric and polarimetric observations of two type II supernovae (SNe) 2013hj and 2014G. SN 2014G is a spectroscopically classified type IIL event, which we also confirm photometrically as its light curve show characteristic features (plateau slope of 2.55 mag (100 d)$ ^{-1} $ in V-band and duration of $ \\sim77 $d) of a generic IIL SN. On the other hand SN 2013hj also shows high plateau decline rate of $ 1.5 $ mag (100 d)$ ^{-1} $ in V-band, similar to SNe IIL, but marginally lower than SNe IIL template light curves. Our high cadence photometric observations of SNe 2013hj and 2014G enables us to cover all characteristic phases up to radioactive tail of optical light curves. Broadband polarimetric observations reveal some polarization in SN 2013hj with subtle enhancement as SN evolves towards plateau end, however the polarization angle remains constant throughout the evolution. This characteristic is consistent with the idea that the evolving SN with recombining hydrogen envelope is slo...

  18. Clues To The Nature of SN 2009ip from Photometric and Spectroscopic Evolution to Late Times

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, M L; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; Parrent, J; Halford, M; Zaritsky, D; Bianco, F; Rest, A; Dilday, B

    2014-01-01

    We present time series photometric and spectroscopic data for the transient SN 2009ip from the start of its outburst in September 2012 until November 2013. This data was collected primarily with the new robotic capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, a specialized facility for time domain astrophysics, and includes supporting high-resolution spectroscopy from the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Gemini Observatory. Based on our nightly photometric monitoring, we interpret the strength and timing of fluctuations in the light curve as interactions between fast-moving ejecta and an inhomogeneous CSM produced by past eruptions of this massive luminous blue variable (LBV) star. Our time series of spectroscopy in 2012 reveals that, as the continuum and narrow H-alpha flux from CSM interactions declines, the broad component of H-alpha persists with SN-like velocities that are not typically seen in LBVs or SN Impostor events. At late times we...

  19. Devil declines and catastrophic cascades: is mesopredator release of feral cats inhibiting recovery of the eastern quoll?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn A Fancourt

    Full Text Available The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus is a medium-sized Australian marsupial carnivore that has recently undergone a rapid and severe population decline over the 10 years to 2009, with no sign of recovery. This decline has been linked to a period of unfavourable weather, but subsequent improved weather conditions have not been matched by quoll recovery. A recent study suggested another mechanism: that declines in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii populations, due to the spread of the fatal Devil Facial Tumour Disease, have released feral cats (Felis catus from competitive suppression, with eastern quoll declines linked to a subsequent increase in cat sightings. Yet current evidence of intraguild suppression among devils, cats and quolls is scant and equivocal. We therefore assessed the influences of top-down effects on abundance and activity patterns among devils, feral cats and eastern quolls. Between 2011 and 2013, we monitored four carnivore populations using longitudinal trapping and camera surveys, and performed camera surveys at 12 additional sites throughout the eastern quoll's range. We did not find evidence of a negative relationship between devil and cat abundance, nor of higher cat abundance in areas where devil populations had declined the longest. Cats did not appear to avoid devils spatially; however, there was evidence of temporal separation of cat and devil activity, with reduced separation and increasing nocturnal activity observed in areas where devils had declined the longest. Cats and quolls used the same areas, and there was no evidence that cat and quoll abundances were negatively related. Temporal overlap in observed cat and quoll activity was higher in summer than in winter, but this seasonal difference was unrelated to devil declines. We suggest that cats did not cause the recent quoll decline, but that predation of juvenile quolls by cats could be inhibiting low density quoll populations from recovering their

  20. Devil Declines and Catastrophic Cascades: Is Mesopredator Release of Feral Cats Inhibiting Recovery of the Eastern Quoll?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancourt, Bronwyn A.; Hawkins, Clare E.; Cameron, Elissa Z.; Jones, Menna E.; Nicol, Stewart C.

    2015-01-01

    The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) is a medium-sized Australian marsupial carnivore that has recently undergone a rapid and severe population decline over the 10 years to 2009, with no sign of recovery. This decline has been linked to a period of unfavourable weather, but subsequent improved weather conditions have not been matched by quoll recovery. A recent study suggested another mechanism: that declines in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) populations, due to the spread of the fatal Devil Facial Tumour Disease, have released feral cats (Felis catus) from competitive suppression, with eastern quoll declines linked to a subsequent increase in cat sightings. Yet current evidence of intraguild suppression among devils, cats and quolls is scant and equivocal. We therefore assessed the influences of top-down effects on abundance and activity patterns among devils, feral cats and eastern quolls. Between 2011 and 2013, we monitored four carnivore populations using longitudinal trapping and camera surveys, and performed camera surveys at 12 additional sites throughout the eastern quoll’s range. We did not find evidence of a negative relationship between devil and cat abundance, nor of higher cat abundance in areas where devil populations had declined the longest. Cats did not appear to avoid devils spatially; however, there was evidence of temporal separation of cat and devil activity, with reduced separation and increasing nocturnal activity observed in areas where devils had declined the longest. Cats and quolls used the same areas, and there was no evidence that cat and quoll abundances were negatively related. Temporal overlap in observed cat and quoll activity was higher in summer than in winter, but this seasonal difference was unrelated to devil declines. We suggest that cats did not cause the recent quoll decline, but that predation of juvenile quolls by cats could be inhibiting low density quoll populations from recovering their former abundance

  1. Subjective cognitive decline: The first clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Studart Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Mild cognitive impairment is considered as the first clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease (AD, when the individual exhibits below performance on standardized neuropsychological tests. However, some subjects before having a lower performance on cognitive assessments already have a subjective memory complaint. Objective: A review about subjective cognitive decline, the association with AD biomarkers and risk of conversion to dementia. Methods: We performed a comprehensive non-systematic review on PubMed. The keywords used in the search were terms related to subjective cognitive decline. Results: Subjective cognitive decline is characterized by self-experience of deterioration in cognitive performance not detected objectively through formal neuropsychological testing. However, various terms and definitions have been used in the literature and the lack of a widely accepted concept hampers comparison of studies. Epidemiological data have shown that individuals with subjective cognitive decline are at increased risk of progression to AD dementia. In addition, there is evidence that this group has a higher prevalence of positive biomarkers for amyloidosis and neurodegeneration. However, Alzheimer's disease is not the only cause of subjective cognitive decline and various other conditions can be associated with subjective memory complaints, such as psychiatric disorders or normal aging. The features suggestive of a neurodegenerative disorder are: onset of decline within the last five years, age at onset above 60 years, associated concerns about decline and confirmation by an informant. Conclusion: These findings support the idea that subjective cognitive complaints may be an early clinical marker that precedes mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Clues to the nature of SN 2009ip from photometric and spectroscopic evolution to late times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, M. L. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sand, D. J. [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Parrent, J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Halford, M.; Zaritsky, D. [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bianco, F. [Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dilday, B., E-mail: melissagraham@berkeley.edu [North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Avenue, Coeur d' Alene, ID 83814 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We present time series photometric and spectroscopic data for the transient SN 2009ip from the start of its outburst in 2012 September until 2013 November. These data were collected primarily with the new robotic capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, a specialized facility for time domain astrophysics, and includes supporting high-resolution spectroscopy from the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Gemini Observatory. Based on our nightly photometric monitoring, we interpret the strength and timing of fluctuations in the light curve as interactions between fast-moving ejecta and an inhomogeneous circumstellar material (CSM) produced by past eruptions of this massive luminous blue variable (LBV) star. Our time series of spectroscopy in 2012 reveals that, as the continuum and narrow Hα flux from CSM interactions declines, the broad component of Hα persists with supernova (SN)-like velocities that are not typically seen in LBVs or SN impostor events. At late times, we find that SN 2009ip continues to decline slowly, at ≲ 0.01 mag day{sup –1}, with small fluctuations in slope similar to Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) or SN impostors but no further LBV-like activity. The late-time spectrum features broad calcium lines similar to both late-time SNe and SN impostors. In general, we find that the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of SN 2009ip is more similar to SNe IIn than either continued eruptions of an LBV star or SN impostors but we cannot rule out a nonterminal explosion. In this context, we discuss the implications for episodic mass loss during the late stages of massive star evolution.

  3. Applications of structural and spectroscopic techniques to the experimental and theoretical study of new luminescent materials

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro Ahumada, G A

    2001-01-01

    momentum:DELTA J = 6 is observed for this system. A declining cascade that can reasonably explain the unsuspected related spectral intensity, in the order of 10-9, is presented and suggested although a value was predicted for the electric dipolar force of lesser than 4 orders of magnitude what was observed. This problem is discussed and a mechanism is proposed for spectral intensities associated with two emissions characterized by DELTA J = 4 (electric hexadecapole) and DELTA J = 2 (electric cuadrupole). The laboratory tests made, include synthesis by solid state reactions of Dy sup 3 sup + and Ho sup 3 sup + , type elpasolites, structural characterization using the x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and diffuse neutron scattering techniques, and Raman and electronic spectroscopic characterization. Results are presented for cubic systems with Cr sup 3 sup + (3d sup 3 ) and Mo sup 3 sup + (4d sup 3 ) ions, since these are privileged from a spectroscopic point of view and except for the hexacyano ion of Cr(...

  4. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  5. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

  6. Preparation of cesium targets for gamma-spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Basu, S. K.; Chanda, S.; Deb, P.; Eqbal, Md; Kundu, S.; Joseph, D.

    2000-11-01

    A procedure to prepare monoisotopic cesium compound targets for gamma-spectroscopic experiments is described. Using this procedure, uniform targets up to thicknesses of 0.6-1.2 mg/cm 2 were prepared and used for in-beam spectroscopic studies. The purity of the target was tested by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) measurements.

  7. Obtaining the Electron Angular Momentum Coupling Spectroscopic Terms, jj

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orofino, Hugo; Faria, Roberto B.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed to obtain the electron angular momentum coupling (jj) spectroscopic terms, which is based on building microstates in which each individual electron is placed in a different m[subscript j] "orbital". This approach is similar to that used to obtain the spectroscopic terms under the Russell-Saunders (LS) coupling…

  8. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-07-01

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm--a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra.

  9. Particle retention in porous media: Applications to water injectivity decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wennberg, Kjell Erik

    1998-12-31

    This thesis studies the problem of migration and deposition of colloidal particles within porous media, theoretically and by computerized simulation. Special emphasis is put on the prediction of injectivity decline in water injection wells due to inherent particles in the injection water. The study of particle deposition within porous media requires a correct prediction of the deposition rate or filtration coefficient. A thorough review of the modeling approaches used in the past are combined with new ideas in order to arrive at an improved model for the prediction of the filtration coefficient. A new way of determining the transition time for the dominant deposition mechanism to change from internal deposition to external cake formation is proposed. From this fundamental theory, equations are given for water injectivity decline predictions. A computer program called WID for water injectivity decline predictions was developed. Using water quality, formation properties, injection rate/pressure and completion information as input, WID predicts decline in vertical and horizontal injection wells with openhole, perforated and fractured completions. The calculations agree fairly well with field data; in some cases the agreement is excellent. A poor match in a few cases indicates that more mechanisms may be responsible for injectivity decline than those presently accounted for by the simulator. The second part of the study deals with a theoretical investigation of the multi-dimensional nature of particle deposition in porous media. 112 refs., 100 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Global amphibian declines: perspectives from the United States and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Christine L.; Cipriano, R.C.; Bruckner, A.W.; Shchelkunov, I.S.

    2011-01-01

    Over recent decades, amphibians have experienced population declines, extirpations and species-level extinctions at an alarming rate. Numerous potential etiologies for amphibian declines have been postulated including climate and habitat degradation. Other potential anthropogenic causes including overexploitation and the frequent introductions of invasive predatory species have also been blamed for amphibian declines. Still other underlying factors may include infectious diseases caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, pathogenic viruses (Ranavirus), and other agents. It is nearly certain that more than one etiology is to blame for the majority of the global amphibian declines, and that these causal factors include some combination of climatological or physical habitat destabilization and infectious disease, most notably chytridiomycosis. Scientific research efforts are aimed at elucidating these etiologies on local, regional, and global scales that we might better understand and counteract the driving forces behind amphibian declines. Conservation efforts as outlined in the Amphibian Conservation Action Plan of 2005 are also being made to curtail losses and prevent further extinctions wherever possible.

  11. Factors affecting the decline of ventilatory function in chronic bronchitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, A.H.; Barter, C.E.; O' Connell, J.M.; Huggins, R.

    1985-10-01

    Ninety six middle aged male patients with chronic bronchitis with relatively well preserved ventilatory function who were resident in Queensland, New South Wales, or Victoria took part in a prospective study to determine the relationship of various factors to the rate of decline of the Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1). Thirty of the subjects withdrew, leaving 66 to be followed for four to six years. The mean rate of decline of the Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) was 58.6 ml/year. The subjects ventilatory responses to bronchodilator and to methacholine were significantly related to each other and to sputum eosinophilia. With a linear model for the data on 57 patients who had methacholine and skin tests the rate of decline of the FEV1 was found, after adjustment had been made for other variables, to be significantly related to state of residence, current smoking, response to bronchodilator, age, and occupational exposure to dust. Response to bronchodilator was interchangeable with response to methacholine. When data from all 66 subjects were introduced into the model, in addition to the five significant individual variables (FEV1/VC% X response to bronchodilator) was significantly related to the rate of decline of the FEV1. Of these prognostic indices, response to bronchodilator was independent of the initial FEV1, FEV/VC%, and FEV1% predicted. The difference between states, which was not explained by differences due to sampling or withdrawal of subjects, was due to a low rate of decline in Queensland.

  12. Detecting insect pollinator declines on regional and global scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubuhn, Gretchen; Droege, Sam; Connor, Edward F.; Gemmill-Herren, Barbara; Potts, Simon G.; Minckley, Robert L.; Griswold, Terry; Jean, Robert; Kula, Emanuel; Roubik, David W.; Cane, Jim; Wright, Karen W.; Frankie, Gordon; Parker, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been considerable concern about declines in bee communities in agricultural and natural habitats. The value of pollination to agriculture, provided primarily by bees, is >$200 billion/year worldwide, and in natural ecosystems it is thought to be even greater. However, no monitoring program exists to accurately detect declines in abundance of insect pollinators; thus, it is difficult to quantify the status of bee communities or estimate the extent of declines. We used data from 11 multiyear studies of bee communities to devise a program to monitor pollinators at regional, national, or international scales. In these studies, 7 different methods for sampling bees were used and bees were sampled on 3 different continents. We estimated that a monitoring program with 200-250 sampling locations each sampled twice over 5 years would provide sufficient power to detect small (2-5%) annual declines in the number of species and in total abundance and would cost U.S.$2,000,000. To detect declines as small as 1% annually over the same period would require >300 sampling locations. Given the role of pollinators in food security and ecosystem function, we recommend establishment of integrated regional and international monitoring programs to detect changes in pollinator communities.

  13. Two Remarkable Spectroscopic Categories of Young O Stars from the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Walborn, Nolan R; Taylor, William D; Simon-Diaz, Sergio; Evans, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    The spectral and spatial characteristics of two special categories of O stars found in the VFTS dataset are presented. One of them comprises very rapid rotators, including several more extreme than any previously known. These objects are distributed around the peripheries of the main 30 Doradus clusters, suggesting a runaway nature for which their radial velocities already provide preliminary supporting evidence. The other category consists of a large number of Vz stars, previously hypothesized on spectroscopic grounds to be on or very near the ZAMS. Their distribution is the inverse of that of the rapid rotators: the Vz are strongly concentrated to the ionizing clusters, plus a newly recognized band of recent and current star formation to the north, which provides strong circumstantial evidence for their extreme youth.

  14. Latitude distribution of nonradial pulsations in rapidly rotating B stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankov, S.; Mathias, P.; Domiciano de Souza, A., Jr.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Aerts, C.

    2004-05-01

    We present a method for the analysis of latitude distribution associated with temperature and/or velocity perturbations of the stellar surface due to non-radial pulsation (NRP) modes in rapidly rotating B stars. The technique is applied together with Fourier Doppler Imaging (FDI) to high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic observations of ɛ Per. The main advantage of this approach is that it decomposed complex multi-periodic line profile variations into single components, allowing the detailed analysis of each mode seperately. We study the 10.6-d-1 frequency that is particularly important for modal analysis of non-radial pulsations in the star.

  15. On the decline of biodiversity due to area loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Petr; Storch, David; Jetz, Walter

    2015-11-17

    Predictions of how different facets of biodiversity decline with habitat loss are broadly needed, yet challenging. Here we provide theory and a global empirical evaluation to address this challenge. We show that extinction estimates based on endemics-area and backward species-area relationships are complementary, and the crucial difference comprises the geometry of area loss. Across three taxa on four continents, the relative loss of species, and of phylogenetic and functional diversity, is highest when habitable area disappears inward from the edge of a region, lower when it disappears from the centre outwards, and lowest when area is lost at random. In inward destruction, species loss is almost proportional to area loss, although the decline in phylogenetic and functional diversity is less severe. These trends are explained by the geometry of species ranges and the shape of phylogenetic and functional trees, which may allow baseline predictions of biodiversity decline for underexplored taxa.

  16. Declining numbers of pancreas transplantations but significant improvements in outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruessner, A C; Gruessner, R W G

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, over the past 8 years, the number of pancreas transplantations has steadily declined. This decline comes as a surprise, because patient and graft outcomes have substantially improved during the same period of time. Patient survival rates at 1 year in all 3 recipient categories are >96%; graft survival rates are 82%-89%. Changes in immunosuppressive therapy have had a positive impact on outcome, as have better pancreas donor and recipient selection criteria and refined post-transplantation patient care. Although different factors may have contributed to the declining pancreas transplantation numbers, a more effective process of publicly promoting and widely communicating the improved results of pancreas transplantation is warranted.

  17. Analysis of FEV1 decline in relatively healthy heavy smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Laura H.; Dirksen, Asger; Shaker, Saher B.;

    2014-01-01

    Progressive decline in lung function has been widely accepted as the hallmark of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, recent evidence indicates that the rate of decline measured as decline in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) is higher in mild to moderate COPD than...... in severe COPD. Usually changes in FEV1 are measured in ml that is "absolute"; however, changes can also be measured "relative" as a percentage of the actual FEV1. We hypothesize that relative measurements could be more appropriate than absolute measurements for describing changes in lung function. We...... analyzed data from 3,218 relatively healthy heavy smokers who participated in the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial. The influences of age, sex, height, body mass index, smoking, and severity of airflow limitation on FEV1 were analyzed in mixed effects models. In absolute terms those with the best lung...

  18. Spectroscopic analysis of LYSO:Ce crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, A. F.; Carreira, J. F. C.; Rodrigues, J.; Sedrine, N. Ben; Castro, I. F. C.; Correia, P. M. M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Rino, L.; Monteiro, T.

    2017-02-01

    Rare earth orthosilicates are among the most widely used scintillator materials in the last decades. Particularly, lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) is known to exhibit great potentialities in the field of radiation detectors for medical imaging. Consequently, an in-depth knowledge of the material properties is of utmost interest for the mentioned applications. In this work the spectroscopic properties of commercial cerium doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystals (LYSO:Ce) were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, steady state photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation and time resolved photoluminescence. Site selective excitation was used under steady state (325 nm) and pulsed (266 nm) conditions to separately investigate the temperature dependence of the 5d → 4f Ce1 and Ce2 luminescence, allowing to establish the thermal quenching dependence of the Ce2 optical center. In the case of the Ce1 optical center, a luminescence quantum efficiency of 78% was obtained from 14 K to room temperature with 266 nm photon excitation.

  19. Robust Spectroscopic Inference with Imperfect Models

    CERN Document Server

    Czekala, Ian; Mandel, Kaisey S; Hogg, David W; Green, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    We present a modular, extensible framework for the spectroscopic inference of physical parameters based on synthetic model spectra. The subtraction of an imperfect model from a continuously sampled spectrum introduces covariance between adjacent datapoints (pixels) into the residual spectrum. In the limit of high signal-to-noise data with large spectral range that is common for stellar parameter estimation, that covariant structure can bias the parameter determinations. We have designed a likelihood function formalism to account for the structure of the covariance matrix, utilizing the machinery of Gaussian process kernels. We specifically address the common problem of mismatches in model spectral line strengths (with respect to data) due to intrinsic model imperfections (e.g., in the atomic or molecular data, or radiative transfer treatment) by developing a novel local covariance kernel framework that identifies and self-consistently downweights pathological spectral line "outliers." By fitting multiple spec...

  20. Compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Valerie; Hamdan, Khaled; Hewett, Jacqueline; Makaryceva, Juljia; Tait, Iain; Cuschieri, Alfred; Padgett, Miles J.

    2002-05-01

    We describe a compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for in vivo point monitoring of aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence and autofluorescence, as a non-invasive method of differentiating normal and cancerous tissue. This instrument incorporates a 405nm diode laser with a shutter to prevent exposure of tissue to harmful light doses and reduce photobleaching, a bifurcated optical fibre to allow illumination of tissue and collection of fluorescence with a single fibre, a compact grating spectrometer for collection of spectra and a PC for system control. We present spectra obtained using this system both during routine gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopy for cancer detection and during photodynamic therapy (PDT) of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) for monitoring of treatment progress. These results illustrate the potential of the system to be used for fluorescence monitoring in a variety of clinical applications.

  1. Improved spectroscopic parameters for transiting planet hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Guillermo; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Buchhave, Lars A; Winn, Joshua N; Holman, Matthew J; Carter, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    We report homogeneous spectroscopic determinations of the effective temperature, metallicity, and projected rotational velocity for the host stars of 56 transiting planets. Our analysis is based primarily on the Stellar Parameter Classification (SPC) technique. We investigate systematic errors by examining subsets of the data with two other methods that have often been used in previous studies (SME and MOOG). The SPC and SME results, both based on comparisons between synthetic spectra and actual spectra, show strong correlations between temperature, [Fe/H], and log g when solving for all three quantities simultaneously. In contrast the MOOG results, based on a more traditional curve-of-growth approach, show no such correlations. To combat the correlations and improve the accuracy of the temperatures and metallicities, we repeat the SPC analysis with a constraint on log g based on the mean stellar density that can be derived from the analysis of the transit light curves. Previous studies that have not taken ad...

  2. Spectroscopic properties of Callinectes sapidus hemocyanin subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeva, Stanka; Dolashka, Pavlina; Bankov, Banko; Voelter, Wolfgang; Salvato, Benedeto; Genov, Nicolay

    1995-10-01

    The two major subunits of the Callinectes sapidus hemocyanin were isolated and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. They consist of 641 and 652 residues, respectively. Circular dichroism spectra showed that the structural integrity of the isolated polypeptide chains is preserved. Tryptophan fluorescence parameters were determined for the hemocyanin aggregates and for the subunits Cs1 and Cs2. The emitting tryptophyl fluorophores in the native hemocyanin are deeply buried in hydrophobic regions and are shielded from the solvent by the quaternary structure of the protein aggregates. In two subunits, obtained after dissociation of the aggregates, these residues become "exposed". It is concluded that the tryptophyl side chains in Cs1 and Cs2 are located in subunit interfaces (contact regions) in a negatively charged environment when the polypeptide chains are aggregated. Most probably they participate in hydrophobic protein-protein interactions. The environment of these fluorophores is more negatively charged after the dissociation of the aggregates to subunits.

  3. The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer: throughput optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagey, Nicolas; Mignot, Shan; Szeto, Kei; McConnachie, Alan; Murowinski, Rick

    2016-08-01

    The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE) will obtain millions of optical to near-infrared spectra, at low (R 2,500) to high (R 40,000) spectral resolution, via a highly multiplexed ( 3000) fiber-fed system. Key science programs for MSE (black hole reverberation mapping, stellar population analysis at high redshift, subkm/ s velocity accuracy for stellar astrophysics) will target faint Galactic and extra-galactic targets (typical visual magnitudes up to 24). MSE will thus need to achieve the highest throughput possible over the 360 to 1800 nm wavelength range. Here we discuss building an optimized throughput budget in terms of performance allocation and technical solutions to steer the concept design studies.

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of genetically modified flax fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymińska, L.; Gągor, A.; Hanuza, J.; Kulma, A.; Preisner, M.; Żuk, M.; Szatkowski, M.; Szopa, J.

    2014-09-01

    The principal goal of this paper is an analysis of flax fiber composition. Natural and genetically modified flax fibers derived from transgenic flax have been analyzed. Development of genetic engineering enables to improve the quality of fibers. Three transgenic plant lines with different modifications were generated based on fibrous flax plants as the origin. These are plants with: silenced cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) gene; overexpression of polygalacturonase (PGI); and expression of three genes construct containing β-ketothiolase (phb A), acetoacetyl-CoA reductase (phb B), and poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid synthase (phb C). Flax fibers have been studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. The integral intensities of the IR bands have been used for estimation of the chemical content of the normal and transgenic flaxes. The spectroscopic data were compared to those obtained from chemical analysis of flax fibers. X-ray studies have been used to characterize the changes of the crystalline structure of the flax cellulose fibers.

  5. Synthetic Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Indices in Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, M.; Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Bressan, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present a progress report on the calculation of ultraviolet spectroscopic indices by using the UVBLUE library of synthetic spectra. The ensemble of indices are aimed at complementing empirical databases for the study of stellar populations. The definitions for the set of indices are mainly those empirically built upon data collected with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Because the far-ultraviolet (far-UV) and mid-ultraviolet (mid-UV) are sensitive to quite dissimilar stellar populations, they are presented separately. We provide a few examples on the effects of the leading atmospheric parameters on index values. This analysis is, to our knowledge, the first based upon high resolution synthetic spectra and we envisage important applications on the study of stellar aggregates at UV wavelengths.

  6. XRASE: The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnopper, H.W.; Silver, E.; Murray, S.

    2001-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer (XRASE) has a unique combination of features that will make it possible to address many of NASA's scientific goals. These include how galaxy clusters form, the physics and chemistry of the ISM, the heating of stellar coronae, the amount and content of intergalactic...... baryonic matter, the mass of black holes and the formation of disks and jets in AGN and galactic binaries. XRASE has a thin foil, multilayered telescope with a large collecting area up to 10 keV, especially in the Fe K alpha region (1100 cm(2)). Its microcalorimeter array combines high energy resolution (7...... eV at 6 keV) and efficiency with a field-of-view of 26 arcmin(2) . A deep orbit allows for long, continuous observations. Monitoring instruments in the optical (WOM-X), UV (TAUVEX) and hard X-RAY (GRAM) bands will offer exceptional opportunities to make simultaneous multi-wavelength observations....

  7. Spectroscopic Confirmation of the Pisces Overdensity

    CERN Document Server

    Kollmeier, Juna A; Shectman, Stephen; Thompson, Ian B; Preston, George W; Simon, Joshua D; Crane, Jeffrey D; Ivezić, Željko; Sesar, Branimir

    2009-01-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of the "Pisces Overdensity", also known as "Structure J", a photometric overdensity of RR Lyrae stars discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at an estimated photometric distance of ~85kpc. We measure radial velocities for 8 RR Lyrae stars within Pisces. We find that 5 of the 8 stars have heliocentric radial velocities within a narrow range of -87 km/s < v < -67 km/s, suggesting that the photometric overdensity is mainly due to a physically associated system, probably a dwarf galaxy or a disrupted galaxy. Two of the remaining 3 stars differ from one another by only 9 km/s, but it would be premature to identify them as a second system.

  8. XRASE: The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnopper, H.W.; Silver, E.; Murray, S.

    2001-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer (XRASE) has a unique combination of features that will make it possible to address many of NASA's scientific goals. These include how galaxy clusters form, the physics and chemistry of the ISM, the heating of stellar coronae, the amount and content of intergalactic...... baryonic matter, the mass of black holes and the formation of disks and jets in AGN and galactic binaries. XRASE has a thin foil, multilayered telescope with a large collecting area up to 10 keV, especially in the Fe K alpha region (1100 cm(2)). Its microcalorimeter array combines high energy resolution (7...... eV at 6 keV) and efficiency with a field-of-view of 26 arcmin(2) . A deep orbit allows for long, continuous observations. Monitoring instruments in the optical (WOM-X), UV (TAUVEX) and hard X-RAY (GRAM) bands will offer exceptional opportunities to make simultaneous multi-wavelength observations....

  9. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Turid

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS) in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  10. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turid Knutsen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  11. Selective spectroscopic methods for water analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, Bikas [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-06-24

    This dissertation explores in large part the development of a few types of spectroscopic methods in the analysis of water. Methods for the determination of some of the most important properties of water like pH, metal ion content, and chemical oxygen demand are investigated in detail. This report contains a general introduction to the subject and the conclusions. Four chapters and an appendix have been processed separately. They are: chromogenic and fluorogenic crown ether compounds for the selective extraction and determination of Hg(II); selective determination of cadmium in water using a chromogenic crown ether in a mixed micellar solution; reduction of chloride interference in chemical oxygen demand determination without using mercury salts; structural orientation patterns for a series of anthraquinone sulfonates adsorbed at an aminophenol thiolate monolayer chemisorbed at gold; and the role of chemically modified surfaces in the construction of miniaturized analytical instrumentation.

  12. Cosmic Ray Removal in Fiber Spectroscopic Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhongrui; Zhang, Haotong; Yuan, Hailong; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Li, Guangwei; Lei, Yajuan; Dong, Yiqiao; Yang, Huiqin; Zhao, Yongheng; Cao, Zihuang

    2017-02-01

    Single-exposure spectra in large spectral surveys are valuable for time domain studies such as stellar variability, but there is no available method to eliminate cosmic rays for single-exposure, multi-fiber spectral images. In this paper, we describe a new method to detect and remove cosmic rays in multi-fiber spectroscopic single exposures. Through the use of two-dimensional profile fitting and a noise model that considers the position-dependent errors, we successfully detect as many as 80% of the cosmic rays and correct the cosmic ray polluted pixels to an average accuracy of 97.8%. Multiple tests and comparisons with both simulated data and real LAMOST data show that the method works properly in detection rate, false detection rate, and validity of cosmic ray correction.

  13. The Spectroscopic Variability of GRB 021004

    CERN Document Server

    Matheson, T; Foltz, C; West, S; Williams, G; Falco, E E; Calkins, M L; Castander, F J; Gawiser, E; Jha, S; Bersier, D F; Stanek, K Z

    2003-01-01

    We present spectra of the optical transient (OT) associated with GRB 021004. The spectra show a blue continuum with superposed absorption features and one emission line. There are two intervening metal-line systems at z = 1.380 and z = 1.602 and one very strong absorption system at a redshift of z = 2.323. Ly_alpha emission is also seen at this redshift. While the spectrum of the OT overall cannot be simply described with a power law, the spectral index over the range 5500-8850 A is steep, F_nu prop nu^(-0.96 +/- 0.03). Comparison of spectra from multiple epochs shows a distinct color evolution with the OT becoming redder with time, implying a B-V increase of ~0.2-0.3 mag over the first three days. This is the first clear example of color change in an OT detected spectroscopically.

  14. Spectroscopic sensitive polarimeter for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Nayak, Amritha; Prahl, Scott A

    2011-04-01

    We present the design and calibration of a spectroscopic sensitive polarimeter. The polarimeter can measure the full Stokes vector in the wavelength range 550 to 750 nm with 1-nm resolution and consists of a fiber-based spectrophotometer, a white light emitting diode light source, two liquid crystal retarders, and one polarizer. Calibration of the system is achieved with a scheme that does not require knowledge of the polarizing elements' orientation or retardation. Six intensity spectra are required to calculate the full spectrum Stokes vector. Error in the polarimeter is less than 5%. We report the Stokes vectors for light transmitted through nonscattering polarizing elements as well as a measurement of the depolarizing properties of chicken muscle at several wavelengths.

  15. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Mechanism of Photocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Nosaka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Reaction mechanisms of various kinds of photocatalysts have been reviewed based on the recent reports, in which various spectroscopic techniques including luminol chemiluminescence photometry, fluorescence probe method, electron spin resonance (ESR, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy were applied. The reaction mechanisms elucidated for bare and modified TiO2 were described individually. The modified visible light responsive TiO2 photocatalysts, i.e., Fe(III-deposited metal-doped TiO2 and platinum complex-deposited TiO2, were studied by detecting paramagnetic species with ESR, •O2− (or H2O2 with chemiluminescence photometry, and OH radicals with a fluorescence probe method. For bare TiO2, the difference in the oxidation mechanism for the different crystalline form was investigated by the fluorescence probe method, while the adsorption and decomposition behaviors of several amino acids and peptides were investigated by 1H-NMR spectroscopy.

  16. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Studies in Flotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been extensively employed in flotation research.The work done by the author and co-workers has been reported.A comparison has been made among the different FTIR spectroscopic techniques,e.g.,transmission FTIR spectroscopy,diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy,and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy.FTIR spectroscopy has been used to study the mechanism of interaction between the collector and the surfaces of different minerals,the mechanism of action of the depressant in improving the selectivity of flotation,and the mechanism of adsorption of the polymeric modifying reagent on mineral surfaces.The interaction between particles in mineral suspension has also been studied by FTIR spectroscopy.

  17. Thumb-size ultrasonic-assisted spectroscopic imager for in-situ glucose monitoring as optional sensor of conventional dialyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogo, Kosuke; Mori, Keita; Qi, Wei; Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    We proposed the ultrasonic-assisted spectroscopic imaging for the realization of blood-glucose-level monitoring during dialytic therapy. Optical scattering and absorption caused by blood cells deteriorate the detection accuracy of glucose dissolved in plasma. Ultrasonic standing waves can agglomerate blood cells at nodes. In contrast, around anti-node regions, the amount of transmitted light increases because relatively clear plasma appears due to decline the number of blood cells. Proposed method can disperse the transmitted light of plasma without time-consuming pretreatment such as centrifugation. To realize the thumb-size glucose sensor which can be easily attached to dialysis tubes, an ultrasonic standing wave generator and a spectroscopic imager are required to be small. Ultrasonic oscillators are ∅30[mm]. A drive circuit of oscillators, which now size is 41×55×45[mm], is expected to become small. The trial apparatus of proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imager, whose size is 30×30×48[mm], also can be little-finger size in principal. In the experiment, we separated the suspension mixed water and micro spheres (Θ10[mm) into particles and liquid regions with the ultrasonic standing wave (frequency: 2[MHz]). Furthermore, the spectrum of transmitted light through the suspension could be obtained in visible light regions with a white LED.

  18. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4–8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K+ contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 °C to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R2 ~ 0.76). SR Ca2+-ATPase, relative to Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments. PMID:25056841

  19. Rapid manufacturing for microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . Microfluidics is at the forefront of developing solutions for drug discovery, diagnostics (from glucose tests to malaria and TB testing) and environmental diagnostics (E-coli monitoring of drinking water). In order to quickly implement new designs, a rapid... stream_source_info Land_2012.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2089 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Land_2012.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Rapid manufacturing...

  20. Rapid cooled lens cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, David M.; Hsu, Ike C.

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes the optomechanical design, thermal analysis, fabrication, and test evaluation processes followed in developing a rapid cooled, infrared lens cell. Thermal analysis was the key engineering discipline exercised in the design phase. The effect of thermal stress on the lens, induced by rapid cooling of the lens cell, was investigated. Features of this lens cell that minimized the thermal stress will be discussed in a dedicated section. The results of thermal analysis on the selected lens cell design and the selection of the flow channel design in the heat exchanger will be discussed. Throughout the paper engineering drawings, illustrations, analytical results, and photographs of actual hardware are presented.

  1. Rapid microbiology - raising awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailie, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A 'high-level overview' of some of the emerging rapid microbiology technologies designed to help healthcare engineering and infection control teams working in hospitals and other healthcare facilities more rapidly identify potentially hazardous levels of waterborne microorganisms in their water systems, enabling them to take prompt remedial action, and a look at the some of the 'pros and cons' of such testing techniques, was given by Nalco technical director, Howard Barnes, the vice-chair of the Legionella Control Association (LCA), at a recent LCA open day. HEJ editor, Jonathan Bailie, reports.

  2. Spectroscopic neutron detection using composite scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, I.; Foster, A.; Kukharev, V.; Mayer, M.; Meddeb, A.; Nattress, J.; Ounaies, Z.; Trivelpiece, C.

    2016-09-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM), especially highly enriched uranium, is exceptionally difficult to detect without the use of active interrogation (AI). We are investigating the potential use of low-dose active interrogation to realize simultaneous high-contrast imaging and photofission of SNM using energetic gamma-rays produced by low-energy nuclear reactions, such as 11B(d,nγ)12C and 12C(p,p‧)12C. Neutrons produced via fission are one reliable signature of the presence of SNM and are usually identified by their unique timing characteristics, such as the delayed neutron die-away. Fast neutron spectroscopy may provide additional useful discriminating characteristics for SNM detection. Spectroscopic measurements can be conducted by recoil-based or thermalization and capture-gated detectors; the latter may offer unique advantages since they facilitate low-statistics and event-by-event neutron energy measurements without spectrum unfolding. We describe the results of the development and characterization of a new type of capture-gated spectroscopic neutron detector based on a composite of scintillating polyvinyltoluene and lithium-doped scintillating glass in the form of millimeter-thick rods. The detector achieves >108 neutron-gamma discrimination resulting from its geometric properties and material selection. The design facilitates simultaneous pulse shape and pulse height discrimination, despite the fact that no materials intrinsically capable of pulse shape discrimination have been used to construct the detector. Accurate single-event measurements of neutron energy may be possible even when the energy is relatively low, such as with delayed fission neutrons. Simulation and preliminary measurements using the new composite detector are described, including those conducted using radioisotope sources and the low-dose active interrogation system based on low-energy nuclear reactions.

  3. Spectroscopic detection of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Ines; Grüner, Roman; Matthäus, Christian; Dietzek, Benjamin; Werncke, W.; Lademann, Jürgen; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    The hand-foot-syndrome presents a severe dermal side-effect of chemotherapeutic cancer treatment. The cause of this side-effect is the elimination of systemically administered chemotherapeutics with the sweat. Transported to the skin surface, the drugs subsequently penetrate into the skin in the manner of topically applied substances. Upon accumulation of the chemotherapeutics in the skin the drugs destroy cells and tissue - in the same way as they are supposed to act in cancer cells. Aiming at the development of strategies to illuminate the molecular mechanism underlying the handfoot- syndrome (and, in a second step, strategies to prevent this severe side-effect), it might be important to evaluate the concentration and distribution of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants in the human skin. The latter can be estimated by the carotenoid concentration, as carotenoids serve as marker substances for the dermal antioxidative status.Following the objectives outlined above, this contribution presents a spectroscopic study aiming at the detection and quantification of carotenoids and selected chemotherapeutics in human skin. To this end, spontaneous Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy are combined with two-photon excited fluorescence. While the latter technique is Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to your MySPIE To Do List at http://myspie.org and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval.restricted to the detection of fluorescent chemotherapeutics, e.g., doxorubicin, the vibrational spectroscopic techniques can - in principle - be applied to any type of analyte molecules. Furthermore, we will present the

  4. Highlights of the Brazilian Solar Spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, H. S.; Cecatto, J. R.; Mészárosová, H.; Faria, C.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Karlický, M.; de Andrade, M. C.

    2009-07-01

    The digital, decimetric (950-2500 MHz) Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS, Sawant, H.S., Subramanian, K.R., Faria, C., et al. Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS). Solar Phys. 200, 167-176, 2001) with high time (10-1000 ms) and frequency (1-10 MHz) resolution is in regular operation since April, 1998, at the National Space Research Institute (INPE) at São José dos Campos, Brazil. The BSS has now been upgraded with a new digital data acquisition and data processing system. The new version of the BSS has improved the observational possibilities with the capability to record up to 200 frequency channels available in the selectable frequency range 950-2500 MHz. The GPS receiver permits the acquisition of data with time accuracy in the order of 0.1 ms. The software system of the BSS is composed by two distinct modules: the first, data acquisition system provides a flexible Graphical User Interface (GUI) that allows one to choose the observational parameters. The second module is the real time visualization system that permits real time visualization of the observed dynamic spectrum and additionally allows procedures for visualization and preliminary analysis of the recorded solar spectra. Using the new visualization system, we have realized two new types of dm-radio fine structures: narrow band type III bursts with positive as well as negative group frequency drift and dots emissions arranged in zebra-like and fiber-like chains. Furthermore, we have found flare generated fast wave trains according to their tadpole signature in wavelet power spectra for a decimetric type IV radio event (June 6, 2000 flare).

  5. Recent widespread tree growth decline despite increasing atmospheric CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas C R Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The synergetic effects of recent rising atmospheric CO(2 and temperature are expected to favor tree growth in boreal and temperate forests. However, recent dendrochronological studies have shown site-specific unprecedented growth enhancements or declines. The question of whether either of these trends is caused by changes in the atmosphere remains unanswered because dendrochronology alone has not been able to clarify the physiological basis of such trends. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we combined standard dendrochronological methods with carbon isotopic analysis to investigate whether atmospheric changes enhanced water use efficiency (WUE and growth of two deciduous and two coniferous tree species along a 9 degrees latitudinal gradient across temperate and boreal forests in Ontario, Canada. Our results show that although trees have had around 53% increases in WUE over the past century, growth decline (measured as a decrease in basal area increment--BAI has been the prevalent response in recent decades irrespective of species identity and latitude. Since the 1950s, tree BAI was predominantly negatively correlated with warmer climates and/or positively correlated with precipitation, suggesting warming induced water stress. However, where growth declines were not explained by climate, WUE and BAI were linearly and positively correlated, showing that declines are not always attributable to warming induced stress and additional stressors may exist. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show an unexpected widespread tree growth decline in temperate and boreal forests due to warming induced stress but are also suggestive of additional stressors. Rising atmospheric CO2 levels during the past century resulted in consistent increases in water use efficiency, but this did not prevent growth decline. These findings challenge current predictions of increasing terrestrial carbon stocks under climate change scenarios.

  6. Predicting functional decline and survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Mei-Lyn; Tan, Pei Fang; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2017-01-01

    Better predictors of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease course could enable smaller and more targeted clinical trials. Partially to address this aim, the Prize for Life foundation collected de-identified records from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sufferers who participated in clinical trials of investigational drugs and made them available to researchers in the PRO-ACT database. In this study, time series data from PRO-ACT subjects were fitted to exponential models. Binary classes for decline in the total score of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale revised (ALSFRS-R) (fast/slow progression) and survival (high/low death risk) were derived. Data was segregated into training and test sets via cross validation. Learning algorithms were applied to the demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters in the training set to predict ALSFRS-R decline and the derived fast/slow progression and high/low death risk categories. The performance of predictive models was assessed by cross-validation in the test set using Receiver Operator Curves and root mean squared errors. A model created using a boosting algorithm containing the decline in four parameters (weight, alkaline phosphatase, albumin and creatine kinase) post baseline, was able to predict functional decline class (fast or slow) with fair accuracy (AUC = 0.82). However similar approaches to build a predictive model for decline class by baseline subject characteristics were not successful. In contrast, baseline values of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyltransferase, urine specific gravity and ALSFRS-R item score-climbing stairs were sufficient to predict survival class. Using combinations of small numbers of variables it was possible to predict classes of functional decline and survival across the 1-2 year timeframe available in PRO-ACT. These findings may have utility for design of future ALS clinical trials.

  7. Recent widespread tree growth decline despite increasing atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas C R; Anand, Madhur; Leithead, Mark D

    2010-07-21

    The synergetic effects of recent rising atmospheric CO(2) and temperature are expected to favor tree growth in boreal and temperate forests. However, recent dendrochronological studies have shown site-specific unprecedented growth enhancements or declines. The question of whether either of these trends is caused by changes in the atmosphere remains unanswered because dendrochronology alone has not been able to clarify the physiological basis of such trends. Here we combined standard dendrochronological methods with carbon isotopic analysis to investigate whether atmospheric changes enhanced water use efficiency (WUE) and growth of two deciduous and two coniferous tree species along a 9 degrees latitudinal gradient across temperate and boreal forests in Ontario, Canada. Our results show that although trees have had around 53% increases in WUE over the past century, growth decline (measured as a decrease in basal area increment--BAI) has been the prevalent response in recent decades irrespective of species identity and latitude. Since the 1950s, tree BAI was predominantly negatively correlated with warmer climates and/or positively correlated with precipitation, suggesting warming induced water stress. However, where growth declines were not explained by climate, WUE and BAI were linearly and positively correlated, showing that declines are not always attributable to warming induced stress and additional stressors may exist. Our results show an unexpected widespread tree growth decline in temperate and boreal forests due to warming induced stress but are also suggestive of additional stressors. Rising atmospheric CO2 levels during the past century resulted in consistent increases in water use efficiency, but this did not prevent growth decline. These findings challenge current predictions of increasing terrestrial carbon stocks under climate change scenarios.

  8. Effects of surface wind speed decline on hydrology in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, X.; Tang, Q.; Zhang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Surface wind speed decline in China has been widely reported, but its effects on hydrology have not been fully evaluated to date. In this study, we evaluate the effects of wind speed decline on hydrology in China during 1966-2011 by using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model. Two model experiments, i.e. VIC simulations with the observed (EXP1) and detrended wind speed (EXP2), are performed in the major river basins in China. The differences between the two experiments are analyzed to assess the effects of wind speed decline on hydrology. Results show that wind speed has decreased by 29% of its mean in China, even by 80% for some areas in the northern China. The wind speed decline have resulted in a decrease of evapotranspiration by 1-3% of mean annual evapotranspiration and an increase of runoff by 1-6% of mean annual runoff at most basins in China. The effect of wind speed on runoff and soil moisture is large in the northern basins where small change in hydrological conditions would have significant implications for water management. In addition, Wind speed decline has offset the expansion of the drought area in China. It has contributed to a reduction of drought areas by 21%, 17%, 15% and 12% for the mean drought area in the Songhuajiang River, Hai River, Liao River and Yellow River basins, respectively, and by 8.8% of the mean drought area over China. The effect of wind speed decline on soil moisture drought is large in most basins in China expect for the Southwest and Pearl River basins.

  9. The future of species under climate change: resilience or decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Craig; Agudo, Rosa

    2013-08-02

    As climates change across already stressed ecosystems, there is no doubt that species will be affected, but to what extent and which will be most vulnerable remain uncertain. The fossil record suggests that most species persisted through past climate change, whereas forecasts of future impacts predict large-scale range reduction and extinction. Many species have altered range limits and phenotypes through 20th-century climate change, but responses are highly variable. The proximate causes of species decline relative to resilience remain largely obscure; however, recent examples of climate-associated species decline can help guide current management in parallel with ongoing research.

  10. Climate Variations and Alaska Tundra Vegetation Productivity Declines in Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, U. S.; Walker, D. A.; Bieniek, P.; Raynolds, M. K.; Epstein, H. E.; Comiso, J. C.; Pinzon, J. E.; Tucker, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    While sea ice has continued to decline, vegetation productivity increases have declined particularly during spring in Alaska as well as many parts of the Arctic tundra. To understand the processes behind these features we investigate spring climate variations that includes temperature, circulation patterns, and snow cover to determine how these may be contributing to spring browning. This study employs remotely sensed weekly 25-km sea ice concentration, weekly surface temperature, and bi-weekly NDVI from 1982 to 2014. Maximum NDVI (MaxNDVI, Maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), Time Integrated NDVI (TI-NDVI), Summer Warmth Index (SWI, sum of degree months above freezing during May-August), atmospheric reanalysis data, dynamically downscaled climate data, meteorological station data, and snow water equivalent (GlobSnow, assimilated snow data set). We analyzed the data for the full period (1982-2014) and for two sub-periods (1982-1998 and 1999-2014), which were chosen based on the declining Alaska SWI since 1998. MaxNDVI has increased from 1982-2014 over most of the Arctic but has declined from 1999 to 2014 southwest Alaska. TI-NDVI has trends that are similar to those for MaxNDVI for the full period but display widespread declines over the 1999-2014 period. Therefore, as the MaxNDVI has continued to increase overall for the Arctic, TI-NDVI has been declining since 1999 and these declines are particularly noteworthy during spring in Alaska. Spring declines in Alaska have been linked to increased spring snow cover that can delay greenup (Bieniek et al. 2015) but recent ground observations suggest that after an initial warming and greening, late season freezing temperature are damaging the plants. The late season freezing temperature hypothesis will be explored with meteorological climate/weather data sets for Alaska tundra regions. References P.A. Bieniek, US Bhatt, DA Walker, MK Raynolds, JC Comiso, HE Epstein, JE Pinzon, CJ Tucker, RL Thoman, H Tran, N M

  11. Amphibian decline: An integrated analysis of multiple stressor effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, G.; Krest, S.K.; Sparling, D. W.; Linder, G.; Krest, S.K.; Sparling, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Capturing the attention and imagination of the public and the scientific community alike, the mysterious decline in amphibian populations drew scientists and resource managers from ecotoxicology and chemistry, ecology and field biology, conservation biology, and natural resource policy to a SETAC–Johnson Foundation workshop. Facilitating environmental stewardship, increasing capacity of the sciences to explain complex stressors, and educating the public on relationships among communities of all types motivated these experts to address amphibian decline and the role of various stressors in these losses.

  12. Rapid Prototyping Reconsidered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosier, James

    2011-01-01

    Continuing educators need additional strategies for developing new programming that can both reduce the time to market and lower the cost of development. Rapid prototyping, a time-compression technique adapted from the high technology industry, represents one such strategy that merits renewed evaluation. Although in higher education rapid…

  13. AFRPL Rapid Indexing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Alfred A.

    A modified Keyword Out of Context (KWOC) system was developed to gain rapid control over more than 8,000 scattered, unindexed documents. This was the first step in providing the technical information support required by Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory scientists and engineers. Implementation of the KWOC system, computer routines, and…

  14. Early-Onset, Regular Cannabis Use Is Linked to IQ Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is Linked to IQ Decline Early-Onset, Regular Cannabis Use Is Linked to IQ Decline Email Facebook ... that cannabis use may harm the developing brain. Cannabis Use Correlates With Cognitive Decline The study participants ...

  15. Poor decision making is a consequence of cognitive decline among older persons without Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A Boyle

    Full Text Available Decision making is an important determinant of health and well-being across the lifespan but is critical in aging, when many influential decisions are made just as cognitive function declines. Increasing evidence suggests that older adults, even those without dementia, often make poor decisions and are selectively vulnerable to scams. To date, however, the factors associated with poor decision making in old age are unknown. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that poor decision making is a consequence of cognitive decline among older persons without Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment.Participants were 420 non-demented persons from the Memory and Aging Project, a longitudinal, clinical-pathologic cohort study of aging in the Chicago metropolitan area. All underwent repeated cognitive evaluations and subsequently completed assessments of decision making and susceptibility to scams. Decision making was measured using 12 items from a previously established performance-based measure and a self-report measure of susceptibility to scams.Cognitive function data were collected over an average of 5.5 years prior to the decision making assessment. Regression analyses were used to examine whether the prior rate of cognitive decline predicted the level of decision making and susceptibility to scams; analyses controlled for age, sex, education, and starting level of cognition. Among 420 persons without dementia, more rapid cognitive decline predicted poorer decision making and increased susceptibility to scams (p's<0.001. Further, the relations between cognitive decline, decision making and scams persisted in analyses restricted to persons without any cognitive impairment (i.e., no dementia or even mild cognitive impairment.Poor decision making is a consequence of cognitive decline among older persons without Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment, those widely considered "cognitively healthy." These findings suggest

  16. A Monitoring Campaign for Luhman 16AB. I. Detection of Resolved Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Burgasser, Adam J; Faherty, Jacqueline K; Radigan, Jacqueline; J., Amaury H M; Plavchan, Peter; Street, Rachel; Jehin, E; Delrez, L; Opitom, C

    2014-01-01

    [abbreviated] We report resolved near-infrared spectroscopic monitoring of the nearby L dwarf/T dwarf binary WISE J104915.57-531906.1AB (Luhman 16AB), as part of a broader campaign to characterize the spectral energy distribution and temporal variability of this system. A continuous 45-minute sequence of low-resolution IRTF/SpeX data spanning 0.8-2.4 micron were obtained, concurrent with combined-light optical photometry with ESO/TRAPPIST. Our spectral observations confirm the flux reversal of this binary, and we detect a wavelength-dependent decline in the relative spectral fluxes of the two components coincident with a decline in the combined-light optical brightness of the system over the course of the observation. These data are successfully modeled as a combination of brightness and color variability in the T0.5 Luhman 16B, consistent cloud variations; and no significant variability in L7.5 Luhman 16A. We estimate a peak-to-peak amplitude of 13.5% at 1.25 micron over the full lightcurve. Using a two-spot...

  17. Biomechanical analysis of the single-leg decline squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.; Bredeweg, S. W.; Hof, A. L.

    Background: The single-leg squat on a 25 decline board has been described as a clinical assessment tool and as a rehabilitation exercise for patients with patellar tendinopathy. Several assumptions have been made about its working mechanism on patellar load and patellofemoral forces, but these are

  18. Do Declining Discount Rates lead to Time Inconsistent Economic Advice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Chr.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the risk of time inconsistency in economic appraisals related to the use of hyperbolic discounting (declining discount rates) instead of exponential discounting (constant discount rate). Many economists are uneasy about the prospects of potential time inconsistency. The paper...

  19. CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF REGIONAL POPULATION DECLINE FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haartsen, Tialda; Van Wissen, Leo

    During the past few years, the Dutch education system has been confronted with a sharp decline in the number of pupils. Especially in rural villages, inhabitants fear for the closure of their local primary school, which is perceived as a very negative development for local village life. This paper

  20. Maatregelen tegen Pear Decline Phytoplasma infectie via enten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dees, R.H.L.; Kock, de M.J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Pear Decline is een ziekte bij perenbomen en wordt veroorzaakt door een fytoplasma. Zieke perenbomen worden gekenmerkt door een vervroegde en veelal intensieve roodverkleuring van de bladeren. Bij een ernstige aantasting sterft de boom af. Bomen gaan echter niet altijd dood. Sommige bomen groeien do

  1. 26 CFR 1.167(b)-2 - Declining balance method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... straight line rate (without adjustment for salvage) is 5 percent, and the declining balance rate at twice the normal straight line rate is 10 percent. The annual depreciation allowances for 1954, 1955, and...)(2) shall not exceed twice the appropriate straight line rate computed without adjustment for...

  2. Quantitative EEG and Cognitive Decline in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalii V. Cozac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline is common with the progression of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Different candidate biomarkers are currently studied for the risk of dementia in PD. Several studies have shown that quantitative EEG (QEEG is a promising predictor of PD-related cognitive decline. In this paper we briefly outline the basics of QEEG analysis and analyze the recent publications addressing the predictive value of QEEG in the context of cognitive decline in PD. The MEDLINE database was searched for relevant publications from January 01, 2005, to March 02, 2015. Twenty-four studies reported QEEG findings in various cognitive states in PD. Spectral and connectivity markers of QEEG could help to discriminate between PD patients with different level of cognitive decline. QEEG variables correlate with tools for cognitive assessment over time and are associated with significant hazard ratios to predict PD-related dementia. QEEG analysis shows high test-retest reliability and avoids learning effects associated with some neuropsychological testing; it is noninvasive and relatively easy to repeat.

  3. Biomechanical analysis of the single-leg decline squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.; Bredeweg, S. W.; Hof, A. L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The single-leg squat on a 25 decline board has been described as a clinical assessment tool and as a rehabilitation exercise for patients with patellar tendinopathy. Several assumptions have been made about its working mechanism on patellar load and patellofemoral forces, but these are n

  4. Responses of England, Germany and Switzerland to Declining School Enrolments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Catherine

    Results of interviews with educators in England, Germany, and Switzerland are combined with statistical data in this study of the effects of declining enrollment and the development of multicultural programs in those countries. In all three countries, the author encountered a prevailing resistance to program change in the face of declining…

  5. When Patients Decline Medical Student Participation: The Preceptors' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tricia S.; Skye, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Patients' receptivity towards medical student participation has been examined predominantly from the patient and/or the medical student perspective. Few studies have investigated the preceptor's perspective. The study examined preceptors' experience with patients declining medical student participation in clinical care and identified…

  6. RECENT OIL PRICE DECLINE BENEFITS OIL GIANTS LIMITEDLY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Sinopec, Asia's largest refiner, hasn't really benefited from recent declines in global crude oil prices, because its refining costs still far exceed domestic oil product prices. China caps refined oil product prices at relatively low levels by world standards.

  7. Evaluating Functional Decline in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Sara; Weiss, Patrice L.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease with a wide-ranging impact on functional status. The aim of the study was to examine the added value of simultaneously evaluating fatigue, personal ADL and handwriting performance as indicators for functional decline among patients with MS. Participants were 50 outpatients with MS and 26 matched healthy…

  8. Stagnation in mortality decline among elders in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, F; Nusselder, WJ; Looman, CWN; Mackenbach, JP; Kunst, AE

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study assesses whether the stagnation of old-age (80+) mortality decline observed in The Netherlands in the 1980s continued in the 1990s and determines which factors contributed to this stagnation. Emphasis is on the role of smoking. Design and Methods: Poisson regression analysis with

  9. [Convalescence and decline in physical function level following intensive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, J.B.; Moller, K.; Perner, A.

    2009-01-01

    More patients survive critical illness, which emphasises the need to assess outcome measures other than mortality. A prolonged decline in physical function is frequently observed after discharge in the critically ill. Neuromuscular dysfunction and muscle atrophy incurred during intensive care may...

  10. Are neonicotinoid insecticides driving declines of widespread butterflies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre S. Gilburn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been widespread concern that neonicotinoid pesticides may be adversely impacting wild and managed bees for some years, but recently attention has shifted to examining broader effects they may be having on biodiversity. For example in the Netherlands, declines in insectivorous birds are positively associated with levels of neonicotinoid pollution in surface water. In England, the total abundance of widespread butterfly species declined by 58% on farmed land between 2000 and 2009 despite both a doubling in conservation spending in the UK, and predictions that climate change should benefit most species. Here we build models of the UK population indices from 1985 to 2012 for 17 widespread butterfly species that commonly occur at farmland sites. Of the factors we tested, three correlated significantly with butterfly populations. Summer temperature and the index for a species the previous year are both positively associated with butterfly indices. By contrast, the number of hectares of farmland where neonicotinoid pesticides are used is negatively associated with butterfly indices. Indices for 15 of the 17 species show negative associations with neonicotinoid usage. The declines in butterflies have largely occurred in England, where neonicotinoid usage is at its highest. In Scotland, where neonicotinoid usage is comparatively low, butterfly numbers are stable. Further research is needed urgently to show whether there is a causal link between neonicotinoid usage and the decline of widespread butterflies or whether it simply represents a proxy for other environmental factors associated with intensive agriculture.

  11. Declining MIS Enrollment: The Death of the MIS Degree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Gary; Lockridge, T. Maurice

    2011-01-01

    There is little doubt that enrollments in MIS degree programs have been declining since the recession in the technical industry in 2001. Reagan's research (2008) indicates that enrollments in MIS degree programs is only about 25% of the 2001 level. Many MIS (IS) programs have been abandoned or combined with other related programs. While many…

  12. Measuring the meltdown: drivers of global amphibian extinction and decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjot S Sodhi

    Full Text Available Habitat loss, climate change, over-exploitation, disease and other factors have been hypothesised in the global decline of amphibian biodiversity. However, the relative importance of and synergies among different drivers are still poorly understood. We present the largest global analysis of roughly 45% of known amphibians (2,583 species to quantify the influences of life history, climate, human density and habitat loss on declines and extinction risk. Multi-model Bayesian inference reveals that large amphibian species with small geographic range and pronounced seasonality in temperature and precipitation are most likely to be Red-Listed by IUCN. Elevated habitat loss and human densities are also correlated with high threat risk. Range size, habitat loss and more extreme seasonality in precipitation contributed to decline risk in the 2,454 species that declined between 1980 and 2004, compared to species that were stable (n = 1,545 or had increased (n = 28. These empirical results show that amphibian species with restricted ranges should be urgently targeted for conservation.

  13. Competitive actions of small firms in a declining market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Bumgardner; Urs Buehlmann; Albert Schuler; Jeff. Crissey

    2011-01-01

    Small firms, through their flexibility advantages and closeness to customers, potentially can increase their sales volume in economic downturns. The decline in U.S. housing construction (beginning in 2006) provided an opportunity to develop and test four hypotheses predicting the attributes and marketing actions associated with successful companies supplying housing...

  14. Are neonicotinoid insecticides driving declines of widespread butterflies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilburn, Andre S; Bunnefeld, Nils; Wilson, John McVean; Botham, Marc S; Brereton, Tom M; Fox, Richard; Goulson, Dave

    2015-01-01

    There has been widespread concern that neonicotinoid pesticides may be adversely impacting wild and managed bees for some years, but recently attention has shifted to examining broader effects they may be having on biodiversity. For example in the Netherlands, declines in insectivorous birds are positively associated with levels of neonicotinoid pollution in surface water. In England, the total abundance of widespread butterfly species declined by 58% on farmed land between 2000 and 2009 despite both a doubling in conservation spending in the UK, and predictions that climate change should benefit most species. Here we build models of the UK population indices from 1985 to 2012 for 17 widespread butterfly species that commonly occur at farmland sites. Of the factors we tested, three correlated significantly with butterfly populations. Summer temperature and the index for a species the previous year are both positively associated with butterfly indices. By contrast, the number of hectares of farmland where neonicotinoid pesticides are used is negatively associated with butterfly indices. Indices for 15 of the 17 species show negative associations with neonicotinoid usage. The declines in butterflies have largely occurred in England, where neonicotinoid usage is at its highest. In Scotland, where neonicotinoid usage is comparatively low, butterfly numbers are stable. Further research is needed urgently to show whether there is a causal link between neonicotinoid usage and the decline of widespread butterflies or whether it simply represents a proxy for other environmental factors associated with intensive agriculture.

  15. Is open surgery for head and neck cancers truly declining?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartl, D.M.; Brasnu, D.F.; Shah, J.P.; Hinni, M.L.; Takes, R.P.; Olsen, K.D.; Kowalski, L.P.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Strojan, P.; Wolf, G.T.; Rinaldo, A.; Suarez, C.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Paleri, V.; Forastiere, A.A.; Werner, J.A.; Ferlito, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the past two decades, major modifications in the way we treat head and neck cancers, due to advances in technology and medical oncology, have led to a decline in the use of open surgery as first-line treatment of cancers arising from several primary tumor sites. The incidence of tobacco- and alco

  16. Diagnosing declining grassland wader populations using simple matrix models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, Chris; Roodbergen, Maja; Hemerik, Lia

    2009-01-01

    Many populations of wader species have shown a strong decline in number in Western-Europe in recent years. The use of simple population models such as matrix models can contribute to conserve these populations by identifying the most profitable management measures. Parameterization of such models is

  17. Population decline and plague in late medieval Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothen, J A

    1996-01-01

    Norwegian scholars have engaged in considerable research over the last half century in an attempt to assess the impact of the Black Plague of 1349 on population and society in Norway. Evidence has been put forward relating the incidence of plague to a continuance of population decline over the two centuries following its initial introduction. Estimates of population decline in Norway between 1350 and 1550 indicate a reduction by as much as 65%. Two directions of study have emerged, one concentrating on land abandonment known as the "Ødegard Project." The other is represented by the recent works of Ole Jørgen Benedictow presenting epidemiological and osteo-archaeological research. An examination of the available literature raises questions concerning the degree to which plague, and its recurrence, directly affected population decline in Norway during the Late Middle Ages. While evidence of the virulence of the plague and the degree of farm abandonment is compelling, a direct relationship to population decline may not be as great as implied by the research. Other explanatory factors, especially social and economic responses to plague, have been given limited attention.

  18. The Assessment of Behavioural Decline in Adults with Down's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen; Harte, Cyan; Patrick, Shona; Matheson, Edith; Murray, George C.

    2002-01-01

    A study examined two methods of using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales with people with Down syndrome at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Scoring the scales using the basal rule outlined in the manual resulted in highlighting significant declines in scores for those meeting the criteria for "probable Alzheimer's disease."…

  19. Has spring snowpack declined in the Washington Cascades?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mote

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Our best estimates of 1 April snow water equivalent (SWE in the Cascade Mountains of Washington State indicate a substantial (roughly 15–35% decline from mid-century to 2006, with larger declines at low elevations and smaller declines or increases at high elevations. This range of values includes estimates from observations and hydrologic modeling, reflects a range of starting points between about 1930 and 1970 and also reflects uncertainties about sampling. The most important sampling issue springs from the fact that half the 1 April SWE in the Cascades is found below about 1240 m, altitudes at which sampling was poor before 1945. Separating the influences of temperature and precipitation on 1 April SWE in several ways, it is clear that long-term trends are dominated by trends in temperature, whereas variability in precipitation adds "noise" to the time series. Consideration of spatial and temporal patterns of change rules out natural variations like the Pacific Decadal Oscillation as the sole cause of the decline. Regional warming has clearly played a role, but it is not yet possible to quantify how much of that regional warming is related to greenhouse gas emissions.

  20. The Declining Threat to U.S. Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    although its fundamental problems-Javanese overpopulation , Moslem fundamentalism and separatism in Northern Sumatra, a visible end to exportable quantities...modernization, economic equalization, overpopulation , scarce resources, cooperation, and democracy. The key operational elements of the Palestinian...between 1981 and 1989. Although countries vary widely in decline, only Colombia , Chile, Barbados, and the Dominican Republic registered growth during

  1. Are We Sure the Quality of Teacher Candidates is Declining?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Arnold M.; Gibson, Harry

    1982-01-01

    Data suggest that self-selection is weeding out the poorer students in the teacher education program at Western Washington University. The grade point average of freshmen, although declining for the university as a whole, is rising in teacher education. (Author/JM)

  2. Ear length and kidney function decline after kidney donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katavetin, Pisut; Watanatorn, Salin; Townamchai, Natavudh; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat

    2016-11-01

    The preservation of kidney function after kidney donation depends on the kidney reserve - the potential of the remaining kidney to boost their function after loss of the other kidney. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, size and shape of the external ears are examined to evaluate the person's kidney health. We hypothesized that ear size might be a practical yet overlooked marker of kidney reserve. Fifty kidney transplantation donors were participated in this study. The length and width of both ears of all participants were measured during one of the post-donation visits. Pre-donation serum creatinine and post-donation serum creatinine as well as other relevant parameters (age, sex, weight, height, etc.) of the participants were extracted from medical records. The estimated GFR was calculated from serum creatinine, age and sex using the CKD-EPI equation. Ear length negatively associated with %GFR decline after kidney donation. For every 1 cm increase in ear length, it was associated with 5.7% less GFR decline after kidney donation (95% Confidence Interval 0.2 to 11.3, P = 0.04). Ear width, as well as age, sex, body weight, height, body mass index, and pre-donation eGFR did not significantly associate with the GFR decline. Our findings support the notion of Traditional Chinese Medicine that ear morphology may be associated with kidney health and suggest that ear length might be a useful predictor of kidney function decline after kidney donation.

  3. Cortical cholinergic decline parallels the progression of Borna virus encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gies, U; Gorcs, TJ; Mulder, J; Planz, O; Stitz, L; Bilzer, T; Luiten, PGM; Harkany, T; Görcs, Tamás J.

    2001-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV)-induced meningoencephalitis is associated with the dysfunction of the cholinergic system. Temporal development of this cholinergic decline during pre-encephalitic and encephalitic stages of BDV infection remains however elusive. Changes in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)

  4. Drought-induced forest decline: causes, scope and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Lloret, Francisco; Breshears, David D

    2012-10-23

    A large number of episodes of forest mortality associated with drought and heat stress have been detected worldwide in recent decades, suggesting that some of the world's forested ecosystems may be already responding to climate change. Here, we summarize a special session titled 'Drought-induced forest decline: causes, scope and implications' within the 12th European Ecological Federation Congress, held in Ávila (Spain) from 25 to 29 September 2011. The session focused on the interacting causes and impacts of die-off episodes at the community and ecosystem levels, and highlighted recent events of drought- and heat-related tree decline, advances in understanding mechanisms and in predicting mortality events, and diverse consequences of forest decline. Talks and subsequent discussion noted a potentially important role of carbon that may be interrelated with plant hydraulics in the multi-faceted process leading to drought-induced mortality; a substantial and yet understudied capacity of many forests to cope with extreme climatic events; and the difficulty of separating climate effects from other anthropogenic changes currently shaping forest dynamics in many regions of the Earth. The need for standard protocols and multi-level monitoring programmes to track the spatio-temporal scope of forest decline globally was emphasized as critical for addressing this emerging environmental issue.

  5. Decline of the Tibetan gazelle Procapra picticaudata in Ladakh, India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatnagar, Y.V.; Wangchuk, R.; Mishra, C.

    2006-01-01

    The Tibetan gazelle Procapra picticaudata is endemic to the Tibetan plateau. In the Ladakh region of northern India its range declined from c. 20,000 km2 in the early 1900s to c. 1,000 km2 in the late 1980s. Here we report the results of our recent (1999¿2003) assessments of the gazelle¿s conservati

  6. Pesticides and Population Declines of California Alpine Frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airborne pesticides from the Central Valley of California have been implicated as a cause for population declines of several amphibian species, with the strongest evidence for the mountain yellow-legged frog complex (Rana muscosa and R. sierrae) in the Sierra Nevada. We measured ...

  7. Decreased tuberculosis incidence and declining clustered case rates, Madrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñigo, Jesús; Arce, Araceli; Palenque, Elia; García de Viedma, Darío; Chaves, Fernando

    2008-10-01

    To determine effect of recent tuberculosis transmission rates on incidence rates, we conducted 2 prospective population-based molecular epidemiologic studies in Madrid during 1997-1999 (4% immigrants) and 2002-2004 (14.9% immigrants). Case rates decreased in association with declining clustered case rates among Spanish-born persons. New strains were introduced through immigration.

  8. Biomechanical analysis of the single-leg decline squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.; Bredeweg, S. W.; Hof, A. L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The single-leg squat on a 25 decline board has been described as a clinical assessment tool and as a rehabilitation exercise for patients with patellar tendinopathy. Several assumptions have been made about its working mechanism on patellar load and patellofemoral forces, but these are n

  9. Pesticides and Population Declines of California Alpine Frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airborne pesticides from the Central Valley of California have been implicated as a cause for population declines of several amphibian species, with the strongest evidence for the mountain yellow-legged frog complex (Rana muscosa and R. sierrae) in the Sierra Nevada. We measured ...

  10. Can Policy Alone Stop Decline of Children and Youth Fitness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhua; Yang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Various models and methods have been proposed to address the worldwide decline in children's and youth's physical fitness, and the social-ecological model has shown some promise. Yet, the impact of the policy intervention, one component of that model, has not been evaluated carefully. Using limited data from policy documents, the impact of policy…

  11. In a Decade of Decline: The Seven R's of Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Marvin W.

    1984-01-01

    Administrators must focus on the long-term effects of resource decline and identify a strategy to promote renewal and prevent stagnation. Redefinition of mission, rethinking models, reintegration of organizational processes, revitalizing members, reparations, recuperation and repatriation, and recommitment are discussed. (MLW)

  12. Gauss-Newton based kurtosis blind deconvolution of spectroscopic data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghe Yuan; Ziqiang Hu

    2006-01-01

    @@ The spectroscopic data recorded by dispersion spectrophotometer are usually degraded by the response function of the instrument. To improve the resolving power, double or triple cascade spectrophotometer and narrow slits have been employed, but the total flux of the radiation decreases accordingly, resulting in a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and a longer measuring time. However, the spectral resolution can be improved by mathematically removing the effect of the instrument response function. Based on the ShalviWeinstein criterion, a Gauss-Newton based kurtosis blind deconvolution algorithm for spectroscopic data is proposed. Experiments with some real measured Raman spectroscopic data show that this algorithm has excellent deconvolution capability.

  13. Stellar Abundance and Galactic Chemical Evolution through LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Zhao; Yu-Qin Chen; Jian-RongShi; Yan-Chun Liang; Jin-Liang Hou; Li Chen; Hua-Wei Zhang; Ai-Gen Li

    2006-01-01

    A project of a spectroscopic survey of Galactic structure and evolution with a Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) is presented. The spectroscopic survey consists of two observational modes for various targets in our Galaxy. One is a major survey of the Milky Way aimed at a systematic study of the stellar abundance and Galactic chemical evolution through low resolution (R=1000 - 2000) spectroscopy.Another is a follow-up observation with medium resolution (R=10000) spectrographs aimed at detailed studies of the selected stars with different chemical composition, kinematicsand dynamics.

  14. Declines in Sexual Frequency among American Adults, 1989-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenge, Jean M; Sherman, Ryne A; Wells, Brooke E

    2017-03-06

    American adults had sex about nine fewer times per year in the early 2010s compared to the late 1990s in data from the nationally representative General Social Survey, N = 26,620, 1989-2014. This was partially due to the higher percentage of unpartnered individuals, who have sex less frequently on average. Sexual frequency declined among the partnered (married or living together) but stayed steady among the unpartnered, reducing the marital/partnered advantage for sexual frequency. Declines in sexual frequency were similar across gender, race, region, educational level, and work status and were largest among those in their 50s, those with school-age children, and those who did not watch pornography. In analyses separating the effects of age, time period, and cohort, the decline was primarily due to birth cohort (year of birth, also known as generation). With age and time period controlled, those born in the 1930s (Silent generation) had sex the most often, whereas those born in the 1990s (Millennials and iGen) had sex the least often. The decline was not linked to longer working hours or increased pornography use. Age had a strong effect on sexual frequency: Americans in their 20s had sex an average of about 80 times per year, compared to about 20 times per year for those in their 60s. The results suggest that Americans are having sex less frequently due to two primary factors: An increasing number of individuals without a steady or marital partner and a decline in sexual frequency among those with partners.

  15. An appraisal of the maternal mortality decline in Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hussein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A decline in the national maternal mortality ratio in Nepal has been observed from surveys conducted between 1996 and 2008. This paper aims to assess the plausibility of the decline and to identify drivers of change. METHODS: National and sub-national trends in mortality data were investigated using existing demographic and health surveys and maternal mortality and morbidity surveys. Potential drivers of the variation in maternal mortality between districts were identified by regressing district-level indicators from the Nepal demographic health surveys against maternal mortality estimates. RESULTS: A statistically significant decline of the maternal mortality ratio from 539 maternal deaths to 281 per 100,000 (95% CI 91,507 live births between 1993 and 2003 was demonstrated. The sub-national changes are of similar magnitude and direction to those observed nationally, and in the terai region (plains the differences are statistically significant with a reduction of 361 per 100,000 live births (95% CI 36,686 during the same time period. The reduction in fertility, changes in education and wealth, improvements in components of the human development index, gender empowerment and anaemia each explained more than 10% of the district variation in maternal mortality. A number of limitations in each of the data sources used were identified. Of these, the most important relate to the underestimation of numbers of deaths. CONCLUSION: It is likely that there has been a decline in Nepal's maternal mortality since 1993. This is good news for the country's sustained commitments in this area. Conclusions on the magnitude, pattern of the change and drivers of the decline are constrained by lack of data. We recommend close tracking of maternal mortality and its determinants in Nepal, attention to the communication of future estimates, and various options for bridging data gaps.

  16. Evaluating the links between climate, disease spread, and amphibian declines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Jason R; Raffel, Thomas R; Romansic, John M; McCallum, Hamish; Hudson, Peter J

    2008-11-11

    Human alteration of the environment has arguably propelled the Earth into its sixth mass extinction event and amphibians, the most threatened of all vertebrate taxa, are at the forefront. Many of the worldwide amphibian declines have been caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), and two contrasting hypotheses have been proposed to explain these declines. Positive correlations between global warming and Bd-related declines sparked the chytrid-thermal-optimum hypothesis, which proposes that global warming increased cloud cover in warm years that drove the convergence of daytime and nighttime temperatures toward the thermal optimum for Bd growth. In contrast, the spatiotemporal-spread hypothesis states that Bd-related declines are caused by the introduction and spread of Bd, independent of climate change. We provide a rigorous test of these hypotheses by evaluating (i) whether cloud cover, temperature convergence, and predicted temperature-dependent Bd growth are significant positive predictors of amphibian extinctions in the genus Atelopus and (ii) whether spatial structure in the timing of these extinctions can be detected without making assumptions about the location, timing, or number of Bd emergences. We show that there is spatial structure to the timing of Atelopus spp. extinctions but that the cause of this structure remains equivocal, emphasizing the need for further molecular characterization of Bd. We also show that the reported positive multi-decade correlation between Atelopus spp. extinctions and mean tropical air temperature in the previous year is indeed robust, but the evidence that it is causal is weak because numerous other variables, including regional banana and beer production, were better predictors of these extinctions. Finally, almost all of our findings were opposite to the predictions of the chytrid-thermal-optimum hypothesis. Although climate change is likely to play an important role in worldwide amphibian declines

  17. Targeting Functional Decline in Alzheimer Disease: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Christopher M; Boustani, Malaz A; Schmid, Arlene A; LaMantia, Michael A; Austrom, Mary G; Miller, Douglas K; Gao, Sujuan; Ferguson, Denisha Y; Lane, Kathleen A; Hendrie, Hugh C

    2017-02-07

    Alzheimer disease results in progressive functional decline, leading to loss of independence. To determine whether collaborative care plus 2 years of home-based occupational therapy delays functional decline. Randomized, controlled clinical trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01314950). Urban public health system. 180 community-dwelling participants with Alzheimer disease and their informal caregivers. All participants received collaborative care for dementia. Patients in the intervention group also received in-home occupational therapy delivered in 24 sessions over 2 years. The primary outcome measure was the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Group Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADCS ADL); performance-based measures included the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and Short Portable Sarcopenia Measure (SPSM). At baseline, clinical characteristics did not differ significantly between groups; the mean Mini-Mental State Examination score for both groups was 19 (SD, 7). The intervention group received a median of 18 home visits from the study occupational therapists. In both groups, ADCS ADL scores declined over 24 months. At the primary end point of 24 months, ADCS ADL scores did not differ between groups (mean difference, 2.34 [95% CI, -5.27 to 9.96]). We also could not definitively demonstrate between-group differences in mean SPPB or SPSM values. The results of this trial are indeterminate and do not rule out potential clinically important effects of the intervention. The authors could not definitively demonstrate whether the addition of 2 years of in-home occupational therapy to a collaborative care management model slowed the rate of functional decline among persons with Alzheimer disease. This trial underscores the burden undertaken by caregivers as they provide care for family members with Alzheimer disease and the difficulty in slowing functional decline. National Institute on Aging.

  18. Dietary patterns, cognitive decline, and dementia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Rest, Ondine; Berendsen, Agnes Am; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; de Groot, Lisette Cpgm

    2015-03-01

    Nutrition is an important modifiable risk factor that plays a role in the strategy to prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Research on nutritional effects has until now mainly focused on the role of individual nutrients and bioactive components. However, the evidence for combined effects, such as multinutrient approaches, or a healthy dietary pattern, such as the Mediterranean diet, is growing. These approaches incorporate the complexity of the diet and possible interaction and synergy between nutrients. Over the past few years, dietary patterns have increasingly been investigated to better understand the link between diet, cognitive decline, and dementia. In this systematic review we provide an overview of the literature on human studies up to May 2014 that examined the role of dietary patterns (derived both a priori as well as a posteriori) in relation to cognitive decline or dementia. The results suggest that better adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with less cognitive decline, dementia, or Alzheimer disease, as shown by 4 of 6 cross-sectional studies, 6 of 12 longitudinal studies, 1 trial, and 3 meta-analyses. Other healthy dietary patterns, derived both a priori (e.g., Healthy Diet Indicator, Healthy Eating Index, and Program National Nutrition Santé guideline score) and a posteriori (e.g., factor analysis, cluster analysis, and reduced rank regression), were shown to be associated with reduced cognitive decline and/or a reduced risk of dementia as shown by all 6 cross-sectional studies and 6 of 8 longitudinal studies. More conclusive evidence is needed to reach more targeted and detailed guidelines to prevent or postpone cognitive decline.

  19. Declines in moose population density at Isle Royle National Park, MI, USA and accompanied changes in landscape patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, N. R.; Pastor, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ungulate herbivores create patterns of forage availability, plant species composition, and soil fertility as they range across large landscapes and consume large quantities of plant material. Over time, herbivore populations fluctuate, producing great potential for spatio-temporal landscape dynamics. In this study, we extend the spatial and temporal extent of a long-term investigation of the relationship of landscape patterns to moose foraging behavior at Isle Royale National Park, MI. We examined how patterns of browse availability and consumption, plant basal area, and soil fertility changed during a recent decline in the moose population. We used geostatistics to examine changes in the nature of spatial patterns in two valleys over 18 years and across short-range and long-range distance scales. Landscape patterns of available and consumed browse changed from either repeated patches or randomly distributed patches in 1988-1992 to random point distributions by 2007 after a recent record high peak followed by a rapid decline in the moose population. Patterns of available and consumed browse became decoupled during the moose population low, which is in contrast to coupled patterns during the earlier high moose population. Distributions of plant basal area and soil nitrogen availability also switched from repeated patches to randomly distributed patches in one valley and to random point distributions in the other valley. Rapid declines in moose population density may release vegetation and soil fertility from browsing pressure and in turn create random landscape patterns. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  20. Declines in low-elevation subalpine tree populations outpace growth in high-elevation populations with warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlisk, Erin; Castanha, Cristina; Germino, Matthew J.; Veblen, Thomas T; Smith, Jeremy M.; Kueppers, Lara M.

    2017-01-01

    Species distribution shifts in response to climate change require that recruitment increase beyond current range boundaries. For trees with long life spans, the importance of climate-sensitive seedling establishment to the pace of range shifts has not been demonstrated quantitatively.Using spatially explicit, stochastic population models combined with data from long-term forest surveys, we explored whether the climate-sensitivity of recruitment observed in climate manipulation experiments was sufficient to alter populations and elevation ranges of two widely distributed, high-elevation North American conifers.Empirically observed, warming-driven declines in recruitment led to rapid modelled population declines at the low-elevation, ‘warm edge’ of subalpine forest and slow emergence of populations beyond the high-elevation, ‘cool edge’. Because population declines in the forest occurred much faster than population emergence in the alpine, we observed range contraction for both species. For Engelmann spruce, this contraction was permanent over the modelled time horizon, even in the presence of increased moisture. For limber pine, lower sensitivity to warming may facilitate persistence at low elevations – especially in the presence of increased moisture – and rapid establishment above tree line, and, ultimately, expansion into the alpine.Synthesis. Assuming 21st century warming and no additional moisture, population dynamics in high-elevation forests led to transient range contractions for limber pine and potentially permanent range contractions for Engelmann spruce. Thus, limitations to seedling recruitment with warming can constrain the pace of subalpine tree range shifts.