WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapid s4 movement

  1. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schenck, C H; Montplaisir, J Y; Frauscher, B

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to provide a consensus statement by the International Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Study Group (IRBD-SG) on devising controlled active treatment studies in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and devising studies of neuroprotection against Parkinson disease (PD...

  2. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul

    2009-01-01

    and neurological disease. RBD is related to brainstem pathology. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that RBD is frequently related to Parkinsonian disorders and narcolepsy. This article reviews recent knowledge about RBD with focus on the diagnostic process and management. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-May......Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical...

  3. Rapid eye movement sleep in breath holders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, J; Hasegawa, T; Shimohira, M; Fukumizu, M; Iwakawa, Y

    2000-07-01

    One-night polysomnography was performed on seven subjects suffering from breath-holding spells, including one whose death was suggested to be a consequence of a breath-holding spell. The fatal case showed no rapid eye movements (REMs) during REM sleep, although he exhibited REMs during wakefulness. The average numbers of both REMs and bursts of REMs in REM sleep in the other six breath holders were significantly lower than those in age-matched controls. The breath holders showed no airway obstruction, desaturation, or sleep fragmentation. Since the rapid ocular activity in REM sleep is generated in the brain stem, we hypothesized that a functional brainstem disturbance is involved in the occurrence of breath-holding spells.

  4. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jennum, Poul; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare disabling hypersomnia disorder that may include cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, but also disrupted nighttime sleep by nocturnal awakenings, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is characterized...... by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinsonisms, but is also reported in narcolepsy in up to 60% of patients. RBD in patients with narcolepsy is, however......, a distinct phenotype with respect to other RBD patients and characterized also by absence of gender predominance, elementary rather than complex movements, less violent behavior and earlier age at onset of motor events, and strong association to narcolepsy with cataplexy/hypocretin deficiency. Patients...

  5. Do the eyes scan dream images during rapid eye movement sleep? Evidence from the rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair-Visonneau, Laurène; Oudiette, Delphine; Gaymard, Bertrand; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2010-06-01

    Rapid eye movements and complex visual dreams are salient features of human rapid eye movement sleep. However, it remains to be elucidated whether the eyes scan dream images, despite studies that have retrospectively compared the direction of rapid eye movements to the dream recall recorded after having awakened the sleeper. We used the model of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (when patients enact their dreams by persistence of muscle tone) to determine directly whether the eyes move in the same directions as the head and limbs. In 56 patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and 17 healthy matched controls, the eye movements were monitored by electrooculography in four (right, left, up and down) directions, calibrated with a target and synchronized with video and sleep monitoring. The rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder-associated behaviours occurred 2.1 times more frequently during rapid eye movement sleep with than without rapid eye movements, and more often during or after rapid eye movements than before. Rapid eye movement density, index and complexity were similar in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and controls. When rapid eye movements accompanied goal-oriented motor behaviour during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (e.g. grabbing a fictive object, hand greetings, climbing a ladder), which happened in 19 sequences, 82% were directed towards the action of the patient (same plane and direction). When restricted to the determinant rapid eye movements, the concordance increased to 90%. Rapid eye movements were absent in 38-42% of behaviours. This directional coherence between limbs, head and eye movements during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder suggests that, when present, rapid eye movements imitate the scanning of the dream scene. Since the rapid eye movements are similar in subjects with and without rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, this concordance can be extended

  6. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jennum, Poul; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-08-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare disabling hypersomnia disorder that may include cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, but also disrupted nighttime sleep by nocturnal awakenings, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is characterized by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinsonisms, but is also reported in narcolepsy in up to 60% of patients. RBD in patients with narcolepsy is, however, a distinct phenotype with respect to other RBD patients and characterized also by absence of gender predominance, elementary rather than complex movements, less violent behavior and earlier age at onset of motor events, and strong association to narcolepsy with cataplexy/hypocretin deficiency. Patients with narcolepsy often present dissociated sleep features including RSWA, increased density of phasic chin EMG and frequent shift from REM to NREM sleep, with or without associated clinical RBD. Most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy lack the hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Tonic and phasic motor activities in REM sleep and dream-enacting behavior are mostly reported in presence of cataplexy. Narcolepsy without cataplexy is a condition rarely associated with hypocretin deficiency. We proposed that hypocretin neurons are centrally involved in motor control during wakefulness and sleep in humans, and that hypocretin deficiency causes a functional defect in the motor control involved in the development of cataplexy during wakefulness and RBD/RSWA/phasic motor activity during REM sleep. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Integrated database for rapid mass movements in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jaedicke

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid gravitational slope mass movements include all kinds of short term relocation of geological material, snow or ice. Traditionally, information about such events is collected separately in different databases covering selected geographical regions and types of movement. In Norway the terrain is susceptible to all types of rapid gravitational slope mass movements ranging from single rocks hitting roads and houses to large snow avalanches and rock slides where entire mountainsides collapse into fjords creating flood waves and endangering large areas. In addition, quick clay slides occur in desalinated marine sediments in South Eastern and Mid Norway. For the authorities and inhabitants of endangered areas, the type of threat is of minor importance and mitigation measures have to consider several types of rapid mass movements simultaneously.

    An integrated national database for all types of rapid mass movements built around individual events has been established. Only three data entries are mandatory: time, location and type of movement. The remaining optional parameters enable recording of detailed information about the terrain, materials involved and damages caused. Pictures, movies and other documentation can be uploaded into the database. A web-based graphical user interface has been developed allowing new events to be entered, as well as editing and querying for all events. An integration of the database into a GIS system is currently under development.

    Datasets from various national sources like the road authorities and the Geological Survey of Norway were imported into the database. Today, the database contains 33 000 rapid mass movement events from the last five hundred years covering the entire country. A first analysis of the data shows that the most frequent type of recorded rapid mass movement is rock slides and snow avalanches followed by debris slides in third place. Most events are recorded in the steep fjord

  8. Integrated database for rapid mass movements in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaedicke, C.; Lied, K.; Kronholm, K.

    2009-03-01

    Rapid gravitational slope mass movements include all kinds of short term relocation of geological material, snow or ice. Traditionally, information about such events is collected separately in different databases covering selected geographical regions and types of movement. In Norway the terrain is susceptible to all types of rapid gravitational slope mass movements ranging from single rocks hitting roads and houses to large snow avalanches and rock slides where entire mountainsides collapse into fjords creating flood waves and endangering large areas. In addition, quick clay slides occur in desalinated marine sediments in South Eastern and Mid Norway. For the authorities and inhabitants of endangered areas, the type of threat is of minor importance and mitigation measures have to consider several types of rapid mass movements simultaneously. An integrated national database for all types of rapid mass movements built around individual events has been established. Only three data entries are mandatory: time, location and type of movement. The remaining optional parameters enable recording of detailed information about the terrain, materials involved and damages caused. Pictures, movies and other documentation can be uploaded into the database. A web-based graphical user interface has been developed allowing new events to be entered, as well as editing and querying for all events. An integration of the database into a GIS system is currently under development. Datasets from various national sources like the road authorities and the Geological Survey of Norway were imported into the database. Today, the database contains 33 000 rapid mass movement events from the last five hundred years covering the entire country. A first analysis of the data shows that the most frequent type of recorded rapid mass movement is rock slides and snow avalanches followed by debris slides in third place. Most events are recorded in the steep fjord terrain of the Norwegian west coast, but

  9. Role of hydrophobic and ionic forces in the movement of S4 of the Shaker potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David J S; Neale, Edward J; Munsey, Tim S; Bannister, John P; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2012-12-01

    Voltage-gated ion (K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+)) channels contain a pore domain (PD) surrounded by four voltage sensing domains (VSD). Each VSD is made up of four transmembrane helices, S1-S4. S4 contains 6-7 positively charged residues (arginine/lysine) separated two hydrophobic residues, whereas S1-S3 contribute to two negatively charged clusters. These structures are conserved among all members of the voltage-gated ion channel family and play essential roles in voltage gating. The role of S4 charged residues in voltage gating is well established: During depolarization, they move out of the membrane electric field, exerting a mechanical force on channel gates, causing them to open. However, the role of the intervening hydrophobic residues in voltage sensing is unclear. Here we studied the role of these residues in the prototypical Shaker potassium channel. We have altered the physicochemical properties of both charged and hydrophobic positions of S4 and examined the effect of these modifications on the gating properties of the channel. For this, we have introduced cysteines at each of these positions, expressed the mutants in Xenopus oocytes, and examined the effect of in situ addition of charge, via Cd(2+), on channel gating by two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results reveal a face of the S4 helix (comprising residues L358, L361, R365 and R368) where introduction of charge at hydrophobic positions destabilises the closed state and removal of charges from charged positions has an opposite effect. We propose that hydrophobic residues play a crucial role in limiting gating to a physiological voltage range.

  10. Characteristics of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Frandsen, Rune Asger Vestergaard; Knudsen, Stine

    2013-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with Parkinsonian disorders, but is also reported in narcolepsy. Most patients with narcol...

  11. Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Zoetmulder, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by a history of recurrent nocturnal dream enactment behavior and loss of skeletal muscle atonia and increased phasic muscle activity during REM sleep: REM sleep without atonia. RBD and associated comorbidities ha...

  12. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder and Neurodegenerative Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Michael Joseph; Schenck, Carlos Hugh

    2015-06-01

    The dream enactment of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is often the first indication of an impending α-synuclein disorder, such as Parkinson disease, multiple-system atrophy, or dementia with Lewy bodies. To provide an overview of RBD from the onset of dream enactment through the emergence of a parkinsonian disorder. Peer-reviewed articles, including case reports, case series, retrospective reviews, prospective randomized trials, and basic science investigations, were identified in a PubMed search of articles on RBD from January 1, 1986, through July 31, 2014. Under normal conditions, vivid dream mentation combined with skeletal muscle paralysis characterizes rapid eye movement sleep. In RBD, α-synuclein abnormalities in the brainstem disinhibit rapid eye movement sleep motor activity, leading to dream enactment. The behaviors of RBD are often theatrical, with complexity, aggression, and violence; fighting and fleeing actions can be injurious to patients as well as bed partners. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is distinguished from other parasomnias by clinical features and the demonstration of rapid eye movement sleep without atonia on polysomnography. Consistent with early neurodegeneration, patients with RBD demonstrate subtle motor, cognitive, and autonomic impairments. Approximately 50% of patients with spontaneous RBD will convert to a parkinsonian disorder within a decade. Ultimately, nearly all (81%-90%) patients with RBD develop a neurodegenerative disorder. Among patients with Parkinson disease, RBD predicts a non-tremor-predominant subtype, gait freezing, and an aggressive clinical course. The most commonly cited RBD treatments include low-dose clonazepam or high-dose melatonin taken orally at bedtime. Treatment of RBD can prevent injury to patients and bed partners. Because RBD is a prodromal syndrome of Parkinson disease (or related disorder), it represents a unique opportunity for developing and testing disease

  13. Detecting rapid mass movements using electrical self-potential measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Thomas; Limbrock, Jonas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Kemna, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Rapid mass movements are a latent danger for lives and infrastructure in almost any part of the world. Often such mass movements are caused by increasing pore pressure, for example, landslides after heavy rainfall or dam breaking after intrusion of water in the dam. Among several other geophysical methods used to observe water movement, the electrical self-potential method has been applied to a broad range of monitoring studies, especially focusing on volcanism and dam leakage but also during hydraulic fracturing and for earthquake prediction. Electrical self-potential signals may be caused by various mechanisms. Though, the most relevant source of the self-potential field in the given context is the streaming potential, caused by a flowing electrolyte through porous media with electrically charged internal surfaces. So far, existing models focus on monitoring water flow in non-deformable porous media. However, as the self-potential is sensitive to hydraulic parameters of the soil, any change in these parameters will cause an alteration of the electric signal. Mass movement will significantly influence the hydraulic parameters of the solid as well as the pressure field, assuming that fluid movement is faster than the pressure diffusion. We will present results of laboratory experiments under drained and undrained conditions with fluid triggered as well as manually triggered mass movements, monitored with self-potential measurements. For the undrained scenarios, we observe a clear correlation between the mass movements and signals in the electric potential, which clearly differ from the underlying potential variations due to increased saturation and fluid flow. In the drained experiments, we do not observe any measurable change in the electric potential. We therefore assume that change in fluid properties and release of the load causes disturbances in flow and streaming potential. We will discuss results of numerical simulations reproducing the observed effect. Our

  14. Genetics of rapid eye movement sleep in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Adamczyk, M.; Ambrosius, U; Lietzenmaier, S; Wichniak, A; Holsboer, F.; Friess, E

    2015-01-01

    The trait-like nature of electroencephalogram (EEG) is well established. Furthermore, EEG of wake and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep has been shown to be highly heritable. However, the genetic effects on REM sleep EEG microstructure are as yet unknown. REM sleep is of special interest since animal and human data suggest a connection between REM sleep abnormalities and the pathophysiology of psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here we report the results of a study in monozygotic (MZ...

  15. Rapid Detection of Small Movements with GNSS Doppler Observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensinn, Roland; Geiger, Alain

    2017-04-01

    High-alpine terrain reacts very sensitively to varying environmental conditions. As an example, increasing temperatures cause thawing of permafrost areas. This, in turn causes an increasing threat by natural hazards like debris flow (e.g. rock glaciers) or rockfalls. The Institute of Geodesy and Photogrammetry is contributing to alpine mass-movement monitoring systems in different project areas in the Swiss Alps. A main focus lies on providing geodetic mass-movement information derived from GNSS static solutions on a daily and a sub-daily basis, obtained with low-cost and autonomous GNSS stations. Another focus is set on rapidly providing reliable geodetic information in real-time i.e. for an integration in early warning systems. One way to achieve this is the estimation of accurate station velocities from observations of range rates, which can be obtained as Doppler observables from time derivatives of carrier phase measurements. The key for this method lies in a precise modeling of prominent effects contributing to the observed range rates, which are satellite velocity, atmospheric delay rates and relativistic effects. A suitable observation model is then devised, which accounts for these predictions. The observation model, combined with a simple kinematic movement model forms the basis for the parameter estimation. Based on the estimated station velocities, movements are then detected using a statistical test. To improve the reliablity of the estimated parameters, another spotlight is set on an on-line quality control procedure. We will present the basic algorithms as well as results from first tests which were carried out with a low-cost GPS L1 phase receiver. With a u-blox module and a sampling rate of 5 Hz, accuracies on the mm/s level can be obtained and velocities down to 1 cm/s can be detected. Reliable and accurate station velocities and movement information can be provided within seconds.

  16. Morbidities in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Mayer, Geert; Ju, Yo-El

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (iRBD, RBD without any obvious comorbid major neurological disease), is strongly associated with numerous comorbid conditions. The most prominent is that with neurodegenerative disorders, especially synuclein-mediated disorders, above all...... of dementia with Lewy bodies. These findings underline the progressive disease process, suggesting involvement of more brain regions in patients with a more advanced disease stage. RBD is also associated with narcolepsy, and it is likely that RBD associated with narcolepsy is a distinct subtype associated...

  17. The improvement of movement and speech during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cock, Valérie Cochen; Debs, Rachel; Oudiette, Delphine; Leu, Smaranda; Radji, Fatai; Tiberge, Michel; Yu, Huan; Bayard, Sophie; Roze, Emmanuel; Vidailhet, Marie; Dauvilliers, Yves; Rascol, Olivier; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2011-03-01

    Multiple system atrophy is an atypical parkinsonism characterized by severe motor disabilities that are poorly levodopa responsive. Most patients develop rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. Because parkinsonism is absent during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease, we studied the movements of patients with multiple system atrophy during rapid eye movement sleep. Forty-nine non-demented patients with multiple system atrophy and 49 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease were interviewed along with their 98 bed partners using a structured questionnaire. They rated the quality of movements, vocal and facial expressions during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder as better than, equal to or worse than the same activities in an awake state. Sleep and movements were monitored using video-polysomnography in 22/49 patients with multiple system atrophy and in 19/49 patients with Parkinson's disease. These recordings were analysed for the presence of parkinsonism and cerebellar syndrome during rapid eye movement sleep movements. Clinical rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder was observed in 43/49 (88%) patients with multiple system atrophy. Reports from the 31/43 bed partners who were able to evaluate movements during sleep indicate that 81% of the patients showed some form of improvement during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. These included improved movement (73% of patients: faster, 67%; stronger, 52%; and smoother, 26%), improved speech (59% of patients: louder, 55%; more intelligible, 17%; and better articulated, 36%) and normalized facial expression (50% of patients). The rate of improvement was higher in Parkinson's disease than in multiple system atrophy, but no further difference was observed between the two forms of multiple system atrophy (predominant parkinsonism versus cerebellar syndrome). Video-monitored movements during rapid eye movement sleep in patients with multiple system

  18. Modeling rapid mass movements using the shallow water equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergarten, S.; Robl, J.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a new method to model rapid mass movements on complex topography using the shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates. These equations are the widely used standard approximation for the flow of water in rivers and shallow lakes, but the main prerequisite for their application - an almost horizontal fluid table - is in general not satisfied for avalanches and debris flows in steep terrain. Therefore, we have developed appropriate correction terms for large topographic gradients. In this study we present the mathematical formulation of these correction terms and their implementation in the open source flow solver GERRIS. This novel approach is evaluated by simulating avalanches on synthetic and finally natural topographies and the widely used Voellmy flow resistance law. The results are tested against analytical solutions and the commercial avalanche model RAMMS. The overall results are in excellent agreement with the reference system RAMMS, and the deviations between the different models are far below the uncertainties in the determination of the relevant fluid parameters and involved avalanche volumes in reality. As this code is freely available and open source, it can be easily extended by additional fluid models or source areas, making this model suitable for simulating several types of rapid mass movements. It therefore provides a valuable tool assisting regional scale natural hazard studies.

  19. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with narcolepsy is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2010-01-01

    that rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder coexists with cataplexy in narcolepsy due to hypocretin deficiency. In our study, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder was diagnosed by the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (2nd edition) criteria in 63 narcolepsy patients with or without......Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by dream-enacting behaviour and impaired motor inhibition during rapid eye movement sleep. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders, but also reported in narcolepsy with cataplexy....... Most narcolepsy with cataplexy patients lack the sleep-wake, and rapid eye movement sleep, motor-regulating hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. In contrast, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and hypocretin deficiency are rare in narcolepsy without cataplexy. We hypothesized...

  20. [Parkinson Disease With Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by lack of muscle atonia during REM sleep and enactment of dream content. RBD is associated with Parkinson disease (PD) and has high incidence in PD patients. PD patient with RBD mainly presents rigid type, has longer disease duration, more severe motor and non-motor symptoms and poorer activity of daily living and life quality. The pathophysiological mechanisms of RBD may be related to dysfunctions of pontine tegmentum, locus coeruleus/sub-locus coeruleus complex and related projections. The diagnosis of RBD depends on clinical histories and video-polysomnography (v-PSG). Besides treatment for PD, protective measures have to be taken for patients and their sleep partners. If abnormal behaviors during sleep cause distress and danger,patients should be given drug therapy.

  1. Cognition in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François eGagnon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD is a parasomnia characterized by excessive muscle activity and undesirable motor events during REM sleep. RBD occurs in approximately 0.5% of the general population, with a higher prevalence in older men. RBD is a frequent feature of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, but is only rarely reported in Alzheimer’s disease. RBD is also a risk factor for α-synuclein-related diseases, such as DLB, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and multiple system atrophy. Therefore, RBD has major implications for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and for understanding neurodegeneration mechanisms. Several markers of neurodegeneration have been identified in RBD, including cognitive impairments such as deficits in attention, executive functions, learning capacities, and visuospatial abilities. Approximately 50% of RBD patients present mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Moreover, RBD is also associated with cognitive decline in PD.

  2. Detection of rapid-eye movements in sleep studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajeev; Takeuchi, Tomoka; Laroche, Suzie; Gotman, Jean

    2005-08-01

    One of the key features of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep is the presence of bursts of REMs. Sleep studies routinely use REMs to classify sleep stages. Moreover, REM count or density has been used in studies involving learning and various psychiatric disorders. Most of these studies have been based on the visual identification of REMs, which is generally a very time-consuming task. This and the varying definitions of REMs across scorers have warranted the development of automatic REM detection methodologies. In this paper, we present a new detection scheme that combines many of the intrinsic properties of REMs and requires minimal parameter adjustments. In the proposed method, a single parameter can be used to control the REM detection sensitivity and specificity tradeoff. Manually scored training data are used to develop the method. We assess the performance of the method against manual scoring of individual REM events and present validation results using a separate data set. The ability of the method to discriminate fast horizontal ocular movement in REM sleep from other types of events is highlighted. A key advantage of the presented method is the minimal a priori information requirement. The results of training data (recordings from five subjects) show an overall sensitivity of 78.8% and specificity of 81.6%. The performance on the testing data (recording from five subjects different from the training data) showed overall sensitivity of 67.2% and specificity of 77.5%.

  3. Investigating rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in Parkinson's disease using the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder screening questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolitho, Samuel J; Naismith, Sharon L; Terpening, Zoe; Grunstein, Ron R; Melehan, Kerri; Yee, Brendon J; Coeytaux, Alessandra; Gilat, Moran; Lewis, Simon J G

    2014-05-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently observed in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Accurate diagnosis is essential for managing this condition. Furthermore, the emergence of idiopathic RBD in later life can represent a premotor feature, heralding the development of PD. Reliable, accurate methods for identifying RBD may offer a window for early intervention. This study sought to identify whether the RBD screening questionnaire (RBDSQ) and three questionnaires focused on dream enactment were able to correctly identify patients with REM without atonia (RWA), the neurophysiological hallmark of RBD. Forty-six patients with PD underwent neurological and sleep assessment in addition to completing the RBDSQ, the RBD single question (RBD1Q), and the Mayo Sleep Questionnaire (MSQ). The REM atonia index was derived for all participants as an objective measure of RWA. Patients identified to be RBD positive on the RBDSQ did not show increased RWA on polysomnography (80% sensitivity and 55% specificity). However, patients positive for RBD on questionnaires specific to dream enactment correctly identified higher degrees of RWA and improved the diagnostic accuracy of these questionnaires. This study suggests that the RBDSQ does not accurately identify RWA, essential for diagnosing RBD in PD. Furthermore, the results suggest that self-report measures of RBD need to focus questions on dream enactment behavior to better identify RWA and RBD. Further studies are needed to develop accurate determination and quantification of RWA in RBD to improve management of patients with PD in the future. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Ictal SPECT in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Geert; Bitterlich, Marion; Kuwert, Torsten; Ritt, Philipp; Stefan, Hermann

    2015-05-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is a rapid eye movement parasomnia clinically characterized by acting out dreams due to disinhibition of muscle tone in rapid eye movement sleep. Up to 80-90% of the patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder develop neurodegenerative disorders within 10-15 years after symptom onset. The disorder is reported in 45-60% of all narcoleptic patients. Whether rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is also a predictor for neurodegeneration in narcolepsy is not known. Although the pathophysiology causing the disinhibition of muscle tone in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder has been studied extensively in animals, little is known about the mechanisms in humans. Most of the human data are from imaging or post-mortem studies. Recent studies show altered functional connectivity between substantia nigra and striatum in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. We were interested to study which regions are activated in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder during actual episodes by performing ictal single photon emission tomography. We studied one patient with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, one with Parkinson's disease and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, and two patients with narcolepsy and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. All patients underwent extended video polysomnography. The tracer was injected after at least 10 s of consecutive rapid eye movement sleep and 10 s of disinhibited muscle tone accompanied by movements registered by an experienced sleep technician. Ictal single photon emission tomography displayed the same activation in the bilateral premotor areas, the interhemispheric cleft, the periaqueductal area, the dorsal and ventral pons and the anterior lobe of the cerebellum in all patients. Our study shows that in patients with Parkinson's disease and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder-in contrast to wakefulness

  5. [Electromyography Analysis of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Natsuko; Kinoshita, Fumiya; Takada, Hiroki; Nakayama, Meiho

    2018-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG), which records physiological phenomena including brain waves, breathing status, and muscle tonus, is useful for the diagnosis of sleep disorders as a gold standard. However, measurement and analysis are complex for several specific sleep disorders, such as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Usually, brain waves during REM sleep indicate an awakening pattern under relaxed conditions of skeletal and antigravity muscles. However, these muscles are activated during REM sleep when patients suffer from RBD. These activated muscle movements during REM, so-called REM without atonia (RWA) recorded by PSG, may be related to a neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson's disease. Thus, careful analysis of RWA is significant not only physically, but also clinically. Commonly, manual viewing measurement analysis of RWA is time-consuming. Therefore, quantitative studies on RWA are rarely reported. A software program, developed from Microsoft Office Excel ® , was used to semiautomatically analyze the RWA ratio extracted from PSG to compare with manual viewing measurement analysis. In addition, a quantitative muscle tonus study was carried out to evaluate the effect of medication on RBD patients. Using this new software program, we were able to analyze RWA on the same cases in approximately 15 min as compared with 60 min in the manual viewing measurement analysis. This software program can not only quantify RWA easily but also identify RWA waves for either phasic or tonic bursts. We consider that this software program will support physicians and scientists in their future research on RBD. We are planning to offer this software program for free to physicians and scientists.

  6. Dopamine transporter imaging in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Kyeong; Yoon, In Young; Kim, Jong Min; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Byung Chul; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The pathogenesis of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is still unknown. However, involvement of dopaminergic system in RBD has been hypothesized because of frequent association with degenerative movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent and pattern of loss of dopamine transporter in RBD using FP-CIT SPECT. Fourteen patient with idiopathic RBD (mean age:665 yrs, M:F=10:3) participated in this study. Polysonmography confirmed loss of REM atonia and determined RBD severities by amount of tonic/phasic muscle activity during REM sleep in all cases. To compare with RBD, 14 early idiopathic Parkinson's disease rated as Hoehn and Yahr stage 1 (IPD) and 12 healthy controls were also selected. All participants performed single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging 3 hours after injection of [123I]FP-CIT. Regions of interest were drawn on bilateral caudate and putamen, whole striatum and occipital cortex. Specific binding for dopamine transporters (DAT) were calculated using region to occipital uptake ratio based on the transient equilibrium method. Overall mean of DAT density in the striatum was lower in RBD group than controls, and higher than IPD group, However, DAT density in most individual RBD was still within normal range, and total striatal DAT density was not correlated with severity of RBD. Meanwhile, the caudate to putamen uptake ratio (C/P ratio) in RBD group was insignificantly higher than those in healthy controls. Nevertheless, C/P ratio within RBD group was reversely correlated with the RBD severity. Our study suggested that nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration could be a part of the pathogenesis of RBD, but not essential for the development of RBD. Further longitudinal evaluation of presynaptic dopaminergic system in idiopathic RBD may guarantee the more understanding for RBD and associated neurodegenerative disease.

  7. Rapid Eye Movement and Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Contributions in Memory Consolidation and Resistance to Retroactive Interference for Verbal Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Gaétane; Leproult, Rachel; Neu, Daniel; Peigneux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypothesis that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep contributes to the consolidation of new memories, whereas non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep contributes to the prevention of retroactive interference. Design: Randomized, crossover study. Setting: Two sessions of either a morning nap or wakefulness. Participants: Twenty-five healthy young adults. Interventions: Declarative learning of word pairs followed by a nap or a wake interval, then learning of interfering word pairs and delayed recall of list A. Measurements and Results: After a restricted night (24:00-06:00), participants learned a list of word pairs (list A). They were then required to either take a nap or stay awake during 45 min, after which they learned a second list of word pairs (list B) and then had to recall list A. Fifty percent of word pairs in list B shared the first word with list A, resulting in interference. Ten subjects exhibited REM sleep whereas 13 subjects exhibited NREM stage 3 (N3) sleep. An interference effect was observed in the nap but not in the wake condition. In post-learning naps, N3 sleep was associated with a reduced interference effect, which was not the case for REM sleep. Moreover, participants exhibiting N3 sleep in the post-learning nap condition also showed a reduced interference effect in the wake condition, suggesting a higher protection ability against interference. Conclusion: Our results partly support the hypothesis that non-rapid eye movement sleep contributes in protecting novel memories against interference. However, rapid eye movement sleep-related consolidation is not evidenced. Citation: Deliens G; Leproult R; Neu D; Peigneux P. Rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep contributions in memory consolidation and resistance to retroactive interference for verbal material. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1875-1883. PMID:24293762

  8. Rapid eye movement sleep disturbances in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnulf, I.; Nielsen, J.; Lohmann, E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders including insomnia, movements during sleep, and daytime sleepiness are common but poorly studied in Huntington disease (HD). Objective: To evaluate the HD sleep-wake phenotype (including abnormal motor activity during sleep) in patients with various HD stages and the l......Background: Sleep disorders including insomnia, movements during sleep, and daytime sleepiness are common but poorly studied in Huntington disease (HD). Objective: To evaluate the HD sleep-wake phenotype (including abnormal motor activity during sleep) in patients with various HD stages...

  9. Rapid intermittent movement of axonal neurofilaments observed by fluorescence photobleaching

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, L; Brown, A

    2001-01-01

    Observations on naturally occurring gaps in the axonal neurofilament array of cultured neurons have demonstrated that neurofilament polymers move along axons in a rapid, intermittent, and highly asynchronous manner...

  10. The nasal and gut microbiome in Parkinson's disease and idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Pandey, Urvashi; Wicke, Tamara; Sixel-Döring, Friederike; Janzen, Annette; Sittig-Wiegand, Elisabeth; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Mollenhauer, Brit; Wilmes, Paul

    2017-08-26

    Increasing evidence connects the gut microbiota and the onset and/or phenotype of Parkinson's disease (PD). Differences in the abundances of specific bacterial taxa have been reported in PD patients. It is, however, unknown whether these differences can be observed in individuals at high risk, for example, with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, a prodromal condition of α-synuclein aggregation disorders including PD. To compare microbiota in carefully preserved nasal wash and stool samples of subjects with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, manifest PD, and healthy individuals. Microbiota of flash-frozen stool and nasal wash samples from 76 PD patients, 21 idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder patients, and 78 healthy controls were assessed by 16S and 18S ribosomal RNA amplicon sequencing. Seventy variables, related to demographics, clinical parameters including nonmotor symptoms, and sample processing, were analyzed in relation to microbiome variability and controlled differential analyses were performed. Differentially abundant gut microbes, such as Akkermansia, were observed in PD, but no strong differences in nasal microbiota. Eighty percent of the differential gut microbes in PD versus healthy controls showed similar trends in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, for example, Anaerotruncus and several Bacteroides spp., and correlated with nonmotor symptoms. Metagenomic sequencing of select samples enabled the reconstruction of genomes of so far uncharacterized differentially abundant organisms. Our study reveals differential abundances of gut microbial taxa in PD and its prodrome idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in comparison to the healthy controls, and highlights the potential of metagenomics to identify and characterize microbial taxa, which are enriched or depleted in PD and/or idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. © 2017 The Authors. Movement

  11. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease: magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Andrew H; Duncan, Gordon W; Firbank, Michael J; Yarnall, Alison J; Khoo, Tien K; Burn, David J; O'Brien, John T

    2013-06-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder has poor prognostic implications for Parkinson's disease. The authors recruited 124 patients with early Parkinson's disease to compare clinical and neuroimaging findings based on the presence of this sleep disorder. The presence of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder was assessed with the Mayo Sleep Questionnaire. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences were obtained for voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging. Patients with sleep disorder had more advanced disease, but groups had similar clinical characteristics and cognitive performance. Those with sleep disorder had areas of reduced cortical grey matter volume and white matter changes compared with those who did not have sleep disorder. However, differences were slight and were not significant when the analyses were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder was associated with subtle changes in white matter integrity and grey matter volume in patients with early Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Recent data on rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in patients with Parkinson disease: analysis of behaviors, movements, and periodic limb movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochen De Cock, Valérie

    2013-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a fascinating parasomnia in which patients are able to enact their dreams because of a lack of muscle atonia during REM sleep. RBD represents a unique window into the dream world. Frequently associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), RBD raises various issues about dream modifications in this pathology and about aggressiveness during RBD episodes in placid patients during wakefulness. Studies on these behaviors have underlined their non-stereotyped, action-filled and violent characteristics but also their isomorphism with dream content. Complex, learnt behaviors may reflect the cortical involvement in this parasomnia but the more frequent elementary movements and the associated periodic limb movements during sleep also implicate the brainstem. Surprisingly, patients with PD have an improvement of their movements during their RBD as if they were disease-free. Also not yet understood, this improvement of movement during REM sleep raises issues about the pathways involved in RBD and about the possibility of using this pathway to improve movement in PD during the day. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality of life in patients with an idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keun Tae; Motamedi, Gholam K; Cho, Yong Won

    2017-08-01

    There have been few quality of life studies in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. We compared the quality of life in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder patients to healthy controls, patients with hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus without complication and idiopathic restless legs syndrome. Sixty patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (24 female; mean age: 61.43 ± 8.99) were enrolled retrospectively. The diagnosis was established based on sleep history, overnight polysomnography, neurological examination and Mini-Mental State Examination to exclude secondary rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. All subjects completed questionnaires, including the Short Form 36-item Health Survey for quality of life. The total quality of life score in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (70.63 ± 20.83) was lower than in the healthy control group (83.38 ± 7.96) but higher than in the hypertension (60.55 ± 24.82), diabetes mellitus (62.42 ± 19.37) and restless legs syndrome (61.77 ± 19.25) groups. The total score of idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder patients had a negative correlation with the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (r = -0.498, P Health Survey score and the Insomnia Severity Index (β = -1.100, P = 0.001) and Beck Depression Inventory-2 (β = -1.038, P sleep behaviour disorder had a significant negative impact on quality of life, although this effect was less than that of other chronic disorders. This negative effect might be related to a depressive mood associated with the disease. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. The role of rapid eye movement sleep for amygdala-related memory processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genzel, L.K.E.; Spoormaker, V.I.; Konrad, B.N.; Dresler, M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the years, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep has been associated with general memory consolidation, specific consolidation of perceptual, procedural, emotional and fear memories, brain maturation and preparation of waking consciousness. More recently, some of these associations (e.g., general and

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder--diagnostik, årsager og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical...

  16. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with narcolepsy is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2010-01-01

    variables were analysed in relation to cataplexy and hypocretin deficiency with uni- and multivariate logistic/linear regression models, controlling for possible rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder biasing factors (age, gender, disease duration, previous anti-cataplexy medication). Only hypocretin...

  17. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder--diagnostik, årsager og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical and neu...

  18. Disrupted rapid eye movement sleep predicts poor declarative memory performance in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinska, Malgorzata; Timol, Ridwana; Kaminer, Debra; Thomas, Kevin G F

    2014-06-01

    Successful memory consolidation during sleep depends on healthy slow-wave and rapid eye movement sleep, and on successful transition across sleep stages. In post-traumatic stress disorder, sleep is disrupted and memory is impaired, but relations between these two variables in the psychiatric condition remain unexplored. We examined whether disrupted sleep, and consequent disrupted memory consolidation, is a mechanism underlying declarative memory deficits in post-traumatic stress disorder. We recruited three matched groups of participants: post-traumatic stress disorder (n = 16); trauma-exposed non-post-traumatic stress disorder (n = 15); and healthy control (n = 14). They completed memory tasks before and after 8 h of sleep. We measured sleep variables using sleep-adapted electroencephalography. Post-traumatic stress disorder-diagnosed participants experienced significantly less sleep efficiency and rapid eye movement sleep percentage, and experienced more awakenings and wake percentage in the second half of the night than did participants in the other two groups. After sleep, post-traumatic stress disorder-diagnosed participants retained significantly less information on a declarative memory task than controls. Rapid eye movement percentage, wake percentage and sleep efficiency correlated with retention of information over the night. Furthermore, lower rapid eye movement percentage predicted poorer retention in post-traumatic stress disorder-diagnosed individuals. Our results suggest that declarative memory consolidation is disrupted during sleep in post-traumatic stress disorder. These data are consistent with theories suggesting that sleep benefits memory consolidation via predictable neurobiological mechanisms, and that rapid eye movement disruption is more than a symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  19. Rapid eye movements during sleep in mice: high trait-like stability qualifies rapid eye movement density for characterization of phenotypic variation in sleep patterns of rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Stephany; Romanowski, Christoph P N; Becker, Andreas; Wetter, Thomas C; Kimura, Mayumi; Fenzel, Thomas

    2011-11-02

    In humans, rapid eye movements (REM) density during REM sleep plays a prominent role in psychiatric diseases. Especially in depression, an increased REM density is a vulnerability marker for depression. In clinical practice and research measurement of REM density is highly standardized. In basic animal research, almost no tools are available to obtain and systematically evaluate eye movement data, although, this would create increased comparability between human and animal sleep studies. We obtained standardized electroencephalographic (EEG), electromyographic (EMG) and electrooculographic (EOG) signals from freely behaving mice. EOG electrodes were bilaterally and chronically implanted with placement of the electrodes directly between the musculus rectus superior and musculus rectus lateralis. After recovery, EEG, EMG and EOG signals were obtained for four days. Subsequent to the implantation process, we developed and validated an Eye Movement scoring in Mice Algorithm (EMMA) to detect REM as singularities of the EOG signal, based on wavelet methodology. The distribution of wakefulness, non-REM (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was typical of nocturnal rodents with small amounts of wakefulness and large amounts of NREM sleep during the light period and reversed proportions during the dark period. REM sleep was distributed correspondingly. REM density was significantly higher during REM sleep than NREM sleep. REM bursts were detected more often at the end of the dark period than the beginning of the light period. During REM sleep REM density showed an ultradian course, and during NREM sleep REM density peaked at the beginning of the dark period. Concerning individual eye movements, REM duration was longer and amplitude was lower during REM sleep than NREM sleep. The majority of single REM and REM bursts were associated with micro-arousals during NREM sleep, but not during REM sleep. Sleep-stage specific distributions of REM in mice correspond to human

  20. Rapid eye movements during sleep in mice: High trait-like stability qualifies rapid eye movement density for characterization of phenotypic variation in sleep patterns of rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulda Stephany

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, rapid eye movements (REM density during REM sleep plays a prominent role in psychiatric diseases. Especially in depression, an increased REM density is a vulnerability marker for depression. In clinical practice and research measurement of REM density is highly standardized. In basic animal research, almost no tools are available to obtain and systematically evaluate eye movement data, although, this would create increased comparability between human and animal sleep studies. Methods We obtained standardized electroencephalographic (EEG, electromyographic (EMG and electrooculographic (EOG signals from freely behaving mice. EOG electrodes were bilaterally and chronically implanted with placement of the electrodes directly between the musculus rectus superior and musculus rectus lateralis. After recovery, EEG, EMG and EOG signals were obtained for four days. Subsequent to the implantation process, we developed and validated an Eye Movement scoring in Mice Algorithm (EMMA to detect REM as singularities of the EOG signal, based on wavelet methodology. Results The distribution of wakefulness, non-REM (NREM sleep and rapid eye movement (REM sleep was typical of nocturnal rodents with small amounts of wakefulness and large amounts of NREM sleep during the light period and reversed proportions during the dark period. REM sleep was distributed correspondingly. REM density was significantly higher during REM sleep than NREM sleep. REM bursts were detected more often at the end of the dark period than the beginning of the light period. During REM sleep REM density showed an ultradian course, and during NREM sleep REM density peaked at the beginning of the dark period. Concerning individual eye movements, REM duration was longer and amplitude was lower during REM sleep than NREM sleep. The majority of single REM and REM bursts were associated with micro-arousals during NREM sleep, but not during REM sleep. Conclusions Sleep

  1. Rapid eye movement sleep behavioral events: a new marker for neurodegeneration in early Parkinson disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixel-Döring, Friederike; Trautmann, Ellen; Mollenhauer, Brit; Trenkwalder, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    To analyze potential markers in sleep for early recognition of neurodegenerative disease in newly diagnosed, unmedicated patients with Parkinson disease (PD) compared to controls. Videopolysomnography (vPSG) was available in 158 newly diagnosed, unmedicated patients with PD and 110 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HC). Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was analyzed for REM without atonia (RWA) and studied by review of time-synchronized video. Motor behaviors and/or vocalizations in REM sleep with a purposeful component other than comfort moves were identified as REM sleep behavioral events (RBE). Two or more events had to be present to be classified as "RBE positive." RBE subjects included rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and non-RBD subjects based on the presence or absence of RWA > 18.2%. RBE were detected in 81 of 158 patients with de novo PD (51%) and 17 of 110 HC (15%) (P sleep (P = 0.002) and a higher periodic leg movements in sleep index (P = 0.022) compared to subjects without RBE. This first description of REM sleep behavioral events (RBE) shows it occurs more frequently in patients with de novo Parkinson disease (PD) than in healthy controls and may be an early sign of neurodegeneration and precede rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). There is no specific phenotype of PD associated with newly defined RBE or RBD at this early stage.

  2. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder as an outlier detection problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempfner, Jacob; Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Nikolic, M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder is a strong early marker of Parkinson's disease and is characterized by REM sleep without atonia and/or dream enactment. Because these measures are subject to individual interpretation, there is consequently need...... for quantitative methods to establish objective criteria. This study proposes a semiautomatic algorithm for the early detection of Parkinson's disease. This is achieved by distinguishing between normal REM sleep and REM sleep without atonia by considering muscle activity as an outlier detection problem. METHODS...... limb movements did only have a minor influence on the quantification of the muscle activity. Analysis of muscle activity during nonrapid eye movement sleep may improve the separation even further. Copyright © 2014 by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society....

  3. Research progress on the pathogenesis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-yang JIANG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD is a sleep disorder characterized by the disappearance of muscle relaxation and enacting one's dreams during rapid eye movement (REM, with most of the dreams being violent or aggressive. Prevalence of RBD, based on population, is 0.38%-2.01%, but it becomes much higher in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, especially α - synucleinopathies. RBD may herald the emergence of α-synucleinopathies by decades, thus it may be used as an effective early marker of neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we summarized the progress on the pathogenesis of RBD and its relationship with neurodegenerative diseases. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.10.003

  4. A single-question screen for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postuma, Ronald B; Arnulf, Isabelle; Hogl, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia that is an important risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Lewy body dementia. Its prevalence is unknown. One barrier to determining prevalence is that current screening tools are too long for large-scale epi......Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia that is an important risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Lewy body dementia. Its prevalence is unknown. One barrier to determining prevalence is that current screening tools are too long for large......-scale epidemiologic surveys. Therefore, we designed the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Single-Question Screen (RBD1Q), a screening question for dream enactment with a simple yes/no response....

  5. Importance of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder to the Primary Care Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarter, Stuart J; Howell, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Sleep disorders and neurodegenerative diseases are commonly encountered in primary care. A common, but underdiagnosed sleep disorder, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), is highly associated with Parkinson disease and related disorders. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is common. It is estimated to affect 0.5% of the general population and more than 7% of individuals older than 60 years; however, most cases go unrecognized. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder presents as dream enactment, often with patients thrashing, punching, and kicking while they are sleeping. Physicians can quickly assess for the presence of RBD with high sensitivity and specificity by asking patients the question "Have you ever been told that you act out your dreams, for example by punching or flailing your arms in the air or screaming and shouting in your sleep?" Patients with RBD exhibit subtle signs of neurodegenerative disease, such as mild motor slowing, constipation, or changes in sense of smell. These signs and symptoms may predict development of a neurodegenerative disease within 3 years. Ultimately, most patients with RBD develop a neurodegenerative disease, highlighting the importance of serial neurological examinations to assess for the presence of parkinsonism and/or cognitive impairment and prognostic counseling for these patients. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is treatable with melatonin (3-6 mg before bed) or clonazepam (0.5-1 mg before bed) and may be the most common, reversible cause of sleep-related injury. Thus, it is important to identify patients at risk of RBD in a primary care setting so that bedroom safety can be addressed and treatment may be initiated. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dream Anxiety in Patients with Rapid Eye Movement Dependent Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ece Yazla; Mustafa Bilici; Zerrin Pelin

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the breathing disorders that arise during sleep and are predominantly observed in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) phase onto the dreams which have negative effects on daily life. While doing this, we also investigated differences between the REM dependent and non REM dependent obstructive sleep apnea syndrome groups in terms of some sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Methods: Seventy patients who had got the diagnosis of obs...

  7. Apnea-Induced Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Disruption Impairs Human Spatial Navigational Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Varga, Andrew W.; Kishi, Akifumi; Mantua, Janna; Lim, Jason; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Leibert, David P.; Osorio, Ricardo S.; Rapoport, David M.; Ayappa, Indu

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal electrophysiology and behavioral evidence support a role for sleep in spatial navigational memory, but the role of particular sleep stages is less clear. Although rodent models suggest the importance of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in spatial navigational memory, a similar role for REM sleep has never been examined in humans. We recruited subjects with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who were well treated and adherent with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Restric...

  8. Slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep deprivation: differing impacts on memory consolidation?

    OpenAIRE

    Solomons, Luke

    2016-01-01

    It has been debated whether different stages in the human sleep cycle preferentially mediate the consolidation of explicit and implicit memories, or whether all of the stages in succession are necessary for optimal consolidation. We investigated whether the selective deprivation of slow wave sleep (SWS) or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep over an entire night would have a specific effect on consolidation in explicit and implicit memory tasks. Participants had one control night of undisturbed sl...

  9. Rapid change in articulatory lip movement induced by preceding auditory feedback during production of bilabial plosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochida, Takemi; Gomi, Hiroaki; Kashino, Makio

    2010-11-08

    There has been plentiful evidence of kinesthetically induced rapid compensation for unanticipated perturbation in speech articulatory movements. However, the role of auditory information in stabilizing articulation has been little studied except for the control of voice fundamental frequency, voice amplitude and vowel formant frequencies. Although the influence of auditory information on the articulatory control process is evident in unintended speech errors caused by delayed auditory feedback, the direct and immediate effect of auditory alteration on the movements of articulators has not been clarified. This work examined whether temporal changes in the auditory feedback of bilabial plosives immediately affects the subsequent lip movement. We conducted experiments with an auditory feedback alteration system that enabled us to replace or block speech sounds in real time. Participants were asked to produce the syllable /pa/ repeatedly at a constant rate. During the repetition, normal auditory feedback was interrupted, and one of three pre-recorded syllables /pa/, /Φa/, or /pi/, spoken by the same participant, was presented once at a different timing from the anticipated production onset, while no feedback was presented for subsequent repetitions. Comparisons of the labial distance trajectories under altered and normal feedback conditions indicated that the movement quickened during the short period immediately after the alteration onset, when /pa/ was presented 50 ms before the expected timing. Such change was not significant under other feedback conditions we tested. The earlier articulation rapidly induced by the progressive auditory input suggests that a compensatory mechanism helps to maintain a constant speech rate by detecting errors between the internally predicted and actually provided auditory information associated with self movement. The timing- and context-dependent effects of feedback alteration suggest that the sensory error detection works in a

  10. Rapid change in articulatory lip movement induced by preceding auditory feedback during production of bilabial plosives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemi Mochida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been plentiful evidence of kinesthetically induced rapid compensation for unanticipated perturbation in speech articulatory movements. However, the role of auditory information in stabilizing articulation has been little studied except for the control of voice fundamental frequency, voice amplitude and vowel formant frequencies. Although the influence of auditory information on the articulatory control process is evident in unintended speech errors caused by delayed auditory feedback, the direct and immediate effect of auditory alteration on the movements of articulators has not been clarified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This work examined whether temporal changes in the auditory feedback of bilabial plosives immediately affects the subsequent lip movement. We conducted experiments with an auditory feedback alteration system that enabled us to replace or block speech sounds in real time. Participants were asked to produce the syllable /pa/ repeatedly at a constant rate. During the repetition, normal auditory feedback was interrupted, and one of three pre-recorded syllables /pa/, /Φa/, or /pi/, spoken by the same participant, was presented once at a different timing from the anticipated production onset, while no feedback was presented for subsequent repetitions. Comparisons of the labial distance trajectories under altered and normal feedback conditions indicated that the movement quickened during the short period immediately after the alteration onset, when /pa/ was presented 50 ms before the expected timing. Such change was not significant under other feedback conditions we tested. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The earlier articulation rapidly induced by the progressive auditory input suggests that a compensatory mechanism helps to maintain a constant speech rate by detecting errors between the internally predicted and actually provided auditory information associated with self movement. The timing- and context

  11. A Hidden Markov Movement Model for rapidly identifying behavioral states from animal tracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whoriskey, Kim; Auger-Méthé, Marie; Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard

    2017-01-01

    animal tracking data with significant measurement error, a Bayesian state-space model called the first-Difference Correlated Random Walk with Switching (DCRWS) has often been used for this purpose. However, for aquatic animals, highly accurate tracking data of animal movement are now becoming more common....... 2. We developed a new Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for identifying behavioral states from animal tracks with negligible error, which we called the Hidden Markov Movement Model (HMMM). We implemented as the basis for the HMMM the process equation of the DCRWS, but we used the method of maximum...... likelihood and the R package TMB for rapid model fitting. 3. We compared the HMMM to a modified version of the DCRWS for highly accurate tracks, the DCRWSnome, and to a common HMM for animal tracks fitted with the R package moveHMM. We show that the HMMM is both accurate and suitable for multiple species...

  12. A rapid method of detecting motor blocks in patients with Parkinson's disease during volitional hand movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Mirjana B.

    2002-01-01

    -5%; 56% had MBT% 5-10%; 22% had MBT% 10-15%; 5.5% had MBT% 15-20°% and 2% had MBT% 20-25%. No block lasted more than 25% from the whole movement duration. Table 2 is the summary of mean variability for kinematic indicators of motor block (N, mbt%, t% and for the movement duration T during a 7 day-testing of patients #3. The analysis of calculated data for eight tested PD patients revealed a significant difference (p < 0.01 between healthy controls and three PD patients; data on five PD patients were not significantly different (ns. This method clustered 3 PD patients in the group that experience motor blocks, while the rest were in the group without their significant occurrence. DISCUSSION This algorithm is an additional instrument in classical evaluation of PD patients during their clinical evaluation and treatment. It provides to clinician a rapid feedback on the changes of voluntary hand movements in everyday progress of illness. Furthermore, this method could be of assistance for developing strategies to overcome motor blocks in arm movements at their beginning, as well as for the feedback of the success of drug therapy.

  13. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder--diagnostik, årsager og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    and neurological disease. RBD is related to brainstem pathology. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that RBD is frequently related to Parkinsonian disorders and narcolepsy. This article reviews recent knowledge about RBD with focus on the diagnostic process and management.......Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical...

  14. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder--diagnostik, årsager og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical...... and neurological disease. RBD is related to brainstem pathology. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that RBD is frequently related to Parkinsonian disorders and narcolepsy. This article reviews recent knowledge about RBD with focus on the diagnostic process and management....

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder--diagnostik, årsager og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of REM sleep and related electromyographic atonia with marked muscular activity and dream enactment behaviour. RBD is seen in 0.5% of the population. It occurs in an idiopathic form and secondarily to medical and neu...... and neurological disease. RBD is related to brainstem pathology. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that RBD is frequently related to Parkinsonian disorders and narcolepsy. This article reviews recent knowledge about RBD with focus on the diagnostic process and management....

  16. Rapid Eye Movements (REMs) and visual dream recall in both congenitally blind and sighted subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Bértolo, Helder; Mestre, Tiago; Barrio de Santos, Ana Rosa; Antona Peñalba, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate rapid eye movements (REMs) associated with visual dream recall in sighted subjects and congenital blind. During two consecutive nights polysomnographic recordings were performed at subjects home. REMs were detected by visual inspection on both EOG channels (EOG-H, EOG-V) and further classified as occurring isolated or in bursts. Dream recall was defined by the existence of a dream report. The two groups were compared using t-test and also the two-way ANOVA and...

  17. Modelling rapid mass movements using the shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergarten, S.; Robl, J.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a new method to model rapid mass movements on complex topography using the shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates. These equations are the widely used standard approximation for the flow of water in rivers and shallow lakes, but the main prerequisite for their application - an almost horizontal fluid table - is in general not satisfied for avalanches and debris flows in steep terrain. Therefore, we have developed appropriate correction terms for large topographic gradients. In this study we present the mathematical formulation of these correction terms and their implementation in the open-source flow solver GERRIS. This novel approach is evaluated by simulating avalanches on synthetic and finally natural topographies and the widely used Voellmy flow resistance law. Testing the results against analytical solutions and the proprietary avalanche model RAMMS, we found a very good agreement. As the GERRIS flow solver is freely available and open source, it can be easily extended by additional fluid models or source areas, making this model suitable for simulating several types of rapid mass movements. It therefore provides a valuable tool for assisting regional-scale natural hazard studies.

  18. Validation of the Turkish Version of the Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarı Cömert, Itır; Pelin, Zerrin; Arıcak, Tolga; Yapan, Saadet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of a Turkish version of the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder questionnaire (the RBDSQ-T) for identifying patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and to ensure that this tool can be applied in Turkish language. Three groups were enrolled to validate the RBDSQ-T: 78 healthy controls, 17 patients previously diagnosed with RBD, and 28 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Based on a cut-off score of five, the RBDSQ-T was able to discriminate RBD patients from healthy controls with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 87%. Accordingly, 63% of patients were correctly diagnosed using the RBDSQ-T. Similarly, with a cut-off score of five, the RBDSQ-T was able to discriminate RBD from OSAS with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64%. Assessment of test-retest reliability and internal consistency reliability using Kuder-Richardson 20 analysis revealed a test-retest correlation coefficient of 0.95 and a Kuder-Richardson 20 value of 0.82. The findings demonstrate that the RBDSQ-T is a valid and reliable tool. PMID:27340339

  19. Validation of the Turkish Version of the Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itır Tarı Cömert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of a Turkish version of the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder questionnaire (the RBDSQ-T for identifying patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD and to ensure that this tool can be applied in Turkish language. Three groups were enrolled to validate the RBDSQ-T: 78 healthy controls, 17 patients previously diagnosed with RBD, and 28 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Based on a cut-off score of five, the RBDSQ-T was able to discriminate RBD patients from healthy controls with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 87%. Accordingly, 63% of patients were correctly diagnosed using the RBDSQ-T. Similarly, with a cut-off score of five, the RBDSQ-T was able to discriminate RBD from OSAS with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64%. Assessment of test-retest reliability and internal consistency reliability using Kuder-Richardson 20 analysis revealed a test-retest correlation coefficient of 0.95 and a Kuder-Richardson 20 value of 0.82. The findings demonstrate that the RBDSQ-T is a valid and reliable tool.

  20. Long-Term Follow-up Investigation of Isolated Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Without Atonia Without Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Ambra; Gabelia, David; Högl, Birgit; Mitterling, Thomas; Mahlknecht, Philipp; Stockner, Heike; Poewe, Werner; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-11-15

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a harbinger of synuclein-mediated neurodegenerative diseases. It is unknown if this also applies to isolated REM sleep without atonia (RWA). We performed a long-term follow-up investigation of subjects with isolated RWA. Participants were recruited from 50 subjects with isolated RWA who were identified at the sleep laboratory of the Department of Neurology at the Medical University of Innsbruck between 2003 and 2005. Eligible subjects underwent follow-up clinical examination, polysomnography, and assessment of neurodegenerative biomarkers (cognitive impairment, finger speed deficit, impaired color vision, olfactory dysfunction, orthostatic hypotension, and substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). After a mean of 8.6 ± 0.9 y, 1 of 14 participating subjects (7.3%) progressed to RBD. Ten of 14 RWA subjects (71.4%) were positive for at least one neurodegenerative biomarker. Substantia nigra hyperechogenicity and presence of mild cognitive impairment were both present in 4 of 14 subjects with isolated RWA. Electromyographic activity measures increased significantly from baseline to follow-up polysomnography ("any" mentalis and both anterior tibialis muscles: 32.5 ± 9.4 versus 52.2 ± 16.6%; p = 0.004). This study provides first evidence that isolated RWA is an early biomarker of synuclein-mediated neurodegeneration. These results will have to be replicated in larger studies with longer observational periods. If confirmed, these disease findings have implications for defining at-risk cohorts for Parkinson disease. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  1. Clinical characteristics, management and long-term outcome of suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in 14 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, T A; Chidester, R M; Chrisman, C L

    2011-02-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics, management and long-term outcome in dogs with suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. Medical records and video recordings of 14 dogs with suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder were reviewed and the owners were contacted via telephone or email for further information. Clinical signs included episodes of violent limb movements, howling, barking, growling, chewing, or biting during sleep. Episodes occurred at night and during daytime naps. The age at onset ranged from 8 weeks to 7·5 years with a median of 6 years but 64% of dogs were one year or less. There was no apparent sex or breed predisposition. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder events were reduced in severity and frequency in 78% of the dogs treated with 40 mg/kg/day oral potassium bromide. One dog was euthanized within 3 months of the onset of signs because of their severity. The duration of the disorder in the 13 surviving dogs ranged from 1·5 to 9 years. None of the dogs spontaneously recovered. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is suspected to occur in dogs, as it does in human beings. It causes concern to the owners and disrupts the home environment. Unlike human beings, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder of dogs often has a juvenile onset. © 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  2. Eruption of a deep-sea mud volcano triggers rapid sediment movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feseker, Tomas; Boetius, Antje; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Blandin, Jerome; Olu, Karine; Yoerger, Dana R; Camilli, Richard; German, Christopher R; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-11-11

    Submarine mud volcanoes are important sources of methane to the water column. However, the temporal variability of their mud and methane emissions is unknown. Methane emissions were previously proposed to result from a dynamic equilibrium between upward migration and consumption at the seabed by methane-consuming microbes. Here we show non-steady-state situations of vigorous mud movement that are revealed through variations in fluid flow, seabed temperature and seafloor bathymetry. Time series data for pressure, temperature, pH and seafloor photography were collected over 431 days using a benthic observatory at the active Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano. We documented 25 pulses of hot subsurface fluids, accompanied by eruptions that changed the landscape of the mud volcano. Four major events triggered rapid sediment uplift of more than a metre in height, substantial lateral flow of muds at average velocities of 0.4 m per day, and significant emissions of methane and CO₂ from the seafloor.

  3. Neuropeptide S mitigates spatial memory impairment induced by rapid eye movement sleep deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhengqing; Huang, Liuqing; Wu, Huijuan; Li, Yanpeng; Zhang, Lin; Yin, You; Xiang, Zhenghua; Zhao, Zhongxin

    2010-06-23

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation causes learning and memory deficits. Neuropeptide S, a newly discovered neuropeptide, has been shown to regulate arousal, anxiety, and may enhance long-term memory formation and spatial memory. However, it is unknown whether neuropeptide S could improve the REM sleep deprivation-induced memory impairment. Here, we report that 72-h REM sleep deprivation in rats resulted in spatial memory impairment and reduced phosphorylation level of cAMP-response element binding protein in the hippocampus, both of which were reversed by central administration of neuropeptide S. The results suggest that neuropeptide S mitigates spatial memory impairment in rats induced by 72-h REM sleep deprivation, possibly through activating cAMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation in the hippocampus.

  4. The 'scanning hypothesis' of rapid eye movements during REM sleep: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnulf, I

    2011-12-01

    Rapid eye movements (REMs) and visual dreams are salient features of REM sleep. However, it is unclear whether the eyes scan dream images. Several lines of evidence oppose the scanning hypothesis: REMs persist in animals and humans without sight (pontine cats, foetus, neonates, born-blinds), some binocular REMs are not conjugated (no focus point), REMs occur in parallel (not in series) with the stimulation of the visual cortex by ponto-geniculo-occipital spikes, and visual dreams can be obtained in non REM sleep. Studies that retrospectively compared the direction of REMs to dream recall recorded after having awakened the sleeper yielded inconsistent results, with a concordance varying from 9 to 80%. However, this method was subject to methodological flaws, including the bias of retrospection and neck atonia that does not allow the determination of the exact direction of gaze. Using the model of RBD (in which patients are able to enact their dreams due to the absence of muscle atonia) in 56 patients, we directly determined if the eyes moved in the same directions as the head and limbs. When REMs accompanied goal-oriented motor behaviour during RBD (e.g., framing something, greeting with the hand, climbing a ladder), 90% were directed towards the action of the patient (same plane and direction). REMs were however absent in 38% of goal-oriented behaviours. This directional coherence between limbs, head and eye movements during RBD suggests that, when present, REMs imitate the scanning of the dream scene. Because REMs index and complexity were similar in patients with RBD and controls, this concordance can be extended to normal REM sleep. These results are consistent with the model of a brainstem generator activating simultaneously images, sounds, limbs movements and REMs in a coordinated parallel manner, as in a virtual reality.

  5. Rapid Eye Movements (REMs) and visual dream recall in both congenitally blind and sighted subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bértolo, Helder; Mestre, Tiago; Barrio, Ana; Antona, Beatriz

    2017-08-01

    Our objective was to evaluate rapid eye movements (REMs) associated with visual dream recall in sighted subjects and congenital blind. During two consecutive nights polysomnographic recordings were performed at subjects home. REMs were detected by visual inspection on both EOG channels (EOG-H, EOG-V) and further classified as occurring isolated or in bursts. Dream recall was defined by the existence of a dream report. The two groups were compared using t-test and also the two-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Fisher test (for the features diagnosis (blind vs. sighted) and dream recall (yes or no) as a function of time). The average of REM awakenings per subject and the recall ability were identical in both groups. CB had a lower REM density than CS; the same applied to REM bursts and isolated eye movements. In the two-way ANOVA, REM bursts and REM density were significantly different for positive dream recall, mainly for the CB group and for diagnosis; furthermore for both features significant results were obtained for the interaction of time, recall and diagnosis; the interaction of recall and time was however, stronger. In line with previous findings the data show that blind have lower REMs density. However the ability of dream recall in congenitally blind and sighted controls is identical. In both groups visual dream recall is associated with an increase in REM bursts and density. REM bursts also show differences in the temporal profile. REM visual dream recall is associated with increased REMs activity.

  6. Memory Reactivation during Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Promotes Its Generalization and Integration in Cortical Stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpenich, Virginie; Schmidt, Christina; Albouy, Geneviève; Matarazzo, Luca; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Boveroux, Pierre; Degueldre, Christian; Leclercq, Yves; Balteau, Evelyne; Collette, Fabienne; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Maquet, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. In this study we tested the influence of memory reactivation during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on memory performance and brain responses at retrieval in healthy human participants. Participants: Fifty-six healthy subjects (28 women and 28 men, age [mean ± standard deviation]: 21.6 ± 2.2 y) participated in this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Methods and Results: Auditory cues were associated with pictures of faces during their encoding. These memory cues delivered during REM sleep enhanced subsequent accurate recollections but also false recognitions. These results suggest that reactivated memories interacted with semantically related representations, and induced new creative associations, which subsequently reduced the distinction between new and previously encoded exemplars. Cues had no effect if presented during stage 2 sleep, or if they were not associated with faces during encoding. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that following exposure to conditioned cues during REM sleep, responses to faces during retrieval were enhanced both in a visual area and in a cortical region of multisensory (auditory-visual) convergence. Conclusions: These results show that reactivating memories during REM sleep enhances cortical responses during retrieval, suggesting the integration of recent memories within cortical circuits, favoring the generalization and schematization of the information. Citation: Sterpenich V, Schmidt C, Albouy G, Matarazzo L, Vanhaudenhuyse A, Boveroux P, Degueldre C, Leclercq Y, Balteau E, Collette F, Luxen A, Phillips C, Maquet P. Memory reactivation during rapid eye movement sleep promotes its generalization and integration in cortical stores. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1061-1075. PMID:24882901

  7. Electroencephalographic findings related with mild cognitive impairment in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai, Taeko; Matsuura, Masato; Inoue, Yuichi

    2013-12-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and electroencephalographic (EEG) slowing have been reported as common findings of idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) and α-synucleinopathies. The objective of this study is to clarify the relation between MCI and physiological markers in iRBD. Cross-sectional study. Yoyogi Sleep Disorder Center. Thirty-one patients with iRBD including 17 younger patients with iRBD (younger than 70 y) and 17 control patients for the younger patients with iRBD. N/A. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and n-polysomnogram (PSG) were conducted of all participants. In patients with iRBD, the factors associated with MCI were explored among parameters of REM sleep without atonia (RWA), score of Sniffin' Sticks Test (threshold-discrimination-identification [TDI] score), RBD morbidity, and RBD severity evaluated with the Japanese version of the RBD questionnaire (RBDQ-JP). The younger iRBD group showed significantly lower alpha power during wake and lower MoCA score than the age-matched control group. MCI was detected in 13 of 17 patients (76.5%) on MoCA in this group. Among patients wtih iRBD, the MoCA score negatively correlated with age, proportion of slow wave sleep, TDI score, and EEG spectral power. Multiple regression analysis provided the following equation: MoCA score = 50.871-0.116*age -5.307*log (δ power during REM sleep) + 0.086*TDI score (R² = 0.598, P sleep), and 0.357 for TDI score (F = 9.900, P sleep and olfactory dysfunction, was revealed to be associated with cognitive decline in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

  8. Quantitative assessment of motor speech abnormalities in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusz, Jan; Hlavnička, Jan; Tykalová, Tereza; Bušková, Jitka; Ulmanová, Olga; Růžička, Evžen; Šonka, Karel

    2016-03-01

    Patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) are at substantial risk for developing Parkinson's disease (PD) or related neurodegenerative disorders. Speech is an important indicator of motor function and movement coordination, and therefore may be an extremely sensitive early marker of changes due to prodromal neurodegeneration. Speech data were acquired from 16 RBD subjects and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. Objective acoustic assessment of 15 speech dimensions representing various phonatory, articulatory, and prosodic deviations was performed. Statistical models were applied to characterise speech disorders in RBD and to estimate sensitivity and specificity in differentiating between RBD and control subjects. Some form of speech impairment was revealed in 88% of RBD subjects. Articulatory deficits were the most prominent findings in RBD. In comparison to controls, the RBD group showed significant alterations in irregular alternating motion rates (p = 0.009) and articulatory decay (p = 0.01). The combination of four distinctive speech dimensions, including aperiodicity, irregular alternating motion rates, articulatory decay, and dysfluency, led to 96% sensitivity and 79% specificity in discriminating between RBD and control subjects. Speech impairment was significantly more pronounced in RBD subjects with the motor score of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale greater than 4 points when compared to other RBD individuals. Simple quantitative speech motor measures may be suitable for the reliable detection of prodromal neurodegeneration in subjects with RBD, and therefore may provide important outcomes for future therapy trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Morning rapid eye movement sleep naps facilitate broad access to emotional semantic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michelle; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-03-01

    The goal of the study was to assess semantic priming to emotion and nonemotion cue words using a novel measure of associational breadth for participants who either took rapid eye movement (REM) or nonrapid eye movement (NREM) naps or who remained awake; assess relation of priming to REM sleep consolidation and REM sleep inertia effects. The associational breadth task was applied in both a priming condition, where cue-words were signaled to be memorized prior to sleep (primed), and a nonpriming condition, where cue words were not memorized (nonprimed). Cue words were either emotional (positive, negative) or nonemotional. Participants were randomly assigned to either an awake (WAKE) or a sleep condition, which was subsequently split into NREM or REM groups depending on stage at awakening. Hospital-based sleep laboratory. Fifty-eight healthy participants (22 male) ages 18 to 35 y (Mage = 23.3 ± 4.08 y). The REM group scored higher than the NREM or WAKE groups on primed, but not nonprimed emotional cue words; the effect was stronger for positive than for negative cue words. However, REM time and percent correlated negatively with degree of emotional priming. Priming occurred for REM awakenings but not for NREM awakenings, even when the latter sleep episodes contained some REM sleep. Associational breadth may be selectively consolidated during REM sleep for stimuli that have been tagged as important for future memory retrieval. That priming decreased with REM time and was higher only for REM sleep awakenings is consistent with two explanatory REM sleep processes: REM sleep consolidation serving emotional downregulation and REM sleep inertia. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. Study on rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease at early stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-li ZOU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the incidence, occurrence time and electrophysiological characteristics of rapid eye movement behavior disorder (RBD in patients with early Parkinson's disease (PD, and the characteristics of motor symptoms and non . motor symtoms (NMS. Methods Sixty PD patients were divided into PD + RBD group (N = 42 and control group (N = 18 according to whether they were complicated with RBD or not. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRSⅡ andⅢ, Hoehn-Yahr Stage, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD, RBD Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS and polysomnography (PSG were used in 60 patients. Results Among 60 patients, 42 (70% were accompanied by RBD. PSG showed that PD + RBD patients mainly presented upper limb stretching and gripping, body twitching, laughing, shouting, cursing and other non.violent actions, except 2 cases presented violent actions, such as hitting, kicking, etc. In PD + RBD group, the age was older (P = 0.024, duration was longer (P = 0.000, and UPDRSⅡ (P = 0.005,UPDRSⅢ(P = 0.001, the scale values of Hoehn-Yahr Sotage 2 (P = 0.007, anxiety (P = 0.044 and depression (P = 0.001 ratio were all higher than control group. There were significant differences in density of mandible myoelectric activity (P = 0.000 and ratio of rapid eye movement (REM without atonia (P = 0.000 between 2 groups. In PD + RBD group, 16 patients (38.10% had symptoms of RBD, earlier than PD occurred 5.20 (3.91, 6.51 years. Conclusions PD patients with older age, longer duration, more severe motor symptoms and non?motor symptoms were more likely to be accompanied by RBD. The severity of RBD in PD patients accompanied with RBD is higher than that in PD without RBD. RBD may be the early manifestation of PD. PSG has important value in the diagnosis of PD with RBD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.10.006

  11. Movement trajectory smoothness is not associated with the endpoint accuracy of rapid multi-joint arm movements in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Brach; Van Gemmert, Arend W A; Sharma, Siddharth; Chakrabarti, Somesh; Zavaremi, Shahrzad H; Stelmach, George

    2013-06-01

    The minimum variance theory proposes that motor commands are corrupted by signal-dependent noise and smooth trajectories with low noise levels are selected to minimize endpoint error and endpoint variability. The purpose of the study was to determine the contribution of trajectory smoothness to the endpoint accuracy and endpoint variability of rapid multi-joint arm movements. Young and older adults performed arm movements (4 blocks of 25 trials) as fast and as accurately as possible to a target with the right (dominant) arm. Endpoint accuracy and endpoint variability along with trajectory smoothness and error were quantified for each block of trials. Endpoint error and endpoint variance were greater in older adults compared with young adults, but decreased at a similar rate with practice for the two age groups. The greater endpoint error and endpoint variance exhibited by older adults were primarily due to impairments in movement extent control and not movement direction control. The normalized jerk was similar for the two age groups, but was not strongly associated with endpoint error or endpoint variance for either group. However, endpoint variance was strongly associated with endpoint error for both the young and older adults. Finally, trajectory error was similar for both groups and was weakly associated with endpoint error for the older adults. The findings are not consistent with the predictions of the minimum variance theory, but support and extend previous observations that movement trajectories and endpoints are planned independently. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic of arm’s micro movements of elite athlete in Olympic exercises Rapid Fire Pistol and Air Pistol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.T. Pyatkov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to scientifically substantiate the method of contactless determination of athlete hand’s movements in Olympic exercises with pistol. Material: in the research we used the data of 37 elite athletes in exercise Air Pistol (n=32 and in exercise Rapid Fire Pistol (n=5. Registration of pistol projection’s quickness of movement in target area was realized with the help of computer system Scatt. In total we analyzed 3100 space-time parameters of athletes’ technical-tactic actions in finalizing phase of shooting cycle. Results: we tested innovative method of contactless measuring of athlete’s hand’s micro movements in finalizing phase of shooting cycle. We found uncontrolled deviations from optimal pistol pointing position in vertical, horizontal and sagittal planes. Quickness of athlete hand’s movements in shooting process was determined. Conclusions: we scientifically substantiated the method of contactless determination of athlete hand’s movements at a distance in Olympic exercises with pistol. Besides, we determined the dynamic of athlete’s hand micro movements in Olympic exercises Rapid Fire Pistol та Air Pistol.

  13. Suppression of interictal spikes during phasic rapid eye movement sleep: a quantitative stereo-electroencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, C; Zubler, F; Gibbs, S; de Carli, F; Proserpio, P; Rubino, A; Cossu, M; Tassi, L; Schindler, K; Nobili, L

    2017-10-01

    Tonic and phasic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep seem to represent two different brain states exerting different effects on epileptic activity. In particular, interictal spikes are suppressed strongly during phasic REM sleep. The reason for this effect is not understood completely. A different level of synchronization in phasic and tonic REM sleep has been postulated, yet never measured directly. Here we assessed the interictal spike rate across non-REM (NREM) sleep, phasic and tonic REM sleep in nine patients affected by drug resistant focal epilepsy: five with type II focal cortical dysplasia and four with hippocampal sclerosis. Moreover, we applied different quantitative measures to evaluate the level of synchronization at the local and global scale during phasic and tonic REM sleep. We found a lower spike rate in phasic REM sleep, both within and outside the seizure onset zone. This effect seems to be independent from the histopathological substrate and from the brain region, where epileptic activity is produced (temporal versus extra-temporal). A higher level of synchronization was observed during tonic REM sleep both on a large (global) and small (local) spatial scale. Phasic REM sleep appears to be an interesting model for understanding the mechanisms of suppression of epileptic activity. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Wing, Yun Kwok; Xing, Jianli; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Zengqiang; Yao, Hongxiang; Guo, Yan'e; Shang, Yanchang; Zhang, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders characterized by α-synuclein deposition, including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and Lewy body dementia. However, this tendency in tauopathy-mediated diseases is rare and only sporadically reported. We systematically illustrate the occurrence of RBD and sleep features among a cohort of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), a non-synucleinopathy. We recruited 105 clinically probable AD patients. Fifteen clinically probable AD patients with suspected RBD underwent a video-polysomnography (vPSG) examination. Five patients with probable AD exhibited RBD. One of the patients performed repeated touching of the head and the face with his hands and flailed his arms. Three patients exhibited hand twisting, exploring, prominent limb kicking, and jerking. The fifth patient exhibited all of the characteristics of RBD (he recalled a dream about fighting animals), and his wife was awakened by his screaming. Of these five patients, one patient took the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drug donepezil. The patients with AD + RBD demonstrated increases in both tonic and phasic electromyography activity during REM sleep, but sleep architecture did not differ between the AD + RBD and AD-alone groups. RBD can occur in patients with AD. The occurrence of RBD does not change the sleep architecture of AD patients.

  15. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder: A Review of the Literature and Update on Current Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos L; Jaimchariyatam, Nattapong; Budur, Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by abnormal behaviors emerging during REM sleep that may cause injury or sleep disruption. The diagnosis requires polysomnography (PSG) demonstrating a loss of normal skeletal muscle atonia during REM sleep. RBD results from dysfunction of the brain stem circuits responsible for maintaining normal REM sleep atonia and suppressing behaviors during REM sleep. The diagnosis of idiopathic RBD (IRBD), that is, RBD without an identifiable cause, is frequently followed years later by the development of a neurodegenerative disorder, most commonly one of the synucleinopathies. As such, RBD is often a step in the progression of a neurodegenerative disorder. In this circumstance, it is a manifestation of neurodegeneration occurring in the brain stem before spreading to adjacent and other CNS regions, resulting in the development of symptoms and signs that permit recognition of a specific neurodegenerative disorder. RBD has been linked with narcolepsy and has been associated with a variety of other disorders. The management of RBD focuses on preventive/safety measures, counseling, monitoring for the development of a neurodegenerative disorder, and pharmacotherapy, which is typically effective but not well understood. The purpose of this article is to review and update our current understanding of the clinical features, epidemiology, demographics, pathophysiology, evaluation, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, causes, associations, and the clinical management of RBD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Impulse control disorder and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard, Sophie; Dauvilliers, Yves; Yu, Huan; Croisier-Langenier, Muriel; Rossignol, Alexia; Charif, Mahmoud; Geny, Christian; Carlander, Bertrand; Cochen De Cock, Valérie

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between ICD and RBD is still not yet understood and the results from the current literature are contradictory in PD. We aimed to explore the association between rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and impulse control disorder in Parkinson's disease. Ninety-eight non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease underwent one night of video-polysomnography recording. The diagnosis of RBD was established according to clinical and polysomnographic criteria. Impulse control disorders were determined by a gold standard, semi-structured diagnostic interview. Half of the patients (n = 49) reported clinical history of RBD while polysomnographic diagnosis of RBD was confirmed in 31.6% of the patients (n = 31). At least one impulse control disorder was identified in 21.4% of patients, 22.6% with RBD and 20.9% without. Logistic regression controlling for potential confounders indicated that both clinical RBD (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.07-1.48, P = 0.15) and polysomnographic confirmed RBD diagnoses (OR = 0.1.28, 95% CI = 0.31-5.33, P = 0.34) were not associated with impulse control disorder. In Parkinson's disease, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder is not associated with impulse control disorder. The results of our study do not support the notion that PSG-confirmed RBD and ICD share a common pathophysiology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Longitudinal assessment of probable rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnarå, K A; Dietrichs, E; Toft, M

    2015-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is frequently present in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and may have prognostic implications. There are few longitudinal studies of RBD in patients with PD. Our aim was to investigate whether RBD was a persistent feature in a follow-up study of 107 patients with PD. After a mean follow-up time of 3 years, 96 patients were available for reassessment. Probable RBD (pRBD) was diagnosed by the REM sleep behaviour disorder screening questionnaire. At follow-up, pRBD was found in 49% of the patients, versus 38% at baseline. The pRBD status remained unchanged in three-quarters of the patients, whilst 17% had new pRBD symptoms. Disease duration was longer in the pRBD group, 9.4 vs. 7.6 years (P = 0.02). Probable RBD is a persistent feature in PD and probably increases over time. © 2015 EAN.

  18. Laughing as a manifestation of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siclari, F; Wienecke, M; Poryazova, R; Bassetti, C L; Baumann, C R

    2011-06-01

    Among the range of sleep-related behavior displayed by patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD), aggressive acts are particularly common, while pleasant behaviors have rarely been reported. We aimed at identifying the frequency and characteristics of patients who displayed laughing as a pleasant, nonviolent manifestation of RBD. We reviewed 67 consecutive polysomnographic recordings of patients with RBD, obtained in our sleep laboratory between July 2004 and July 2009. We identified 14 patients (21% of our RBD patients with degenerative parkinsonism: 10 males, mean age 63 ± 11 years) who repeatedly laughed during REM sleep. Ten patients had idiopathic Parkinson's disease, 3 suffered from multisystem atrophy and 1 patient was diagnosed with dementia with Lewy bodies. Other RBD-associated behaviors included smiling, crying, aggressive behavior, screaming, and somniloquia. Nine of the 14 patients were depressed during daytime. Laughing belongs to the spectrum of behavioral manifestations of RBD. Many of our patients with RBD-associated laughter were depressed, suggesting a dissociation between emotional expression during daytime and REM sleep. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Eruption of a deep-sea mud volcano triggers rapid sediment movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feseker, Tomas; Boetius, Antje; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Blandin, Jerome; Olu, Karine; Yoerger, Dana R.; Camilli, Richard; German, Christopher R.; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are important sources of methane to the water column. However, the temporal variability of their mud and methane emissions is unknown. Methane emissions were previously proposed to result from a dynamic equilibrium between upward migration and consumption at the seabed by methane-consuming microbes. Here we show non-steady-state situations of vigorous mud movement that are revealed through variations in fluid flow, seabed temperature and seafloor bathymetry. Time series data for pressure, temperature, pH and seafloor photography were collected over 431 days using a benthic observatory at the active Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano. We documented 25 pulses of hot subsurface fluids, accompanied by eruptions that changed the landscape of the mud volcano. Four major events triggered rapid sediment uplift of more than a metre in height, substantial lateral flow of muds at average velocities of 0.4 m per day, and significant emissions of methane and CO2 from the seafloor. PMID:25384354

  20. Memory reactivation during rapid eye movement sleep promotes its generalization and integration in cortical stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpenich, Virginie; Schmidt, Christina; Albouy, Geneviève; Matarazzo, Luca; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Boveroux, Pierre; Degueldre, Christian; Leclercq, Yves; Balteau, Evelyne; Collette, Fabienne; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Maquet, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. In this study we tested the influence of memory reactivation during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on memory performance and brain responses at retrieval in healthy human participants. Fifty-six healthy subjects (28 women and 28 men, age [mean ± standard deviation]: 21.6 ± 2.2 y) participated in this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Auditory cues were associated with pictures of faces during their encoding. These memory cues delivered during REM sleep enhanced subsequent accurate recollections but also false recognitions. These results suggest that reactivated memories interacted with semantically related representations, and induced new creative associations, which subsequently reduced the distinction between new and previously encoded exemplars. Cues had no effect if presented during stage 2 sleep, or if they were not associated with faces during encoding. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that following exposure to conditioned cues during REM sleep, responses to faces during retrieval were enhanced both in a visual area and in a cortical region of multisensory (auditory-visual) convergence. These results show that reactivating memories during REM sleep enhances cortical responses during retrieval, suggesting the integration of recent memories within cortical circuits, favoring the generalization and schematization of the information.

  1. A new function of rapid eye movement sleep: improvement of muscular efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zi-Jian

    2015-05-15

    Previously I demonstrated that the slow wave sleep (SWS) functioned to adjust the emotional balance disrupted by emotional memories randomly accumulated during waking, while the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep played the opposite role. Many experimental results have unambiguously shown that various emotional memories are processed during REM sleep. In this article, it is attempted to combine this confirmed function of REM sleep with the atonic state unique to REM sleep, and to integrate a new theory suggesting that improvement of muscular efficiency be a new function of REM sleep. This new function of REM sleep is more advantageous than the function of REM sleep in emotional memories and disinhibited drives to account for the phylogenetic variations of REM sleep, especially the absence of REM sleep in dolphins and short duration of REM sleep in birds in contrary to that in humans and rodents, the absence of penile erections in REM sleep in armadillo, as well as the higher voltage in EEG during REM sleep in platypus and ostrich. Besides, this new function of REM sleep is also advantageous to explain the association of REM sleep with the atonic episodes in SWS, the absence of drastic menopausal change in duration of REM sleep, and the effects of ambient temperature on the duration of REM sleep. These comparative and experimental evidences support the improvement of muscular efficiency as a new and major function of REM sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: informing future drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennum P

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Poul Jennum, Julie AE Christensen, Marielle Zoetmulder Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Danish Center for Sleep Medicine, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: Rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD is a parasomnia characterized by a history of recurrent nocturnal dream enactment behavior and loss of skeletal muscle atonia and increased phasic muscle activity during REM sleep: REM sleep without atonia. RBD and associated comorbidities have recently been identified as one of the most specific and potentially sensitive risk factors for later development of any of the alpha-synucleinopathies: Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and other atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Several other sleep-related abnormalities have recently been identified in patients with RBD/Parkinson’s disease who experience abnormalities in sleep electroencephalographic frequencies, sleep–wake transitions, wake and sleep stability, occurrence and morphology of sleep spindles, and electrooculography measures. These findings suggest a gradual involvement of the brainstem and other structures, which is in line with the gradual involvement known in these disorders. We propose that these findings may help identify biomarkers of individuals at high risk of subsequent conversion to parkinsonism. Keywords: motor control, brain stem, hypothalamus, hypocretin

  3. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in treatment-naïve Parkinson disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomhause, Lucie; Dujardin, Kathy; Duhamel, Alain; Delliaux, Marie; Derambure, Philippe; Defebvre, Luc; Monaca Charley, Christelle

    2013-10-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a risk factor for dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) patients. The objectives of our study were to prospectively evaluate the frequency of RBD in a sample of treatment-naïve, newly diagnosed PD patients and compare sleep characteristics and cognition in RBD and non-RBD groups. Fifty-seven newly diagnosed PD patients were consecutively recruited in a university medical center. All patients underwent two overnight polysomnography (PSG) sessions and were diagnosed with RBD according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Revision criteria. Daytime sleepiness was measured in a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Cognition was assessed in a standard neuropsychologic examination. Seventeen PD patients (30%) met the criteria for RBD. The RBD patients and non-RBD patients did not significantly differ in mean age, gender ratio, disease duration, motor symptom subtype and severity, total sleep time, percentage of REM sleep, apnea-hypopnea index, mean oxygen saturation, and importantly cognitive performance. However, non-RBD patients had a significantly shorter mean daytime sleep latency than RBD patients (15 vs. 18 min, respectively; P=.014). A high frequency of RBD was found in our sample of 57 newly diagnosed PD patients. At this stage in the disease, RBD was not found to be associated with other sleep disorders or cognitive decline. Follow-up is needed to assess the risk for developing dementia in early-stage PD patients with RBD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Perception of experimental pain is reduced after provoked waking from rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya, Vivek G; Bentley, Alison J

    2010-06-01

    Patients with chronic pain often complain of pain when they wake at night, but the accuracy of their perception of the pain after waking at night is unknown. While cognitive functions are reduced for a short time after waking from sleep, a situation known as sleep inertia, it is unclear how sleep inertia may affect the perception of pain. We investigated the effects of sleep inertia on the perception of experimentally induced pain. Fourteen male volunteers were exposed to a randomized thermal heat stimulus of 43.1 degrees C 'hot' and 46.5 degrees C 'hurting' during provoked waking from Stage 2 sleep, slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Subjects rated their pain on awakening on a Visual Analogue Scale at 30 s after awakening and each minute thereafter for 5 min. We found no change in pain perception over the 5-min period irrespective of temperature used or sleep stage. However, perceived pain when awoken abruptly from REM sleep was significantly lower than the awake score for both the hot (P = 0.0069) and hurting (P = 0.0025) temperatures. Pain perception when woken from Stage 2 sleep or slow wave sleep was not significantly different from perception when awake. Our findings indicate that sleep inertia reduces pain perception when awoken abruptly from REM. This suggests that patients who wake up in pain either perceive accurately the pain they are experiencing, or at worst underestimate the level of pain if woken from REM sleep.

  5. Sleep alterations in mammals: did aquatic conditions inhibit rapid eye movement sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Vibha; Jha, Sushil K

    2012-12-01

    Sleep has been studied widely in mammals and to some extent in other vertebrates. Higher vertebrates such as birds and mammals have evolved an inimitable rapid eye movement (REM) sleep state. During REM sleep, postural muscles become atonic and the temperature regulating machinery remains suspended. Although REM sleep is present in almost all the terrestrial mammals, the aquatic mammals have either radically reduced or completely eliminated REM sleep. Further, we found a significant negative correlation between REM sleep and the adaptation of the organism to live on land or in water. The amount of REM sleep is highest in terrestrial mammals, significantly reduced in semi-aquatic mammals and completely absent or negligible in aquatic mammals. The aquatic mammals are obligate swimmers and have to surface at regular intervals for air. Also, these animals live in thermally challenging environments, where the conductive heat loss is approximately ~90 times greater than air. Therefore, they have to be moving most of the time. As an adaptation, they have evolved unihemispheric sleep, during which they can rove as well as rest. A condition that immobilizes muscle activity and suspends the thermoregulatory machinery, as happens during REM sleep, is not suitable for these animals. It is possible that, in accord with Darwin's theory, aquatic mammals might have abolished REM sleep with time. In this review, we discuss the possibility of the intrinsic role of aquatic conditions in the elimination of REM sleep in the aquatic mammals.

  6. Rapid eye movement-sleep is reduced in patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis—an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxi Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sleep disturbances are commonly found in patients in the postoperative period. Sleep disturbances may give rise to several complications including cardiopulmonary instability, transient cognitive dysfunction and prolonged convalescence. Many factors including host inflammatory responses are believed to cause postoperative sleep disturbances, as inflammatory responses can alter sleep architecture through cytokine-brain interactions. Our aim was to investigate alteration of sleep architecture during acute infection and its relationships to inflammation and clinical symptoms.Materials & Methods. In this observational study, we included patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis as a model to investigate the isolated effects of inflammatory responses on sleep. Eleven patients completed the study. Patients were admitted and treated with antibiotics for two nights, during which study endpoints were measured by polysomnography recordings, self-reported discomfort scores and blood samples of cytokines. One month later, the patients, who now were in complete remission, were readmitted and the endpoints were re-measured (the baseline values.Results. Total sleep time was reduced 4% and 7% the first (p = 0.006 and second (p = 0.014 nights of diverticulitis, compared to baseline, respectively. The rapid eye movement sleep was reduced 33% the first night (p = 0.016, compared to baseline. Moreover, plasma IL-6 levels were correlated to non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep and fatigue.Conclusion. Total sleep time and rapid eye movement sleep were reduced during nights with active diverticulitis and correlated with markers of inflammation.

  7. Mortality and Its Risk Factors in Patients with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junying; Zhang, Jihui; Lam, Siu Ping; Mok, Vincent; Chan, Anne; Li, Shirley Xin; Liu, Yaping; Tang, Xiangdong; Yung, Wing Ho; Wing, Yun Kwok

    2016-08-01

    To determine the mortality and its risk factors in patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). A total of 205 consecutive patients with video-polysomnography confirmed RBD (mean age = 66.4 ± 10.0 y, 78.5% males) were recruited. Medical records and death status were systematically reviewed in the computerized records of the health care system. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was used to calculate the risk ratio of mortality in RBD with reference to the general population. Forty-three patients (21.0%) died over a mean follow-up period of 7.1 ± 4.5 y. The SMR was not increased in the overall sample, SMR (95% confidence interval [CI]) = 1.00 (0.73-1.33). However, SMR (95% CI) increased to 1.80 (1.21-2.58) and 1.75 (1.11-2.63) for RBD patients in whom neurodegenerative diseases and dementia, respectively, eventually developed. In the Cox regression model, mortality risk was significantly associated with age (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.10), living alone (HR = 2.04; 95% CI, 1.39-2.99), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR = 3.38; 95% CI, 1.21-9.46), cancer (HR = 10.09; 95% CI, 2.65-38.42), periodic limb movements during sleep (HR = 3.06; 95% CI, 1.50-6.24), and development of neurodegenerative diseases (HR = 2.84; 95% CI, 1.47-5.45) and dementia (HR = 2.66; 95% CI, 1.39-5.08). Patients with RBD have a higher mortality rate than the general population only if neurodegenerative diseases develop. Several risk factors on clinical and sleep aspects are associated with mortality in RBD patients. Our findings underscore the necessity of timely neuroprotective interventions in the early phase of RBD before the development of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Rapid eye movement-sleep is reduced in patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis—an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chenxi; Alamili, Mahdi; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2015-01-01

    responses are believed to cause postoperative sleep disturbances, as inflammatory responses can alter sleep architecture through cytokine-brain interactions. Our aim was to investigate alteration of sleep architecture during acute infection and its relationships to inflammation and clinical symptoms....... Materials & Methods. In this observational study, we included patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis as a model to investigate the isolated effects of inflammatory responses on sleep. Eleven patients completed the study. Patients were admitted and treated with antibiotics for two nights, during...... was reduced 4% and 7% the first (p = 0.006) and second (p = 0.014) nights of diverticulitis, compared to baseline, respectively. The rapid eye movement sleep was reduced 33% the first night (p = 0.016), compared to baseline. Moreover, plasma IL-6 levels were correlated to non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid...

  9. Quantitative EEG of Rapid-Eye-Movement Sleep: A Marker of Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayet, Pauline; Petit, Dominique; Frauscher, Birgit; Gagnon, Jean-François; Gosselin, Nadia; Gagnon, Katia; Rouleau, Isabelle; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    The basal forebrain cholinergic system, which is impaired in early Alzheimer's disease, is more crucial for the activation of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) than it is for wakefulness. Quantitative EEG from REM sleep might thus provide an earlier and more accurate marker of the development of Alzheimer's disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects than that from wakefulness. To assess the superiority of the REM sleep EEG as a screening tool for preclinical Alzheimer's disease, 22 subjects with amnestic MCI (a-MCI; 63.9±7.7 years), 10 subjects with nonamnestic MCI (na-MCI; 64.1±4.5 years) and 32 controls (63.7±6.6 years) participated in the study. Spectral analyses of the waking EEG and REM sleep EEG were performed and the [(delta+theta)/(alpha+beta)] ratio was used to assess between-group differences in EEG slowing. The a-MCI subgroup showed EEG slowing in frontal lateral regions compared to both na-MCI and control groups. This EEG slowing was present in wakefulness (compared to controls) but was much more prominent in REM sleep. Moreover, the comparison between amnestic and nonamnestic subjects was found significant only for the REM sleep EEG. There was no difference in EEG power ratio between na-MCI and controls for any of the 7 cortical regions studied. These findings demonstrate the superiority of the REM sleep EEG in the discrimination between a-MCI and both na-MCI and control subjects. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2015.

  10. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder after bilateral subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Eun; Jeon, Beom S; Paek, Sun-Ha; Yun, Ji Young; Yang, Hui-Jun; Kim, Han-Joon; Ehm, Gwanhee; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Jee-Young; Kim, Ji-Young

    2015-02-01

    The effect of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) on rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in Parkinson's disease (PD) is not well known. We evaluated the change in the incidence of probable RBD after bilateral STN DBS in PD patients. Ninety patients with PD treated with bilateral STN DBS underwent retrospective assessment of RBD by interview before and after DBS. Forty-seven (52.2%) of the 90 patients had RBD preoperatively. RBD was resolved only in one patient and persisted in 46 patients at 1 year after DBS. RBD developed de novo in 16 patients (de novo RBD group) within 1 year after DBS, resulting in 62 (68.9%) of the 90 patients having RBD 1 year after DBS. Patients with RBD at any time within 1 year after DBS (RBD group, n = 63) were older than the patients without RBD (non-RBD group, n = 27). The sum of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) axial score for the "on" state was lower in the RBD group than in the non-RBD group after DBS (p = 0.029). Comparing the de novo RBD group and non-RBD group, the UPDRS Part III and total score and the levodopa equivalent daily doses for the "on" states decreased more in the de novo RBD group than in the non-RBD group (p < 0.05). The incidence of clinical RBD increased after bilateral STN DBS because de novo RBD developed and pre-existing RBD persisted after DBS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Apnea-induced rapid eye movement sleep disruption impairs human spatial navigational memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Andrew W; Kishi, Akifumi; Mantua, Janna; Lim, Jason; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Leibert, David P; Osorio, Ricardo S; Rapoport, David M; Ayappa, Indu

    2014-10-29

    Hippocampal electrophysiology and behavioral evidence support a role for sleep in spatial navigational memory, but the role of particular sleep stages is less clear. Although rodent models suggest the importance of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in spatial navigational memory, a similar role for REM sleep has never been examined in humans. We recruited subjects with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who were well treated and adherent with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Restricting CPAP withdrawal to REM through real-time monitoring of the polysomnogram provides a novel way of addressing the role of REM sleep in spatial navigational memory with a physiologically relevant stimulus. Individuals spent two different nights in the laboratory, during which subjects performed timed trials before and after sleep on one of two unique 3D spatial mazes. One night of sleep was normally consolidated with use of therapeutic CPAP throughout, whereas on the other night, CPAP was reduced only in REM sleep, allowing REM OSA to recur. REM disruption via this method caused REM sleep reduction and significantly fragmented any remaining REM sleep without affecting total sleep time, sleep efficiency, or slow-wave sleep. We observed improvements in maze performance after a night of normal sleep that were significantly attenuated after a night of REM disruption without changes in psychomotor vigilance. Furthermore, the improvement in maze completion time significantly positively correlated with the mean REM run duration across both sleep conditions. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel role for REM sleep in human memory formation and highlight a significant cognitive consequence of OSA. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414571-07$15.00/0.

  12. Rapid-Eye-Movement-Sleep (REM Associated Enhancement of Working Memory Performance after a Daytime Nap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Yuet Ying Lau

    Full Text Available The main objective was to study the impact of a daytime sleep opportunity on working memory and the mechanism behind such impact. This study adopted an experimental design in a sleep research laboratory. Eighty healthy college students (Age:17-23, 36 males were randomized to either have a polysomnography-monitored daytime sleep opportunity (Nap-group, n=40 or stay awake (Wake-group, n=40 between the two assessment sessions. All participants completed a sleep diary and wore an actigraph-watch for 5 days before and one day after the assessment sessions. They completed the state-measurement of sleepiness and affect, in addition to a psychomotor vigilance test and a working memory task before and after the nap/wake sessions. The two groups did not differ in their sleep characteristics prior to and after the lab visit. The Nap-group had higher accuracy on the working memory task, fewer lapses on the psychomotor vigilance test and lower state-sleepiness than the Wake-group. Within the Nap-group, working memory accuracy was positively correlated with duration of rapid eye movement sleep (REM and total sleep time during the nap. Our findings suggested that "sleep gain" during a daytime sleep opportunity had significant positive impact on working memory performance, without affecting subsequent nighttime sleep in young adult, and such impact was associated with the duration of REM. While REM abnormality has long been noted in pathological conditions (e.g. depression, which are also presented with cognitive dysfunctions (e.g. working memory deficits, this was the first evidence showing working memory enhancement associated with REM in daytime napping in college students, who likely had habitual short sleep duration but were otherwise generally healthy.

  13. Rapid eye movement sleep in relation to overweight in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianchen; Forbes, Erika E; Ryan, Neal D; Rofey, Dana; Hannon, Tamara S; Dahl, Ronald E

    2008-08-01

    Short sleep duration is associated with obesity, but few studies have examined the relationship between obesity and specific physiological stages of sleep. To examine specific sleep stages, including rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and stages 1 through 4 of non-REM sleep, in relation to overweight in children and adolescents. A total of 335 children and adolescents (55.2% male; aged 7-17 years) underwent 3 consecutive nights of standard polysomnography and weight and height assessments as part of a study on the development of internalizing disorders (depression and anxiety). Body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) z score and weight status (normal, at risk for overweight, overweight) according to the body mass index percentile for age and sex. The body mass index z score was significantly related to total sleep time (beta = -0.174), sleep efficiency (beta = -0.027), and REM density (beta = -0.256). Compared with normal-weight children, overweight children slept about 22 minutes less and had lower sleep efficiency, shorter REM sleep, lower REM activity and density, and longer latency to the first REM period. After adjustment for demographics, pubertal status, and psychiatric diagnosis, 1 hour less of total sleep was associated with approximately 2-fold increased odds of overweight (odds ratio = 1.85), 1 hour less of REM sleep was associated with about 3-fold increased odds (odds ratio = 2.91), and REM density and activity below the median increased the odds of overweight by 2-fold (odds ratio = 2.18) and 3-fold (odds ratio = 3.32), respectively. Our results confirm previous epidemiological observations that short sleep time is associated with overweight in children and adolescents. A core aspect of the association between short sleep duration and overweight may be attributed to reduced REM sleep. Further studies are needed to investigate possible mechanisms underpinning the association between diminished REM sleep and

  14. Selective Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Deprivation Affects Cell Size and Number in Kitten Locus Coeruleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Shaffery

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells in the locus coeruleus (LC constitute the sole source of norepinephrine (NE in the brain, and change their discharge rates according to vigilance state. In addition to its well established role in vigilance, NE affects synaptic plasticity in the postnatal critical period (CP of development. One form of CP synaptic plasticity affected by NE results from monocular occlusion, which leads to physiological and cytoarchitectural alterations in central visual areas. Selective suppression of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS in the CP kitten enhances the central effects of monocular occlusion. The mechanisms responsible for heightened cortical plasticity following REMS deprivation (REMSD remain undetermined. One possible mediator of an increase in plasticity is continuous NE outflow, which presumably persists during extended periods of REMSD. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of NE and serves as a marker for NE-producing cells. We selectively suppressed REMS in kittens for one week during the CP. The number and size of LC cells expressing immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-ir was assessed in age-matched REMS-deprived (RD-, treatment-control (TXC-, and home cage-reared (HCC animals. Sleep amounts and slow wave activity (SWA were also examined relative to baseline. Time spent in REMS during the study was lower in RD compared to TXC animals, and RD kittens increased SWA delta power in the latter half of the REMSD period. The estimated total number of TH-ir cells in LC was significantly lower in the RD- than in the TXC kittens and numerically lower than in HCC animals. The size of LC cells expressing TH-ir was greatest in the HCC group. They were significantly larger than the cells in the RD kittens. These data are consistent with a possible reduction in NE in forebrain areas, including visual cortex, caused by one week of REMSD.

  15. Rapid-Eye-Movement-Sleep (REM) Associated Enhancement of Working Memory Performance after a Daytime Nap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Esther Yuet Ying; Wong, Mark Lawrence; Lau, Kristy Nga Ting; Hui, Florence Wai Ying; Tseng, Chia-huei

    2015-01-01

    The main objective was to study the impact of a daytime sleep opportunity on working memory and the mechanism behind such impact. This study adopted an experimental design in a sleep research laboratory. Eighty healthy college students (Age:17-23, 36 males) were randomized to either have a polysomnography-monitored daytime sleep opportunity (Nap-group, n=40) or stay awake (Wake-group, n=40) between the two assessment sessions. All participants completed a sleep diary and wore an actigraph-watch for 5 days before and one day after the assessment sessions. They completed the state-measurement of sleepiness and affect, in addition to a psychomotor vigilance test and a working memory task before and after the nap/wake sessions. The two groups did not differ in their sleep characteristics prior to and after the lab visit. The Nap-group had higher accuracy on the working memory task, fewer lapses on the psychomotor vigilance test and lower state-sleepiness than the Wake-group. Within the Nap-group, working memory accuracy was positively correlated with duration of rapid eye movement sleep (REM) and total sleep time during the nap. Our findings suggested that "sleep gain" during a daytime sleep opportunity had significant positive impact on working memory performance, without affecting subsequent nighttime sleep in young adult, and such impact was associated with the duration of REM. While REM abnormality has long been noted in pathological conditions (e.g. depression), which are also presented with cognitive dysfunctions (e.g. working memory deficits), this was the first evidence showing working memory enhancement associated with REM in daytime napping in college students, who likely had habitual short sleep duration but were otherwise generally healthy.

  16. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder: A Window on the Emotional World of Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Paolo; Quaranta, Davide; Di Giacopo, Raffaella; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Mazza, Marianna; Martini, Annalisa; Canestri, Jorge; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by motor activity during sleep with dream mentation. Aggressiveness has been considered a peculiar feature of dreams associated with RBD, despite normal score in aggressiveness scales during wakefulness. We aimed to measure daytime aggressiveness and analyze dream contents in a population of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) with and without RBD. Design: This is a single-center prospective observational study; it concerns the description of the clinical features of a medical disorder in a case series. Setting: The study was performed in the Department of Neurosciences of the Catholic University in Rome, Italy. Patients: Three groups of subjects were enrolled: patients with PD plus RBD, patients with PD without RBD, and healthy controls. Interventions: The diagnosis of RBD was determined clinically and confirmed by means of overnight, laboratory-based video-polysomnography. For the evaluation of diurnal aggressiveness, the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) was used. The content of dreams was evaluated by means of the methods of Hall and Van De Castle. Measurements and Results: Patients with PD without RBD displayed higher levels of anger, and verbal and physical aggressiveness than patients with PD and RBD and controls. Patients with PD and RBD and controls did not differ in hostility. Conclusions: It can be hypothesized that a noradrenergic impairment at the level of the locus coeruleus could, at the same time, explain the presence of REM sleep behavior disorder, as well as the reduction of diurnal aggressiveness. This finding also suggests a role for REM sleep in regulating homeostasis of emotional brain function. Citation: Mariotti P, Quaranta D, Di Giacopo R, Bentivoglio AR, Mazza M, Martini A, Canestri J, Della Marca G. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: a window on the emotional world of Parkinson disease. SLEEP 2015;38(2):287–294. PMID:25325501

  17. Validation of an integrated software for the detection of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauscher, Birgit; Gabelia, David; Biermayr, Marlene; Stefani, Ambra; Hackner, Heinz; Mitterling, Thomas; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2014-10-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep without atonia (RWA) is the polysomnographic hallmark of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). To partially overcome the disadvantages of manual RWA scoring, which is time consuming but essential for the accurate diagnosis of RBD, we aimed to validate software specifically developed and integrated with polysomnography for RWA detection against the gold standard of manual RWA quantification. Academic referral center sleep laboratory. Polysomnographic recordings of 20 patients with RBD and 60 healthy volunteers were analyzed. N/A. Motor activity during REM sleep was quantified manually and computer assisted (with and without artifact detection) according to Sleep Innsbruck Barcelona (SINBAR) criteria for the mentalis ("any," phasic, tonic electromyographic [EMG] activity) and the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle (phasic EMG activity). Computer-derived indices (with and without artifact correction) for "any," phasic, tonic mentalis EMG activity, phasic FDS EMG activity, and the SINBAR index ("any" mentalis + phasic FDS) correlated well with the manually derived indices (all Spearman rhos 0.66-0.98). In contrast with computerized scoring alone, computerized scoring plus manual artifact correction (median duration 5.4 min) led to a significant reduction of false positives for "any" mentalis (40%), phasic mentalis (40.6%), and the SINBAR index (41.2%). Quantification of tonic mentalis and phasic FDS EMG activity was not influenced by artifact correction. The computer algorithm used here appears to be a promising tool for REM sleep behavior disorder detection in both research and clinical routine. A short check for plausibility of automatic detection should be a basic prerequisite for this and all other available computer algorithms. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  18. Study on transcranial sonography in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-dong LI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the changes of transcranial sonography (TCS in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD.  Methods Fifteen patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of RBD according to International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD, 2nd edition. Under the monitor of polysomnography (PSG, the sleep architectures of all RBD cases were evaluated by Polysmith software and visual analysis. Furthermore, all RBD patients and 15 normal controls underwent TCS. Cases with substantia nigra echo intensity over Ⅲ grade and substantia nigra area over 0.20 cm2 were supposed to be hyperechogenicity. Additionally, the width of the third ventricle was measured and whether there was hyperechogenicity in basal ganglia was evaluated. The cognitive functions were evaluated by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA.  Results RBD patients presented typical clinical manifestations and electrophysiologic changes. No significant difference (P = 0.080, 0.109 was found in the comparison of hyperechogenicity rate on substantia nigra (6/15 and basal ganglia (7/15 in RBD patients and normal controls (1/15, 2/15. No significant difference in the comparison of MoCA was found in RBD patients with or without substantia nigra hyperechogenicity (P = 0.075. The RBD patients with hyperechogenicity on basal ganglia had higher MMSE scores than those without hyperechogenicity on basal ganglia, and the difference was significant (P = 0.021.  Conclusions RBD which is suggested as the prodromal period of synucleinopathy may present hyperechogenicity in substantia nigra and basal ganglia on TCS. TCS could detect subclinical changes of brain and evaluate the risk of synucleinopathy. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.04.010

  19. Consolidation of strictly episodic memories mainly requires rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauchs, Géraldine; Bertran, Françoise; Guillery-Girard, Bérengère; Desgranges, Béatrice; Kerrouche, Nacer; Denise, Pierre; Foret, Jean; Eustache, Francis

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of sleep deprivation during the first or second half of the night on episodic memory consolidation. Episodic memory is defined as memory for events located in time and space. It is also characterized by autonoetic consciousness, which gives a subject the conscious sensation of traveling back in time to relive the original event and forward into the future. Consolidation of episodic information was tested after 4-hour retention intervals, which followed learning and occurred during either the early or late half night, respectively dominated by slow wave sleep (SWS) or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, or corresponding periods of wakefulness. Data collection occurred in the sleep laboratory. Forty-three young healthy subjects: 9 men and 34 women, age ranging from 18 to 26 years (mean 20.18 +/- 1.94 years) were included in this study. Waking after a 4-hour retention interval filled with early or late sleep, or 4-hour sleep deprivation, during early or late period of night. The cognitive task, named the What-Where-When test, was specially designed to assess factual, spatial, and temporal components of episodic memory. This task was associated with the Remember/Know paradigm to assess autonoetic consciousness. We measured performance on immediate free recall, delayed free recall (after a 4-hour interval of wakefulness or sleep), and delayed recognition. We also calculated a forgetting rate for each feature (factual, spatial, and temporal) and, for the recognition task, scores of autonoetic consciousness (R responses). REM-sleep deprivation was associated with significantly lower recall of spatial information compared to SWS deprivation (P sleep (P sleep deprivation was also associated with a higher forgetting rate of temporal information as compared to the early sleep condition (Psleep deprivation led subjects to give significantly fewer R responses, indicative of true memories, as compared to SWS deprivation (P sleep.

  20. The link between Parkinson's disease and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder with dream enactment: Possible implications for early rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian P; Westlake, Kelly P

    2017-09-07

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, to inform readers of the link between the loss of motor inhibition during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep dreaming, diagnosed as REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), and the future onset of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's Disease and dementia with lewy bodies. It has been reported that motor disinhibition during rapid eye movement sleep often precedes onset of these disorders by years or even decades. Second, to consider that identification of RBD and the early involvement of rehabilitation and/or development of home exercise plans may aid in prolonging and even increasing function, independence, and quality of life should such neurodegenerative disorders develop later in life. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. The Circadian Clock Gene Csnk1e Regulates Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Amount, and Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep Architecture in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lili; Bryant, Camron D.; Loudon, Andrew; Palmer, Abraham A.; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Turek, Fred W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Efforts to identify the genetic basis of mammalian sleep have included quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and gene targeting of known core circadian clock genes. We combined three different genetic approaches to identify and test a positional candidate sleep gene — the circadian gene casein kinase 1 epsilon (Csnk1e), which is located in a QTL we identified for rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on chromosome 15. Measurements and Results: Using electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings, baseline sleep was examined in a 12-h light:12-h dark (LD 12:12) cycle in mice of seven genotypes, including Csnk1etau/tau and Csnk1e-/- mutant mice, Csnk1eB6.D2 and Csnk1eD2.B6 congenic mice, and their respective wild-type littermate control mice. Additionally, Csnk1etau/tau and wild-type mice were examined in constant darkness (DD). Csnk1etau/tau mutant mice and both Csnk1eB6.D2 and Csnk1eD2.B6 congenic mice showed significantly higher proportion of sleep time spent in REM sleep during the dark period than wild-type controls — the original phenotype for which the QTL on chromosome 15 was identified. This phenotype persisted in Csnk1etau/tau mice while under free-running DD conditions. Other sleep phenotypes observed in Csnk1etau/tau mice and congenics included a decreased number of bouts of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and an increased average NREM sleep bout duration. Conclusions: These results demonstrate a role for Csnk1e in regulating not only the timing of sleep, but also the REM sleep amount and NREM sleep architecture, and support Csnk1e as a causal gene in the sleep QTL on chromosome 15. Citation: Zhou L; Bryant CD; Loudon A; Palmer AA; Vitaterna MH; Turek FW. The circadian clock gene Csnk1e regulates rapid eye movement sleep amount, and nonrapid eye movement sleep architecture in mice. SLEEP 2014;37(4):785-793. PMID:24744456

  2. Nocturnal Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Latency for Identifying Patients With Narcolepsy/Hypocretin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andlauer, Olivier; Moore, Hyatt; Jouhier, Laura; Drake, Christopher; Peppard, Paul E.; Han, Fang; Hong, Seung-Chul; Poli, Francesca; Plazzi, Giuseppe; O’Hara, Ruth; Haffen, Emmanuel; Roth, Thomas; Young, Terry; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Narcolepsy, a disorder associated with HLA-DQB1*06:02 and caused by hypocretin (orexin) deficiency, is diagnosed using the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) following nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG). In many patients, a short rapid eye movement sleep latency (REML) during the NPSG is also observed but not used diagnostically. OBJECTIVE To determine diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of nocturnal REML measures in narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational study using receiver operating characteristic curves for NPSG REML and MSLT findings (sleep studies performed between May 1976 and September 2011 at university medical centers in the United States, China, Korea, and Europe) to determine optimal diagnostic cutoffs for narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency compared with different samples: controls, patients with other sleep disorders, patients with other hypersomnias, and patients with narcolepsy with normal hypocretin levels. Increasingly stringent comparisons were made. In a first comparison, 516 age- and sex-matched patients with narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency were selected from 1749 patients and compared with 516 controls. In a second comparison, 749 successive patients undergoing sleep evaluation for any sleep disorders (low pretest probability for narcolepsy) were compared within groups by final diagnosis of narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency. In the third comparison, 254 patients with a high pretest probability of having narcolepsy were compared within group by their final diagnosis. Finally, 118 patients with narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency were compared with 118 age- and sex-matched patients with a diagnosis of narcolepsy but with normal hypocretin levels. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES Sensitivity and specificity of NPSG REML and MSLT as diagnostic tests for narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency. This diagnosis was defined as narcolepsy associated with cataplexy plus HLA-DQB1*06:02 positivity (no cerebrospinal

  3. Dealing with the Empty Vehicle Movements in Personal Rapid Transit System with Batteries Constraints in a Dynamic Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzeddine Fatnassi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Personal Rapid Transit is a new emergent transportation tool. It relies on using a set of small driverless electric vehicles to transport people on demand. Because of the specific on-demand characteristic of the Personal Rapid Transit system, many Personal Rapid Transit vehicles would move empty which results in a high level of wasted transportation capacity. This is enhanced while using Personal Rapid Transit vehicles with limited electric battery capacity. This paper deals with this problem in a real time context while minimizing the set of empty vehicle movements. First, a mathematical formulation to benchmark waiting time of passengers in Personal Rapid Transit systems is proposed. Then, a simulation model that captures the main features of the Personal Rapid Transit system is developed. A decision support system which integrates several real time solution strategies as well as a simulation module is proposed. Our dispatching strategies are evaluated and compared based on our simulation model. The efficiency of our method is tested through extensive test studies.

  4. Impact forces cannot explain the one-target advantage in rapid aimed hand movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegstraaten, Marianne; Smeets, Jeroen B J; Brenner, Eli

    A pointing movement is executed faster when a subject is allowed to stop at the first target than when the subject has to proceed to a second target ("one-target advantage"). Our hypothesis was that this is because the impact at the target helps to stop the finger when the finger does not have to

  5. [A rapid detection of motor block in patients with Parkinson disease during volitional movements of the hand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Mirjana B; Kostić, Vladimir; Dzoljić, Eleonora; Ercegovac, Marko

    2002-01-01

    -15%; 5.5% had MBT% 15-20% and 2% had MBT% 20-25%. No block lasted more than 25% from the whole movement duration. Table 2 is the summary of mean variability for kinematic indicators of motor block (N, mbt%, t%) and for the movement duration T during a 7 day-testing of patients #3. The analysis of calculated data for eight tested PD patients revealed a significant difference (p evaluation of PD patients during their clinical evaluation and treatment. It provides to clinician a rapid feedback on the changes of voluntary hand movements in everyday progress of illness. Furthermore, this method could be of assistance for developing strategies to overcome motor blocks in arm movements at their beginning, as well as for the feedback of the success of drug therapy.

  6. Correlation between regular mouthing movements and heart rate patterns during non-rapid eye movement periods in normal human fetuses between 32 and 40 weeks of gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otera, Yuka; Morokuma, Seiichi; Fukushima, Kotaro; Wake, Norio; Kato, Kiyoko

    2013-06-01

    Regular mouthing movements (RMMs) are observed during fetal non-rapid eye movement (NREM) periods. To determine the correlation between RMM and fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns during NREM periods. Fetal eye and mouth movements and FHR patterns were observed and recorded. 50 normal singleton pregnancies between 32 and 40 weeks of gestation. Changes in the power spectrum ratio of 3-minute blocks of RMM clusters, FHR with RMM clusters (HR+), and FHR without RMM clusters (HR-) were calculated at a frequency band of 0.02 Hz among 3 gestational age groups: group 1, 32-34 weeks gestation; group 2, 35-37 weeks gestation; group 3, 38-40 weeks gestation. We calculated the percentage of cases showing dominant peak ratios of RMM and HR+ in the same frequency band, the maximum correlation coefficient, and its lag time. In group 3, the dominant peaks of both RM and HR+ were present at the same frequency band, 0.06-0.08 Hz; this was not seen in the other groups' relative power spectral patterns. The percentage of cases showing dominant peaks of RMM and HR+ in the same frequency band increased with advancing gestational age. The maximum correlation coefficient in groups 1 (0.28 ± 0.11) and 3 (0.45 ± 0.14) differed significantly (p<0.05). The correlation between RMM and FHR patterns became stronger, and their rhythmicity was similar, from 38 to 40 gestational weeks, suggesting that a common center starts to govern both patterns at approximately 38 weeks gestation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Study on the relation of brain functional connectivity to movement disorders and cognitive impairment in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-ju ZHANG

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the relation between abnormal functional connectivity of substantia nigra and impairment of movement and cognition in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. Methods A total of 22 subjects, including 14 patients with RBD and 8 sex, age, education-matched healthy controls, were enrolled in this study according to international diagnostic criteria. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Ⅲ (UPDRS Ⅲ and Hoehn-Yahr Stage were used to evaluate motor function. Digit Ordering Test - Attention (DOT - A, Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT, Stroop Color-Word Test (SCWT, Trail Making Test (TMT, Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test (ROCFT, Clock Drawing Test (CDT, Boston Naming Test (BNT and Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT were used to evaluate cognitive function. The functional connectivity from left and right substantia nigra to brain region were examined. Results There were no statistical differences of UPDRSⅢ and Hoehn?Yahr Stage between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. In comparison with control group, SDMT (P = 0.001, ROCFT-copy (P = 0.013 and AVLT-N2 (P = 0.032 were significantly lower, while TMT-B test was significantly higher (P =0.005 in RBD group. Compared with control group, the functional connectivity of right substantia nigra to left precentral gyrus (P < 0.005 and right angular gyrus (P < 0.005 were all decreased in RBD group. Conclusions The results suggest that cognitive impairment occurs earlier than movement disorders in RBD, and there are abnormal functional connectivity from right substantia nigra to left precentral gyrus and right angular gyrus, proving that abnormal functional connectivity is the base of behavior disorders in RBD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.09.005

  8. A rapid phenol toxicity test based on photosynthesis and movement of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottuparambil, Sreejith [Institute of Green Environmental Research Center, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youn-Jung [Institute of Green Environmental Research Center, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Marine Science, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Green-Pioneer (Ltd.), Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hoon; Kim, Mi-Sung; Park, Areum; Park, Jihae [Institute of Green Environmental Research Center, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Woongghi [Department of Biology, Chungnam University, Daejeon 306 764 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Taejun, E-mail: hanalgae@hanmail.net [Institute of Green Environmental Research Center, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Marine Science, Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Green-Pioneer (Ltd.), Incheon National University, Incheon 406 840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Rapid phenol toxicity tests (1 h) were developed based on Chl a fluorescence and the movement parameters of Euglena agilis. • Phenol significantly reduced F{sub v}/F{sub m} of PS II and rETRmax with EC50 values of 8.94 and 4.67 mM, respectively. • Among the movement parameters tested, velocity was the most sensitive biomarker with an EC50 of 3.17 mM. • The EC50 values for F{sub v}/F{sub m}, motility, and velocity appear to overlap the environmental permissible levels of phenol. - Abstract: Phenol, a monosubstituted aromatic hydrocarbon with various commercial uses, is a major organic constituent in industrial wastewaters. The ecotoxic action of phenol for aquatic environment is well known. In this study, rapid phenol toxicity tests (1 h) were developed based on chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence and the movement parameters of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter. Phenol significantly reduced the maximum quantum yield (F{sub v}/F{sub m}) of photosystem II (PS II) and the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (rETR{sub max}) with median effective concentration (EC{sub 50}) values of 8.94 and 4.67 mM, respectively. Phenol reduced the motility and triggered change in the swimming velocity of the test organism. Among the parameters tested, velocity was the most sensitive biomarker with an EC{sub 50} of 3.17 mM. The EC{sub 50} values for F{sub v}/F{sub m}, motility, and velocity appear to overlap the permitted levels of phenol. In conclusion, the photosynthesis and movement of E. agilis can be fast and sensitive risk assessment parameters for the evaluation of phenol toxicity in municipal and industrial effluents.

  9. Visual Working Memory Modulates Rapid Eye Movements to Simple Onset Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Hollingworth, Andrew; Matsukura, Michi; Luck, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) representations influence attention and gaze control in complex tasks, such as visual search, that require top-down selection to resolve stimulus competition. VWM and visual attention clearly interact, but the mechanism of that interaction is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that VWM representations of object features influence the spatiotemporal dynamics of extremely simple eye movements, in the absence of stimulus competition or goal-level biases. The rea...

  10. Cerebral O2 metabolism and cerebral blood flow in humans during deep and rapid-eye-movement sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Wildschiødtz, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    It could be expected that the various stages of sleep were reflected in variation of the overall level of cerebral activity and thereby in the magnitude of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The elusive nature of sleep imposes major methodological restrictions...... on examination of this question. We have now measured CBF and CMRO2 in young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness, deep sleep (stage 3/4), and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep as verified by standard polysomnography...

  11. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide excites medial pontine reticular formation neurons in the brainstem rapid eye movement sleep-induction zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Reiner, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although it has long been known that microinjection of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF) induces a state that resembles rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, it is likely that other transmitters contribute to mPRF regulation of behavioral states. A key...... conclude that VIP excites mPRF neurons by activation of a sodium current. This effect is mediated at least in part by G-protein stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, cAMP, and protein kinase A. These data suggest that VIP may play a physiological role in REM induction by its actions on mPRF neurons....

  12. Normal Morning Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Levels and No Association with Rapid Eye Movement or Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Parameters in Narcolepsy Type 1 and Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrölkamp, Maren; Jennum, Poul J; Gammeltoft, Steen; Holm, Anja; Kornum, Birgitte R; Knudsen, Stine

    2017-02-15

    Other than hypocretin-1 (HCRT-1) deficiency in narcolepsy type 1 (NT1), the neurochemical imbalance of NT1 and narcolepsy type 2 (NT2) with normal HCRT-1 levels is largely unknown. The neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is mainly secreted during sleep and is involved in rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep regulation. Hypocretin neurons reciprocally interact with MCH neurons. We hypothesized that altered MCH secretion contributes to the symptoms and sleep abnormalities of narcolepsy and that this is reflected in morning cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MCH levels, in contrast to previously reported normal evening/afternoon levels. Lumbar CSF and plasma were collected from 07:00 to 10:00 from 57 patients with narcolepsy (subtypes: 47 NT1; 10 NT2) diagnosed according to International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Third Edition (ICSD-3) and 20 healthy controls. HCRT-1 and MCH levels were quantified by radioimmunoassay and correlated with clinical symptoms, polysomnography (PSG), and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) parameters. CSF and plasma MCH levels were not significantly different between narcolepsy patients regardless of ICSD-3 subtype, HCRT-1 levels, or compared to controls. CSF MCH and HCRT-1 levels were not significantly correlated. Multivariate regression models of CSF MCH levels, age, sex, and body mass index predicting clinical, PSG, and MSLT parameters did not reveal any significant associations to CSF MCH levels. Our study shows that MCH levels in CSF collected in the morning are normal in narcolepsy and not associated with the clinical symptoms, REM sleep abnormalities, nor number of muscle movements during REM or NREM sleep of the patients. We conclude that morning lumbar CSF MCH measurement is not an informative diagnostic marker for narcolepsy.

  13. Visual working memory modulates rapid eye movements to simple onset targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, Andrew; Matsukura, Michi; Luck, Steven J

    2013-05-01

    Representations in visual working memory (VWM) influence attention and gaze control in complex tasks, such as visual search, that require top-down selection to resolve stimulus competition. VWM and visual attention clearly interact, but the mechanism of that interaction is not well understood. In the research reported here, we demonstrated that in the absence of stimulus competition or goal-level biases, VWM representations of object features influence the spatiotemporal dynamics of extremely simple eye movements. The influence of VWM therefore extends into the most basic operations of the oculomotor system.

  14. Just a scary dream? A brief review of sleep terrors, nightmares, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Mark; Sheldon, Stephen H; Loghmanee, Darius

    2013-10-01

    The clinical spectrum of sleep disorders in children is broad, ranging from primary snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome to complex sleep-related behaviors and movement disorders. Although snoring and OSA typically receive significant attention and discussion, other biologically based sleep disorders are as common, if not more common, in children. A general pediatrician is frequently presented with the complaint of sleep talking, sleep walking, or abnormal movements during sleep. Even more alarming is the presentation of the child suddenly and explosively screaming during sleep. Such complaints fall under the category of parasomnias. Exclusive to sleep and wake-to-sleep transitions, these parasomnias include arousals with abnormal motor, behavioral, autonomic, or sensory symptoms. Parasomnias can be noticeably dissimilar in clinical manifestations, but most share biologic characteristics. Three parasomnias associated with loud vocalizations associated with sleep that can present to general practitioners include sleep terrors, nightmares, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Although usually benign, these sleep disorders can be disruptive and even potentially dangerous to the patient and can often be threatening to quality of life. In this article, we describe the clinical features of some of these disorders and how to differentiate between their alarming presentations. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Shorter duration of non-rapid eye movement sleep slow waves in EphA4 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyburger, Marlène; Poirier, Gaétan; Carrier, Julie; Mongrain, Valérie

    2017-10-01

    Slow waves occurring during non-rapid eye movement sleep have been associated with neurobehavioural performance and memory. In addition, the duration of previous wakefulness and sleep impacts characteristics of these slow waves. However, molecular mechanisms regulating the dynamics of slow-wave characteristics remain poorly understood. The EphA4 receptor regulates glutamatergic transmission and synaptic plasticity, which have both been linked to sleep slow waves. To investigate if EphA4 regulates slow-wave characteristics during non-rapid eye movement sleep, we compared individual parameters of slow waves between EphA4 knockout mice and wild-type littermates under baseline conditions and after a 6-h sleep deprivation. We observed that, compared with wild-type mice, knockout mice display a shorter duration of positive and negative phases of slow waves under baseline conditions and after sleep deprivation. However, the mutation did not change slow-wave density, amplitude and slope, and did not affect the sleep deprivation-dependent changes in slow-wave characteristics, suggesting that EphA4 is not involved in the response to elevated sleep pressure. Our present findings suggest a role for EphA4 in shaping cortical oscillations during sleep that is independent from sleep need. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  16. Fragmentation of Rapid Eye Movement and Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep without Total Sleep Loss Impairs Hippocampus-Dependent Fear Memory Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael L; Katsuyama, Ângela M; Duge, Leanne S; Sriram, Chaitra; Krushelnytskyy, Mykhaylo; Kim, Jeansok J; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2016-11-01

    Sleep is important for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memories. It is hypothesized that the temporal sequence of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is critical for the weakening of nonadaptive memories and the subsequent transfer of memories temporarily stored in the hippocampus to more permanent memories in the neocortex. A great body of evidence supporting this hypothesis relies on behavioral, pharmacological, neural, and/or genetic manipulations that induce sleep deprivation or stage-specific sleep deprivation. We exploit an experimental model of circadian desynchrony in which intact animals are not deprived of any sleep stage but show fragmentation of REM and NREM sleep within nonfragmented sleep bouts. We test the hypothesis that the shortening of NREM and REM sleep durations post-training will impair memory consolidation irrespective of total sleep duration. When circadian-desynchronized animals are trained in a hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-conditioning task they show normal short-term memory but impaired long-term memory consolidation. This impairment in memory consolidation is positively associated with the post-training fragmentation of REM and NREM sleep but is not significantly associated with the fragmentation of total sleep or the total amount of delta activity. We also show that the sleep stage fragmentation resulting from circadian desynchrony has no effect on hippocampus-dependent spatial memory and no effect on hippocampus-independent cued fear-conditioning memory. Our findings in an intact animal model, in which sleep deprivation is not a confounding factor, support the hypothesis that the stereotypic sequence and duration of sleep stages play a specific role in long-term hippocampus-dependent fear memory consolidation.

  17. Fight or flight? Dream content during sleepwalking/sleep terrors vs. rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uguccioni, Ginevra; Golmard, Jean-Louis; de Fontréaux, Alix Noël; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Brion, Agnès; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Dreams enacted during sleepwalking or sleep terrors (SW/ST) may differ from those enacted during rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Subjects completed aggression, depression, and anxiety questionnaires. The mentations associated with SW/ST and RBD behaviors were collected over their lifetime and on the morning after video polysomnography (PSG). The reports were analyzed for complexity, length, content, setting, bizarreness, and threat. Ninety-one percent of 32 subjects with SW/ST and 87.5% of 24 subjects with RBD remembered an enacted dream (121 dreams in a lifetime and 41 dreams recalled on the morning). These dreams were more complex and less bizarre, with a higher level of aggression in the RBD than in SW/ST subjects. In contrast, we found low aggression, anxiety, and depression scores during the daytime in both groups. As many as 70% of enacted dreams in SW/ST and 60% in RBD involved a threat, but there were more misfortunes and disasters in the SW/ST dreams and more human and animal aggressions in the RBD dreams. The response to these threats differed, as the sleepwalkers mostly fled from a disaster (and 25% fought back when attacked), while 75% of RBD subjects counterattacked when assaulted. The dreams setting included their bedrooms in 42% SW/ST dreams, though this finding was exceptional in the RBD dreams. Different threat simulations and modes of defense seem to play a role during dream-enacted behaviors (e.g., fleeing a disaster during SW/ST, counterattacking a human or animal assault during RBD), paralleling and exacerbating the differences observed between normal dreaming in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) vs rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expander (MARPE: the quest for pure orthopedic movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Suzuki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The midpalatal suture has bone margins with thick connective tissue interposed between them, and it does not represent the fusion of maxillary palatal processes only, but also the fusion of palatal processes of the jaws and horizontal osseous laminae of palatal bones. Changing it implies affecting neighboring areas. It has got three segments that should be considered by all clinical analyses, whether therapeutic or experimental: the anterior segment (before the incisive foramen, or intermaxillary segment, the middle segment (from the incisive foramen to the suture transversal to the palatal bone and the posterior segment (after the suture transversal to the palatal bone . Rapid palatal expansion might be recommended for patients at the final pubertal growth stage, in addition to adult patients with maxillary constriction. It represents a treatment solution that can potentially avoid surgical intervention. When performed in association with rapid palatal expanders, it might enhance the skeletal effects of the latter. Of the various designs of expansion appliances, MARPE (miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expander has been modified in order to allow its operational advantages and outcomes to become familiar in the clinical practice.

  19. Auditory inhibition of rapid eye movements and dream recall from REM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Katrina; Conduit, Russell

    2009-03-01

    There is debate in dream research as to whether ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves or cortical arousal during sleep underlie the biological mechanisms of dreaming. This study comprised 2 experiments. As eye movements (EMs) are currently considered the best noninvasive indicator of PGO burst activity in humans, the aim of the first experiment was to investigate the effect of low-intensity repeated auditory stimulation on EMs (and inferred PGO burst activity) during REM sleep. It was predicted that such auditory stimuli during REM sleep would have a suppressive effect on EMs. The aim of the second experiment was to examine the effects of this auditory stimulation on subsequent dream reporting on awakening. Repeated measures design with counterbalanced order of experimental and control conditions across participants. Sleep laboratory based polysomnography (PSG) PARTICIPANTS: Experiment 1 : 5 males and 10 females aged 18-35 years (M = 20.8, SD = 5.4). Experiment 2 : 7 males and 13 females aged 18-35 years (M = 23.3, SD = 5.5). Below-waking threshold tone presentations during REM sleep compared to control REM sleep conditions without tone presentations. PSG records were manually scored for sleep stages, EEG arousals, and EMs. Auditory stimulation during REM sleep was related to: (a) an increase in EEG arousal, (b) a decrease in the amplitude and frequency of EMs, and (c) a decrease in the frequency of visual imagery reports on awakening. The results of this study provide phenomenological support for PGO-based theories of dream reporting on awakening from sleep in humans.

  20. A comparative study of methods for automatic detection of rapid eye movement abnormal muscular activity in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Alexander Neergaard; Cesari, Matteo; Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate rapid eye movement (REM) muscular activity in narcolepsy by applying five algorithms to electromyogram (EMG) recordings, and to investigate its value for narcolepsy diagnosis. Patients/methods: A modified version of phasic EMG metric (mPEM), muscle activity index (MAI), REM...... atonia index (RAI), supra-threshold REM EMG activit ymetric (STREAM), and Frandsen method (FR) were calculated from polysomnography recordings of 20 healthy controls, 18 clinic controls (subjects suspected with narcolepsy but finally diagnosed without any sleep abnormality), 16 narcolepsy type 1 without...... REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), 9 narcolepsy type 1 with RBD, and 18 narcolepsy type 2. Diagnostic value of metrics in differentiating between groups was quantified by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Correlations among the metrics and cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1...

  1. Center of Pressure Displacement of Standing Posture during Rapid Movements Is Reorganised Due to Experimental Lower Extremity Muscle Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Shiozawa

    Full Text Available Postural control during rapid movements may be impaired due to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of experimental knee-related muscle pain on the center of pressure (CoP displacement in a reaction time task condition.Nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (dominant side shoulder flexion and bilateral heel lift before, during, and after experimental pain induced in the dominant side vastus medialis or the tibialis anterior muscles by hypertonic saline injections. The CoP displacement was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral side by two force plates and the net CoP displacement was calculated.Compared with non-painful sessions, tibialis anterior muscle pain during the peak and peak-to-peak displacement for the CoP during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs of the shoulder task reduced the peak-to-peak displacement of the net CoP in the medial-lateral direction (P<0.05. Tibialis anterior and vastus medialis muscle pain during shoulder flexion task reduced the anterior-posterior peak-to-peak displacement in the ipsilateral side (P<0.05.The central nervous system in healthy individuals was sufficiently robust in maintaining the APA characteristics during pain, although the displacement of net and ipsilateral CoP in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions during unilateral fast shoulder movement was altered.

  2. A rapid phenol toxicity test based on photosynthesis and movement of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Kim, Youn-Jung; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Mi-Sung; Park, Areum; Park, Jihae; Shin, Woongghi; Han, Taejun

    2014-10-01

    Phenol, a monosubstituted aromatic hydrocarbon with various commercial uses, is a major organic constituent in industrial wastewaters. The ecotoxic action of phenol for aquatic environment is well known. In this study, rapid phenol toxicity tests (1h) were developed based on chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence and the movement parameters of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter. Phenol significantly reduced the maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) of photosystem II (PS II) and the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (rETRmax) with median effective concentration (EC50) values of 8.94 and 4.67 mM, respectively. Phenol reduced the motility and triggered change in the swimming velocity of the test organism. Among the parameters tested, velocity was the most sensitive biomarker with an EC50 of 3.17 mM. The EC50 values for Fv/Fm, motility, and velocity appear to overlap the permitted levels of phenol. In conclusion, the photosynthesis and movement of E. agilis can be fast and sensitive risk assessment parameters for the evaluation of phenol toxicity in municipal and industrial effluents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Degenerative Encephalopathy in Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers Presenting with a Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, E N; Dawson, L J; Rose, J H; Van Meervenne, S; Frykman, O; Rohdin, C; Leijon, A; Soerensen, K E; Järnegren, J; Johnson, G C; O'Brien, D P; Granger, N

    2016-09-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by loss of neurons and are commonly associated with a genetic mutation. To characterize the clinical and histopathological features of a novel degenerative neurological disease affecting the brain of young adult Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers (NSDTRs). Nine, young adult, related NSDTRs were evaluated for neurological dysfunction and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. Case series review. Clinical signs of neurological dysfunction began between 2 months and 5 years of age and were progressive in nature. They were characterized by episodes of marked movements during sleep, increased anxiety, noise phobia, and gait abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging documented symmetrical, progressively increasing, T2-weighted image intensity, predominantly within the caudate nuclei, consistent with necrosis secondary to gray matter degeneration. Abnormalities were not detected on clinicopathological analysis of blood and cerebrospinal fluid, infectious disease screening or urine metabolite screening in most cases. Postmortem examination of brain tissue identified symmetrical malacia of the caudate nuclei and axonal dystrophy within the brainstem and spinal cord. Genealogical analysis supports an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A degenerative encephalopathy was identified in young adult NSDTRs consistent with a hereditary disease. The prognosis is guarded due to the progressive nature of the disease, which is minimally responsive to empirical treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by ..cap alpha..-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S/sub 2/ episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system.

  5. Alterations in regional cerebral glucose metabolism across waking and non-rapid eye movement sleep in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J; Germain, Anne; Price, Julie C; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Miewald, Jean M; Kupfer, David J

    2005-04-01

    Depression is associated with sleep disturbances, including alterations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Non-rapid eye movement sleep is associated with decreases in frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex metabolic activity compared with wakefulness. To show that depressed patients would have less of a decrease than controls in frontal metabolism between waking and NREM sleep and to show that during NREM sleep, they would have increased activity in structures that promote arousal. Subjects completed electroencephalographic sleep and regional cerebral glucose metabolism assessments during both waking and NREM sleep using [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography. General clinical research center. The study included 29 unmedicated patients who met the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV criteria for current major depression and who had a score of 15 or greater on a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and 28 medically healthy subjects of comparable age and sex who were free of mental disorders. Electroencephalographic sleep and regional cerebral metabolism during waking and NREM sleep. Depressed patients showed smaller decreases than healthy subjects in relative metabolism in broad regions of the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex from waking to NREM sleep. Depressed patients showed larger decreases than healthy subjects in relative metabolism in the left amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, cerebellum, parahippocampal cortex, fusiform gyrus, and occipital cortex. However, in post hoc analyses, depressed patients showed hypermetabolism in these areas during both waking and NREM sleep. The smaller decrease in frontal metabolism from waking to NREM sleep in depressed patients is further evidence for a dynamic sleep-wake alteration in prefrontal cortex function in depression. Hypermetabolism in a ventral emotional neural system during waking in depressed patients persists into NREM sleep.

  6. Repeated Administration of Korea Red Ginseng Extract Increases Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep via GABAAergic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Il; Kim, Chung-Soo; Han, Jin-Yi; Oh, Eun-Hye; Oh, Ki-Wan; Eun, Jae Soon

    2012-10-01

    The current inquiry was conducted to assess the change in sleep architecture after long periods of administration to determine whether ginseng can be used in the therapy of sleeplessness. Following post-surgical recovery, red ginseng extract (RGE, 200 mg/ kg) was orally administrated to rats for 9 d. Data were gathered on the 1st, 5th, and 9th day, and an electroencephalogram was recorded 24 h after RGE administration. Polygraphic signs of unobstructed sleep-wake activities were simultaneously recorded with sleep-wake recording electrodes from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. for 6 h. Rodents were generally tamed to freely moving polygraphic recording conditions. Although the 1st and 5th day of RGE treatment showed no effect on power densities in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the 9th day of RGE administration showed augmented α-wave (8.0 to 13.0 Hz) power densities in NREM and REM sleep. RGE increased total sleep and NREM sleep. The total percentage of wakefulness was only decreased on the 9th day, and the number of sleep-wake cycles was reduced after the repeated administration of RGE. Thus, the repeated administration of RGE increased NREM sleep in rats. The α-wave activities in the cortical electroencephalograms were increased in sleep architecture by RGE. Moreover, the levels of both α- and β-subunits of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor were reduced in the hypothalamus of the RGE-treated groups. The level of glutamic acid decarboxylase was over-expressed in the hypothalamus. These results demonstrate that RGE increases NREM sleep via GABAAergic systems.

  7. Reduction in ultrasonic vocalizations in pups born to rapid eye movement sleep restricted mothers in rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalesh K Gulia

    Full Text Available The effects of rapid eye movement sleep restriction (REMSR in rats during late pregnancy were studied on the ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs made by the pups. USVs are distress calls inaudible to human ears. Rapid eye movement (REM sleep was restricted in one group of pregnant rats for 22 hours, starting from gestational day 14 to 20, using standard single platform method. The USVs of male pups were recorded after a brief isolation from their mother for two minutes on alternate post-natal days, from day one till weaning. The USVs were recorded using microphones and were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using SASPro software. Control pups produced maximum vocalization on post-natal days 9 to 11. In comparison, the pups born to REMSR mothers showed not only a reduction in vocalization but also a delay in peak call making days. The experimental group showed variations in the types and characteristics of call types, and alteration in temporal profile. The blunting of distress call making response in these pups indicates that maternal sleep plays a role in regulating the neural development involved in vocalizations and possibly in shaping the emotional behaviour in neonates. It is suggested that the reduced ultrasonic vocalizations can be utilized as a reliable early marker for affective state in rat pups. Such impaired vocalization responses could provide an important lead in understanding mother-child bonding for an optimal cognitive development during post-partum life. This is the first report showing a potential link between maternal REM sleep deprivation and the vocalization in neonates and infants.

  8. Reduction in ultrasonic vocalizations in pups born to rapid eye movement sleep restricted mothers in rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulia, Kamalesh K; Patel, Niraj; Radhakrishnan, Arathi; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of rapid eye movement sleep restriction (REMSR) in rats during late pregnancy were studied on the ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) made by the pups. USVs are distress calls inaudible to human ears. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was restricted in one group of pregnant rats for 22 hours, starting from gestational day 14 to 20, using standard single platform method. The USVs of male pups were recorded after a brief isolation from their mother for two minutes on alternate post-natal days, from day one till weaning. The USVs were recorded using microphones and were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using SASPro software. Control pups produced maximum vocalization on post-natal days 9 to 11. In comparison, the pups born to REMSR mothers showed not only a reduction in vocalization but also a delay in peak call making days. The experimental group showed variations in the types and characteristics of call types, and alteration in temporal profile. The blunting of distress call making response in these pups indicates that maternal sleep plays a role in regulating the neural development involved in vocalizations and possibly in shaping the emotional behaviour in neonates. It is suggested that the reduced ultrasonic vocalizations can be utilized as a reliable early marker for affective state in rat pups. Such impaired vocalization responses could provide an important lead in understanding mother-child bonding for an optimal cognitive development during post-partum life. This is the first report showing a potential link between maternal REM sleep deprivation and the vocalization in neonates and infants.

  9. Noradrenergic modulation of masseter muscle activity during natural rapid eye movement sleep requires glutamatergic signalling at the trigeminal motor nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Peter B; Mir, Saba; Peever, John H

    2014-01-01

    Noradrenergic neurotransmission in the brainstem is closely coupled to changes in muscle activity across the sleep–wake cycle, and noradrenaline is considered to be a key excitatory neuromodulator that reinforces the arousal-related stimulus on motoneurons to drive movement. However, it is unknown if α-1 noradrenoceptor activation increases motoneuron responsiveness to excitatory glutamate (AMPA) receptor-mediated inputs during natural behaviour. We studied the effects of noradrenaline on AMPA receptor-mediated motor activity at the motoneuron level in freely behaving rats, particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, a period during which both AMPA receptor-triggered muscle twitches and periods of muscle quiescence in which AMPA drive is silent are exhibited. Male rats were subjected to electromyography and electroencephalography recording to monitor sleep and waking behaviour. The implantation of a cannula into the trigeminal motor nucleus of the brainstem allowed us to perfuse noradrenergic and glutamatergic drugs by reverse microdialysis, and thus to use masseter muscle activity as an index of motoneuronal output. We found that endogenous excitation of both α-1 noradrenoceptor and AMPA receptors during waking are coupled to motor activity; however, REM sleep exhibits an absence of endogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor activity. Importantly, exogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor stimulation cannot reverse the muscle twitch suppression induced by AMPA receptor blockade and nor can it elevate muscle activity during quiet REM, a phase when endogenous AMPA receptor activity is subthreshold. We conclude that the presence of an endogenous glutamatergic drive is necessary for noradrenaline to trigger muscle activity at the level of the motoneuron in an animal behaving naturally. PMID:24860176

  10. A novel non-rapid-eye movement and rapid-eye-movement parasomnia with sleep breathing disorder associated with antibodies to IgLON5: a case series, characterisation of the antigen, and post-mortem study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, Lidia; Gaig, Carles; Gelpi, Ellen; Bataller, Luis; Lewerenz, Jan; Torres-Vega, Estefanía; Contreras, Angeles; Giometto, Bruno; Compta, Yaroslau; Embid, Cristina; Vilaseca, Isabel; Iranzo, Alex; Santamaría, Joan; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmunity might be associated with or implicated in sleep and neurodegenerative disorders. We aimed to describe the features of a novel neurological syndrome associated with prominent sleep dysfunction and antibodies to a neuronal antigen. In this observational study, we used clinical and video polysomnography to identify a novel sleep disorder in three patients referred to the Sleep Unit of Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Spain, for abnormal sleep behaviours and obstructive sleep apnoea. These patients had antibodies against a neuronal surface antigen, which were also present in five additional patients referred to our laboratory for antibody studies. These five patients had been assessed with polysomnography, which was done in our sleep unit in one patient and the recording reviewed in a second patient. Two patients underwent post-mortem brain examination. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry were used to characterise the antigen and develop an assay for antibody testing. Serum or CSF from 298 patients with neurodegenerative, sleep, or autoimmune disorders served as control samples. All eight patients (five women; median age at disease onset 59 years [range 52-76]) had abnormal sleep movements and behaviours and obstructive sleep apnoea, as confirmed by polysomnography. Six patients had chronic progression with a median duration from symptom onset to death or last visit of 5 years (range 2-12); in four the sleep disorder was the initial and most prominent feature, and in two it was preceded by gait instability followed by dysarthria, dysphagia, ataxia, or chorea. Two patients had a rapid progression with disequilibrium, dysarthria, dysphagia, and central hypoventilation, and died 2 months and 6 months, respectively, after symptom onset. In five of five patients, video polysomnography showed features of obstructive sleep apnoea, stridor, and abnormal sleep architecture (undifferentiated non-rapid-eye-movement [non-REM] sleep or poorly structured

  11. Baseline Levels of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep May Protect Against Excessive Activity in Fear-Related Neural Circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Itamar; Lupkin, Shira M; Sinha, Neha; Tsai, Alan; Gluck, Mark A

    2017-11-15

    Sleep, and particularly rapid eye movement sleep (REM), has been implicated in the modulation of neural activity following fear conditioning and extinction in both human and animal studies. It has long been presumed that such effects play a role in the formation and persistence of posttraumatic stress disorder, of which sleep impairments are a core feature. However, to date, few studies have thoroughly examined the potential effects of sleep prior to conditioning on subsequent acquisition of fear learning in humans. Furthermore, these studies have been restricted to analyzing the effects of a single night of sleep-thus assuming a state-like relationship between the two. In the current study, we used long-term mobile sleep monitoring and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) to explore whether trait-like variations in sleep patterns, measured in advance in both male and female participants, predict subsequent patterns of neural activity during fear learning. Our results indicate that higher baseline levels of REM sleep predict reduced fear-related activity in, and connectivity between, the hippocampus, amygdala and ventromedial PFC during conditioning. Additionally, skin conductance responses (SCRs) were weakly correlated to the activity in the amygdala. Conversely, there was no direct correlation between REM sleep and SCRs, indicating that REM may only modulate fear acquisition indirectly. In a follow-up experiment, we show that these results are replicable, though to a lesser extent, when measuring sleep over a single night just before conditioning. As such, baseline sleep parameters may be able to serve as biomarkers for resilience, or lack thereof, to trauma. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Numerous studies over the past two decades have established a clear role of sleep in fear-learning processes. However, previous work has focused on the effects of sleep following fear acquisition, thus neglecting the potential effects of baseline sleep levels on the acquisition itself. The

  12. Acute administration of fluoxetine normalizes rapid eye movement sleep abnormality, but not depressive behaviors in olfactory bulbectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Qun; Tu, Zhi-Cai; Xu, Xing-Yuan; Li, Rui; Qu, Wei-Min; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2012-01-01

    In humans, depression is associated with altered rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. However, the exact nature of the relationship between depressive behaviors and sleep abnormalities is debated. In this study, bilateral olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) was carried out to create a model of depression in rats. The sleep-wake profiles were assayed using a cutting-edge sleep bioassay system, and depressive behaviors were evaluated by open field and forced swimming tests. The monoamine content and monoamine metabolite levels in the brain were determined by a HPLC-electrochemical detection system. OBX rats exhibited a significant increase in REM sleep, especially between 15:00 and 18:00 hours during the light period. Acute treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) immediately abolished the OBX-induced increase in REM sleep, but hyperactivity in the open field test and the time spent immobile in the forced swimming test remained unchanged. Neurochemistry studies revealed that acute administration of fluoxetine increased serotonin (5-HT) levels in the hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain and decreased levels of the 5-HT metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). The ratio of 5-HIAA to 5-HT decreased in almost all regions of the brain. These results indicate that acute administration of fluoxetine can reduce the increase in REM sleep but does not change the depressive behaviors in OBX rats, suggesting that there was no causality between REM sleep abnormalities and depressive behaviors in OBX rats. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Why Are Seizures Rare in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep? Review of the Frequency of Seizures in Different Sleep Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the formal characterization of sleep stages, there have been reports that seizures may preferentially occur in certain phases of sleep. Through ascending cholinergic connections from the brainstem, rapid eye movement (REM sleep is physiologically characterized by low voltage fast activity on the electroencephalogram, REMs, and muscle atonia. Multiple independent studies confirm that, in REM sleep, there is a strikingly low proportion of seizures (~1% or less. We review a total of 42 distinct conventional and intracranial studies in the literature which comprised a net of 1458 patients. Indexed to duration, we found that REM sleep was the most protective stage of sleep against focal seizures, generalized seizures, focal interictal discharges, and two particular epilepsy syndromes. REM sleep had an additional protective effect compared to wakefulness with an average 7.83 times fewer focal seizures, 3.25 times fewer generalized seizures, and 1.11 times fewer focal interictal discharges. In further studies REM sleep has also demonstrated utility in localizing epileptogenic foci with potential translation into postsurgical seizure freedom. Based on emerging connectivity data in sleep, we hypothesize that the influence of REM sleep on seizures is due to a desynchronized EEG pattern which reflects important connectivity differences unique to this sleep stage.

  14. Effects of partial sleep deprivation on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep: A high density EEG investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, David T; Goldstein, Michael R; Cook, Jesse D; Smith, Richard; Riedner, Brady A; Rumble, Meredith E; Jelenchick, Lauren; Roth, Andrea; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M; Peterson, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Changes in slow waves during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in response to acute total sleep deprivation are well-established measures of sleep homeostasis. This investigation utilized high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine topographic changes in slow waves during repeated partial sleep deprivation. Twenty-four participants underwent a 6-day sleep restriction protocol. Spectral and period-amplitude analyses of sleep hdEEG data were used to examine changes in slow wave energy, count, amplitude, and slope relative to baseline. Changes in slow wave energy were dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized for analysis, with widespread increases during sleep restriction and recovery when comparing data from the first portion of the sleep period, but restricted to recovery sleep if the entire sleep episode was considered. Period-amplitude analysis was less dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized, and demonstrated topographic changes in the count, amplitude, and distribution of slow waves, with frontal increases in slow wave amplitude, numbers of high-amplitude waves, and amplitude/slopes of low amplitude waves resulting from partial sleep deprivation. Topographic changes in slow waves occur across the course of partial sleep restriction and recovery. These results demonstrate a homeostatic response to partial sleep loss in humans. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Abnormal response of melanin-concentrating hormone deficient mice to fasting: hyperactivity and rapid eye movement sleep suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willie, J T; Sinton, C M; Maratos-Flier, E; Yanagisawa, M

    2008-10-28

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that has been implicated in energy homeostasis. Pharmacological studies with MCH and its receptor antagonists have suggested additional behavioral roles for the neuropeptide in the control of mood and vigilance states. These suggestions have been supported by a report of modified sleep in the MCH-1 receptor knockout mouse. Here we found that MCH knockout (MCH(-)(/)(-)) mice slept less during both the light and dark phases under baseline conditions. In response to fasting, MCH(-)(/)(-) mice exhibited marked hyperactivity, accelerated weight loss and an exaggerated decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Following a 6-h period of sleep deprivation, however, the sleep rebound in MCH(-)(/)(-) mice was normal. Thus MCH(-)(/)(-) mice adapt poorly to fasting, and their loss of bodyweight under this condition is associated with behavioral hyperactivity and abnormal expression of REM sleep. These results support a role for MCH in vigilance state regulation in response to changes in energy homeostasis and may relate to a recent report of initial clinical trials with a novel MCH-1 receptor antagonist. When combined with caloric restriction, the treatment of healthy, obese subjects with this compound resulted in some subjects experiencing vivid dreams and sleep disturbances.

  16. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning: a window into rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Jiao; Wei, Jing; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Ru; Chen, Jing; Ji, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Jun-Yi; Shen, Yun; Xiong, Kang-Ping; Huang, Jun-Ying; Yang, Ya-Ping; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-12-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning occurs in Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Idiopathic RBD (iRBD) is a well-established prodromal hallmark of synucleinopathies and occurs secondary to many neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. The aim of this study is to determine whether or not retinal structures are altered with the onset of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorders (RBD). In all, a total of 63 patients with PD, 14 patients with idiopathic RBD, and 26 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were enrolled and underwent optical coherence tomography measurements (HD-OCT (Zeiss) ) for the average and every quadrant of RNFL thickness. The REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ) was used to classify PD patients with clinically probable RBD (PD + pRBD) or without probable RBD (PD - pRBD). Patients with iRBD were identified by polysomnography. For patients with RBD (idiopathic or secondary to PD), we found a significant decrease in RNFL thickness compared with groups without RBD (PD - pRBD and healthy controls) (all p treatment. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that RBDSQ score was negatively associated with average and inferior RNFL variation in PD (all p < 0.005). The findings show that RNFL was slightly but significantly thinner in idiopathic RBD. In PD, RNFL thickness may vary depending on the presence of RBD.

  17. Effects of partial sleep deprivation on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep: a high density EEG investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, David T.; Goldstein, Michael R.; Cook, Jesse D.; Smith, Richard; Riedner, Brady A.; Rumble, Meredith E.; Jelenchick, Lauren; Roth, Andrea; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M.; Peterson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Changes in slow waves during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in response to acute total sleep deprivation are well-established measures of sleep homeostasis. This investigation utilized high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine topographic changes in slow waves during repeated partial sleep deprivation. Methods Twenty-four participants underwent a 6-day sleep restriction protocol. Spectral and period-amplitude analyses of sleep hdEEG data were used to examine changes in slow wave energy, count, amplitude, and slope relative to baseline. Results Changes in slow wave energy were dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized for analysis, with widespread increases during sleep restriction and recovery when comparing data from the first portion of the sleep period, but restricted to recovery sleep if the entire sleep episode was considered. Period-amplitude analysis was less dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized, and demonstrated topographic changes in the count, amplitude, and distribution of slow waves, with frontal increases in slow wave amplitude, numbers of high-amplitude waves, and amplitude/slopes of low amplitude waves resulting from partial sleep deprivation. Conclusions Topographic changes in slow waves occur across the course of partial sleep restriction and recovery. Significance These results demonstrate a homeostatic response to partial sleep loss in humans. PMID:26596212

  18. The effects of social housing on extinction of fear conditioning in rapid eye movement sleep-deprived rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Amy Silvestri

    2014-05-01

    Both human and animal research indicate that rapid eye movement sleep (REM) plays an important role in the processing of emotional information. REM is altered after fear conditioning in rats, but this alteration can be mitigated by exposure to a naïve conspecific. In addition, both the housing condition (isolated vs paired) and the experiences of rats' cagemates can influence the response to aversive events. Based on this prior work, the present study sought to determine the effects of social housing on the previously demonstrated impairment in the extinction of conditioned fear responses produced by REM deprivation. Rats were assigned to one of three housing conditions: housed with a naïve rat, housed with another fear-conditioned rat, or housed alone. The results demonstrated that rats housed with either a naïve or a fear-conditioned conspecific exhibited an impairment in the acquisition of extinction as a consequence of REM deprivation, as observed in previous studies. However, rats in the isolated condition demonstrated a trend toward an impairment only after continued extinction training. These results indicate that the effects of social housing on REM deprivation-induced impairments in learning and memory are subtle, but may explain some conflicting findings in the literature.

  19. Heterochronic shifts in germband movements contribute to the rapid embryonic development of the coffin fly Megaselia scalaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotton, Karl R

    2014-11-01

    The coffin fly, Megaselia scalaris, is a species of medical and forensic importance and is increasingly being used for the study of genetics. Postmortem interval can be estimated based on the life stage of M. scalaris recovered from corpses, therefore many studies have addressed the duration of each life stage. These studies demonstrate that embryogenesis completes significantly faster in M. scalaris than in the congener Megaselia abdita and faster even than the 24 h needed for Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis. However, until now it has been unclear if this increased speed is achieved by reducing developmental time across all embryonic stages or by the acceleration of individual stages and processes. Here I use time-lapse imaging to create a staging scheme for M. scalaris embryogenesis. Comparison of stages between D. melanogaster and both Megaselia species reveals that heterochronic shifts, simultaneous morphogenetic movements and compression of individual stages all contribute to the rapid development of M. scalaris. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation disrupts consolidation but not reconsolidation of novel object recognition memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Tian, Shaowen; Ke, Jie

    2014-03-20

    There is increasing evidence that sleep plays a critical role in memory consolidation. However, there are comparatively few studies that have assessed the relationship between sleep and memory reconsolidation. In the present study, we explored the effects of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (RSD) on the consolidation (experiment 1) and reconsolidation (experiment 2) of novel object recognition memory in rats. In experiment 1 behavioral procedure involved two training phases: sample and test. Rats were subjected to 6h RSD starting either immediately after sample (exposed to 2 objects) or 6h later. In experiment 2 behavioral procedure involved three training phases: sample, reactivation and test. Rats were subjected to 6h RSD starting either immediately after reactivation (exposed to the same 2 sample objects to reactivate the memory trace) or 6h later. Results from experiment 1 showed that post-sample RSD from 0 to 6h but not 6 to 12h disrupted novel object recognition memory consolidation. However, we found that post-reactivation RSD whether from 0 to 6h or 6 to 12h had no effect on novel object recognition memory reconsolidation in experiment 2. The results indicated that RSD selectively disrupted consolidation of novel object recognition memory, suggesting a dissociation effect of RSD on consolidation and reconsolidation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nocturnal agitation in Huntington disease is caused by arousal-related abnormal movements rather than by rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutel, Dulce; Tchikviladzé, Maya; Charles, Perrine; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Roze, Emmanuel; Durr, Alexandra; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2015-06-01

    Patients with Huntington disease (HD) and their spouses often complain of agitation during sleep, but the causes are mostly unknown. To evaluate sleep and nocturnal movements in patients with various HD stages and CAG repeats length. The clinical features and sleep studies of 29 patients with HD were retrospectively collected (11 referred for genotype-phenotype correlations and 18 for agitation during sleep) and compared with those of 29 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. All patients had videopolysomnography, but the movements during arousals were re-analyzed in six patients with HD with stored video. The patients had a longer total sleep period and REM sleep onset latency, but no other differences in sleep than controls. There was no correlation between CAG repeat length and sleep measures, but total sleep time and sleep efficiency were lower in the subgroup with moderate than milder form of HD. Periodic limb movements and REM sleep behavior disorders were excluded, although 2/29 patients had abnormal REM sleep without atonia. In contrast, they had clumsy and opisthotonos-like movements during arousals from non-REM or REM sleep. Some movements were violent and harmful. They might consist of voluntary movements inappropriately involving the proximal part of the limbs on a background of exaggerated hypotonia. Giant (>65 mcV) sleep spindles were observed in seven (24%) patients with HD and one control. The nocturnal agitation in patients with HD seems related to anosognostic voluntary movements on arousals, rather than to REM sleep behavior disorder and other sleep problems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: devising controlled active treatment studies for symptomatic and neuroprotective therapy--a consensus statement from the International Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, C H; Montplaisir, J Y; Frauscher, B; Hogl, B; Gagnon, J-F; Postuma, R; Sonka, K; Jennum, P; Partinen, M; Arnulf, I; Cochen de Cock, V; Dauvilliers, Y; Luppi, P-H; Heidbreder, A; Mayer, G; Sixel-Döring, F; Trenkwalder, C; Unger, M; Young, P; Wing, Y K; Ferini-Strambi, L; Ferri, R; Plazzi, G; Zucconi, M; Inoue, Y; Iranzo, A; Santamaria, J; Bassetti, C; Möller, J C; Boeve, B F; Lai, Y Y; Pavlova, M; Saper, C; Schmidt, P; Siegel, J M; Singer, C; St Louis, E; Videnovic, A; Oertel, W

    2013-08-01

    We aimed to provide a consensus statement by the International Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Study Group (IRBD-SG) on devising controlled active treatment studies in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and devising studies of neuroprotection against Parkinson disease (PD) and related neurodegeneration in RBD. The consensus statement was generated during the fourth IRBD-SG symposium in Marburg, Germany in 2011. The IRBD-SG identified essential methodologic components for a randomized trial in RBD, including potential screening and diagnostic criteria, inclusion and exclusion criteria, primary and secondary outcomes for symptomatic therapy trials (particularly for melatonin and clonazepam), and potential primary and secondary outcomes for eventual trials with disease-modifying and neuroprotective agents. The latter trials are considered urgent, given the high conversion rate from idiopathic RBD (iRBD) to Parkinsonian disorders (i.e., PD, dementia with Lewy bodies [DLB], multiple system atrophy [MSA]). Six inclusion criteria were identified for symptomatic therapy and neuroprotective trials: (1) diagnosis of RBD needs to satisfy the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, second edition, (ICSD-2) criteria; (2) minimum frequency of RBD episodes should preferably be ⩾2 times weekly to allow for assessment of change; (3) if the PD-RBD target population is included, it should be in the early stages of PD defined as Hoehn and Yahr stages 1-3 in Off (untreated); (4) iRBD patients with soft neurologic dysfunction and with operational criteria established by the consensus of study investigators; (5) patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI); and (6) optimally treated comorbid OSA. Twenty-four exclusion criteria were identified. The primary outcome measure for RBD treatment trials was determined to be the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) efficacy index, consisting of a four-point scale with a four-point side-effect scale. Assessment of

  3. Sleep spindles and rapid eye movement sleep as predictors of next morning cognitive performance in healthy middle-aged and older participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafortune, Marjolaine; Gagnon, Jean-François; Martin, Nicolas; Latreille, Véronique; Dubé, Jonathan; Bouchard, Maude; Bastien, Célyne; Carrier, Julie

    2014-04-01

    Spindles and slow waves are hallmarks of non-rapid eye movement sleep. Both these oscillations are markers of neuronal plasticity, and play a role in memory and cognition. Normal ageing is associated with spindle and slow wave decline and cognitive changes. The present study aimed to assess whether spindle and slow wave characteristics during a baseline night predict cognitive performance in healthy older adults the next morning. Specifically, we examined performance on tasks measuring selective and sustained visual attention, declarative verbal memory, working memory and verbal fluency. Fifty-eight healthy middle-aged and older adults (aged 50-91 years) without sleep disorders underwent baseline polysomnographic sleep recording followed by neuropsychological assessment the next morning. Spindles and slow waves were detected automatically on artefact-free non-rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalogram. All-night stage N2 spindle density (no./min) and mean frequency (Hz) and all-night non-rapid eye movement sleep slow wave density (no./min) and mean slope (μV/s) were analysed. Pearson's correlations were performed between spindles, slow waves, polysomnography and cognitive performance. Higher spindle density predicted better performance on verbal learning, visual attention and verbal fluency, whereas spindle frequency and slow wave density or slope predicted fewer cognitive performance variables. In addition, rapid eye movement sleep duration was associated with better verbal learning potential. These results suggest that spindle density is a marker of cognitive functioning in older adults and may reflect neuroanatomic integrity. Rapid eye movement sleep may be a marker of age-related changes in acetylcholine transmission, which plays a role in new information encoding. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  4. Characteristics of early- and late-onset rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in China: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junying; Zhang, Jihui; Du, Lina; Li, Zhe; Li, Yun; Lei, Fei; Wing, Yun-Kwok; Kushida, Clete A; Zhou, Dong; Tang, Xiangdong

    2014-06-01

    To investigate demography and clinic and polysomnographic characteristics in Chinese rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) patients across onset ages. Ninety consecutive patients fulfilling the criteria for RBD were recruited for study in our sleep center. Patients were separated into early- and late-onset groups according to age when symptoms began (50 years, respectively). Ninety age- and gender-matched healthy subjects served as controls. All subjects were interviewed for their clinical history, completed an RBD questionnaire, and underwent an overnight video polysomnography assessment. Demographics, comorbidities, scores on the RBD questionnaire, sleep architecture, and EMG activity were compared between the patients and controls and between the early- and late-onset groups. Of all RBD patients, 63 were male, and mean age of RBD onset was 54.3±15.7 years. In 25 patients (28%), RBD was secondary and associated with neurodegenerative disease, narcolepsy or antidepressant use. Twenty-three patients (26%) had early-onset RBD and 67 (74%) were in the late-onset group. RBD patients had significantly more comorbidities, dreams and dream-enacting behaviors, and poorer sleep quality than did controls. The early-onset group had a high proportion of females (48%) and an increased proportion of cases associated with narcolepsy. The early-onset group also had fewer movements, lower EMG activity during REM sleep, and better sleep quality when compared to the late-onset group. EMG activity was positively correlated with age of onset. The mean follow-up time was 1.57±0.82 years, and four patients in the late-onset group were subsequently diagnosed with neurodegenerative diseases. Stratifying patients into early and late-onset RBD revealed different characteristics from those previously described as typical for RBD. EMG activity during REM sleep was positively correlated with age of onset. We suggest that it will be valuable to explore the relationship

  5. The S4-S5 linker acts as a signal integrator for HERG K+ channel activation and deactivation gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG K(+ channels have unusual gating kinetics. Characterised by slow activation/deactivation but rapid inactivation/recovery from inactivation, the unique gating kinetics underlie the central role hERG channels play in cardiac repolarisation. The slow activation and deactivation kinetics are regulated in part by the S4-S5 linker, which couples movement of the voltage sensor domain to opening of the activation gate at the distal end of the inner helix of the pore domain. It has also been suggested that cytosolic domains may interact with the S4-S5 linker to regulate activation and deactivation kinetics. Here, we show that the solution structure of a peptide corresponding to the S4-S5 linker of hERG contains an amphipathic helix. The effects of mutations at the majority of residues in the S4-S5 linker of hERG were consistent with the previously identified role in coupling voltage sensor movement to the activation gate. However, mutations to Ser543, Tyr545, Gly546 and Ala548 had more complex phenotypes indicating that these residues are involved in additional interactions. We propose a model in which the S4-S5 linker, in addition to coupling VSD movement to the activation gate, also contributes to interactions that stabilise the closed state and a separate set of interactions that stabilise the open state. The S4-S5 linker therefore acts as a signal integrator and plays a crucial role in the slow deactivation kinetics of the channel.

  6. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in young- and older-onset Parkinson disease: a questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, R; Yadav, R; Pal, P K

    2014-06-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is common in Parkinson disease (PD). To determine the frequency of clinically probable RBD (cpRBD) in young-onset (21 to 40 years; OOPD) and characterize its pattern. A total of 156 patients with PD (YOPD-51, OOPD-105) were clinically examined and the presence of RBD was diagnosed using the minimal criteria for diagnosis of RBD (International Classification of Sleep Disorders, ICSD-1). RBD screening questionnaire based on the minimal criteria was used. The bed-partners were also interviewed with Mayo sleep questionnaire. Other scales included Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS III), Hoehn & Yahr stage, Mini Mental Status Examination, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Parkinson Disease Sleep Scale, Epworth Sleep Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. cpRBD was diagnosed in 30 (19.2%) patients, majority being OOPD rather than YOPD (86.7% vs. 13.3%; P=0.01). The frequency of RBD was significantly higher (P=0.016) in OOPD (24.8%) compared to those with YOPD (7.8%). Most often (72.4%) RBD occurred after the onset of parkinsonian symptoms. RBD was independently associated with higher global PSQI scores, total ESS scores and total PDSS scores after adjusting for the effects of age, gender, Hoehn & Yahr stage and duration of illness. Patients with RBD were older with later-onset motor symptoms, a more advanced stage, poorer sleep quality, and more frequent daytime sleepiness. Older-onset PD had a higher frequency of RBD than young-onset PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Allergic rhinitis affects the duration of rapid eye movement sleep in children with sleep-disordered breathing without sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Renata C; Alvarez, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Our goals were to assess whether allergic rhinitis (AR) is an aggravating factor that affects the severity of sleep apnea in children with tonsils/adenoid hypertrophy (T&A) and to compare polysomnographic data from children with and without AR. This prospective study included 135 children (age range, 3 to 14 years) with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) resulting from T&A. Children with lung, neurological, or craniofacial problems; septal deviations; previous pharyngeal surgeries; or orthodontic treatments were excluded. All children underwent a clinical evaluation, nasopharyngoscopy or lateral X-ray imaging, sleep study, and hypersensitivity skin-prick test. The mean patient age was 6.44 ± 2.55 years (83 males). AR was present in 42.2% of the children; 40% presented with sleep apnea; and 17.04% had sleep apnea and AR. The percentage of time spent in the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep stage was lower among children with AR without sleep apnea (p = 0.028); however, the percentage of REM sleep was not significantly different among children with apnea (p = 0.2922). No difference in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was observed between the children with (AHI = 2.79 events/hour) and without AR (3.75 events/hour, p = 0.4427). A multivariate analysis showed that nasal congestion was an important factor that can affect the duration of the REM sleep stage. AR affects REM sleep in children with SDB without sleep apnea, and AR is not an aggravating factor regarding the severity of AHI. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  8. Time-of-night variations in the story-like organization of dream experience developed during rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolli, Carlo; Guazzelli, Mario; Bellucci, Claudia; Mazzetti, Michela; Palagini, Laura; Rosenlicht, Nicholas; Feinberg, Irwin

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the cycles (2nd/4th) and duration-related (5/10 min) variations in the story-like organization of dream experience elaborated during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Dream reports were analysed using story grammar rules. Reports were provided by those subjects (14 of 22) capable of reporting a dream after each of the four awakenings provoked in 2 consecutive nights during REM sleep of the 2nd and 4th cycles, after periods of either 5 or 10 min, counterbalanced across the nights. Two researchers who were blind as to the sleep condition scored the dream reports independently. The values of the indicators of report length (measured as value of total word count) and of story-like organization of dream reports were matched taking time-of-night (2nd and 4th cycles) and REM duration (5 versus 10 min) as factors. Two-way analyses of variance showed that report length increased significantly in 4th-cycle REM sleep and nearly significantly for longer REM duration, whereas the number of dream-stories per report did not vary. The indices of sequential (number of statements describing the event structure developed in the story) and hierarchical (number of episodes per story) organization increased significantly only in dream-stories reported after 10 min of 4th-cycle REM sleep. These findings indicate that the characteristics of structural organization of dream-stories vary along with time of night, and suggest that the elaboration of a long and complex dream-story requires a fairly long time and the availability of a great amount of cognitive resources to maintain its continuity and coherence. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  9. Effect of dual tasking on postural responses to rapid lower limb movement while seated on an exercise ball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P; Sorinola, I; Strutton, P H

    2014-06-01

    Postural adjustments are used by the central nervous system to pre-empt and correct perturbations in balance during voluntary body movements. Alteration in these responses is associated with a number of neuromuscular/musculoskeletal conditions. Attention has been identified as important in this system; performing a concurrent cognitive task has been suggested to reduce the efficacy of this postural control. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of concurrent cognitive tasking on anticipatory postural adjustments while sitting on an exercise ball with a view to help inform future rehabilitation programmes. Bilateral EMG activity was recorded from the external and internal obliques, rectus abdominis, erector spinae and the right rectus femoris of 20 healthy subjects (9 males) with mean (SD) age of 21.88 (0.86) years (range 21-24 years). A rapid hip flexion protocol was carried out under three conditions: no concurrent task, counting out loud up from one and completing a serial sevens task. The addition of the cognitive task delayed and reduced the EMG in the prime mover muscle but had little impact on the responses of the trunk muscles within the time frame of the anticipatory responses; suggestive of a decoupling of voluntary and postural control mechanisms. The results of this study suggest that perhaps the clinical effects of dual task may not be largely due to changes in anticipatory postural adjustments. However, it would be important to compare these results to those seen in older and functionally impaired individuals as this would be more representative of the typical population undertaking such rehabilitation programmes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in Parkinson's disease: a meta and meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaona; Sun, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Junhong; Tang, Liou; Xie, Anmu

    2017-01-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is thought to be one of the most frequent preceding symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the prevalence of RBD in PD stated in the published studies is still inconsistent. We conducted a meta and meta-regression analysis in this paper to estimate the pooled prevalence. We searched the electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, EMBASE and EBSCO up to June 2016 for related articles. STATA 12.0 statistics software was used to calculate the available data from each research. The prevalence of RBD in PD patients in each study was combined to a pooled prevalence with a 95 % confidence interval (CI). Subgroup analysis and meta-regression analysis were performed to search for the causes of the heterogeneity. A total of 28 studies with 6869 PD cases were deemed eligible and included in our meta-analysis based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The pooled prevalence of RBD in PD was 42.3 % (95 % CI 37.4-47.1 %). In subgroup analysis and meta-regression analysis, we found that the important causes of heterogeneity were the diagnosis criteria of RBD and age of PD patients (P = 0.016, P = 0.019, respectively). The results indicate that nearly half of the PD patients are suffering from RBD. Older age and longer duration are risk factors for RBD in PD. We can use the minimal diagnosis criteria for RBD according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders to diagnose RBD patients in our daily work if polysomnography is not necessary.

  11. Ventricular orexin-A (hypocretin-1 levels correlate with rapid-eye-movement sleep without atonia in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridoux A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Agathe Bridoux,1,2 Stephane Moutereau,3 Ala Covali-Noroc,1 Laurent Margarit,1 Stephane Palfi,4 Jean-Paul Nguyen,5 Jean-Pascal Lefaucheur,1,2 Pierre Césaro,6 Marie-Pia d'Ortho,7 Xavier Drouot1,21Service de Physiologie, Groupe Henri Mondor, 2Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris Est Créteil, 3Service de Biochimie, Groupe Henri Mondor, 4UF Neurochirurgie Fonctionnelle, Groupe Henri Mondor, Créteil, France; 5Service de Neurochirurgie, Hôpital Nord Laënnec, Nantes, France; 6Service de Neurologie, Groupe Henri Mondor, Créteil, France; 7Service de Physiologie, Groupe Bichat – Claude Bernard, Paris, FranceObjective: Patients with Parkinson's disease frequently complain of sleep disturbances and loss of muscle atonia during rapid-eye-movement (REM sleep is not rare. The orexin-A (hypocretin-1 hypothalamic system plays a central role in controlling REM sleep. Loss of orexin neurons results in narcolepsy-cataplexy, a condition characterized by diurnal sleepiness and REM sleep without atonia. Alterations in the orexin-A system have been also documented in Parkinson's disease, but whether these alterations have clinical consequences remains unknown.Methods: Here, we measured orexin-A levels in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid from eight patients with Parkinson's disease (four males and four females who underwent ventriculography during deep brain-stimulation surgery and performed full-night polysomnography before surgery.Results: Our results showed a positive correlation between orexin-A levels and REM sleep without muscle atonia.Conclusion: Our results suggest that high levels of orexin-A in Parkinson's disease may be associated with loss of REM muscle atonia.Keywords: Parkinson, orexin-A, ventricular CSF, REM atonia

  12. Prognostic and symptomatic aspects of rapid eye movement sleep in a mouse model of posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Polta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Not every individual develops Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD after the exposure to a potentially traumatic event. Therefore, the identification of pre-existing risk factors and early diagnostic biomarkers is of high medical relevance. However, no objective biomarker has yet progressed into clinical practice. Sleep disturbances represent commonly reported complaints in PTSD patients. In particular, changes in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS properties are frequently observed in PTSD patients. Here, we examined in a mouse model of PTSD whether (1 mice developed REMS alterations after trauma and (2 whether REMS architecture before and/or shortly after trauma predicted the development of PTSD-like symptoms. We monitored sleep-wake behavior via combined EEG/EMG recordings immediately before (24 h pre, immediately after (0-48 h post and two months after exposure to an electric foot shock in male C57BL/6N mice (n=15. PTSD-like symptoms, including hyperarousal, contextual and generalized fear, were assessed one month post-trauma.Shocked mice showed early-onset and sustained elevation of REMS compared to non-shocked controls. In addition, REMS architecture before trauma was correlated with the intensity of acoustic startle responses, but not contextual fear, one month after trauma.Our data suggest REMS as prognostic (pre-trauma and symptomatic (post-trauma marker of PTSD-like symptoms in mice. Translated to the situation in humans, REMS may constitute a viable, objective and non-invasive biomarker in PTSD and other trauma-related psychiatric disorders, which could guide pharmacological interventions in humans at high risk.

  13. Study on microstructure of corpus striatum in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder using magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-meng ZHANG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the structure of corpus striatum and the integrity of white matter fiber in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD and idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD.  Methods Twelve patients with iRBD, 12 patients with PD and 10 healthy subjects that were well matched in gender, age and education were enrolled in this study. Head MRI examination was performed to all subjects to observe the changes of corpus striatum structure (the gray matter volume and the integrity of white matter fiber [fractional anisotropy (FA] by combining voxel?based morphometry (VBM and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI.  Results Compared with healthy subjects, the gray matter volume of left caudate nucleus was significantly decreased (P < 0.005, and FA values of left caudate nucleus (P < 0.005, right caudate nucleus (P < 0.001 and right putamen (P < 0.05 were all significantly reduced in iRBD patients; FA value of right putamen was significantly decreased in PD patients (P < 0.05. Compared with PD patients, the gray matter volume of left caudate nucleus of iRBD patients was significantly reduced (P < 0.001, FA values of left caudate nucleus (P < 0.01 and right caudate nucleus (P < 0.005 of iRBD patients were significantly reduced.  Conclusions There is atrophy of gray matter volume and extensive white matter fiber impairment in corpus striatum of patients with iRBD, and the white matter fiber impairment was similar to PD, which provides an anatomical evidence for iRBD being presymptom of PD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.05.008

  14. Cytomorphometric changes in the dorsal raphe neurons after rapid eye movement sleep deprivation are mediated by noradrenalin in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas Sudipta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study was carried out to investigate the effect of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS deprivation (REMSD on the cytomorphology of the dorsal raphe (DR neurons and to evaluate the possible role of REMSD-induced increased noradrenalin (NA in mediating such effects. Methods Rats were REMS deprived by the flowerpot method; free moving normal home cage rats, large platform and post REMS-deprived recovered rats were used as controls. Further, to evaluate if the effects were induced by NA, separate sets of experimental rats were treated (i.p. with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (PRZ. Histomorphometric analysis of DR neurons in stained brain sections were performed in experimental and control rats; neurons in inferior colliculus (IC served as anatomical control. Results The mean size of DR neurons was larger in REMSD group compared to controls, whereas, neurons in the recovered group of rats did not significantly differ than those in the control animals. Further, mean cell size in the post-REMSD PRZ-treated animals was comparable to those in the control groups. IC neurons were not affected by REMSD. Conclusions REMS loss has been reported to impair several physiological, behavioral and cellular processes. The mean size of the DR neurons was larger in the REMS deprived group of rats than those in the control groups; however, in the REMS deprived and prazosin treated rats the size was comparable to the normal rats. These results showed that REMSD induced increase in DR neuronal size was mediated by NA acting on α1-adrenoceptor. The findings suggest that the sizes of DR neurons are sensitive to REMSD, which if not compensated could lead to neurodegeneration and associated disorders including memory loss and Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, nocturnal disturbances and quality of life in patients with Parkinson’s disease: a case-controlled study using the rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder screening questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Keisuke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing evidence provides a clear association between rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorders (RBD and Parkinson’s disease (PD, but the clinical features that determine the co-morbidity of RBD and PD are not yet fully understood. Methods We evaluated the characteristics of nocturnal disturbances and other motor and non-motor features related to RBD in patients with PD and the impact of RBD on their quality of life. Probable RBD (pRBD was evaluated using the Japanese version of the RBD screening questionnaire (RBDSQ-J. Results A significantly higher frequency of pRBD was observed in PD patients than in the controls (RBDSQ-J ≥ 5 or ≥ 6: 29.0% vs. 8.6%; 17.2% vs. 2.2%, respectively. After excluding restless legs syndrome and snorers in the PD patients, the pRBD group (RBDSQ-J≥5 showed higher scores compared with the non-pRBD group on the Parkinson’s disease sleep scale-2 (PDSS-2 total and three-domain scores. Early morning dystonia was more frequent in the pRBD group. The Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39 domain scores for cognition and emotional well-being were higher in the patients with pRBD than in the patients without pRBD. There were no differences between these two groups with respect to the clinical subtype, disease severity or motor function. When using a cut-off of RBDSQ-J = 6, a similar trend was observed for the PDSS-2 and PDQ-39 scores. Patients with PD and pRBD had frequent sleep onset insomnia, distressing dreams and hallucinations. The stepwise linear regression analysis showed that the PDSS-2 domain “motor symptoms at night”, particularly the PDSS sub-item 6 “distressing dreams”, was the only predictor of RBDSQ-J in PD. Conclusion Our results indicate a significant impact of RBD co-morbidity on night-time disturbances and quality of life in PD, particularly on cognition and emotional well-being. RBDSQ may be a useful tool for not only screening RBD in PD patients

  16. The Clinical Phenotype of Idiopathic Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder at Presentation: A Study in 203 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Iranzo, Alex; Serradell, Mónica; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan

    2016-01-01

    To describe the clinical phenotype of idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (IRBD) at presentation in a sleep center. Clinical history review of 203 consecutive patients with IRBD identified between 1990 and 2014. IRBD was diagnosed by clinical history plus video-polysomnographic demonstration of REM sleep with increased electromyographic activity linked to abnormal behaviors. Patients were 80% men with median age at IRBD diagnosis of 68 y (range, 50-85 y). In addition to the already known clinical picture of IRBD, other important features were apparent: 44% of the patients were not aware of their dream-enactment behaviors and 70% reported good sleep quality. In most of these cases bed partners were essential to convince patients to seek medical help. In 11% IRBD was elicited only after specific questioning when patients consulted for other reasons. Seven percent did not recall unpleasant dreams. Leaving the bed occurred occasionally in 24% of subjects in whom dementia with Lewy bodies often developed eventually. For the correct diagnosis of IRBD, video-polysomnography had to be repeated in 16% because of insufficient REM sleep or electromyographic artifacts from coexistent apneas. Some subjects with comorbid obstructive sleep apnea reported partial improvement of RBD symptoms following continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Lack of therapy with clonazepam resulted in an increased risk of sleep related injuries. Synucleinopathy was frequently diagnosed, even in patients with mild severity or uncommon IRBD presentations (e.g., patients who reported sleeping well, onset triggered by a life event, nocturnal ambulation) indicating that the development of a neurodegenerative disease is independent of the clinical presentation of IRBD. We report the largest IRBD cohort observed in a single center to date and highlight frequent features that were not reported or not sufficiently emphasized in previous publications. Physicians should be aware of

  17. Distinct associations between energy balance and the sleep characteristics slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutters, F; Gonnissen, H K; Hursel, R; Lemmens, S G; Martens, E A; Westerterp-Plantenga, M S

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiologically, an inverse relationship between body mass index (BMI) and sleep duration is observed. Intra-individual variance in the amount of slow wave sleep (SWS) or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep has been related to variance of metabolic and endocrine parameters, which are risk factors for the disturbance of energy balance (EB). To investigate inter-individual relationships between EB (EB= energy intake-energy expenditure∣, MJ/24 h), SWS or REM sleep, and relevant parameters in normal-weight men during two 48 h stays in the controlled environment of a respiration chamber. A total of 16 men (age 23±3.7 years, BMI 23.9±1.9 kg m(-2)) stayed in the respiration chamber twice for 48 h to assure EB. Electroencephalography was used to monitor sleep (2330-0730 hrs). Hunger and fullness were scored by visual analog scales; mood was determined by State Trait Anxiety Index-state and food reward by liking and wanting. Baseline blood and salivary samples were collected before breakfast. Subjects were fed in EB, except for the last dinner, when energy intake was ad libitum. The subjects slept on average 441.8±49 min per night, and showed high within-subject reliability for the amount of SWS and REM sleep. Linear regression analyses showed that EB was inversely related to the amount of SWS (r=-0.43, Phunger, reward, stress and orexigenic hormone concentrations were related to overeating, as well as to the amount of SWS and REM sleep, however, after inclusion of these parameters in a multiple regression, the amount of SWS and REM sleep did not add to the explained variance of EB, which suggests that due to their individual associations, these EB parameters are mediator variables. A positive EB due to overeating, was explained by a smaller amount of SWS and higher amount of REM sleep, mediated by hunger, fullness, State Trait Anxiety Index-state scores, glucose/insulin ratio, and ghrelin and cortisol concentrations.

  18. Rapid eye movement (REM sleep deprivation reduces rat frontal cortex acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7 activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camarini R.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep deprivation induces several behavioral changes. Among these, a decrease in yawning behavior produced by low doses of cholinergic agonists is observed which indicates a change in brain cholinergic neurotransmission after REM sleep deprivation. Acetylcholinesterase (Achase controls acetylcholine (Ach availability in the synaptic cleft. Therefore, altered Achase activity may lead to a change in Ach availability at the receptor level which, in turn, may result in modification of cholinergic neurotransmission. To determine if REM sleep deprivation would change the activity of Achase, male Wistar rats, 3 months old, weighing 250-300 g, were deprived of REM sleep for 96 h by the flower-pot technique (N = 12. Two additional groups, a home-cage control (N = 6 and a large platform control (N = 6, were also used. Achase was measured in the frontal cortex using two different methods to obtain the enzyme activity. One method consisted of the obtention of total (900 g supernatant, membrane-bound (100,000 g pellet and soluble (100,000 g supernatant Achase, and the other method consisted of the obtention of a fraction (40,000 g pellet enriched in synaptic membrane-bound enzyme. In both preparations, REM sleep deprivation induced a significant decrease in rat frontal cortex Achase activity when compared to both home-cage and large platform controls. REM sleep deprivation induced a significant decrease of 16% in the membrane-bound Achase activity (nmol thiocholine formed min-1 mg protein-1 in the 100,000 g pellet enzyme preparation (home-cage group 152.1 ± 5.7, large platform group 152.7 ± 24.9 and REM sleep-deprived group 127.9 ± 13.8. There was no difference in the soluble enzyme activity. REM sleep deprivation also induced a significant decrease of 20% in the enriched synaptic membrane-bound Achase activity (home-cage group 126.4 ± 21.5, large platform group 127.8 ± 20.4, REM sleep-deprived group 102.8 ± 14.2. Our results

  19. Dissociating the contributions of slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep to emotional item and source memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groch, S; Zinke, K; Wilhelm, I; Born, J

    2015-07-01

    Sleep benefits the consolidation of emotional memories, and this influence is commonly attributed to the rapid eye movement (REM) stage of sleep. However, the contributions of sleep stages to memory for an emotional episode may differ for the event per se (i.e., item memory), and the context in which it occurred (source memory). Here, we examined the effects of slow wave sleep (SWS) and REM sleep on the consolidation of emotionally negative and neutral item (picture recognition) and source memory (recall of picture-location and picture-frame color association) in humans. In Study 1, the participants (n=18) learned 48 negative and 48 neutral pictures which were presented at specific locations and preceded by colored frames that had to be associated with the picture. In a within-subject design, learning was either followed by a 3-h early-night SWS-rich or by a late-night REM sleep-rich retention interval, then retrieval was tested. Only after REM-rich sleep, and not after SWS-rich sleep, was there a significant emotional enhancement, i.e., a significantly superior retention of emotional over neutral pictures. On the other hand, after SWS-rich sleep the retention of picture-frame color associations was better than after REM-rich sleep. However, this benefit was observed only for neutral pictures; and it was completely absent for the emotional pictures. To examine whether this absent benefit reflected a suppressive effect of emotionality on associations of minor task relevance, in Study 2 we manipulated the relevance of the picture-frame color association by combining it with information about monetary reward, following otherwise comparable procedures. Here, rewarded picture-frame color associations were equally well retained over SWS-rich early sleep no matter if the frames were associated with emotional or neutral pictures. Results are consistent with the view that REM sleep favors the emotional enhancement of item memory whereas SWS appears to contribute primarily

  20. A prospective, naturalistic follow-up study of treatment outcomes with clonazepam in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shirley Xin; Lam, Siu Ping; Zhang, Jihui; Yu, Mandy Wai Man; Chan, Joey Wing Yin; Liu, Yaping; Lam, Venny Kwai Ho; Ho, Crover Kwok Wah; Zhou, Junying; Wing, Yun Kwok

    2016-05-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by prominent dream-enacting behaviors, often resulting in sleep-related injuries. This study aimed to prospectively examine the treatment response of people with RBD treated with clonazepam, by quantitatively delineating the characteristic changes in the clinical and polysomnographic features, and to explore the factors associated with this response. Patients diagnosed with idiopathic RBD (iRBD) were consecutively recruited and invited to complete clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) assessments and self-administered questionnaires (including the modified REM Sleep Behavior Questionnaire, RBDQ-3M) before and after the initiation of treatment with clonazepam. Thirty-nine iRBD patients (male: 74.4%, mean age at diagnosis: 68.3 ± 7.8 years) were recruited with a follow-up duration of 28.8 ± 13.3 months. Clonazepam was offered as the first-line treatment (starting dose: 0.43 ± 0.16 mg, range: 0.125-1.00; dose at follow-up: 0.98 ± 0.63 mg, range: 0.125-3). Treatment response, as defined by a complete elimination of sleep-related injuries and potentially injurious behaviors to self and/or to bed partner, at follow-up was reported in 66.7% of the overall study subjects. Frequency of disturbing dreams with violent and frightening content and vigorous behavioral RBD symptoms was significantly reduced, while residual nocturnal symptoms and an increase in REM-related EMG activities were observed at follow-up. Less optimal treatment outcomes were found to be associated with the presence of comorbid obstructive sleep apnea and earlier onset of RBD. Clonazepam differentially changes dream affect and content, as well as reduces vigorous verbal and motor behaviors. Residual RBD symptoms are common, despite treatment. Other more effective alternative or adjunctive interventions are needed for better clinical management of RBD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Considering Valproate as a Risk Factor for Rapid Exacerbation of Complex Movement Disorder in Progressed Stages of Late-Infantile CLN2 Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Jessika; Nickel, Miriam; Schulz, Angela; Denecke, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2 (CLN2 disease, OMIM 204500) is a rare autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder. It is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders in childhood. Symptoms include epilepsy, rapid motor and language regression, dementia, visual loss, and a complex movement disorder in later stages of the disease. We report on two children with genetically confirmed late-infantile CLN2 disease who developed a severe exacerbation of their complex movement disorder leading to hyperthermia, hyper-CK-emia and decreased level of consciousness over several weeks despite different therapeutic approaches. Both patients were on long-term antiepileptic treatment with valproate and only after the withdrawal of valproate, the movement disorder disappeared and level of consciousness improved. These observations emphasize that valproate has to be considered as a possible risk factor in patients in later stages of late-infantile CLN2 disease who develop a rapidly progressive complex movement disorder. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. The Role of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Slow-Wave Activity in Prefrontal Metabolism across Young and Middle Age Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wilckens, K.A.; Aizenstein, H J; Nofzinger, E.A.; James, J. A.; Hasler, B.P.; Rosario-Rivera, B.L.; Franzen, P; Germain, A.; Hall, M. H.; Kupfer, D.J.; Price, J C.; Siegle, G.J.; Buysse, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (0.5���4 Hz) during non rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep is a marker for cortical reorganization, particularly within the prefrontal cortex. Greater slow-wave activity during sleep may promote greater waking prefrontal metabolic rate, and in turn, executive function. However, this process may be affected by age. Here we examined whether greater NREM slow-wave activity was associated with higher prefrontal metabolism during wakefulness and whether this...

  3. Recent developments in the study of rapid human movements with the kinematic theory: Applications to handwriting and signature synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Plamondon, Réjean; O’Reilly, Christian; Galbally, Javier; Almaksour, Abdullah; Anquetil, Éric

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Human movement modeling can be of great interest for the design of pattern recognition systems relying on the understanding of the fine motor control (such as on-line handwriting recognition or signature verification) as well as for the development of intelligent systems involving in a way or another the processing of human movements. In this paper, we briefly list the different models that have been proposed in order to characterize the handwriting process and focus o...

  4. Antarctic killer whales make rapid, round-trip movements to subtropical waters: evidence for physiological maintenance migrations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durban, J W; Pitman, R L

    2012-04-23

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are important predators in high latitudes, where their ecological impact is mediated through their movements. We used satellite telemetry to provide the first evidence of migration for killer whales, characterized by fast (more than 12 km h(-1), 6.5 knots) and direct movements away from Antarctic waters by six of 12 type B killer whales tagged when foraging near the Antarctic Peninsula, including all tags transmitting for more than three weeks. Tags on five of these whales revealed consistent movements to subtropical waters (30-37° S) off Uruguay and Brazil, in surface water temperatures ranging from -1.9°C to 24.2°C; one 109 day track documented a non-stop round trip of almost 9400 km (5075 nmi) in just 42 days. Although whales travelled slower in the warmest waters, there was no obvious interruption in swim speed or direction to indicate calving or prolonged feeding. Furthermore, these movements were aseasonal, initiating over 80 days between February and April; one whale returned to within 40 km of the tagging site at the onset of the austral winter in June. We suggest that these movements may represent periodic maintenance migrations, with warmer waters allowing skin regeneration without the high cost of heat loss: a physiological constraint that may also affect other whales.

  5. A microstructural study of sleep instability in drug-naive patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls: sleep spindles, rapid eye movements, and muscle atonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénolé, Fabian; Chevrier, Elyse; Stip, Emmanuel; Godbout, Roger

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed at characterizing the functional stability of sleep in schizophrenia by quantifying dissociated stages of sleep (DSS), and to explore their correlation with psychopathology. The sleep of 10 first-break, drug-naive young adults with schizophrenia and 10 controls was recorded. Four basic DSS patterns were scored: 1) the transitional EEG-mixed intermediate stage (EMIS); 2) Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep without rapid eye movement (RSWR); 3) REM sleep without atonia (RSWA); and 4) non-REM sleep with rapid eye movements. An intermediate sleep (IS) score was calculated by summing EMIS and RSWR scores, and the durations of intra-REM sleep periods IS (IRSPIS) and IS scored "at the expense" of REM sleep (ISERS) were determined. Patients were administered the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) at the time of recording. Proportions of each DSS variables over total sleep time and proportions of IRSPIS and ISERS over REM sleep duration were compared between patients and controls. Correlation coefficients between DSS variables and BPRS total scores were calculated. The proportion of total DSS did not differ between patients and controls. Among DSS subtypes, RSWA was significantly increased in patients while other comparisons showed no significant differences. Significant positive correlations were found between BPRS scores and proportions of DSS, IS, RSWR, IRSPIS and ISERS over total sleep and REM sleep durations. These results demonstrate the functional instability of REM sleep in first-break, drug naive young adults with schizophrenia and unveil a pattern reminiscent of REM sleep behavior disorder. The significant correlation suggests that schizophrenia and REM sleep share common neuronal control mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cognitive performances and mild cognitive impairment in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: results of a longitudinal follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzaghi, Michele; Zucchella, Chiara; Rustioni, Valter; Sinforiani, Elena; Manni, Raffaele

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the capacity of neuropsychological deficits in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) to predict the development of dementia and/or parkinsonism. Prospective longitudinal follow-up study. Tertiary sleep center. Twenty patients with initial iRBD (19 males, mean age 66.1 ± 7.1) underwent a clinical and neuropsychological follow-up within a mean of 43 ± 19 months. Neuropsychological performances at baseline were compared with those of healthy controls matched for sex, age, and education. Discontinuation of clonazepam at least 7 days before the follow-up evaluation. At follow-up, the Wilcoxon test showed a significant worsening of scores on Raven Colored Matrices 47 (P = 0.01), Attentive matrices (P = 0.002), phonemic (P = 0.04) and sematic (P = 0.04) fluency. Thirteen patients (65%) showed cognitive deterioration involving multiple domains. Of these, four patients (20%) maintained a stable cognitive dysfunction and nine (45%) showed a progression of cognitive dysfunction: six (30%) in constructional abilities (P = 0.03), four (20%) in short-term memory (P = NS), three (15%) in executive functions and non-verbal logic (P = NS), one (5%) in verbal fluency (P = NS), and one (5%) in long-term memory (P = NS) (McNemar test). Seven patients (35%) retained a normal cognitive profile. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) was diagnosed at baseline in seven patients (35%). At follow-up, three of these patients showed overt dementia that was accompanied by parkinsonism in all cases; one had worsened from non-amnesic single-domain to nonamnesic multiple-domain MCI, two were stable, and one patient no longer met the criteria for MCI. Four patients (20%) without MCI at baseline had MCI at follow-up. Patients who developed MCI/dementia had an older age at disease onset (65.8 ± 5.4 versus 56.8 ± 9.3; P = 0.01) compared with those who did not. Our findings corroborate evidence that visuospatial abilities constitute the area most affected in

  7. Rapid movement of frozen debris-lobes: implications for permafrost degradation and slope instability in the south-central Brooks Range, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Daanen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a reconnaissance investigation of unusual debris mass-movement features on permafrost slopes that pose a potential infrastructure hazard in the south-central Brooks Range, Alaska. For the purpose of this paper, we describe these features as frozen debris-lobes. We focus on the characterisation of frozen debris-lobes as indicators of various movement processes using ground-based surveys, remote sensing, field and laboratory measurements, and time-lapse observations of frozen debris-lobe systems along the Dalton Highway. Currently, some frozen debris-lobes exceed 100 m in width, 20 m in height and 1000 m in length. Our results indicate that frozen debris-lobes have responded to climate change by becoming increasingly active during the last decades, resulting in rapid downslope movement. Movement indicators observed in the field include toppling trees, slumps and scarps, detachment slides, striation marks on frozen sediment slabs, recently buried trees and other vegetation, mudflows, and large cracks in the lobe surface. The type and diversity of observed indicators suggest that the lobes likely consist of a frozen debris core, are subject to creep, and seasonally unfrozen surface sediment is transported in warm seasons by creep, slumping, viscous flow, blockfall and leaching of fines, and in cold seasons by creep and sliding of frozen sediment slabs. Ground-based measurements on one frozen debris-lobe over three years (2008–2010 revealed average movement rates of approximately 1 cm day−1, which is substantially larger than rates measured in historic aerial photography from the 1950s to 1980s. We discuss how climate change may further influence frozen debris-lobe dynamics, potentially accelerating their movement. We highlight the potential direct hazard that one of the studied frozen debris-lobes may pose in the coming years and decades to the nearby Trans Alaska Pipeline System and the Dalton Highway, the

  8. Samsung Galaxy S4 for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Explore a world of possibilities with your Samsung Galaxy S 4 smartphone Everything's more exciting when you've got the Galaxy in your hand. Let For Dummies be your guide to getting the most out of your Galaxy S 4. You'll cruise through the smartphone basics and set up process before moving on to the fun stuff like staying in touch with e-mail and texting, surfing the web, navigating with maps, shooting and sharing photos and video, watching movies, listening to music, and so much more. Whether you're entering the smartphone world for the first time or just moving up to

  9. Coilin is rapidly recruited to UVA-induced DNA lesions and γ-radiation affects localized movement of Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártová, Eva; Foltánková, Veronika; Legartová, Soňa; Sehnalová, Petra; Sorokin, Dmitry V; Suchánková, Jana; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Cajal bodies are important nuclear structures containing proteins that preferentially regulate RNA-related metabolism. We investigated the cell-type specific nuclear distribution of Cajal bodies and the level of coilin, a protein of Cajal bodies, in non-irradiated and irradiated human tumor cell lines and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Cajal bodies were localized in different nuclear compartments, including DAPI-poor regions, in the proximity of chromocenters, and adjacent to nucleoli. The number of Cajal bodies per nucleus was cell cycle-dependent, with higher numbers occurring during G2 phase. Human ES cells contained a high coilin level in the nucleoplasm, but coilin-positive Cajal bodies were also identified in nuclei of mouse and human ES cells. Coilin, but not SMN, recognized UVA-induced DNA lesions, which was cell cycle-independent. Treatment with γ-radiation reduced the localized movement of Cajal bodies in many cell types and GFP-coilin fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was very fast in nucleoplasm in comparison with GFP-coilin recovery in DNA lesions. By contrast, nucleolus-localized coilin displayed very slow fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, which indicates very slow rates of protein diffusion, especially in nucleoli of mouse ES cells.

  10. Comparative enzymology of (2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine and (2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Arthur J L; Krasnikov, Boris F; Pinto, John T; Kung, Hank F; Li, Jianyong; Ploessl, Karl

    2012-09-01

    Many cancer cells have a strong requirement for glutamine. As an aid for understanding this phenomenon the (18)F-labeled 2S,4R stereoisomer of 4-fluoroglutamine [(2S,4R)4-FGln] was previously developed for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET). In the present work, comparative enzymological studies of unlabeled (2S,4R)4-FGln and its deamidated product (2S,4R)4-FGlu were conducted as an adjunct to these PET studies. Our findings are as follows: Rat kidney preparations catalyze the deamidation of (2S,4R)4-FGln. (2,4R)4-FGln and (2S,4R)4-FGlu are substrates of various aminotransferases. (2S,4R)4-FGlu is a substrate of glutamate dehydrogenase, but not of sheep brain glutamine synthetase. The compound is, however, a strong inhibitor of this enzyme. Rat liver cytosolic fractions catalyze a γ-elimination reaction with (2S,4R)4-FGlu, generating α-ketoglutarate. Coupling of a deamidase reaction with this γ-elimination reaction provides an explanation for the previous detection of (18)F(-) in tumors exposed to [(18)F](2S,4R)4-FGln. One enzyme contributing to this reaction was identified as alanine aminotransferase, which catalyzes competing γ-elimination and aminotransferase reactions with (2S,4R)4-FGlu. This appears to be the first description of an aminotransferase catalyzing a γ-elimination reaction. The present results demonstrate that (2S,4R)4-FGln and (2S,4R)4-FGlu are useful analogues for comparative studies of various glutamine- and glutamate-utilizing enzymes in normal and cancerous mammalian tissues, and suggest that tumors may metabolize (2S,4R)4-FGln in a generally similar fashion to glutamine. In plants, yeast and bacteria a major route for ammonia assimilation involves the consecutive action of glutamate synthase plus glutamine synthetase (glutamate synthase cycle). It is suggested that (2S,4R)4-FGln and (2S,4R)4-FGlu will be useful probes in studies of ammonia assimilation by the glutamate synthase pathway in these organisms. Finally, glutamine

  11. Can observers link dream content to behaviours in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder? A cross-sectional experimental pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Katja; Frauscher, Birgit; Gschliesser, Viola; Wolf, Elisabeth; Falkenstetter, Tina; Schönwald, Suzana V; Ehrmann, Laura; Zangerl, Anja; Marti, Isabelle; Boesch, Sylvia M; Revonsuo, Antti; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2012-02-01

    Motor activity in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) has been linked to dream content. Systematic and controlled sleep laboratory studies directly assessing the relation between RBD behaviours and experienced dream content are, however, largely lacking. We aimed to investigate whether a link can be established between RBD behaviours and dream content when both are systematically sampled in a controlled setting. We investigated six patients with Parkinson syndrome and RBD who underwent 2-3 nights of video-polysomnographic recording during which they were awakened from REM sleep (10 min after the onset of the second and successive REM periods). Spontaneous free-worded dream reports and a structured dream questionnaire were obtained. Video recordings of motor manifestations were each combined with four dream reports, and seven judges had to match the video clip with the correctly reported dream content from a choice of four possibilities. Of the 35 REM sleep awakenings performed, a total of 17 (48.6%) motor-behavioural episodes with recalled dream content were obtained. The mean of correctly identified video-dream pairs was 39.5% (range 0-100%). Our data showed that reported dream content can be linked to motor behaviours above chance level. Matching accuracy was affected mainly by the clarity of dream reports and the specific nature of movements manifest in video recordings. © 2011 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Decreased phasic EMG activity during rapid eye movement sleep in treatment-naïve Parkinson's disease: effects of treatment with levodopa and progression of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Caminero, Ana B; De La Llave, Yolanda; Larrosa, Oscar; Barrio, Soledad; Granizo, Juan J; Pareja, Juan A

    2002-09-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) and may anticipate its diagnosis by several years. We assessed the presence of motor dyscontrol during REM sleep in treatment-naïve PD patients and investigated the putative effect of levodopa (L-dopa) treatment on motor activity. Overnight sleep studies were performed on 15 previously untreated PD patients and 14 controls at baseline, again after a 3- to 9-month treatment period with a low dose of L-dopa, and 2 to 5 days after treatment discontinuation (in 8 patients). No differences in sleep parameters were observed across groups or treatment conditions. None of the patients met criteria for RBD at baseline, whereas 5 patients were symptomatic at the time of the second sleep study. A quantitative analysis of electromyographic (EMG) activity during REM sleep showed a lower phasic twitching activity in untreated PD than in controls. However, an increase in both phasic twitching and tonic activity was found after treatment with L-dopa. Discontinuation of treatment resulted in a return to pretreatment values of phasic but not of tonic EMG activity. Thus, the increase in phasic activity seems to depend on the effects of L-dopa, whereas the increase in tonic EMG activity during REM sleep might be caused by other factors such as the progression of disease. Potential implications for the understanding of the relationship between RBD and PD are discussed. Copyright 2002 Movement Disorder Society

  13. The Benefit of Directed Forgetting Persists After a Daytime Nap: The Role of Spindles and Rapid Eye Movement Sleep in the Consolidation of Relevant Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskovich, Borbála; Szollosi, Ágnes; Gombos, Ferenc; Racsmány, Mihály; Simor, Péter

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of directed forgetting instruction on memory retention after a 2-hour delay involving a daytime nap or an equivalent amount of time spent awake. We examined the associations between sleep-specific oscillations and the retention of relevant and irrelevant study materials. We applied a list-method directed forgetting paradigm manipulating the perceived relevance of previously encoded lists of words. Participants were randomly assigned to either a nap or an awake group, and to a remember or a forget subgroup. The remember and the forget subgroups were both instructed to study two consecutive lists of words, although, the forget subgroup was manipulated to forget the first list and memorize only the second one. Participants were 112 healthy individuals (44 men; Mage = 21.4 years, SD = 2.4). A significant directed forgetting effect emerged after a 2-hour delay both in the awake and sleep conditions; however, the effect was more pronounced within the sleep group. The benefit of directed forgetting, that is, relatively enhanced recall of relevant words in the forget group, was evidenced only in those participants that reached rapid eye movement (REM) phase. Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sigma power was correlated with memory performance for the relevant (second) list, and sleep spindle amplitude was associated with the retention of both lists. These associations, however, were detected only within the forget subgroup. REM duration correlated with recall performance for the relevant (second) list within the forget subgroup, and with recall performance for the first list within the remember subgroup. A directed forgetting effect persists after a 2-hour delay spent awake or asleep. Spindle-related activity and subsequent REM sleep might selectively facilitate the processing of memories that are considered to be relevant for the future.

  14. Control of the strength of visual-motor transmission as the mechanism of rapid adaptation of priors for Bayesian inference in smooth pursuit eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Timothy R; Tokiyama, Stefanie; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2017-08-01

    Bayesian inference provides a cogent account of how the brain combines sensory information with "priors" based on past experience to guide many behaviors, including smooth pursuit eye movements. We now demonstrate very rapid adaptation of the pursuit system's priors for target direction and speed. We go on to leverage that adaptation to outline possible neural mechanisms that could cause pursuit to show features consistent with Bayesian inference. Adaptation of the prior causes changes in the eye speed and direction at the initiation of pursuit. The adaptation appears after a single trial and accumulates over repeated exposure to a given history of target speeds and directions. The influence of the priors depends on the reliability of visual motion signals: priors are more effective against the visual motion signals provided by low-contrast vs. high-contrast targets. Adaptation of the direction prior generalizes to eye speed and vice versa, suggesting that both priors could be controlled by a single neural mechanism. We conclude that the pursuit system can learn the statistics of visual motion rapidly and use those statistics to guide future behavior. Furthermore, a model that adjusts the gain of visual-motor transmission predicts the effects of recent experience on pursuit direction and speed, as well as the specifics of the generalization between the priors for speed and direction. We suggest that Bayesian inference in pursuit behavior is implemented by distinctly non-Bayesian internal mechanisms that use the smooth eye movement region of the frontal eye fields to control of the gain of visual-motor transmission.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Bayesian inference can account for the interaction between sensory data and past experience in many behaviors. Here, we show, using smooth pursuit eye movements, that the priors based on past experience can be adapted over a very short time frame. We also show that a single model based on direction-specific adaptation of the strength of

  15. The King-Devick (K-D) test of rapid eye movements: a bedside correlate of disability and quality of life in MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moster, Stephen; Wilson, James A; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J

    2014-08-15

    We investigated the King-Devick (K-D) test of rapid number naming as a visual performance measure in a cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In this cross-sectional study, 81 patients with MS and 20 disease-free controls from an ongoing study of visual outcomes underwent K-D testing. A test of rapid number naming, K-D requires saccadic eye movements as well as intact vision, attention and concentration. To perform the K-D test, participants are asked to read numbers aloud as quickly as possible from three test cards; the sum of the three test card times in seconds constitutes the summary score. High-contrast visual acuity (VA), low-contrast letter acuity (1.25% and 2.5% levels), retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT), MS Functional Composite (MSFC) and vision-specific quality of life (QOL) measures (25-Item NEI Visual Functioning Questionnaire [NEI-VFQ-25] and 10-Item Neuro-Ophthalmic Supplement) were also assessed. K-D time scores in the MS cohort (total time to read the three test cards) were significantly higher (worse) compared to those for disease-free controls (P=0.003, linear regression, accounting for age). Within the MS cohort, higher K-D scores were associated with worse scores for the NEI-VFQ-25 composite (Pdisability status as disabled (receiving disability pension) did worse on K-D testing compared to those working full-time (P=0.001, accounting for age). The K-D test, a impairment, and reduced vision-specific QOL in patients with MS. Scores reflect work disability as well as structural changes as measured by OCT imaging. History of ON and abnormal binocular acuities were associated with worse K-D scores, suggesting that abnormalities detected by K-D may go along with afferent dysfunction in MS patients. A brief test that requires saccadic eye movements, K-D should be considered for future MS trials as a rapid visual performance measure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative assessment of isolated rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia without clinical REM sleep behavior disorder: clinical and research implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai-Sakuma, Taeko; Frauscher, Birgit; Mitterling, Thomas; Ehrmann, Laura; Gabelia, David; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Inoue, Yuichi; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2014-09-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia (RWA) is observed in some patients without a clinical history of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). It remains unknown whether these patients meet the refined quantitative electromyographic (EMG) criteria supporting a clinical RBD diagnosis. We quantitatively evaluated EMG activity and investigated its overnight distribution in patients with isolated qualitative RWA. Fifty participants with an incidental polysomnographic finding of RWA (isolated qualitative RWA) were included. Tonic, phasic, and 'any' EMG activity during REM sleep on PSG were quantified retrospectively. Referring to the quantitative cut-off values for a polysomnographic diagnosis of RBD, 7/50 (14%) and 6/50 (12%) of the patients showed phasic and 'any' EMG activity in the mentalis muscle above the respective cut-off values. No patient was above the cut-off value for tonic EMG activity or phasic EMG activity in the anterior tibialis muscles. Patients with RWA above the cut-off value showed higher amounts of RWA during later REM sleep periods. This is the first study showing that some subjects with incidental RWA meet the refined quantitative EMG criteria for a diagnosis of RBD. Future longitudinal studies must investigate whether this subgroup with isolated qualitative RWA is at an increased risk of developing fully expressed RBD and/or neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Essential roles of GABA transporter-1 in controlling rapid eye movement sleep and in increased slow wave activity after sleep deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Hong Xu

    Full Text Available GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of sleep. GABA transporter subtype 1 (GAT1 constructs high affinity reuptake sites for GABA and regulates GABAergic transmission in the brain. However, the role of GAT1 in sleep-wake regulation remains elusive. In the current study, we characterized the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and responses to sleep deprivation in GAT1 knock-out (KO mice. GAT1 KO mice exhibited dominant theta-activity and a remarkable reduction of EEG power in low frequencies across all vigilance stages. Under baseline conditions, spontaneous rapid eye movement (REM sleep of KO mice was elevated both during the light and dark periods, and non-REM (NREM sleep was reduced during the light period only. KO mice also showed more state transitions from NREM to REM sleep and from REM sleep to wakefulness, as well as more number of REM and NREM sleep bouts than WT mice. During the dark period, KO mice exhibited more REM sleep bouts only. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREM and REM sleep in both genotypes. However, slow wave activity, the intensity component of NREM sleep was briefly elevated in WT mice but remained completely unchanged in KO mice, compared with their respective baselines. These results indicate that GAT1 plays a critical role in the regulation of REM sleep and homeostasis of NREM sleep.

  18. Effects of oral temazepam on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep in healthy young adults: A high-density EEG investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, D T; Goldstein, M R; Cook, J D; Smith, R; Riedner, B A; Rumble, M E; Jelenchick, L; Roth, A; Tononi, G; Benca, R M; Peterson, M J

    2016-03-01

    Slow waves are characteristic waveforms that occur during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep that play an integral role in sleep quality and brain plasticity. Benzodiazepines are commonly used medications that alter slow waves, however, their effects may depend on the time of night and measure used to characterize slow waves. Prior investigations have utilized minimal scalp derivations to evaluate the effects of benzodiazepines on slow waves, and thus the topography of changes to slow waves induced by benzodiazepines has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to evaluate the effects of oral temazepam on slow wave activity, incidence, and morphology during NREM sleep in 18 healthy adults relative to placebo. Temazepam was associated with significant decreases in slow wave activity and incidence, which were most prominent in the latter portions of the sleep period. However, temazepam was also associated with a decrease in the magnitude of high-amplitude slow waves and their slopes in the first NREM sleep episode, which was most prominent in frontal derivations. These findings suggest that benzodiazepines produce changes in slow waves throughout the night that vary depending on cortical topography and measures used to characterize slow waves. Further research that explores the relationships between benzodiazepine-induced changes to slow waves and the functional effects of these waveforms is indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. β oscillation during slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep in the electroencephalogram of a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Jeantet

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVES: To search for early abnormalities in electroencephalogram (EEG during sleep which may precede motor symptoms in a transgenic mouse model of hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD. DESIGN: In the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of HD, rhythmic brain activity in EEG recordings was monitored longitudinally and across vigilance states through the onset and progression of disease. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Mice with chronic electrode implants were recorded monthly over wake-sleep cycles (4 hours, beginning at 9-11 weeks (presymptomatic period through 6-7 months (symptomatic period. Recording data revealed a unique β rhythm (20-35 Hz, present only in R6/1 transgenic mice, which evolves in close parallel with the disease. In addition, there was an unusual relationship between this β oscillation and vigilance states: while nearly absent during the active waking state, the β oscillation appeared with drowsiness and during slow wave sleep (SWS and, interestingly, strengthened rather than dissipating when the brain returned to an activated state during rapid eye movement (REM sleep. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to providing a new in vivo biomarker and insight into Huntington's disease pathophysiology, this serendipitous observation opens a window onto the rarely explored neurophysiology of the cortico-basal ganglia circuit during SWS and REM sleep.

  20. β oscillation during slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep in the electroencephalogram of a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeantet, Yannick; Cayzac, Sebastien; Cho, Yoon H

    2013-01-01

    To search for early abnormalities in electroencephalogram (EEG) during sleep which may precede motor symptoms in a transgenic mouse model of hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD). In the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of HD, rhythmic brain activity in EEG recordings was monitored longitudinally and across vigilance states through the onset and progression of disease. Mice with chronic electrode implants were recorded monthly over wake-sleep cycles (4 hours), beginning at 9-11 weeks (presymptomatic period) through 6-7 months (symptomatic period). Recording data revealed a unique β rhythm (20-35 Hz), present only in R6/1 transgenic mice, which evolves in close parallel with the disease. In addition, there was an unusual relationship between this β oscillation and vigilance states: while nearly absent during the active waking state, the β oscillation appeared with drowsiness and during slow wave sleep (SWS) and, interestingly, strengthened rather than dissipating when the brain returned to an activated state during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In addition to providing a new in vivo biomarker and insight into Huntington's disease pathophysiology, this serendipitous observation opens a window onto the rarely explored neurophysiology of the cortico-basal ganglia circuit during SWS and REM sleep.

  1. Expression of prion protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Parkinson's disease complicated with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W J; Shang, X L; Peng, J; Zhou, M H; Sun, W J

    2017-01-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and mainly manifests with decreasing numbers of dopaminergic neurons. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) has an incidence of 15-47% in all PD patients. Prion proteins (PrPs), which are expressed in both neurons and glial cells of the brain, are believed to be correlated with abnormal neurological functions, although their role in PD-related sleeping disorders remains unclear. We therefore investigated the expressional profiles of PrP in PD patients with RBD. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein levels of PrP, respectively, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of PD patients with RBD, PD patients without sleeping disorder, and healthy people (N = 23 each). We investigated the correlation between the CSF PrP level and sleeping behavior in PD patients. Patients with PD complicated with RBD had significantly elevated CSF PrP expression levels (both mRNA and protein) compared with either PD patients without sleeping disorder or healthy individuals (P < 0.05 in both cases). There is elevated expression of PrP in the CSF of PD patients with RBD. This may benefit the diagnosis of PD-related RBD.

  2. [Effect of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation on anxiety behavior and hippocampus NO level: different responses of adolescent and adult C57BL/6J mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin-Yan; Chen, Tian-Bin; Hao, Yan-Li; Zhang, Bin

    2015-10-01

    To explore the difference between adolescent and adult C57BL/6J mice in response to rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) deprivation in terms of anxiety behavior and hippocampal NO level. Both adolescent and adult C57BL/6J mice were divided into normal control (NC) group, wide platform (WP) group, and 24-hour REMS deprivation group, each group consisting of 15 mice. REMS deprivation models were established using a small platform in water tank, and the elevated plus maze test was used to examine anxiety behavior of the mice. After behavioral tests, the mice were sacrificed to examine hippocampal NO levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and hippocampal nNOS protein expression was detected with Western blotting. The adolescent C57BL/6J mice showed no obvious differences in anxiety behaviors between the 3 groups, but NO level and nNOS expression in the hippocampus was significantly higher in REMSD group than in NC and WP groups (Pdeprivation produces different effects on anxiety-related behaviors between adolescent and adult mice possibly in relation to their different responses in terms of NO levels and nNOS expression in the hippocampus.

  3. State-specific effects of sevoflurane anesthesia on sleep homeostasis: selective recovery of slow wave but not rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dinesh; Lipinski, William J; Walker, Amanda J; Turner, Ashley M; Mashour, George A

    2011-02-01

    Prolonged propofol administration does not result in signs of sleep deprivation, and propofol anesthesia appears to satisfy the homeostatic need for both rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. In the current study, the effects of sevoflurane on recovery from total sleep deprivation were investigated. Ten male rats were instrumented for electrophysiologic recordings under three conditions: (1) 36-h ad libitum sleep; (2) 12-h sleep deprivation followed by 24-h ad libitum sleep; and (3) 12-h sleep deprivation, followed by 6-h sevoflurane exposure, followed by 18-h ad libitum sleep. The percentage of waking, NREM sleep, and REM sleep, as well as NREM sleep δ power, were calculated and compared for all three conditions. Total sleep deprivation resulted in significantly increased NREM and REM sleep for 12-h postdeprivation. Sevoflurane exposure after deprivation eliminated the homeostatic increase in NREM sleep and produced a significant decrease in the NREM sleep δ power during the postanesthetic period, indicating a complete recovery from the effects of deprivation. However, sevoflurane did not affect the time course of REM sleep recovery, which required 12 h after deprivation and anesthetic exposure. Unlike propofol, sevoflurane anesthesia has differential effects on NREM and REM sleep homeostasis. These data confirm the previous hypothesis that inhalational agents do not satisfy the homeostatic need for REM sleep, and that the relationship between sleep and anesthesia is likely to be agent and state specific.

  4. The role of non-rapid eye movement slow-wave activity in prefrontal metabolism across young and middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilckens, Kristine A; Aizenstein, Howard J; Nofzinger, Eric A; James, Jeffrey A; Hasler, Brant P; Rosario-Rivera, Bedda L; Franzen, Peter L; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H; Kupfer, David J; Price, Julie C; Siegle, Greg J; Buysse, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (0.5-4 Hz) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is a marker for cortical reorganization, particularly within the prefrontal cortex. Greater slow wave activity during sleep may promote greater waking prefrontal metabolic rate and, in turn, executive function. However, this process may be affected by age. Here we examined whether greater NREM slow wave activity was associated with higher prefrontal metabolism during wakefulness and whether this relationship interacted with age. Fifty-two participants aged 25-61 years were enrolled into studies that included polysomnography and a (18) [F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography scan during wakefulness. Absolute and relative measures of NREM slow wave activity were assessed. Semiquantitative and relative measures of cerebral metabolism were collected to assess whole brain and regional metabolism, focusing on two regions of interest: the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. Greater relative slow wave activity was associated with greater dorsolateral prefrontal metabolism. Age and slow wave activity interacted significantly in predicting semiquantitative whole brain metabolism and outside regions of interest in the posterior cingulate, middle temporal gyrus and the medial frontal gyrus, such that greater slow-wave activity was associated with lower metabolism in the younger participants and greater metabolism in the older participants. These results suggest that slow-wave activity is associated with cerebral metabolism during wakefulness across the adult lifespan within regions important for executive function. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  5. Promotion of non-rapid eye movement sleep and activation of reticular thalamic neurons by a novel MT2 melatonin receptor ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Sanchez, Rafael; Comai, Stefano; Lacoste, Baptiste; Bambico, Francis Rodriguez; Dominguez-Lopez, Sergio; Spadoni, Gilberto; Rivara, Silvia; Bedini, Annalida; Angeloni, Debora; Fraschini, Franco; Mor, Marco; Tarzia, Giorgio; Descarries, Laurent; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2011-12-14

    Melatonin activates two brain G-protein coupled receptors, MT(1) and MT(2), whose differential roles in the sleep-wake cycle remain to be defined. The novel MT(2) receptor partial agonist, N-{2-[(3-methoxyphenyl) phenylamino] ethyl} acetamide (UCM765), is here shown to selectively promote non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) in rats and mice. The enhancement of NREMS by UCM765 is nullified by the pharmacological blockade or genetic deletion of MT(2) receptors. MT(2), but not MT(1), knock-out mice show a decrease in NREMS compared to the wild strain. Immunohistochemical labeling reveals that MT(2) receptors are localized in sleep-related brain regions, and notably the reticular thalamic nucleus (Rt). Microinfusion of UCM765 in the Rt promotes NREMS, and its systemic administration induces an increase in firing and rhythmic burst activity of Rt neurons, which is blocked by the MT(2) antagonist 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin. Since developing hypnotics that increase NREMS without altering sleep architecture remains a medical challenge, MT(2) receptors may represent a novel target for the treatment of sleep disorders.

  6. A Biphasic Change of Regional Blood Volume in the Frontal Cortex during Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Khatami, Ramin

    2015-08-01

    Current knowledge on hemodynamics in sleep is limited because available techniques do not allow continuous recordings and mainly focus on cerebral blood flow while neglecting other important parameters, such as blood volume (BV) and vasomotor activity. Observational study. Continuous measures of hemodynamics over the left forehead and biceps were performed using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during nocturnal polysomnography in 16 healthy participants in sleep laboratory. Temporal dynamics and mean values of cerebral and muscular oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2), deoxygenated hemoglobin (HHb), and BV during different sleep stages were compared. A biphasic change of cerebral BV was observed which contrasted a monotonic increase of muscular BV during non-rapid eye movement sleep. A significant decrement in cerebral HbO2 and BV accompanied by an increase of HHb was recorded at sleep onset (Phase I). Prior to slow wave sleep (SWS) HbO2 and BV turned to increase whereas HHb began to decrease in subsequent Phase II suggested increased brain perfusion during SWS. The cerebral HbO2 slope correlated to BV slope in Phase I and II, but it only correlated to HHb slope in Phase II. The occurrence time of inflection points correlated to SWS latencies. Initial decrease of brain perfusion with decreased blood volume (BV) and oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) together with increasing muscular BV fit thermoregulation process at sleep onset. The uncorrelated and correlated slopes of HbO2 and deoxygenated hemoglobin indicate different mechanisms underlying the biphasic hemodynamic process in light sleep and slow wave sleep (SWS). In SWS, changes in vasomotor activity (i.e., increased vasodilatation) may mediate increasing cerebral and muscular BV. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  7. Blood RNA biomarkers in prodromal PARK4 and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder show role of complexin 1 loss for risk of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suna Lahut

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a frequent neurodegenerative process in old age. Accumulation and aggregation of the lipid-binding SNARE complex component α-synuclein (SNCA underlies this vulnerability and defines stages of disease progression. Determinants of SNCA levels and mechanisms of SNCA neurotoxicity have been intensely investigated. In view of the physiological roles of SNCA in blood to modulate vesicle release, we studied blood samples from a new large pedigree with SNCA gene duplication (PARK4 mutation to identify effects of SNCA gain of function as potential disease biomarkers. Downregulation of complexin 1 (CPLX1 mRNA was correlated with genotype, but the expression of other Parkinson's disease genes was not. In global RNA-seq profiling of blood from presymptomatic PARK4 indviduals, bioinformatics detected significant upregulations for platelet activation, hemostasis, lipoproteins, endocytosis, lysosome, cytokine, Toll-like receptor signaling and extracellular pathways. In PARK4 platelets, stimulus-triggered degranulation was impaired. Strong SPP1, GZMH and PLTP mRNA upregulations were validated in PARK4. When analysing individuals with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, the most specific known prodromal stage of general PD, only blood CPLX1 levels were altered. Validation experiments confirmed an inverse mutual regulation of SNCA and CPLX1 mRNA levels. In the 3′-UTR of the CPLX1 gene we identified a single nucleotide polymorphism that is significantly associated with PD risk. In summary, our data define CPLX1 as a PD risk factor and provide functional insights into the role and regulation of blood SNCA levels. The new blood biomarkers of PARK4 in this Turkish family might become useful for PD prediction.

  8. Dreaming furiously? A sleep laboratory study on the dream content of people with Parkinson's disease and with or without rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Katja; Frauscher, Birgit; Peltomaa, Taina; Gschliesser, Viola; Revonsuo, Antti; Högl, Birgit

    2015-03-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) has been related to altered, action-filled, vivid, and aggressive dream content, but research comparing the possible differences in dreams of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with and without RBD is scarce. The dream content of PD patients with and without RBD was analyzed with specific focus on action-filledness, vividness, emotional valence, and threats. A total of 69 REM and NREM dream reports were collected in the sleep laboratory, 37 from nine PD patients with RBD and 32 from six PD patients without RBD. A content analysis of (1) action-filledness (actions and environmental events); (2) vividness (emotions and cognitive activity); (3) intensity of actions, events and emotions; (4) emotional valence, and (5) threatening events was performed on the transcripts. Altogether 563 dream elements expressing action-filledness and vividness were found. There were no significant between-group differences in the number or distribution of elements reflecting action-filledness or vividness, emotional valence or threats. In within-group analyses, PD patients with RBD had significantly more negative compared to positive dreams (p = 0.012) and compared to PD patients without RBD, a tendency to have more intense actions in their dreams (p = 0.066). Based on the results of this study, there are no major between-group differences in the action-filledness, vividness, or threat content of dreams of PD patients with and without RBD. However, within-group analyses revealed that dreams were more often negatively than positively toned in PD patients with RBD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparing cortical auditory processing in children with typical and atypical benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes: Electrophysiologic evidence of the role of non-rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippini, Melissa; Boni, Antonella; Giannotta, Melania; Pini, Antonella; Russo, Angelo; Musti, Muriel Assunta; Guerra, Angelo; Lassonde, Maryse; Gobbi, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) is an objective measure of central auditory discrimination. MMN alterations have been shown in children with language and/or developmental disorders. In benign focal epilepsies, neuropsychological disorders are often reported and linked to interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. There are few studies reporting MMN in children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) and sleep IEDs. Moreover, no MMN recording has yet been reported in atypical BECTS children with continuous spike-and-wave during sleep (CSWS). We retrospectively compared MMN in typical and atypical BECTS children, particularly addressing the impact of NREM sleep IEDs on auditory discrimination. Moreover, we attempted a neuropsychological characterization of patients. The MMN was recorded in 9 normal controls and 23 patients (14 typical BECTS and 9 atypical BECTS) in an oddball paradigm with syllable stimuli. MMN, sleep electroencephalography (EEG) and neuropsychological evaluation were realized in the same testing session. Measurable MMN responses to speech stimuli were identified in both the control and patient groups. A significant difference between control and atypical BECTS children was found with respect to amplitude (p = 0.0061). Atypical BECTS also showed a lower MMN amplitude with respect to typical BECTS, but this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.0545). Statistical comparisons between groups revealed no differences in latency. Among the neuropsychological variables, academic difficulties were significantly more prominent in the patients with atypical BECTS (p = 0.04). CSWS EEG pattern affects auditory discrimination and may have a long-lasting impact on academic skills acquisition, whereas in typical BECTS children with a lower degree of IED NREM sleep, plastic brain reorganization or the preservation of participating networks may prevent such difficulty. Early

  10. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during non-rapid eye movement sleep improves behavioral inhibition in attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Tobias Munz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Behavioral inhibition, which is a later-developing executive function (EF and anatomically located in prefrontal areas, is impaired in attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. While optimal EFs have been shown to depend on efficient sleep in healthy subjects, the impact of sleep problems, frequently reported in ADHD, remains elusive. Findings of macroscopic sleep changes in ADHD are inconsistent, but there is emerging evidence for distinct microscopic changes with a focus on prefrontal cortical regions and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM slow-wave sleep. Recently, slow oscillations (SO during non-REM sleep were found to be less functional and, as such, may be involved in sleep-dependent memory impairments in ADHD. Objective: By augmenting slow-wave power through bilateral, slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation (so-tDCS, frequency = 0.75 Hz during non-REM sleep, we aimed to improve daytime behavioral inhibition in children with ADHD. Methods: 14 boys (10-14 yrs diagnosed with ADHD were included. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, patients received so-tDCS either in the first or in the second experimental sleep night. Inhibition control was assessed with a visuomotor go/no-go task. Intrinsic alertness was assessed with a simple stimulus response task. To control for visuomotor performance, motor memory was assessed with a finger sequence tapping task. Results: SO-power was enhanced during early non-REM sleep, accompanied by slowed reaction times and decreased standard deviations of reaction times, in the go/no-go task after so-tDCS. In contrast, intrinsic alertness and motor memory performance were not improved by so-tDCS. Conclusion: Since behavioral inhibition but not intrinsic alertness or motor memory was improved by so-tDCS, our results suggest that lateral prefrontal slow oscillations during sleep might play a specific role for executive functioning in ADHD.

  11. Translational evaluation of JNJ-18038683, a 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 receptor antagonist, on rapid eye movement sleep and in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Dugovic, Christine; Kramer, Michelle; De Boer, Peter; Singh, Jaskaran; Wilson, Sue; Bertelsen, Kirk; Di, Jianing; Shelton, Jonathan; Aluisio, Leah; Dvorak, Lisa; Fraser, Ian; Lord, Brian; Nepomuceno, Diane; Ahnaou, Abdellah; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus; Chai, Wenying; Dvorak, Curt; Sands, Steve; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy W

    2012-08-01

    In rodents 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 (5-HT(7)) receptor blockade has been shown to be effective in models of depression and to increase the latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and decrease REM duration. In the clinic, the REM sleep reduction observed with many antidepressants may serve as a biomarker. We report here the preclinical and clinical evaluation of a 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, (3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-1-(phenylmethyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]azepine 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylate) (JNJ-18038683). In rodents, JNJ-18038683 increased the latency to REM sleep and decreased REM duration, and this effect was maintained after repeated administration for 7 days. The compound was effective in the mouse tail suspension test. JNJ-18038683 enhanced serotonin transmission, antidepressant-like behavior, and REM sleep suppression induced by citalopram in rodents. In healthy human volunteers JNJ-18038683 prolonged REM latency and reduced REM sleep duration, demonstrating that the effect of 5-HT(7) blockade on REM sleep translated from rodents to humans. Like in rats, JNJ-18038683 enhanced REM sleep suppression induced by citalopram in humans, although a drug-drug interaction could not be ruled out. In a double-blind, active, and placebo-controlled clinical trial in 225 patients suffering from major depressive disorder, neither treatment with pharmacologically active doses of JNJ-18038683 or escitalopram separated from placebo, indicating a failed study lacking assay sensitivity. Post hoc analyses using an enrichment window strategy, where all the efficacy data from sites with an implausible high placebo response [placebo group Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) = 28) are removed, there was a clinically meaningful difference between JNJ-18038683 and placebo. Further clinical studies are required to characterize the potential antidepressant efficacy of JNJ-18038683.

  12. The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, E; Eichenlaub, J-B; Lewis, P A; Walker, M P; Gaskell, M G; Malinowski, J E; Blagrove, M

    2015-07-01

    Incorporation of details from waking life events into Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep dreams has been found to be highest on the night after, and then 5-7 nights after events (termed, respectively, the day-residue and dream-lag effects). In experiment 1, 44 participants kept a daily log for 10 days, reporting major daily activities (MDAs), personally significant events (PSEs), and major concerns (MCs). Dream reports were collected from REM and Slow Wave Sleep (SWS) in the laboratory, or from REM sleep at home. The dream-lag effect was found for the incorporation of PSEs into REM dreams collected at home, but not for MDAs or MCs. No dream-lag effect was found for SWS dreams, or for REM dreams collected in the lab after SWS awakenings earlier in the night. In experiment 2, the 44 participants recorded reports of their spontaneously recalled home dreams over the 10 nights following the instrumental awakenings night, which thus acted as a controlled stimulus with two salience levels, high (sleep lab) and low (home awakenings). The dream-lag effect was found for the incorporation into home dreams of references to the experience of being in the sleep laboratory, but only for participants who had reported concerns beforehand about being in the sleep laboratory. The delayed incorporation of events from daily life into dreams has been proposed to reflect REM sleep-dependent memory consolidation. However, an alternative emotion processing or emotional impact of events account, distinct from memory consolidation, is supported by the finding that SWS dreams do not evidence the dream-lag effect. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Activation of phasic pontine-wave generator prevents rapid eye movement sleep deprivation-induced learning impairment in the rat: a mechanism for sleep-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; Mavanji, Vijayakumar; Ulloor, Jagadish; Patterson, Elissa H

    2004-02-11

    Animal and human studies of sleep and learning have demonstrated that training on various tasks increases subsequent rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity, followed by improvement in performance on the learned task. It is well documented that REM sleep deprivation after learning trials blocks the expected improvement in performance on subsequent retesting. Our aim was to test whether experimentally induced P-wave generator activation could eliminate the learning impairment produced by post-training REM sleep deprivation. Rats were trained on a two-way active avoidance-learning task. Immediately thereafter, two groups of those rats received a control vehicle (100 nl saline) microinjection and one group received a carbachol (50 ng in 100 nl saline) microinjection into the P-wave generator. The carbachol-injected group and one of the two control saline microinjected groups were selectively deprived of REM sleep during a 6 hr polygraphic recording session. All rats were then tested on the avoidance-learning task. The rats that received both the control saline injection and REM sleep deprivation showed learning deficits compared with the control saline-injected rats that were allowed to sleep normally. In contrast, the rats that received the carbachol microinjection and REM sleep deprivation demonstrated normal learning. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that carbachol-induced activation of the P-wave generator prevents the memory-impairing effects of post-training REM sleep deprivation. This evidence supports our hypothesis that the activation of the P-wave generator during REM sleep deprivation enhances a physiological process of memory, which occurs naturally during post-training REM sleep.

  14. Rapid eye movement sleep loss induces neuronal apoptosis in the rat brain by noradrenaline acting on alpha 1-adrenoceptor and by triggering mitochondrial intrinsic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu I Somarajan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many neurodegenerative disorders are associated with rapid eye movement sleep (REMS-loss, however the mechanism was unknown. As REMS-loss elevates noradrenaline (NA level in the brain as well as induces neuronal apoptosis and degeneration, in this study we have delineated the intracellular molecular pathway involved in REMS deprivation (REMSD associated NA-induced neuronal apoptosis. Rats were REMS deprived for 6 days by the classical flower-pot method, suitable controls were conducted and the effects on apoptosis markers evaluated. Further, the role of NA was studied by one, intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of NA-ergic alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (PRZ and two, by down-regulation of NA synthesis in locus coeruleus (LC neurons by local microinjection of tyrosine hydroxylase siRNA (TH-siRNA. Immunoblot estimates showed that the expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins viz. Bcl2-associated death promoter (BAD protein, apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1, cytochrome c, caspase9, caspase3 were elevated in the REMS-deprived rat brains, while caspase8 level remained unaffected; PRZ treatment did not allow elevation of these pro-apoptotic factors. Further, REMSD increased cytochrome c expression, which was prevented if the NA synthesis from the LC neurons was blocked by microinjection of TH-siRNA in vivo into the LC during REMSD in freely moving normal rats. Mitochondrial damage was re-confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, which showed distinctly swollen mitochondria with disintegrated cristae, chromosomal condensation and clumping along the nuclear membrane and all these changes were prevented in PRZ treated rats. Combining findings of this study along with earlier reports we propose that upon REMSD NA level increases in the brain as the LC NA-ergic REM-OFF neurons do not cease firing and TH is up-regulated in those neurons. This elevated NA acting on alpha1-adrenoceptors damages mitochondria causing release of

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep without atonia may help diagnose Lewy body disease in middle-aged and older patients with somatic symptom disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munechika, Takayuki; Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Okuda, Masato; Iwamoto, Kunihiro; Torii, Youta; Iritani, Shuji; Ozaki, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Lewy body disease (LBD), including Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), is defined pathologically as degeneration in the central and peripheral nervous system associated with Lewy bodies. Somatic symptom disorder often predates the clinical diagnosis of PD and DLB. It is crucial to make an initial diagnosis of LBD in patients with psychiatric symptoms because administering psychotropic drugs often causes or exacerbates extrapyramidal signs. Given the close association between rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder and LBD, REM sleep without atonia on polysomnography may help to diagnose LBD in middle-aged and older patients with somatic symptom disorder. We reviewed the clinical profiles of five patients with an initial diagnosis of somatic symptom disorder who exhibited REM sleep without atonia on polysomnography. There were three men and two women, with a mean age of 68.4 years (range: 55.0-78.0 years). The mean Mini-Mental State Examination score was 26 (range: 22-30). Only two patients had a clinical history of dream-enacting behaviour and fulfilled the clinical criteria for REM sleep behaviour disorder, but clinical conditions in the other three patients corresponded to subclinical REM sleep behaviour disorder. Final clinical diagnoses were made as probable DLB in three patients; two patients did not meet the clinical criteria for PD or DLB. Neurological examinations revealed mild extrapyramidal signs in these two patients, and their scores on the motor component of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale were 8 and 5 points, and their Mini-Mental State Examination scores were 30 points. Neither patient exhibited dream-enacting behaviour, but both had constipation. Cardiac 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy revealed mild increased washout rates. REM sleep without atonia may provide an opportunity to identify LBD in patients with somatic symptom disorder, even before they fulfil the clinical criteria for PD or

  16. A pilot study of serotonin-1A receptor genotypes and rapid eye movement sleep sensitivity to serotonergic/cholinergic imbalance in humans: a pharmacological model of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biard K

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen Biard,1,2 Alan B Douglass,2,3 Rébecca Robillard,2 Joseph De Koninck1,2 1School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, 2University of Ottawa Institute for Mental Health Research, 3Royal Ottawa Mental Health Center, University of Ottawa Institute for Mental Health Research, Ottawa, ON, Canada Rationale: The serotonergic and cholinergic systems are jointly involved in regulating sleep but this system is theorized to be disturbed in depressed individuals. We previously reported that cholinergic and serotonergic agents induce sleep changes partially consistent with monoamine models of sleep disturbances in depression. One potential cause of disturbed neurotransmission is genetic predisposition. The G(-1019 allele of the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A receptor promoter region predicts an increased risk for depression compared to the wild-type C(-1019 allele. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate how serotonin-1A receptor genotypes mediate sleep sensitivity to pharmacological probes modeling the serotonergic/cholinergic imbalance of depression. Methods: Seventeen healthy female participants homozygous for either C (n=11 or G (n=6 alleles aged 18–27 years were tested on four nonconsecutive nights. Participants were given galantamine (an anti-acetylcholinesterase, buspirone (a serotonergic agonist, both drugs together, or placebos before sleeping. Results: As reported previously, buspirone significantly increased rapid eye movement (REM latency (P<0.001, as well as awakenings, percentage of time spent awake, and percentage of time asleep spent in stage N1 (P<0.019. Galantamine increased awakenings, percentage of time spent awake, percentage of time asleep spent in stage N1, and percentage of time asleep spent in REM, and decreased REM latency and percentage of time asleep spent in stage N3 (P<0.019. Galantamine plus buspirone given together disrupted sleep more than either drug alone, lowering sleep efficiency and percentage of time asleep

  17. Rapid touch-stimulated movement in the androgynophore of Passiflora flowers (subgen. Decaloba; Sect. Xerogona): an adaptation to enhance cross-pollination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorza, Livia C T; Dornelas, Marcelo Carnier

    2014-01-01

    Plant touch-sensitive organs have been described since Darwin's observations and are related to a quick response to environment stimuli. Sensitive flower organs have been associated to an increase in the chances of cross pollination but there are few studies regarding this topic. Here we describe for the first time the kinetic of the androgynophore movement of 4 Passiflora species (P. sanguinolenta, P. citrina, P. capsularis, and P. rubra). For that, we collected flowers and recorded the movement after mechano-stimulating the androgynophore. From the recordings, we described the movement regarding its response and sensibility to mechanical stimulus and calculated the duration, speed, and the angle formed by the androgynophore before and after the movement. From our data we were able to propose a link to the pollination habit of these species. The movement of the androgynophore in these Passiflora is a noteworthy floral feature that might lead us to another astonishing example of a mechanism that evolved among angiosperms to assure sexual reproduction.

  18. Neurodegenerative disease status and post-mortem pathology in idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behaviour disorder: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Alex; Tolosa, Eduard; Gelpi, Ellen; Molinuevo, José Luis; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Serradell, Mónica; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Vilaseca, Isabel; Lomeña, Francisco; Vilas, Dolores; Lladó, Albert; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan

    2013-05-01

    We postulated that idiopathic rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (IRBD) represents the prodromal phase of a Lewy body disorder and that, with sufficient follow-up, most cases would eventually be diagnosed with a clinical defined Lewy body disorder, such as Parkinson's disease (PD) or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Patients from an IRBD cohort recruited between 1991 and 2003, and previously assessed in 2005, were followed up during an additional period of 7 years. In this original cohort, we sought to identify the nature and frequency of emerging defined neurodegenerative syndromes diagnosed by standard clinical criteria. We estimated rates of survival free from defined neurodegenerative disease by means of the Kaplan-Meier method. We further characterised individuals who remained diagnosed as having only IRBD, through dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging, transcranial sonography (TCS), and olfactory testing. We did a neuropathological assessment in three patients who died during follow-up and who had the antemortem diagnosis of PD or DLB. Of the 44 participants from the original cohort, 36 (82%) had developed a defined neurodegenerative syndrome by the 2012 assessment (16 patients were diagnosed with PD, 14 with DLB, one with multiple system atrophy, and five with mild cognitive impairment). The rates of neurological-disease-free survival from time of IRBD diagnosis were 65·2% (95% CI 50·9 to 79·5) at 5 years, 26·6% (12·7 to 40·5) at 10 years, and 7·5% (-1·9 to 16·9) at 14 years. Of the four remaining neurological-disease-free individuals who underwent neuroimaging and olfactory tests, all four had decreased striatal DAT uptake, one had substantia nigra hyperechogenicity on TCS, and two had impaired olfaction. In three patients, the antemortem diagnoses of PD and DLB were confirmed by neuropathological examination showing widespread Lewy bodies in the brain, and α-synuclein aggregates in the peripheral autonomic nervous system in one case

  19. Developmental trends in speed accuracy trade-off in 6-10-year-old children performing rapid reciprocal and discrete aiming movements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Sugden, D.A.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic tasks are performed better than discrete tasks in adults but it is unknown whether this advantage is present in children as well. Three age groups of participants (6, 8, and 10 years old) executed cyclic and discrete aiming movements to two differently sized target using a Fitts task to

  20. Developmental trends in speed accuracy trade-off in 6-10-year-old children performing rapid reciprocal and discrete aiming movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Sugden, D.A.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic tasks are performed better than discrete tasks in adults but it is unknown whether this advantage is present in children as well. Three age groups of participants (6, 8, and 10 years old) executed cyclic and discrete aiming movements to two differently sized target using a Fitts task to

  1. Higher spin gauge theory on fuzzy \\boldsymbol {S^4_N}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Marcus; Steinacker, Harold C.

    2018-02-01

    We examine in detail the higher spin fields which arise on the basic fuzzy sphere S^4N in the semi-classical limit. The space of functions can be identified with functions on classical S 4 taking values in a higher spin algebra associated to \

  2. Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy (S4) User Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, T. Shane

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a User Guide for the Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy (S4). S4 was developed to optimally select a sensor suite from a larger pool of candidate sensors based on their performance in a diagnostic system. For aerospace systems, selecting the proper sensors is important for ensuring adequate measurement coverage to satisfy operational, maintenance, performance, and system diagnostic criteria. S4 optimizes the selection of sensors based on the system fault diagnostic approach while taking conflicting objectives such as cost, weight and reliability into consideration. S4 can be described as a general architecture structured to accommodate application-specific components and requirements. It performs combinational optimization with a user defined merit or cost function to identify optimum or near-optimum sensor suite solutions. The S4 User Guide describes the sensor selection procedure and presents an example problem using an open source turbofan engine simulation to demonstrate its application.

  3. Duration of Acute and Chronic Toxicity Testing in Animals (ICH S4A and S4B)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Per; Van Cauteren, Herman

    2013-01-01

    To support approval of pharmaceuticals for long term use in humans it is required that product safety is supported by acute and chronic toxicity studies in rodents and non-rodents. The duration of acute toxicity studies (S4A) and chronic rodent studies (S4B) were harmonised between the three ICH ...

  4. Bowel Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... passes through the large intestine too slowly. Bowel incontinence is a problem controlling your bowel movements. Other abnormalities with bowel movements may be a sign of a digestive problem. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  5. CMB-S4 Technology Book, First Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abitbol, Maximilian H. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); et al.

    2017-06-08

    CMB-S4 is a proposed experiment to map the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to nearly the cosmic variance limit for the angular scales that are accessible from the ground. The science goals and capabilities of CMB-S4 in illuminating cosmic inflation, measuring the sum of neutrino masses, searching for relativistic relics in the early universe, characterizing dark energy and dark matter, and mapping the matter distribution in the universe have been described in the CMB-S4 Science Book. This Technology Book is a companion volume to the Science Book. The ambitious science goals of the proposed "Stage-IV" CMB-S4 will require a step forward in experimental capability from the current Stage-III experiments. To guide this process, the community summarized the current state of the technology and identify R&D efforts necessary to advance it for possible use in CMB-S4. The book focused on the technical challenges in four broad areas: Telescope Design; Receiver Optics; Focal-Plane Optical Coupling; and Focal-Plane Sensor and Readout.

  6. Is NiCo2S4 really a semiconductor?

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2015-08-31

    NiCo2S4 is a technologically important electrode material that has recently achieved remarkable performance in pseu-docapacitor, catalysis, and dye-synthesized solar cell applications.[1-5] Essentially, all reports on this material have pre-sumed it to be semiconducting, like many of the chalcogenides, with a reported band-gap in the range of 1.2-1.7 eV.[6,7] In this report, we have conducted detailed experimental and theoretical studies, most of which done for the first time, which overwhelmingly show that NiCo2S4 is in fact a metal. We have also calculated the Raman spectrum of this mate-rial and experimentally verified it for the first time, hence clarifying inconsistent Raman spectra reports. Some of the key results that support our conclusions include: (1) the measured carrier density in NiCo2S4 is 3.18×1022 cm-3, (2) Ni-Co2S4 has a room temperature resistivity of around 103 µΩ cm which increases with temperature, (3) NiCo2S4 exhibits a quadratic dependence of the magnetoresistance on magnetic field, (4) thermopower measurements show an extremely low Seebeck coefficient of 5 µV K-1, (5) first principles calculations confirm that NiCo2S4 is a metal. These results sug-gest that it is time to re-think the presumed semiconducting nature of this promising material. They also suggest that the metallic conductivity is another reason (besides the known significant redox activity) behind the excellent perfor-mance reported for this material.

  7. An automated image-based method of 3D subject-specific body segment parameter estimation for kinetic analyses of rapid movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Alison L; Corazza, Stefano; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Accurate subject-specific body segment parameters (BSPs) are necessary to perform kinetic analyses of human movements with large accelerations, or no external contact forces or moments. A new automated topographical image-based method of estimating segment mass, center of mass (CM) position, and moments of inertia is presented. Body geometry and volume were measured using a laser scanner, then an automated pose and shape registration algorithm segmented the scanned body surface, and identified joint center (JC) positions. Assuming the constant segment densities of Dempster, thigh and shank masses, CM locations, and moments of inertia were estimated for four male subjects with body mass indexes (BMIs) of 19.7-38.2. The subject-specific BSP were compared with those determined using Dempster and Clauser regression equations. The influence of BSP and BMI differences on knee and hip net forces and moments during a running swing phase were quantified for the subjects with the smallest and largest BMIs. Subject-specific BSP for 15 body segments were quickly calculated using the image-based method, and total subject masses were overestimated by 1.7-2.9%.When compared with the Dempster and Clauser methods, image-based and regression estimated thigh BSP varied more than the shank parameters. Thigh masses and hip JC to thigh CM distances were consistently larger, and each transverse moment of inertia was smaller using the image-based method. Because the shank had larger linear and angular accelerations than the thigh during the running swing phase, shank BSP differences had a larger effect on calculated intersegmental forces and moments at the knee joint than thigh BSP differences did at the hip. It was the net knee kinetic differences caused by the shank BSP differences that were the largest contributors to the hip variations. Finally, BSP differences produced larger kinetic differences for the subject with larger segment masses, suggesting that parameter accuracy is more

  8. Family physics with S4 and Pati-Salam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Adelhart Toorop, R.

    2010-01-01

    Family symmetries and grand unified symmetries can bring more structure in the mass sector of the standard model and explain the patterns in the quarks’ and leptons’ masses and mixing. We discuss in particular a model with a Pati-Salam × S4 symmetry. This model can explain the observed neutrino

  9. Electrodeposited Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Valdes, M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrochimica Acta Vol. 128, pp 393-399 Electrodeposited Cu2ZnSnS4thin films M. Valdesa, M. Modibedib, M. Matheb, T. Hilliec,d, M. Vazqueza,∗ aDivisión Electroquimica y Corrosión, INTEMA, UNMdP-CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 B7608FDQ Mar del Plata, Argentina...

  10. [Stereotypic movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alvarez, E

    2003-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movement with certain peculiar features that make them especially interesting. Their physiopathology and their relationship with the neurobehavioural disorders they are frequently associated with are unknown. In this paper our aim is to offer a simple analysis of their dominant characteristics, their differentiation from other processes and a hypothesis of the properties of stereotypic movements, which could all set the foundations for research work into their physiopathology.

  11. CMB-S4 Science Book, First Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazajian, Kevork N. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); et al.

    2016-10-09

    This book lays out the scientific goals to be addressed by the next-generation ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment, CMB-S4, envisioned to consist of dedicated telescopes at the South Pole, the high Chilean Atacama plateau and possibly a northern hemisphere site, all equipped with new superconducting cameras. CMB-S4 will dramatically advance cosmological studies by crossing critical thresholds in the search for the B-mode polarization signature of primordial gravitational waves, in the determination of the number and masses of the neutrinos, in the search for evidence of new light relics, in constraining the nature of dark energy, and in testing general relativity on large scales.

  12. Conserved higher-spin charges in AdS4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Gelfond

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gauge invariant conserved conformal currents built from massless fields of all spins in 4d Minkowski space–time and AdS4 are described in the unfolded dynamics approach. The current cohomology associated with non-zero conserved charges is found. The resulting list of charges is shown to match the space of parameters of the conformal higher-spin symmetry algebra in four dimensions.

  13. {{{ N}}=2} SUSY gauge theories on S4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomichi, Kazuo

    2017-11-01

    We review exact results in {{ N}}=2 supersymmetric gauge theories defined on S 4 and its deformation. We first summarize the construction of rigid SUSY theories on curved backgrounds based on off-shell supergravity, then explain how to apply the localization principle to supersymmetric path integrals. Closed formulae for partition function as well as expectation values of non-local BPS observables are presented. This is a contribution to the review issue ‘Localization techniques in quantum field theories’ (ed V Pestun and M Zabzine) which contains 17 chapters available at [1].

  14. S4HARA: System for HIV/AIDS resource allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Michael W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS resource allocation decisions are influenced by political, social, ethical and other factors that are difficult to quantify. Consequently, quantitative models of HIV/AIDS resource allocation have had limited impact on actual spending decisions. We propose a decision-support System for HIV/AIDS Resource Allocation (S4HARA that takes into consideration both principles of efficient resource allocation and the role of non-quantifiable influences on the decision-making process for resource allocation. Methods S4HARA is a four-step spreadsheet-based model. The first step serves to identify the factors currently influencing HIV/AIDS allocation decisions. The second step consists of prioritizing HIV/AIDS interventions. The third step involves allocating the budget to the HIV/AIDS interventions using a rational approach. Decision-makers can select from several rational models of resource allocation depending on availability of data and level of complexity. The last step combines the results of the first and third steps to highlight the influencing factors that act as barriers or facilitators to the results suggested by the rational resource allocation approach. Actionable recommendations are then made to improve the allocation. We illustrate S4HARA in the context of a primary healthcare clinic in South Africa. Results The clinic offers six types of HIV/AIDS interventions and spends US$750,000 annually on these programs. Current allocation decisions are influenced by donors, NGOs and the government as well as by ethical and religious factors. Without additional funding, an optimal allocation of the total budget suggests that the portion allotted to condom distribution be increased from 1% to 15% and the portion allotted to prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections be increased from 43% to 71%, while allocation to other interventions should decrease. Conclusion Condom uptake at the clinic should be increased by

  15. Entanglement entropy and duality in AdS4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Bakas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Small variations of the entanglement entropy δS and the expectation value of the modular Hamiltonian δE are computed holographically for circular entangling curves in the boundary of AdS4, using gravitational perturbations with general boundary conditions in spherical coordinates. Agreement with the first law of thermodynamics, δS=δE, requires that the line element of the entangling curve remains constant. In this context, we also find a manifestation of electric–magnetic duality for the entanglement entropy and the corresponding modular Hamiltonian, following from the holographic energy–momentum/Cotton tensor duality.

  16. A natural S 4 × SO(10) model of flavour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkeroth, Fredrik; de Anda, Francisco J.; King, Stephen F.; Perdomo, Elena

    2017-10-01

    We propose a natural S 4 × SO(10) supersymmetric grand unified theory of flavour with an auxiliary Z_4^2× Z_4^R symmetry, based on small Higgs representations (nothing larger than an adjoint) and hence a type-I seesaw mechanism. The Yukawa structure of all fermions is determined by the hierarchical vacuum expectation values of three S 4 triplet flavons, with CSD3 vacuum alignments, where up-type quarks and neutrinos couple to one Higgs 10, and the down-type quarks and charged leptons couple to a second Higgs 10. The Yukawa matrices are obtained from sums of low-rank matrices, where each matrix in the sum naturally accounts for the mass of a particular family, as in sequential dominance in the neutrino sector, which predicts a normal neutrino mass hierarchy. The model accurately fits all available quark and lepton data, with predictions for the leptonic CP phase in 95% credible intervals given by 281° Higgs doublets emerging from the two Higgs 10s without mixing, and we demonstrate how a μ term of O(TeV) can be realised, as well as doublet-triplet splitting, with Planck scale operators controlled by symmetry, leading to acceptable proton decay.

  17. Simple, Scalable, Script-Based Science Processor (S4P)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Vollmer, Bruce; Berrick, Stephen; Mack, Robert; Pham, Long; Zhou, Bryan; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The development and deployment of data processing systems to process Earth Observing System (EOS) data has proven to be costly and prone to technical and schedule risk. Integration of science algorithms into a robust operational system has been difficult. The core processing system, based on commercial tools, has demonstrated limitations at the rates needed to produce the several terabytes per day for EOS, primarily due to job management overhead. This has motivated an evolution in the EOS Data Information System toward a more distributed one incorporating Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS). As part of this evolution, the Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DAAC) has developed a simplified processing system to accommodate the increased load expected with the advent of reprocessing and launch of a second satellite. This system, the Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Processor (S42) may also serve as a resource for future SIPS. The current EOSDIS Core System was designed to be general, resulting in a large, complex mix of commercial and custom software. In contrast, many simpler systems, such as the EROS Data Center AVHRR IKM system, rely on a simple directory structure to drive processing, with directories representing different stages of production. The system passes input data to a directory, and the output data is placed in a "downstream" directory. The GES DAAC's Simple Scalable Script-based Science Processing System is based on the latter concept, but with modifications to allow varied science algorithms and improve portability. It uses a factory assembly-line paradigm: when work orders arrive at a station, an executable is run, and output work orders are sent to downstream stations. The stations are implemented as UNIX directories, while work orders are simple ASCII files. The core S4P infrastructure consists of a Perl program called stationmaster, which detects newly arrived work orders and forks a job to run the

  18. S4 : A free electromagnetic solver for layered periodic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2012-10-01

    We describe S4, a free implementation of the Fourier modal method (FMM), which has also been commonly referred to as rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA), for simulating electromagnetic propagation through 3D structures with 2D periodicity. We detail design aspects that allow S4 to be a flexible platform for these types of simulations. In particular, we highlight the ability to select different FMM formulations, user scripting, and extensibility of program capabilities for eigenmode computations. Program summary Program title: S4 Catalogue identifier: AEMO_v1_0. Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMO_v1_0..html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 56910 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 433883 Distribution format: Programming language: C, C++. Computer: Any computer with a Unix-like environment and a C++ compiler. Developed on 2.3 GHz AMD Phenom 9600. Operating system: Any Unix-like environment; developed under MinGW32 on Windows 7. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Parallelized using MPI. RAM: Problem dependent (linearly proportional to number of layers and quadratic in number of Fourier components). A single layer calculation with approximately 100 Fourier components uses approximately 10 MB. Classification: 10. Electrostatics and Electromagnetics. External routines: Lua [1] and optionally exploits additional free software packages: FFTW [2], CHOLMOD [3], MPI message-passing interface [4], LAPACK and BLAS linear-algebra software [5], and Kiss FFT [6]. Nature of problem: Time-harmonic electromagnetism in layered bi-periodic structures. Solution method: The Fourier modal method (rigorous coupled wave analysis) and the scattering matrix method. Running time: Problem dependent and highly dependent on quality of the BLAS

  19. Isomonodromic deformations and SU 2-invariant instantons on S4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasliski, Richard Muñiz

    2009-07-01

    Anti-self-dual (ASD) solutions to the Yang-Mills equation (or instantons) over an anti-self-dual 4-manifold, which are invariant under an appropriate action of a three-dimensional Lie group, give rise, via twistor construction, to isomonodromic deformations of connections on CP having four simple singularities. As is well known, such deformations are governed by the sixth Painlevé equation P VI(α,β,γ,δ). We work out the particular case of the SU-action on S4, obtained from the irreducible representation on R5. In particular, we express the parameters (α,β,γ,δ) in terms of the instanton number. The present paper contains the proof of the result announced in [Richard Muñiz Manasliski, Painlevé VI equation from invariant instantons, in: Geometric and Topological Methods for Quantum field theory, Contemp. Math., vol. 434, Amer. Math. Soc., Providence, RI, 2007, pp. 215-222].

  20. CMB-S4 and the hemispherical variance anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Márcio; Copi, Craig J.; Knox, Lloyd; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2017-09-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) full-sky temperature data show a hemispherical asymmetry in power nearly aligned with the Ecliptic. In real space, this anomaly can be quantified by the temperature variance in the Northern and Southern Ecliptic hemispheres, with the Northern hemisphere displaying an anomalously low variance while the Southern hemisphere appears unremarkable [consistent with expectations from the best-fitting theory, Lambda Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM)]. While this is a well-established result in temperature, the low signal-to-noise ratio in current polarization data prevents a similar comparison. This will change with a proposed ground-based CMB experiment, CMB-S4. With that in mind, we generate realizations of polarization maps constrained by the temperature data and predict the distribution of the hemispherical variance in polarization considering two different sky coverage scenarios possible in CMB-S4: full Ecliptic north coverage and just the portion of the North that can be observed from a ground-based telescope at the high Chilean Atacama plateau. We find that even in the set of realizations constrained by the temperature data, the low Northern hemisphere variance observed in temperature is not expected in polarization. Therefore, observing an anomalously low variance in polarization would make the hypothesis that the temperature anomaly is simply a statistical fluke more unlikely and thus increase the motivation for physical explanations. We show, within ΛCDM, how variance measurements in both sky coverage scenarios are related. We find that the variance makes for a good statistic in cases where the sky coverage is limited, however, full northern coverage is still preferable.

  1. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear......Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. Architectonic implementation questions relations between the human body and a body of architecture by the different ways we handle drawing materials. A drawing may explore architectonic problems at other...

  2. Striking movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Like all music performance, percussion playing requires high control over timing and sound properties. Specific to percussionists, however, is the need to adjust the movement to different instruments with varying physical properties and tactile feedback to the player. Furthermore, the well defined...

  3. Psychodynamic Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This chapter/article describes the historical development of the disciplin Psychodynamic Movement. The importance of this disciplin for self-experience and for training in developing a therapist identy for the music therapy students are emphasized. Prototypeexercises developed and simplified...

  4. Gracious Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Kreft

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1984 Christopher Cordner offered a critical view on theories of graceful movement in sport developed by Ng. G. Wulk, David Best and Joseph Kupfer. In 2001 Paul Davis criticized his view. Cordner responded, rejecting all the criticism. More than a century before, Herbert Spencer and Jean-Marie Guyau had a similar controversy over grace. Both exchanges of opinion involve three positions: that grace is the most efficient movement and therefore something quantitative and measurable; that grace is expression of the wholeness of person and the world; and that grace is something which neither science nor philosophy can explain. To clarify these conflicting issues, this article proposes to examine the history of the notion which goes back to the Latin gratia and has root in the Ancient Greek charis, and to apply the concepts of cultural anchor and thin coherence, following John R. Searle’s explanation that we produce epistemically objective accounts of ontologically subjective reality.

  5. Computational movement analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laube, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief discusses the characteristics of spatiotemporal movement data, including uncertainty and scale. It investigates three core aspects of Computational Movement Analysis: Conceptual modeling of movement and movement spaces, spatiotemporal analysis methods aiming at a better understanding of movement processes (with a focus on data mining for movement patterns), and using decentralized spatial computing methods in movement analysis. The author presents Computational Movement Analysis as an interdisciplinary umbrella for analyzing movement processes with methods from a range of fi

  6. Fabrication of water-soluble polymer-encapsulated As4S4 to increase oral bioavailability and chemotherapeutic efficacy in AML mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiang; Wang, Chuan; Li, Xiaojin; Guo, Hua; Meng, Jie; Liu, Jian; Xu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Realgar (As4S4) has been demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML); it has the advantages of no drug resistance and oral administration. Nevertheless, its poor solubility has been an obstacle to its bioavailability, requiring high-dose administration over a long period. We investigated whether crushing realgar crystals to the nanoscale and encapsulating the particles in a water-soluble polymer in one step using hot-melt extrusion would increase the bioavailability of As4S4. Raw As4S4 (r-As4S4) and water-soluble polymer were processed via co-rotating twin screw extrusion. The resulting product (e-As4S4) was characterized by SEM, XRD, and DLS. The cytotoxicity and therapeutic effects of e-As4S4 were evaluated in vivo and in vitro. The results show that e-As4S4 dissolved rapidly in water, forming a stable colloid solution. The average size of e-As4S4 particles was 680 nm, which was reduced by more than 40-fold compared with that of r-As4S4. The bioavailability of e-As4S4 was up to 12.6-fold higher than that of r-As4S4, and it inhibited the proliferation of HL-60 cells much more effectively than did r-As4S4, inducing apoptosis and significantly reducing the infiltration of HL-60 cells into the bone marrow, spleen, and liver. This in turn prolonged the survival of AML mice. PMID:27383126

  7. S4-3: Spatial Processing of Visual Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin'ya Nishida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Local motion signals are extracted in parallel by a bank of motion detectors, and their spatiotemporal interactions are processed in subsequent stages. In this talk, I will review our recent studies on spatial interactions in visual motion processing. First, we found two types of spatial pooling of local motion signals. Directionally ambiguous 1D local motion signals are pooled across orientation and space for solution of the aperture problem, while 2D local motion signals are pooled for estimation of global vector average (e.g., Amano et al., 2009 Journal of Vision 9(3:4 1–25. Second, when stimulus presentation is brief, coherent motion detection of dynamic random-dot kinematogram is not efficient. Nevertheless, it is significantly improved by transient and synchronous presentation of a stationary surround pattern. This suggests that centre-surround spatial interaction may help rapid perception of motion (Linares et al., submitted. Third, to know how the visual system encodes pairwise relationships between remote motion signals, we measured the temporal rate limit for perceiving the relationship of two motion directions presented at the same time at different spatial locations. Compared with similar tasks with luminance or orientation signals, motion comparison was more rapid and hence efficient. This high performance was affected little by inter-element separation even when it was increased up to 100 deg. These findings indicate the existence of specialized processes to encode long-range relationships between motion signals for quick appreciation of global dynamic scene structure (Maruya et al., in preparation.

  8. Pest Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Bhar

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of woody borders surrounding crop fields is desirable for biodiversity conservation. However, for crop pest management, the desirability of woody borders depends on the trade-off between their effects at the local field scale and the landscape scale. At the local scale, woody borders can reduce pest populations by increasing predation rates, but they can also increase pest populations by providing complementary habitats and reducing movement rate of pests out of crop fields. At the regional scale, woody borders can reduce pest populations by reducing colonization of newly planted crop fields. Our objective was to develop guidelines for maximizing pest control while maintaining woody borders in the landscape. We wished to determine the conditions under which the regional effect of borders on colonization can outweigh local enhancement effects of borders on pest populations. We built a stochastic, individual-based, spatially implicit simulation model of a specialist insect population in a landscape divided into a number of crop fields. We conducted simulations to determine the conditions under which woody borders enhance vs. reduce the regional pest population size. The following factors were considered: landscape fragmentation, crop rotation period, barrier effect of woody borders, disperser success rate, and effect of woody borders on local survival. The simulation results suggest that woody borders are most likely to enhance regional control of crop pests if (1 the woody borders are very effective in reducing insect movement from one crop field to another, and (2 crop rotation is on a very short cycle. Based on these results, our preliminary recommendations are that woody borders should contain dense, tall vegetation to reduce insect movement, and crops should be rotated on as short a cycle as possible. These conditions should ensure that woody borders can be maintained for their conservation value without enhancing crop pest

  9. Steric hindrance between S4 and S5 of the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel hampers pore opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajo, Koichi; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2014-06-12

    In voltage-gated K(+) channels, membrane depolarization induces an upward movement of the voltage-sensing domains (VSD) that triggers pore opening. KCNQ1 is a voltage-gated K(+) channel and its gating behaviour is substantially modulated by auxiliary subunit KCNE proteins. KCNE1, for example, markedly shifts the voltage dependence of KCNQ1 towards the positive direction and slows down the activation kinetics. Here we identify two phenylalanine residues on KCNQ1, Phe232 on S4 (VSD) and Phe279 on S5 (pore domain) to be responsible for the gating modulation by KCNE1. Phe232 collides with Phe279 during the course of the VSD movement and hinders KCNQ1 channel from opening in the presence of KCNE1. This steric hindrance caused by the bulky amino-acid residues destabilizes the open state and thus shifts the voltage dependence of KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel.

  10. DFT study of optoelectronic and magnetic properties of iron-containing diamond-like materials Ag2FeSiS4, Li2FeSnS4, and Li2FeGeS4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Sikander; Khan, Saleem Ayaz; Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2017-10-01

    Ag2FeSiS4, Li2FeSnS4, and Li2FeGeS4 have been studied by first-principles calculations within density functional theory (DFT) added to the Coulomb energy (U Hubbard term) to treat the strong correlation of Fe 3d electrons. All three materials have shown that their conduction band minimum (CBM) and valence band maximum (VBM) were situated at Γ point, indicating a direct band gap of 1.99 and 2.26 eV, 2.24 eV for Ag2FeSiS4, Li2FeSnS4, and Li2FeGeS4 respectively. The lower part of the valence band was dominated by S-s orbitals while the mid part were contributed mostly by Sn/Ge-s and Ag-d states. Hence, the VBM and CBM were mainly due to Fe-d states. The bonding characterization have shown a strong covalent bonding between the Fe-S, Ge-S, Sn-S, Ag-S and Si-S atoms. The imaginary part of the dielectric constant have revealed that the first optical critical point energy occurred at 1.2 eV for Ag2FeSiS4, and at 2.0 eV for Li2FeSnS4, and Li2FeGeS4 compounds leading them to absorb less of visible spectrum. The existence of iron in the composition of these compounds have induced magnetic properties that we explored by the calculation of the magnetic moment and spin-densities maps.

  11. Computational Chemistry of Modified [MFe3S4] and [M2Fe2S4] Clusters: Assessment of Trends in Electronic Structure and Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Ooi, Bee Lean; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the molecular evolution of iron−sulfur clusters in terms of electronic structure and function. Metal-substituted models of biological [Fe4S4] clusters in oxidation states [MxFe4−xS4]3+/2+/1+ have been studied by density functional theory (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, ...

  12. Hierarchical NiCo2 S4 Nanotube@NiCo2 S4 Nanosheet Arrays on Ni Foam for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haichao; Chen, Si; Shao, Hongyan; Li, Chao; Fan, Meiqiang; Chen, Da; Tian, Guanglei; Shu, Kangying

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical NiCo2 S4 nanotube@NiCo2 S4 nanosheet arrays on Ni foam have been successfully synthesized. Owing to the unique hierarchical structure, enhanced capacitive performance can be attained. A specific capacitance up to 4.38 F cm(-2) is attained at 5 mA cm(-2) , which is much higher than the specific capacitance values of NiCo2 O4 nanosheet arrays, NiCo2 S4 nanosheet arrays and NiCo2 S4 nanotube arrays on Ni foam. The hierarchical NiCo2 S4 nanostructure shows superior cycling stability; after 5000 cycles, the specific capacitance still maintains 3.5 F cm(-2) . In addition, through the morphology and crystal structure measurement after cycling stability test, it is found that the NiCo2 S4 electroactive materials are gradually corroded; however, the NiCo2 S4 phase can still be well-maintained. Our results show that hierarchical NiCo2 S4 nanostructures are suitable electroactive materials for high performance supercapacitors. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessl, A Jon; Mckeown, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders can be hypokinetic (e.g., parkinsonism), hyperkinetic, or dystonic in nature and commonly arise from altered function in nuclei of the basal ganglia or their connections. As obvious structural changes are often limited, standard imaging plays less of a role than in other neurologic disorders. However, structural imaging is indicated where clinical presentation is atypical, particularly if the disorder is abrupt in onset or remains strictly unilateral. More recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may allow for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and atypical forms of parkinsonism. Functional imaging can assess regional cerebral blood flow (functional MRI (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)), cerebral glucose metabolism (PET), neurochemical and neuroreceptor status (PET and SPECT), and pathologic processes such as inflammation or abnormal protein deposition (PET) (Table 49.1). Cerebral blood flow can be assessed at rest, during the performance of motor or cognitive tasks, or in response to a variety of stimuli. In appropriate situations, the correct imaging modality and/or combination of modalities can be used to detect early disease or even preclinical disease, and to monitor disease progression and the effects of disease-modifying interventions. Various approaches are reviewed here. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. (2S,4R)- and (2S,4S)-perfluoro-tert-butyl 4-hydroxyproline: two conformationally distinct proline amino acids for sensitive application in 19F NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tressler, Caitlin M; Zondlo, Neal J

    2014-06-20

    (2S,4R)- and (2S,4S)-perfluoro-tert-butyl 4-hydroxyproline were synthesized (as Fmoc-, Boc-, and free amino acids) in 2-5 steps. The key step of each synthesis was a Mitsunobu reaction with perfluoro-tert-butanol, which incorporated a perfluoro-tert-butyl group, with nine chemically equivalent fluorines. Both amino acids were incorporated in model α-helical and polyproline helix peptides. Each amino acid exhibited distinct conformational preferences, with (2S,4R)-perfluoro-tert-butyl 4-hydroxyproline promoting polyproline helix. Peptides containing these amino acids were sensitively detected by (19)F NMR, suggesting their use in probes and medicinal chemistry.

  15. Inhibition of various steps in the replication cycle of vesicular stomatitis virus contributes to its photoinactivation by AlPcS4 or Pc4 and red light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, ACE; Wagenaars-van Gompel, AE; Hermanns, RCA; van der Meulen, J; Smit, J; Wilschut, J; Brand, A; Dubbelman, TMAR; VanSteveninck, J

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) was used as a model virus to study the processes involved in photoinactivation by aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AIPcS(4),) or silicon phthalocyanine HOSiPcOSi(CH3)(2)(CH2)(3)N(CH3)(2) (Pc4) and red light. Previously a very rapid decrease in the

  16. Top-mass effects in differential Higgs production through gluon fusion at order \\alpha_s^4

    CERN Document Server

    Harlander, Robert V; Ozeren, Kemal J; Wiesemann, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Effects from a finite top quark mass on differential distributions in the Higgs+jet production cross section through gluon fusion are studied at next-to-leading order in the strong coupling, i.e. $O(\\alpha_s^4)$. Terms formally subleading in $1/m_t$ are calculated, and their influence on the transverse momentum and rapidity distribution of the Higgs boson are evaluated. We find that, for the differential K-factor, the heavy-top limit is valid at the 2-3% level as long as the transverse momentum of the Higgs remains below about 150 GeV.

  17. Enriching s4 U-RNA Using Methane Thiosulfonate (MTS) Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Erin E; Simon, Matthew D

    2016-12-07

    Metabolic labeling of cellular RNA is a useful approach to study RNA biology. 4-Thiouridine (s4 U) is a convenient nucleoside for metabolic labeling because it is cell permeable and is incorporated into newly transcribed RNA, and the sulfur moiety provides a handle for biochemical purification. However, a critical step in the purification of s4 U-RNA is the efficiency of the chemistry used to enrich s4 U-RNA. Here, we present a protocol for s4 U-RNA enrichment that includes efficient and reversible covalent chemistry to biotinylate s4 U-RNA using the activated disulfide methane thiosulfonate conjugated to biotin (MTS-biotin), followed by enrichment on streptavidin beads. The efficiency of this chemistry reduces enrichment bias and requires less starting material, thereby expanding the utility of s4 U to study RNA biology. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Finite-action solutions of Yang-Mills equations on de Sitter dS4 and anti-de Sitter AdS4 spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Tatiana A.; Lechtenfeld, Olaf; Popov, Alexander D.

    2017-11-01

    We consider pure SU(2) Yang-Mills theory on four-dimensional de Sitter dS4 and anti-de Sitter AdS4 spaces and construct various solutions to the Yang-Mills equations. On de Sitter space we reduce the Yang-Mills equations via an SU(2)-equivariant ansatz to Newtonian mechanics of a particle moving in R^3 under the influence of a quartic potential. Then we describe magnetic and electric-magnetic solutions, both Abelian and non-Abelian, all having finite energy and finite action. A similar reduction on anti-de Sitter space also yields Yang-Mills solutions with finite energy and action. We propose a lower bound for the action on both backgrounds. Employing another metric on AdS4, the SU(2) Yang-Mills equations are reduced to an analytic continuation of the above particle mechanics from R^3 to R^{2,1} . We discuss analytical solutions to these equations, which produce infinite-action configurations. After a Euclidean continuation of dS4 and AdS4 we also present self-dual (instanton-type) Yang-Mills solutions on these backgrounds.

  19. Magnetism of the chromium thio-spinels Fe1-xCuxCr2S4 studied using muon spin rotation and relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvius, G M; Krimmel, A; Wäppling, R; Hartmann, O; Litterst, F J; Wagner, F E; Tsurkan, V; Loidl, A

    2013-05-08

    Powder samples of Fe1-xCuxCr2S4 with x = 0,0.2,0.5,0.8 were studied, between 5 and 300 K. The results reveal that for x < 1, the magnetic order in the series is more varied than the simple collinear ferrimagnetic structure traditionally assumed to exist everywhere from the Curie point to T → 0. In FeCr2S4 several ordered magnetic phases are present, with the ground state likely to have an incommensurate cone-like helical structure. Fe0.8Cu0.2Cr2S4 is the compound for which simple collinear ferrimagnetism is best developed. In Fe0.5Cu0.5Cr2S4 the ferrimagnetic spin structure is not stable, causing spin reorientation around 90 K. In Fe0.2Cu0.8Cr2S4 the ferrimagnetic structure is at low temperatures considerably distorted locally, but with rising temperature this disorder shows a rapid reduction, coupled to increased spin fluctuation rates. In summary, the present data show that the changes induced by the replacement of Fe by Cu have more profound influences on the magnetic properties of the Fe1-xCuxCr2S4 compounds than merely a shift of Curie temperature, saturation magnetization and internal field magnitude.

  20. Computational studies of modified [Fe3S4] clusters: Why iron is optimal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2008-01-01

    This work reports density functional computations of metal-substituted models of biological [Fe3S4] clusters in oxidation states [MFe2S4]+/0/−1 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Mo). Geometry optimization with a dielectric screening model is shown to provide a substantial improvement in structure,...

  1. Different proportions of C/KCu7S4 hybrid structure for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shuge; Xi, Yi; Hu, Chenguo; Yue, Xule; Cheng, Lu; Wang, Guo

    2014-10-01

    KCu7S4 has the channel structure and minor resistance. Its double larger channels ensure that the ions can well exchange with other's, at the same time, can shorten the ionic diffusion path and improve the ionic and electronic transport. So KCu7S4 shows good electrochemical property. The paper reports a novel and high performance supercapacitor based on hybrid carbon particles and KCu7S4 (C/KCu7S4) electrode. For the hybrid structure with different proportions of C and KCu7S4, the C/KCu7S4 (1:10) hybrid supercapacitor shows preferable electrochemical performance and large specific capacitance (469 mF cm-2) at high charge-discharge rate (2 mA), still retaining ∼95% of the capacitance over 5000 cycles by charge-discharge process at a fixed current of 10 mA. Three supercapacitor units in series can light 50 light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for 2.5 min, 10 LEDs for 4 min, one LED for 5.5 min. The much-increased capacity, rate capability, and cycling stability may be attributed to the superionic conductive KCu7S4 nanowires and C/KCu7S4 hybrid structure, which improve ionic and electronic transport, enhance the kinetics of redox reactions through the electrode system.

  2. Magnetic properties in spinel-type compounds MYb2S4 ( M= Mg, Mn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisu, Shuji; Iwasa, Taku; Tamaki, Sachi; Nagata, Shoichi

    2003-05-01

    The spinel-type compounds MYb2S4 ( M= Mg, Mn) have been prepared and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been carried out. Two types of sample for MnYb 2S 4 were obtained. The stable phase has a normal-spinel structure and the newly found metastable phase has a modified spinel structure which is not the inverse spinel. Susceptibility data show clearly the difference between both samples of MnYb 2S 4, which reflects the difference of the crystal field on Yb 3+ ions. Moreover, the magnitude of the FC susceptibility data for each type of MnYb 2S 4 is slightly larger than that of ZFC below about 50 K, while such difference is not observed for MgYb 2S 4.

  3. MAu2GeS4-Chalcogel (M = Co, Ni): Heterogeneous Intra- and Intermolecular Hydroamination Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Davaasuren, Bambar

    2017-08-08

    High surface area macroporous chalcogenide aerogels (chalcogels) MAu2GeS4 (M = Co, Ni) were prepared from K2Au2GeS4 precursor and Co(OAc)2 or NiCl2 by one-pot sol-gel metathesis reactions in aqueous media. The MAu2GeS4-chalcogels were screened for catalytic intramolecular hydroamination of 4-pentyn-1-amine substrate at different temperatures. 87% and 58% conversion was achieved at 100 °C, using CoAu2GeS4- and NiAu2GeS4-chalcogels respectively, and the reaction kinetics follows the first order. It was established that the catalytic performance of the aerogels is associated with the M(2+) centers present in the structure. Intermolecular hydroamination of aniline with 1-R-4-ethynylbenzene (R = -H, -OCH3, -Br, -F) was carried out at 100 °C using CoAu2GeS4-chalcogel catalyst, due to its promising catalytic performance. The CoAu2GeS4-chalcogel regioselectively converted the pair of substrates to respective Markovnikov products, (E)-1-(4-R-phenyl)-N-phenylethan-1-imine, with 38% to 60% conversion.

  4. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  5. Stereotypic movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001548.htm Stereotypic movement disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stereotypic movement disorder is a condition in which a person makes ...

  6. Eye Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  7. Valence and core-level binding energy shifts in realgar (As 4S 4) and pararealgar (As 4S 4) arsenic sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Heather A.; Dorko, Michael J.; Oman, Jason K.; Garrett, Simon J.

    2003-06-01

    The core level and valence band X-ray photoelectron spectra (XP spectra) of two arsenic sulfides, As 4S 4 (α-realgar) and As 4S 4 (pararealgar), are reported. Pararealgar is a polymorph of realgar created by irradiation of realgar with visible light. The core level spectra of the materials can be distinguished by small differences in core level binding energies (BEs). For example, the As 3d 5/2 and S 2p 3/2 peaks are at 43.1 and 162.8 eV BE, respectively, in realgar and 43.2 and 162.7 eV BE, respectively, in pararealgar. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level were performed on single As 4S 4 clusters to determine the ground state orbital energies for realgar and pararealgar and electrostatic potential-derived atomic charges. The shifts in the core level BEs are qualitatively reproduced in the orbital energies and can be rationalized based on an increased average charge in pararealgar (S=-0.21, As=+0.21) versus realgar (S=-0.19, As=+0.19). A large variation in calculated charge between inequivalent As sites in pararealgar (from +0.09 to +0.31) broadens the observed arsenic XP spectra features. In addition, the four main features in the valence bands of these materials have been identified based on the DFT calculations.

  8. Intelligence and Information-Sharing Elements of S.4 and H.R. 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masse, Todd

    2007-01-01

    Title I of S.4 and Title VII of H.R. 1 include corresponding measures related to enhancing information and intelligence sharing, both horizontally within the Federal Government and vertically between the Federal Government and state...

  9. Complete O(αs4) QCD corrections to hadronic Z decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikov, P A; Chetyrkin, K G; Kühn, J H; Rittinger, J

    2012-06-01

    Corrections of order α(s)(4) for the axial singlet contributions for the decay rate of the Z boson into hadrons are evaluated in the limit of the heavy top quark mass. Combined with recently finished O(α(s)(4)) calculations of the nonsinglet corrections, the new results directly lead us to the first complete O(α(s)(4)) prediction for the total hadronic decay rate of the Z boson. The new O(α(s)(4)) term in Z-decay rate leads to a significant stabilization of the perturbative series, to a reduction of the theory uncertainty in the strong coupling constant α(s), as extracted from these measurements, and to a small shift of the central value.

  10. Spectroscopic investigation and normal mode analysis of As 4S 4 polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz-Miranda, M.; Sbrana, G.; Bonazzi, P.; Menchetti, S.; Pratesi, G.

    1996-10-01

    Tetra-arsenic tetrasulfide polymorphs have been investigated by IR, Raman and UV-visible spectroscopies. The mineral realgar ( α-As 4S 4) and the high-temperature phase β-As 4S 4 transform to pararealgar by exposure to monochromatic laser light with a reaction rate depending on the wavelength of the exciting radiation. The photoinduced alteration process has been monitored by Raman spectroscopy, following in real time the spectral changes of the samples undergoing irradiation. A satisfactory assignment of realgar, β-As 4S 4 and pararealgar was obtained by employing a simplified valence force field which provided a complete set of normal coordinates suitable for describing the vibrational spectra of these As 4S 4 polymorphs.

  11. Horizontal gene transfer of zinc and non-zinc forms of bacterial ribosomal protein S4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthey-Schulten Zaida

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The universal ribosomal protein S4 is essential for the initiation of small subunit ribosomal assembly and translational accuracy. Being part of the information processing machinery of the cell, the gene for S4 is generally thought of as being inherited vertically and has been used in concatenated gene phylogenies. Here we report the evolution of ribosomal protein S4 in relation to a broad sharing of zinc/non-zinc forms of the gene and study the scope of horizontal gene transfer (HGT of S4 during bacterial evolution. Results In this study we present the complex evolutionary history of ribosomal protein S4 using 660 bacterial genomes from 16 major bacterial phyla. According to conserved characteristics in the sequences, S4 can be classified into C+ (zinc-binding and C- (zinc-free variants, with 26 genomes (mainly from the class Clostridia containing genes for both. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of the S4 sequences was incongruent with the standard bacterial phylogeny, indicating a departure from strict vertical inheritance. Further analysis using the genome content near the S4 genes, which are usually located in a conserved gene cluster, showed not only that HGT of the C- gene had occurred at various stages of bacterial evolution, but also that both the C- and C+ genes were present before the individual phyla diverged. To explain the latter, we theorize that a gene pool existed early in bacterial evolution from which bacteria could sample S4 gene variants, according to environmental conditions. The distribution of the C+/- variants for seven other zinc-binding ribosomal proteins in these 660 bacterial genomes is consistent with that seen for S4 and may shed light on the evolutionary pressures involved. Conclusion The complex history presented for "core" protein S4 suggests the existence of a gene pool before the emergence of bacterial lineages and reflects the pervasive nature of HGT in subsequent bacterial evolution

  12. Violation of Bell inequalities from S_4 symmetry: the three orbits case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolonek-Lasoń, Katarzyna; Sobieski, Ścibór

    2017-02-01

    The recently proposed (Güney and Hillery in Phys Rev A 90:062121, 2014; Phys Rev A 91:052110, 2015) group theoretical approach to the problem of violating the Bell inequalities is applied to S_4 group. The Bell inequalities based on the choice of three orbits in the representation space corresponding to standard representation of S_4 are derived and their violation is described. The corresponding nonlocal games are analyzed.

  13. Movement and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Eriksson, Eva; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement...

  14. Linking Literacy and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Rae

    2010-01-01

    There are many links between literacy and movement. Movement and language are both forms of communication and self-expression. Rhythm is an essential component of both language and movement. While people may think of rhythm primarily in musical terms, there is a rhythm to words and sentences as well. Individuals develop an internal rhythm when…

  15. Social movements and science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The article examines the role of social movements in the development of scientific knowledge. Interactions between social movements and science in broad, historical terms are discussed. The relations between the new social movements of the 1960s and 1970s and changes in the contemporary scientific...

  16. Bubbling controlled by needle movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vejrazka, Jiri; Fujasova, Maria; Stanovsky, Petr; Ruzicka, Marek C; Drahos, JirI [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: vejrazka@icpf.cas.cz

    2008-07-30

    A device for 'on-demand' production of bubbles is presented. The device is based on a movable needle, through which air is injected. Bubbling is controlled by a rapid needle movement, which induces the bubble detachment. Conditions for proper function of the device include the restriction on the flow rate through the needle, sufficient needle pressure drop and adequate needle acceleration. Functionality of the device is demonstrated. Bubbling from a stationary needle is also discussed and a scaling for bubble size is proposed for the case of short needles, to which a constant flow rate is imposed through tubes of a finite volume.

  17. Plant nuclear photorelocation movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Takeshi; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2014-06-01

    Organelle movement and positioning are essential for proper cellular function. A nucleus moves dynamically during cell division and differentiation and in response to environmental changes in animal, fungal, and plant cells. Nuclear movement is well-studied and the mechanisms have been mostly elucidated in animal and fungal cells, but not in plant cells. In prothallial cells of the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and leaf cells of the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, light induces nuclear movement and nuclei change their position according to wavelength, intensity, and direction of light. This nuclear photorelocation movement shows some common features with the photorelocation movement of chloroplasts, which is one of the best-characterized plant organelle movements. This review summarizes nuclear movement and positioning in plant cells, especially plant-specific nuclear photorelocation movement and discusses the relationship between nuclear photorelocation movement and chloroplast photorelocation movement. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Pain ameliorating effect of eye movement desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, H; Groth, S; Rogers, D

    1994-06-01

    This study explores the efficacy of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMD/R) in the management of acute pain induced by hand exposures to ice water. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to one of the following interventions: (a) eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, (b) eye movement desensitization with music (EMD/M), and (c) control. The EMD/R participants focused on negative experiences associated with exposure to ice water, generated positive self-talk, and diverted their attention away from pain by focusing on a rapidly moving light on a monitor. The EMD with music group received eye movement desensitization coupled with preferred music. Repeated measures univariate and multivariate analysis of covariance was used to analyze the data. Results indicated that both procedures alleviated participants' pain to a similar degree and significantly more than the control, P < 0.05.

  19. Free volume structure of realgar α-As4S4 by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Ingram, A.; Demchenko, P.

    2015-04-01

    Atomic-deficient free volume structure of realgar α-As4S4, the low-temperature modification, of tetraarsenic tetrasulfide polymorphs, is studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Eventual channels of positron annihilation in this molecular crystal are shown to be connected with low electron density entities around cage As4S4 molecules composing realgar-type structure of monoclinic P21/n space group. The overlapped spaces of bond-free solid angles around S atoms forming self-closed As4S4 molecules contribute preferentially to positron trapping modes, while a competitive influence of bound positron-electron states (positronium) stabilized in intermolecular spaces occurs also to be essential in the decomposed lifetime spectra too.

  20. Structural analysis of the S4-S5 linker of the human KCNQ1 potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Shovanlal; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2015-01-02

    KCNQ1 plays important roles in the cardiac action potential and consists of an N-terminal domain, a voltage-sensor domain, a pore domain and a C-terminal domain. KCNQ1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel and its channel activity is regulated by membrane potentials. The linker between transmembrane helices 4 and 5 (S4-S5 linker) is important for transferring the conformational changes from the voltage-sensor domain to the pore domain. In this study, the structure of the S4-S5 linker of KCNQ1 was investigated by solution NMR, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The S4-S5 linker adopted a helical structure in detergent micelles. The W248 may interact with the cell membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) and Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. Risk factors include the following: A sedentary lifestyle Smoking Obesity Many people with narcolepsy or rapid eye movement (REM) behavior disorder move their legs periodically during sleep. Both ...

  2. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD.

  3. A Performance Update of the InterOcean S4 Electromagnetic Current Meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    150 - -S4 300- wj 150- H__VMCM a_ 0 _ _ 1 2 3 4 5 6 HOURS • ,. 5~ Figure 6. R/V ASTERIAS VMCI/S4 Tbw Test Time Series A yoyo -ing experiment for 16...914-92-C- 6619F/ 14/2N E, hhh,~EmEEmoEE.EEEEI IN U--. 1.84 IJI2 2A LL 1.16 ",W111’ 2- 111 "- lll __- -: -IJ. .t~o MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART...working instrument. Presented are the test procedures and results performed on three production units placing emphasis on the oceanographic users point

  4. Gender and Migration : a Women's Movement Perspective on ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Gender and Migration : a Women's Movement Perspective on Negotiating Rights (India). Women's movements in India are struggling to address problems arising from rapidly changing social relations and vulnerabilities associated with, among other things, the phenomenon of migration. This project will allow a ...

  5. The mathematics of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  6. Sensation of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sensation of Movement will discuss the role of sensation in the control of action, bodily self-recognition, and sense of agency. Sensing movement is dependent on a range of information received by the brain, from signalling in the peripheral sensory organs to the establishment of higher order goals....... This volume will question whether one type of information is more relevant for the ability to sense and control movements, and demonstrate the importance of integrating neuroscientific knowledge with philosophical perspectives, in order to arrive at new insights into how sensation of movement can be studied...

  7. Mechanistic studies on the reactions of PhS(-) or [MoS(4)](2)(-) with [M(4)(SPh)(10)](2)(-) (M = Fe or Co).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhen; Henderson, Richard A

    2002-08-12

    Kinetic studies, using stopped-flow spectrophotometry, on the reactions of [M(4)(SPh)(10)](2)(-) (M = Fe or Co) with PhS(-) to form [M(SPh)(4)](2)(-) are described, as are the reactions between [M(4)(SPh)(10)](2)(-) and [MoS(4)](2)(-) to form [S(2)MoS(2)Fe(SPh)(2)](2)(-) or [S(2)MoS(2)CoS(2)MoS(2)](2)(-). The kinetics of the reactions with PhS(-) are consistent with an initial associative substitution mechanism involving attack of PhS(-) at one of the tetrahedral M sites of [M(4)(SPh)(10)](2)(-) to form [M(4)(SPh)(11)](3)(-). Subsequent or concomitant cleavage of a micro-SPh ligand, at the same M, initiates a cascade of rapid reactions which result ultimately in the complete rupture of the cluster and formation of [M(SPh)(4)](2)(-). The kinetics of the reaction between [M(4)(SPh)(10)](2)(-) and [MoS(4)](2)(-) indicate an initial dissociative substitution mechanism at low concentrations of [MoS(4)](2)(-), in which rate-limiting dissociation of a terminal thiolate from [M(4)(SPh)(10)](2)(-) produces [M(4)(SPh)(9)](-) and the coordinatively unsaturated M site is rapidly attacked by a sulfido group of [MoS(4)](2)(-). It is proposed that subsequent chelation of the MoS(4) ligand results in cleavage of an M-micro-SPh bond, initiating a cascade of reactions which lead to the ultimate break-up of the cluster and formation of the products, [S(2)MoS(2)Fe(SPh)(2)](2)(-) or [S(2)MoS(2)CoS(2)MoS(2)](2)(-). With [Co(4)(SPh)(10)](2)(-), at higher concentrations of [MoS(4)](2)(-), a further substitution pathway is evident which exhibits a second order dependence on the concentration of [MoS(4)](2)(-). The mechanistic picture of cluster disruption which emerges from these studies rationalizes the "all or nothing" reactivity of [M(4)(SPh)(10)](2)(-).

  8. (2S,4S)-4-Fluoro-1-{[(2-hydroxy-1,1-dimethylethyl)amino]acetyl}-pyrrolidine-2-carbonitrile monobenzenesulfonate (TS-021) is a selective and reversible dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Koji; Kozakai, Akinori; Okumura-Kitajima, Lisa; Mita, Yasuo; Kitano, Kiyokazu; Jingu, Shigeji; Nakaike, Shiro

    2011-03-25

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has significant roles in the regulation of postprandial glucose metabolism, and the active form of GLP-1 is rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-IV. Therefore, DPP-IV inhibition is a promising approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In the present study, we investigated the character of a DPP-IV inhibitor, TS-021, (2S, 4S)-4-fluoro-1-{[(2-hydroxy-1,1-dimethylethyl)amino]acetyl}-pyrrolidine-2-carbonitrile monobenzenesulfonate both in vitro and in vivo. TS-021 inhibits DPP-IV activity in human plasma with an IC(50) value of 5.34nM. In kinetics experiments, TS-021 had a relatively higher dissociation rate constant, with a k(off) value of 1.09×10(-3)s, despite exhibiting a potent human plasma DPP-IV inhibition activity with a K(i) value of 4.96nM. TS-021 exhibited significant inhibition selectivity against DPP-8 (>600 fold), DPP-9 (>1200 fold) and other peptidases examined (>15,000 fold). In normal rats, dogs and monkeys, a single oral dose of TS-021 exhibited favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. In Zucker fatty (fa/fa) rats, a rat model of obesity and impaired glucose tolerance, the oral administration of TS-021 resulted in the suppression of plasma DPP-IV activity and an increase in the active form of GLP-1. Furthermore, TS-021 exhibited a significant improvement in glucose tolerance by increasing the plasma insulin level during oral glucose tolerance tests at doses of 0.02-0.5mg/kg. These results suggest that TS-021 is a selective and reversible dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor and has excellent characteristics as an oral anti-diabetic agent for postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High-Purity Fe3S4 Greigite Microcrystals for Magnetic and Electrochemical Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Guowei; Zhang, Baomin; Yu, Feng; Novakova, Alla A.; Krivenkov, Maxim S.; Kiseleva, Tatiana Y.; Chang, Liao; Rao, Jiancun; Polyakov, Alexey O.; Blake, Graeme R.; de Groot, Robert A.; Palstra, Thomas T. M.

    2014-01-01

    High-purity Fe3S4 (greigite) microcrystals with octahedral shape were synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method using a surfactant. The as-prepared samples have the inverse spinel structure with high crystallinity. The saturation magnetization (M-s) reaches 3.74 mu(B) at 5 K and 3.51 mu(B) at

  10. depmixS4: an R-package for hidden Markov models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, I.; Speekenbrink, M.

    2010-01-01

    depmixS4 implements a general framework for defining and estimating dependent mixture models in the R programming language. This includes standard Markov models, latent/hidden Markov models, and latent class and finite mixture distribution models. The models can be fitted on mixed multivariate data

  11. Hydrogen Evolution on Supported Incomplete Cubane-type [Mo3S4](4+) Electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaramillo, Thomas; Bonde, Jacob Lindner; Zhang, Jingdong

    2008-01-01

    Electrocatalytic properties of biomimetic supported incomplete cubane-type [Mo3S4](4+) clusters are investigated. The activity toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is evaluated on both a high surface area gas diffusion electrode in a membrane electrode assembly and on highly orientated...

  12. Investigating the role of (2S,4R)-4-hydroxyproline in elastin model peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochicchio, Brigida; Laurita, Alessandro; Heinz, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications play a key role in defining the biological functions of proteins. Among them, the hydroxylation of proline producing the (2S,4R)-4-hydroxyproline (Hyp) is one of the most frequent modifications observed in vertebrates, being particularly abundant in the proteins o...

  13. Particle properties and their modification in mechanically activated realgar As4S4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Baláž

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work mechanical activation of realgar As4S4 was studied. The addition of sodium chloride NaCl as a solid diluent intothe milling process substantially improved solid state properties of the obtained fines. However, the polymorphous transformationof

  14. Spray-coated ligand-free Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoparticle thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Sara Lena Josefin; Murthy, Swathi; Kofod, Guggi

    We have fabricated Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films from spray-coating ligand-free nanoparticle inks. The as-synthesized CZTS nanoparticles were inherently ligand-free [1], which allows the use of polar solvents, such as water and ethanol. Another advantage of these particles is that user...

  15. Structural, microstructural and optical properties of Cu2ZnSnS4 thin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 5. Structural, microstructural and optical properties of Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 thin films prepared by thermal evaporation: effect of substrate temperature and annealing. U CHALAPATHI S UTHANNA V SUNDARA RAJA. Volume 40 Issue 5 September 2017 pp 887-895 ...

  16. Ni 2-uptake in Pseudomonas putida strain S4: a possible role of Mg ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Essential metal ion homeostasis is based on regulated uptake of metal ions, both during its scarcity and abundance. Pseudomonas putida strain S4, a multimetal resistant bacterium, was employed to investigate Ni2+ entry into cells. It was observed that Mg2+ regulates the entry of Ni2+ and by this plays a protective role to ...

  17. Thin films of absorber material Cu2ZnSnS4 for solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt; Schou, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition technique is applied to the production of thin films of CZTS (Cu2ZnSnS4).This vacuum technique has proven to be particularly successful in the production of films with acomplex stoichiometry, as in the case of high temperature superconductors. The material ablated bythe la...

  18. The spontaneous eye movements in the awake kitten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, L; Lucchetti, C

    1985-07-01

    The spontaneous eye movements were analysed comparatively in the kitten and in the cat. The eye movements were recorded in the dark by a magnetic search coil technique. The spatio-temporal organization of eye movements in the kitten has a prevailing vertical orientation and differs completely from that of the cat. In the kitten the amplitude of eye movements is smaller than in the cat and only a few movements are followed by fixation. It results, by correlating amplitude-peak velocity, that rapid eye movements in the awake kitten are saccades. From our results we conclude that the eye movements in the kitten and in the cat differ in many aspects and that the visual system is responsible for the development of the correct oculomotor behaviour.

  19. Cation/Anion Substitution in Cu2ZnSnS4 for Improved Photovoltaic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthoju, Balakrishna; Mohapatra, Jeotikanta; Jangid, Manoj K.; Bahadur, D.; Medhekar, N. V.; Aslam, M.

    2016-01-01

    Cations and anions are replaced with Fe, Mn, and Se in CZTS in order to control the formations of the secondary phase, the band gap, and the micro structure of Cu2ZnSnS4. We demonstrate a simplified synthesis strategy for a range of quaternary chalcogenide nanoparticles such as Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), Cu2FeSnS4 (CFTS), Cu2MnSnS4 (CMTS), Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe), and Cu2ZnSn(S0.5Se0.5)4 (CZTSSe) by thermolysis of metal chloride precursors using long chain amine molecules. It is observed that the crystal structure, band gap and micro structure of the CZTS thin films are affected by the substitution of anion/cations. Moreover, secondary phases are not observed and grain sizes are enhanced significantly with selenium doping (grain size ~1 μm). The earth-abundant Cu2MSnS4/Se4 (M = Zn, Mn and Fe) nanoparticles have band gaps in the range of 1.04–1.51 eV with high optical-absorption coefficients (~104 cm−1) in the visible region. The power conversion efficiency of a CZTS solar cell is enhanced significantly, from 0.4% to 7.4% with selenium doping, within an active area of 1.1 ± 0.1 cm2. The observed changes in the device performance parameters might be ascribed to the variation of optical band gap and microstructure of the thin films. The performance of the device is at par with sputtered fabricated films, at similar scales. PMID:27748406

  20. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  1. Dynamics of human movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The part of (bio)mechanics that studies the interaction of forces on the human skeletal system and its effect on the resulting movement is called rigid body dynamics. Some basic concepts are presented: A mathematical formulation to describe human movement and how this relates on the mechanical loads

  2. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  3. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  4. Impaired visual perception in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomhause, Lucie; Dujardin, Kathy; Boucart, Muriel; Herlin, Virginie; Defebvre, Luc; Derambure, Philippe; Monaca Charley, Christelle

    2014-05-01

    Patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) often develop synucleinopathies (Parkinson's disease [PD], in particular). Cognitive disorders affecting different domains have been reported in patients with iRBD. Dysexecutive disorders seem to predominate, but there is no consensus on the nature of visuospatial disorders in iRBD. The objective is to identify and characterize visuospatial disorders in patients with REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD - either idiopathic or associated with PD). Fifteen patients with iRBD, 30 patients with PD (15 of whom had RBD), and 20 healthy control subjects underwent an extensive assessment of visuospatial functions. Two computerized tasks were used: a Biederman task (to assess the 3 levels of visuoperceptive processing) and a Posner paradigm (to assess visual attention). The visual priming effects classically described for the Biederman task in healthy controls were not found in iRBD patients. Patients with iRBD were no quicker in naming objects with the same general structure as previously presented objects but did have a normal priming effect for strictly identical objects. Parkinson's disease patients with RBD had poorer visuoperceptive performance levels than PD patients without RBD. There were no significant differences between the 4 groups in the Posner attentional task. First, this study confirms the presence of visuoperceptive dysfunction in iRBD patients and revealed a selective defect in intermediate visuoperceptive processing (i.e., general object representation). Second, RBD in PD appeared to be associated with poorer visuoperceptive abilities. Third, this visuoperceptive dysfunction in RBD patients was not associated with impaired attention.

  5. Rapid Nonconjugate Adaptation of Vertical Voluntary Pursuit Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    applied to the post-adaptation data from the left eye magnification condition: YRpost(Transformed) = (2 * YRpre) - YRPost (6) For example, if the pie ...nonconjugate adaptation with spectacle- mounted plano -cylindrical lenses, Lemij (1990) demonstrated that nonconjugate pursuit adaptation was

  6. Comments on Penrose Limit of AdS_4 x M^{1,1,1}

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Changhyun

    2002-01-01

    We construct a Penrose limit of AdS_4 x M^{1,1,1} where M^{1,1,1}= SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1)/(SU(2) x U(1) x U(1)) that provides the pp-wave geometry equal to the one in the Penrose limit of AdS_4 x S^7. There exists a subsector of three dimensional N=2 dual gauge theory which has enhanced N=8 maximal supersymmetry. We identify operators in the N=2 gauge theory with supergravity KK excitations in the pp-wave geometry and describe how the gauge theory operators made out of two kinds of chiral field...

  7. Finite-size corrections for quantum strings on AdS4 x CP3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astolfi, D.; Puletti, V.G.M.; Grignani, G.

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the calculation of curvature corrections to the pp-wave energy of type IIA string states on AdS4×CP3 initiated in arXiv:0807.1527. Using the near pp-wave Hamiltonian found in arXiv:0912.2257, we compute the first non-vanishing correction to the energy of a set of bosonic string states...

  8. Logarithmic corrections to entropy of magnetically charged AdS4 black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Imtak; Lal, Shailesh

    2017-11-01

    Logarithmic terms are quantum corrections to black hole entropy determined completely from classical data, thus providing a strong check for candidate theories of quantum gravity purely from physics in the infrared. We compute these terms in the entropy associated to the horizon of a magnetically charged extremal black hole in AdS4×S7 using the quantum entropy function and discuss the possibility of matching against recently derived microscopic expressions.

  9. New insights into the structure, chemistry, and properties of Cu4SnS4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Amitava; Mohapatra, Sudip; Yaghoobnejad Asl, Hooman; Lee, Seng Huat; Hor, Yew San; Medvedeva, Julia E.; McClane, Devon L.; Hilmas, Gregory E.; McGuire, Michael A.; May, Andrew F.; Wang, Hsin; Dash, Shreeram; Welton, Aaron; Boolchand, Punit; Devlin, Kasey P.; Aitken, Jennifer; Herbst-Irmer, Regine; Petříček, Váčlav

    2017-09-01

    The ambient temperature structure of Cu4SnS4 has been revisited and the recently reported low temperature structure has been confirmed from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. A structural phase transition from a large monoclinic unit cell at low temperature to a smaller orthorhombic unit cell at high temperature has been observed. The room temperature phase exhibited disorder in the two copper sites, which is a different finding from earlier reports. The low temperature monoclinic form crystallizes in P21/c space group, which is isostructural with Cu4GeS4. The phase transition has also been studied with variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction and 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivity of polycrystalline Cu4SnS4 are reported from 16 to 400 K on hot pressed pellets. Thermal conductivity measurements at high temperatures, 350 - 750 K exhibited very low thermal conductivities in the range 0.28 - 0.35 W K-1 m-1. In all the transport measurements the phase transition has been observed at around 232 K. Resistivity decreases, while Seebeck coefficient increases after the phase transition during warming up from low to high temperatures. This change in resistivity has been correlated with the results of first-principles electronic band structure calculations using highly-accurate screened-exchange local density approximation. It was found that both the low hole effective mass of 0.63 me for the Γ→Y crystallographic direction and small band gap, 0.49 eV, are likely to contribute to the observed higher conductivity of the orthorhombic phase. Cu4SnS4 is also electrochemically active and shows reversible reaction with lithium between 1.7 and 3.5 volts.

  10. Double gaps along Shaker S4 demonstrate omega currents at three different closed states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal El-Din, Tamer M; Heldstab, Hansjakob; Lehmann, Claudia; Greeff, Nikolaus G

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in detail how the voltage sensor in the Shaker potassium channel moves during the gating process. After the publication of the open channel structure from the crystallized K(V)AP channel in 2003, an alternative so-called "paddle" model was put forward in contrast to the existing helical screw model. The voltage sensor S4 contains 4 arginine residues relevant for gating, R1(362), R2(365), R3(368) and R4(371), each separated by 2 neutral residues. These charged residues coil as one of three threads on the S4-alpha-helix. Based on a previous finding that the mutation R1S leads to the so-called omega leak current through a "gating-pore" in the closed state, we introduced gaps systematically along the arginine thread substituting long arginines by short serines. Mutations R2S or R3S did neither create transient nor steady leaks. The fact that the native residue A359, which is located three amino acids in front of R1, is a short one, motivated us to check its role. Mutation of A359 to arginine blocked the omega current in the R1S mutant indicating that the omega pore is occupied by A359 and R1. Introducing further double gaps (RR to SS) at sequential positions (0 + 1, 1 + 2, 2 + 3), produced clear leak currents which were remarkably stable over a wide voltage range. These leaks contradict that S4 would swing together with S3 in lipid according to the paddle hypothesis. Rather, our results show that during gating the S4 segment moves in 3 helical steps through a fixed pore formed by the channel protein.

  11. The Extremes in Intra-Night Blazar Variability: The S4 0954+65 Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumen Bachev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present results of optical observations of the extremely violently variable blazar S4 0954+65 on intra-night time scales. The object showed flux changes of up to 100% within a few hours. Time delays between optical bands, color changes and “rms-flux” relations are investigated and the results are discussed in terms of existing models of blazar variability.

  12. Photoinduced features of energy bandgap in quaternary Cu2CdGeS4 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brik, M. G.; Kityk, I. V.; Parasyuk, O. V.; Myronchuk, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    The quaternary chalcogenide crystal Cu2CdGeS4 was studied both experimentally and theoretically in the present paper. Investigations of polarized fundamental absorption spectra demonstrated a high sensitivity to external light illumination. The photoinduced changes were studied using a cw 532 nm green laser with energy density about 0.4 J cm-2. The spectral maximum of the photoinduced anisotropy was observed at spectral energies equal to about 1.4 eV (energy gap equal to about 1.85 eV) corresponding to maximal density of the intrinsic defect levels. Spectroscopic measurements were performed for polarized and unpolarized photoinducing laser light to separate the contribution of the intrinsic defect states from that of the pure states of the valence and conduction bands. To understand the origin of the observed photoinduced absorption near the fundamental edge, the benchmark first-principles calculations of the structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties of Cu2CdGeS4 were performed by the general gradient approximation (GGA) and local density approximation (LDA) methods. The calculated dielectric function and optical absorption spectra exhibit some anisotropic behavior (shift of the absorption maxima in different polarizations) within the 0.15-0.20 eV energy range not only near the absorption edge; optical anisotropy was also found for the deeper inter-band transition spectral range. Peculiar features of chemical bonds in Cu2CdGeS4 were revealed by studying the electron density distribution. Possible intrinsic defects are shown to affect the optical absorption spectra considerably. Pressure effects on the structural and electronic properties were modeled by optimizing the crystal structure and calculating all relevant properties at elevated hydrostatic pressure. The first estimations of the bulk modulus (69 GPa (GGA) or 91 GPa (LDA)) and its pressure derivative for Cu2CdGeS4 are also reported.

  13. Music and movement

    OpenAIRE

    Nasev, Lence

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is one of the fundamental elements without which music would not exist. In plays with singing, a child learns to synchronize its movements with the rhythm of music from a very early age. The skill of movement plays a major role in the learning of music and thus deserves an important place in the school curriculum. In this paper, an overview is made of the most important music pedagogues who introduced movement, and at the same time perceived its importance in learning musical conte...

  14. Unraveling the electrolyte properties of Na3SbS4 through computation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Larry E.; Hood, Zachary D.; Holzwarth, N. A. W.

    2017-12-01

    Solid-state sodium electrolytes are expected to improve next-generation batteries on the basis of favorable energy density and reduced cost. Na3SbS4 represents a new solid-state ion conductor with high ionic conductivities in the mS/cm range. Here, we explore the tetragonal phase of Na3SbS4 and its interface with metallic sodium anode using a combination of experiments and first-principles calculations. The computed Na-ion vacancy migration energies of 0.1 eV are smaller than the value inferred from experiment, suggesting that grain boundaries or other factors dominate the experimental systems. Analysis of symmetric cells of the electrolyte—Na/Na 3SbS4/Na —show that a conductive solid electrolyte interphase forms. Computer simulations infer that the interface is likely to be related to Na3SbS3 , involving the conversion of the tetrahedral SbS43 - ions of the bulk electrolyte into trigonal pyramidal SbS33 - ions at the interface.

  15. Verification of models for ballistic movement time and endpoint variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ray F; Drury, Colin G

    2013-01-01

    A hand control movement is composed of several ballistic movements. The time required in performing a ballistic movement and its endpoint variability are two important properties in developing movement models. The purpose of this study was to test potential models for predicting these two properties. Twelve participants conducted ballistic movements of specific amplitudes using a drawing tablet. The measured data of movement time and endpoint variability were then used to verify the models. This study was successful with Hoffmann and Gan's movement time model (Hoffmann, 1981; Gan and Hoffmann 1988) predicting more than 90.7% data variance for 84 individual measurements. A new theoretically developed ballistic movement variability model, proved to be better than Howarth, Beggs, and Bowden's (1971) model, predicting on average 84.8% of stopping-variable error and 88.3% of aiming-variable errors. These two validated models will help build solid theoretical movement models and evaluate input devices. This article provides better models for predicting end accuracy and movement time of ballistic movements that are desirable in rapid aiming tasks, such as keying in numbers on a smart phone. The models allow better design of aiming tasks, for example button sizes on mobile phones for different user populations.

  16. PET imaging of glutaminolysis in tumors by 18F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Brian P; Ploessl, Karl; Wang, Limin; Qu, Wenchao; Zha, Zhihao; Wise, David R; Chodosh, Lewis A; Belka, George; Thompson, Craig B; Kung, Hank F

    2011-12-01

    Changes in gene expression, metabolism, and energy requirements are hallmarks of cancer growth and self-sufficiency. Upregulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTor pathway in tumor cells has been shown to stimulate aerobic glycolysis, which has enabled (18)F-FDG PET tumor imaging. However, of the millions of (18)F-FDG PET scans conducted per year, a significant number of malignant tumors are (18)F-FDG PET-negative. Recent studies suggest that several tumors may use glutamine as the key nutrient for survival. As an alternative metabolic tracer for tumors, (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine was developed as a PET tracer for mapping glutaminolytic tumors. A series of in vitro cell uptake and in vivo animal studies were performed to demonstrate tumor cell addiction to glutamine. Cell uptake studies of this tracer were performed in SF188 and 9L glioblastoma tumor cells. Dynamic small-animal PET studies of (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine were conducted in 2 animal models: xenografts produced in F344 rats by subcutaneous injection of 9L tumor cells and transgenic mice with M/tomND spontaneous mammary gland tumors. In vitro studies showed that both transformed 9L and SF188 tumor cells displayed a high rate of glutamine uptake (maximum uptake, ≈ 16% dose/100 μg of protein). The cell uptake of (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine by SF188 cells is comparable to that of (3)H-L-glutamine but higher than that of (18)F-FDG. The tumor cell uptake can be selectively blocked. Biodistribution and PET studies showed that (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine localized in tumors with a higher uptake than in surrounding muscle and liver tissues. Data suggest that certain tumor cells may use glutamine for energy production. The results support that (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine is selectively taken up and trapped by tumor cells. It may be useful as a novel metabolic tracer for tumor imaging.

  17. Movements and feelings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Fernandez Poncela

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This text reviews the theory of recognition and focuses on the study of the role of emotions in collective action and social movements. It shows how emotion becomes feeling and creates a need to be met, leading to action. Anger, for example, as emotion, moves on to the feeling of indignation, and it is expressed in many forms, including the pursuit of justice and recognition. This point lands and deepens the study with the experience of the student movement in Mexico #YoSoy132 in 2012. The research is based on interviews with members of the movement. The presence and importance of feelings in collective action and social movements through the proposed case study is finally shown.

  18. Movement coordination during conversation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Latif

    Full Text Available Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers' perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers.

  19. Post-Umbrella Movement: Localism and Radicalness of the Hong Kong Student Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-po Chan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hong Kong student movements before the Umbrella Movement showed a political outlook of voicing within norm of the establishment, using “peaceful, rational and non-violent” approaches, acknowledging the authorities of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR and mainland Chinese governments and recognizing attachment to the motherland China. Today’s new emerging political outlook of the Hong Kong student movement has a profile of anti-establishment, using more assertive means and not excluding radical behaviour, distrust of the HKSAR and mainland authorities and assertion of radical localism. In the last two years, Hong Kong students have undergone a rapid change in their orientation, resulting in today’s outlook. This paper argues that the Umbrella Movement is the key for the turnaround and it testifies to the birth of a new social and political consciousness amongst Hong Kong students.

  20. Sacral sparing in SCI: beyond the S4-S5 and anorectal examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariffa, José; Kramer, John L K; Jones, Linda A T; Lammertse, Daniel P; Curt, Armin; Steeves, John D

    2012-05-01

    Sensory and/or motor function sparing, including the S4-S5 spinal cord segment, is central to classifying neurologic impairment after spinal cord injury (SCI) using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades within the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI). Within the ISNCSCI protocol, which is essential for both clinical and research purposes, assessing sacral sparing requires an anorectal and S4-S5 examination. However, in situations where these data are incomplete, the relationships between anorectal/S4-S5 examinations and functional preservation at more rostral sacral segments may be useful. To evaluate whether slightly more rostral sensory and motor outcomes of the ISNCSCI can accurately predict caudal sacral sparing (S4-S5 dermatome sensation, "deep pressure" anal sensation [AS], and voluntary anal contraction [AC]). Retrospective analysis of the European Multicenter Study about Spinal Cord Injury database. One thousand four hundred sixty-seven AIS-A, AIS-B, and AIS-C subjects. International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury examinations. The value of six factors (sensory preservation at S1, S2, and S3; motor preservation at S1; motor function at more than three segments below the motor level; and sensory function at more than three segments below the neurologic level) for predicting ISNCSCI sacral sparing measures (AS, S4-S5 dermatome sensation, AC) was evaluated. Combinations of the most promising factors were then evaluated for their ability to accurately predict the AIS grade. Preserved sensation at the first sacral segment (S1S) provided good prediction (90.5%) of caudal sacral sensory sparing (ie, AS or S4-S5 sensation). Voluntary anal contraction was accurately predicted by preserved motor function within the first sacral segment (S1M) in 85.4% of cases. The alternate classification schemes evaluated for accurately predicting the AIS classification

  1. Rooted in Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The result of the synergy between four doctoral projects and an advanced MA-level course on Bronze Age Europe, this integrated assemblage of articles represents a variety of different subjects united by a single theme: movement. Ranging from theoretical discussion of the various responses...... period of European prehistory. In so doing, the text not only addresses transmission and reception, but also the conceptualization of mobility within a world which was literally Rooted in Movement....

  2. Spiraldynamik - intelligent movement

    OpenAIRE

    Wippert, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Spiraldynamik ® is an anatomically based movement and therapy concept. It was founded by the physiotherapist Yolanda Deswarte, and Dr. med. Christian Larsen. During the time that he was professionally active as a pediatrician, Christian Larsen repeatedly wondered: “is the universal principle of organization, the spiral, also embodied in man?” Observing the babies and toddlers that he worked with inspired him to research further into movement sequences. International interdisciplinary research...

  3. Anomaly detection: eye movement patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W; Fodor, J D; Crain, S; Shankweiler, D

    1998-09-01

    The symptom of a garden path in sentence processing is an important anomaly in the input string. This anomaly signals to the parser that an error has occurred, and provides cues for how to repair it. Anomaly detection is thus an important aspect of sentence processing. In the present study, we investigated how the parser responds to unambiguous sentences that contain syntactic anomalies and pragmatic anomalies, examining records of eye movement during reading. While sensitivity to the two kinds of anomaly was very rapid and essentially simultaneous, qualitative differences existed in the patterns of first-pass reading times and eye regressions. The results are compatible with the proposal that syntactic information and pragmatic information are used differently in garden-path recovery.

  4. Are Eyebrow Movements Linked to Voice Variations and Turn-Taking in Dialogue? An Experimental Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaitella, Isabelle; Santi, Serge; Lagrue, Benoit; Cave, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Following our work on the relationship between eyebrow movements and the fundamental frequency of the voice, this article presents the results of a study on this phenomenon, and also on the temporal location of rapid eyebrow movements with respect to speaking turns during dialogue. We used an automatic movement-acquisition system coupled with the…

  5. A dual visual-local feedback model of the vergence eye movement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkelens, C.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069562296

    2011-01-01

    Pure vergence movements are the eye movements that we make when we change our binocular fixation between targets differing in distance but not in direction relative to the head. Pure vergence is slow and controlled by visual feedback. Saccades are the rapid eye movements that we make between targets

  6. Nuclear movement in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xin

    2017-12-11

    Nuclear movement within a cell occurs in a variety of eukaryotic organisms including yeasts and filamentous fungi. Fungal molecular genetic studies identified the minus-end-directed microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein as a critical protein for nuclear movement or orientation of the mitotic spindle contained in the nucleus. Studies in the budding yeast first indicated that dynein anchored at the cortex via its anchoring protein Num1 exerts pulling force on an astral microtubule to orient the anaphase spindle across the mother-daughter axis before nuclear division. Prior to anaphase, myosin V interacts with the plus end of an astral microtubule via Kar9-Bim1/EB1 and pulls the plus end along the actin cables to move the nucleus/spindle close to the bud neck. In addition, pushing or pulling forces generated from cortex-linked polymerization or depolymerization of microtubules drive nuclear movements in yeasts and possibly also in filamentous fungi. In filamentous fungi, multiple nuclei within a hyphal segment undergo dynein-dependent back-and-forth movements and their positioning is also influenced by cytoplasmic streaming toward the hyphal tip. In addition, nuclear movement occurs at various stages of fungal development and fungal infection of plant tissues. This review discusses our current understanding on the mechanisms of nuclear movement in fungal organisms, the importance of nuclear positioning and the regulatory strategies that ensure the proper positioning of nucleus/spindle. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Human fetal eye movements: detection in utero by ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, R S; Nijhuis, J G; Martin, C B; Prechtl, H F

    1981-02-01

    Eye movements of the human fetus were detected in utero by means of real-time B-scan and M-mode ultrasonography. In 14 low-risk fetuses studied between 32 weeks menstrual age and term either rapid or slow eye movements or a mixture of both types were detected in 60 +/- 10% (mean +/- SD) of 558 2 min scoring epochs. A comparison of direct echoscopic detection of eye movements in a 3-day-old neonate confirmed that the movements observed in the orbital region with the real-time scanner corresponded well with eye movements seen directly. Thus eye movements can be added to the list of phenomena which can be observed noninvasively for the study of human fetal behaviour.

  8. Ultra-thin Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cell by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Crovetto, Andrea; Yan, Chang

    2017-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of a 5.2% efficiency Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cell made by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) featuring an ultra-thin absorber layer (less than 450 nm). Solutions to the issues of reproducibility and micro-particulate ejection often encountered with PLD are proposed....... At the optimal laser fluence, amorphous CZTS precursors with optimal stoichiometry for solar cells are deposited from a single target. Such precursors do not result in detectable segregation of secondary phases after the subsequent annealing step. In the analysis of the solar cell device, we focus on the effects...

  9. Optical Outburst of the Blazar S4 0954+658 in Early 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Morozova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the behavior of the BL Lac object S4 0954+658 during an unprecedented bright optical flare in early 2015. The optical flare was accompanied by a powerful γ -ray flare and the detection of very-high-energy γ -ray emission. We analyze total and polarized intensity images obtained with the VLBA at 43 GHz and discover a new bright polarized superluminal knot, which was ejected from the VLBI-core during the peak of the flare.

  10. Development of a Tetrathioether (S4) Bifunctional Chelate System for Rh-105

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Figure 8: Summary of trans-RhX2-S4-(COOH)2 HPLC analysis Waters RP-18 1% - 90% B 8min iso at 90% 1 min 15 Since the existence of at least two trans...2000 4000 m Vo lts 0 2000 4000 Figure 9: HPLC analysis of samples prepared under reaction conditions 1-4. Waters RP-18 1% - 90% B 8min iso at...1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 9000 10000 11000 12000 13000 14000 In te ns ity 544.91 572.88 508.87 718.50 1090.05805.12492.92

  11. Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals and graphene quantum dots for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Xin, Xukai; Lin, Zhiqun

    2011-08-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots exhibit great potential for applications in next generation high efficiency, low cost solar cells because of their unique optoelectronic properties. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals and graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have recently received much attention as building blocks for use in solar energy conversion due to their outstanding properties and advantageous characteristics, including high optical absorptivity, tunable bandgap, and earth abundant chemical composition. In this Feature Article, recent advances in the synthesis and utilization of CZTS nanocrystals and colloidal GQDs for photovoltaics are highlighted, followed by an outlook on the future research efforts in these areas.

  12. [Scenes in movement. Movement disorders on film].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares Romero, J

    2010-03-01

    There are publications in which various neurological diseases are analysed on film. However, no references have been found on movement disorders in this medium. A total of 104 documents were collected and reviewed using the internet movie data base (IMDb). The majority were associated with dystonia, Parkinson's and tics, were American commercial productions, and the most common genre was drama. The cinema usually depicts old men with developed Parkinson's disease. However, motor complications only appear in 19% and non-motor symptoms in 14%. The image of dystonia is generally that of a young man, with disabling dystonia secondary to childhood cerebral palsy. Tics appear associated with Tourette's syndrome, with the excessive use of obscene expressions and with very few references to other important aspects of this syndrome, such as mood and behavioural changes. The majority of tremors portrayed on film are associated with Parkinsonism and are not pathological. Myoclonus appears anecdotically and is normally symptomatic. Parkinson's disease is the type of movement disorder that the cinema portrays with greater neurological honesty and in a more dignified manner.

  13. “Specificity Determinants” Improve Therapeutic Indices of Two Antimicrobial Peptides Piscidin 1 and Dermaseptin S4 Against the Gram-negative Pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqing Jiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new class of antimicrobial agents with lower rates of resistance and different targets is urgently needed because of the rapidly increasing resistance to classical antibiotics. Amphipathic cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs represent such a class of compounds. In our previous studies, using a 26-residue de novo designed antimicrobial peptide, we proposed the concept of “specificity determinant(s”: positively charged residue(s in the center of the non-polar face of AMPs that could decrease hemolytic activity/toxicity but increase or maintain the same level of antimicrobial activity to increase dramatically the therapeutic index. In the current study, we used d-enantiomers of two AMPs, Piscidin 1 isolated from fish and dermaseptin S4 isolated from frog. We substituted different positions in the center of the hydrophobic face with one or two lysine residue(s (one or two “specificity determinant(s”. This simple modification not only maintained or improved antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii (11 strains and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (6 strains, but also dramatically decreased hemolytic activity of human red blood cells, as predicted. Therapeutic indices improved by 55-fold and 730-fold for piscidin 1 (I9K and dermaseptin S4 (L7K, A14K, respectively, against A. baumannii. Similarly, the therapeutic indices improved 32-fold and 980-fold for piscidin 1 (I9K and dermaseptin S4 (L7K, A14K, respectively, against P. aeruginosa.

  14. Psychostimulants and movement disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres eAsser

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulants are a diverse group of substances with their main psychomotor effects resembling those of amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine or cathinone. Due to their potential as drugs of abuse, recreational use of most of these substances is illegal since the 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances. In recent years, new psychoactive substances have emerged mainly as synthetic cathinones with new molecules frequently complementing the list.Psychostimulant related movement disorders are a known entity often seen in emergency rooms around the world. These admissions are becoming more frequent as are fatalities associated with drug abuse. Still the legal constraints of the novel synthetic molecules are bypassed. At the same time chronic and permanent movement disorders are much less frequently encountered. These disorders frequently manifest as a combination of movement disorders. The more common symptoms include agitation, tremor, hyperkinetic and stereotypical movements, cognitive impairment, and also hyperthermia and cardiovascular dysfunction.The pathophysiological mechanisms behind the clinical manifestations have been researched for decades. The common denominator is the monoaminergic signaling. Dopamine has received the most attention but further research has demonstrated involvement of other pathways. Common mechanisms linking psychostimulant use and several movement disorders exist.

  15. Psychostimulants and Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asser, Andres; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants are a diverse group of substances with their main psychomotor effects resembling those of amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, or cathinone. Due to their potential as drugs of abuse, recreational use of most of these substances is illegal since 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances. In recent years, new psychoactive substances have emerged mainly as synthetic cathinones with new molecules frequently complementing the list. Psychostimulant related movement disorders are a known entity often seen in emergency rooms around the world. These admissions are becoming more frequent as are fatalities associated with drug abuse. Still the legal constraints of the novel synthetic molecules are bypassed. At the same time, chronic and permanent movement disorders are much less frequently encountered. These disorders frequently manifest as a combination of movement disorders. The more common symptoms include agitation, tremor, hyperkinetic and stereotypical movements, cognitive impairment, and also hyperthermia and cardiovascular dysfunction. The pathophysiological mechanisms behind the clinical manifestations have been researched for decades. The common denominator is the monoaminergic signaling. Dopamine has received the most attention but further research has demonstrated involvement of other pathways. Common mechanisms linking psychostimulant use and several movement disorders exist. PMID:25941511

  16. Pursuit Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauzlis, Rich; Stone, Leland; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    When viewing objects, primates use a combination of saccadic and pursuit eye movements to stabilize the retinal image of the object of regard within the high-acuity region near the fovea. Although these movements involve widespread regions of the nervous system, they mix seamlessly in normal behavior. Saccades are discrete movements that quickly direct the eyes toward a visual target, thereby translating the image of the target from an eccentric retinal location to the fovea. In contrast, pursuit is a continuous movement that slowly rotates the eyes to compensate for the motion of the visual target, minimizing the blur that can compromise visual acuity. While other mammalian species can generate smooth optokinetic eye movements - which track the motion of the entire visual surround - only primates can smoothly pursue a single small element within a complex visual scene, regardless of the motion elsewhere on the retina. This ability likely reflects the greater ability of primates to segment the visual scene, to identify individual visual objects, and to select a target of interest.

  17. Breeding potential of S4 maize lines in topcrosses for agronomic and forage traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Martins Marcondes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the performance of 46 maize lines (S4 obtained from crosses between the commercial hybrids Penta x P30F53 in topcrosses with the commercial simple cross hybrid Dow8460 (tester and checks (hybrids Penta, P30F53, Dow8460 and Status. The grain yield was evaluated in two environments in Guarapuava, Paraná State, and the effects of genotype, environment and genotype x environment interaction were significant. The grain yield of the topcross hybrids ranged from 8,416 to 13,428 kg ha-1. The agronomic characteristics of the forage and the bromatological characteristics of the silage were evaluated in environment 1. The green mass yield of the forage ranged from 48,767 to 87,714 kg ha-1 and the dry mass yield ranged from 14,749 to 26,130 kg ha-1. The neutral detergent fiber content ranged from 44.85 to 58.45% and the acid detergent fiber content ranged from 28.28 to 37.06%. The relative feed value of the silage ranged between 100.5 and 138.5. The tester, hybrid Dow8460, was efficient to discriminate the relative performance of the S4 lines in the topcrosses.

  18. Two design of the S4.BEN01 magnet for the CBETA splitter/merger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berg, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-10

    The splitter/merger section of the CBETA project [1] consists of 4 beam lines as shown in Fig. 1. Two of the functions of the splitter’s/merger’s lines is to match the beam parameters at the exit of the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) to the beam parameters at the entrance of the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) arc, and also place the reference particles of the beam bunches at the entrance of the FFAG arc on specified trajectories according to their energies. In this technical note we are presenting results from the 2D and 3D electromagnetic analysis of the S4.BEN01 magnet which is one of the dipole magnets of the 150 MeV line of the splitter/merger. In particular we present results from two designs of the S4.BEN01 magnet, one based on iron dominated current-excited magnet, and the other design based on Halbach-type permanent magnet. An evaluation of the two designs will be given in the section under “conclusion”.

  19. Green Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Cu2ZnSnS4 Powder Using Hydrothermal Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shri kant Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS powder was synthesized by a hydrothermal process, using thiourea as sulfur precursor. The powder was qualitatively analyzed using X-ray to identify the phase, and the size of the particles was determined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Raman peak at 337.5 cm−1 confirms the formation of pure CZTS particles. The powder was also synthesized solvothermally using ethylenediamine as solvent. The hydrothermally synthesized powder indicated the presence of the kesterite phase Cu2ZnSnS4 and particle size of about 4-5 nm. This environmentally green synthesis by hydrothermal route can produce gram scale synthesis of material with a chemical yield in excess of ~ 90%. UV Vis absorption spectra measurements indicated the band gap of as-synthesized CZTS nanoparticles to be 1.7 eV, which is near the optimum value for photovoltaic solar cell, showing its possible use in photovoltaics.

  20. The S4---S5 linker - gearbox of TRP channel gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Laura; Wang, Hongmei; Zheng, Wang; Philipp, Stephan E; Hidalgo, Patricia; Cavalié, Adolfo; Chen, Xing-Zhen; Beck, Andreas; Flockerzi, Veit

    2017-11-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are cation channels which participate in a wide variety of physiological processes in organisms ranging from fungi to humans. They fulfill roles in body homeostasis, are sensors for noxious chemicals and temperature in the mammalian somatosensory system and are activated by light stimulated phospholipase C activity in Drosophila or by hypertonicity in yeast. The transmembrane topology of TRP channels is similar to that of voltage-gated cation channels. TRP proteins assemble as tetramers with each subunit containing six transmembrane helices (S1-S6) and intracellular N- and C-termini. Here we focus on the emerging functions of the cytosolic S4-S5 linker on TRP channel gating. Most of this knowledge comes from pathogenic mutations within the S4-S5 linker that alter TRP channel activities. This knowledge has stimulated forward genetic approaches to identify additional residues around this region which are essential for channel gating and is supported, in part, by recent structures obtained for TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV6, TRPA1, and TRPP2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Movement as utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couton, Philippe; López, José Julián

    2009-10-01

    Opposition to utopianism on ontological and political grounds has seemingly relegated it to a potentially dangerous form of antiquated idealism. This conclusion is based on a restrictive view of utopia as excessively ordered panoptic discursive constructions. This overlooks the fact that, from its inception, movement has been central to the utopian tradition. The power of utopianism indeed resides in its ability to instantiate the tension between movement and place that has marked social transformations in the modern era. This tension continues in contemporary discussions of movement-based social processes, particularly international migration and related identity formations, such as open borders transnationalism and cosmopolitanism. Understood as such, utopia remains an ongoing and powerful, albeit problematic instrument of social and political imagination.

  2. Niflumic acid alters gating of HCN2 pacemaker channels by interaction with the outer region of S4 voltage sensing domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lan; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2009-05-01

    Niflumic acid, 2-[[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (NFA), is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modifies the gating of many ion channels. Here, we investigated the effects of NFA on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) pacemaker channels expressed in X. laevis oocytes using site-directed mutagenesis and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Extracellular NFA acted rapidly and caused a slowing of activation and deactivation and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of HCN2 channel activation (-24.5 +/- 1.2 mV at 1 mM). Slowed channel gating and reduction of current magnitude was marked in oocytes treated with NFA, while clamped at 0 mV but minimal in oocytes clamped at -100 mV, indicating the drug preferentially interacts with channels in the closed state. NFA at 0.1 to 3 mM shifted the half-point for channel activation in a concentration-dependent manner, with an EC(50) of 0.54 +/- 0.068 mM and a predicted maximum shift of -38 mV. NFA at 1 mM also reduced maximum HCN2 conductance by approximately 20%, presumably by direct block of the pore. The rapid onset and state-dependence of NFA-induced changes in channel gating suggests an interaction with the extracellular region of the S4 transmembrane helix, the primary voltage-sensing domain of HCN2. Neutralization (by mutation to Gln) of any three of the outer four basic charged residues in S4, but not single mutations, abrogated the NFA-induced shift in channel activation. We conclude that NFA alters HCN2 gating by interacting with the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor domains.

  3. Movement Without Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Fortuna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Johnson Simon, an artist based in West Palm Beach, FL, provided the cover art for the Fall 2017 edition of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy (OJOT. “Dancing in Motion” is a 36” x 60” painting made from acrylic on canvas. Johnson always wanted to become a dancer. He was born with cerebral palsy, and therefore physical limitations make it difficult for Johnson to coordinate his body movements. Through use of vibrant colors and bold strokes, Johnson’s expressionist paintings evoke movement and motion. Occupational therapy helped Johnson discover his artistic abilities. Painting empowered him to move without limitations

  4. Disorders of Upper Limb Movements in Ataxia-Telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasef G Shaikh

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia is known for cerebellar degeneration, but clinical descriptions of abnormal tone, posture, and movements suggest involvement of the network between cerebellum and basal ganglia. We quantitatively assessed the nature of upper-limb movement disorders in ataxia-telangiectasia. We used a three-axis accelerometer to assess the natural history and severity of abnormal upper-limb movements in 80 ataxia-telangiectasia and 19 healthy subjects. Recordings were made during goal-directed movements of upper limb (kinetic task, while arms were outstretched (postural task, and at rest. Almost all ataxia-telangiectasia subjects (79/80 had abnormal involuntary movements, such as rhythmic oscillations (tremor, slow drifts (dystonia or athetosis, and isolated rapid movements (dystonic jerks or myoclonus. All patients with involuntary movements had both kinetic and postural tremor, while 48 (61% also had resting tremor. The tremor was present in transient episodes lasting several seconds during two-minute recording sessions of all three conditions. Percent time during which episodic tremor was present was greater for postural and kinetic tasks compared to rest. Resting tremor had higher frequency but smaller amplitude than postural and kinetic tremor. Rapid non-rhythmic movements were minimal during rest, but were triggered during sustained arm postures and goal directed arm movements suggesting they are best considered a form of dystonic jerks or action myoclonus. Advancing age did not correlate with the severity of involuntary limb movements. Abnormal upper-limb movements in ataxia-telangiectasia feature classic cerebellar impairment, but also suggest involvement of the network between the cerebellum and basal ganglia.

  5. A movement ecology paradigm for unifying organismal movement research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Ran; Getz, Wayne M.; Revilla, Eloy; Holyoak, Marcel; Kadmon, Ronen; Saltz, David; Smouse, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    Movement of individual organisms is fundamental to life, quilting our planet in a rich tapestry of phenomena with diverse implications for ecosystems and humans. Movement research is both plentiful and insightful, and recent methodological advances facilitate obtaining a detailed view of individual movement. Yet, we lack a general unifying paradigm, derived from first principles, which can place movement studies within a common context and advance the development of a mature scientific discipline. This introductory article to the Movement Ecology Special Feature proposes a paradigm that integrates conceptual, theoretical, methodological, and empirical frameworks for studying movement of all organisms, from microbes to trees to elephants. We introduce a conceptual framework depicting the interplay among four basic mechanistic components of organismal movement: the internal state (why move?), motion (how to move?), and navigation (when and where to move?) capacities of the individual and the external factors affecting movement. We demonstrate how the proposed framework aids the study of various taxa and movement types; promotes the formulation of hypotheses about movement; and complements existing biomechanical, cognitive, random, and optimality paradigms of movement. The proposed framework integrates eclectic research on movement into a structured paradigm and aims at providing a basis for hypothesis generation and a vehicle facilitating the understanding of the causes, mechanisms, and spatiotemporal patterns of movement and their role in various ecological and evolutionary processes. ”Now we must consider in general the common reason for moving with any movement whatever.“ (Aristotle, De Motu Animalium, 4th century B.C.) PMID:19060196

  6. Holographic microstate counting for AdS4 black holes in massive IIA supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Morteza; Hristov, Kiril; Passias, Achilleas

    2017-10-01

    We derive the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy for a class of BPS black holes in the massive type IIA supergravity background AdS4 × S 6 from a microscopic counting of supersymmetric ground states in a holographically dual field theory. The counting is performed by evaluating the topologically twisted index of three-dimensional N=2 Chern-Simons-matter gauge theories in the large N limit. The I-extremization principle is shown to match the attractor mechanism for the near-horizon geometries constructed in the four-dimensional dyonic N=2 gauged supergravity, that arises as a consistent truncation of massive type IIA supergravity on S 6. In particular, our results prove that the imaginary part of the three-dimensional partition functions plays a crucial rôle in holography.

  7. Hybrid Functional Study of Sodium and Potassium Incorporation in Cu2ZnSnS4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Kin Fai; Wong, Manhoi; Zhang, Yiou; Zhang, Jingzhao; Zhu, Junyi

    The thermodynamics of Na and K incorporation and its effects in Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is studied using density functional theory with hybrid functional. The allowed chemical potential of Na/K in CZTS is established. Formation energy calculations shows that Na can be significantly incorporated as both substitutional defects and interstitial defects, and incorporation of K related defects are generally less favorable. Transition energy calculations is performed showing that both Na and K exhibit benign defect properties and act as a p-type dopant. The qualitative disagreement between GGA with rigid band edge shifting and HSE calculations, formation of defect complexes, and implications in experiment will also be discussed. The understandings on the defect properties of Na and K provides an essential knowledge to further understand the surfactant effects of Na and K observed in experiments. This work is supported by General Research Fund Ref. No: 14319416.

  8. Neutrino mixing and leptonic CP violation from S 4 flavour and generalised CP symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penedo, J. T.; Petcov, S. T.; Titov, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    We consider a class of models of neutrino mixing with S 4 lepton flavour symmetry combined with a generalised CP symmetry, which are broken to residual Z 2 and Z 2 × H CP ν symmetries in the charged lepton and neutrino sectors, respectively, H CP ν being a remnant CP symmetry of the neutrino Majorana mass term. In this set-up the neutrino mixing angles and CP violation (CPV) phases of the neutrino mixing matrix depend on three real parameters — two angles and a phase. We classify all phenomenologically viable mixing patterns and derive predictions for the Dirac and Majorana CPV phases. Further, we use the results obtained on the neutrino mixing angles and leptonic CPV phases to derive predictions for the effective Majorana mass in neutrinoless double beta decay.

  9. Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanoparticle Absorber Layers for Thin-Film Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Sara Lena Josefin

    In the search for a new material for solar cells, the quaternary chalcogenide copper zinc tin sulde (Cu2ZnSnS4 or CZTS) is one potential candidate. It is abundant, environmentally-friendly, inexpensive, and presently it has a mediocre record effciency of around 10% with potential to reach above 15......%. This thesis is a part of the work done in making the prospects of solutionprocessed CZTS more fruitful. In addition to an inexpensive material, a cheap production pathway is also required for the material to be suitable for solar cells of the future. Solution-processing comprises either a nanoparticle ink...... or a precursor ink that can be printed, sprayed, or in another way coated on a substrate appropriate for mass production. For CZTS, the power conversion effciency of these device are lagging behind the vacuum processed CZTS thin films, as certain challenges arise with solution-processing. The conversion...

  10. Dilute Magnetic Semiconductor Cu2FeSnS4 Nanocrystals with a Novel Zincblende Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diluted magnetic semiconductor Cu2FeSnS4 nanocrystals with a novel zincblende structure have been successfully synthesized by a hot-injection approach. Cu+, Fe2+, and Sn4+ ions occupy the same position in the zincblende unit cell, and their occupancy possibilities are 1/2, 1/4, and 1/4, respectively. The nanocrystals were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED, energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy. The nanocrystals have an average size of 7.5 nm and a band gap of 1.1 eV and show a weak ferromagnetic behavior at low temperature.

  11. [Ratification of UE 4.4 S4 "simulated blood transfusion": inquiry and answers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaud, J-J; Fournier-Prud'Homme, C; Couto, L; Lepleux, F; Male, F; Novel, C; Sandrin, M-C; Zamboni, M-A

    2012-11-01

    The new training reference guide related to state registered degree has been applied since 31 July 2009. Training and valuation projects developed by nurse training institutes have been amended to comply with learning concept: understanding-action-transfer. Validation of grade 4.4 S4 is part of competence 4 validation "implementation of actions related to diagnostic and therapy". The requirement for all students to ratify simulated transfusion lead teachers to update their knowledge and to be more committed to knowledge acquisition. To complete its work, the research and quality control department of the French Transfusion Company regarding the result of the national 2011 inquiry, proposes in relation with the National Transfusion Institute to provide the professional network with tools and supports making knowledge exchanges and experience sharing easier. The reference transfusional teaching guide updating intended to training institutes is being carried out and considered as a priority. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimization study for the experimental configuration of CMB-S4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Darcy; Chinone, Yuji; Kusaka, Akito; Borril, Julian; Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen; Ferraro, Simone; Keskitalo, Reijo; Lee, Adrian T.; Roe, Natalie A.; Sherwin, Blake D.; Suzuki, Aritoki

    2018-02-01

    The CMB Stage 4 (CMB-S4) experiment is a next-generation, ground-based experiment that will measure the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization to unprecedented accuracy, probing the signature of inflation, the nature of cosmic neutrinos, relativistic thermal relics in the early universe, and the evolution of the universe. CMB-S4 will consist of O(500,000) photon-noise-limited detectors that cover a wide range of angular scales in order to probe the cosmological signatures from both the early and late universe. It will measure a wide range of microwave frequencies to cleanly separate the CMB signals from galactic and extra-galactic foregrounds. To advance the progress towards designing the instrument for CMB-S4, we have established a framework to optimize the instrumental configuration to maximize its scientific output. The framework combines cost and instrumental models with a cosmology forecasting tool, and evaluates the scientific sensitivity as a function of various instrumental parameters. The cost model also allows us to perform the analysis under a fixed-cost constraint, optimizing for the scientific output of the experiment given finite resources. In this paper, we report our first results from this framework, using simplified instrumental and cost models. We have primarily studied two classes of instrumental configurations: arrays of large-aperture telescopes with diameters ranging from 2–10 m, and hybrid arrays that combine small-aperture telescopes (0.5-m diameter) with large-aperture telescopes. We explore performance as a function of telescope aperture size, distribution of the detectors into different microwave frequencies, survey strategy and survey area, low-frequency noise performance, and balance between small and large aperture telescopes for hybrid configurations. Both types of configurations must cover both large (~ degree) and small (~ arcmin) angular scales, and the performance depends on assumptions for performance vs. angular scale

  13. Managing Movement as Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrell, Sinead

    2011-01-01

    The associate director of education at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago recounts her learning and teaching through managing the Movement as Partnership program. Included are detailed descriptions of encounters with teachers and students as they create choreography reflective of their inquiry into integrating dance and literacy arts curriculum in the…

  14. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Ambar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychogenic movement Disorders (PMD may result from somatoform disorders, factitious disorders, malingering, depression anxiety disorders and less frequently, histrionic personality disorders. First recognized by Henry Head in early twentieth century, PMD s commonly encountered and clues to their differentiation from organic disease. A generally accepted management protocol has been outlined.

  15. Rhythm Training through Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveire, Janine H.

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that string playing, rhythm, pitch, and tone quality are all dependent on the movement and coordination of the player. Presents a rhythmic focus lesson plan for students who need improvement in rhythm skills. Includes a lesson plan diagram and suggested teacher resources. (CFR)

  16. Material and Affective Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén

    2014-01-01

    . The chapter traces the former pupil’s memories of physical and affective movements within the larger context of school and discovers surprisingly diverse modes of knowing, relating, and attending to things, teachers and classmates among and between the three generations. It thus taps into the rich realms...

  17. The Mastery of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Rudolf; Ullmann, Lisa

    In this third edition, some amendments and additions have been made to the original text, first published in 1950. As in past editions, the relationship between the inner motivation of movement and the outer functioning of the body is explored. Acting and dancing are shown as activities deeply concerned with man's urge to establish values and…

  18. [Architecture and movement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivallan, Armel

    2012-01-01

    Leading an architectural project means accompanying the movement which it induces within the teams. Between questioning, uncertainty and fear, the organisational changes inherent to the new facility must be subject to constructive and ongoing exchanges. Ethics, safety and training are revised and the unit projects are sometimes modified.

  19. Music, Movement, and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper's premise is that music, movement, and poetry are unique and creative methods to be used by the counselor in working with both children and adults. Through these media, the counselor generates material for the counseling session that may not be available through more traditional "talk therapies." The choice of music as a counseling…

  20. Editorial: Body Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Assuncao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, the juxtaposition between physical bodies and the gameworld is ever more fluid. Virtual Reality headsets are available at game stores with more AAA games being created for the format. The release of the Nintendo Switch and its dynamic JoyCon controllers reintroduce haptic movement based controls.  Pokémon GO’s augmented reality took gamers outdoors and has encouraged the Harry Potter franchise to follow in its mobile footsteps. Each development encourages a step further into the digital world. At the same time, the movement of bodies always has political dimensions. We live in a world where walls seem like solutions to the movement of bodies, while the mere meeting of bodies elsewhere – for sex, marriage and other reasons – is still forbidden by many states’ rules. Games and game-like interfaces have shown the ability to bend those rules, and to sometimes project other worlds and rule systems over our world in order to make bodies move and meet. For this special issue on ‘Body Movements’, Press Start invited authors to focus on embodiment, body movements, political bodies, community bodies, virtual bodies, physical bodies, feminine, masculine, trans- bodies, agency or its lack, and anything else in between. The response to this invitation was variegated, and provocative, as outlined here.

  1. Studying Social Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie; McCurdy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    and then draws specific links to how the method has been used in the study of activism and social movements. In doing so, this article brings together key academic debates on participant observation, which have been considered separately, such as insider/outsider and overt/covert, but not previously been brought...

  2. Measuring Facial Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  3. Effects of indium contents on photocatalytic performance of ZnIn2S4 for hydrogen evolution under visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kelin; Zhu, Rongshu; Tian, Fei; Cao, Gang; Ouyang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    A series of ZnInxS4+y (x=1.6, 2.0, 2.3, 2.6, 2.9, 3.1) photocatalysts were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method and characterized by various analytical techniques, such as XRD, EDS, UV-vis DRS, SEM, TEM, BET and PL. The ZnInxS4+y photocatalysts had a similar crystal structure. With the increase of indium content, the absorption edges of ZnInxS4+y photocatalysts shifted to longer wavelength, their crystal sizes decreased firstly and then increased and the variation of the specific surface area and total pore volume was exactly opposite. Especially, when x=2.3, ZnIn2.3S4+y catalyst had smallest crystal size, largest specific surface area and total pore volume. Additionally, the morphology of ZnInxS4+y greatly depended on the contents of indium. The photocatalytic activity of ZnInxS4+y was evaluated by photocatalytic hydrogen production from water under visible light. The ZnIn2.3S4+y sample had the highest photocatalytic activity among these ZnInxS4+y photocatalysts and its hydrogen production rate was 363 μmol/g h.

  4. Cascading gauge theory on dS4 and String Theory landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchel, Alex; Galante, Damián A.

    2014-06-01

    Placing anti-D3 branes at the tip of the conifold in Klebanov-Strassler geometry provides a generic way of constructing meta-stable de Sitter (dS) vacua in String Theory. A local geometry of such vacua exhibit gravitational solutions with a D3 charge measured at the tip opposite to the asymptotic charge. We discuss a restrictive set of such geometries, where anti-D3 branes are smeared at the tip. Such geometries represent holographic dual of cascading gauge theory in dS4 with or without chiral symmetry breaking. We find that in the phase with unbroken chiral symmetry the D3 charge at the tip is always positive. Furthermore, this charge is zero in the phase with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. We show that the effective potential of the chirally symmetric phase is lower than that in the symmetry broken phase, i.e., there is no spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking for cascading gauge theory in dS4. The positivity of the D3 brane charge in smooth de-Sitter deformed conifold geometries with fluxes presents difficulties in uplifting AdS vacua to dS ones in String Theory via smeared anti-D3 branes. First, turning on fluxes on Calabi-Yau compactifications of type IIB string theory produces highly warped geometry with stabilized complex structure (but not Kähler) moduli of the compactification [3]; Next, including non-perturbative effects (which are under control given the unbroken supersymmetry), one obtains anti-de Sitter (AdS4) vacua with all moduli fixed; Finally, one uses anti-D3 branes of type IIB string theory to uplift AdS4 to de Sitter (dS4) vacua. As the last step of the construction completely breaks supersymmetry, it is much less controlled. In fact, in [4-7] it was argued that putting anti-D3 branes at the tip of the Klebanov-Strassler (KS) [8] geometry (as done in KKLT construction) leads to a naked singularity. Whether or not the resulting singularity is physical is subject to debates. When M4=dS4 and the chiral symmetry is unbroken, the D3 brane

  5. Neuromuscular Control of Rapid Linear Accelerations in Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    fish : Final Report Eric D. Tytell Department of Biology , Tufts University, eric.tytell@tufts.edu Abstract In this project, we measured muscle... important aspects of how rapid movements are controlled, but will have to be done using a negative stimulus such as a object accelerating toward the fish ...sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus. Animals with flexible bodies, like fishes , face a tradeoff for rapid movements. To produce high forces, they must

  6. Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured Fe3S4, an isostructural compound of half-metallic Fe3O4

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2015-06-10

    High-purity, well-crystallized spinel Fe3S4 nanoplatelets were synthesized by the hydrothermal method, and the saturation magnetic moment of Fe3S4 was measured at 1.83 μB/f.u. The temperature-dependent resistivity of Fe3S4 was metallic-like for T < 180 K: room-temperature resistivity was measured at 7.711 × 103  μΩ cm. The anomalous Hall conductivity of Fe3S4 decreased with increasing longitudinal conductivity, in sharp contrast with the accepted theory of the anomalous Hall effect in a dirty-metal regime. Furthermore, negligible spin-dependent magnetoresistance was observed. Band structure calculations confirmed our experimental observations that Fe3S4 is a metal and not a half metal as expected.

  7. Movement: A Clinical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Dalaie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: One major drawback of orthodontic treatment is its long duration due to slow tooth movement and the pain at the onset of treatment following application of forces. There is controversy regarding the efficacy of laser for decreasing the treatment time and pain of orthodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low level diode laser on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and the associated pain.Materials and Methods: In this double blind randomized controlled clinical trial, 12 or- thodontic patients referring to Shahid Beheshti School of Dentistry for first premolar ex- traction were randomly selected and allocated to gallium aluminum-arsenide laser (Ga,Al,As diode laser, 880 nm, 100 mW, 5 j/cm2, 8 points, 80 seconds, continuous mode or control group. The patients initially underwent leveling and alignment using the sectional system. Force (150 gr was applied to each canine tooth via sectional closing loops. The loops were activated every month. The rate of tooth movement and pain were monitored over the treatment period and recorded on days 1, 3, 7, 30, 33, 37, 60, 63 and 67. Two-way ANOVA was used for comparison of groups.Results: There was no significant difference in terms of tooth movement and pain scores between the irradiated and non-irradiated sides at any time point (P>0.05.Conclusion: Although laser enhanced orthodontic tooth movement in the upper jaw, we failed to provide solid evidence to support the efficacy of laser for expediting tooth move- ment or reducing the associated pain.

  8. Visible light responsive Cu2MoS4 nanosheets incorporated reduced graphene oxide for efficient degradation of organic pollutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameshbabu, R.; Vinoth, R.; Navaneethan, M.; Harish, S.; Hayakawa, Y.; Neppolian, B.

    2017-10-01

    Visible light active copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu2MoS4) nanosheets were successfully anchored on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using facile hydrothermal method. During the hydrothermal reaction, reduction of graphene oxide into rGO and the formation of Cu2MoS4 nanosheets were successfully obtained. The charge transfer interaction between the rGO sheets and Cu2MoS4 nanosheets extended the absorption to visible region in comparison with bare Cu2MoS4 nanosheets i.e without rGO sheets. Furthermore, the notable photoluminescence quenching observed for Cu2MoS4/rGO nanocomposite revealed the effective role of rGO towards the significant inhibition of electron-hole pair recombination. The photocatalytic efficiencies of bare Cu2MoS4 and Cu2MoS4/rGO nanocomposite was evaluated for the degradation of methyl orange dye under visible irradiation (λ > 420 nm). A maximum photodegradation efficiency of 99% was achieved for Cu2MoS4/rGO nanocomposite, while only 64% photodegradation was noted for bare Cu2MoS4. The enhanced optical absorption in visible region, high surface area, and low charge carrier recombination in the presence of rGO sheets were the main reasons for the enhancement in photodegardation of MO dye. In addition, the resultant Cu2MoS4/rGO nanocomposite was found to be reusable for five successive cycles without significant loss in its photocatalytic performance.

  9. Eye movements in depth to visual illusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wismeijer, D. A.

    2009-10-01

    We perceive the three-dimensional (3D) environment that surrounds us with deceptive effortlessness. In fact, we are far from comprehending how the visual system provides us with this stable perception of the (3D) world around us. This thesis will focus on the interplay between visual perception of depth and its closely related action system, eye movements in depth. The human visual system is comprised of a sensory (input) and an output (motor) system. Processed information from the sensory system can result in two explicit measurable response types: conscious visual perception and ocular motor behavior. It is still a matter of debate whether conscious visual perception and action (including hand- and arm-movements) use the same information or whether the visual system has separate channels processing information for perception and action. In this thesis, we study (1) if separate channels, one for eye movements and one for conscious visual perception, indeed exist, and (2) if so, if there is a direct input from the perceptual pathway to the motor pathway. Assuming that either eye movements and conscious visual perception are based on information from a common source (a negative answer to issue 1) or perception can directly influence, or guide, eye movements (an affirmative answer to research question 2), (eye) movements reflect our conscious visual perception. If so, eye movements could provide us with an alternative method to probe our conscious visual perception, making explicit perceptual reports superfluous. In this thesis we focus on depth perception and the two types of eye movements that are closest related to depth perception, namely vergence (an eye movement that gets a certain depth plane into focus) and saccades (a rapid eye movement to change gaze direction). Over the last 20 years it has been shown that depth perception is based on a weighted combination of depth cues available such as linear perspective, occlusion and binocular disparity. How eye

  10. Overlap of movement planning and movement execution reduces reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban de Xivry, Jean-Jacques; Legrain, Valéry; Lefèvre, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Motor planning is the process of preparing the appropriate motor commands in order to achieve a goal. This process has largely been thought to occur before movement onset and traditionally has been associated with reaction time. However, in a virtual line bisection task we observed an overlap between movement planning and execution. In this task performed with a robotic manipulandum, we observed that participants (n = 30) made straight movements when the line was in front of them (near target) but often made curved movements when the same target was moved sideways (far target, which had the same orientation) in such a way that they crossed the line perpendicular to its orientation. Unexpectedly, movements to the far targets had shorter reaction times than movements to the near targets (mean difference: 32 ms, SE: 5 ms, max: 104 ms). In addition, the curvature of the movement modulated reaction time. A larger increase in movement curvature from the near to the far target was associated with a larger reduction in reaction time. These highly curved movements started with a transport phase during which accuracy demands were not taken into account. We conclude that an accuracy demand imposes a reaction time penalty if processed before movement onset. This penalty is reduced if the start of the movement consists of a transport phase and if the movement plan can be refined with respect to accuracy demands later in the movement, hence demonstrating an overlap between movement planning and execution. In the planning of a movement, the brain has the opportunity to delay the incorporation of accuracy requirements of the motor plan in order to reduce the reaction time by up to 100 ms (average: 32 ms). Such shortening of reaction time is observed here when the first phase of the movement consists of a transport phase. This forces us to reconsider the hypothesis that motor plans are fully defined before movement onset. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Shared bimanual tasks elicit bimanual reflexes during movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutha, Pratik K; Sainburg, Robert L

    2009-12-01

    Previous research has suggested distinct predictive and reactive control mechanisms for bimanual movements compared with unimanual motion. Recent studies have extended these findings by demonstrating that movement corrections during bimanual movements might differ depending on whether or not the task is shared between the arms. We hypothesized that corrective responses during shared bimanual tasks recruit bilateral rapid feedback mechanisms such as reflexes. We tested this hypothesis by perturbing one arm as subjects performed uni- and bimanual movements. Movements were made in a virtual-reality environment in which hand position was displayed as a cursor on a screen. During bimanual motion, we provided cursor feedback either independently for each arm (independent-cursor) or such that one cursor was placed at the average location between the arms (shared-cursor). On random trials, we applied a 40 N force pulse to the right arm 100 ms after movement onset. Our results show that while reflex responses were rapidly elicited in the perturbed arm, electromyographic activity remained close to baseline levels in the unperturbed arm during the independent-cursor trials. In contrast, when the cursor was shared between the arms, reflex responses were reduced in the perturbed arm and were rapidly elicited in the unperturbed arm. Our results thus suggest that when both arms contribute to achieving the task goal, reflex responses are bilaterally elicited in response to unilateral perturbations. These results agree with and extend recent suggestions that bimanual feedback control might be modified depending on task context.

  12. Paroxysmal eye-head movements in Glut1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Toni S; Pons, Roser; Engelstad, Kristin; Kane, Steven A; Goldberg, Michael E; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2017-04-25

    To describe a characteristic paroxysmal eye-head movement disorder that occurs in infants with Glut1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS). We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 101 patients with Glut1 DS to obtain clinical data about episodic abnormal eye movements and analyzed video recordings of 18 eye movement episodes from 10 patients. A documented history of paroxysmal abnormal eye movements was found in 32/101 patients (32%), and a detailed description was available in 18 patients, presented here. Episodes started before age 6 months in 15/18 patients (83%), and preceded the onset of seizures in 10/16 patients (63%) who experienced both types of episodes. Eye movement episodes resolved, with or without treatment, by 6 years of age in 7/8 patients with documented long-term course. Episodes were brief (usually eye movements were rapid, multidirectional, and often accompanied by a head movement in the same direction. Eye movements were separated by clear intervals of fixation, usually ranging from 200 to 800 ms. The movements were consistent with eye-head gaze saccades. These movements can be distinguished from opsoclonus by the presence of a clear intermovement fixation interval and the association of a same-direction head movement. Paroxysmal eye-head movements, for which we suggest the term aberrant gaze saccades, are an early symptom of Glut1 DS in infancy. Recognition of the episodes will facilitate prompt diagnosis of this treatable neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Root growth movements: waving and skewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Rahul; Bassham, Diane C

    2014-05-01

    Roots anchor a plant in the soil, acquire nutrition and respond to environmental cues. Roots perform these functions using intricate movements and a variety of pathways have been implicated in mediating their growth patterns. These include endogenous genetic factors, perception of multiple environmental stimuli, signaling pathways interacting with hormonal dynamics and cellular processes of rapid cell elongation. In this review we attempt to consolidate our understanding of two specific types of root movements, waving and skewing, that arise on the surface of growth media, and how they are regulated by various genes and factors. These include crucial factors that are part of a complex nexus of processes including polar auxin transport and cytoskeletal dynamics. This knowledge can be extrapolated in the future for engineering plants with root architecture better suited for different soil and growth conditions such as abiotic stresses or even extended spaceflight. Technological innovations and interdisciplinary approaches promise to allow the tracking of root movements on a much finer scale, thus helping to expedite the discovery of more nodes in the regulation of root waving and skewing and movement in general. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mindfulness-Based Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Alexander R; Klepin, Heidi D; Porges, Stephen W; Rejeski, W Jack

    2016-12-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that physical activity is an effective intervention for cancer survivors, including for those undergoing active cancer treatments. However, to date most evidence has emerged from interventions that have promoted moderate to vigorous physical activity. In this conceptual review, we argue that attention should be given to the entire continuum of physical activity from reducing sedentary behavior to increasing higher levels of physical activity when possible. In addition, considerable evidence in the cancer literature supports the value of mindfulness-based interventions as a means of helping patients and survivors cope with the variety of threats that accompany this disease. Based on the success of these two areas of research, we argue for conceptualizing and promoting physical activity as Mindfulness-Based Movement, using Polyvagal Theory as a theoretical framework to understand the role and value of Mindfulness-Based Movement as a potential intervention for cancer care and control.

  15. [Neuropsychiatry Of Movement Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orjuela-Rojas, Juan Manuel; Barrios Vincos, Gustavo Adolfo; Martínez Gallego, Melisa Alejandra

    2017-10-01

    Movement disorders can be defined as neurological syndromes presenting with excessive or diminished automatic or voluntary movements not related to weakness or spasticity. Both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD) are well-known examples of these syndromes. The high prevalence of comorbid psychiatric symptoms like depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, hallucinations, delusions, impulsivity, sleep disorders, apathy and cognitive impairment mean that these conditions must be regarded as neuropsychiatric diseases. In this article, we review neuroanatomical (structural and functional), psychopathological and neuropsychological aspects of PD and HD. The role of fronto-subcortical loops in non-motor functions is particularly emphasised in order to understand the clinical spectrum of both diseases, together with the influence of genetic, psychological and psychosocial aspects. A brief description of the main psychopharmacological approaches for both diseases is also included. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Studying frozen movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy White

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of Spyros Papapetros, On the Animation of the Inorganic: Art, Architecture, and the Extension of Life: Spyros Papapetros examines ideas about simulated movement and inorganic life during and after the turn of the twentieth century. Exploring works of a selection of important art historians as well as artists and architects of the period, the author maintains that the ability to identify with material objects was repressed by modernist culture, and yet found expression stylistically through depictions of inorganic forms. That expression is shown to have continuity with older medieval and renaissance depictions. The book is organized by a narrative that evokes the modes of inquiry documented and critiqued by the content of the book, employing movement as a narrative device, a metaphor, while serving as a subject of inquiry.

  17. Tumor microenvironmental changes induced by the sulfamate carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitor S4 in a laryngeal tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tineke W H Meijer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX plays a pivotal role in pH homeostasis, which is essential for tumor cell survival. We examined the effect of the CAIX inhibitor 4-(3'(3",5"-dimethylphenyl-ureidophenyl sulfamate (S4 on the tumor microenvironment in a laryngeal tumor model by analyzing proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, hypoxia, metabolism and CAIX ectodomain shedding. METHODS: SCCNij202 tumor bearing-mice were treated with S4 for 1, 3 or 5 days. CAIX ectodomain shedding was measured in the serum after therapy. Effects on tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, hypoxia (pimonidazole and CAIX were investigated with quantitative immunohistochemistry. Metabolic transporters and enzymes were quantified with qPCR. RESULTS: CAIX ectodomain shedding decreased after treatment with S4 (p<0.01. S4 therapy did neither influence tumor cell proliferation nor the amount of apoptosis and necrosis. Hypoxia (pimonidazole and CAIX expression were also not affected by S4. CHOP and MMP9 mRNA as a reference of intracellular pH did not change upon treatment with S4. Compensatory mechanisms of pH homeostasis at the mRNA level were not observed. CONCLUSION: As the clinical and biological meaning of the decrease in CAIX ectodomain shedding after S4 therapy is not clear, studies are required to elucidate whether the CAIX ectodomain has a paracrine or autocrine signaling function in cancer biology. S4 did not influence the amount of proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis and hypoxia. Therefore, it is unlikely that S4 can be used as single agent to influence tumor cell kill and proliferation, and to target primary tumor growth.

  18. UAVs and Patient Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    space.”62 UAVs were initially utilized for intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance , and targeting missions.63 However, UAVs are now being designed...AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY UAVs and PATIENT MOVEMENT by Brian R Blanchard, Major, USAF Doctor...time to care for wounded Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines lies in the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles ( UAVs ) for patient transport. An

  19. Confronting Islamic Jihadist Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Afzal Upal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that in order to win the long-term fight against Islamic Jihadist movements, we must confront their ideological foundations and provide the majority of Muslims with an alternative narrative that satisfies their social identity needs for a positive esteem.  By analysing social identity dynamics of Western-Muslim interactions, this paper presents some novel ideas that can lead to the creation of such a narrative.

  20. Monitoring underground movements

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    On 16 September 2015 at 22:54:33 (UTC), an 8.3-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of Chile. 11,650 km away, at CERN, a new-generation instrument – the Precision Laser Inclinometer (PLI) – recorded the extreme event. The PLI is being tested by a JINR/CERN/ATLAS team to measure the movements of underground structures and detectors.   The Precision Laser Inclinometer during assembly. The instrument has proven very accurate when taking measurements of the movements of underground structures at CERN.    The Precision Laser Inclinometer is an extremely sensitive device capable of monitoring ground angular oscillations in a frequency range of 0.001-1 Hz with a precision of 10-10 rad/Hz1/2. The instrument is currently installed in one of the old ISR transfer tunnels (TT1) built in 1970. However, its final destination could be the ATLAS cavern, where it would measure and monitor the fine movements of the underground structures, which can affect the precise posi...

  1. Movement Disorders and Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A. Shipton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are neurological conditions affecting speed, fluency, quality, and ease of movement. Deep brain stimulation (DBS is used to treat advanced Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. Possible target sites for DBS include the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus, the globus pallidus internus, and the subthalamic nucleus. High-frequency DBS leads to a kind of functional deafferentation of the stimulated structure and to the modulation of cortical activity. This has a profound effect on the efficiency of movement. Indications for the use of DBS include the need to improve function, reduce medication dependency, and avoid ablative neurosurgery. Appropriate patient selection is critical for success. The implantation technique is briefly described. Programming stimulation parameters are performed via telemetry. The adverse effects of DBS are discussed. The future should see the development of “closed-loop” systems. Its use has promoted interdisciplinary team work and provided an improved understanding of the complex neurocircuitry associated with these disorders. DBS is a highly effective, safe, and reversible surgical treatment for advanced Parkinson’s disease, tremor, and dystonia. It is a useful therapeutic option in carefully selected patients that significantly improves motor symptoms, functional status, and quality of life.

  2. Synthesis of CdIn2S4 Microsphere and Its Photocatalytic Activity for Azo Dye Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CdIn2S4 was prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The prepared CdIn2S4 was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS, and N2-sorption techniques. Aqueous photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the decomposition of methyl orange under visible light irradiation. The results indicate that the prepared CdIn2S4 has spherical morphology with mesoporous structure which can efficiently degrade methyl orange in water. The sample prepared at 500°C exhibits the optimized photocatalytic activity.

  3. Synthesis of CdIn 2 S 4 Microsphere and Its Photocatalytic Activity for Azo Dye Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jianhui; Lin, Wei; Chen, Jianqin

    2014-01-01

    CdIn2S4 was prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The prepared CdIn2S4 was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS), and N2-sorption techniques. Aqueous photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the decomposition of methyl orange under visible light irradiation. The results indicate that the prepared CdIn2S4 has spherical morphology with mesopo...

  4. Exceptional $N=6$ and $N=2 AdS_4$ Supergravity, and Zero-Center Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianopoli, L; Ferrara, Sergio; Grassi, P A; Trigiante, M

    2009-01-01

    We study the gauging of the orthosymplectic algebras OSp(6|4)xSO(2) and its "dual" OSp(2|4)x SO(6), both based on supergravities with the same exceptional coset SO*(12)/U(6), and gauge group SO(6)xSO(2). The two dual theories are obtained by two different truncations of gauged N=8 AdS_4 supergravity. We explicitly study the gauge sector of the two dual theories with the most general group allowed by supersymmetry. In the ungauged (super-Poincar\\'e) case they exhibit the same (large) black-hole attractor solutions with dual relations between the 1/N-BPS and non-BPS configurations. The N=6 gravity multiplet has also the exceptional property to be a {\\em zero-center module} of OSp(6|4), as it is the case for superconformal Yang--Mills theory in four dimensions based on SU(2,2|n) (PSU(2,2|4) for n=4) or OSp(n|4).

  5. Static structures of the BCS-like holographic superfluid in AdS4 spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shanquan; Liu, Wenbiao; Tian, Yu

    2017-03-01

    We investigate in detail the m2=0 Abelian Higgs model in AdS4 , which is considered as the holographic dual of the most BCS-like superfluid. In homogeneous and isotropic superfluid solutions, we calculate the fourth-sound speeds, the square of which approaches 1 /2 with increasing chemical potential (lowering temperature). Then we present the single dark soliton solutions, which becomes thinner with increasing chemical potential. For the first time, we also find the interesting double and triple dark soliton solutions, which is unexpected and shows the possibility of more complicated static configurations. Finally, we investigate vortex solutions. For winding number n =1 , the vortex becomes thinner with increasing chemical potential. At a given chemical potential, with increasing winding number, first the vortex becomes bigger and the charge density depletion becomes larger, and then the charge density depletion settles down at a certain value and the growth of the vortex size is found to obey a scaling symmetry.

  6. Structural, Optical and Electrical Conductivity Properties of Stannite Cu2ZnSnS4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhvalinskii, V. S.; Nguyen, Thi Tham Hong; Pham, Thi Thao; Dang, Ngoc Toan; Piliuk, E. A.; Taran, S. V.

    2017-06-01

    A precursor powder was obtained from drying the solutions of a mixture of different ratios of Cu, Zn and Sn chloride and thiourea. The Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) samples were prepared from thermal decomposition of the corresponding precursors in vacuum, and were then characterized using scanning emission microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray powder diffraction and Raman scattering. According to x-ray diffraction analysis, all the synthesized samples had a tetragonal structure of space group I\\overline{4} 2m. The electrical properties of the CZTS samples were investigated in the temperature range of 10-325 K. The charge carrier concentration was measured to be about p = 1 × 1016 cm-3. A crossover from a nearest-neighbor hopping conduction mechanism at high temperatures ( T > 150 K) to a Mott variable-range hopping conduction mechanism at low temperatures ( T quartz substrates was obtained using magnetron sputtering, for which a band gap of E g = 1.3 eV was determined from transmittance measurements.

  7. FeCr2S4 in magnetic fields: possible evidence for a multiferroic ground state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinshaw, J.; Ulrich, C.; Günther, A.; Schrettle, F.; Wohlauer, M.; Krohns, S.; Reehuis, M.; Studer, A. J.; Avdeev, M.; Quach, D. V.; Groza, J. R.; Tsurkan, V.; Loidl, A.; Deisenhofer, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on neutron diffraction, thermal expansion, magnetostriction, dielectric, and specific heat measurements on polycrystalline FeCr2S4 in external magnetic fields. The ferrimagnetic ordering temperatures TC ≈ 170 K and the transition at TOO ≈ 10 K, which has been associated with orbital ordering, are only weakly shifted in magnetic fields up to 9 T. The cubic lattice parameter is found to decrease when entering the state below TOO. The magnetic moments of the Cr- and Fe-ions are reduced from the spin-only values throughout the magnetically ordered regime, but approach the spin-only values for fields >5.5 T. Thermal expansion in magnetic fields and magnetostriction experiments indicate a contraction of the sample below about 60 K. Below TOO this contraction is followed by a moderate expansion of the sample for fields larger than ~4.5 T. The transition at TOO is accompanied by an anomaly in the dielectric constant. The dielectric constant depends on both the strength and orientation of the external magnetic field with respect to the applied electric field for T magnetic-field-induced change of the dielectric constant and the magnetic-field dependent magnetization is observed. This behaviour is consistent with the existence of a ferroelectric polarization and a multiferroic ground state below 10 K. PMID:25123960

  8. Progress in Thin Film Solar Cells Based on Cu2ZnSnS4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The research in thin film solar cells has been dominated by light absorber materials based on CdTe and Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS in the last several decades. The concerns of environment impact of cadmium and the limited availability of indium in those materials have driven the research towards developing new substitute light absorbers made from earth abundant, environment benign materials. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS semiconductor material has emerged as one of the most promising candidates for this aim and has attracted considerable interest recently. Significant progress in this relatively new research area has been achieved in the last three years. Over 130 papers on CZTS have been published since 2007, and the majority of them are on the preparation of CZTS thin films by different methods. This paper, will review the wide range of techniques that have been used to deposit CZTS semiconductor thin films. The performance of the thin film solar cells using the CZTS material will also be discussed.

  9. Investigating the role of (2S,4R)-4-hydroxyproline in elastin model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Brigida; Laurita, Alessandro; Heinz, Andrea; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Pepe, Antonietta

    2013-12-09

    Post-translational modifications play a key role in defining the biological functions of proteins. Among them, the hydroxylation of proline producing the (2S,4R)-4-hydroxyproline (Hyp) is one of the most frequent modifications observed in vertebrates, being particularly abundant in the proteins of the extracellular matrix. In collagen, hydroxylation of proline plays a critical role, conferring the correct structure and mechanical strength to collagen fibers. In elastin, the exact role of this modification is not yet understood. Here we show that Hyp-containing elastin polypeptides have flexible molecular structures, analogously to proline-containing polypeptides. In turn, the self-assembly of the elastin peptides is significantly altered by the presence of Hyp, evidencing different supramolecular structures. Also the in vitro susceptibility to protease digestion is changed. These findings give a better insight into the elastic fiber formation and degradation processes in the extracellular matrix. Furthermore, our results could contribute in defining the subtle role of proline structural variants in the folding and self-assembly of elastin-inspired peptides, helping the rational design of elastin biomaterials.

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of the semiconductor material Cu2ZnTiS4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Bustos, H. G.; Patarroyo-Mesa, M.; Gómez-Cuaspud, J. A.; Pineda-Triana, Y.; Vera-López, E.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the results of the synthesis and characterization of a quaternary semiconductor based on Cu2ZnTiS4 (abbreviated CZTiS), using a hydrothermal technique. The results confirm that time (24, 48 and 72 hours) and temperature (250, 275, and 300°C) factors, used in synthesis process, regulate different levels of electrical conductivity in these materials. The results of ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV) analysis, confirm the production of semiconductor solids with Band-gap values around 1.4eV, being coherent with a strong absorption in the ultraviolet region. The X-Ray Diffraction analysis (XRD), confirm that there is an opposite and proportional relationship between the crystal sizes, the reaction times and the synthesis temperature. In all cases, the particle sizes were 50-100nm. The results derived from Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), confirm the obtaining of homogenous materials with optimal morphological properties in accordance with synthesis method. Similarly, the composition values derived from the Energy-Dispersion X-ray Spectroscopy analysis (EDS), shown that obtained compositions are in agree with expected values. Finally, the results of electric characterization, confirm that used synthesis parameters show a strong dependence on the conductive behaviour of solids being the most relevant result the shown by the solid obtained at 300°C and 72 hours of reaction in accordance with preliminary works.

  11. DPRK's 4{sup th} Nuclear Test and its Tritium Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Soo; Lee, Sang Joon; Chang, Sun Young [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    On January 6, 2016 at 10:30am, the artificial earthquake in the DPRK was detected by multiple international seismic organizations. After 2 hours, the DPRK announced on state TV that 'The first H-bomb test was successfully conducted in the DPRK at 10:00 am on Wednesday, Juche 105(2016), pursuant to the strategic determination of the ruling communist party.' There has been a doubt about the real nature of the DPRK's 4th nuclear test, since 2 months have been passed after its nuclear test. To analyze the nature of the DPRK's nuclear test, it is necessary to check possible options for production of essential materials. The pathways to produce nuclear fusion material (tritium) and to have a relatively high possibility for the DPRK are described in this article. Tritium is key material for H-bomb. And there are two options for the DPRK which are 1) production and 2) illicit trafficking. And this study is focused on production possibility of DPRK. Determination of the nature of DPRK's nuclear test is very hard issue.

  12. SO(10) × S 4 grand unified theory of flavour and leptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Anda, Francisco J.; King, Stephen F.; Perdomo, Elena

    2017-12-01

    We propose a Grand Unified Theory of Flavour, based on SO(10) together with a non-Abelian discrete group S 4, under which the unified three quark and lepton 16-plets are unified into a single triplet 3'. The model involves a further discrete group ℤ 4 R × ℤ 4 3 which controls the Higgs and flavon symmetry breaking sectors. The CSD2 flavon vacuum alignment is discussed, along with the GUT breaking potential and the doublet-triplet splitting, and proton decay is shown to be under control. The Yukawa matrices are derived in detail, from renormalisable diagrams, and neutrino masses emerge from the type I seesaw mechanism. A full numerical fit is performed with 15 input parameters generating 19 presently constrained observables, taking into account supersymmetry threshold corrections. The model predicts a normal neutrino mass ordering with a CP oscillation phase of 260°, an atmospheric angle in the first octant and neutrinoless double beta decay with m ββ = 11 meV. We discuss N 2 leptogenesis, which fixes the second right-handed neutrino mass to be M 2 ≃ 2 × 1011 GeV, in the natural range predicted by the model.

  13. ZnIn2S4 as a window in heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, O.; Calzadilla, O.; Seuret, D.; Vidal, J.; Leccabue, F.

    1984-07-01

    The physical properties of ZnIn2S5 (n-type) crystals have been investigated experimentally in order to determine the possibility of using them as windows in the preparation of heterojunction solar cells with chalcopyrite compounds as p-type absorbers. The crystals have a high resistivity of between 0.8 and 10 ohms per cm and they were prepared by an annealing process under a high manganese pressure. Optical transmission spectra for the material were obtained for a sample 63 microns thick with a band gap of about 2.34 eV, and a heterojunction was formed by vacuum deposition of CuInSe2 onto ZnIn2S4. Prior to evaporation, the substrates were etched in a 3HCl: 1HNO3 solution and the thin films were deposited by flash evaporation techniques. An analysis of the spectral response of the material showed that it is possible to obtain crystals which are good enough to be used as windows in solar cells. It is recommended that the materials be used in the form of thin films with a resistivity of about 0.1 ohms/c.

  14. Compressibility and polymorphism of α-As4S4 realgar under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuktabiev, M. A.; Popova, S. V.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Lyapin, A. G.; Katayama, Y.

    2009-09-01

    The energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction technique has been employed to study the structure and equation of state of realgar As4S4 under pressures up to 8 GPa at room temperature. We have obtained pressure dependences of the unit cell parameters and volume for the monoclinic structure of realgar. An approximation of the equation of state through the Murnaghan equation gives the bulk modulus and its derivative, B0 = 8.1 ± 0.5 GPa and B0' = 9.0 ± 0.5, respectively. A comparison of the obtained values with the corresponding values for other molecular crystals is drawn and discussed. At a pressure of around 7 GPa, realgar showed a polymorph transition to a new molecular phase with a supposedly orthorhombic structure. Such identification is evidenced by the presence of geometrical correlations between the parameters of the parent monoclinic phase and those of the new phase, and the phase transition is likely to be associated with the removal of a monoclinic distortion in the unit cell.

  15. Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reactions on Nanostructured Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) Electrocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digraskar, Renuka V.; Mulik, Balaji B.; Walke, Pravin S.; Ghule, Anil V.; Sathe, Bhaskar R.

    2017-08-01

    A novel and facile one-step sonochemical method is used to synthesize Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanoparticles (2.6 ± 0.4 nm) as cathode electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reactions. The detailed morphology, crystal and surface structure, and composition of the CZTS nanostructures were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), Selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements, Electron dispersive analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy respectively. Electrocatalytic abilities of the nanoparticles toward Hydrogen Evolution Reactions (HER) were verified through cyclic voltammograms (CV) and Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Tafel polarization measurements. It reveals enhanced activity at lower onset potential 300 mV v/s RHE, achieved at exceptionally high current density -130 mA/cm2, which is higher than the existing non-nobel metal based cathodes. Further result exhibits Tafel slope of 85 mV/dec, exchange current density of 882 mA/cm2, excellent stability (> 500 cycles) and lower charge transfer resistance. This sonochemically fabricated CZTSs nanoparticles are leading to significantly reduce cell cost and simplification of preparation process over existing high efficiency Pt and other nobel metal-free cathode electrocatalyst.

  16. Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Spinal Cord Stimulation Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement Past Issues / Summer ... a lifelong sentence of permanent paralysis." Read More "Spinal Cord Stimulation" Articles Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement / Progress in ...

  17. Human preference for air movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Tynel, A.

    2002-01-01

    Human preference for air movement was studied at slightly cool, neutral, and slightly warm overall thermal sensations and at temperatures ranging from 18 deg.C to 28 deg.C. Air movement preference depended on both thermal sensation and temperature, but large inter-individual differences existed...... between subjects. Preference for less air movement was linearly correlated with draught discomfort, but the percentage of subjects who felt draught was lower than the percentage who preferred less air movement....

  18. Antiglobalization movements and their critics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Antiglobalization movements are transnational social movements that challenge what they perceive as a monolithic global laissez-faire economic regime. From the 1990s, these movements have accused global political and economic networks of delivering too much power to dominant elites at the expense...... of ideological incoherence, self-interested protectionism, and illiberal and undemocratic political methods, and point to Western liberal elite dominance within the movements. The debate has ...

  19. Eye movements when viewing advertisements

    OpenAIRE

    Emily eHiggins; Mallorie eLeinenger; Keith eRayner

    2014-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind ...

  20. Social Movements and Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francisca Pinheiro Coelho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study approaches the relationship between social movements and institutions in Brazil concerning three different stages of the process of re-democratization: the political transition; the National Constituent Assembly; and the new Constitutional Order. The general question is: what is the interface, reciprocity or conflict, between social movements and institutions in this context of social change? The paper examines the different roles of social movements and institutions in each specific period: in the pre-democratization moment, the movement for direct elections for president, Diretas-Já, is analyzed; in the National Constituent Assembly, the movement in defense for free public education is examined;  in the new constitutional order, the pro-reform political movement is studied.  The work focuses on the scope of the studies on social movements and democracy.  It belongs to the field of the studies about the representativeness and legitimacy of the demands of social movements in the context of democracy and its challenges. Key words: social movement, institution, reciprocity, conflict, democracy.   Social Movements and Institutions                               Resumen El estudio aborda la relación entre los movimientos sociales e instituciones en Brasil en tres etapas diferentes del proceso de redemocratización en las últimas décadas: la transición política; la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente; y el nuevo orden constitucional. La pregunta general es: ¿cuál es la relación, la reciprocidad o el conflito, entre los movimientos sociales y las instituciones en este contexto de cambio social? El artículo examina los diferentes roles de los movimientos sociales e instituciones en cada período específico: en el momento de la transición política analiza el movimiento de las elecciones directas para presidente, las Diretas-Já; en la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente aborda el movimiento en

  1. Linking Movement Ecology with Wildlife Management and Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mark Allen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A common challenge in species conservation and management is how to incorporate species movements into management objectives. There often is a lack of knowledge of where, when and why species move. The field of movement ecology has grown rapidly in the last decade and is now providing the knowledge needed to incorporate movements of species into management planning. This knowledge can also be used to develop management strategies that are flexible in time and space and may improve the effectiveness of management actions. Therefore, wildlife management and conservation may benefit by strengthening the link with movement ecology. We present a framework that illustrates how animal movement can be used to enhance conservation planning and identify management actions that are complementary to existing strategies. The framework contains five steps that identify (1 the movement attributes of a species, (2 their impacts on ecosystems, (3 how this knowledge can be used to guide the scale and type of management, (4 the implementation, and (5 the evaluation of management actions. We discuss these five steps in detail, highlighting why the step is important and how the information can be obtained. We illustrate the framework through a case study of managing a highly mobile species, the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar, a harvested species of conservation concern. We believe that the movement-management framework provides an important, and timely, link between movement ecology and wildlife management and conservation, and highlights the potential for complementary, dynamic solutions for managing wildlife.

  2. A nontoxic and low-cost hydrothermal route for synthesis of hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-01-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  3. Gravitational wave memory in dS4+2n and 4D cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y.-Z.

    2017-02-01

    We argue that massless gravitons in all even dimensional de Sitter (dS) spacetimes higher than two admit a linear memory effect arising from their propagation inside the null cone. Assume that gravitational waves (GWs) are being generated by an isolated source, and over only a finite period of time {η\\text{i}}≤slant η ≤slant {η\\text{f}} . Outside of this time interval, suppose the shear-stress of the GW source becomes negligible relative to its energy-momentum and its mass quadrupole moments settle to static values. We then demonstrate, the transverse-traceless (TT) GW contribution to the perturbation of any dS4+2n written in a conformally flat form ({{a}2}{ημ ν}\\text{d}{{x}μ}\\text{d}{{x}ν} )—after the source has ceased and the primary GW train has passed—amounts to a spacetime constant shift in the flat metric proportional to the difference between the TT parts of the source’s final and initial mass quadrupole moments. As a byproduct, we present solutions to Einstein’s equations linearized about de Sitter backgrounds of all dimensions greater than three. We then point out there is a similar but approximate tail induced linear GW memory effect in 4D matter dominated universes. Our work here serves to improve upon and extend the 4D cosmological results of Chu (2015 Phys. Rev. D 92 124038), which in turn preceded complementary work by Bieri et al (2015 arXiv:1509.01296) and by Kehagias and Riotto (2016 arXiv:1602.02653).

  4. Globular Cluster Populations: Results Including S4G Late-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; McCabe, Kelsey; Aravena, Manuel; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Comerón, Sébastien; Courtois, Helene M.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Hinz, Joannah L.; Ho, Luis C.; Holwerda, Benne; Kim, Taehyun; Knapen, Johan H.; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Salo, Heikki; Sheth, Kartik

    2016-02-01

    Using 3.6 and 4.5 μm images of 73 late-type, edge-on galaxies from the S4G survey, we compare the richness of the globular cluster populations of these galaxies to those of early-type galaxies that we measured previously. In general, the galaxies presented here fill in the distribution for galaxies with lower stellar mass, M*, specifically {log}({M}*/{M}⊙ )\\lt 10, overlap the results for early-type galaxies of similar masses, and, by doing so, strengthen the case for a dependence of the number of globular clusters per 109M⊙ of galaxy stellar mass, TN, on M*. For 8.5\\lt {log}({M}*/{M}⊙ )\\lt 10.5 we find the relationship can be satisfactorily described as {T}{{N}}={({M}*/{10}6.7)}-0.56 when M* is expressed in solar masses. The functional form of the relationship is only weakly constrained, and extrapolation outside this range is not advised. Our late-type galaxies, in contrast to our early types, do not show the tendency for low-mass galaxies to split into two TN families. Using these results and a galaxy stellar mass function from the literature, we calculate that, in a volume-limited, local universe sample, clusters are most likely to be found around fairly massive galaxies (M* ˜ 1010.8M⊙) and present a fitting function for the volume number density of clusters as a function of parent-galaxy stellar mass. We find no correlation between TN and large-scale environment, but we do find a tendency for galaxies of fixed M* to have larger TN if they have converted a larger proportion of their baryons into stars.

  5. Synchronous separation, seaming, sealing and sterilization (S4) using brazing for sample containerization and planetary protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Freeman, David; Campos, Sergio

    2017-04-01

    The potential return of samples back to Earth in a future NASA mission would require protection of our planet from the risk of bringing uncontrolled biological materials back with the samples. In order to ensure this does not happen, it would be necessary to "break the chain of contact (BTC)", where any material reaching Earth would have to be inside a container that is sealed with extremely high confidence. Therefore, it would be necessary to contain the acquired samples and destroy any potential biological materials that may contaminate the external surface of their container while protecting the sample itself for further analysis. A novel synchronous separation, seaming, sealing and sterilization (S4) process for sample containerization and planetary protection has been conceived and demonstrated. A prototype double wall container with inner and outer shells and Earth clean interstitial space was used for this demonstration. In a potential future mission, the double wall container would be split into two halves and prepared on Earth, while the potential on-orbit execution would consist of inserting the sample into one of the halves and then mating to the other half and brazing. The use of brazing material that melts at temperatures higher than 500°C would assure sterilization of the exposed areas since all carbon bonds are broken at this temperature. The process would be executed in two-steps, Step-1: the double wall container halves would be fabricated and brazed on Earth; and Step-2: the containerization and sterilization process would be executed on-orbit. To prevent potential jamming during the process of mating the two halves of the double wall container and the extraction of the brazed inner container, a cone-within-cone approach has been conceived and demonstrated. The results of this study will be described and discussed.

  6. Electrodeposition mechanism of quaternary compounds Cu2ZnSnS4: Effect of the additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Aiyue; Li, Zhilin; Wang, Feng; Dou, Meiling; Liu, Jingjun; Ji, Jing; Song, Ye

    2018-01-01

    The electrodeposition mechanism of pure phase Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin film with subsequent annealing was investigated in detail. An electrolyte design principle of quaternary compounds was proposed. The complex ions of Cu(H2C6H5O7)+, Cu2(C6H5O7)+, Zn(C4H5O6)+, Sn(H2C6H5O7)+ and Sn2(C6H5O7)+, which influenced the reduction process and played important roles in co-deposition, were identified by UV spectra. Electrochemical studies indicated that trisodium citrate and tartaric acid could narrow the co-deposition potential range of the four elements to -0.8 V to -1.2 V (vs. SCE). The cause was the synergetic effect that trisodium citrate inhibited the reduction of Cu2+ and Sn2+ and tartaric acid promoted the reduction of Zn2+. The reduction of S2O32- was mainly attributed to the induction effect of the metallic ions, and the H+ dissociated from tartaric acid could also promote the cathode process of S2O32-. The reaction mechanism could be summarized as the following steps: (I) Cu(H2C6H5O7)+, Cu2(C6H5O7)+ → Cu, Sn(H2C6H5O7)+, Sn2(C6H5O7)+ → Sn, Zn(C4H5O6)+ → Zn; (II) the desorption of (H2C6H5O7)- and (C6H5O7)-, and the reduction of S2O32- induced by metallic ions and H+. The mechanism studies provided a path of electrolyte design for multicomponent compounds.

  7. SEVERIDAD DE CURVULARIA EN 67 LÍNEAS AUTOFECUNDADAS S4 DE MAÍZ AMARRILLO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Rafael Garcés Fiallos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Entre los principales problemas que afectan la producción del cultivo de maíz (Zea mays L., podemos citar a las enfermedades, causadas por diferentes patógenos, entre ellos la mancha foliar de curvularia causada por Curvularia spp. El control más barato, viable y que no causa daños al medio ambiente contra casi cualquier patógeno, es a través de la resistencia genética de la planta hospedante es decir, mediante el mejoramiento genético y utilización de variedades resistentes. Por lo tanto, el objetivo de esta investigación fue evaluar la severidad de curvularia en líneas promisorias autofecundadas S4 de maíz amarillo, obtenidos a partir de materiales comerciales. En la primera población (LM1 se encontraron valores máximos de 5.6 y menores de 1.4 lesiones cm-2, mientras que en la segunda población (LM2 los promedios máximos y mínimos fueron de 8.0 y 1.5 lesiones cm-2, respectivamente. Se constató diferencia entre las líneas evaluadas en función de la severidad de mancha de curvularia, en los dos experimentos. Con la información obtenida se torna importante considerar los valores de severidad obtenidos en estos experimentos, para el futuro desarrollo de nuevos híbridos de maíz con caracteres contrastantes en el comportamiento de la planta a determinadas enfermedades, asegurando el éxito de un programa de mejoramiento genético. Por otro lado, para futuros trabajos similares se recomienda realizar más de una evaluación y en diferentes estadios fenológicos del cultivo.

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis of CaIn2S4-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites with increased photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jianjun; Yan, Wenhao; Sun, Song; Bao, Jun; Gao, Chen

    2014-08-13

    A series of CaIn2S4-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposites with different RGO contents were fabricated using a facile hydrothermal approach. During the hydrothermal process, the reduction of graphene oxide to RGO, in situ deposition of synthesized CaIn2S4 nanoparticles on RGO nanosheets and formation of chemical-bonding CaIn2S4-RGO nanocomposites were performed simultaneously. Under visible light irradiation, the as-prepared CaIn2S4-RGO nanocomposites showed enhanced photocatalytic performance for rhodamine B degradation and phenol oxidation. The sample with 5 wt % RGO hybridized CaIn2S4 exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. The enhancement of photocatalytic performance may be related to the increased adsorption/reaction sites, positive shift of the valence band potential, and high separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers due to the electronic interaction between CaIn2S4 and RGO. We hope that this work can not only provide an in-depth study on the photocatalytic mechanism of RGO-enhanced activity, but also provide some insights for fabricating efficient and stable RGO-based photocatalysts in the potential applications of purifying polluted water resources.

  9. NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain of hERG and its interaction with the S4-S5 linker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingxin; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Huang, Qiwei; Raida, Manfred [Experimental Therapeutics Center, The Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 31 Biopolis Way Nanos, 03-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore); Kang, CongBao, E-mail: cbkang@etc.a-star.edu.sg [Experimental Therapeutics Center, The Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 31 Biopolis Way Nanos, 03-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} The N-terminal domain (NTD, eag domain) containing 135 residues of hERG was expressed and purified from E. coli cells. {yields} Solution structure of NTD was determined with NMR spectroscopy. {yields} The alpha-helical region (residues 13-23) was demonstrated to possess the characteristics of an amphipathic helix. {yields} NMR titration confirmed the interaction between NTD and the peptide from the S4-S5 linker. -- Abstract: The human Ether-a-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel mediates the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) in the cardiac action potential. Mutations in the 135 amino acid residue N-terminal domain (NTD) cause channel dysfunction or mis-translocation. To study the structure of NTD, it was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells using affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein behaved as a monomer under purification conditions. Far- and near-UV, circular dichroism (CD) and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that the purified protein was well-folded. The solution structure of NTD was obtained and the N-terminal residues 13-23 forming an amphipathic helix which may be important for the protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions. NMR titration experiment also demonstrated that residues from 88 to 94 in NTD are important for the molecular interaction with the peptide derived from the S4-S5 linker.

  10. Diagnosing disconjugate eye movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Alessandro; Liao, Ke; Matta, Manuela; Leigh, R John

    2008-01-01

    Background: Saccades are fast eye movements that conjugately shift the point of fixation between distant features of interest in the visual environment. Several disorders, affecting sites from brainstem to extraocular muscle, may cause horizontal saccades to become disconjugate. Prior techniques for detection of saccadic disconjugacy, especially in internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO), have compared only one point in abducting vs adducting saccades, such as peak velocity. Methods: We applied a phase-plane technique that compared each eye’s velocity as a function of change in position (normalized displacement) in 22 patients with disease variously affecting the brainstem reticular formation, the abducens nucleus, the medial longitudinal fasciculus, the oculomotor nerve, the abducens nerve, the neuromuscular junction, or the extraocular muscles; 10 age-matched subjects served as controls. Results: We found three different patterns of disconjugacy throughout the course of horizontal saccades: early abnormal velocity disconjugacy during the first 10% of the displacement in patients with INO, oculomotor or abducens nerve palsy, and advanced extraocular muscle disease; late disconjugacy in patients with disease affecting the neuromuscular junction; and variable middle-course disconjugacy in patients with pontine lesions. When normal subjects made disconjugate saccades between two targets aligned on one eye, the initial part of the movement remained conjugate. Conclusions: Along with conventional measures of saccades, such as peak velocity, phase planes provide a useful tool to determine the site, extent, and pathogenesis of disconjugacy. We hypothesize that the pale global extraocular muscle fibers, which drive the high-acceleration component of saccades, receive a neural command that ensures initial ocular conjugacy. GLOSSARY Abd. = abducens; CN = cranial nerve; CPEO = chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia; EM = eye movement; H = horizontal; INO = internuclear

  11. Knowledge through movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Kjær; Moser, T.

    2003-01-01

    In: Children and adolescents in movement - perspectives and ideas. The Danish Ministry of Culture, pages 150 - 162. 2003 Short description: the article debunks a lot of the myths surrounding body and learning, and replace them with a vision about another kind of learning. The aim is to reintroduce....... The current focus on the head and lack of attention to the body unifies society to focus on cognitive learning. This has implications for the values created by this system. Learning Lab Denmark aims to examine new ways of reintroducing the body into learning....

  12. Mungiki as Youth Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Like many other African countries, Kenya has a large and growing youth population. Some of the youths are mobilized into militant and political networks; one of these is the Mungiki movement. The article explores Mungiki’s combination of politics, religion and Kikuyu traditions. Using the examples...... of snuff tobacco, revolutionary talk and generational exclusion, it is argued that one way of understanding the connection between the various elements is to look at specific youth practices that cut across apparently separate activities. This reveals that youth in the Mungiki discourse is a highly...

  13. The Matter of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres, Phil

    2015-01-01

    This contribution concerns itself with the design and realisation of architectures that operate with material dynamics. It presents this concern as a counter to the consideration of movement in architecture as something conceptualised from the position of the observer. The contribution draws upon...... research from the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) which has recently focused upon the investigation of materially active systems ranging from textile logics at architectural scale to bending active structures in both natural and synthetic fibre-based composites...... at the intersection between architecture (considered as both practice and spatial construct) and digital technologies....

  14. West African Antislavery Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahonou, Eric Komlavi; Pelckmans, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    the penal code of Mali. Anti-slavery activists not only address their claims to their national governments but also intend to initiate change at local level. In that respect the democratic decentralization reforms were significant because they allowed educated anti-slavery activists to appeal their brethren...... to unite, mobilize and struggle. Members of anti-slavery movements with slave origins accessed power positions through peaceful electoral processes in Benin, mali, Niger and Mauritania. People of slave origins gained ground in local politics of a number of municipalities. In localities where anti...

  15. Stereotypic movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Harvey S

    2011-01-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive, rhythmic, fixed, patterned in form, amplitude, and localization, but purposeless (e.g., hand shaking, waving, body rocking, head nodding). They are commonly seen in children; both in normal children (primary stereotypy) and in individuals with additional behavioral or neurological signs and symptoms (secondary stereotypy). They should be differentiated from compulsions (OCD), tics (tic disorders), trichotillomania, skin picking disorder, or the direct physiological effect of a substance. There is increasing evidence to support a neurobiological mechanism. Response to behavioral and pharmacological therapies is variable. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Energy and Movement

    CERN Document Server

    90, Sol

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, Energy and Movement, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  17. Embodied health movements: new approaches to social movements in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Phil; Zavestoski, Stephen; McCormick, Sabrina; Mayer, Brian; Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Gasior Altman, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Social movements organised around health-related issues have been studied for almost as long as they have existed, yet social movement theory has not yet been applied to these movements. Health social movements (HSMs) are centrally organised around health, and address: (a) access to or provision of health care services; (b) health inequality and inequity based on race, ethnicity, gender, class and/or sexuality; and/or (c) disease, illness experience, disability and contested illness. HSMs can be subdivided into three categories: health access movements seek equitable access to health care and improved provision of health care services; constituency-based health movements address health inequality and health inequity based on race, ethnicity, gender, class and/or sexuality differences; and embodied health movements (EHMs) address disease, disability or illness experience by challenging science on etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. These groups address disproportionate outcomes and oversight by the scientific community and/or weak science. This article focuses on embodied health movements, primarily in the US. These are unique in three ways: 1) they introduce the biological body to social movements, especially with regard to the embodied experience of people with the disease; 2) they typically include challenges to existing medical/scientific knowledge and practice; and 3) they often involve activists collaborating with scientists and health professionals in pursuing treatment, prevention, research and expanded funding. This article employs various elements of social movement theory to offer an approach to understanding embodied health movements, and provides a capsule example of one such movement, the environmental breast cancer movement.

  18. BCI using imaginary movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohani, Darius Adam; Henning, William S.; Thomsen, Carsten E.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, much progress has been made in the rapidly evolving field of Brain Computer Interface (BCI). This paper presents a novel concept: a BCI-simulator, which has been developed for the Hex-O-Spell interface, using the sensory motor rhythms (SMR) paradigm. With the simulator...

  19. Na2EuAs2S5, NaEuAsS4, and Na4Eu(AsS4)2: controlling the valency of arsenic in polysulfide fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Tarun K; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2012-04-02

    The reactivity of europium with As species in Lewis basic alkali-metal polysulfide fluxes was investigated along with compound formation and the As(3+)/As(5+) interplay vis-à-vis changes in the flux basicity. The compound Na(2)EuAs(2)S(5) containing trivalent As(3+) is stabilized from an arsenic-rich polysulfide flux. It crystallizes in the monoclinic centrosymmetric space group P2(1)/c. Na(2)EuAs(2)S(5) has [As(2)S(5)](4-) units, built of corner sharing AsS(3) pyramids, which are coordinated to Eu(2+) ions to give a two-dimensional (2D) layered structure. A sodium polysulfide flux with comparatively less arsenic led to the As(5+) containing compounds NaEuAsS(4) (orthorhombic, Ama2) and Na(4)Eu(AsS(4))(2) (triclinic, P1) depending on Na(2)S/S ratio. The NaEuAsS(4) and Na(4)Eu(AsS(4))(2) have a three-dimensional (3D) structure built of [AsS(4)](3-) tetrahedra coordinated to Eu(2+) ions. All compounds are semiconductors with optical energy gaps of ∼2 eV.

  20. CONTROLS ON CAPITAL MOVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petris Sorina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, capital mobility was encouraged across national borders, because it was considered that such capital can seek the highest rate of return. However, recent global financial developments have shown that, due to contagion, the mobility of capital flows can cause severe financial imbalances. In the context of globalization, liberalization or maintaining controls on capital flows is a current topic, more debated by economists. This topic is very important, due to the impact of liberalization decision or maintaining controls on capital flows has on the overall macroeconomic framework. The paper analyzes the relationship between capital flows’ control and the income per capita, the degree of central bank independence, democracy country, the foreign exchange regime. Also, it analyzes the effectiveness in time of capital controls, taking account of financial system development and potential risks of instability. Over time, it was observed that a period in which they have imposed restrictions on capital movements was followed by a removal of such restrictions, and vice versa. Cyclic change of capital movements regime corresponds to the cyclic evolution of the global economy. Full capital account liberalization led to the emergence of currency and financial crises, so that the idea of maintaining controls on capital is not rejected by economists. After a full liberalization of capital flows, there is a change in the mentality of an increasing number of economists, who support the maintenance of controls, in a gradual liberalization.

  1. Supranuclear eye movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, João; Eggenberger, Eric

    2014-11-01

    This work reviews supranuclear ocular motor disorders, highlighting new data published during the past year. Perceptional adaptative mechanisms may explain recent research concerning the discrepancy between objective measurement of saccade abnormalities and their putative functional visual impairment. Eye movement classes seem to be selectively disrupted by different neurodegenerative disorders. Deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease patients may improve pursuit deficits, highlighting the role of basal ganglia in the control of smooth pursuit. Subcortical optokinetic pathways seem to play an important role in maintaining the monocular nasotemporal optokinetic asymmetry seen in patients with infantile esotropia. Vergence-vestibular interaction has been further delineated in patients with idiopathic bilateral vestibular failure. Pharmacological treatment of central vestibular disorders with 4-aminopyridine has been extended to patients with ataxia-telangiectasia in whom it seems to reduce slow-phase velocity of nystagmus. Recent data derived from anatomic and functional imaging studies are providing new insights into supranuclear ocular motor circuitry. Novel pharmacological and surgical therapies may have future implications in visual and vestibular rehabilitation of patients with supranuclear eye movement disorders.

  2. Spectroelectrochemistry and modeling of enargite (Cu3AsS4) reactivity under atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Robert Nicholas Verne

    Raman spectroscopy has been a useful technology for fundamental studies in the mining industry. Surface changes through oxidation and reduction reactions can be monitored in-situ, allowing the changes to be monitored in real time. In conjunction with cyclic voltammetry, to change the conditions at which a mineral surface is subjected to, reaction and reaction conditions can be identified. The results can then be plotted to create a map similar to that of an EH-pH diagram. In this study, the copper arsenic sulfide mineral, enargite (Cu 3AsS4) was subjected to a series of tests. Relatively pure samples were obtained from Butte, MT and Quirivilca, Peru and used to create mineral electrodes. The electrodes were cycled over an EH range of -1000 to +1000 mV (vs SHE) at pH values ranging from 1 to 13. Changes to the surface of the mineral were identified by comparing Raman spectra to a mineral Raman database. Plotted results were then compared against mass-balanced EH-pH diagrams for the Cu-As-S-H2O system, created using the STABCAL thermodynamic calculation program. Ultimately, the EH-pH diagram is modified based on the results, and an updated version was created. The mass-balanced methodology is applied, in conjunction with Gibbs' phase rule, to an aqueous quaternary system. Variations in EH-pH diagrams of the Cu-As-S-H2O system based on slight changes in concentrations of copper, arsenic and sulfur are examined. Finally, a novel nano-graphene material was tested for its ability to adsorb arsenic. Arsenic remediation, downstream of an enargite leach, remains an unsolved issue. The nano-graphene platelets were not able to successfully reduce arsenic levels in solution below the EPA-required limitation of 10 ppb. A thermodynamic evaluation of the adsorption characterized the process as physisorption, and likely unsuitable for long-term arsenic storage. A functionalized version of the nano-graphene may enhance results.

  3. Movement velocity vs. strength training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário C. Marques

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intensity during strength training has been commonly identified with relative load (percentage of one-repetition maximum, 1RM or with performing a given maximal number of repetitions in each set (XRM: 5RM, 10RM, 15 RM, etc.. Yet, none of these methods can be appropriate for precisely monitoring the real training effort in each training session. The first approach requires coaches to individually assess the 1RM value for each athlete. We may agree that expressing intensity as a percentage of the maximum repetition has the advantage that it can be used to program strength training for multiple athletes simultaneously, the loads being later transformed in absolute values (kg for each individual. Further, another advantage is that this expression of the intensity can clearly reflect the dynamics of the evolution of the training load if we understand the percentage of 1RM as an effort, and not as a simple arithmetic calculus. Nevertheless, direct assessment of 1RM has some possible disadvantages worth noting. It may be associated with risk of injury when performed incorrectly or by novice athlete’s and it is time-consuming and impractical for large groups. Moreover, the actual RM can change quite rapidly after only a few training sessions and often the obtained value is not the subject’s true maximum. The classic way to prescribe loading intensity is to determine, through trial and error, the maximum number of repetitions that one can be performed with a given submaximal weight. For example, 5RM refers to a weight that can only be lifted five times. Some studies identified the relationship between selected percentages of 1RM and the number of repetitions to failure, establishing a repetition maximum continuum. It is believed that certain performance characteristics are best trained using specific RM load ranges. This method eliminates the need for a direct 1RM test, but it is not without drawbacks either. Using exhaustive efforts is common

  4. Tracking the Poster Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2015-01-01

    in the Museum to expose the poster-image as a medium in its own artistic, technical, historical and popular right; the article examines the event as a sign holding core characteristics of a ‘poster movement’ prevailing during the interwar years. The period made a varied scene for exhibitions promoting...... commercial and graphic design of various kinds of which British and Foreign Posters offers a particularly rich example. The exhibition attracted commercial, artistic and curatorial forces substantiating the idea of a movement, and approached commercial art from a perspective that raised new awareness towards...... graphic material in urban and museum space alike. To clarify the curatorial approach the analysis draws on a theoretical scheme of ecological semiotics, the concept of counterability and contextualising displays, which I name poster milieux: the 1931 case demonstrates how contemporary commercial art...

  5. Aeroelastic Uncertainty Quantification Studies Using the S4T Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbay, Melike; Heeg, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This paper originates from the joint efforts of an aeroelastic study team in the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel from NATO Science and Technology Organization, with the Task Group number AVT-191, titled "Application of Sensitivity Analysis and Uncertainty Quantification to Military Vehicle Design." We present aeroelastic uncertainty quantification studies using the SemiSpan Supersonic Transport wind tunnel model at the NASA Langley Research Center. The aeroelastic study team decided treat both structural and aerodynamic input parameters as uncertain and represent them as samples drawn from statistical distributions, propagating them through aeroelastic analysis frameworks. Uncertainty quantification processes require many function evaluations to asses the impact of variations in numerous parameters on the vehicle characteristics, rapidly increasing the computational time requirement relative to that required to assess a system deterministically. The increased computational time is particularly prohibitive if high-fidelity analyses are employed. As a remedy, the Istanbul Technical University team employed an Euler solver in an aeroelastic analysis framework, and implemented reduced order modeling with Polynomial Chaos Expansion and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to perform the uncertainty propagation. The NASA team chose to reduce the prohibitive computational time by employing linear solution processes. The NASA team also focused on determining input sample distributions.

  6. Interactive map of refugee movement in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calka, Beata; Cahan, Bruce

    2016-12-01

    Considering the recent mass movement of people fleeing war and oppression, an analysis of changes in migration, in particular an analysis of the final destination refugees choose, seems to be of utmost importance. Many international organisations like UNHCR (the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) or EuroStat gather and provide information on the number of refugees and the routes they follow. What is also needed to study the state of affairs closely is a visual form presenting the rapidly changing situation. An analysis of the problem together with up-to-date statistical data presented in the visual form of a map is essential. This article describes methods of preparing such interactive maps displaying movement of refugees in European Union countries. Those maps would show changes taking place throughout recent years but also the dynamics of the development of the refugee crisis in Europe. The ArcGIS software was applied to make the map accessible on the Internet. Additionally, online sources and newspaper articles were used to present the movement of migrants. The interactive map makes it possible to watch spatial data with an opportunity to navigate within the map window. Because of that it is a clear and convenient tool to visualise such processes as refugee migration in Europe.

  7. Interactive map of refugee movement in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calka Beata

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the recent mass movement of people fleeing war and oppression, an analysis of changes in migration, in particular an analysis of the final destination refugees choose, seems to be of utmost importance. Many international organisations like UNHCR (the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees or EuroStat gather and provide information on the number of refugees and the routes they follow. What is also needed to study the state of affairs closely is a visual form presenting the rapidly changing situation. An analysis of the problem together with up-to-date statistical data presented in the visual form of a map is essential. This article describes methods of preparing such interactive maps displaying movement of refugees in European Union countries. Those maps would show changes taking place throughout recent years but also the dynamics of the development of the refugee crisis in Europe. The ArcGIS software was applied to make the map accessible on the Internet. Additionally, online sources and newspaper articles were used to present the movement of migrants. The interactive map makes it possible to watch spatial data with an opportunity to navigate within the map window. Because of that it is a clear and convenient tool to visualise such processes as refugee migration in Europe.

  8. The neurophysiology of paediatric movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Verity M

    2017-12-01

    To demonstrate how neurophysiological tools have advanced our understanding of the pathophysiology of paediatric movement disorders, and of neuroplasticity in the developing brain. Delineation of corticospinal tract connectivity using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is being investigated as a potential biomarker for response to therapy. TMS measures of cortical excitability and neuroplasticity are also being used to investigate the effects of therapy, demonstrating neuroplastic changes that relate to functional improvements. Analyses of evoked potentials and event-related changes in the electroencephalogaphy spectral activity provide growing evidence for the important role of aberrant sensory processing in the pathophysiology of many different movement disorders. Neurophysiological findings demonstrate that children with clinically similar phenotypes may have differing underlying pathophysiology, which in turn may explain differential response to therapy. Neurophysiological parameters can act as biomarkers, providing a means to stratify individuals, and are well suited to provide biofeedback. They therefore have enormous potential to facilitate improvements to therapy. Although currently a small field, the role of neurophysiology in paediatric movement disorders is poised to expand, both fuelled by and contributing to the rapidly growing fields of neuro-rehabilitation and neuromodulation and the move towards a more individualized therapeutic approach.

  9. Air movement - good or bad?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    Air movement - good or bad? The question can only be answered by those who are exposed when they are exposed. Human perception of air movement depends on environmental factors including air velocity, air velocity fluctuations, air temperature, and personal factors such as overall thermal sensation...... and activity level. Even for the same individual, sensitivity to air movement may change from day to day as a result of e.g. different levels of fatigue. Based on existing literature, the current paper summarizes factors influencing the human perception of air movement and attempts to specify in general terms...... when air movement is desirable and when it is not. At temperatures up to 22-23oC, at sedentary activity and with occupants feeling neutral or cooler there is a risk of air movement being perceived as unacceptable, even at low velocities. In particular, a cool overall thermal sensation negatively...

  10. Synthesis of the ZnGa2S4 Nanocrystals and Their Visible-Light Photocatalytic Degradation Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Peng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured ZnGa2S4 with indirect band gap was prepared by a simple thiourea reduction method. As-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-Vis. The visible-light photocatalytic activity of the ZnGa2S4 was evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB aqueous solution. The high photoactivities of ZnGa2S4 can be attributed to the small band gap and large surface area, which is beneficial for degradation of pollutants and enhancement of transfer of photogenerated carriers.

  11. An empirical model of L-band scintillation S4 index constructed by using FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Ping; Bilitza, Dieter; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Caton, Ronald; Chang, Loren C.; Yeh, Wen-Hao

    2017-09-01

    Modern society relies heavily on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technology for applications such as satellite communication, navigation, and positioning on the ground and/or aviation in the troposphere/stratosphere. However, ionospheric scintillations can severely impact GNSS systems and their related applications. In this study, a global empirical ionospheric scintillation model is constructed with S4-index data obtained by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) satellites during 2007-2014 (hereafter referred to as the F3CGS4 model). This model describes the S4-index as a function of local time, day of year, dip-latitude, and solar activity using the index PF10.7. The model reproduces the F3/C S4-index observations well, and yields good agreement with ground-based reception of satellite signals. This confirms that the constructed model can be used to forecast global L-band scintillations on the ground and in the near surface atmosphere.

  12. Social Movements and Educational Research: Toward a United Field of Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesz, Tricia; Korora, Aaron M.; Walkuski, Christy Burke; Foot, Rachel E.

    2018-01-01

    Background/Context: Educational research addressing social movements appears to be growing rapidly but, with a few exceptions, this body of literature has remained largely isolated in pockets stretched across myriad fields of educational scholarship. Awareness and dialogue across researchers is limited because social movement-focused educational…

  13. The movement ecology of seagrasses

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, Kathryn; van Dijk, Kor-jent; Ruiz-Montoya, Leonardo; Kendrick, Gary A.; Krauss, Siegfried L.; Waycott, Michelle; Verduin, Jennifer; Lowe, Ryan; Statton, John; Brown, Eloise; Duarte, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    A movement ecology framework is applied to enhance our understanding of the causes, mechanisms and consequences of movement in seagrasses: marine, clonal, flowering plants. Four life-history stages of seagrasses can move: pollen, sexual propagules, vegetative fragments and the spread of individuals through clonal growth. Movement occurs on the water surface, in the water column, on or in the sediment, via animal vectors and through spreading clones. A capacity for long-distance dispersal and ...

  14. Teaching Movement Activities as Performativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens-Ole

    2017-01-01

    -teaching the movement activities must be integrated in the academic and creative subjects as active teaching and brain breaks etc. or as organized activities during the extended school day. Movement activities has become a part of all subjects and all teachers’ professional task. Since these movement activities...... but also according to the subject. The following teaching roles are identified: Organizer, participator, performer, observer, caregiver, classroom leader, mood creator and culture creator. Integrating movement activities in the everyday life in school not only seems to be a challenge it also seems...

  15. The Explanatory Range of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Torben

    2005-01-01

    Drawing a distinction between systemic and functional explanations of movement in general, I shall argue that the Chomskyan view of movement in language is originally functional. With the advent of the Minimimalist Program, however, it has become systemic, but no argument for this change has been...... forthcoming. I'll then present data (from Danish) to sustain the view that only functional type explanations of movement can be empirically motivated, and these only if movement is reinterpreted as transition states between representations of different kinds....

  16. Bewitched - The Tea Party Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashbee, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the development of the Tea Party movement, the character of its thinking and the nature of the interests and constituencies to which it is tied. The article suggests that despite the importance of ideas and interests, and the process of interaction between them, the movement....... The political friction that this creates has contributed to the anger that has characterised the movement. While the Tea Party movement may, as such, have only an ephemeral existence, independent conservatives are likely to remain a significant and potent constituency and will, within the institutional...

  17. Arousal facilitates involuntary eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGirolamo, Gregory J; Patel, Neha; Blaukopf, Clare L

    2016-07-01

    Attention plays a critical role in action selection. However, the role of attention in eye movements is complicated as these movements can be either voluntary or involuntary, with, in some circumstances (antisaccades), these two actions competing with each other for execution. But attending to the location of an impending eye movement is only one facet of attention that may play a role in eye movement selection. In two experiments, we investigated the effect of arousal on voluntary eye movements (antisaccades) and involuntary eye movements (prosaccadic errors) in an antisaccade task. Arousal, as caused by brief loud sounds and indexed by changes in pupil diameter, had a facilitation effect on involuntary eye movements. Involuntary eye movements were both significantly more likely to be executed and significantly faster under arousal conditions (Experiments 1 and 2), and the influence of arousal had a specific time course (Experiment 2). Arousal, one form of attention, can produce significant costs for human movement selection as potent but unplanned actions are benefited more than planned ones.

  18. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    , to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual...... makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias...

  19. Faradic redox active material of Cu7S4 nanowires with a high conductance for flexible solid state supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Muhammad Sufyan; Dai, Shuge; Wang, Mingjun; Xi, Yi; Lang, Qiang; Guo, Donglin; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-08-01

    The exploration of high Faradic redox active materials with the advantages of low cost and low toxicity has been attracting great attention for producing high energy storage supercapacitors. Here, the high Faradic redox active material of Cu7S4-NWs coated on a carbon fiber fabric (CFF) is directly used as a binder-free electrode for a high performance flexible solid state supercapacitor. The Cu7S4-NW-CFF supercapacitor exhibits excellent electrochemical performance such as a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 at the scan rate of 10 mV s-1 and a high energy density of 35 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 200 W kg-1, with the advantages of a light weight, high flexibility and long term cycling stability by retaining 95% after 5000 charge-discharge cycles at a constant current of 10 mA. The high Faradic redox activity and high conductance behavior of the Cu7S4-NWs result in a high pseudocapacitive performance with a relatively high specific energy and specific power. Such a new type of pseudocapacitive material of Cu7S4-NWs with its low cost is very promising for actual application in supercapacitors.The exploration of high Faradic redox active materials with the advantages of low cost and low toxicity has been attracting great attention for producing high energy storage supercapacitors. Here, the high Faradic redox active material of Cu7S4-NWs coated on a carbon fiber fabric (CFF) is directly used as a binder-free electrode for a high performance flexible solid state supercapacitor. The Cu7S4-NW-CFF supercapacitor exhibits excellent electrochemical performance such as a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 at the scan rate of 10 mV s-1 and a high energy density of 35 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 200 W kg-1, with the advantages of a light weight, high flexibility and long term cycling stability by retaining 95% after 5000 charge-discharge cycles at a constant current of 10 mA. The high Faradic redox activity and high conductance behavior of the Cu7S4-NWs result in

  20. Synthesis of AgGaGeS4 polycrystalline materials by vapor transporting and mechanical oscillation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Zhao, Beijun; Zhu, Shifu; He, Zhiyu; Chen, Baojun; Pu, Yunxiao; Lin, Li; Zhao, Zhangrui; Zhong, Yikai

    2017-06-01

    Single-phase AgGaGeS4 polycrystalline materials were synthesized directly from the constituent elements by vapor transporting and mechanical oscillation method. The problem of explosions was solved by careful control of the heating and cooling cycle and adopting the two-zone rocking furnace with specially designed temperature profile. The mechanical and temperature oscillations, as well as gradient cooling, were introduced in the synthesis process. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) micro analysis indicated that the synthesized compound is a single-phase AgGaGeS4 polycrystalline material.

  1. D4 S4: A Four Dimensions Instructional Strategy for Web-based and Blended Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy A. ABDELAZIZ,

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Web-based education is facing a paradigm shift under the rapid development of information and communication technology. The new paradigm of learning requires special techniques of course design, special instructional models, and special methods of evaluation. This paper investigates the effectiveness of an adaptive instructional strategy for teaching and learning through the Web and blended learning environments. The central theme of this strategy is that instructional strategies give instructors and students a conceptual as well as a practical mode of delivery from which to teach and learn. Considering and applying new instructional strategy can help instructors to understand the uses of pedagogical content knowledge, as well as to reflect the role of technological content knowledge that can be adapted and/or adopted in teaching in all educational levels and environments. The main objective of this paper was to develop a holonomic instructional strategy for Web-based and blended learning. This strategy is guided by the non-linear and interactive features of learning environments. The strategy is consisted of four dimensions: designing, developing, delving and distributing. In this new instructional strategy, learning is holonomic and adaptive. Learning occurs in an open learning environment, in which instructors are designing a shared vision, developing a sharable e-learning task, delving students’ learning through scaffolding and salvaging students’ knowledge. The expected outcome of this instructional strategy is that each learner will develop a cognitive schema to be used to organize and construct knowledge and meaning in similar context of learning which may increase the generalizability, trustworthiness and transferability of learning. The results of applying this new strategy showed that this strategy is effective on developing both achievement and deep learning levels among a sample of graduate students.

  2. Early Christian movements: Jesus movements and the renewal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article investigates the origins and development of the earliest Jesus movements within the context of persistent conflict between the Judean and Galilean peasantry and their Jerusalem and Roman rulers. It explores the prominence of popular prophetic and messianic movements and shows how the earliest ...

  3. Early Christian movements: Jesus movements and the renewal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UPuser

    Abstract. This article investigates the origins and development of the earliest. Jesus movements within the context of persistent conflict between the Judean and Galilean peasantry and their Jerusalem and Roman rulers. It explores the prominence of popular prophetic and messianic movements and shows how the earliest ...

  4. Spray-coated Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films for large-scale photovoltaic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Sara Lena Josefin; Murthy, Swathi; Mariño, Simón López

    2017-01-01

    The kesterite material, Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), has in the preceding ten years been investigated and developed as a new Earth-abundant material for solar cells. The interest in this inorganic semiconductor originates in its optimal energy band gap of approx. 1.5 eV, high absorption coefficient, and the...

  5. Interface band gap narrowing behind open circuit voltage losses in Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Palsgaard, Mattias Lau Nøhr; Gunst, Tue

    2017-01-01

    We present evidence that bandgap narrowing at the heterointerface may be a major cause of the large open circuit voltage deficit of Cu2ZnSnS4/CdS solar cells. Bandgap narrowing is caused by surface states that extend the Cu2ZnSnS4valence band into the forbidden gap. Those surface states...... voltage measurements on Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cells can be reproduced quantitatively without necessarily assuming a cliff-like conduction band offset with the CdS buffer layer. Our first-principles calculations indicate that Zn-based alternative buffer layers are advantageous due to the ability of...... Zn to passivate those surface states. Focusing future research on Zn-based buffers is expected to significantly improve the open circuit voltage and efficiency of pure-sulfide Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cells....

  6. Crystalline NiCo2S4 nanotube array coated with amorphous NiCoxSy for supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Rui; Zhang, Mingyi; Yao, Yunhe; Gao, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Hierarchical NiCo2S4@NiCoxSy core/shell nanoarrays grown on carbon cloth were successfully synthesized via a two-step hydrothermal route and following an electrodeposition process. Compared with bare NiCo2S4, the electrochemical performance of NiCo2S4@NiCoxSy nanoarrays have been apparently improved, which shows areal capacitance as high as 3.9F/cm(2) at a constant current density of 1mA/cm(2). And the composite material exhibits excellent rate capability that a high areal capacitance of 2.9F/cm(2) is still retaining as the current density increase to 50mA/cm(2). The superior electrochemical performance can be attributed to the reasonably designed core/shell hierarchical structure of NiCo2S4@NiCoxSy nanoarrays, which would be promising for high-performance supercapacitor materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sport for Development (S4D) as "Core University Business"? Modelling University Participation in Sport-Based Social Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Edoardo G. F.; McGrath, Richard; Immink, Maarten A.; May, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Among the recognised strengths of the "Sport for Development" (S4D) framework there is the capacity of sport to contribute to positive community networks, education and community participation. However, its relevance to tertiary education institutions is often under-appreciated. In this framework, the Football United® program was…

  8. ATel 7545: Fermi LAT Detection of a GeV flare from spectrally hard FSRQ S4 1800+44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buson, S.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux and an unusually hard gamma-ray spectrum from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) S4 1800+44 (also known as 3FGL J1801.5+4403, Acero et al. ...

  9. Movement disorders in spinocerebellar ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Giunti, P.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) can present with a large variety of noncerebellar symptoms, including movement disorders. In fact, movement disorders are frequent in many of the various SCA subtypes, and they can be the presenting, dominant, or even isolated disease feature. When

  10. Movement Patterns in Educational Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Christensen, Bianca Clavio; Nielsen, Thorsten B.

    2018-01-01

    Although movement is essential in location-based games to get from one point of interest to the next, it is seldom taken into account for the game design and the selection of locations. Instead, player movement is usually analyzed after the fact, i.e. when the game is ready to play. In this paper......-based educational games....

  11. Trajectory Indexing Using Movement Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfoser, D.; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2005-01-01

    With the proliferation of mobile computing, the ability to index efficiently the movements of mobile objects becomes important. Objects are typically seen as moving in two-dimensional (x,y) space, which means that their movements across time may be embedded in the three-dimensional (x,y,t) space....

  12. 3-D eye movement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchowski, Andrew; Medlin, Eric; Cournia, Nathan; Murphy, Hunter; Gramopadhye, Anand; Nair, Santosh; Vorah, Jeenal; Melloy, Brian

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents a novel three-dimensional (3-D) eye movement analysis algorithm for binocular eye tracking within virtual reality (VR). The user's gaze direction, head position, and orientation are tracked in order to allow recording of the user's fixations within the environment. Although the linear signal analysis approach is itself not new, its application to eye movement analysis in three dimensions advances traditional two-dimensional approaches, since it takes into account the six degrees of freedom of head movements and is resolution independent. Results indicate that the 3-D eye movement analysis algorithm can successfully be used for analysis of visual process measures in VR. Process measures not only can corroborate performance measures, but also can lead to discoveries of the reasons for performance improvements. In particular, analysis of users' eye movements in VR can potentially lead to further insights into the underlying cognitive processes of VR subjects.

  13. Reactivity of CO2 on the surfaces of magnetite (Fe3O4), greigite (Fe3S4) and mackinawite (FeS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Carballal, David; Roldan, Alberto; Dzade, Nelson Y; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2018-01-13

    The growing environmental, industrial and commercial interests in understanding the processes of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and conversion have led us to simulate, by means of density functional theory calculations, the application of different iron oxide and sulfide minerals to capture, activate and catalytically dissociate this molecule. We have chosen the {001} and {111} surfaces of the spinel-structured magnetite (Fe3O4) and its isostructural sulfide counterpart greigite (Fe3S4), which are both materials with the Fe cations in the 2+/3+ mixed valence state, as well as mackinawite (tetragonal FeS), in which all iron ions are in the ferrous oxidation state. This selection of iron-bearing compounds provides us with understanding of the effect of the composition, stoichiometry, structure and oxidation state on the catalytic activation of CO2 The largest adsorption energies are released for the interaction with the Fe3O4 surfaces, which also corresponds to the biggest conformational changes of the CO2 molecule. Our results suggest that the Fe3S4 surfaces are unable to activate the CO2 molecule, while a major charge transfer takes place on FeS{111}, effectively activating the CO2 molecule. The thermodynamic and kinetic profiles for the catalytic dissociation of CO2 into CO and O show that this process is feasible only on the FeS{111} surface. The findings reported here show that these minerals show promise for future CO2 capture and conversion technologies, ensuring a sustainable future for society.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'Providing sustainable catalytic solutions for a rapidly changing world'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Exploring cattle movements in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensoy, Chellafe; Faes, Christel; Welby, Sarah; Van der Stede, Yves; Aerts, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Movement of animals from one farm to another is a potential risk and can lead to the spreading of livestock diseases. Therefore, in order to implement effective control measures, it is important to understand the movement network in a given area. Using the SANITEL data from 2005 to 2009, around 2 million cattle movements in Belgium were traced. Exploratory analysis revealed different spatial structures for the movement of different cattle types: fattening calves are mostly moved to the Antwerp region, adult cattle are moved to different parts in Belgium. Based on these differences, movement of cattle would more likely cause a spread of disease to a larger number of areas in Belgium as compared to the fattening calves. A closer inspection of the spatial and temporal patterns of cattle movement using a weighted negative binomial model, revealed a significant short-distance movement of bovine which could be an important factor contributing to the local spreading of a disease. The model however revealed hot spot areas of movement in Belgium; four areas in the Walloon region (Luxembourg, Hainaut, Namur and Liege) were found as hot spot areas while East and West Flanders are important "receivers" of movement. This implies that an introduction of a disease to these Walloon regions could result in a spread toward the East and West Flanders regions, as what happened in the case of Bluetongue BTV-8 outbreak in 2006. The temporal component in the model also revealed a linear trend and short- and long-term seasonality in the cattle movement with a peak around spring and autumn. The result of this explorative analysis enabled the identification of "hot spots" in time and space which is important in enhancing any existing monitoring and surveillance system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Francisella tularensis SchuS4 and SchuS4 lipids inhibit IL-12p40 in primary human dendritic cells by inhibition of IRF1 and IRF8*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Robin; Wang, Rong; Alinger, Joshua B.; Small, Pamela; Bosio, Catharine M.

    2013-01-01

    Induction of innate immunity is essential for host survival of infection. Evasion and inhibition of innate immunity is a strategy used by pathogens, such as the highly virulent bacterium Francisella tularensis, to ensure their replication and transmission. The mechanism and bacterial components responsible for this suppression of innate immunity by F. tularensis are not defined. Here, we demonstrate that lipids enriched from virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4, but not attenuated Live Vaccine Strain (LVS), inhibit inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Suppression of inflammatory responses is associated with IκBα independent inhibition of NF-κBp65 activation and selective inhibition of activation of Interferon Regulatory Factors (IRFs). Interference with NF-κBp65 and IRFs is also observed following infection with viable SchuS4. Together these data provide novel insight as to how highly virulent bacteria selectively modulate the host to interfere innate immune responses required for survival of infection. PMID:23817430

  16. Preparation and absolute configuration of (1R,4R)-(+)-3-oxo-, (1S,4S)-(-)-3-oxo- and (1R,3S,4R)-(+)-3-acetyloxy-5-oxo-1 ,8-cineole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loandos, María del H; Villecco, Margarita B; Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro; Catalán, César A N

    2009-11-01

    Enantiomerically pure (1S,4S)-(-)-3-oxo-1,8-cineole (-)-2 and (1R,4R)-(+)-3-oxo-1,8-cineole (+)-2 were prepared for the first time and their absolute configurations assigned by vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) measurements. Thus, treatment of cineole 1 with chromyl acetate gave rac-2 which after sodium borohydride reduction and acetylation provided racemic 3-endo-acetyloxy-1,8-cineole, rac-4. Enantioselective hydrolysis using porcine liver esterase (PLE) gave a mixture of 3-endo-hydroxy-1,8-cineole (-)-3 and 3-endo-acetyloxy-1,8-cineole (+)-4. After chromatographic separation, (-)-3 was oxidized to (+)-2, while (+)-4 was hydrolysed to (+)-3 and then oxidized to (-)-2. The absolute configuration of either ketone 2 was established by VCD spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/DGDZVP level of theory, from where it followed that the (+)-2 enantiomer corresponds to (1R,4R)-1,3,3-trimethyl-5-oxo-2-oxabicyclo[2.2.2]octane and the (-)-2 enantiomer to the (1S,4S) molecule which is also in agreement with the absolute configuration deduced by the Mosher method for the starting chiral alcohols. Some literature inconsistencies are clarified. In addition, the enantiomerically pure monoester (1S,3S,4R,5R)-(-)-3-acetyloxy-5-hydroxy-1,8-cineole 6 and the ketoester (1R,3S,4R)-(+)-3-acetyloxy-5-oxo-1,8-cineole 7 were prepared from meso-diacetate 5 by enantioselective asymmetrization also using PLE.

  17. (μ-Piperazine-1,4-dicarbodithioato-κ4S1,S1′:S4,S4′bis[bis(triphenylphosphane-κPgold(I] chloroform disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilia A. Guzei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Au2(C6H8N2S4(C18H15P4]·2CHCl3, the digold complex resides on a crystallographic inversion center and co-crystallizes with two molecules of chloroform solvent. The piperazine-1,4-dicarbodithioate linker has an almost ideal chair conformation. The geometry about the gold atoms is severely distorted tetrahedral punctuated by a very acute S—Au—S bite angle.

  18. Evolution of density-dependent movement during experimental range expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronhofer, E A; Gut, S; Altermatt, F

    2017-12-01

    Range expansions and biological invasions are prime examples of transient processes that are likely impacted by rapid evolutionary changes. As a spatial process, range expansions are driven by dispersal and movement behaviour. Although it is widely accepted that dispersal and movement may be context-dependent, for instance density-dependent, and best represented by reaction norms, the evolution of density-dependent movement during range expansions has received little experimental attention. We therefore tested current theory predicting the evolution of increased movement at low densities at range margins using highly replicated and controlled range expansion experiments across multiple genotypes of the protist model system Tetrahymena thermophila. Although rare, we found evolutionary changes during range expansions even in the absence of initial standing genetic variation. Range expansions led to the evolution of negatively density-dependent movement at range margins. In addition, we report the evolution of increased intrastrain competitive ability and concurrently decreased population growth rates in range cores. Our findings highlight the importance of understanding movement and dispersal as evolving reaction norms and plastic life-history traits of central relevance for range expansions, biological invasions and the dynamics of spatially structured systems in general. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  19. Does the cerebellum initiate movement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, W T

    2014-02-01

    Opinion is divided on what the exact function of the cerebellum is. Experiments are summarized that support the following views: (1) the cerebellum is a combiner of multiple movement factors; (2) it contains anatomically fixed permanent focal representation of individual body parts (muscles and segments) and movement modes (e.g., vestibular driven vs. cognitive driven); (3) it contains flexible changing representations/memory of physical properties of the body parts including muscle strength, segment inertia, joint viscosity, and segmental interaction torques (dynamics); (4) it contains mechanisms for learning and storage of the properties in item no. 3 through trial-and-error practice; (5) it provides for linkage of body parts, motor modes, and motordynamics via the parallel fiber system; (6) it combines and integrates the many factors so as to initiate coordinated movements of the many body parts; (7) it is thus enabled to play the unique role of initiating coordinated movements; and (8) this unique causative role is evidenced by the fact that: (a) electrical stimulation of the cerebellum can initiate compound coordinated movements; (b) in naturally initiated compound movements, cerebellar discharge precedes that in downstream target structures such as motor cerebral cortex; and (c) cerebellar ablation abolishes the natural production of compound movements in the awake alert individuals.

  20. Pioneers of eye movement research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the technology affording eye movement recordings carry the risk of neglecting past achievements. Without the assistance of this modern armoury, great strides were made in describing the ways the eyes move. For Aristotle the fundamental features of eye movements were binocular, and he described the combined functions of the eyes. This was later given support using simple procedures like placing a finger over the eyelid of the closed eye and culminated in Hering's law of equal innervation. However, the overriding concern in the 19th century was with eye position rather than eye movements. Appreciating discontinuities of eye movements arose from studies of vertigo. The characteristics of nystagmus were recorded before those of saccades and fixations. Eye movements during reading were described by Hering and by Lamare in 1879; both used similar techniques of listening to sounds made during contractions of the extraocular muscles. Photographic records of eye movements during reading were made by Dodge early in the 20th century, and this stimulated research using a wider array of patterns. In the mid-20th century attention shifted to the stability of the eyes during fixation, with the emphasis on involuntary movements. The contributions of pioneers from Aristotle to Yarbus are outlined. PMID:23396982

  1. Pioneers of Eye Movement Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Wade

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the technology affording eye movement recordings carry the risk of neglecting past achievements. Without the assistance of this modern armoury, great strides were made in describing the ways the eyes move. For Aristotle the fundamental features of eye movements were binocular, and he described the combined functions of the eyes. This was later given support using simple procedures like placing a finger over the eyelid of the closed eye and culminated in Hering's law of equal innervation. However, the overriding concern in the 19th century was with eye position rather than eye movements. Appreciating discontinuities of eye movements arose from studies of vertigo. The characteristics of nystagmus were recorded before those of saccades and fixations. Eye movements during reading were described by Hering and by Lamare in 1879; both used similar techniques of listening to sounds made during contractions of the extraocular muscles. Photographic records of eye movements during reading were made by Dodge early in the 20th century, and this stimulated research using a wider array of patterns. In the mid-20th century attention shifted to the stability of the eyes during fixation, with the emphasis on involuntary movements. The contributions of pioneers from Aristotle to Yarbus are outlined.

  2. Jellyfish movement data - Determining Movement Patterns of Jellyfish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is to determine horizontal and vertical movement patterns of two jellyfish species in Hood Canal, in relation to environmental variables. It is being...

  3. Magnetoencephalographic study on facial movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku eMiki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we introduced our three studies that focused on facial movements. In the first study, we examined the temporal characteristics of neural responses elicited by viewing mouth movements, and assessed differences between the responses to mouth opening and closing movements and an averting eyes condition. Our results showed that the occipitotemporal area, the human MT/V5 homologue, was active in the perception of both mouth and eye motions. Viewing mouth and eye movements did not elicit significantly different activity in the occipitotemporal area, which indicated that perception of the movement of facial parts may be processed in the same manner, and this is different from motion in general. In the second study, we investigated whether early activity in the occipitotemporal region evoked by eye movements was influenced by a face contour and/or features such as the mouth. Our results revealed specific information processing for eye movements in the occipitotemporal region, and this activity was significantly influenced by whether movements appeared with the facial contour and/or features, in other words, whether the eyes moved, even if the movement itself was the same. In the third study, we examined the effects of inverting the facial contour (hair and chin and features (eyes, nose, and mouth on processing for static and dynamic face perception. Our results showed the following: (1 In static face perception, activity in the right fusiform area was affected more by the inversion of features while that in the left fusiform area was affected more by a disruption in the spatial relationship between the contour and features, and (2 In dynamic face perception, activity in the right occipitotemporal area was affected by the inversion of the facial contour.

  4. Dance movement therapy for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkou, Vicky; Meekums, Bonnie

    2017-02-03

    Dementia is a collective name for different degenerative brain syndromes which, according to Alzheimer's Disease International, affects approximately 35.6 million people worldwide. The latest NICE guideline for dementia highlights the value of diverse treatment options for the different stages and symptoms of dementia including non-pharmacological treatments. Relevant literature also argues for the value of interventions that acknowledge the complexity of the condition and address the person as a whole, including their physical, emotional, social and cognitive processes. At the same time, there is growing literature that highlights the capacity of the arts and embodied practices to address this complexity. Dance movement therapy is an embodied psychological intervention that can address complexity and thus, may be useful for people with dementia, but its effectiveness remains unclear. To assess the effects of dance movement therapy on behavioural, social, cognitive and emotional symptoms of people with dementia in comparison to no treatment, standard care or any other treatment. Also, to compare different forms of dance movement therapy (e.g. Laban-based dance movement therapy, Chacian dance movement therapy or Authentic Movement). Searches took place up to March 2016 through ALOIS, Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement's Specialized Register, which covers CENTRAL, a number of major healthcare databases and trial registers, and grey literature sources. We checked bibliographies of relevant studies and reviews, and contacted professional associations, educational programmes and experts from around the world. We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language, including cross-over design and cluster-RCTs for inclusion. Studies considered had to include people with dementia, in any age group and in any setting, with interventions delivered by a dance movement therapy practitioner who (i) had received formal training (ii) was a dance movement

  5. [Stereotactic radiosurgery for movement disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobstyl, Michał; Ząbek, Mirosław

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, functional neurosurgery is an established treatment for movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. The effectiveness and safety of neuromodulation procedures (deep brain stimulation) replaced in the last years ablative irreversible stereotactic lesions for movement disorders. Stereotactic radiosurgery with gamma knife is a non-invasive form of treatment for movement disorders. The main limitation of stereotactic radiosurgery is the impossibility of electrophysiological confirmation of the target structure. Nevertheless, patients with advanced age and significant medical conditions that preclude classic open stereotactic procedures or patients who must receive anticoagulation therapy may gain great functional benefit using gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery.

  6. MnO2@KCu7S4 NWs hybrid compositions for high-power all-solid-state supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shuge; Xi, Yi; Hu, Chenguo; Yue, Xule; Cheng, Lu; Wang, Guo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a high-power all-solid-state supercapacitor based on a novel structure of MnO2@KCu7S4 NWs. The electrodes exhibit excellent electrochemical performance with large specific capacitance of 533 F g-1 and the maximum power density 2.02 kW kg-1, still hold 85% of the capacitance over 6000 cycles. Besides, we also explored the effect of temperature on the capacitance. When compared with capacitance at different temperatures, the specific capacity at 80 °C demonstrates significantly higher. Moreover, two supercapacitors in series can power 41 light-emitting diodes (LEDs) about 4 min. These results suggest that such MnO2@KCu7S4 hybrid composite is promising for next generation high-performance supercapacitors.

  7. Cube-like Cu2MoS4 photocatalysts for visible light-driven degradation of methyl orange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cube-like Cu2MoS4 nanoparticles with low-index facets and high crystallinity were fabricated via a hydrothermal method. The as-obtained nanocubes with an average size of 40-60 nm are composed of stacking-Cu2MoS4 layers separated by a weak Van der Waals gap of 0.5 nm. A strong absorption at visible light region is observed in the nanocube aqueous solution, indicating its optical-band gap of 1.78 eV. The photocatalytic measurements reveal that the nanocubes can thoroughly induce the degradation of methyl orange under visible light irradiation with good structural stability. Our finding may provide a way in design and fabrication of transition metal dichalcogenide nanostructures for practical applications.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: S4G galaxy morphologies in the CVRHS system (Buta+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buta, R. J.; Sheth, K.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Knapen, J. H.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Elmegreen, D.; Ho, L. C.; Zaritsky, D.; Courtois, H.; Hinz, J. L.; Munoz-Mateos, J.-C.; Kim, T.; Regan, M. W.; Gadotti, D. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Laine, J.; Menendez-Delmestre, K.; Comeron, S.; Erroz-Ferrer, S.; Seibert, M.; Mizusawa, T.; Holwerda, B.; Madore, B. F.

    2015-05-01

    Our final list has 2412 galaxies, 60 more than the extended S4images were already available. New data were collected for the ~1750 remaining sample galaxies. The CVRHS system is a modified version of the de Vaucouleurs (1959HDP....53..275D) revised Hubble-Sandage (VRHS) system that is described in the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies (dVA, Buta et al. 2007dvag.book.....B). (4 data files).

  9. Exploring the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with the bicyclical AMPA analogue (S)-4-AHCP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina B; Pickering, Darryl S; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2005-01-01

    The X-ray structure of the ionotropic GluR2 ligand-binding core (GluR2-S1S2J) in complex with the bicyclical AMPA analogue (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-7,8-dihydro-6H-cyclohepta[d]-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [(S)-4-AHCP] has been determined, as well as the binding pharmacology of this construct...

  10. Synthesis and Structure of a New Quinary Sulfide Halide: LaCa(2)GeS(4)Cl(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitzendanner, Robert L.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    1996-04-24

    A new quinary rare earth sulfide-halide compound has been synthesized and its structure determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. LaCa(2)GeS(4)Cl(3) crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric hexagonal space group -P6(3)mc (No. 186) with Z = 2, a = 9.731(1) Å, and c = 6.337(1) Å. Lanthanum and calcium are mixed on a pseudo-trigonal prismatic site, coordinated to three sulfur atoms on one triangular face and three chlorine atoms on the other. Isolated, slightly distorted tetrahedra of GeS(4) are oriented with a tetrahedral 3-fold axis aligned along the crystallographic 3-fold rotation axis. Preliminary optical studies indicate that this material has a useful optical window extending approximately from 0.5 to 10 &mgr;m. Nonlinear optical activity of LaCa(2)GeS(4)Cl(3) is demonstrated by the generation of green light when pumped with a 1.064 &mgr;m Nd:YAG laser.

  11. Characterization of methyl parathion degradation by a Burkholderia zhejiangensis strain, CEIB S4-3, isolated from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoca-Ursino, Elida C; Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Dantán-González, Edgar; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ortiz-Hernández, Ma Laura

    2017-12-01

    Through the use of an enrichment technique, we isolated from the agricultural soils of Morelos in central México a strain of Burkholderia zhejiangensis identified as CEIB S4-3, it's could use the pesticide methyl parathion (MP) as the only source of carbon and degrade completely p-nitrophenol (PNP). For more efficient MP and PNP degradation by the CEIB S4-3 strain, the absence of an extra carbon source, a large inoculum and an MP concentration up to 50 mg/l are required. Sequence and annotation analysis of the draft genome, showed presence of mpd functional gene, which was expressed and its activity on the MP was confirmed. Additionally, the genes coding for enzymes in the benzoquinone pathway (conducted by Gram-negative bacteria) and the benzenotriol pathway (conducted by Gram-positive bacteria) were found, which was corroborated by identification of intermediary metabolites by HPLC. Thus, we propose that B. zhejiangensis CEIB S4-3 uses both degradation pathways.

  12. Movement disorders in mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaoui, Roula; Sue, Carolyn M

    2018-01-06

    Mitochondrial disease presents with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that may appear at any age and cause multisystem dysfunction. A broad spectrum of movement disorders can manifest in mitochondrial diseases including ataxia, Parkinsonism, myoclonus, dystonia, choreoathetosis, spasticity, tremor, tic disorders and restless legs syndrome. There is marked heterogeneity of movement disorder phenotypes, even in patients with the same genetic mutation. Moreover, the advent of new technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, is likely to identify novel causative genes, expand the phenotype of known disease genes and improve the genetic diagnosis in these patients. Identification of the underlying genetic basis of the movement disorder is also a crucial step to allow for targeted therapies to be implemented as well as provide the basis for a better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of the disease process. The aim of this review is to discuss the spectrum of movement disorders associated with mitochondrial disease.

  13. Social movements: A poststructuralist reading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antón Fernández de Rota Irimia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The present article tries to rethink social movements from a poststructuralist position, going beyond Synthesis Theory. For the last twenty years the synthesis of the theories of Resource Mobilization, Political Opportunity and Cognitive Framing has been taken to be the last word in the sociology of social movements. Nevertheless, far from being any sort of advance, Synthesis Theory has merely perpetuated previous theories, without, in my opinion,managing to reconceptualize the constitution of power, or the force and embodiment of movement. The lack of theoretical attention to the definition of movement is a curious absence which needs to be redressed . My aim is approach it not from the notion of "subject" or any other type of "institution", but rather in terms of the contingencies of everyday life.   

  14. NSAIDs in orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumar Karthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response toward a mechanical force. The movement is induced by prolonged application of controlled mechanical forces, which create pressure and tension zones in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, causing remodeling of tooth sockets. Orthodontists often prescribe drugs to manage pain from force application to biologic tissues. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the drugs usually prescribed. NSAIDs block prostaglandin synthesis and result in slower tooth movement. Prostaglandins have been found to play a direct role in bone resorption. Aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, vadecoxib, and celecoxib are the commonly prescribed drugs. Acetaminophen is the drug of choice for orthodontic pain without affecting orthodontic tooth movement.

  15. The Movements of Near Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, R.; Witt, D.

    1974-01-01

    Presents a computer program that uses radial and transverse star movements to make approximations of the closest approach in light years. In addition using the present actual visual magnitude the greatest magnitude attained is calculated. (Author/GS)

  16. Eye movements when viewing advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Emily; Leinenger, Mallorie; Rayner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads), before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet). Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research. PMID:24672500

  17. Eye movements when viewing advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Emily; Leinenger, Mallorie; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads), before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet). Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research.

  18. Eye Movements When Viewing Advertisements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eHiggins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads, before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet. Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research.

  19. Laban Movement Analysis in Dance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Toby

    1984-01-01

    Laban Movement Analysis is a system that helps dancers recognize and define the variety of elements that make up the movement event. This is not a method of teaching a movement style, but provides a means for creative expression. (DF)

  20. Signature movements lead to efficient search for threatening actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen J A van Boxtel

    Full Text Available The ability to find and evade fighting persons in a crowd is potentially life-saving. To investigate how the visual system processes threatening actions, we employed a visual search paradigm with threatening boxer targets among emotionally-neutral walker distractors, and vice versa. We found that a boxer popped out for both intact and scrambled actions, whereas walkers did not. A reverse correlation analysis revealed that observers' responses clustered around the time of the "punch", a signature movement of boxing actions, but not around specific movements of the walker. These findings support the existence of a detector for signature movements in action perception. This detector helps in rapidly detecting aggressive behavior in a crowd, potentially through an expedited (subcortical threat-detection mechanism.

  1. Semantic trajectory compression: Representing urban movement in a nutshell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Florian Richter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing number of rapidly growing repositories capturing the movement of people in space-time. Movement trajectory compression becomes an obvious necessity for coping with such growing data volumes. This paper introduces the concept of semantic trajectory compression (STC. STC allows for substantially compressing trajectory data with acceptable information loss. It exploits that human urban mobility typically occurs in transportation networks that define a geographic context for the movement. In STC, a semantic representation of the trajectory that consists of reference points localized in a transportation network replaces raw, highly redundant position information (e.g., from GPS receivers. An experimental evaluation with real and synthetic trajectories demonstrates the power of STC in reducing trajectories to essential information and illustrates how trajectories can be restored from compressed data. The paper discusses possible application areas of STC trajectories.

  2. Movement Behaviors in Children and Indicators of Adverse Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Mads Fiil

    The prevalence of overweight children is high and increasing numbers of children now show features of metabolic syndrome. Various aspects of physical activity, sedentary behavior, and lack of good-quality sleep have all been linked to this recent development of overweight and cardio-metabolic risk...... at reducing obesity and its associated metabolic complications in adulthood. In my PhD thesis I assessed objectively measured physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sleep in 8- to 11-year-old Danish children and related these movement behaviors to indicators of adverse health (dietary intake, adiposity...... among children. Early puberty is a period characterized by rapid changes in body composition and movement behaviors. As movement behaviors, obesity, and cardio-metabolic risk appear to track from childhood to adulthood, this may be a critical period for implementing preventive strategies aimed...

  3. Mandibular movement range in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Barbara Cristina Zanandréa; Medeiros, Ana Paula Magalhães; Felício, Cláudia Maria de

    2009-01-01

    identification of the mandibular movement range is an important procedure in the evaluation of the stomatognathic system. However, there are few studies in children that focus on normal parameters or abnormalities. to determine the average range of mandibular movements in Brazilian children aged 6 to 12 years; to verify the difference between genders, in each age group, and between the different age groups: 6-8 years; 8.1-10 years; and 10.1-12 years. participants of the study were 240 healthy children selected among regular students from local schools of São Paulo State. The maximum mandibular opening, lateral excursion and protrusive movements, and deviation of the medium line, if present, were measured using a digital caliper. Student T test, Analysis of variance and Tukey test were considered significant for p mandibular opening; 7.71mm for lateral excursion to the right; 7.92mm for lateral excursion to the left; 7.45mm for protrusive movements. No statistical difference was observed between genders. There was a gradual increase in the range of mandibular movements, with significant differences mainly between the ages of 6-8 years and 10.1-12 years. during childhood the range of mandibular movements increases. Age should be considered in this analysis for a greater precision in the diagnosis.

  4. The movement ecology of seagrasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kathryn; van Dijk, Kor-Jent; Ruiz-Montoya, Leonardo; Kendrick, Gary A; Krauss, Siegfried L; Waycott, Michelle; Verduin, Jennifer; Lowe, Ryan; Statton, John; Brown, Eloise; Duarte, Carlos

    2014-11-22

    A movement ecology framework is applied to enhance our understanding of the causes, mechanisms and consequences of movement in seagrasses: marine, clonal, flowering plants. Four life-history stages of seagrasses can move: pollen, sexual propagules, vegetative fragments and the spread of individuals through clonal growth. Movement occurs on the water surface, in the water column, on or in the sediment, via animal vectors and through spreading clones. A capacity for long-distance dispersal and demographic connectivity over multiple timeframes is the novel feature of the movement ecology of seagrasses with significant evolutionary and ecological consequences. The space-time movement footprint of different life-history stages varies. For example, the distance moved by reproductive propagules and vegetative expansion via clonal growth is similar, but the timescales range exponentially, from hours to months or centuries to millennia, respectively. Consequently, environmental factors and key traits that interact to influence movement also operate on vastly different spatial and temporal scales. Six key future research areas have been identified.

  5. Eventful places in the 2011 movements

    OpenAIRE

    Risager, Bjarke Skærlund

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the Occupy movement, the Egyptian revolutionaries and other of the 2011 social movements, this paper investigates the relationship between social movement and place. Drawing on first-hand accounts from these movements, I argue that the relationship between movement and place is dialectical and mutually constitutive: the physical and symbolic characteristics of place influence the formation of the movement and its actions while the latter re-creates the place. This is a corrective ...

  6. High Precision Neural Decoding of Complex Movement Trajectories using Recursive Bayesian Estimation with Dynamic Movement Primitives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotson, Guy; Smith, Ryan J; Rouse, Adam G; Schieber, Marc H; Thakor, Nitish V; Wester, Brock A

    2016-07-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) are a rapidly progressing technology with the potential to restore function to victims of severe paralysis via neural control of robotic systems. Great strides have been made in directly mapping a user's cortical activity to control of the individual degrees of freedom of robotic end-effectors. While BMIs have yet to achieve the level of reliability desired for widespread clinical use, environmental sensors (e.g. RGB-D cameras for object detection) and prior knowledge of common movement trajectories hold great potential for improving system performance. Here we present a novel sensor fusion paradigm for BMIs that capitalizes on information able to be extracted from the environment to greatly improve the performance of control. This was accomplished by using dynamic movement primitives to model the 3D endpoint trajectories of manipulating various objects. We then used a switching unscented Kalman filter to continuously arbitrate between the 3D endpoint kinematics predicted by the dynamic movement primitives and control derived from neural signals. We experimentally validated our system by decoding 3D endpoint trajectories executed by a non-human primate manipulating four different objects at various locations. Performance using our system showed a dramatic improvement over using neural signals alone, with median distance between actual and decoded trajectories decreasing from 31.1 cm to 9.9 cm, and mean correlation increasing from 0.80 to 0.98. Our results indicate that our sensor fusion framework can dramatically increase the fidelity of neural prosthetic trajectory decoding.

  7. Eye movements in ephedrone-induced parkinsonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Bonnet

    Full Text Available Patients with ephedrone parkinsonism (EP show a complex, rapidly progressive, irreversible, and levodopa non-responsive parkinsonian and dystonic syndrome due to manganese intoxication. Eye movements may help to differentiate parkinsonian syndromes providing insights into which brain networks are affected in the underlying disease, but they have never been systematically studied in EP. Horizontal and vertical eye movements were recorded in 28 EP and compared to 21 Parkinson's disease (PD patients, and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects using standardized oculomotor tasks with infrared videooculography. EP patients showed slow and hypometric horizontal saccades, an increased occurrence of square wave jerks, long latencies of vertical antisaccades, a high error rate in the horizontal antisaccade task, and made more errors than controls when pro- and antisaccades were mixed. Based on oculomotor performance, a direct differentiation between EP and PD was possible only by the velocity of horizontal saccades. All remaining metrics were similar between both patient groups. EP patients present extensive oculomotor disturbances probably due to manganese-induced damage to the basal ganglia, reflecting their role in oculomotor system.

  8. High specific radioactivity (1R,2S)-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorometaraminol: a PET radiotracer for mapping sympathetic nerves of the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, Oliver; Valette, Heric; Dolle, Frederic E-mail: dolle@dsvidf.cea.fr; Halldin, Christer; Loc' h, Christian; Fuseau, Chantal; Coulon, Christine; Ottaviani, Michele; Bottlaender, Michel; Maziere, Bernard; Crouzel, Christian

    2000-04-01

    The radiolabeled catecholamine analogue (1R,2S)-6-[{sup 18}F]fluorometaraminol (6-[{sup 18}F]FMR) is a substrate for the neuronal norepinephrine transporter. It has been used as a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand to map sympathetic nerves in dog heart. 6-[{sup 18}F]FMR could be only synthesized with low specific radioactivity, which precluded its use in human subjects. We have recently prepared (1R,2S)-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorometaraminol (4-[{sup 18}F]FMR), a new fluoro-analogue of metaraminol, with high specific radioactivity (56-106 GBq/{mu}mol). In the present study, we demonstrate in rats that 4-[{sup 18}F]FMR possesses similar affinity toward myocardial norepinephrine transport mechanisms as 6-[{sup 18}F]FMR. When compared with control animals, an 80% and 76% reduction in myocardial uptake was observed in animals pretreated with desipramine (an inhibitor of the neuronal norepinephrine transporter) and with reserpine (a blocker of the vesicular storage of monoamines), respectively. The entire radioactivity in rat myocardium represented unmetabolized parent tracer as determined by high performance liquid chromatography analysis of tissue extracts. In dogs, myocardial kinetics of 4-[{sup 18}F]FMR were assessed using PET. A rapid and high uptake was observed, followed by prolonged cardiac retention. A heart-to-lung ratio of 15 was reached 10 min after injection of the radiotracer. Pretreatment with desipramine reduced the heart half-life of 4-[{sup 18}F]FMR by 90% compared with control. Moreover, an infusion of tyramine caused a rapid decline of radioactivity in the heart. This demonstrates that 4-[{sup 18}F]FMR specifically visualizes sympathetic neurons in dog heart. High specific radioactivity 4-[{sup 18}F]FMR is a promising alternative to 6-[{sup 18}F]FMR for myocardial neuronal mapping with PET in humans.

  9. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand.

  10. Data S4.xls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Choong Yong

    Microcebus murinus), Bushbaby (Otolemur Garnettii), Mouse (Mus musculus), Rat (Rattus norvegicus), Squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus), Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), Pig (Sus scrofa) ...

  11. S:4 )~W:<.. ~ ---1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ever, must be rejected as mere false propaganda because reality and experience have unmistakably proved that the Kremlin's definition of the concepts peace and peaceful co-existence is totally different to that of the West. While proclaiming peace, and propagating the principles of detente and peaceful co-existence, it ...

  12. S:4 )~W:<.. ~ ---1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    building the new society in socialist countries, and for developing ... secure world domination, not by making war but by means of ... the British geographer, Sir Halford Mackinder, at the beginning of ... to lend itself to the growth of empires and in the end to a single ... India and South Atlantic) and the surrounding lands. (India ...

  13. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  14. Heterometallic [AgFe(3)S (4)] ferredoxin variants: synthesis, characterization, and the first crystal structure of an engineered heterometallic iron-sulfur protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martic, Maja; Jakab-Simon, Ida Noémi; Haahr, Lærke Tvedebrink; Hagen, Wilfred Raymond; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2013-02-01

    Heterometallic [AgFe(3)S(4)] iron-sulfur clusters assembled in wild-type Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin and two variants, D14C and D14H, are characterized. The crystal structure of the [AgFe(3)S(4)] D14C variant shows that the silver(I) ion is indeed part of the cluster and is coordinated to the thiolate group of residue 14. Cyclic voltammetry shows one redox pair with a reduction potential of +220 mV versus the standard hydrogen electrode which is assigned to the [AgFe(3)S(4)](2+/+) couple. The oxidized form of the [AgFe(3)S(4)] D14C variant is stable in the presence of dioxygen, whereas the oxidized forms of the [AgFe(3)S(4)] wild type and D14H variants convert to the [Fe(3)S(4)] ferredoxin form. The monovalent d (10) silver(I) ion stabilizes the [Fe(3)S(4)](+/0) cluster fragment, as opposed to divalent d (10) metal ions, resulting in more than 0.4 V difference in reduction potentials between the silver(I) and, e.g., zinc(II) heterometallic [MFe(3)S(4)] ferredoxins. The trend in reduction potentials for the variants containing the [AgFe(3)S(4)] cluster is wild type ≤ D14C potential trend for the variants containing the heterometallic [AgFe(3)S(4)] cluster and the [Fe(3)S(4)] cluster can be rationalized in terms of the electrostatic influence of the residue 14 side chains, rather than the dissociation constant of this residue, as is the case for [Fe(4)S(4)] ferredoxins. The trends in reduction potentials are in line with there being no electronic coupling between the silver(I) ion and the Fe(3)S(4) fragment.

  15. Rare Earth Chalcogels NaLnSnS4 (Ln = Y, Gd, Tb) for Selective Adsorption of Volatile Hydrocarbons and Gases

    KAUST Repository

    Edhaim, Fatimah

    2017-06-28

    The synthesis and characterization of the rare earth chalcogenide aerogels NaYSnS4, NaGdSnS4, and NaTbSnS4 is reported. Rare earth metal ions like Y3+, Gd3+, and Tb3+ react with the chalcogenide clusters [SnS4]4– in aqueous formamide solution forming extended polymeric networks by gelation. Aerogels obtained after supercritical drying have BET surface areas of 649 m2·g–1 (NaYSnS4), 479 m2·g–1 (NaGdSnS4), and 354 m2·g–1 (NaTbSnS4). Electron microscopy and physisorption studies reveal that the new materials have pores in the macro (above 50 nm) and meso (2–50 nm) regions. These aerogels show higher adsorption of toluene vapor over cyclohexane vapor and CO2 over CH4 or H2. The notable adsorption capacity for toluene (NaYSnS4: 1108 mg·g–1; NaGdSnS4: 921 mg·g–1; and NaTbSnS4: 645 mg·g–1) and high selectivity for gases (CO2/H2: 172 and CO2/CH4: 50 for NaYSnS4, CO2/H2: 155 and CO2/CH4: 37 for NaGdSnS4, and CO2/H2: 75 and CO2/CH4: 28 for NaTbSnS4) indicate potential future use of chalcogels in adsorption-based gas or hydrocarbon separation processes.

  16. Mindful Movement and Skilled Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dav eClark

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel mind-body connection has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage higher-order inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer’s spectrum of mindful learning that spans from mindlessness to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais’ suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other

  17. Mindful movement and skilled attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Dav; Schumann, Frank; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2015-01-01

    Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel "mind-body connection" has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited) behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage "higher-order" inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer's spectrum of mindful learning that spans from "mindlessness" to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais' suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other populations.

  18. Antiperovskite Chalco-Halides Ba3(FeS4)Cl, Ba3(FeS4)Br, and Ba3(FeSe4)Br with Spin Super-Super Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Liu, Kai; He, Jian-Qiao; Wu, Hui; Huang, Qing-Zhen; Lin, Jian-Hua; Lu, Zhong-Yi; Huang, Fu-Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Perovskite-related materials have received increasing attention for their broad applications in photovoltaic solar cells and information technology due to their unique electrical and magnetic properties. Here we report three new antiperovskite chalco-halides: Ba3(FeS4)Cl, Ba3(FeS4)Br, and Ba3(FeSe4)Br. All of them were found to be good solar light absorbers. Remarkably, although the shortest Fe-Fe distance exceeds 6 Å, an unexpected anti-ferromagnetic phase transition near 100 K was observed in their magnetic susceptibility measurement. The corresponding complex magnetic structures were resolved by neutron diffraction experiments as well as investigated by first-principles electronic structure calculations. The spin-spin coupling between two neighboring Fe atoms along the b axis, which is realized by the Fe-S···S-Fe super-super exchange mechanism, was found to be responsible for this magnetic phase transition.

  19. High crystalline Cu2ZnSnS4 semiconductor prepared from low toxicity ethanol-based precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Badrul; Prastyo, Bayu Eko; Nurjaya, Dwi Marta; Muslih, Ersan Yudhapratama; Alfauzan, Sahri Karim

    2017-01-01

    At this moment, we present a new, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly method of preparing a high crystalline Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) absorber layer for thin film solar cells using ethanol-based solutions. Ethanolamine (ETA) and 2-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were studied as a stabilizer and to improve wetting ability of the precursors during the deposition process. Cu2ZnSnS4 precursors are deposited onto soda lime glass using spin coater in different molar of cations in the precursor. The effects of a precursor system, ethanol-ETA-MPA, and ethanol-MPA, on the structure, morphology, composition and optical properties of CZTS thin films have been investigated in details. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed the successful fabrication of high crystalline Cu2ZnSnS4 kesterite phase. The crystallinity of CZTS is continue increasing before reaching 2.2 molar cations of the ethanol-MPA precursors. The crystallinity of ethanol-ETA-MPA precursors remains similar in the experiment using 1.2 molar and 1.6 molars. The highest crystallinity was achieved using 2 molar cations of the ethanol-MPA precursor. Its band gap energy is found to be around 1.4 eV. The SEM micrographs of CZTS film shows the average grain size around 1.5 µm and some porosity which indicated the room of improvement. The high-crystallinity CZTS achieved in the present study brings a low-cost absorber semiconductor one step closer to practical use.

  20. Multiwavelength observations of the γ-ray flaring quasar S4 1030+61 in 2009-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, E. V.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Hovatta, T.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the parsec-scale multifrequency properties of the quasar S4 1030+61 during a prolonged radio and γ-ray activity. Observations were performed within Fermi γ-ray telescope, Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40-m telescope and MOJAVE Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) monitoring programmes, covering five years from 2009. The data are supplemented by four-epoch VLBA observations at 5, 8, 15, 24 and 43 GHz, which were triggered by the bright γ-ray flare, registered in the quasar in 2010. The S4 1030+61 jet exhibits an apparent superluminal velocity of (6.4 ± 0.4)c and does not show ejections of new components in the observed period, while decomposition of the radio light curve reveals nine prominent flares. The measured variability parameters of the source show values typical for Fermi-detected quasars. Combined analysis of radio and γ-ray emission implies a spatial separation between emitting regions at these bands of about 12 pc and locates the γ-ray emission within a parsec from the central engine. We detected changes in the value and direction of the linear polarization and the Faraday rotation measure. The value of the intrinsic brightness temperature of the core is above the equipartition state, while its value as a function of distance from the core is well approximated by the power law. Altogether these results show that the radio flaring activity of the quasar is accompanied by injection of relativistic particles and energy losses at the jet base, while S4 1030+61 has a stable, straight jet well described by standard conical jet theories.

  1. Context-dependent adaptation of visually-guided arm movements and vestibular eye movements: role of the cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate motor control requires adaptive processes that correct for gradual and rapid perturbations in the properties of the controlled object. The ability to quickly switch between different movement synergies using sensory cues, referred to as context-dependent adaptation, is a subject of considerable interest at present. The potential function of the cerebellum in context-dependent adaptation remains uncertain, but the data reviewed below suggest that it may play a fundamental role in this process.

  2. Rapid eye-fixation training without eyetracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Leung, Parkson; Franconeri, Steve; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2009-06-01

    Maintenance of stable central eye fixation is crucial for a variety of behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging experiments. Naive observers in these experiments are not typically accustomed to fixating, either requiring the use of cumbersome and costly eyetracking or producing confounds in results. We devised a flicker display that produced an easily detectable visual phenomenon whenever the eyes moved. A few minutes of training using this display dramatically improved the accuracy of eye fixation while observers performed a demanding spatial attention cuing task. The same amount of training using control displays did not produce significant fixation improvements, and some observers consistently made eye movements to the peripheral attention cue, contaminating the cuing effect. Our results indicate that (1) eye fixation can be rapidly improved in naive observers by providing real-time feedback about eye movements, and (2) our simple flicker technique provides an easy and effective method for providing this feedback.

  3. Sodium distribution in solar-grade Cu2ZnSnS4 layers using atom-probe tomographic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Shin; Asahi, Ryoji; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Itoh, Tadayoshi; Ohishi, Kei-ichiro

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effect of alkali doping on Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) photovoltaic cells, we studied compositional distributions in CZTS layers using three-dimensional atom-probe tomography. The segregation of Na at a concentration of approximately 1 at. % was observed predominantly at CZTS grain boundaries. The concentration of Na in the interior of the CZTS grains was below the detection limit (approximately 40 ppm). Na ions may exist as sulfide compounds at CZTS grain boundaries, independent of the presence of oxygen.

  4. Solution synthesis and reactivity of colloidal Fe2GeS4: a potential candidate for earth abundant, nanostructured photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Sarah J; Prieto, Amy L

    2013-12-11

    Iron chalcogenides, in particular iron pyrite, have great potential to be useful materials for cost-effective thin film photovoltaics. However, the performance of pyrite as an absorber material in photovoltaic devices has fallen far short of the theoretical efficiency. A potential cause of this may be the instability of the pyrite phase. An alternate class of iron chalcogenides, Fe2MS4 (M = Ge, Si) has been proposed as a possible alternative to pyrite, yet has only been studied for interesting magnetic properties. Herein, we report the first solution synthesis of colloidal Fe2GeS4 and report the optical properties, reactivity, and potential for use as a photovoltaic material.

  5. Low temperature magnetic susceptibility behavior of the Neuschwanstein EL6 meteorite and mineral daubreelite (FeCr2S4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohout, T.; Kletetschka, G.; Lehtinen, M.; Pesonen, L. J.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    Neuschwanstein meteorite (enstatite chondrite EL-6) fall occurred on April 6, 2002 close to Neuschwanstein castle in Bavaria, Germany. Total three meteorite bodies were found on the fall site. Two fragments coming from a 1750g body found on July 14, 2002 were obtained to the Division of Geophysics, University of Helsinki. The low temperature magnetic properties were investigated using KLY-3 and KLY-4 kappabridges equipped with low temperature control unit. During the low-temperature susceptibility measurements an unknown kink feature was observed at ~150 K on all measured samples. The closest known magnetic transition is the curie temperature Tc ~170 K of synthetic FeCr2S4 mentioned in Müller et al., 2006. FeCr2S4 is naturally present in enstatite chondrites and iron meteorites in the form of mineral daubreelite and was reported to be present in the Neuschwanstein meteorite in Zipfel and Dreibus, 2003. The extensive study of magnetic susceptibility of Neuschwanstein meteorite and daubreelite extract form Coahuila iron meteorite (hexahedrite, II A) was conducted in order to investigate the low temperature magnetic susceptibility of those materials and its field and frequency dependence. The results indicate Tc of natural daubreelite extract from Coahuila meteorite to be ~160 K what is slightly lower than the Tc of synthetic FeCr2S4 reported in Müller et al., 2006. The magnetic susceptibility of natural daubreelite from Coahuila meteorite and of ~150 K feature in Neuschwanstein meteorite show no field dependence of magnetic susceptibility. Due to the similarity in the low temperature magnetic susceptibility behaviour of Neuschwanstein meteorite and daubreelite extract from Coahuila meteorite we link the Neuschwanstein ~150 K feature to the Tc of daubreelite present in this meteorite. The 10 K difference of the Tc of daubreelite in Neuschwanstein and Coahuila meteorites can be attributed to the presence of impurities or structural deformations in the daubreelite

  6. Spray-coated Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films for large-scale photovoltaic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Sara Lena Josefin; Murthy, Swathi; Mariño, Simón López

    The kesterite material, Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), has in the preceding ten years been investigated and developed as a new Earth-abundant material for solar cells. The interest in this inorganic semiconductor originates in its optimal energy band gap of approx. 1.5 eV, high absorption coefficient...... the “cousin”-material, CuInGaSe2 (CIGS), which is currently one of the main thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies on the market. In this work, CZTS thin films have been fabricated by solution-processing, which allows relatively fast and inexpensive deposition when compared to vacuum-processed films...

  7. Dopamine function and the efficiency of human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gepshtein, Sergei; Li, Xiaoyan; Snider, Joseph; Plank, Markus; Lee, Dongpyo; Poizner, Howard

    2014-03-01

    To sustain successful behavior in dynamic environments, active organisms must be able to learn from the consequences of their actions and predict action outcomes. One of the most important discoveries in systems neuroscience over the last 15 years has been about the key role of the neurotransmitter dopamine in mediating such active behavior. Dopamine cell firing was found to encode differences between the expected and obtained outcomes of actions. Although activity of dopamine cells does not specify movements themselves, a recent study in humans has suggested that tonic levels of dopamine in the dorsal striatum may in part enable normal movement by encoding sensitivity to the energy cost of a movement, providing an implicit "motor motivational" signal for movement. We investigated the motivational hypothesis of dopamine by studying motor performance of patients with Parkinson disease who have marked dopamine depletion in the dorsal striatum and compared their performance with that of elderly healthy adults. All participants performed rapid sequential movements to visual targets associated with different risk and different energy costs, countered or assisted by gravity. In conditions of low energy cost, patients performed surprisingly well, similar to prescriptions of an ideal planner and healthy participants. As energy costs increased, however, performance of patients with Parkinson disease dropped markedly below the prescriptions for action by an ideal planner and below performance of healthy elderly participants. The results indicate that the ability for efficient planning depends on the energy cost of action and that the effect of energy cost on action is mediated by dopamine.

  8. Disorders of vergence eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Alessandro; Chen, Athena L; Leigh, R John

    2011-02-01

    The aim is to re-interpret disorders of vergence in the light of recent studies that view disjunctive eye movements as but one component of three-dimensional gaze control. Most natural eye movements combine vergence with saccades, pursuit and vestibular eye movements. Electrophysiological studies in epileptic patients, as well as evidence from monkeys, indicate that frontal and parietal cortex govern vergence as a component of three-dimensional gaze. Clinicians apply Hering's law of equal innervation to interpret disjunctive movements as the superposition of conjugate and vergence commands. However, electrophysiological studies indicate that disjunctive saccades are achieved by programming each eye's movement independently. Patients with internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) may have preserved vergence, which can be recruited to compensate for loss of conjugacy. Vergence may also enable gaze shifts in saccadic palsy. Some forms of nystagmus suppress or change with convergence; co-contraction of the horizontal rectus muscles does not appear to be the explanation. Rather, effects of near viewing on central vestibular mechanisms or differential activation of specific types of extra-ocular muscle fiber may be responsible. Interpretation of disorders of vergence is aided by applying a scheme in which their contributions to three-dimensional gaze control is considered.

  9. Movement sequencing in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Long, Jeffrey D; Lourens, Spencer G; Stout, Julie C; Mills, James A; Paulsen, Jane S

    2014-08-01

    To examine longitudinal changes in movement sequencing in prodromal Huntington's disease (HD) participants (795 prodromal HD; 225 controls) from the PREDICT-HD study. Prodromal HD participants were tested over seven annual visits and were stratified into three groups (low, medium, high) based on their CAG-Age Product (CAP) score, which indicates likely increasing proximity to diagnosis. A cued movement sequence task assessed the impact of advance cueing on response initiation and execution via three levels of advance information. Compared to controls, all CAP groups showed longer initiation and movement times across all conditions at baseline, demonstrating a disease gradient for the majority of outcomes. Across all conditions, the high CAP group had the highest mean for baseline testing, but also demonstrated an increase in movement time across the study. For initiation time, the high CAP group showed the highest mean baseline time across all conditions, but also faster decreasing rates of change over time. With progress to diagnosis, participants may increasingly use compensatory strategies, as evidenced by faster initiation. However, this occurred in conjunction with slowed execution times, suggesting a decline in effectively accessing control processes required to translate movement into effective execution.

  10. Eye movements in vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, A; Colpak, A I; Zee, D S

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of patients with vestibular symptoms usually begins with the question: is the lesion central or is it peripheral? The answer commonly emerges from a careful examination of eye movements, especially when the lesion is located in otherwise clinically silent areas of the brain such as the vestibular portions of the cerebellum (flocculus, paraflocculus which is called the tonsils in humans, nodulus, and uvula) and the vestibular nuclei as well as immediately adjacent areas (the perihypoglossal nuclei and the paramedian nuclei and tracts). The neural circuitry that controls vestibular eye movements is intertwined with a larger network within the brainstem and cerebellum that also controls other types of conjugate eye movements. These include saccades and pursuit as well as the mechanisms that enable steady fixation, both straight ahead and in eccentric gaze positions. Navigating through this complex network requires a thorough knowledge about all classes of eye movements to help localize lesions causing a vestibular disorder. Here we review the different classes of eye movements and how to examine them, and then describe common ocular motor findings associated with central vestibular lesions from both a topographic and functional perspective. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. BCG strain S4-Jena: An early BCG strain is capable to reduce the proliferation of bladder cancer cells by induction of apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Inge-Marie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intravesical immunotherapy with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin has been established as the most effective adjuvant treatment for high risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. We investigated the differences between the S4-Jena BCG strain and commercially available BCG strains. We tested the genotypic varieties between S4-Jena and other BCG strains and analysed the effect of the BCG strains TICE and S4-Jena on two bladder cancer cell lines. Results In contrast to commercially available BCG strains the S4-Jena strain shows genotypic differences. Spoligotyping verifies the S4-Jena strain as a BCG strain. Infection with viable S4-Jena or TICE decreased proliferation in the T24 cell line. Additionally, hallmarks of apoptosis were detectable. In contrast, Cal29 cells showed only a slightly decreased proliferation with TICE. Cal29 cells infected with S4-Jena, though, showed a significantly decreased proliferation in contrast to TICE. Concordantly with these results, infection with TICE had no effect on the morphology and hallmarks of apoptosis of Cal29 cells. However, S4-Jena strain led to clearly visible morphological changes and caspases 3/7 activation and PS flip. Conclusions S4-Jena strain has a direct influence on bladder cancer cell lines as shown by inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. The data implicate that the T24 cells are responder for S4-Jena and TICE BCG. However, the Cal29 cells are only responder for S4-Jena and they are non-responder for TICE BCG. S4-Jena strain may represent an effective therapeutic agent for NMIBC.

  12. Lattice-matched Cu2ZnSnS4/CeO2 solar cell with open circuit voltage boost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Yan, Chang; Iandolo, Beniamino

    2016-01-01

    We report a reproducible enhancement of the open circuit voltage in Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cells by introduction of a very thin CeO2 interlayer between the Cu2ZnSnS4 absorber and the conventional CdS buffer. CeO2, a non-toxic earth-abundant compound, has a nearly optimal band alignment with Cu2ZnSnS4...

  13. Functional extension of amino acid triads from the fourth transmembrane segment (S4) into its external linker in Shaker K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Chin; Lin, Shin; Chang, Po-Chun; Lin, Hsiao-Chun; Kuo, Chung-Chin

    2011-10-28

    The highly conserved fourth transmembrane segment (S4) is the primary voltage sensor of the voltage-dependent channel and would move outward upon membrane depolarization. S4 comprises repetitive amino acid triads, each containing one basic (presumably charged and voltage-sensing) followed by two hydrophobic residues. We showed that the triad organization is functionally extended into the S3-4 linker right external to S4 in Shaker K(+) channels. The arginine (and lysine) substitutes for the third and the sixth residues (Ala-359 and Met-356, respectively) external to the outmost basic residue (Arg-362) in S4 dramatically and additively stabilize S4 in the resting conformation. Also, Leu-361 and Leu-358 play a very similar role in stabilization of S4 in the resting position, presumably by their hydrophobic side chains. Moreover, the double mutation A359R/E283A leads to a partially extruded position of S4 and consequently prominent closed-state inactivation, suggesting that Glu-283 in S2 may coordinate with the arginines in the extruded S4 upon depolarization. We conclude that the triad organization extends into the S3-4 linker for about six amino acids in terms of their microenvironment. These approximately six residues should retain the same helical structure as S4, and their microenvironment serves as part of the "gating canal" accommodating the extruding S4. Upon depolarization, S4 most likely moves initially as a sliding helix and follows the path that is set by the approximately six residues in the S3-4 linker in the resting state, whereas further S4 translocation could be more like, for example, a paddle, without orderly coordination from the contiguous surroundings.

  14. Rapid Automatic Motor Encoding of Competing Reach Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Gallivan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mounting neural evidence suggests that, in situations in which there are multiple potential targets for action, the brain prepares, in parallel, competing movements associated with these targets, prior to implementing one of them. Central to this interpretation is the idea that competing viewed targets, prior to selection, are rapidly and automatically transformed into corresponding motor representations. Here, by applying target-specific, gradual visuomotor rotations and dissociating, unbeknownst to participants, the visual direction of potential targets from the direction of the movements required to reach the same targets, we provide direct evidence for this provocative idea. Our results offer strong empirical support for theories suggesting that competing action options are automatically represented in terms of the movements required to attain them. The rapid motor encoding of potential targets may support the fast optimization of motor costs under conditions of target uncertainty and allow the motor system to inform decisions about target selection.

  15. Camera Movement in Narrative Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Isak

    2007-01-01

    Just like art historians have focused on e.g. composition or lighting, this dissertation takes a single stylistic parameter as its object of study: camera movement. Within film studies this localized avenue of middle-level research has become increasingly viable under the aegis of a perspective......, and that a given camera movement may activate one or more of the proposed functions at any given moment. Six main functions are proposed and defined: 1) Orientation: orienting the viewer spatially. 2) Pacing: contributing to the cinematic rhythm of the film. 3) Inflection: inflecting shots in a suggestive...... to illustrate how the functions may mesh in individual camera movements six concrete examples are analyzed. The analyses illustrate how the taxonomy presented can substantiate analysis and interpretation of film style. More generally, the dissertation - and particularly these in-depth analyses - illustrates how...

  16. Movements of Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Bonnie M.; Knight, Richard R.

    1991-01-01

    Ninety-seven grizzly bears Ursus arctos horribilis were radio-located 6299 times during 1975–1987. Annual range sizes differed by sex, age, reproductive status and amount of precipitation. Females exhibited greater fidelity to seasonal and annual ranges than males. Weaned female offspring generally remained in the vicinity of the maternal range, while weaned males often made substantial movements to unexplored country. Average total home range size was 884 km2 for females and 3757 km2 for males. Males consistently exhibited greater indices of movement and range sizes than females. All cohorts had larger mean ranges during this study than during the period 1959–1969 when the population had access to open garbage dumps. Movements and elevational distribution of all cohorts were related to availability of whitebark pine Pinus albicaulis seeds. We hypothesized that females with cubs-of-the-year and yearlings were displaced from most productive habitats during seasons and years of limited food availability.

  17. Yarbus, Eye Movements, and Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin W Tatler

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact of Yarbus's research on eye movements was enormous following the translation of his book Eye Movements and Vision into English in 1967. In stark contrast, the published material in English concerning his life is scant. We provide a brief biography of Yarbus and assess his impact on contemporary approaches to research on eye movements. While early interest in his work focused on his study of stabilised retinal images, more recently this has been replaced with interest in his work on the cognitive influences on scanning patterns. We extended his experiment on the effect of instructions on viewing a picture using a portrait of Yarbus rather than a painting. The results obtained broadly supported those found by Yarbus.

  18. Eye Movements, Perceptual Span, and Reading Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Keith

    1983-01-01

    Research is reviewed on eye movements during reading, on the perceptual span and control of eye movements during normal reading, and on the nature of eye movements in dyslexia. Rather than the cause of dyslexia, eye movements are said to reflect underlying cognitive or neurological problems. (CL)

  19. Rapid, generalized adaptation to asynchronous audiovisual speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Burg, Erik; Goodbourn, Patrick T

    2015-04-07

    The brain is adaptive. The speed of propagation through air, and of low-level sensory processing, differs markedly between auditory and visual stimuli; yet the brain can adapt to compensate for the resulting cross-modal delays. Studies investigating temporal recalibration to audiovisual speech have used prolonged adaptation procedures, suggesting that adaptation is sluggish. Here, we show that adaptation to asynchronous audiovisual speech occurs rapidly. Participants viewed a brief clip of an actor pronouncing a single syllable. The voice was either advanced or delayed relative to the corresponding lip movements, and participants were asked to make a synchrony judgement. Although we did not use an explicit adaptation procedure, we demonstrate rapid recalibration based on a single audiovisual event. We find that the point of subjective simultaneity on each trial is highly contingent upon the modality order of the preceding trial. We find compelling evidence that rapid recalibration generalizes across different stimuli, and different actors. Finally, we demonstrate that rapid recalibration occurs even when auditory and visual events clearly belong to different actors. These results suggest that rapid temporal recalibration to audiovisual speech is primarily mediated by basic temporal factors, rather than higher-order factors such as perceived simultaneity and source identity. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensorimotor integration in movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2003-03-01

    Although current knowledge attributes movement disorders to a dysfunction of the basal ganglia-motor cortex circuits, abnormalities in the peripheral afferent inputs or in their central processing may interfere with motor program execution. We review the abnormalities of sensorimotor integration described in the various types of movement disorders. Several observations, including those of parkinsonian patients' excessive reliance on ongoing visual information during movement tasks, suggest that proprioception is defective in Parkinson's disease (PD). The disturbance of proprioceptive regulation, possibly related to the occurrence of abnormal muscle-stretch reflexes, might be important for generating hypometric or bradykinetic movements. Studies with somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), prepulse inhibition, and event-related potentials support the hypothesis of central abnormalities of sensorimotor integration in PD. In Huntington's disease (HD), changes in SEPs and long-latency stretch reflexes suggest that a defective gating of peripheral afferent input to the brain might impair sensorimotor integration in cortical motor areas, thus interfering with the processing of motor programs. Defective motor programming might contribute to some features of motor impairment in HD. Sensory symptoms are frequent in focal dystonia and sensory manipulation can modify the dystonic movements. In addition, specific sensory functions (kinaesthesia, spatial-temporal discrimination) can be impaired in patients with focal hand dystonia, thus leading to a "sensory overflow." Sensory input may be abnormal and trigger focal dystonia, or defective "gating" may cause an input-output mismatch in specific motor programs. Altogether, several observations strongly support the idea that sensorimotor integration is impaired in focal dystonia. Although elemental sensation is normal in patients with tics, tics can be associated with sensory phenomena. Some neurophysiological studies suggest that