WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapid pesticide leaching

  1. Soil column leaching of pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this review, I address the practical and theoretical aspects of pesticide soil mobility.I also address the methods used to measure mobility, and the factors that influence it, and I summarize the data that have been published on the column leaching of pesticides.Pesticides that enter the unsaturated soil profile are transported downwards by the water flux, and are adsorbed, desorbed, and/or degraded as they pass through the soil. The rate of passage of a pesticide through the soil depends on the properties of the pesticide, the properties of the soil and the prevailing environmental conditions.Because large amounts of many different pesticides are used around the world, they and their degradates may sometimes contaminate groundwater at unacceptable levels.It is for this reason that assessing the transport behavior and soil mobility of pesticides before they are sold into commerce is important and is one indispensable element that regulators use to assess probable pesticide safety. Both elementary soil column leaching and sophisticated outdoor lysimeter studies are performed to measure the leaching potential for pesticides; the latter approach more reliably reflects probable field behavior, but the former is useful to initially profile a pesticide for soil mobility potential.Soil is physically heterogeneous. The structure of soil varies both vertically and laterally, and this variability affects the complex flow of water through the soil profile, making it difficult to predict with accuracy. In addition, macropores exist in soils and further add to the complexity of how water flow occurs. The degree to which soil is tilled, the density of vegetation on the surface, and the type and amounts of organic soil amendments that are added to soil further affect the movement rate of water through soil, the character of soil adsorption sites and the microbial populations that exist in the soil. Parameters that most influence the rate of pesticide mobility in soil are

  2. Long-term lessons on pesticide leaching obtained via the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Anette E.; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn

    To avoid any unacceptable influence on the environment posed by pesticides and their degradation products, all pesticides used in the European Union needs authorization. The authorization procedure includes assessing the leaching risk of both pesticides and their degradation products...

  3. Pesticide leaching in a changing climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Signe Bonde

    preferential flow pathways. The sensitivity of pesticide leaching towards single high intensity events was tested by use of the artificial Chicago Design Storm (CDS), which were inserted in the driving weather file. Glyphosate showed a strong dependence, as short intense events resulted in relatively high...... leaching amounts under specific pre and post event weather conditions. This clearly illustrated the importance of including weather variability in pesticide fate modelling. An ensemble of 11 climate model projections were downscaled by perturbing a weather generator calibrated on local meteorological data......, resulting in 3000-year long weather series of statistically stationary climate. Effects of pesticide properties (sorption and degradation), pesticide application dates, and soil properties were included. The synthetic weather series produced in relation to objective (II) were used to simulate future changes...

  4. Sensitivity analyses for four pesticide leaching models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubus, Igor G; Brown, Colin D; Beulke, Sabine

    2003-09-01

    Sensitivity analyses using a one-at-a-time approach were carried out for leaching models which have been widely used for pesticide registration in Europe (PELMO, PRZM, PESTLA and MACRO). Four scenarios were considered for simulation of the leaching of two theoretical pesticides in a sandy loam and a clay loam soil, each with a broad distribution across Europe. Input parameters were varied within bounds reflecting their uncertainty and the influence of these variations on model predictions was investigated for accumulated percolation at 1-m depth and pesticide loading in leachate. Predictions for the base-case scenarios differed between chromatographic models and the preferential flow model MACRO for which large but transient pesticide losses were predicted in the clay loam. Volumes of percolated water predicted by the four models were affected by a small number of input parameters and to a small extent only, suggesting that meteorological variables will be the main drivers of water balance predictions. In contrast to percolation, predictions for pesticide loss were found to be sensitive to a large number of input parameters and to a much greater extent. Parameters which had the largest influence on the prediction of pesticide loss were generally those related to chemical sorption (Freundlich exponent nf and distribution coefficient Kf) and degradation (either degradation rates or DT50, QTEN value). Nevertheless, a significant influence of soil properties (field capacity, bulk density or parameters defining the boundary between flow domains in MACRO) was also noted in at least one scenario for all models. Large sensitivities were reported for all models, especially PELMO and PRZM, and sensitivity was greater where only limited leaching was simulated. Uncertainty should be addressed in risk assessment procedures for crop-protection products.

  5. Pesticide leaching through sandy and loamy fields e Long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn

    2015-01-01

    The European Union authorization procedure for pesticides includes assessment of the leaching risk posed by pesticides and their degradation products aimed at avoiding any unacceptable influence on the environment, in particular contamination of water, including drinking water and groundwater...

  6. Nitrate leaching and pesticide use in energy crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Uffe

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well.......Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well....

  7. The Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Brüsch, Walter Michael; Juhler, Rene K.

    Environmental Protection Agency that no restriction is needed given a yearly average concentration not exceeding 0.1 μg/l. New results from one of PLAP-field-sites show that late sommer periods with several pronounced rain events (more than 50 mm/day) can generate leaching of the herbicide glyphosate through...... concentration). Thus: exhibited and/or their degradation product(-s) 1 m b.g.s. in yearly average concentrations exceeding 0.1 μg/l (maximum allowable concentration). Thus: o azoxystrobin and its degradation product CyPM o bentazone o ethofumesate o TFMP (degradation product of fluazifop-P-butyl) o glyphosate......, and triasulfuron) were not detected during the 1999-2009 monitoring period. 9 of the pesticides and/or their degradation products: o bentazone o ethofumesate o TFMP and fluazifop-P (degradation products of fluazifop-P-butyl) o glyphosate and its degradation product AMPA o metamitron and its degradation product...

  8. Monitoring of pesticide leaching from cultivated fields in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüsch, Walter; Rosenbom, Annette E; Badawi, Nora

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme (PLAP) was initiated in 1998 by the Danish Parliament in order to evaluate whether the use of approved pesticides will result in an unacceptable contamination of the groundwater, if applied under field conditions in accordance with current Danish...

  9. Modelling The Risk of Pesticide Leaching At A Regional-scale In The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiktak, A.; de Nie, D. S.; van der Linden, A. M. A.

    A one dimensional pesticide leaching model, PEARL, in combination with a Geo- graphical Information System was used to calculate the leaching potential of pesticides into local surface waters and the regional groundwater. Calculations were performed for 6405 plots, which are unique combinations of spatially distributed model inputs. To have the seepage and drainage fluxes correctly described, the model was loosely coupled with a regional groundwater model. Simulations were carried out for four pesticides with different properties. Results showed that, generally, the average fluxes of pesticide into local surface waters were higher than the average fluxes of pesti- cide into the regional groundwater. Discharge by rapid drainage mechanisms (i.e. tube drainage and rapid surface drainage) dominated. For the four pesticides, completely different spatial patterns of leaching and discharge by drainage water were predicted. It was shown that the spatial pattern was affected by a large number of interacting pro- cesses, and that the relative importance of these processes differed between the four example pesticides. Frequency distributions of the leaching concentration showed that three pesticides were above the registration limit of 0.1 ug/L at more than 20% of the agricultural area. These results were compared with results from the first-tier of the Dutch pesticide registration procedure, which comes down to the application of one single standard scenario. For two pesticides, the first-tier was not strict enough. It was shown that it is not possible to find one single standard scenario, which applies to the full range of registered pesticides. This means that the number of standard sce- narios should be increased. Direct application of a regional-scale model, however, is to be preferred, because it provides the user with frequency distributions and gives information about areas of safe usage.

  10. Effect of harsh or mild extraction of soil on pesticide leaching to groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, Jos J.T.I.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of leaching to groundwater is an important aspect of pesticide risk assessment. The first leaching tier usually consists of simulations with leaching scenarios based on pesticide- soil properties derived from laboratory studies. Because the extractability of pesticide residues in such

  11. Prediction of climate impacts on pesticide leaching to the aquatic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Hans Jørgen; Rosenbom, Annette; van der Keur, Peter

    Evaluation of direct and indirect (crop rotations, crop management, and pesticide use) climate change effects of pesticide leaching in a regulatory perspective for two Danish cases......Evaluation of direct and indirect (crop rotations, crop management, and pesticide use) climate change effects of pesticide leaching in a regulatory perspective for two Danish cases...

  12. The effect of crop rotation on pesticide leaching in a regional pesticide risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderacchi, Matteo; Di Guardo, Andrea; Vischetti, Costantino; Trevisan, Marco

    2008-11-01

    New modeling approaches that include the use of GIS are under development in order to allow a more realistic assessment of environmental contamination by pesticides. This paper reports a regional GIS-based risk assessment using a software tool able to simulate complex and real crop rotations at the regional scale. A single pesticide leaching assessment has been done. The mean annual pesticide concentration in leachate has been analyzed using both stochastic and deterministic approaches. The outputs of these simulations were mapped over the sampling locations of the regional pesticide monitoring program, demonstrating that GIS-based risk assessment can be used to establish new monitoring programs. A multiple pesticide leaching assessment for analyzing the risk related to pest control strategies in six different maize-based rotations has been carried out. Additive toxic units approach has been used. Crop rotation allows to mediate the risk related to pesticide use because forces the use of different compounds with different fate and toxicology properties.

  13. Parameterisation, evaluation and comparison of pesticide leaching models to data from a Bologna field site, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, James A; Capri, Ettore; Trevisan, Marco; Errera, Giuseppe; Wilkins, Richard M

    2003-01-01

    Effective prediction of pesticide fate using mathematical models requires good process descriptions in the models and good choice of parameter values by the user. This paper examines the ability of seven pesticide leaching models (LEACHP, MACRO, PELMO, PESTLA, PLM, PRZM and VARLEACH) to describe an arable field environment where sunflowers are grown in the Po Valley, northern Italy. Two pesticides were considered, aclonifen and ethoprophos. The models were evaluated in terms of their ability to reproduce field data of soil water content and pesticide residues in the soil and ground water. The evaluation was based on a combination of calibrated and uncalibrated runs. The results from the models were compared with each other to explore the differences between the models. The models varied in their ability to predict soil water content in the summer: the capacity models PRZM, PELMO and VARLEACH predicted less drying than MACRO, PESTLA, PLM and LEACHP. The models varied in their ability to simulate the persistence of the pesticides in the soil. Differences in the simulated pesticide degradation rate were observed between the models, due to variations in the simulated soil water content and soil temperature, and also differences in the equation linking degradation rate to soil water content. There were large differences among the predictions of the models for the mean leaching depth of ethoprophos. PRZM, PELMO, PESTLA and LEACHP all showed similar mean leaching depth to each other, whereas VARLEACH predicted lower ethoprophos mobility and PLM and MACRO predicted greater mobility. All the models overpredicted dispersion of ethoprophos through the soil profile, as compared to the field data. None of the models was able to simulate the field data of rapid leaching of pesticide to ground water except PLM after calibration of the percentage of macropores in the mobile pore space. More work is required in the parameterisation of macropore flow for those models that include

  14. Pesticide sorption and leaching potential on three Hawaiian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen E; Ray, Chittaranjan; Ki, Seo Jin; Spokas, Kurt A; Koskinen, William C

    2015-08-15

    On the Hawaiian Islands, groundwater is the principal source of potable water and contamination of this key resource by pesticides is of great concern. To evaluate the leaching potential of four weak acid herbicides [aminocyclopyrachlor, picloram, metsulfuron-methyl, biologically active diketonitrile degradate of isoxaflutole (DKN)] and two neutral non-ionizable herbicides [oxyfluorfen, alachlor], their sorption coefficients were determined on three prevalent soils from the island of Oahu. Metsulfuron-methyl, aminocylcopyrachlor, picloram, and DKN were relatively low sorbing herbicides (K(oc) = 3-53 mL g(-1)), alachlor was intermediate (K(oc) = 120-150 mL g(-1)), and oxyfluorfen sorbed very strongly to the three soils (K(oc) > 12,000 mL g(-1)). Following determination of K(oc) values, the groundwater ubiquity score (GUS) indices for these compounds were calculated to predicted their behavior with the Comprehensive Leaching Risk Assessment System (CLEARS; Tier-1 methodology for Hawaii). Metsulfuron-methyl, aminocyclopyrachlor, picloram, and DKN would be categorized as likely leachers in all three Hawaiian soils, indicating a high risk of groundwater contamination across the island of Oahu. In contrast, oxyfluorfen, regardless of the degradation rate, would possess a low and acceptable leaching risk due to its high sorption on all three soils. The leaching potential of alachlor was more difficult to classify, with a GUS value between 1.8 and 2.8. In addition, four different biochar amendments to these soils did not significantly alter their sorption capacities for aminocyclopyrachlor, indicating a relatively low impact of black carbon additions from geologic volcanic inputs of black carbon. Due to the fact that pesticide environmental risks are chiefly dependent on local soil characteristics, this work has demonstrated that once soil specific sorption parameters are known one can assess the potential pesticide leaching risks. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Simulation of pesticide leaching in a cracking clay soil with the PEARL model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza, R.P.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2005-01-01

    Testing of pesticide leaching models is important to increase confidence in their use in pesticide registration procedures world-wide. The chromatographic PEARL model was tested against the results of a field leaching study on a cracking clay soil with a tracer (bromide), a mobile pesticide

  16. Modeller subjectivity in estimating pesticide parameters for leaching models using the same laboratory data set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2000-01-01

    User-dependent subjectivity in the process of testing pesticide leaching models is relevant because it may result in wrong interpretation of model tests. About 20 modellers used the same data set to test pesticide leaching models (one or two models per modeller). The data set included laboratory

  17. Uncertainty and stochastic sensitivity analysis of the GeoPEARL pesticide leaching model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Burgers, S.L.G.E.; Tiktak, A.; Berg, van den F.

    2010-01-01

    GeoPEARL is a spatially distributed model describing the fate of pesticides in the soil–plant system. It calculates the drainage of pesticides to local surface waters and the leaching into groundwater. GeoPEARL plays an important role in the evaluation of Dutch pesticide policy plans. This study

  18. Field leaching of pesticides at five test sites in Hawaii: study description and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Sanda, Martin; Loo, Binh; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2010-06-01

    Following the discovery of pesticides in wells, the Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA) supported research to evaluate the likelihood of pesticide leaching to the groundwater in Hawaii. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative leaching pattern of five pesticides at five different sites on three islands and to compare their leaching behavior with bromide and a reference chemical (atrazine) that is known to leach in Hawaiian conditions. Laboratory measurements of sorption and degradation of the pesticides were made. Most of the applied mass of pesticides was still present in the top 80 cm after the 16 week study period. The aggregated oxisol at Kunia showed the most intensive leaching among the five sites. The revised attenuation factor screening approach used by the HDOA indicated that all chemicals, with the exception of trifloxystrobin, had the potential to leach. Similarly, the groundwater ubiquity score ranked trifloxystrobin as a non-leacher. The field leaching data, however, suggested that trifloxystrobin was the most mobile compound among the pesticides tested. Although the results were variable among the sites, the field and laboratory experiments provided useful information for regulating use of these pesticides in Hawaii.

  19. Pesticide leaching via subsurface drains in different hydrologic situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajíček, Antonín; Fučík, Petr; Liška, Marek; Dobiáš, Jakub

    2017-04-01

    degradates varried between 1 730 - 5 760 ng/l. During R-R events, pesticide concentration varried according to runoff composition and time between sprayng and event. Event with no protortiom of event water in drainage runoff were typical by incereas in degradates concentrations (up to 20 000ng/l) and none or low occurence of parent matters. Events with significant event water proportion in drainage runoff were characterised by decrease in degradates concentrations and (when event happened soon affter spraying) by presence of paternal pesticides in drinage runoff. Instanteous concentrations of paren matters can be extremely high in that causes, up to 23 000 ng/l in drainage waters and up to 40 000 ng/l in small stream. Above results suggest that drainage systems could act as significant source of pesticide leaching. When parent compounds leaches via tile drainage systems, there are some border conditions that must exist together such as the occurence of R-R event soon after the pests application and the presence of event water (or water with short residence time in the catchment) in the drainage runoff.

  20. Prediction of climate impacts on pesticide leaching to the aquatic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, Hans Joergen; Rosenbom, A.; van der Keur, P.; Kjaer, J.; Sonnenborg, T. [GEUS Danmark, Copenhagen (Denmark); Olesen, J.E. [Aarhus Univ., Tjele (Denmark); Nistrup Joergensen, L. [Aarhus Unv., Slagelse (Denmark); Boessing Christensen, O. [Danmarks Meteorologiske Institut (DMI), Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-10-01

    The report evaluates direct (precipitation, actual evapotranspiration and temperature) and indirect (crop rotations, crop management, and pesticide use) climatic change effects on pesticide-leaching to groundwater and the aquatic environment by use of MACRO and MIKE SHE model. The analysis is based on five model pesticides: low-dose herbicides, ordinary herbicides, strongly sorbing herbicides, fungicides and insecticides, and selected farm types (arable and dairy) for the variable saturated sandy soil (Jyndevad) and loamy soil (Faardrup). The evaluation has the aim at describing the implications of future climatic factors on pesticide leaching to groundwater as realistic as possible, based on realistic doses and parameters from MACRO setups from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme. (Author)

  1. Pesticide leaching in polders : field and model studies on cracked clays and loamy sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, K.P.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis reports on a study of pesticide leaching in polder areas. The study comprises two aspects: a data collection program and the development, calibration and application of the model SWACRO for the simulation of pesticide transport.

    Field data were

  2. Pesticide leaching in polders : field and model studies on cracked clays and loamy sand

    OpenAIRE

    Groen, K.P.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis reports on a study of pesticide leaching in polder areas. The study comprises two aspects: a data collection program and the development, calibration and application of the model SWACRO for the simulation of pesticide transport.

    Field data were collected at three experimental fields, all situated in the IJsselmeerpolders. The experimental fields were situated on loamy sands and cracked clay soils. Four different pesticides were incorporated in...

  3. Nation-wide assessment of pesticide leaching to groundwater in Germany: comparison of indicator and metamodel approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderborght, Jan; Kuhr, Petra; Tiktak, Aaldrik; Wendland, Frank; Vereecken, Harry; Corsten, Karin

    2010-05-01

    In order to estimate the risk op groundwater contamination by surface applied pesticides, the fate of pesticides in the unsaturated zone needs to be evaluated. Process models that describe relevant processes such as transport of dissolved pesticides, sorption, degradation and root uptake, in combination with water and heat fluxes in the soil have been developed and used for regulatory purposes. Regional assessments are required to indentify regions with higher risks of groundwater contamination. A major problem for the application of process models for a regional, EU-member state, or EU-scale assessment of pesticide leaching risk is the availability of regional databases of input parameters and boundary conditions that are required to run these models. Therefore, procedures that can assess pesticide leaching risk based on databases with regional coverage are required. In this presentation, we compare two different approaches for a regional estimation of pesticide leaching risk to groundwater in Germany. The first method uses an indicator approach to evaluate the risk of pesticide leaching as a function of a number of categorized soil, climate and pesticide properties. The result is a map of categorized risks. In the second approach, a metamodel is used to estimate the leached pesticide concentrations based on nation-wide available data of yearly average precipitation, temperature, soil organic matter content, soil texture, and pesticide parameters. The metamodel represents a synthesis of relations between climate, soil, and pesticide properties on one hand and leaching concentrations that are simulated by a more detailed process model on the other hand. The obtained maps of leaching risks and leaching concentrations were compared with the locations of anomynized pesticide findings in groundwater. The use of databases of pesticide findings in groundwater for the validation of leaching risks assessments is discussed.

  4. Spatially distributed modelling of pesticide leaching at European scale with the PyCatch modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Oliver; van der Perk, Marcel; Karssenberg, Derek; Häring, Tim; Jene, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    The modelling of pesticide transport through the soil and estimating its leaching to groundwater is essential for an appropriate environmental risk assessment. Pesticide leaching models commonly used in regulatory processes often lack the capability of providing a comprehensive spatial view, as they are implemented as non-spatial point models or only use a few combinations of representative soils to simulate specific plots. Furthermore, their handling of spatial input and output data and interaction with available Geographical Information Systems tools is limited. Therefore, executing several scenarios simulating and assessing the potential leaching on national or continental scale at high resolution is rather inefficient and prohibits the straightforward identification of areas prone to leaching. We present a new pesticide leaching model component of the PyCatch framework developed in PCRaster Python, an environmental modelling framework tailored to the development of spatio-temporal models (http://www.pcraster.eu). To ensure a feasible computational runtime of large scale models, we implemented an elementary field capacity approach to model soil water. Currently implemented processes are evapotranspiration, advection, dispersion, sorption, degradation and metabolite transformation. Not yet implemented relevant additional processes such as surface runoff, snowmelt, erosion or other lateral flows can be integrated with components already implemented in PyCatch. A preliminary version of the model executes a 20-year simulation of soil water processes for Germany (20 soil layers, 1 km2 spatial resolution, and daily timestep) within half a day using a single CPU. A comparison of the soil moisture and outflow obtained from the PCRaster implementation and PELMO, a commonly used pesticide leaching model, resulted in an R2 of 0.98 for the FOCUS Hamburg scenario. We will further discuss the validation of the pesticide transport processes and show case studies applied to

  5. Modelling pesticide leaching under climate change: parameter vs. climate input uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Steffens

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Assessing climate change impacts on pesticide leaching requires careful consideration of different sources of uncertainty. We investigated the uncertainty related to climate scenario input and its importance relative to parameter uncertainty of the pesticide leaching model. The pesticide fate model MACRO was calibrated against a comprehensive one-year field data set for a well-structured clay soil in south-western Sweden. We obtained an ensemble of 56 acceptable parameter sets that represented the parameter uncertainty. Nine different climate model projections of the regional climate model RCA3 were available as driven by different combinations of global climate models (GCM, greenhouse gas emission scenarios and initial states of the GCM. The future time series of weather data used to drive the MACRO model were generated by scaling a reference climate data set (1970–1999 for an important agricultural production area in south-western Sweden based on monthly change factors for 2070–2099. 30 yr simulations were performed for different combinations of pesticide properties and application seasons. Our analysis showed that both the magnitude and the direction of predicted change in pesticide leaching from present to future depended strongly on the particular climate scenario. The effect of parameter uncertainty was of major importance for simulating absolute pesticide losses, whereas the climate uncertainty was relatively more important for predictions of changes of pesticide losses from present to future. The climate uncertainty should be accounted for by applying an ensemble of different climate scenarios. The aggregated ensemble prediction based on both acceptable parameterizations and different climate scenarios has the potential to provide robust probabilistic estimates of future pesticide losses.

  6. Evaluation of six pesticides leaching indexes using field data of herbicide application in Casablanca Valley, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, M; Rojas, S; Gómez, P; Suárez, F; Muñoz, J F; Alister, C

    2007-01-01

    A field study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of six pesticide screening leaching indexes for herbicide movement. Adsorption, dissipation and soil movement were studied in a vineyard in a sandy loam soil during 2005 season. Simazine, diuron, pendimethalin, oxyfluorfen and flumioxazin were applied to bare soil at rates commonly used, and their soil concentrations throughout soil profile were determined at 0, 10, 20, 40 and 90 days after application (DAA). Herbicides were subjected to two pluviometric regimens, natural field condition and modified conditions (plus natural rainfall 180 mm). Leaching indexes utilized were: Briggs's Rf, Hamaker's Rf, LEACH, LPI, GUS and LIX. Simazine reached 120 cm, diuron 90 cm, flumioxazin 30 cm soil depth respectively. Pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen were retained up to 5 cm. None of the herbicides leaching was affected by rainfall regimen. Only flumioxazin field dissipation was clearly affected by pluviometric condition. The best representation of the herbicide soil depth movement and leaching below 15 cm soil depth were: Hamaker's Rf < Briggs's Rf < GUS < LPI, < LEACH < LIX. Field results showed a good correlation between herbicides K(d) and their soil depth movement and mass leached below 15 cm soil depth.

  7. Assessing pesticide leaching and desorption in soils with different agricultural activities from Argentina (Pampa and Patagonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Mariana; Miglioranza, Karina S B; Aizpún, Julia E; Isla, Federico I; Peña, Aránzazu

    2010-09-01

    Pesticide distribution in the soil profile depends on soil and pesticide properties as well as on the composition of irrigation water. Water containing surfactants, acids or solvents, may alter pesticide desorption from soil. The distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in two Argentinean agricultural areas, Pampa and Patagonia, was evaluated. Furthermore, pesticide desorption from aged and freshly spiked soils was performed by the batch technique, using solutions of sodium oxalate and citrate, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), wastewater and surfactants. Patagonian soil showed the highest OCP levels (46.5-38.1 μg g(-1) OC) from 0 to 30 cm depth and the predominance of p,p'-DDE residues reflected an extensive and past use of DDT. Pampean soil with lower levels (0.039-0.07 μg g(-1) OC) was mainly polluted by the currently used insecticide endosulfan. Sodium citrate and oxalate, at levels usually exuded by plant roots, effectively enhanced desorption of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE and α-cypermethrin, while no effects were observed for α-endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate. The non-ionic surfactant Tween 80 behaved similarly to the acids, whereas the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate enhanced desorption of all pesticides. Increased desorption of the hydrophobic pesticides also occurred when DOC from humic acids but not from sewage sludge or wastewater were used. Soil profile distribution of pesticides was in accordance with results from desorption studies. Data suggest pesticide leaching in Pampean and Patagonian soils, with risk of endosulfan to reach groundwater and that some organic components of wastewaters may enhance the solubilisation and leaching of recalcitrant compounds such as p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Simulation of pesticide leaching in a cracking clay soil with the PEARL model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorza Júnior, Rômulo P; Boesten, Jos J T I

    2005-05-01

    Testing of pesticide leaching models is important to increase confidence in their use in pesticide registration procedures world-wide. The chromatographic PEARL model was tested against the results of a field leaching study on a cracking clay soil with a tracer (bromide), a mobile pesticide (bentazone) and a moderately sorbing, persistent pesticide (imidacloprid). Input parameters for water flow and solute transport were obtained from site-specific measurements and from literature. The model was tested using a stepwise approach in which each sub-model was sequentially and separately tested. Uncalibrated simulations for the water flow resulted in moisture profiles that were too wet. Calibration of the hydraulic relationships resulted in a good description of the moisture profiles. Calibration of the dispersion length was necessary to obtain a good description of bromide leaching. The calibrated dispersion length was 61 cm, which is very long and indicates a large non-uniformity of solute transport. The half-life of bentazone had to be calibrated to obtain a good description of its field persistence. The calibrated half-life was 2.5 times shorter than the half-life derived from the laboratory studies. Concentrations of bentazone in drain water and groundwater were described reasonably well by PEARL. Although measured and simulated persistence of imidacloprid in soil corresponded well, the bulk of the imidacloprid movement was overestimated by PEARL. However, imidacloprid concentrations in drain water were underestimated. In spite of the extensive calibration of water flow and tracer movement, the behaviour of the moderately sorbing pesticide imidacloprid could not be simulated. This indicates that the convection-dispersion equation cannot be used for accurate simulation of pesticide transport in cracking clay soils (even if extremely long dispersion length is used). Comparison of the model results from a poorly sorbed chemical (bentazone) and a moderately sorbed

  9. Pesticide leaching to the groundwater in drinking water abstraction areas; analysis with the GeoPEARL model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijne, R.; Tiktak, A.; Kraalingen, van D.W.G.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Linden, van der A.M.A.

    2004-01-01

    In the new Dutch decision tree for the evaluation of pesticide leaching from soils, leaching to the shallow groundwater is assessed with the spatially distributed model GeoPEARL. The relative vulnerability of the groundwater in the drinking water abstraction areas is estimated. The general

  10. Pesticide leaching from two Swedish topsoils of contrasting texture amended with biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsbo, Mats; Löfstrand, Elisabeth; de Veer, David van Alphen; Ulén, Barbro

    2013-04-01

    The use of biochar as a soil amendment has recently increased because of its potential for long-term soil carbon sequestration and its potential for improving soil fertility. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of biochar soil incorporation on pesticide adsorption and leaching for two Swedish topsoils, one clay soil and one loam soil. We used the non-reactive tracer bromide and the pesticides sulfosulfuron, isoproturon, imidacloprid, propyzamid and pyraclostrobin, substances with different mobility in soil. Adsorption was studied in batch experiments and leaching was studied in experiments using soil columns (20 cm high, 20 cm diameter) where 0.01 kg kg- 1 dw biochar powder originating from wheat residues had been mixed into the top 10 cm. After solute application the columns were exposed to simulated rain three times with a weekly interval and concentrations were measured in the effluent water. The biochar treatment resulted in significantly larger adsorption distribution coefficients (Kd) for the moderately mobile pesticides isoproturon and imidacloprid for the clay soil and for imidacloprid only for the loam soil. Relative leaching of the pesticides ranged from 0.0035% of the applied mass for pyraclostrobin (average Kd = 360 cm3 g- 1) to 5.9% for sulfosulfuron (average Kd = 5.6 cm3 g- 1). There were no significant effects of the biochar amendment on pesticide concentrations in column effluents for the loam soil. For the clay soil concentrations were significantly reduced for isoproturon, imidacloprid and propyzamid while they were significantly increased for the non-mobile fungicide pyraclostrobin suggesting that the transport was facilitated by material originating from the biochar amendment.

  11. Use of raw or incubated organic wastes as amendments in reducing pesticide leaching through soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Benito, J M; Brown, C D; Herrero-Hernández, E; Arienzo, M; Sánchez-Martín, M J; Rodríguez-Cruz, M S

    2013-10-01

    Soil amendment with organic wastes is becoming a widespread management practice since it can effectively solve the problems of uncontrolled waste accumulation and improve soil quality. However, when simultaneously applied with pesticides, organic wastes can significantly modify the environmental behaviour of these compounds. This study evaluated the effect of sewage sludges (SS), grape marc (GM) and spent mushroom substrates (SMS) on the leaching of linuron, diazinon and myclobutanil in packed columns of a sandy soil with low organic matter (OM) content (Soil plus amendments had been incubated for one month (1 m) or 12 months (12 m). Data from the experimental breakthrough curves (BTCs) were fitted to the one-dimensional transport model CXTFIT 2.1. All three amendments reduced leaching of linuron and myclobutanil relative to unamended soil. SMS was the most effective in reducing leaching of these two compounds independent of whether soil was incubated for 1 m or 12 m. Soil amendments increased retardation coefficients (Rexp) by factors of 3 to 5 for linuron, 2 to 4 for diazinon and 3 to 5 for myclobutanil relative to unamended soil. Leaching of diazinon was relatively little affected by soil amendment compared to the other two compounds and both SS and SMS amendment with 1m incubation resulted in enhanced leaching of diazinon. The leaching data for linuron and myclobutanil were well described by CXTFIT (mean square error, MSEpesticides were similar in soils incubated for one month or one year, indicating that the effect of amendment on leaching persists over relatively long periods of time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of a wood-based biochar on the leaching of pesticides chlorpyrifos, diuron, glyphosate and MCPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlund, Harald; Börjesson, Elisabet; Stenström, John

    2017-04-15

    We studied the ability of a wood-based biochar to reduce the leaching of the pesticides chlorpyrifos, diuron, glyphosate and MCPA in a sand column test system. In addition, time-dependent adsorption of the pesticides to the biochar and to the sand used in the columns was determined. The sorption kinetics was shown to be controlled by the log K ow -values of the pesticides and sorption rates varied in the order: chlorpyrifos (log K ow  = 4.7) > diuron (log K ow  = 2.87) > MCPA (log K ow  = -0.8) > glyphosate (log K ow  = -3.2). Glyphosate sorbed very weakly to the biochar but strongly to the sand. Biochar was most effective at retaining the pesticides if applied as a distinct layer rather than mixed with the sand. Leaching of diuron and MCPA was reduced by biochar application, and the retention was linearly related to the thickness of the biochar layers. However, leaching of chlorpyrifos and glyphosate was not affected by biochar addition. Leaching was low for all pesticides when the pesticides were added directly to biochar that was then added to the column. Together, our results suggest that a viable strategy for using biochar as a means to mitigate leaching of pesticides may be to use it as an adsorptive layer directly on or close to the soil surface. This would be especially useful in areas where pesticides are routinely handled and potentially spilled. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Limitations on the role of incorporated organic matter in reducing pesticide leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, F.; Fernandez-Perez, M.; Johnson, A. C.; Flores-Cesperedes, F.; Gonzalez-Pradas, E.

    2001-06-01

    The use of organic amendments has been suggested as a method of controlling pesticide leaching through soils. The enarenados soils of the intensive horticulture of the Almeria province of southern Spain contain buried organic matter horizons above a soil layer amended with clay. This region is ideal for understanding the potential for and limitations of organic amendments in preventing pesticide pollution. This study measured the sorption and degradation potential of carbofuran in this soil system and the hydrological behaviour of the soil horizons. The sorption of carbofuran was controlled by the organic carbon content, the degradation was strongly pH-dependent and the acidic organic layer protected the sorbed carbofuran against degradation. Hydrologically, the soil system is dominated by ponding above an amended clay layer and by the presence of macropores that can transport water through this clay. A simple model is proposed on this basis and shows that although high levels of dissolved organic carbon can be released by buried organic horizons, the major control on re-release of sorbed pesticide is the potential for sorption hysteresis in this organic layer. A comparison of sorption and degradation data for carbamate insecticides used in the region with groundwater observations for these compounds shows that no amount of incorporated organic would protect against pollution from highly water-soluble compounds.

  14. Effect of pesticide fate parameters and their uncertainty on the selection of 'worst-case' scenarios od pesticide leaching to groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderborght, J.; Tiktak, A.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For the registration of pesticides in the European Union, model simulations for worst-case scenarios are used to demonstrate that leaching concentrations to groundwater do not exceed a critical threshold. A worst-case scenario is a combination of soil and climate properties for which

  15. A moni-modelling approach to manage groundwater risk to pesticide leaching at regional scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guardo, Andrea; Finizio, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Historically, the approach used to manage risk of chemical contamination of water bodies is based on the use of monitoring programmes, which provide a snapshot of the presence/absence of chemicals in water bodies. Monitoring is required in the current EU regulations, such as the Water Framework Directive (WFD), as a tool to record temporal variation in the chemical status of water bodies. More recently, a number of models have been developed and used to forecast chemical contamination of water bodies. These models combine information of chemical properties, their use, and environmental scenarios. Both approaches are useful for risk assessors in decision processes. However, in our opinion, both show flaws and strengths when taken alone. This paper proposes an integrated approach (moni-modelling approach) where monitoring data and modelling simulations work together in order to provide a common decision framework for the risk assessor. This approach would be very useful, particularly for the risk management of pesticides at a territorial level. It fulfils the requirement of the recent Sustainable Use of Pesticides Directive. In fact, the moni-modelling approach could be used to identify sensible areas where implement mitigation measures or limitation of use of pesticides, but even to effectively re-design future monitoring networks or to better calibrate the pedo-climatic input data for the environmental fate models. A case study is presented, where the moni-modelling approach is applied in Lombardy region (North of Italy) to identify groundwater vulnerable areas to pesticides. The approach has been applied to six active substances with different leaching behaviour, in order to highlight the advantages in using the proposed methodology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of farming and agro-industrial wastes as versatile barriers in reducing pesticide leaching through soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoll, J; Ruiz, E; Flores, P; Vela, N; Hellín, P; Navarro, S

    2011-03-15

    Increased interest has been recently focused on assessing the influence of the addition of organic wastes related to movement of pesticides in soils of low organic matter (OM) content. This study reports the effect of two different amendments, animal manure (composted sheep manure) and agro-industrial waste (spent coffee grounds) on the mobility of 10 pesticides commonly used for pepper protection on a clay-loam soil (OM = 0.22%). The tested compounds were azoxystrobin, cyprodinil, fludioxonil, hexaconazole, kresoxim-methyl, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole, and triadimenol (fungicides), pirimicarb (insecticide), and propyzamide (herbicide). Breakthrough curves were obtained from disturbed soil columns. Cumulative curves obtained from unamended soil show a leaching of all pesticides although in different proportions (12-65% of the total mass of compound applied), showing triadimenol and pirimicarb the higher leachability. Significant correlation (r = 0.93, p<0.01) was found between the observed and bibliographical values of GUS index. The addition of the amendments used drastically reduced the movement of the studied pesticides. Only two pesticides were found in leachates from amended soils, pyrimethanil (<1%) for both, and pirimicarb (44%) in the soil amended with spent coffee grounds. A decrease in pesticide leaching was observed with the increase in dissolved organic matter (DOM) of leachates. The results obtained point to the interest in the use of organic wastes in reducing the pollution of groundwater by pesticide drainage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Scale Issues in the Assessment of Pesticide Leaching Vulnerability for Loamy Structured Soils in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Keur, Peter; Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Hollis, John

    Three approaches for vulnerability mapping of pesticide leaching for Denmark are considered. The first method is based on an approach developed at the European spatial scale, the second method relies on mapping soil hydraulic properties at a finer scale derived from a national soil property map...... for vulnerability due to change in climate and agricultural land management. In the European scale approach soil types in Denmark are classified using a decision tree structure that accounts for both soil texture as well as the lower boundary condition available from soil survey data at the European scale...... saturated conductivity. It is expected that loamy soils are vulnerable at both the low and high values as low values indicate risk for preferential flow, whereas high values correspond to a more coarse soil structure with high soil hydraulic conductivity. It appears that the coarse spatial scale of derived...

  18. Sequential use of the STICS crop model and of the MACRO pesticide fate model to simulate pesticides leaching in cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammoglia, Sabine-Karen; Moeys, Julien; Barriuso, Enrique; Larsbo, Mats; Marín-Benito, Jesús-María; Justes, Eric; Alletto, Lionel; Ubertosi, Marjorie; Nicolardot, Bernard; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Mamy, Laure

    2017-03-01

    The current challenge in sustainable agriculture is to introduce new cropping systems to reduce pesticides use in order to reduce ground and surface water contamination. However, it is difficult to carry out in situ experiments to assess the environmental impacts of pesticide use for all possible combinations of climate, crop, and soils; therefore, in silico tools are necessary. The objective of this work was to assess pesticides leaching in cropping systems coupling the performances of a crop model (STICS) and of a pesticide fate model (MACRO). STICS-MACRO has the advantage of being able to simulate pesticides fate in complex cropping systems and to consider some agricultural practices such as fertilization, mulch, or crop residues management, which cannot be accounted for with MACRO. The performance of STICS-MACRO was tested, without calibration, from measurements done in two French experimental sites with contrasted soil and climate properties. The prediction of water percolation and pesticides concentrations with STICS-MACRO was satisfactory, but it varied with the pedoclimatic context. The performance of STICS-MACRO was shown to be similar or better than that of MACRO. The improvement of the simulation of crop growth allowed better estimate of crop transpiration therefore of water balance. It also allowed better estimate of pesticide interception by the crop which was found to be crucial for the prediction of pesticides concentrations in water. STICS-MACRO is a new promising tool to improve the assessment of the environmental risks of pesticides used in cropping systems.

  19. A GIS-assisted regional screening tool to evaluate the leaching potential of volatile and non-volatile pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Seo Jin; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2015-03-01

    A regional screening tool-which is useful in cases where few site-specific parameters are available for complex vadose zone models-assesses the leaching potential of pollutants to groundwater over large areas. In this study, the previous pesticide leaching tool used in Hawaii was revised to account for the release of new volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the soil surface. The tool was modified to introduce expanded terms in the traditional pesticide ranking indices (i.e., retardation and attenuation factors), allowing the estimation of the leaching fraction of volatile chemicals based on recharge, soil, and chemical properties to be updated. Results showed that the previous tool significantly overestimated the mass fraction of VOCs leached through soils as the recharge rates increased above 0.001801 m/d. In contrast, the revised tool successfully delineated vulnerable areas to the selected VOCs based on two reference chemicals, a known leacher and non-leacher, which were determined in local conditions. The sensitivity analysis with the Latin-Hypercube-One-factor-At-a-Time method revealed that the new leaching tool was most sensitive to changes in the soil organic carbon sorption coefficient, fractional organic carbon content, and Henry's law constant; and least sensitive to parameters such as the bulk density, water content at field capacity, and particle density in soils. When the revised tool was compared to the analytical (STANMOD) and numerical (HYDRUS-1D) models as a susceptibility measure, it ranked particular VOCs well (e.g., benzene, carbofuran, and toluene) that were consistent with other two models under the given conditions. Therefore, the new leaching tool can be widely used to address intrinsic groundwater vulnerability to contamination of pesticides and VOCs, along with the DRASTIC method or similar Tier 1 models such as SCI-GROW and WIN-PST.

  20. Mapping Ground water Vulnerability to Pesticides Leaching with Process-based Metamodel of EuroPEARL: The Molignée catchment case, Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, B. B.; Vanclooster, M.; Noël, S.; Buffet, D.; Oger, R.

    2009-04-01

    Diffuse pollution of water resources due to pesticide uses is a major environmental issue in the European Union, regulated by specific legislations: the Water Framework Directive (Directive 2000/60/EC) and the Thematic Strategy on the Sustainable Use of Pesticides. To support these EU policies, indicators of pesticide leaching, at the local scale (agricultural parcel level) and regional scale are required. This paper presents the use of a metamodel of the spatially distributed pesticide leaching model EuroPEARL [Tiktak et al., 2006] to assess pesticide leaching to Ground water in the Molignée Catchment (Belgian Condroz region). EuroPEARL considers transient flow and solute transport and assumes Freundlich adsorption, first-order degradation and passive plant uptake of pesticides in the soil-root system. The EuroPEARL metamodel is based on an analytical expression that describes the mass fraction of pesticide leached in terms of easy available and sensitive soil, climate, land use and pesticide properties. The input parameters of the metamodel are pesticides properties (degradation rate and organic matter-water partition coefficients), soil parameters (organic matter content, dry bulk density and volume fraction of water) and the volume flux of water (hydraulic parameter). These parameters are available in soil databases (Aardewerk and Réquasud) or are derived from pedotransfer functions. The digital soil map of Wallonia is used for the spatial representation, by using the fourteen (23 for the whole Wallonia) main soil types encountered in the catchment, as simulation units. Simulations were also carried out by taking into account four groups of pesticides with different properties (Focus, 2000). The quality of the results obtained will be assessed by comparing the spatial patterns of estimated pesticide leaching with data obtained from existing water monitoring stations.

  1. Modelling Pesticide Leaching At Column, Field and Catchment Scales Ii. Influence of Soil Variability On Small Scale Transfer Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulier, S.; Jarvis, N.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in small scale transfer prop- erties in relation to variability of soil characteristics in a small undulating agricultural catchment (Vemmenhög, 9 km2), where texture and organic C content are strongly related to landscape position (see Gärdenäs et al., this session). Undisturbed soil col- umn samples (20 cm diameter, 20 cm height) were taken at two locations (4 columns at each location): on a hilltop (high clay content), and in a hollow (high C content). Transient leaching experiments for a tracer and a herbicide (MCPA) were carried out in two steps. After a first application of solute and pesticide the columns were ex- posed to natural rainfall. After one pore volume of drainage had flowed through the columns, they were transferred indoors. A second dose of tracer and pesticide was applied, and the columns were irrigated with half a pore volume of natural rainwa- ter. The breakthrough curves obtained for the hilltop columns showed strong evidence of macroporous flow. The flux concentrations and the resident concentration at the end of the experiment measured for the hollow columns suggested that the loss of pesticide from those columns is little. The MACRO model and the inverse modelling package SUFI were used to estimate the small scale parameters for water transfer, so- lute transport, and pesticide. Good agreement was obtained between model and data. Macroporous flow and diffusive transport through hilltop columns was highlighted by the high calibrated values of the effective diffusion pathlength and the dispersivity. As a consequence of the significant organic C content in the hollows, the value of the degradation rate coefficient for hollow columns was important. In both hilltop and hollow columns, the variation of the degradation rate coefficient between the first and the second application of MCPA showed the ability of the micro-organisms to adapt to the pesticide.

  2. Influence of pH-dependent sorption and transformation on simulated pesticide leaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der A.M.A.; Tiktak, A.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Leijnse, A.

    2009-01-01

    The leaching of a substance is influenced by its physico-chemical characteristics as well as environmental conditions. In spatially distributed modelling the influence of soil properties on the half-life and the sorption constant of the substance might become important and can be taken into account.

  3. Does microbial cm-scale heterogeneity impact pesticide degradation in and leaching from loamy agricultural soils?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Binning, Philip John; Aamand, Jens

    2014-01-01

    matrix flow or preferential flow through a soil matrix with a wormhole. MCPA leached, within 250 days, below 1 metre only when degrader biomass was absent and preferential flow occurred. Both biodegradation in the plough layer and the microbially active lining of the wormhole contributed to reducing MCPA...

  4. Processes of microbial pesticide degradation in rapid sand filters for treatment of drinking water

    OpenAIRE

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic rapid sand filters for treatment of groundwater at waterworks were investigated for the ability to remove pesticides. The potential, kinetics and mechanisms of microbial pesticide removal was investigated in microcosms consisting of filter sand, treated water and pesticides in initial concentrations of 0.04-2.4 μg/L. The pesticides were removed from the water in microcosms with filter sand from all three investigated sand filters. Within the experimental periode of six to 13 days, 65-...

  5. Modelling Pesticide Leaching At Column, Field and Catchment Scales Iii. Upscaling By Stochastic (monte Carlo) Simulation and Deterministic Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, N.; Kreuger, J.; Lindahl, A.; Gärdenäs, A.; Alavi, G.; Roulier, S.

    The objective of this study was to identify the main controls on the export of pesticides from a small agricultural catchment in south Sweden (Vemmenhög, 9 km2), specif- ically highlighting and contrasting the impacts of management practices (pesticide application timing and dose), spatial variation in soil properties, and the significance of small-scale properties related to soil structure and macropore flow. A process-based simulation model (MACRO) applicable to the soil profile scale was used to estimate diffuse leaching. Model parameterisation was based on comprehensive data on soil properties and management practices collected in the catchment from soil surveys and farmer questionaires, and column breakthrough experiments for a non-reactive tracer and the herbicide MCPA. Results are presented from two different approaches to up- scaling model predictions, i.) stochastic (Monte Carlo) simulations based on latin hy- percube sampling, accounting for parameter correlation using pedotransfer functions derived from local data, and ii.) deterministic aggregation based on three landscape 'elements': hilltops, midslopes and hollows. Model simulations were compared with concentrations of MCPA measured at the field-scale in tile drain outflow, and at the catchment outlet. The contribution from point sources is estimated from the difference between the measured export of MCPA from the catchment and the upscaled model predictions.

  6. Simulation of pesticide leaching in the field and in zero-tension lysimeters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2007-01-01

    Zero-tension lysimeters play an important role in groundwater risk assessments for pesticides in the European Union. In these assessments, measured lysimeter leachate concentrations are usually used directly for decision making. When doing so, one assumes (i) that the lysimeter bottom boundary

  7. Microbial degradation of pesticides in rapid sand filters for treatment of drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark drinking water supply is based on groundwater which is treated by aeration followed by filtration in rapid sand filters. Unfortunately pesticide contamination of the groundwater poses a threat to the water supply, since the simple treatment process at the waterworks is not considered...... to remove pesticides from the water phase and pesticides are detected in 24% of the active Danish waterworks wells. This study aimed at investigating the potential of microbial pesticide removal in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment. Removal of the pesticides MCPP, bentazone, glyphosate...... and the degradation compound p-nitrophenol was investigated in the rapid sand filters at Islevbro and Sjælsø waterworks plant I and II. Microcosms were set up with sand from rapid sand filters, water and an initial pesticide concentration of 0.03-0.38 μg/L. In all the investigated waterworks the concentration...

  8. Effect of organic fertilizers derived dissolved organic matter on pesticide sorption and leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Xing, Baoshan; Torello, William A

    2005-03-01

    Incorporation of organic fertilizers/amendments has been, and continues to be, a popular strategy for golf course turfgrass management. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from these organic materials may, however, facilitate organic chemical movement through soils. A batch equilibrium technique was used to evaluate the effects of organic fertilizer-derived DOM on sorption of three organic chemicals (2,4-D, naphthalene and chlorpyrifos) in USGA (United States Golf Association) sand, a mixed soil (70% USGA sand and 30% native soil) and a silt loam soil (Typic Fragiochrept). DOM was extracted from two commercial organic fertilizers. Column leaching experiments were also performed using USGA sand. Sorption experiments showed that sorption capacity was significantly reduced with increasing DOM concentration in solution for all three chemicals. Column experimental results were consistent with batch equilibrium data. These results suggest that organic fertilizer-derived DOM might lead to enhanced transport of applied chemicals in turf soils.

  9. Rapid multi-residue method for the determination of pesticide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exposure to pesticides can represent a potential risk to humans. Agricultural workers are at risk of chronic toxicity. Hence, the evaluation of pesticide residues in their blood gives an indication about the extent of exposure and help in assessing adverse health effects. The aim of our study was to develop analytical method for ...

  10. Processes of microbial pesticide degradation in rapid sand filters for treatment of drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Aerobic rapid sand filters for treatment of groundwater at waterworks were investigated for the ability to remove pesticides. The potential, kinetics and mechanisms of microbial pesticide removal was investigated in microcosms consisting of filter sand, treated water and pesticides in initial...... concentrations of 0.04-2.4 μg/L. The pesticides were removed from the water in microcosms with filter sand from all three investigated sand filters. Within the experimental periode of six to 13 days, 65-85% of the bentazone, 86-93% of the glyphosate, 97-99% of the p-nitrophenol was removed from the water phase...

  11. Development of a fieldable rapid pesticide exposure analysis sensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Clauson, Susan L.; Spencer, Sarah A.; Sylvia, James M.; Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2010-04-01

    Despite the recent interest in organically grown foods, most agricultural crops use multiple pesticides to optimize yield. There are many persons whose health may be affected by the spraying; there is the active applicator and the passive neighbors. In between these extremes are the farm workers who pick the crops anywhere from days to weeks after application. How much pesticide residue are these workers exposed to during a workday and how much is transferred back to the residence? Despite the low vapor pressures, what is the true concentration of pesticides surrounding a person when pesticides adsorbed to particulate matter are included? What is the relationship between the concentration around an individual and the amount adsorbed/ingested? To answer these questions on a statistically significant scale in actual field conditions, a portable, fast, inexpensive measurement device is required. We present herein results obtained using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) that demonstrate the capability to detect pesticides in the vapor phase as well as the ability of SERS sensors to detect a particular analyte in a synthetic urine matrix. We will also present data collected from CDC quantified urine samples and will present results obtained in a field test wherein SERS sensors wore worn as dosimeters in the field and real-time vapor sampling of the farm workers barracks was performed. The issue of potential interferences will also be discussed.

  12. Pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherma, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This review is devoted to methods for the determination of residues of pesticides and some related industrial chemicals. Topics include: residue methods, sampling, chromatography, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, carbamate insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, pyrethrins, fumigants, and related chemicals. (MVL)

  13. Rapid nutrient leaching to groundwater and surface water in clay soil areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Hamminga, W.; Oostindie, K.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism and magnitude of nitrate leaching from grassland on a heavy clay soil were investigated by measuring nitrogen input, and nitrate concentrations in groundwater and drain discharge for two years. A bromide tracer was applied to study solute transport mechanisms. Nitrate transport in the

  14. Rapid Detection Technology for Pesticides Residues Based on Microelectrodes Impedance Immunosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Ping Zhao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Compared with conventional methods, electrochemical immunosensors have many advantages, such as low cost, high sensitivity, and rapid detection, and has certain prospects for realizing real-time-monitoring. In this paper, a design of portable pesticide residues detection instrument was presented based on an electrochemical impedance immunosensor. Firstly, we studied on an impedance immunosensor based on interdigitated array microelectrode (IDAM coupled with magnetic nanobeads-antibody conjugates (MNAC for the pesticide detection. Magnetic nanobeads (diameter 150 nm coated with anti-carbofuran antibodies were used for further amplification of the binding reaction between antibody and hapten (carbofuran. Secondly, in order to develop a portable pesticide residue apparatus, we designed the impedance detection electric circuit. Main work included designing and constructing of the system circuit, designing and debugging of the system software and so on. Thirdly, the apparatus was used for the standard pesticides solutions testing combined with immunosensor to test the reliability and stability. The pesticide added standard recovery was more than 70 % and the impedance test error was less than 5 %. The results showed that the proposed instrument had a good consistence compared with the traditional analytical methods. Thus, it would be a promising rapid detection instrument for pesticide residues in agricultural products.

  15. Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dies. Top of Page How can pesticides be dangerous to humans? While some pesticides target pathways unique ... Oral Numbing Gels Methamphetamine_FAQ Mushrooms Plants Scorpions Snakes Spiders 2013 Forensic Course Faculty Hilton Baltimore Reservations ...

  16. Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... While some pesticides target pathways unique to insects, plants, bacteria, or fungi, other pesticides have a broad spectrum of activity. This means that they can have toxic effects in humans as well as in the ...

  17. Rapid biodegradation of organophosphorus pesticides by Stenotrophomonas sp. G1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Shuyan; Chen, Yao [Key Laboratory of Agri-food Safety of Anhui Province, Lab of Quality & Safety and Risk Assessment for Agro-products on Storage and Preservation (Hefei), Ministry of Agriculture, School of Resource and Environment, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Wang, Daosheng [School of Life Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Shi, Taozhong; Wu, Xiangwei; Ma, Xin; Li, Xiangqiong [Key Laboratory of Agri-food Safety of Anhui Province, Lab of Quality & Safety and Risk Assessment for Agro-products on Storage and Preservation (Hefei), Ministry of Agriculture, School of Resource and Environment, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Hua, Rimao, E-mail: rimaohua@ahau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Agri-food Safety of Anhui Province, Lab of Quality & Safety and Risk Assessment for Agro-products on Storage and Preservation (Hefei), Ministry of Agriculture, School of Resource and Environment, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Tang, Xinyun [School of Life Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Li, Qing X. [Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1955 East–West Road, Honolulu, HI 957822 (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Stenotrophomonas sp. G1 was isolated from chlorpyrifos contaminated sludge. • Strain G1 is closest to Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila. • Strain G1 can efficiently degrade 8 organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). • Intracellular methyl parathion hydrolase is responsible for the OP degradation. • Three factors were orthogonally optimized for degradation of methyl parathion. - Abstract: Organophosphorus insecticides have been widely used, which are highly poisonous and cause serious concerns over food safety and environmental pollution. A bacterial strain being capable of degrading O,O-dialkyl phosphorothioate and O,O-dialkyl phosphate insecticides, designated as G1, was isolated from sludge collected at the drain outlet of a chlorpyrifos manufacture plant. Physiological and biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis suggested that strain G1 belongs to the genus Stenotrophomonas. At an initial concentration of 50 mg/L, strain G1 degraded 100% of methyl parathion, methyl paraoxon, diazinon, and phoxim, 95% of parathion, 63% of chlorpyrifos, 38% of profenofos, and 34% of triazophos in 24 h. Orthogonal experiments showed that the optimum conditions were an inoculum volume of 20% (v/v), a substrate concentration of 50 mg/L, and an incubation temperature in 40 °C. p-Nitrophenol was detected as the metabolite of methyl parathion, for which intracellular methyl parathion hydrolase was responsible. Strain G1 can efficiently degrade eight organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and is a very excellent candidate for applications in OP pollution remediation.

  18. Rapid Multi-Residue Analysis of Pesticides in Pulses by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakoshi, Keiko; Otsuka, Kenji; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Tomizawa, Sanae; Masubuchi, Tamako; Yamaki, Yumiko; Nakagawa, Yukiko; Masuda, Ryoko; Suto, Shota; Kokaji, Yoshie; Shindo, Tetsuya; Takano, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Rapid multi-residue analysis of pesticides in pulses was developed using LC-MS/MS. Pesticide residues in 5 g of homogenized pulses were extracted with 30 mL of acetonitrile and salted out with 4 g of anhydrous magnesium sulfate and 2 g of sodium chloride in the presence of citrate buffer in a disposable tube. The resulting residues were extracted with 30 mL of acetonitrile, and co-extractives were removed on a handmade four-layer column, consisting of a layer of Z-Sep/C18 (20 mg/50 mg) dry particles on top of a three-layer, custom-made (pre-packed) column (lower bed: 60 mg of PSA, middle bed: 30 mg of GC, and top bed: 60 mg of C18) packed in a 10 mm internal diameter polypropylene column (3 mL). The developed method showed good recoveries of pesticides in soybean, lentil, white kidney bean and garbanzo. According to the method validation guideline of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan, recovery tests were conducted in soybeans fortified with 107 kinds of pesticides at the levels of 0.01 and 0.1 μg/g, respectively. At each concentration 2 samples were extracted on 5 separate days. Pesticides in the test solution were determined by LC-MS/MS using scheduled MRM. As regards the trueness of this method for 107 pesticides in soybeans, 97 pesticides were in the range of 70-120% with satisfactory repeatability and within-run reproducibility. This new method is expected to be applicable for routine examination of pesticide residues in soybeans.

  19. Bioactive Paper Sensor Based on the Acetylcholinesterase for the Rapid Detection of Organophosphate and Carbamate Pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. I. Badawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In many countries, people are becoming more concerned about pesticide residues which are present in or on food and feed products. For this reason, several methods have been developed to monitor the pesticide residue levels in food samples. In this study, a bioactive paper-based sensor was developed for detection of acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitors including organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Based on the Ellman colorimetric assay, the assay strip is composed of a paper support (1×10 cm, onto which a biopolymer chitosan gel immobilized in crosslinking by glutaraldehyde with AChE and 5,5′-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB and uses acetylthiocholine iodide (ATChI as an outside reagent. The assay protocol involves introducing the sample to sensing zone via dipping of a pesticide-containing solution. Following an incubation period, the paper is placed into ATChI solution to initiate enzyme catalyzed hydrolysis of the substrate, causing a yellow color change. The absence or decrease of the yellow color indicates the levels of the AChE inhibitors. The biosensor is able to detect organophosphate and carbamate pesticides with good detection limits (methomyl=6.16×10-4 mM and profenofos=0.27 mM and rapid response times (~5 min. The results show that the paper-based biosensor is rapid, sensitive, inexpensive, portable, disposable, and easy-to-use.

  20. Chemometric assisted ultrasound leaching-solid phase extraction followed by dispersive-solidification liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of organophosphorus pesticides in soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Kamyar; Abdollahzadeh, Yaser; Asadollahzadeh, Mehdi; Hemmati, Alireza; Tavakoli, Hamed; Torkaman, Rezvan

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound leaching-solid phase extraction (USL-SPE) followed by dispersive-solidification liquid-liquid microextraction (DSLLME) was developed for preconcentration and determination of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in soil samples prior gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. At first, OPPs were ultrasonically leached from soil samples by using methanol. After centrifugation, the separated methanol was diluted to 50 mL with double-distillated water and passed through the C18 SPE cartridge. OPPs were eluted with 1 mL acetonitrile. Thus, 1 mL acetonitrile extract (disperser solvent) and 10 µL 1-undecanol (extraction solvent) were added to 5 mL double-distilled water and a DSLLME technique was applied. The variables of interest in the USL-SPE-DSLLME method were optimized with the aid of chemometric approaches. First, in screening experiments, fractional factorial design (FFD) was used for selecting the variables which significantly affected the extraction procedure. Afterwards, the significant variables were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD). Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factors were 6890-8830. The linear range was 0.025-625 ng g(-1) and limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.012 and 0.2 ng g(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 4.06-8.9% (n=6). The relative recoveries of OPPs from different soil samples were 85-98%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid breakthrough of pesticides via biopres into tile drains and shallow groundwater: a combined experimental and model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, J.; Zehe, E.; Palm, J.; Schroeder, B.

    2009-04-01

    Preferential flow in macropores is a key process which strongly affects infiltration and may cause rapid transport of pesticides into depths of 80 to 150 cm. At these depths they experience a much slower degradation, may leach into shallow groundwater or enter a tile-drain and are transported in surface water bodies. Therefore, preferential transport is an environ¬mental problem because the topsoil is bypassed, which has been originally thought to act as a filter to protect the subsoil and shallow groundwater. To get a better insight in the process of pesticide transport in agricultural soils an irrigation experiment was performed on a 400 m² field site. The experimental plot is located in the Weiherbach valley, south-west Germany, which basic geology consists of Loess and Keuper layers, the soil at the test site is a gleyic Colluvisol. The distance of the irrigation site to the Weiherbach brook is aprox. 12 m, the field is drained with a tile-drain in about 1.2 m depth and the shows runoff over the entire year. Three hours before the irrigation started the farmer applied a pesticide solution consisting of Isoproturon and Flufenacet according to conventional agricultural practice. The irrigation took place in three time blocks (80 min, 60 min, 80 min) and had a total irrigation rate of 33.6 mm measured with ten precipitation samplers. During the first block a tracer solution of 1600 g Bromide and 2000 g Brilliant Blue was irrigated on the test site. The drainage outlet was instrumented with a pressure probe to measure the water level. About 50 water samples were taken on the day of the experiment from the drainage outlet by hand, and in an eight hour interval for six days with an automatic sample procedure. Discharge at the drainage outlet showed two peaks in response irrigation. The breakthrough of the tracer into the brook is much faster then the reaction of the discharge on the precipitation impulse. To gain insight in the vertical transport behaviour three

  2. Pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    Eddleston, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Over 300,000 people die each year from pesticide poisoning. Most result from self-poisoning by ingestion, rather than occupational or accidental exposures which are typically topical or inhalational. Severe pesticide poisoning is more common in the rural developing world where pesticides are widely used in smallholder agricultural practice and therefore freely available. Significant acute poisoning is much less common in industrialized countries and here it is the long-term effects of low-dos...

  3. Collateral damage: rapid exposure-induced evolution of pesticide resistance leads to increased susceptibility to parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Mieke; Stoks, Robby; Coors, Anja; van Doorslaer, Wendy; de Meester, Luc

    2011-09-01

    Although natural populations may evolve resistance to anthropogenic stressors such as pollutants, this evolved resistance may carry costs. Using an experimental evolution approach, we exposed different Daphnia magna populations in outdoor containers to the carbamate pesticide carbaryl and control conditions, and assessed the resulting populations for both their resistance to carbaryl as well as their susceptibility to infection by the widespread bacterial microparasite Pasteuria ramosa. Our results show that carbaryl selection led to rapid evolution of carbaryl resistance with seemingly no cost when assessed in a benign environment. However, carbaryl-resistant populations were more susceptible to parasite infection than control populations. Exposure to both stressors reveals a synergistic effect on sterilization rate by P. ramosa, but this synergism did not evolve under pesticide selection. Assessing costs of rapid adaptive evolution to anthropogenic stress in a semi-natural context may be crucial to avoid too optimistic predictions for the fitness of the evolving populations. © 2011 The Author(s).

  4. Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... off the ground. Close outdoor trash bins and compost containers securely. Remove any standing water in the ... Karr CJ, Solomon GM, Brock-Utne AC. Health effects of common home, lawn, and garden pesticides. Pediatr ...

  5. Leaching of rapidly quenched Al65Cu20Fe15 quasicrystalline ribbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-12-06

    Dec 6, 2017 ... The Al–Mn QC exhibiting a simple icosahedral (i) symmetry. (Pm35), however the ordered QC was showing face-centred icosahedral (FCI) symmetry (Fm35) reported in annealed. Al–Cu–Fe rapidly solidified alloy [7,8]. A stable (i) Al–Cu–. Fe ternary QC has been discovered, which is a part of the.

  6. Microbial pesticide removal in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment – Potential and kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Filter sand samples, taken from aerobic rapid sand filters used for treating groundwater at three Danish waterworks, were investigated for their pesticide removal potential and to assess the kinetics of the removal process. Microcosms were set up with filter sand, treated water, and the pesticides...... or metabolites mecoprop (MCPP), bentazone, glyphosate and p-nitrophenol were applied in initial concentrations of 0.03–2.4 μg/L. In all the investigated waterworks the concentration of pesticides in the water decreased – MCPP decreased to 42–85%, bentazone to 15–35%, glyphosate to 7–14% and p-nitrophenol 1....../L) increased from 0.21%/g filter sand to 0.75%/g filter sand, when oxygen availability was increased from 0.28 mg O2/g filter sand to 1.09 mg O2/g filter sand. Bentazone was initially cleaved in the removal process. A metabolite, which contained the carbonyl group, was removed rapidly from the water phase...

  7. Microbial pesticide removal in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment--potential and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde J; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Filter sand samples, taken from aerobic rapid sand filters used for treating groundwater at three Danish waterworks, were investigated for their pesticide removal potential and to assess the kinetics of the removal process. Microcosms were set up with filter sand, treated water, and the pesticides or metabolites mecoprop (MCPP), bentazone, glyphosate and p-nitrophenol were applied in initial concentrations of 0.03-2.4 μg/L. In all the investigated waterworks the concentration of pesticides in the water decreased - MCPP decreased to 42-85%, bentazone to 15-35%, glyphosate to 7-14% and p-nitrophenol 1-3% - from the initial concentration over a period of 6-13 days. Mineralisation of three out of four investigated pesticides was observed at Sjælsø waterworks Plant II - up to 43% of the initial glyphosate was mineralised within six days. At Sjælsø waterworks Plant II the removal kinetics of bentazone revealed that less than 30 min was needed to remove 50% of the bentazone at all the tested initial concentrations (0.1-2.4 μg/L). Increased oxygen availability led to greater and faster removal of bentazone in the microcosms. After 1 h, bentazone removal (an initial bentazone concentration of 0.1 μg/L) increased from 0.21%/g filter sand to 0.75%/g filter sand, when oxygen availability was increased from 0.28 mg O2/g filter sand to 1.09 mg O2/g filter sand. Bentazone was initially cleaved in the removal process. A metabolite, which contained the carbonyl group, was removed rapidly from the water phase and slowly mineralised after 24 h, while a metabolite which contained the benzene-ring was still present in the water phase. However, the microbial removal of this metabolite was initiated over seven days. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microbial degradation of pesticides in rapid sand filters used for drinking water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen

    in rapid sand filters was not associated with methane oxidation. Based on the present investigations and literature, it was suggested that phenoxy acid degradation in rapid sand filters is due to primary metabolism, and that degradation might be stimulated by enriching naturally occurring specific...... degraders in the sand filters upon exposure to phenoxy acid contaminated groundwater. A suite of evidence showed that the herbicide bentazone was co-metabolically transformed to hydroxy-bentazone by the methanotrophic enrichment culture. Subsequently, it was investigated whether bentazone degradation...... a sequential reactor system, where methanotrophs are grown in the aeration tanks and transported to the rapid sand filters where they can perform co-metabolic pesticide biodegradation. It was suggested that bentazone removal can be stimulated at waterworks, by stimulating growth of methanotrophs. Overall...

  9. Study on Mobility, Distribution and Rapid Ion Mobility Spectrometry Detection of Seven Pesticide Residues in Cucumber, Apple, and Cherry Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Nan; Yuan, Chunhao; Chen, Ronghua; Yang, Juan; Li, Yifan; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2017-01-11

    This research explores the mobility and distribution rules of simazine, acetamiprid, hexazinone, paclobutrazol, amitraz, clofentezine, and boscalid in the pulp and peel of apple, cucumber, and cherry tomato. A laboratory test was carried out by treating the matrices with standard solution for different periods of time. The percentage sorption of pesticides ranged from 0.02 to 89.3% for the three matrices. The pesticides' distribution was also determined, and all pesticides showed ratio values (Q) between pulp and peel concentrations in the three matrices of <0.8, which proved that the highest pesticides' content was found in the peel. In addition, a rapid and simple process combining a surface swab capture method and pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry (PGD-IMS) detection was established for the detection of pesticides on matrix surfaces. In the swab method, the whole matrix surface was swabbed manually by swab sticks, and swab sticks were agitated in acetonitrile to release the pesticides. The releasing factors of pesticides in the three matrices were calculated. The linearity, LOD, LOQ, and matrix effect were investigated to assess the applicability of the swab-IMS process in practical analysis. The swab-IMS method is rapid, sensitive, and quantitative and can be achieved in the field.

  10. Rapid evolution meets invasive species control: The potential for pesticide resistance in sea lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Erin S.; McLaughlin, Robert L.; Adams, Jean V.; Jones, Michael L.; Birceanu, Oana; Christie, Mark R.; Criger, Lori A.; Hinderer, Julia L.M.; Hollingworth, Robert M.; Johnson, Nicholas; Lantz, Stephen R.; Li, Weiming; Miller, James R.; Morrison, Bruce J.; Mota-Sanchez, David; Muir, Andrew M.; Sepulveda, Maria S.; Steeves, Todd B.; Walter, Lisa; Westman, Erin; Wirgin, Isaac; Wilkie, Michael P.

    2018-01-01

    Rapid evolution of pest, pathogen and wildlife populations can have undesirable effects; for example, when insects evolve resistance to pesticides or fishes evolve smaller body size in response to harvest. A destructive invasive species in the Laurentian Great Lakes, the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) has been controlled with the pesticide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) since the 1950s. We evaluated the likelihood of sea lamprey evolving resistance to TFM by (1) reviewing sea lamprey life history and control; (2) identifying physiological and behavioural resistance strategies; (3) estimating the strength of selection from TFM; (4) assessing the timeline for evolution; and (5) analyzing historical toxicity data for evidence of resistance. The number of sea lamprey generations exposed to TFM was within the range observed for fish populations where rapid evolution has occurred. Mortality from TFM was estimated as 82-90%, suggesting significant selective pressure. However, 57 years of toxicity data revealed no increase in lethal concentrations of TFM. Vigilance and the development of alternative controls are required to prevent this aquatic invasive species from evolving strategies to evade control.

  11. Rapid experimental evolution of pesticide resistance in C. elegans entails no costs and affects the mating system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia C Lopes

    Full Text Available Pesticide resistance is a major concern in natural populations and a model trait to study adaptation. Despite the importance of this trait, the dynamics of its evolution and of its ecological consequences remain largely unstudied. To fill this gap, we performed experimental evolution with replicated populations of Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to the pesticide Levamisole during 20 generations. Exposure to Levamisole resulted in decreased survival, fecundity and male frequency, which declined from 30% to zero. This was not due to differential susceptibility of males. Rather, the drug affected mobility, resulting in fewer encounters, probably leading to reduced outcrossing rates. Adaptation, i.e., increased survival and fecundity, occurred within 10 and 20 generations, respectively. Male frequency also increased by generation 20. Adaptation costs were undetected in the ancestral environment and in presence of Ivermectin, another widely-used pesticide with an opposite physiological effect. Our results demonstrate that pesticide resistance can evolve at an extremely rapid pace. Furthermore, we unravel the effects of behaviour on life-history traits and test the environmental dependence of adaptation costs. This study establishes experimental evolution as a powerful tool to tackle pesticide resistance, and paves the way to further investigations manipulating environmental and/or genetic factors underlying adaptation to pesticides.

  12. Potential of short-column liquid chromatographia with tandem mass spectrometric detection for the rapid study of pesticide degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenboom, A.C.; Steen, R.J.C.A.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1998-01-01

    The applicability of solid-phase extraction-LC using two short columns (SPE-LC) and/or single-short-column liquid chromatography (SSC) combined on- line with tandem mass spectrometry (MS) was demonstrated for the rapid study of pesticide degradation. A fast analytical procedure was developed to

  13. Flexible and Adhesive Surface Enhance Raman Scattering Active Tape for Rapid Detection of Pesticide Residues in Fruits and Vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiaming; Huang, Youju; Kannan, Palanisamy; Zhang, Lei; Lin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Jiawei; Chen, Tao; Guo, Longhua

    2016-02-16

    The efficient extraction of targets from complex surfaces is vital for technological applications ranging from environmental pollutant monitoring to analysis of explosive traces and pesticide residues. In our present study, we proposed a proof-of-concept surface enhance Raman scattering (SERS) active substrate serving directly to the rapid extraction and detection of target molecules. The novel substrate was constructed by decorating the commercial tape with colloidal gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), which simultaneously provides SERS activity and "sticky" of adhesive. The utility of SERS tape was demonstrated by directly extracting pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables via a simple and viable "paste and peel off" approach. The obtained strong and easily distinguishable SERS signals allow us to detect various pesticide residues such as parathion-methyl, thiram, and chlorpyrifos in the real samples with complex surfaces including green vegetable, cucumber, orange, and apple.

  14. Applying a statewide geospatial leaching tool for assessing soil vulnerability ratings for agrochemicals across the contiguous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Seo Jin; Ray, Chittaranjan; Hantush, Mohamed M

    2015-06-15

    A large-scale leaching assessment tool not only illustrates soil (or groundwater) vulnerability in unmonitored areas, but also can identify areas of potential concern for agrochemical contamination. This study describes the methodology of how the statewide leaching tool in Hawaii modified recently for use with pesticides and volatile organic compounds can be extended to the national assessment of soil vulnerability ratings. For this study, the tool was updated by extending the soil and recharge maps to cover the lower 48 states in the United States (US). In addition, digital maps of annual pesticide use (at a national scale) as well as detailed soil properties and monthly recharge rates (at high spatial and temporal resolutions) were used to examine variations in the leaching (loads) of pesticides for the upper soil horizons. Results showed that the extended tool successfully delineated areas of high to low vulnerability to selected pesticides. The leaching potential was high for picloram, medium for simazine, and low to negligible for 2,4-D and glyphosate. The mass loadings of picloram moving below 0.5 m depth increased greatly in northwestern and central US that recorded its extensive use in agricultural crops. However, in addition to the amount of pesticide used, annual leaching load of atrazine was also affected by other factors that determined the intrinsic aquifer vulnerability such as soil and recharge properties. Spatial and temporal resolutions of digital maps had a great effect on the leaching potential of pesticides, requiring a trade-off between data availability and accuracy. Potential applications of this tool include the rapid, large-scale vulnerability assessments for emerging contaminants which are hard to quantify directly through vadose zone models due to lack of full environmental data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Shell thickness-dependent Raman enhancement for rapid identification and detection of pesticide residues at fruit peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bianhua; Han, Guangmei; Zhang, Zhongping; Liu, Renyong; Jiang, Changlong; Wang, Suhua; Han, Ming-Yong

    2012-01-03

    Here, we report the shell thickness-dependent Raman enhancement of silver-coated gold nanoparticles (Au@Ag NPs) for the identification and detection of pesticide residues at various fruit peels. The Raman enhancement of Au@Ag NPs to a large family of sulfur-containing pesticides is ~2 orders of magnitude stronger than those of bare Au and Ag NPs, and there is a strong dependence of the Raman enhancement on the Ag shell thickness. It has been shown for the first time that the huge Raman enhancement is contributed by individual Au@Ag NPs rather than aggregated Au@Ag NPs with "hot spots" among the neighboring NPs. Therefore, the Au@Ag NPs with excellent individual-particle enhancement can be exploited as stand-alone-particle Raman amplifiers for the surface identification and detection of pesticide residues at various peels of fruits, such as apple, grape, mango, pear, and peach. By casting the particle sensors onto fruit peels, several types of pesticide residues (e.g., thiocarbamate and organophosphorous compounds) have been reliably/rapidly detected, for example, 1.5 nanograms of thiram per square centimeter at apple peel under the current unoptimized condition. The surface-lifting spectroscopic technique offers great practical potentials for the on-site assessment and identification of pesticide residues in agricultural products. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry for the rapid identification of four highly hazardous pesticides in agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Pengyue; Zhang, Fengzu; Li, Yanjie; Pan, Canping

    2012-08-30

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) is a new ion source technique, which is conducted in the open air under ambient conditions, applied to the rapid and direct analysis of any material (gases, liquids, and solids) with minimal or no sample preparation. In order to take advantage of the capacity of DART mass spectrometry for the real-time analysis of hazardous ingredients in commercial agrochemicals, a pilot study of rapid qualitative determination of hazardous pesticides was performed. Highly hazardous pesticides were identified by DART ionization coupled to a single-quadrupole mass spectrometer (DART-MS). Acetonitrile was chosen for dissolving samples prior to the analysis. Samples were analyzed by this technique in as little as 5 s. Phorate, carbofuran, ethoprophos and fipronil were be detected directly from commercial agrochemicals. The ionization-related parameters (DART temperature, grid voltage and MS fragment) of these compounds were optimized to obtain highly response. Isotope patterns were taken into consideration for qualitative identification. Relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 5) of 2.3-15.0% were obtained by measuring the relative abundance of selected isotopes. This study showed that DART-MS technology was able to qualitatively determine the existence of highly hazardous pesticides in commercial pesticide formulations. It is suggested that this technology should be applied for routine monitoring in the market. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A review of rapid transport of pesticides from sloping farmland to surface waters: processes and mitigation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyu; Zhu, Bo; Katou, Hidetaka

    2012-01-01

    Pesticides applied to sloping farmland may lead to surface water contamination through rapid transport processes as influenced by the complex topography and high spatial variability of soil properties and land use in hilly or mountainous regions. However, the fate of pesticides applied to sloping farmland has not been sufficiently elucidated. This article reviews the current understanding of pesticide transport from sloping farmland to surface water. It examines overland flow and subsurface lateral flow in areas where surface soil is underlain by impervious subsoil or rocks and tile drains. It stresses the importance of quantifying and modeling the contributions of various pathways to rapid pesticide loss at catchment and regional scales. Such models could be used in scenario studies for evaluating the effectiveness of possible mitigation strategies such as constructing vegetated strips, depressions, wetlands and drainage ditches, and implementing good agricultural practices. Field monitoring studies should also be conducted to calibrate and validate the transport models as well as biophysical-economic models, to optimize mitigation measures in areas dominated by sloping farmland.

  18. Rapid detection of pesticide residue in apple based on Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyu; Sun, Yunyun; Peng, Yankun; Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Liu, Qiaoqiao

    2012-05-01

    The potential of Raman spectroscopy in the analysis of low concentration organic contaminants on apples' surface was evidenced in this study. Chlorpyrifos, an organophosphorus pesticide, was used as a probe for this purpose. The characteristic peaks of fingerprints of pesticide on an aluminum substrate and apple fruit cuticle without pesticide residue were acquired first. Then a concentration range of chlorpyrifos (commercial products at 40%) solutions were made using deionised and distilled water. Single 100 μL droplets of the chlorpyrifos solutions were placed gently on apple fruit cuticles and left to dry before analysis. Through comparative analysis of the Raman spectra data collected, 341, 632 and 1237cm-1 were identified to detect the chlorpyrifos pesticide residue on apple surface. Based on the relationship between the Raman intensity of the most prominent peak at around 632cm-1 and the pesticide concentrations, the limit of detection of ordinary Raman spectrum for chlorpyrifos was estimated to be 48ppm.

  19. Rapid and Simultaneous Analysis of 360 Pesticides in Brown Rice, Spinach, Orange, and Potato Using Microbore GC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghwa; Kim, Leesun; Shin, Yongho; Lee, Junghak; Lee, Jiho; Kim, Eunhye; Moon, Joon-Kwan; Kim, Jeong-Han

    2017-04-26

    A multiresidue method for the simultaneous and rapid analysis of 360 pesticides in representative agricultural produce (brown rice, orange, spinach, and potato) was developed using a modified QuEChERS procedure combined with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Selected reaction monitoring transition parameters (e.g., collision energy, precursor and product ions) in MS/MS were optimized to achieve the best selectivity and sensitivity for a wide range of GC-amenable pesticides. A short (20 m) microbore (0.18 mm i.d.) column resulted in better signal-to-noise ratio with reduced analysis time than a conventional narrowbore column (30 m × 0.25 mm i.d.). The priming injection dramatically increased peak areas by masking effect on a new GC liner. The limit of quantitation was 0.99 within the range of 0.0025-0.1 mg/kg. Acetonitrile with 0.1% formic acid without additional buffer salts was used for pesticide extraction, whereas only primary-secondary amine (PSA) was used for dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) cleanup, to achieve good recoveries for most of the target analytes. The recoveries ranged from 70 to 120% with relative standard deviations of ≤20% at 0.01 and 0.05 mg/kg spiking levels (n = 6) in all samples, indicating acceptable accuracy and precision of the method. Seventeen real samples from local markets were analyzed by using the optimized method, and 14 pesticides in 11 incurred samples were found at below the maximum residue limits.

  20. Behavior of pesticides in a paddy field with rapid water penetration; Koka shinto sokudo no hayai suiden ni okeru noyaku dotai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T.; Nakano, Y. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering

    2000-11-10

    The behavior of pesticides (dymron, mefenacet, bensulfuron-methyl) was measured and simulated in a paddy field with rapid water penetration. In the field experiment, the concentration of each pesticide in paddy water reached a maximum shortly after its application, and then diminished rapidly to a non-detectable level within three days. In paddy soil, the concentrations of dymron and mefenacet in the topsoil (from soil surface to 5 cm, 0-5 cm) were much higher than those in the subsoil (5-10 cm) four days after application, and their concentrations in both soils became almost the same after six days. On the other hand, a significant difference in the concentration of bensulfuron-methyl between the topsoil and the subsoil could not be observed. The behavior of pesticides in the paddy field was predicted well using a mathematical simulation model. It was found that transfer of pesticide with dissolution and penetration of water significantly contributed to the behavior of pesticides in paddy water, and the spatial distribution of the pesticides in paddy soil depended on the adsorbability of each pesticide. Dymron and mefenacet were shown to be spatially less mobile than bensulfuron-methyl because of their higher adsorbability. (author)

  1. Rapid dehalogenation of pesticides and organics at the interface of reduced graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koushik, Dibyashree; Sen Gupta, Soujit; Maliyekkal, Shihabudheen M; Pradeep, T

    2016-05-05

    This paper reports dehalogenation of various organohalides, especially aliphatic halocarbons and pesticides at reduced graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite (RGO@Ag). Several pesticides as well as chlorinated and fluorinated alkyl halides were chosen for this purpose. The composite and the products of degradation were characterized thoroughly by means of various microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A sequential two-step mechanism involving dehalogenation of the target pollutants by silver nanoparticles followed by adsorption of the degraded compounds onto RGO was revealed. The composite showed unusual adsorption capacity, as high as 1534 mg/g, which facilitated the complete removal of the pollutants. Irrespective of the pollutants tested, a pseudo-second-order rate equation best described the adsorption kinetics. The affinity of the composite manifested chemical differences. The high adsorption capacity and re-usability makes the composite an excellent substrate for purification of water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid and sensitive suspension array for multiplex detection of organophosphorus pesticides and carbamate pesticides based on silica–hydrogel hybrid microbeads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuan [Key Laboratory of Environmental Medicine Engineering, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Mu, Zhongde; Shangguan, Fengqi [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Ran; Pu, Yuepu [Key Laboratory of Environmental Medicine Engineering, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Yin, Lihong, E-mail: lhyin@seu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Environmental Medicine Engineering, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Silica–hydrogel hybrid microbeads were used to develop suspension array. • The results in detecting pesticides agree well with those from LC–MS/MS. • The method showed the good capability for multiplex analysis of pesticides residues. - Abstract: A technique for multiplex detection of organophosphorus pesticides and carbamate pesticides has been developed using a suspension array based on silica–hydrogel hybrid microbeads (SHHMs). The main advantage of SHHMs, which consist of both silica and hydrogel materials, is that they not only could be distinguished by their characteristic reflection peak originating from the stop-band of the photonic crystal but also have low non-specific adsorption of proteins. Using fluorescent immunoassay, the LODs for fenitrothion, chlorpyrifos-methyl, fenthion, carbaryl and metolcarb were measured to be 0.02 ng/mL, 0.012 ng/mL, 0.04 ng/mL, 0.05 ng/mL and 0.1 ng/mL, respectively, all of which are much lower than the maximum residue limits, as reported in the European Union pesticides database. All the determination coefficients for these five pesticides were greater than 0.99, demonstrating excellent correlations. The suspension array was specific and had no significant cross-reactivity with other chemicals. The results for the detection of pesticide residues collected from agricultural samples using this method agree well with those from liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Our results showed that this simple method is suitable for simultaneous detection of these five pesticides residues in fruits and vegetables.

  3. Validation and uncertainty assessment of rapid extraction and clean-up methods for the determination of 16 organochlorine pesticide residues in vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenisoy-Karakaş, Serpil

    2006-07-07

    Rapid and practical extraction methods were developed using dichloromethane and ethyl acetate for the routine determination of 16 organochlorine pesticide residues and applied to approximately 30 fresh vegetables (tomato, cucumber and pepper) by using GC-ECD. The procedures were validated. Measurement uncertainties were calculated by applying bottom-up approach. The average recoveries obtained for each pesticide ranged between 65 and 102% at three fortification levels. The uncertainties of the analytical methods were lower than 21 and 16% with and without recovery correction, respectively. The calculated limits of detection and quantification were typically less than 1 ng g(-1) that were much lower than the maximum residue levels.

  4. A gas/liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for the rapid screening of 250 pesticides in aqueous matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandramouli, B.; Harvan, D.; Brittain, S.; Hass, R. [Eno River Labs, LLC. Durham, NC (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Pesticide residues in food present a potentially serious and significant cause for concern. Many pesticides have been associated with significant health effects to the nervous and endocrine systems and some have been deemed carcinogenic. There are many well-established techniques for pesticide analysis. However, commercial pesticide methods have traditionally only been available for specific pesticide families, such as chlorinated pesticides or herbicides, and at detection limits ranging from 0.05 ppb to 1 ppm in aqueous matrices. Techniques that can quickly screen for the presence/absence of pesticide residues in food matrices are critical in ensuring the safety of food and water. This paper outlines a combined Gas Chromatographic-High Resolution Mass Spectrometric (GC-HRMS) and Liquid Chromatographic Tandem Mass Spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) screening assay for 250 pesticides that was developed for use in water, and soda samples at screening levels ranging from 0.1-5 ppb. The pesticides selected have been identified by the European Union as being of concern and the target of possible legislation. The list encompasses a variety of pesticide classes and compound groupings.

  5. A preferential flow leaching index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGrath, G.S.; Hinz, C.; Sivapalan, M.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental evidence suggests that for many chemicals surface runoff and rapid preferential flow through the shallow unsaturated zone are significant pathways for transport to streams and groundwater. The signature of this is the episodic and pulsed leaching of these chemicals. The driver for

  6. Rapid screening and quantification of residual pesticides and illegal adulterants in red wine by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tianyang; Fang, Pingping; Jiang, Juanjuan; Zhang, Feng; Yong, Wei; Liu, Jiahui; Dong, Yiyang

    2016-11-04

    A rapid method to screen and quantify multi-class analytic targets in red wine has been developed by direct analysis in real time (DART) coupled with triple quadruple tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ-MS). A modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) procedure was used for increasing analytical speed and reducing matrix effect, and the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in DART-MS/MS ensured accurate analysis. One bottle of wine containing 50 pesticides and 12 adulterants, i.e., preservatives, antioxidant, sweeteners, and azo dyes, could be totally determined less than 12min. This method exhibited proper linearity (R2≥0.99) in the range of 1-1000ng/mL for pesticides and 10-5000ng/mL for adulterants. The limits of detection (LODs) were obtained in a 0.5-50ng/mL range for pesticides and 5-50ng/mL range for adulterants, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were in a 1-100ng/mL range for pesticides and 10-250ng/mL range for adulterants. Three spiked levels for each analyte in wine were evaluated, and the recoveries were in a scope of 75-120%. The results demonstrated DART-MS/MS was a rapid and simple method, and could be applied to rapid analyze residual pesticides and illegal adulterants in a large quantities of red wine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial Leaching

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Worldwide reserves of high-grade ores are diminishing at an alarming rate due to the rapid increase in the demand for metals. However there exist large stockpiles of low and lean grade ores yet to be mined. The problem is that the recovery of metals from low and lean grade ores using conventional techniques is very.

  8. Effect of Intensive Atropine Doses (Rapid Incremental Loading and Titration for Management of Organophosphorus Pesticide Poisoning: a Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Saleh Ahmed

    2014-03-01

    , Basher A, Amin MR, Faiz MA. Effect of Intensive Atropine Doses (Rapid Incremental Loading and Titration for Management of Organophosphorus Pesticide Poisoning: a Case Series. Asia Pac J Med Toxicol 2014;3:23-6.

  9. Rapid gas chromatography with flame photometric detection of multiple organophosphorus pesticides in Salvia miltiorrhizae after ultrasonication assisted one-step extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanshan; Liu, Xiaofei; Qin, Jia'an; Yang, Meihua; Zhao, Hongzheng; Wang, Yong; Guo, Weiying; Ma, Zhijie; Kong, Weijun

    2017-11-15

    A simple and rapid gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) method was developed for the determination of 12 organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in Salvia miltiorrhizae by using ultrasonication assisted one-step extraction (USAE) without any clean-up steps. Some crucial parameters such as type of extraction solvent were optimized to improve the method performance for trace analysis. Any clean-up steps were negligent as no interferences were detected in the GC-FPD chromatograms for sensitive detection. Under the optimized conditions, limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) for all pesticides were in the range of 0.001-0.002mg/kg and 0.002-0.01mg/kg and 0.002-0.01mg/kg, respectively, which were all below the regulatory maximum residue limits suggested. RSDs for method precision (intra- and inter-day variations) were lower than 6.8% in approval with international regulations. Average recovery rates for all pesticides at three fortification levels (0.5, 1.0 and 5.0mg/kg) were in the range of 71.2-101.0% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) pesticide (dimethoate) out of the 12 targets was simultaneously detected in four samples at concentrations of 0.016-0.02mg/kg. Dichlorvos and omethoate were found in the same sample from Sichuan province at 0.004 and 0.027mg/kg, respectively. Malathion and monocrotophos were determined in the other two samples at 0.014 and 0.028mg/kg, respectively. All the positive samples were confirmed by LC-MS/MS. The simple, reliable and rapid USAE-GC-FPD method with many advantages over traditional techniques would be preferred for trace analysis of multiple pesticides in more complex matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sorption kinetics and its effects on retention and leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wilde, Tineke; Mertens, Jan; Spanoghe, Pieter; Ryckeboer, Jaak; Jaeken, Peter; Springael, Dirk

    2008-06-01

    Sorption of pesticides to substrates used in biopurification systems is important as it controls the system's efficiency. Ideally, pesticide sorption should occur fast so that leaching of the pesticide in the biopurification system is minimized. Although modeling of pesticide transport commonly assumes equilibrium, this may not always be true in practice. Sorption kinetics have to be taken into account. This study investigated the batch sorption kinetics of linuron, isoproturon, metalaxyl, isoxaben and lenacil on substrates commonly used in a biopurification system, i.e. cow manure, straw, willow chopping, sandy loam soil, coconut chips, garden waste compost and peat mix. The first-order sorption kinetics model was fitted to the observed pesticide concentrations versus time resulting in an estimated kinetic rate constant alpha. Sorption appeared to be fast for the pesticides linuron and isoxaben, pesticides which were classified as immobile, while less mobile pesticides displayed an overall slower sorption. However, the substrate does not seem to be the main parameter influencing the sorption kinetics. Coconut chips, which is a substrate with a high organic matter content showed slow sorption for most of the pesticides. The effect of different estimated alpha values on the breakthrough of pesticides through a biopurification system was evaluated using the HYDRUS 1D model. Significant differences in leaching behavior were observed as a result of the obtained differences in sorption kinetics.

  11. Screening of pesticides for environmental partitioning tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Paola; Di Guardo, Antonio

    2002-06-01

    The partitioning tendency of chemicals, in this study pesticides in particular, into different environmental compartments depends mainly on the concurrent relevance of the physico-chemical properties of the chemical itself. To rank the pesticides according to their distribution tendencies in the different environmental compartments we propose a multivariate approach: the combination, by principal component analysis, of those physico-chemical properties like organic carbon partition coefficient (Koc), n-octanol/water partition coefficient (Kow), water solubility (Sw), vapour pressure and Henry's law constant (H) that are more relevant to the determination of environmental partitioning. The resultant macrovariables, the PC1 and PC2 scores here named leaching index (LIN) and volatality index (VIN), are proposed as preliminary environmental partitioning indexes in different media. These two indexes are modeled by theoretical molecular descriptors with satisfactory predictive power. Such an approach allows a rapid pre-determination and screening of the environmental distribution of pesticides starting only from the molecular structure of the pesticide, without any a priori knowledge of the physico-chemical properties.

  12. Rapid determination of pesticide residues in Chinese materia medica using QuEChERS sample preparation followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichen Hu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Pesticide residue analysis plays an important role in the quality control of Chinese materia medica. This paper reports the development and validation of an analytical method for the quantitative determination of the residues of 39 pesticides in 12 different matrices of Chinese materia medica. Sample preparation utilized the QuEChERS method with acetonitrile:1% aqueous acetic acid (9:1, v/v as extraction solvent followed by sample clean-up by dispersive solid phase extraction using primary secondary amine sorbent and graphitized carbon black. Extracts were then analysed by gas chromatography coupled with electron impact mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode. Limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantitation (LOQ values were in the ranges 0.5–50 ng/g and 1–100 ng/g, respectively. The recoveries of the 39 pesticides were in the range 75–112% with precision (as relative standard deviation, RSD <15%. The results show that the modified QuEChERS method allows rapid and sensitive analysis of multiple pesticide residues in Chinese materia medica.

  13. [Application of a rapid and simple multi-residue method for determination of pesticide residues in drinking water and beverages using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Naoki; Takatori, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Yoko; Okihashi, Masahiro; Osakada, Masakazu; Nakatsuji, Naoto; Nakayama, Yukiko; Kakimoto, You; Obana, Hirotaka

    2012-01-01

    A rapid and simple multi-residue method for determination of pesticides has been applied to drinking water and beverages. To a disposable polypropylene tube containing 10.0 g sample, 20 mL acetonitrile was added and the mixture was shaken vigorously for 1 min to extract pesticides. Then, 1 g sodium chloride and 4 g magnesium sulfate anhydrous were added, followed by vigorous shaking for 1 min and centrifugation to obtain the organic phase. The organic phase was processed with a graphite carbon black/PSA solid phase column. After concentration and reconstitution with 25% methanol containing aqueous solution, the test solution was analyzed with LC-MS/MS. Recovery tests of 91 pesticides fortified (0.02 μg/g) in 35 kinds of drinking water and beverages were conducted. The decline of recoveries in alcoholic beverages is considered to be due to the increase of organic phase volume owing to ethanol included in the alcoholic beverages. A simulation study was carried out with simulated alcoholic beverages, which consisted of 50% grape juice, with various amounts of ethanol and water, to examine pesticides recoveries and volume of the organic phase. The results suggested this method would be applicable both to alcoholic beverages containing less than 10% ethanol and to alcoholic beverages containing over 10% ethanol after dilution with water to below 10% ethanol prior to the addition of acetonitrile. A sample could be processed and analyzed by LC-MS/MS within 2 h. Thus, this method should be useful for monitoring and screening pesticide residues in drinking water and various beverages.

  14. A spatially distributed model of pesticide movement in Dutch macroporous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiktak, A.; Hendriks, R. F. A.; Boesten, J. J. T. I.; van der Linden, A. M. A.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryIn the Netherlands, a spatially distributed version of the pesticide fate model PEARL is routinely used to assess the leaching potential of pesticides to groundwater. Recently, the model was modified to simulate the movement of pesticides to surface water. The peak concentration is considered to be the most important exposure endpoint for the ecotoxicological effect assessment for aquatic organisms. Macropore flow is an important driver for the peak concentration, so the leaching model PEARL was extended with a macropore module. Macropore parameters were derived from generally available soil data such as organic matter content and clay content using newly developed pedotransfer functions. These pedotransfer functions were constructed using a wide range of Dutch clayey soils. Results indicate a good correlation between these variables and soil structural parameters, which is due to the homogeneous mineralogical composition of Dutch clayey soils. Results of the spatially distributed modelling indicate that due to rapid transport through macropores, the concentration of pesticides in drainage water is generally higher in clayey soils than in light textured soils. In clayey soils, the boundary hydraulic conductivity and organic matter content were the most important drivers for the concentration in drainage water. Results further indicate that the concentration of pesticide in drainage water increases with increasing half-life and decreases with increasing sorption coefficient. However, the effect of these parameters is much less than obtained with the convection-dispersion equation because due to preferential flow most of the reactive part of the soil profile is bypassed.

  15. A rapid, solid phase extraction (SPE technique for the extraction and gas chromatographic determination lindane pesticide residue in tissue and milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuningsih

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Organochlorine pesticide contamination in feed can cause residue in animal product (tissue and milk, so its become a problem in food safety. Solid phase extraction (SPE has been carried out for determination organochlorine pesticide residues in food animal production. The technique was rapid, not costly and produce limited amount of hazardous-waste. Samples were homogenized with acetonitrile trough cartridge C18, eluted in fluorocyl column with 2% ether-petroleum or acetonitrile fortissue and milk samples respectively. The recoveries of tissue sample by addition lindane standard solution: 0.50 and 1.00 μg are 85.10 and 103.10% respectively, while that of milk with the addition of 0.50, 1.00 and 1.50 μg are 83.80, 88.69 and 91.24% respectively. Three replicates were carried out for every sample. According of validation criteria of FAO/IAEA the recovery for analysis of pesticide residues was 70-110%. Therefore, the method is applicable.

  16. Rapid and Green Analytical Method for the Determination of Quinoline Alkaloids from Cinchona succirubra Based on Microwave-Integrated Extraction and Leaching (MIEL) Prior to High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano-Tixier, Anne-Sylvie; Elomri, Abdelhakim; Blanckaert, Axelle; Seguin, Elisabeth; Petitcolas, Emmanuel; Chemat, Farid

    2011-01-01

    Quinas contains several compounds, such as quinoline alkaloids, principally quinine, quinidine, cinchonine and cichonidine. Identified from barks of Cinchona, quinine is still commonly used to treat human malaria. Microwave-Integrated Extraction and Leaching (MIEL) is proposed for the extraction of quinoline alkaloids from bark of Cinchona succirubra. The process is performed in four steps, which ensures complete, rapid and accurate extraction of the samples. Optimal conditions for extraction were obtained using a response surface methodology reached from a central composite design. The MIEL extraction has been compared with a conventional technique soxhlet extraction. The extracts of quinoline alkaloids from C. succirubra obtained by these two different methods were compared by HPLC. The extracts obtained by MIEL in 32 min were quantitatively (yield) and qualitatively (quinine, quinidine, cinchonine, cinchonidine) similar to those obtained by conventional Soxhlet extraction in 3 hours. MIEL is a green technology that serves as a good alternative for the extraction of Cinchona alkaloids. PMID:22174637

  17. [Rapid determination of 6 pesticide residues in tomato paste by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Min; Li, Shiyu; Li, Fengge; Gong, Zhiguo; Wang, Jinhua

    2011-11-01

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method (UPLC-MS/MS) was established for the simultaneous determination of imidacloprid, carbendazim, thiophanate-methyl, propamocarb, methomyl and dimethomorph residues in tomato paste. The samples were extracted by methanol-water (1: 1, v/v) containing 0.1% (v/v) acetic acid. The separation was performed on a Waters Acquity UPLC system with a BEH C18 column with the gradient elution of methanol and water (containing 10 mmol/L ammonium acetate). The six pesticides were determined in the modes of electrospray positive ionization (ESI+) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The analytes were quantified by matrix-matched standard solution, and the calibration curves showed good linearity within the concentrations of 0.005 to 0.2 mg/L and the correlation coefficients (r) were more than 0.995. The average recoveries of the six pesticides ranged from 66.8% to 102.9% in the three spiked levels of 0.02, 0.05 and 0.2 mg/kg. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were all less than 15%. The limits of quantification (LOQ, S/N > 10) were 0.02 mg/kg for the all analytes. The results indicate that the method is easier, faster, more sensitive, and suitable for the qualitative and quantitative confirmation of the six pesticide residues from tomato paste.

  18. Leaching behaviour of azoxystrobin in sandy loam soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr HMM Mzimela

    2014-08-01

    Aug 1, 2014 ... Key words: Leaching, azoxystrobin, sandy loam soil, column, residues. INTRODUCTION. Pesticides are one of the major technological developments of twentieth century. Whether natural or synthetic, they have toxicological significance and pose a potential risk when they persist in the environment. The.

  19. Rapid analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples by dispersive solid-phase extraction based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and pulse glow discharge ion source ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Nan; Gu, Kejia; Liu, Shaowen; Hou, Yanbing; Zhang, Jialei; Xu, Xiang; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2016-03-01

    An analytical method based on dispersive solid-phase extraction with a multiwalled carbon nanotubes sorbent coupled with positive pulse glow discharge ion mobility spectrometry was developed for analysis of 30 pesticide residues in drinking water samples. Reduced ion mobilities and the mass-mobility correlation of 30 pesticides were measured. The pesticides were divided into five groups to verify the separation capability of pulse glow discharge in mobility spectrometry. The extraction conditions such as desorption solvent, ionic strength, conditions of adsorption and desorption, the amounts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and solution pH were optimized. The enrichment factors of pesticides were 5.4- to 48.7-fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 50-fold). The detection limits of pesticides were 0.01∼0.77 μg/kg. The linear range was 0.005-0.2 mg/L for pesticide standard solutions, with determination coefficients from 0.9616 to 0.9999. The method was applied for the analysis of practical and spiked drinking water samples. All results were confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The proposed method was proven to be a commendably rapid screening qualitative and semiquantitative technique for the analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples on site. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Rapid simultaneous determination of organophosphorus pesticides in human serum and urine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatković Milica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Analysis of organophosphosphorus compounds and their metabolites in a biological material includes the use of numerous methods, covering both preparation of samples for analysis and their identification that is considered to be very complex. Low concentrations monitoring requires implementation of highly sensitive analytical techniques. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an original and sensitive method for the detection and quantitation of organophosphorus pesticides (dimethoate, diazinon, malathion and malaoxon in human biological matrices (serum, urine. Methods. This method was based on a solid-phase extraction procedure, a chromatographic separation using an ACQUITY UPLC ® HSST3 column and mass spectrometric detection in the positve ion mode. Mobile phase: was consited of Solvent A (5 mM ammonium formate pH 3.0 and Solvent B (0.1% acetic formate in methanol, in a linear gradient (constant flow-rate 0.3 mL/min. Results. The standard curve was linear in the range of 0.05-5.00 mg/L for malathion and malaoxon, 0.10-5.00 mg/L for dimethoate and 0.05-2.50 mg/L for diazinon. The correlation coefficient was r ≥ 0.99. Extraction recoveries were satisfactory and ranged between 90-99%. The limits of detection (LOD was between 0.007- 0.07 mg/L and the limits of quantitation (LOQ ranged between 0.022-0.085 mg/L. Intra- and interassay precision and accuracy were satisfactory for all of the pesticides analyzed. Conclusion. The method of liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry is simple, accurate, and useful for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in both clinical and forensic toxicology.

  1. Water flow and pesticide transport in cultivated sandy soils : experimental data on complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, M.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2010-01-01

    The risk of leaching of agricultural pesticides from soil to groundwater and water courses has to be evaluated. Complications in water flow and pesticide transport in humic-sandy and loamy-sandy soil profiles can be expected to increase the risk of leaching. Much of the precipitation water is

  2. Evaluation of immunoassays as an alternative for the rapid determination of pesticides in wine and grape samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argarate, Nerea; Arestin, María; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Alfaro, Begoña; Barranco, Alejandro; Sánchez-Baeza, Francisco; Marco, M Pilar

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to address the performance of immunochemical assays for the detection of the residues of three pesticides [atrazine, bromopropylate, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP)] in real winery samples, such as wine, grapes, and grape juice. Different approaches have been evaluated to minimize interferences from the matrixes, and suitable working protocols have been established in order to achieve the necessary LODs, accuracy, and precision for real samples. A simple dilution of the sample proved to be sufficient for the determination of atrazine and bromopropylate in red and white wine and grape juice at the required levels of concentration. However, for TCP, an SPE procedure has been optimized using amino cartridges. The recoveries were above 85% in all cases, and the LOD values were below the parts per billion level, except for bromopropylate, which ranged between 2 and 50 microg/L, depending on the matrix. The grape matrix effect could be resolved by a simple extraction with methanol. Complete recoveries were obtained, and the final measurement procedures were able to determine selected pesticides below their maximum residue levels. The newly developed methods have been compared with standard chromatographic methods.

  3. Fate of pesticides in field ditches: the TOXSWA simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, P.I.

    1996-01-01

    The TOXSWA model describes the fate of pesticides entering field ditches by spray drift, atmospheric deposition, surface run-off, drainage or leaching. It considers four processes: transport, transformation, sorption and volatilization. Analytical andnumerical solutions corresponded well. A sample

  4. Pesticide Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  5. Pesticide Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    This site provides resources for an individual or company wanting to register a pesticide active ingredient or pesticide product in the United States. Features: a manual (blue book), other guidance, and coordinated lists of requirements by pesticide type.

  6. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates pesticides under the statutory authority of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). The registration requirements for antimicrobial pesticides differ somewhat from those of other pesticides. Find out more.

  7. Accurate Mass Fragment Library for Rapid Analysis of Pesticides on Produce Using Ambient Pressure Desorption Ionization with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Sara E.; Lin, Lora A.; Fricke, Frederick L.

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]+) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]+ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]+ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli. The

  8. Simulation of movement of pesticides towards drains with a preferential flow version of PEARL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiktak, Aaldrik; Hendriks, Rob F A; Boesten, Jos J T I

    2012-02-01

    As part of the Dutch authorisation procedure for pesticides, an assessment of the effects on aquatic organisms in surface waters adjacent to agricultural fields is required. The peak concentration is considered to be the most important exposure endpoint for the ecotoxicological effect assessment. Macropore flow is an important driver for the peak concentration, so the leaching model PEARL was extended with a macropore module. The new model has two macropore domains: a bypass domain and an internal catchment domain. The model was tested against data from a field leaching study on a cracking clay soil in the Netherlands. Most parameters of the model could be obtained from site-specific measurements, pedotransfer functions and general soil structural knowledge; only three macropore-flow-related parameters needed calibration. The flow-related macropore parameters could not be calibrated without using the concentration in drain water. Sequential calibration strategies, in which firstly the water flow model and then the pesticide fate model are calibrated, may therefore be less suitable for preferential flow models. After calibration, PEARL could simulate well the observed rapid movement towards drains of two pesticides with contrasting sorption and degradation rate properties. The calibrated value for the fraction of the internal catchment domain was high (90%). This means that a large fraction of water entering the macropores infiltrates into the soil matrix, thus reducing the fraction of rapid flow. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. On-line solid-phase extraction-short-column liquid chromatography combined with various tandem mass spectrometric scanning strategies for the rapid study of transformation of pesticides in surface water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenboom, A.C.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    The applicability of solid-phase extraction-short-column liquid chromatography using two short columns (i.e., 10 and 20 mm long) coupled on-line with tandem mass spectrometric detection is demonstrated for the rapid degradation study of pesticides and their transformation products in water at the

  10. Dissolution Model of Multiple Species: Leaching of Highly Soluble Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luis; Ordóñez, Javier I.; Cisternas, Luis A.

    2017-06-01

    Dissolution of multi-species from a solid matrix is widely extended in different processes such as leaching of minerals; however, its modeling is often focused on a single species. A model for the simultaneous dissolution of soluble species was developed, which considers different solubilities and dissolution rates and considers that particle collapses when the rapidly soluble species is depleted. The collapsed matter is formed by inert material and a fraction of the soluble species with lower dissolution rate that has not dissolved yet. The model is applied to the leaching of a water-soluble mineral (caliche) with two soluble species dissolving simultaneously with different rates. Measured outlet concentrations of nitrate and magnesium were used to validate the model. Results showed that the model reproduced adequately the leaching of species with rapid and intermediate dissolution rate. Effect of the operating and kinetic parameters on the leaching process is also shown using the actual conditions of heap leaching for caliche mineral.

  11. A spatially distributed model of pesticide movement in Dutch macroporous soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiktak, A.; Hendriks, R.F.A.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Linden, van der A.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands, a spatially distributed version of the pesticide fate model PEARL is routinely used to assess the leaching potential of pesticides to groundwater. Recently, the model was modified to simulate the movement of pesticides to surface water. The peak concentration is considered to be

  12. Leaching of DOC, DN, and inorganic constituents from scrap tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Yilmaz, Ozge; Khan, Abdul A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-11-01

    One concern for recycle and reuse of scrap tires is the leaching of tire constituents (organic and inorganic) with time, and their subsequent potential harmful impacts in environment. The main objective of this study was to examine the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved nitrogen (DN), and selected inorganic constituents from scrap tires. Different sizes of tire chips and crumb rubber were exposed to leaching solutions with pH's ranging from 3.0 to 10.0 for 28days. The leaching of DOC and DN were found to be higher for smaller size tire chips; however, the leaching of inorganic constituents was independent of the size. In general, basic pH conditions increased the leaching of DOC and DN, whereas acidic pH conditions led to elevated concentrations of metals. Leaching was minimal around the neutral pH values for all the monitored parameters. Analysis of the leaching rates showed that components associated with the rubbery portion of the tires (DOC, DN, zinc, calcium, magnesium, etc.) exhibited an initial rapid followed by a slow release. On the other hand, a constant rate of leaching was observed for iron and manganese, which are attributed to the metal wires present inside the tires. Although the total amounts that leached varied, the observed leaching rates were similar for all tire chip sizes and leaching solutions. Operation under neutral pH conditions, use of larger size tire chips, prewashing of tires, and removal of metal wires prior to application will reduce the impact of tire recycle and reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid Detection of Pesticide Residues in Chinese Herbal Medicines by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Coupled with Partial Least Squares Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianming Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a simple, rapid, and effective method for simultaneous detection of cartap (Ca, thiocyclam (Th, and tebufenozide (Te in Chinese herbal medicines including Radix Angelicae Dahuricae and Liquorices using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR coupled with partial least squares regression (PLSR. The proposed method can handle the intrinsic interferences of herbal samples; satisfactory average recoveries attained from near-infrared (NIR and mid-infrared (MIR PLSR models were 99.0±10.8 and 100.2±1.0% for Ca, 100.2±6.9 and 99.7±2.5% for Th, and 99.1±6.3 and 99.6±1.0% for Te, respectively. Furthermore, some statistical parameters and figures of merit are fully investigated to evaluate the performance of the two models. It was found that both models could give accurate results and only the performance of MIR-PLSR was slightly better than that of NIR-PLSR in the cases suffering from herbal matrix interferences. In conclusion, FT-IR spectroscopy in combination with PLSR has been demonstrated for its application in rapid screening and quantitative analysis of multipesticide residues in Chinese herbal medicines without physical or chemical separation pretreatment step and any spectral processing, which also implies other potential applications such as food and drug safety, herbal plants quality, and environmental evaluation, due to its advantages of nontoxic and nondestructive analysis.

  14. Influence of Mechanical Activation on the selectivity of Bornite Leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Baláž

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulfidic mineral bornit Cu5FeS4 was exposed to the selective leaching of copper in H2SO4 solution. Surface changes of the mechanically activated sulphide were investigated before and after leaching using the infrared spectroscopy and the scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical activation of the mineral resulted in the mechanochemical surface oxidation and in the formation of the carbonates and sulphates. Furthermore, the specific area and the disordering of the mineral crystal structure increased. These aspects influence the kinetic and selectivity of acid leaching of bornite.Acid leaching of mechanically activated bornite follows through the two stages. In the first, rapid stage of leaching, the simple dissolution of products occurs (iron carbonate, copper and iron sulphate, which are situated in the surface layer of mechanically activated bornite. A relatively high iron recovery is due to the dissolution of hematite which is a minor component of bornite. The second, slow stage of leaching represents leaching of minerals. Iron do not practically underlies to the leaching and the recovery of copper increases gradually.The leaching selectivity of bornite is defined by the ratio Cu/Fe and increases with the growing time of mechanical activation, but only to 10 minutes. Subsequently, an additional increase of the time of mechanical activation tends to decrease the selectivity what is probably caused by the effect of the reduction of reaction surface processes due to agglomeration effects pending the milling and the formation of sulphur on the surfaces of particles which restricted the access of reagents to the remaining mineral. Moreover, this fact was observed by the SEM analysis of bornite. The interdependence between the leaching selectivity of bornite and specific surface area indicates a direct effect of the surface deformation of mechanically activated bornite on the selectivity of leaching.

  15. Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates pesticides used to protect crops and sets limits on the amount of pesticide remaining in or on foods in the U.S. The limits on pesticides on foods are called tolerances in the U.S. (maximum residue limits (MRLs) in many other countries).

  16. Microbial pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael L. McManus

    1991-01-01

    Interest in the use of microbial pesticides has intensified because of public concern about the safety of chemical pesticides and their impact in the environment. Characteristics of the five groups of entomopathogens that have potential as microbial pesticides are briefly discussed and an update is provided on research and development activities underway to enhance the...

  17. 78 FR 3418 - Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on Web-Distributed Labeling for Pesticide...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... Internet. Web-distributed labeling would allow users to retrieve a streamlined version of the pesticide... also allow for more rapid updates to pesticide labeling, meaning risk mitigation measures and new uses... available to users via the Internet, an initiative referred to as ``web-distributed labeling'' (WDL). At the...

  18. GIS based ArcPRZM-3 model for bentazon leaching towards groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Tahir Ali; Lin, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater contamination due to pesticide applications on agricultural lands is of great environmental concern. The mathematical models help to understand the mechanism of pesticide leaching in soils towards groundwater. We developed a user-friendly model called ArcPRZM-3 by integrating widely used Pesticide Root Zone Model version 3 (PRZM-3) using Visual Basic and Geographic Information System (GIS) based Avenue programming. ArcPRZM-3 could be used to simulate pesticide leaching towards groundwater with user-friendly input interfaces coupled with databases of crops, soils and pesticides. The outputs from ArcPRZM-3 could be visualized in user-friendly formats of tables, charts and maps. In this study we evaluated ArcPRZM-3 model by simulating bentazon leaching in soil towards groundwater. ArcPRZM-3 was applied to 37 sites in Woodruff County, Arkansas, USA to observe the daily average dissolved bentazon concentration for soybean, sorghum and rice at a depth of 1.8 m for a period of two years. Nineteen ranks of bentazon leaching potential were obtained using ArcPRZM-3 for all sites having different soil and crop combinations. ArcPRZM-3 simulation results for bentazon were compatible with the field monitored data in term of relative ranking and trend, although some uncertainties exist. This study indicated that macropore flow mechanism would be important in analyzing the effect of irrigation on groundwater contamination due to pesticides. Overall, ArcPRZM-3 could be used to simulate pesticide leaching towards groundwater more efficiently and effectively as compared to PRZM-3.

  19. Ability of the MACRO model to predict long-term leaching of metribuzin and diketometribuzin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbom, Annette E; Kjaer, Jeanne; Henriksen, Trine; Ullum, Marlene; Olsen, Preben

    2009-05-01

    In a regulatory context, numerical models are increasingly employed to quantify leaching of pesticides and their metabolites. Although the ability of these models to accurately simulate leaching of pesticides has been evaluated, little is known about their ability to accurately simulate long-term leaching of metabolites. A Danish study on the dissipation and sorption of metribuzin, involving both monitoring and batch experiments, concluded that desorption and degradation of metribuzin and leaching of its primary metabolite diketometribuzin continued for 5-6 years after application, posing a risk of groundwater contamination. That study provided a unique opportunity for evaluating the ability of the numerical model MACRO to accurately simulate long-term leaching of metribuzin and diketometribuzin. When calibrated and validated with respect to water and bromide balances and applied assuming equilibrium sorption and first-order degradation kinetics as recommended in the European Union pesticide authorization procedure, MACRO was unable to accurately simulate the long-term fate of metribuzin and diketometribuzin; the concentrations in the soil were underestimated by many orders of magnitude. By introducing alternative kinetics (a two-site approach), we captured the observed leaching scenario, thus underlining the necessity of accounting for the long-term sorption and dissipation characteristics when using models to predict the risk of groundwater contamination.

  20. Limitation of point source pesticide pollution: results of bioremediation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoghe, P; Maes, A; Steurbaut, W

    2004-01-01

    Groundwater and surface water is at risk of contamination from the use of some agricultural pesticides. In many circumstances pesticide contamination of water resources is more likely to result from point sources than from diffuse sources following approved application to crops in the field. Such point sources include areas on farms where pesticides are handled, filled into sprayers or where sprayers are washed down. To overcome this way of contamination different kind of bio-remediation systems are nowadays in development. In Flanders, Belgium two pilot plants of bioremediation systems for the in situ retention and/or degradation of pesticides were installed. Both systems were based on the Phytobac concept, a watertight excavation filled with straw, peat, compost and soil. The channel was made in the bottom from plastic foil. All kinds of spray rests were captured by the phytobacs. This study focuses on what level pesticides leach, bio-degrade or are retained by the filling of the phytobac. The soil-properties of the filling were investigated. Pesticide tracers were added for monitoring to both phytobacs. Soil and water samples were taken during one year. Pesticides are retained at least for one month by the filling of the phytobac. Almost no pesticide leached out. In winter hardly any pesticide degradation was observed in the filling of the phytobac. In summer no detectable pesticides were still left in the phytobacs.

  1. Analysis of Recent Situation of Pesticide Poisoning in Bangladesh: Is There a Proper Estimate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourab Dewan

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Pesticide poisoning is responsible for great number of admissions and deaths in Bangladesh. Creating a register of commercially available pesticides in each region for rapid identification of nature of the pesticide is recommended.

  2. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled with geoche......The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled...

  3. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendel, J.E. (compiler)

    1984-08-01

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  4. Leaching Test Relationships, Laboratory-to-Field Comparisons and Recommendations for Leaching Evaluation using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents examples of the relationships between the results of laboratory leaching tests, as defined by the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) or analogous international test methods, and leaching of constituents from a broad range of materials under di...

  5. Rapid multiresidue determination of pesticides in livestock muscle and liver tissue via modified QuEChERS sample preparation and LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, K; Iwatsuki, K; Akama, R; Koike, R

    2017-07-01

    Many multiresidue methods for the determination of pesticides in vegetables and fruits have been reported to date. However, few such methods have been employed to investigate pesticide residues in animal tissue. In this study, an LC-MS/MS multiresidue method coupled with modified QuEChERS extraction was developed and validated for the investigation of eight pesticide residues: prallethrin (PR), resmethrin (RMT), imidacloprid (IMC), diflubenzuron (DFB), cyromazine (CYR), etofenprox (EFP), dinotefuran (DNT) and phthalthrin (PTLT). This method involves initial extraction in a water/acetone system, the addition of salts and a subsequent extraction/partitioning step and, finally, a clean-up step utilising dispersive solid-phase extraction (SPE). The mean recoveries of seven of the pesticides (the exception being CYR) ranged between 74.7% and 113.5%, and the CVs of the livestock tissue - bovine, swine, and chicken muscle and liver tissue spiked at 10 ng g-1 (50 ng g-1 for RMT and DNT) and 100 ng g-1 - were muscle and liver spiked samples ranged from 56.9% to 78.3%, while those of RMT in swine liver were > 120%. Therefore, this method was considered as being unsuitable for the investigation of these samples. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) of seven of the investigated pesticides (the exception being swine liver) in the tissue samples ranged from 0.9 to 15.2 ng g-1. We therefore concluded that this LC-MS/MS multiresidue method is a valid and suitable for the investigation of seven pesticides in animal tissue, but it is unsuitable for the analysis of CYR in all animal tissues and RMT in swine liver tissue.

  6. When does the fluazifop-P-butyl degradate, TFMP, leach through an agricultural loamy soil to groundwater?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Norgaard, Trine; Olsen, Preben

    2016-01-01

    In intensely cultivated regions, it is crucial to have knowledge of the leaching potential related to pesticides in agricultural production. This is especially true in countries, like Denmark, that base its drinking water supply on untreated groundwater. Since fluazifop-P-butyl (FPB) is applied...... value for drinking water applies to them, having its leaching potential regulatory assessed based on high quality estimations of their persistence, and be exposed to an assessment of the risk to consumers of drinking contaminated groundwater....

  7. Mapping Soil Physical Structure of Loamy Agricultural Fields for Assessing Localised Potential Leaching Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Olsen, Preben

    -facilitated transport plays an important role in the leaching of phosphorus and other strongly sorbing compounds. Interesting negative correlations was obtained between bulk density and the 5% tritium tracer arrival time, suggesting soil compaction level to be one of the controls for formation of functional macropore...... in Silstrup was evaluated based on soil texture, structural parameters, tritium breakthrough curves, and colloid- and phosphorus leaching to investigate the link between the leaching of pesticides such as TFMP and soil structure. Bulk soil was sampled from the A-horizon in a 15 x 15 m grid across the field......, and according to soil texture analyses the clay content was ranging from 14.2 to 18.9%, whereas the organic carbon (OC) content was ranging between 1.7 and 2.2%. Clay content increased to the North and OC content to the South. It was found that there is a risk for pronounced leaching to take place from...

  8. LEACH-A: An Adaptive Method for Improving LEACH Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli ZHAO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy has become one of the most important constraints on wireless sensor networks. Hence, many researchers in this field focus on how to design a routing protocol to prolong the lifetime of the network. The classical hierarchical protocols such as LEACH and LEACH-C have better performance in saving the energy consumption. However, the choosing strategy only based on the largest residue energy or shortest distance will still consume more energy. In this paper an adaptive routing protocol named “LEACH-A” which has an energy threshold E0 is proposed. If there are cluster nodes whose residual energy are greater than E0, the node of largest residual energy is selected to communicated with the base station; When all the cluster nodes energy are less than E0, the node nearest to the base station is select to communication with the base station. Simulations show that our improved protocol LEACH-A performs better than the LEACH and the LEACH-C.

  9. Modelling the dissipation and leaching of two herbicides in decomposing mulch of crop residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Sohaib; Iqbal, Akhtar; Lafolie, François; Recous, Sylvie; Benoit, Pierre; Garnier, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    Conservation agricultural practices are increasingly adopted because of ecosystem services such as conservation of soil and water resources. These farming systems are characterized mainly by the presence of mulch made of residues of harvested or cover crops on soil surface. The mulch can intercept and retain applied pesticides depending on pesticide molecule and rainfall timing. The pesticide wash-off from mulch is considered a key process in pesticide fate and can have effects on degradation and transport processes. This work highlights a modelling approach to study the pesticide wash-off from mulch residues and their further transport in soil under two rainfall regimes. Transformation and leaching of two herbicides, s-metolachlor and glyphosate, was studied and simulated by Pastis-mulch model. A pesticide module describing pesticide degradation in mulch and soil was coupled to a transport model including a mulch module. The model was tested to simulate the pesticide dissipation, wash-off from mulch and further leaching in soil. Pesticide degradation parameters in mulch were estimated from incubation experiments with 14C-labelled molecules in small cylinders. The model was then tested using the data obtained through a soil column experiment (reconstructed soil cores :15 cm diameter x 35 cm depth), a mulch of Zea mais + Doliquos lablab and with two treatments varied by water regimes: i) frequent rain (temperate, twice a week) with week intensity (6 mm/hr); and ii) occasional rain (tropical, twice a month) with stronger intensity (20 mm/hr). Columns were incubated at 20 °C for 84 days to monitor soil water, C, N and pesticide dynamics. Model successfully simulated the experimental data of pesticide dissipation in mulch residues. Results showed that the rain regime affected more S-metolachlor than glyphosate behavior. The simulated results indicated also that the dynamics in mulch of the two molecules differed according to the rain treatment. Glyphosate showed a

  10. Pesticide Reevaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the process for periodically evaluating registered pesticides to ensure they meet current science standards for risk assessment, as required by the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act.

  11. Rapid modified QuEChERS method for pesticides detection in honey by high-performance liquid chromatography UV-visible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Bonerba

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The extensive use of pesticides in agriculture plays an important role in bees die-off and allows the presence of residues in hive products, particularly in honey. An accurate and reliable analytical method, based on QuEChERS extractive technique, has been developed for the quantitative determination by high-performance liquid chromatography UV-visible detector of 5 pesticides (Deltamethrin, Dimethoate, Imidacloprid, Acetamiprid, Chlorfenvinphos in honey. The method, according to Commission Directive 2002/63/EC and Regulation 882/2004/EC, provided excellent results with respect to linearity (correlation coefficient up to 0.993, limits of detection and quantification (0.005 and 0.01 μg/mL for Dimethoate, Deltamethrin and Chlorfenvinphos; 0.02 and 0.05 μg/mL for Acetamiprid and Imidacloprid, recovery values (86.4 to 96.3%, precision and relative expanded uncertainty of a measurement, demonstrating the conformity of the this method with the European directives. The proposed method was applied to 23 samples of Apulian honey. None of the investigated pesticides was detected in these samples.

  12. Transformation of Selenium-Containing Phases in Copper Anode Slimes During Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue Jiao; Yang, Hong Ying; Jin, Zhe Nan; Chen, Guo Bao; Tong, Lin Lin

    2017-10-01

    The transformation of selenium-containing phases in copper anode slimes during the leaching process was investigated based on the Eh-pH diagram, leaching efficiencies of metals, and characterization of the residues produced during leaching. The leaching efficiency of selenium increases slowly to 17.7% in the first 50 min and then more rapidly to 98.3% in the next 110 min. The Eh-pH diagram indicates that elemental selenium is an intermediate product of the oxidation of selenide to selenite. The x-ray powder diffraction data and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy data demonstrate that selenium leaching can be divided into three stages. Ag-Cu selenide first transforms into silver selenide and then converts to elemental selenium. Finally, elemental selenium is dissolved as selenite. The intermediate product, elemental selenium, is the main reason for the slow initial leaching rate of selenium.

  13. Pesticide Worker Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protect people who work with pesticides and in pesticide-treated areas; educate medical personnel and the public about recognizing and treating pesticide-related illnesses; promote safe use of pesticides.

  14. Cm-scale Heterogeneity in Degradation - Potential Impact on Leaching of MCPA through a Variably-Saturated Macroporous Clayey Till

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbom, A. E.; Johnsen, A. R.; Aamand, J.; Binning, P. J.; Dechesne, A.; Smets, B. F.; "Cream-Spatial Heterogeneity"-Team

    2011-12-01

    Recent research has revealed a large variation in pesticide mineralization potentials, but little is known about the scale at which these heterogeneities impact the spreading of contaminants. A modeling study aiming at quantifying how heterogeneous degradation potentials in agricultural soil will affect MCPA degradation and leaching was conducted. 2D-distributions (96-well micro plate mineralization assay) of the mineralization potentials of phenoxy acid herbicides (MCPA, 2,4-D) representing layers in the upper meter of variably-saturated clayey till were applied. The rapid mineralization measured was represented by Monod mineralization kinetics, whereas the rest were either represented by slow 0-order mineralization kinetics or no degradation. Five 3D-modelling scenarios were set up using the COMSOL Multiphysics 4.1 toolbox (COMSOL Inc., Burlington, MA, USA): 1) simple matrix flow of water with no biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes; 2) preferential flow (including a wormhole) of water with no biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes; 3) simple matrix flow of water with average biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes, which corresponds to results derived from a conventional homogenized soil sample; 4) simple matrix flow of water with the observed high variation in biodegradation of the MCPA corresponding to random variation in degradation; and 5) vertical structure in water flow combined with vertically structured degradation (defined hot spots and cold spots), which corresponds to a situation where both flow and degradation are associated with macropores/wormholes. Results show that cm-scale heterogeneity in degradation potential with simple matrix flow has a negligible effect on MCPA leaching at one meter below soil surface. By introducing a wormhole in the low-permeable 3D-soil modeling domain, however, the risk of MCPA-leaching below one meter depth increase drastically with low degradation potential along the wall of macropores/wormholes.

  15. Pesticides and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of pesticides Disponible en español Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides have a specific purpose in society. Pesticides are ... aging populations may be more sensitive to the effects of pesticides than others. To reduce the risk of health problems from pesticides there are several things you ...

  16. Degradation and leaching of fluroxypyr after application to railway tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlund, H; Börjesson, E; Jonsson, E; Thierfelder, T

    2012-01-01

    Fluroxypyr is an auxin-type herbicide used for postemergent control of broad-leaved weeds in agriculture and in nonagricultural environments such as railways. The overall aim of this study was to assess the potential environmental impact from fluroxypyr application to railway tracks and to elucidate some of the factors that control its environmental fate. In laboratory studies, we examined the degradation of fluroxypyr and the formation of its metabolites fluroxypyr-methoxypyridine (F-MP) and fluroxypyr-pyridinol (F-P) in soil from two Swedish railways. We also investigated the degradation and leaching of fluroxypyr in three different railway plots treated with fluroxypyr (360 g ae ha). The half-life of fluroxypyr in soil samples ranged between 28 and 78 d. An estimated mean 48.6 ± 20% of the fluroxypyr was converted into F-P and 8.0 ± 2% into F-MP. The main metabolite, F-P, was rapidly degraded, with an average half-life of 10 ± 5 d. However, F-MP was not degraded to a significant degree in any sample, resulting in slowly increasing concentrations throughout the experiment. This pattern of relatively rapid degradation of F-P and slow accumulation of F-MP was also observed in the field. The persistent nature of F-MP may be of concern if fluroxypyr is used repeatedly at the same location. Fluroxypyr was detected in the groundwater beneath the track at all three locations studied in concentrations exceeding the EU limit of 0.1 μg L for pesticides in drinking water, and F-P was detected in the groundwater at two of three locations. The most important factor controlling fluroxypyr degradation rate in soil was the soil water content, which modulated microbial activity and presumably also fluroxypyr availability to microorganisms. Our findings imply that fluroxypyr may not be a suitable herbicide for weed control on railway tracks. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Organo/layered double hydroxide nanohybrids used to remove non ionic pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaara, D; Bruna, F; Ulibarri, M A; Draoui, K; Barriga, C; Pavlovic, I

    2011-11-30

    The preparation and characterization of organo/layered double hydroxide nanohybrids with dodecylsulfate and sebacate as interlayer anion were studied in detail. The aim of the modification of the layered double hydroxides (LDHs) was to change the hydrophilic character of the interlayer to hydrophobic to improve the ability of the nanohybrids to adsorb non-ionic pesticides such as alachlor and metolachlor from water. Adsorption tests were conducted on organo/LDHs using variable pH values, contact times and initial pesticide concentrations (adsorption isotherms) in order to identify the optimum conditions for the intended purpose. Adsorbents and adsorption products were characterized several physicochemical techniques. The adsorption test showed that a noticeable increase of the adsorption of the non-ionic herbicides was produced. Based on the results, the organo/LDHs could be good adsorbents to remove alachlor and metolachlor from water. Different organo/LDHs complexes were prepared by a mechanical mixture and by adsorption. The results show that HTSEB-based complex displays controlled release properties that reduce metolachlor leaching in soil columns compared to a technical product and the other formulations. The release was dependent on the nature of the adsorbent used to prepare the complexes. Thus, it can be concluded that organo/LDHs might act as suitable supports for the design of pesticide slow release formulations with the aim of reducing the adverse effects derived from rapid transport losses of the chemical once applied to soils. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Contribution of waste water treatment plants to pesticide toxicity in agriculture catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trong Dieu Hien; Scharmüller, Andreas; Kattwinkel, Mira; Kühne, Ralph; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2017-11-01

    Pesticide residues are frequently found in water bodies and may threaten freshwater ecosystems and biodiversity. In addition to runoff or leaching from treated agricultural fields, pesticides may enter streams via effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We compared the pesticide toxicity in terms of log maximum Toxic Unit (log mTU) of sampling sites in small agricultural streams of Germany with and without WWTPs in the upstream catchments. We found an approximately half log unit higher pesticide toxicity for sampling sites with WWTPs (p pesticide toxicity in streams with WWTPs. A few compounds (diuron, terbuthylazin, isoproturon, terbutryn and Metazachlor) dominated the herbicide toxicity. Pesticide toxicity was not correlated with upstream distance to WWTP (Spearman's rank correlation, rho = - 0.11, p > 0.05) suggesting that other context variables are more important to explain WWTP-driven pesticide toxicity. Our results suggest that WWTPs contribute to pesticide toxicity in German streams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vertical Leaching of Allelochemicals Affecting Their Bioactivity and the Microbial Community of Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhongxiang; Le, Chang; Xu, Zhenghao; Gu, Zhefeng; Lv, Junfei; Shamsi, Imran Haider

    2017-09-13

    Leaching of allelochemicals in soil is one of the fundamental processes that determines allelopathic activities but is often overlooked. In the present study, the vertical leaching of seven putative allelochemicals as well as one pesticide and one herbicide was investigated using polyvinyl chloride columns combined with a bioassay approach. The results indicated that the leachability of pretilachlor and imidacloprid were the best (Lf > 0.8), followed by vanillin and coumarin (Lf > 0.6). The leachability of daidzein, menthol, and m-tyrosine were medium (0.3 interactions of chemical-microorganism and modified the bioavailability of allelochemicals in soil.

  20. Pesticide Exposure, Safety Issues, and Risk Assessment Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damalas, Christos A.; Eleftherohorinos, Ilias G.

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to prevent or control pests, diseases, weeds, and other plant pathogens in an effort to reduce or eliminate yield losses and maintain high product quality. Although pesticides are developed through very strict regulation processes to function with reasonable certainty and minimal impact on human health and the environment, serious concerns have been raised about health risks resulting from occupational exposure and from residues in food and drinking water. Occupational exposure to pesticides often occurs in the case of agricultural workers in open fields and greenhouses, workers in the pesticide industry, and exterminators of house pests. Exposure of the general population to pesticides occurs primarily through eating food and drinking water contaminated with pesticide residues, whereas substantial exposure can also occur in or around the home. Regarding the adverse effects on the environment (water, soil and air contamination from leaching, runoff, and spray drift, as well as the detrimental effects on wildlife, fish, plants, and other non-target organisms), many of these effects depend on the toxicity of the pesticide, the measures taken during its application, the dosage applied, the adsorption on soil colloids, the weather conditions prevailing after application, and how long the pesticide persists in the environment. Therefore, the risk assessment of the impact of pesticides either on human health or on the environment is not an easy and particularly accurate process because of differences in the periods and levels of exposure, the types of pesticides used (regarding toxicity and persistence), and the environmental characteristics of the areas where pesticides are usually applied. Also, the number of the criteria used and the method of their implementation to assess the adverse effects of pesticides on human health could affect risk assessment and would possibly affect the characterization of the already

  1. Pesticide Exposure, Safety Issues, and Risk Assessment Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Damalas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to prevent or control pests, diseases, weeds, and other plant pathogens in an effort to reduce or eliminate yield losses and maintain high product quality. Although pesticides are developed through very strict regulation processes to function with reasonable certainty and minimal impact on human health and the environment, serious concerns have been raised about health risks resulting from occupational exposure and from residues in food and drinking water. Occupational exposure to pesticides often occurs in the case of agricultural workers in open fields and greenhouses, workers in the pesticide industry, and exterminators of house pests. Exposure of the general population to pesticides occurs primarily through eating food and drinking water contaminated with pesticide residues, whereas substantial exposure can also occur in or around the home. Regarding the adverse effects on the environment (water, soil and air contamination from leaching, runoff, and spray drift, as well as the detrimental effects on wildlife, fish, plants, and other non-target organisms, many of these effects depend on the toxicity of the pesticide, the measures taken during its application, the dosage applied, the adsorption on soil colloids, the weather conditions prevailing after application, and how long the pesticide persists in the environment. Therefore, the risk assessment of the impact of pesticides either on human health or on the environment is not an easy and particularly accurate process because of differences in the periods and levels of exposure, the types of pesticides used (regarding toxicity and persistence, and the environmental characteristics of the areas where pesticides are usually applied. Also, the number of the criteria used and the method of their implementation to assess the adverse effects of pesticides on human health could affect risk assessment and would possibly affect the characterization

  2. PAHs leaching test for solidified waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzler, R.; Grathwohl, P. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Center for Applied Geoscience

    2003-07-01

    The treatment of waste materials to allow recycling or safe disposal is a rapidly expanding business, but also subject to increasing public awareness of enviromental issues and tightening of the regularise governing in many countries. One of the most widely used treatment for wastes is stabilisation /solidification using a cement matrix to obtain a monolithic residue. The most common test procedure to assess the risks of contaminant release into water (seepage, surface and groundwater) is the so-called ''tank leaching test'' or ''diffusion test'' (NEN 7345, Mulder et al 2001, Hohberg et al 2000), in which a solidified specimen is leached with water during different periods of time. The tests are usually done at room temperatures between 20 C and 25 C. However, the temperature under natural conditions are lower resulting in lower contaminant release rates. (subsurface temperature: 5 C - 10 C). If the thermodynamics of the contaminant release, especially the activation energy of desorption and diffusion, is known, it is possible to estimate the contaminant release for lower temperatures, e.g. down to groundwater temperatures. In addition the test can be accelerated if performed at high temperatures.

  3. Movement of water, bromide ion and the pesticides ethoprophos and bentazone measured in a sandy soil in Vredepeel (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Pas, van der L.J.T.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to collect a data set suitable for testing pesticide leaching models in the case of a Dutch sandy soil with a shallow groundwater table. The movement of water, bromide ion and the behaviour of the pesticides ethoprophos and bentazone was studied. The substances were applied

  4. Movement of water, bromide and the pesticides ethoprophos and bentazone in a sandy soil: the Vredepeel data set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Pas, van der L.J.T.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to collect a data set suitable for testing pesticide leaching models in the case of a Dutch sandy soil with a shallow groundwater table. The movement of water, bromide ion and the behaviour of the pesticides ethoprophos and bentazone was studied. The substances were applied

  5. Leaching of Metribuzin and its Metabolites from a Sandy Soil: Comparison between Field, Laboratory, and Modelling Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullum, M.; Henriksen, T.; Kjaer, J.; Plauborg, F.; Olsen, P.

    2003-04-01

    On a sandy field site in Denmark leaching of the two metabolites metribuzin-diketo (MD) and metribuzin-desamino-diketo (MDD) was found as a result of a double application of metribuzin according to the current Danish regulations. The leaching exceeding the maximum allowable concentration of 0.1 µg/l considerably (on a yearly average) was found as a result of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme (PLAP). PLAP comprises an intensive monitoring of pesticide and bromide leaching at six agricultural field sites in Denmark representing a wide range of Danish soil and climate conditions. The programme is developed as an early warning system for the Danish EPA and provides unique data sets allowing for calibration and validation. The leaching behaviour of metribuzin, MD, and MDD was evaluated by comparing field, laboratory, and modelling data. The MACRO model (verson 4.2) was applied to to the test site covering the soil profile to a depth of 5 m b.g.s., always including the groundwater table. The model was parameterized using mainly measured data supplied by literature/default values. Sorption and degradation parameters of both metribuzin and its metabolites were determined in the laboratory using soils from both top- and subsoil. Model performance with respect to solute and pesticide leaching were evaluated by comparing simulated and measured data. The latter comprising, groundwater table, soil water content measured with TDR probes at different depth, and bromide and pesticides concentration measured in grounps of suction cups situated 1 and 2 m b.g.s. Initial modelling result will be presented along with identified model limitations.

  6. Ability of the MACRO Model to Predict Long-Term Leaching of Metribuzin and Diketometribuzin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette E; Kjær, Jeanne; Henriksen, Trine

    2009-01-01

    -term leaching of metabolites. A Danish study on the dissipation and sorption of metribuzin, involving both monitoring and batch experiments, concluded that desorption and degradation of metribuzin and leaching of its primary metabolite diketometribuzin continued for 5-6 years after application, posing a risk...... of groundwater contamination. That study provided a unique opportunity for evaluating the ability of the numericalmodelMACROto accurately simulate long-term leaching of metribuzin and diketometribuzin. When calibrated and validated with respect to water and bromide balances and applied assuming equilibrium...... sorption and first-order degradation kinetics as recommended in the European Union pesticide authorization procedure, MACRO was unable to accurately simulate the long-term fate of metribuzin and diketometribuzin; the concentrations in the soil were underestimated by many orders of magnitude. By introducing...

  7. Reporting Pesticide Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticides incidents must be reported by pesticide registrants. Others, such as members of the public and environmental professionals, would like to report pesticide incidents. This website will facilitate such incident reporting.

  8. Endangered Species: Pesticide Restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our goal is to protect threatened and endangered species and their habitats, without placing unnecessary burden on agriculture and pesticide users. Pesticide limitations are developed to ensure safe use of pesticides in order to meet this goal.

  9. Predicting input of pesticides to surface water via drains - comparing post registration monitoring data with FOCUSsw predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Alf; Kjaer, Jeanne; Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth

    in different water bodies (pond, ditch and stream) in 10 scenarios representing geo-climate conditions across Europe. The model provides estimates of surface water concentration, based on the intended use, taking into account potential input routes (drift, drainage and run-off). Leaching and subsequent...... (such as MACRO) are widely used within the registration process, their validation requires further work, not least because of the limited availability of field data. The Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme (PLAP), an intensive monitoring programme which is used to evaluate the risk...... of leaching of pesticides under field conditions, aims to analyse whether pesticides applied in accordance with granted uses enter the aquatic environment in unacceptable concentrations. Within this programme a high resolution data set comprising 10 years of various pesticide concentrations in drainage from 3...

  10. Pesticide Science and Assessing Pesticide Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA protects human health and the environment by evaluating the risk associated with pesticides before allowing them to be used in the United States. Learn about the tools and processes used in risk assessment for pesticides.

  11. Scientists Probe Pesticide Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes discussions of a symposium on pesticide environmental dynamics with emphases upon pesticide transport processes, environmental reactions, and partitioning in air, soil, water and living organisms. Indicates that the goal is to attain knowledge enough to predict pesticide behavior and describe pesticide distribution with models and…

  12. Spatial variation in herbicide leaching from a marine clay soil via subsurface drains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulén, Barbro M; Larsbo, Mats; Kreuger, Jenny K; Svanbäck, Annika

    2014-03-01

    Subsurface transport via tile drains can significantly contribute to pesticide contamination of surface waters. The spatial variation in subsurface leaching of normally applied herbicides was examined together with phosphorus losses in 24 experimental plots with water sampled flow-proportionally. The study site was a flat, tile-drained area with 60% marine clay in the topsoil in southeast Sweden. The objectives were to quantify the leaching of frequently used herbicides from a tile drained cracking clay soil and to evaluate the variation in leaching within the experimental area and relate this to topsoil management practices (tillage method and structure liming). In summer 2009, 0.14, 0.22 and 1.62%, respectively, of simultaneously applied amounts of MCPA, fluroxypyr and clopyralid were leached by heavy rain five days after spraying. In summer 2011, on average 0.70% of applied bentazone was leached by short bursts of intensive rain 12 days after application. Peak flow concentrations for 50% of the treated area for MCPA and 33% for bentazone exceeded the Swedish no-effect guideline values for aquatic ecosystems. Approximately 0.08% of the glyphosate applied was leached in dissolved form in the winters of 2008/2009 and 2010/2011. Based on measurements of glyphosate in particulate form, total glyphosate losses were twice as high (0.16%) in the second winter. The spatial inter-plot variation was large (72-115%) for all five herbicides studied, despite small variations (25%) in water discharge. The study shows the importance of local scale soil transport properties for herbicide leaching in cracking clay soils. © 2013 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Spatial variation in herbicide leaching from a marine clay soil via subsurface drains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulén, Barbro M; Larsbo, Mats; Kreuger, Jenny K; Svanbäck, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Background Subsurface transport via tile drains can significantly contribute to pesticide contamination of surface waters. The spatial variation in subsurface leaching of normally applied herbicides was examined together with phosphorus losses in 24 experimental plots with water sampled flow-proportionally. The study site was a flat, tile-drained area with 60% marine clay in the topsoil in southeast Sweden. The objectives were to quantify the leaching of frequently used herbicides from a tile drained cracking clay soil and to evaluate the variation in leaching within the experimental area and relate this to topsoil management practices (tillage method and structure liming). Results In summer 2009, 0.14, 0.22 and 1.62%, respectively, of simultaneously applied amounts of MCPA, fluroxypyr and clopyralid were leached by heavy rain five days after spraying. In summer 2011, on average 0.70% of applied bentazone was leached by short bursts of intensive rain 12 days after application. Peak flow concentrations for 50% of the treated area for MCPA and 33% for bentazone exceeded the Swedish no-effect guideline values for aquatic ecosystems. Approximately 0.08% of the glyphosate applied was leached in dissolved form in the winters of 2008/2009 and 2010/2011. Based on measurements of glyphosate in particulate form, total glyphosate losses were twice as high (0.16%) in the second winter. The spatial inter-plot variation was large (72–115%) for all five herbicides studied, despite small variations (25%) in water discharge. Conclusions The study shows the importance of local scale soil transport properties for herbicide leaching in cracking clay soils. © 2013 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:23658148

  14. Metal extraction from ores by heap leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Robert W.

    1997-08-01

    Heap leaching low-grade ores has become a major contributor to the extraction of economically important metals, notably copper and gold. The state-of-the-art in heap leaching is reviewed with emphasis on process engineering. Rock leaching, including rock pore diffusion and mineral kinetics, solution flow, and retention in ore heaps during percolation leaching, and bio-oxidation of sulfidic ores are covered. Oxygen transport into heaps by gaseous diffusion, natural convection, and forced air ventilation is discussed. Strategies for optimizing heap leaching include ore crushing, ore agglomeration, low-cost air ventilation of sulfide ore heaps undergoing bio-oxidation using fans, and the use of aggregate metal extraction rate constants in making metallurgical business decisions about heap leaching.

  15. Leaching and sorption of neonicotinoid insecticides and fungicides from seed coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly; Hladik, Michelle; Sanders, Corey; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2018-01-01

    Seed coatings are a treatment used on a variety of crops to improve production and offer protection against pests and fungal outbreaks. The leaching of the active ingredients associated with the seed coatings and the sorption to soil was evaluated under laboratory conditions using commercially available corn and soybean seeds to study the fate and transport of these pesticides under controlled conditions. The active ingredients (AI) included one neonicotinoid insecticide (thiamethoxam) and five fungicides (azoxystrobin, fludioxonil, metalaxyl, sedaxane thiabendazole). An aqueous leaching experiment was conducted with treated corn and soybean seeds. Leaching potential was a function of solubility and seed type. The leaching of fludioxonil, was dependent on seed type with a shorter time to equilibrium on the corn compared to the soybean seeds. Sorption experiments with the treated seeds and a solution of the AIs were conducted using three different soil types. Sorption behavior was a function of soil organic matter as well as seed type. For most AIs, a negative relationship was observed between the aqueous concentration and the log Koc. Sorption to all soils tested was limited for the hydrophilic pesticides thiamethoxam and metalaxyl. However, partitioning for the more hydrophobic fungicides was dependent on both seed type and soil properties. The mobility of fludioxonil in the sorption experiment varied by seed type indicating that the adjuvants associated with the seed coating could potentially play a role in the environmental fate of fludioxonil. This is the first study to assess, under laboratory conditions, the fate of pesticides associated with seed coatings using commercially available treated seeds. This information can be used to understand how alterations in agricultural practices (e.g., increasing use of seed treatments) can impact the exposure (concentration and duration) and potential effects of these chemicals to aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

  16. Leaching and sorption of neonicotinoid insecticides and fungicides from seed coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L; Hladik, Michelle L; Sanders, Corey J; Kuivila, Kathryn M

    2017-12-29

    Seed coatings are a treatment used on a variety of crops to improve production and offer protection against pests and fungal outbreaks. The leaching of the active ingredients associated with the seed coatings and the sorption to soil was evaluated under laboratory conditions using commercially available corn and soybean seeds to study the fate and transport of these pesticides under controlled conditions. The active ingredients (AI) included one neonicotinoid insecticide (thiamethoxam) and five fungicides (azoxystrobin, fludioxonil, metalaxyl, sedaxane thiabendazole). An aqueous leaching experiment was conducted with treated corn and soybean seeds. Leaching potential was a function of solubility and seed type. The leaching of fludioxonil, was dependent on seed type with a shorter time to equilibrium on the corn compared to the soybean seeds. Sorption experiments with the treated seeds and a solution of the AIs were conducted using three different soil types. Sorption behavior was a function of soil organic matter as well as seed type. For most AIs, a negative relationship was observed between the aqueous concentration and the log Koc. Sorption to all soils tested was limited for the hydrophilic pesticides thiamethoxam and metalaxyl. However, partitioning for the more hydrophobic fungicides was dependent on both seed type and soil properties. The mobility of fludioxonil in the sorption experiment varied by seed type indicating that the adjuvants associated with the seed coating could potentially play a role in the environmental fate of fludioxonil. This is the first study to assess, under laboratory conditions, the fate of pesticides associated with seed coatings using commercially available treated seeds. This information can be used to understand how alterations in agricultural practices (e.g., increasing use of seed treatments) can impact the exposure (concentration and duration) and potential effects of these chemicals to aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

  17. Leaching of nano-ZnO in municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakallioglu, T.; Bakirdoven, M.; Temizel, I. [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Bogazici University, 34342 Istanbul (Turkey); Demirel, B., E-mail: burak.demirel@boun.edu.tr [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Bogazici University, 34342 Istanbul (Turkey); Copty, N.K.; Onay, T.T.; Uyguner Demirel, C.S. [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Bogazici University, 34342 Istanbul (Turkey); Karanfil, T. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Science, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Leaching potential of 3 different types of nano-ZnO in real fresh MSW was investigated. • Batch tests were conducted at different pH, ionic strength and ZnO concentrations. • Most of the added nano-ZnO mass was retained within the solid waste matrix. • The pH and IS conditions did not significantly influence the leaching behavior of ZnO. • A kinetic particle deposition/detachment model was developed to analyze ZnO behavior. - Abstract: Despite widespread use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in commercial products and their potential disposal in landfills, the fate of ENMs in solid waste environments are still not well understood. In this study, the leaching behavior of nano ZnO -one of the most used ENMs- in fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) was investigated. Batch reactors containing municipal solid waste samples were spiked with three different types of nano ZnO having different surface stabilization. The leaching of ZnO was examined under acidic, basic and elevated ionic strength (IS) conditions. The results of the 3-day batch tests showed that the percent of the added nano-ZnO mass retained within the solid waste matrix ranged between 80% and 93% on average for the three types of nano-ZnO tested. The pH and IS conditions did not significantly influence the leaching behavior of ZnO. To further analyze the behavior of ZnO in the MSW matrix, a kinetic particle deposition/detachment model was developed. The model was able to reproduce the main trends of the batch experiments. Reaction rate constants for the batch tests ranged from 0.01 to 0.4 1/hr, reflecting the rapid deposition of nano-ZnO within the MSW matrix.

  18. Mineralization and Transfer Processes of {sup 14}C-labeled Pesticides in Outdoor Lysimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundmann, Sabine; Doerfler, Ulrike, E-mail: doerfler@gsf.de; Ruth, Bernhard; Loos, Christine [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Soil Ecology (Germany); Wagner, Tobias [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Biochemical Plant Pathology (Germany); Karl, Heidrun; Munch, Jean Charles; Schroll, Reiner [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Soil Ecology (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    A recently designed two-chamber-lysimeter-test-system allows the detailed investigation of degradation, transport and transfer processes of {sup 14}C-labeled substances in soil-plant-atmosphere-systems under outdoor conditions. With this test system it is feasible to distinguish between {sup 14}C-emissions from soil surfaces and {sup 14}C-emissions from plant surfaces in soil monoliths under real environmental conditions. Special soil humidity sensors allow the measurement of soil water content near to the soil surface, in 1 and 5 cm depth. The behavior of organic chemicals can be followed for a whole vegetation period and a mass balance for the applied chemical can be established. Some selected results of the herbicides isoproturon and glyphosate - using the two-chamber-lysimeter-test-system - are presented to demonstrate its applicability for the identification and quantification of the processes that govern pesticide behavior in soil-plant-systems. Mineralization of {sup 14}C-isoproturon was very different in four different soils; the mineralization capacity of the soils ranged from 2 to 60%. Leaching of isoproturon in general was very low, but depending on the soil type and environmental conditions isoproturon and its metabolites could be leached via preferential flow, especially shortly after application. For the herbicide {sup 14}C-glyphosate no accumulation of residues in the soil and no leaching of the residues to deeper soil layers could be observed after three applications. Glyphosate was rapidly degraded to AMPA in the soil. Glyphosate and AMPA were accumulated in soy bean nodules.

  19. Modelling pesticide emission patterns in agricultural life cycle inventories using a modular approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mila i Canals, Llorenc; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Domenech, Xavier

    modularity allows to include more sophistication in the different modules as required. For instance, in New Zealand a complex mechanistic model exists for the prediction of pesticide leaching, as well as field data on farmers' habits' effect on pesticide drift, so this was included in the calculations....... The effect of pesticide parameters, site conditions and farmers' habits on the pesticide emission patterns has been described for some pesticides. The feasibility and practicality of the model is discussed in relation to other, more complex, models.......In the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of field crops, the system description and inventory analysis provides information about the identities and quantities of pesticide applied, the form and the pattern of application. The field itself is seen as part of the technosphere, the ecosphere beginning...

  20. Classification and modelling of non-extractable residue (NER) formation from pesticides in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästner, M.; Nowak, K. M.; Miltner, A.

    2015-01-01

    undergo turnover processes and can be volatilised, leached to the groundwater, degraded by microorganisms or taken up and enriched by living organisms. Xenobiotic NER may be derived from parent compounds and primary metabolites that are sequestered (sorbed or entrapped) within the soil organic matter......This presentation provides a comprehensive overview about the formation of nonextractable residues (NER) from organic pesticides and contaminants in soil and tries classifying the different types. Anthropogenic organic chemicals are deliberately (e.g. pesticides) or unintentionally (e...

  1. Estimating pesticide emissions for LCA of agricultural products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2000-01-01

    Emission data for pesticides from agricultural product systems may be based on national and international pesticide usage statistics, but these only provide information on the applied dose. When the field is considered as part of the technosphere, the emissions from the system are those quantities......, which reach the environment surrounding the field. The routes of emission may be direct through wind drift or indirect through evaporation, leaching, or surface run-off. Models are presented that will allow estimation of emission factors based on substance characteristics normally available...

  2. Leaching of gold, silver and accompanying metals from circuit boards (PCBs waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Ficeriová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Au-Ag noble metal wastes represent a wide range of waste types and forms, with various accompanying metallic elements.The presented leaching strategy for Au-Ag contained in circuit boards (PCBs aims at gaining gold and silver in the metallic form.Application of the proposed ammonium thiosulphate leaching process for the treatment of the above mentioned Au-Ag containing wastesrepresents a practical, economic and at the same time an ecological solution. The ammonium thiosulphate based leaching of gold and silverfrom PCBs waste, using crushing as a pretreatment, was investigated. It was possible to achieve 98 % gold and 93 % silver recovery within48 hours of ammonium thiosulphate leaching. This type of leaching is a better leaching procedure for recovery of gold and silver from PCBwaste than the classical toxic cyanide leaching. 84 % Cu, 82 % Fe, 77 % Al, 76 % Zn, 70 % Ni, 90 % Pd, 88 % Pb and 83 % Sn recovery ofthe accompanying metals was achieved, using sulphuric acid with hydrogen peroxide, sodium chloride and aqua regia. A four steps leachingprocess gave a very satisfactory yield and a more rapid kinetics for all observed metals solubilization than other technologies.

  3. Groundwater vulnerability maps for pesticides for Flanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dams, Jef; Joris, Ingeborg; Bronders, Jan; Van Looy, Stijn; Vanden Boer, Dirk; Heuvelmans, Griet; Seuntjens, Piet

    2017-04-01

    Pesticides are increasingly being detected in shallow groundwater and and are one of the main causes of the poor chemical status of phreatic groundwater bodies in Flanders. There is a need for groundwater vulnerability maps in order to design monitoring strategies and land-use strategies for sensitive areas such as drinking water capture zones. This research focuses on the development of generic vulnerability maps for pesticides for Flanders and a tool to calculate substance-specific vulnerability maps at the scale of Flanders and at the local scale. (1) The generic vulnerability maps are constructed using an index based method in which maps of the main contributing factors in soil and saturated zone to high concentrations of pesticides in groundwater are classified and overlain. Different weights are assigned to the contributing factors according to the type of pesticide (low/high mobility, low/high persistence). Factors that are taken into account are the organic matter content and texture of soil, depth of the unsaturated zone, organic carbon and redox potential of the phreatic groundwater and thickness and conductivity of the phreatic layer. (2) Secondly a tool is developed that calculates substance-specific vulnerability maps for Flanders using a hybrid approach where a process-based leaching model GeoPEARL is combined with vulnerability indices that account for dilution in the phreatic layer. The GeoPEARL model is parameterized for Flanders in 1434 unique combinations of soil properties, climate and groundwater depth. Leaching is calculated for a 20 year period for each 50 x 50 m gridcell in Flanders. (3) At the local scale finally, a fully process-based approach is applied combining GeoPEARL leaching calculations and flowline calculations of pesticide transport in the saturated zone to define critical zones in the capture zone of a receptor such as a drinking water well or a river segment. The three approaches are explained more in detail and illustrated

  4. Enhancement in bacterial leaching of chalcopyrite by polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroyoshi, N.; Nakamura, T.; Tsunekawa, M.; Hirajima, T.; Ito, M. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-11-25

    The effect of surfactant addition on bacterial leaching of chalcopyrite by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was investigated with polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) as a surfactant. Bacterial leaching experiments were carried out without nutrient mineral salts such as ammonium sulfate to avoid the complication of leaching behavior with cell growth. Without the surfactant, most cells adhered to the mineral surface and soluble iron was dominantly present in ferrous form. The surfactant depressed the cell adhesion to the mineral surface and the number of cells in the liquid phase increased with increasing addition. When adding 20 to 50 g/m{sup 3} of the surfactant, the cells in the liquid phase rapidly oxidized ferrous ions to form ferric ions and chalcopyrite was chemically oxidized by the ferric ions, as a result the amount of extracted copper increased markedly. However, the excessive addition depressed the bacterial ferrous oxidation and the chemical leaching of chalcopyrite with ferric ions, and decreased copper extraction. 11 refs., 12 figs.

  5. Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program (PESP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    PESP is an EPA partnership program that works with the nation's pesticide-user community to promote IPM practices. Pesticide users can reduce the risks from pests and pesticides. Members include organizations and companies in the pesticide-user community.

  6. Phosphorus leaching in a soil textural gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton

    2009-01-01

    exceeded the in situ leaching. However, the two application techniques did not vary significantly. In a sandy and a clay loam preferential flow paths within the soil columns caused high P leaching when slurry was applied at the soil surface. The effect increased with increasing clay content. Injection...

  7. Study on Leaching of Hexavalent Chromium from Hardened Concretes Using Tank Leaching Test

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Sakai, Etsuo; Sugiyama, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    Tank leaching tests were carried out to investigate the behavior of leaching trace elements from monolith samples. This study consists of two series, and the trace element used was hexavalent chromium. In Series I, the influence of the leachant/surface area of the specimen (L/S ratio) on the leaching amount was investigated. The leaching amount was found to increase with the amount of worked water. This shows that any L/S ratio can be selected in the tank leaching test. In Series II, th...

  8. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yadong, E-mail: yadong.li@jsums.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217 (United States); Richardson, Jay B.; Niu Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J.; Laster, Jeremy D.; Walker, Aaron K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains.

  9. Pesticide Analytical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide manufacturers must develop and submit analytical methods for their pesticide products to support registration of their products under FIFRA. Learn about these methods as well as SOPs for testing of antimicrobial products against three organisms.

  10. Pesticide Product Label System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the...

  11. Pesticides and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticides and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to pesticides may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  12. Pesticide Labeling Questions & Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide manufacturers, applicators, state regulatory agencies, and other stakeholders raise questions or issues about pesticide labels. The questions on this page are those that apply to multiple products or address inconsistencies among product labels.

  13. Pesticides and food safety

    OpenAIRE

    Ötegen, Volkan Recai; Akbaba, Muhsin; Nazlıcan, Ersin; Kurt, Burak

    2017-01-01

    Besidesprevention of tropical diseases, pesticides are also used to make agriculturalactivities fertile. But pesticides are potentially harmful to our health andmay be toxic to the immune, reproductive and nervous systems. Afterapplication; pesticide residues consist depending on factors such as plantspecies, time of administration, how it applied. While pesticides make foodsupply sustainable, there are concerns about residues in food that peopleconsume. Therefore food safety concept introduc...

  14. Comparative Mapping of Soil Physical-Chemical and Structural Parameters at Field Scale to Identify Zones of Enhanced Leaching Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Olsen, Preben

    2013-01-01

    Preferential flow and particle-facilitated transport through macropores contributes significantly to the transport of strongly sorbing substances such as pesticides and phosphorus. The aim of this study was to perform a field-scale characterization of basic soil physical properties like clay...... and organic carbon content and investigate whether it was possible to relate these to derived structural parameters such as bulk density and conservative tracer parameters and to actual particle and phosphorus leaching patterns obtained from laboratory leaching experiments. Sixty-five cylindrical soil columns...... of 20 cm height and 20 cm diameter and bulk soil were sampled from the topsoil in a 15 m  15 m grid in an agricultural loamy field. Highest clay contents and highest bulk densities were found in the northern part of the field. Leaching experiments with a conservative tracer showed fast 5% tracer...

  15. The Pesticide Scorecard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jerome B.

    1977-01-01

    A scheme for comparing the relative toxicities and environmental safety of agricultural pesticides is presented. It is based on the sum of four key factors: (1) oral toxicity to rats, (2) oral toxicity to fish, (3) longevity, and (4) bioaccumulation. Thirty-one pesticides are ranked by these factors. The ranking indicates that new pesticides are…

  16. Factors associated with the decline in suicide by pesticide poisoning in Taiwan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Shu-Sen; Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Eddleston, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Pesticide self-poisoning accounts for one-third of suicides worldwide, but few studies have investigated the national epidemiology of pesticide suicide in countries where it is a commonly used method. We investigated trends in pesticide suicide, and factors associated with such trends......, in Taiwan, a rapidly developing East Asian country. Methods. We conducted an ecological study using graphical approaches and Spearman's correlation coefficients to examine trends in pesticide suicide (1987-2010) in Taiwan in relation to pesticide sales, bans on selected pesticides, the proportion...... of the workforce involved in agriculture and unemployment. We compared pesticide products banned by the Taiwanese government with products that remained on the market and pesticides that accounted for the most poisoning deaths in Taiwan. Results. Age-standardised rates of pesticide suicide showed a 67% reduction...

  17. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic-Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. The work described in this report addresses caustic leaching under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. Because gibbsite leaching kinetics are rapid (gibbsite is expected to be dissolved by the time the final leach temperature is reached), boehmite leach kinetics are the main focus of the caustic-leach tests. The tests were completed at the laboratory-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. Two laboratory-scale caustic-leach tests were performed for each of the PEP runs. For each PEP run, unleached slurry was taken from the PEP caustic-leach vessel for one batch and used as feed for both of the corresponding laboratory-scale tests.

  18. Does microbial centimeter-scale heterogeneity impact MCPA degradation in and leaching from a loamy agricultural soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbom, Annette E; Binning, Philip J; Aamand, Jens; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F; Johnsen, Anders R

    2014-02-15

    The potential for pesticide degradation varies greatly at the centimeter-scale in agricultural soil. Three dimensional numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate how such small-scale spatial heterogeneity may affect the leaching of the biodegradable pesticide 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in the upper meter of a variably-saturated, loamy soil profile. To incorporate realistic spatial variation in degradation potential, we used data from a site where 420 mineralization curves over 5 depths have been measured. Monod kinetics was fitted to the individual curves to derive initial degrader biomass values, which were incorporated in a reactive transport model to simulate heterogeneous biodegradation. Six scenarios were set up using COMSOL Multiphysics to evaluate the difference between models having different degrader biomass distributions (homogeneous, heterogeneous, or no biomass) and either matrix flow or preferential flow through a soil matrix with a wormhole. MCPA leached, within 250 days, below 1m only when degrader biomass was absent and preferential flow occurred. Both biodegradation in the plow layer and the microbially active lining of the wormhole contributed to reducing MCPA-leaching below 1m. The spatial distribution of initial degrader biomass within each soil matrix layer, however, had little effect on the overall MCPA-leaching. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Leaching from municipal solid waste incineration residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyks, J.

    2008-02-15

    Leaching of pollutants from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) residues has been investigated combining a range of laboratory leaching experiments with geochemical modeling. Special attention was paid to assessing the applicability of laboratory data for subsequent modeling with respect to presumed full-scale conditions; both sample pretreatment and actual influence of leaching conditions on the results of laboratory experiments were considered. It was shown that sample pretreatment may have large impact on leaching test data. In particular, a significant fraction of Pb was shown mobile during the washing of residues with water. In addition, drying of residues (i.e. slow oxidation) prior to leaching experiments increased the leaching of Cr significantly. Significant differences regarding the leaching behavior of individual elements with respect to (non)equilibrium conditions in column percolation experiments were observed in the study. As a result, three groups of elements were identified based on the predominant leaching control and the influence of (non)equilibrium on the results of the laboratory column experiments: I. Predominantly availability-controlled elements (e.g. Na, K, Cl) II. Solubility-controlled elements (e.g. Ca, S, Si, Al, Ba, and Zn) III. Complexation-controlled elements (e.g. Cu and Ni) With respect to the above groups it was suggested that results of laboratory column experiments can, with consideration, be used to estimate full-scale leaching of elements from Group I and II. However, in order to avoid large underestimations in the assessment of leaching from Group III, it is imperative to describe the time-dependent transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the tested system or to minimize the physical non-equilibrium during laboratory experiments (e.g. bigger column, slower flow velocity). Forward geochemical modeling was applied to simulate long-term release of elements from a MSWI air-pollution-control residue. Leaching of a

  20. Research Progress on Pesticide Residue Analysis Techniques in Agro-products

    OpenAIRE

    HE Ze-ying; Liu, Xiao-Wei

    2016-01-01

    There are constant occurrences of acute pesticide poisoning among consumers and pesticide residue violations in agro-products import/export trading. Pesticide residue analysis is the important way to protect the food safety and the interest of import/export enterprises. There has been a rapid development in pesticide residue analysis techniques in recent years. In this review, the research progress in the past five years were discussed in the respects of samples preparation and instrument det...

  1. Pesticide Use in U.S. Agriculture: 21 Selected Crops, 1960-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge; Nehring, Richard; Osteen, Craig; Wechsler, Seth James; Martin, Andrew; Vialou, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide use has changed considerably over the past five decades. Rapid growth characterized the first 20 years, ending in 1981. The total quantity of pesticides applied to the 21 crops analyzed grew from 196 million pounds of pesticide active ingredients in 1960 to 632 million pounds in 1981. Improvements in the types and modes of action of active ingredients applied along with small annual fluctuations resulted in a slight downward trend in pesticide use to 516 million pounds in 2008. Thes...

  2. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais)

    OpenAIRE

    Dousset, S.; Thevenot, M.; Schrack, D.; Gouy, V.; Carluer, N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7e24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0e55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9e32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7e12.9%), in agree...

  3. Estimation of pesticide emissions for LCA of agricultural products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Birkved, Morten

    2002-01-01

    Inventory data for the use of pesticides in agricultural or forestry product systems are typically based on the applied dose and the contents of different ingredients in the commercial pesticide product. Normally in LCA, the field is considered as part of the technosphere, and then the emissions...... from the system are only those fractions of the applied dose which reach the environment surrounding the field. The routes of emission may be direct through wind drift or indirect through evaporation, leaching, or surface run-off. Based on existing tools for hazard or risk assessment of pesticides......, a model is presented developed, allowing estimation of emission factors based on characteristics of application and substance, which are normally available....

  4. An improved model for estimating pesticide emissions for agricultural LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijkman, Teunis Johannes; Birkved, Morten; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2011-01-01

    , and thus the initial leaching rate of pesticide through preferential flow. A third improvement of the updated model is a simplified user interface which makes the model easier to evaluate and operate. The updated PestLCI model is demonstrated on cases involving different climatic circumstances...... products, off-target pesticide emissions need to be quantified as accurately as possible because of the considerable toxicity effects associated with chemicals designed to have a high impact on biological organisms like for example insects or weed plants. PestLCI was developed to estimate the fractions...... of the applied pesticide that is emitted from a field to the surrounding environmental compartments: air, surface water, and ground water. However, the applicability of the model has been limited to 1 typical Danish soil type and 1 climatic profile obtained from the national Danish meteorological station...

  5. Hydraulically active biopores stimulate pesticide mineralization in agricultural subsoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badawi, Nora; Johnsen, Anders R.; Brandt, Kristian Koefoed

    2013-01-01

    for microbially-mediated pesticide mineralization, thereby reducing the risk of pesticide leaching. To investigate this we identified hydraulically active biopores in a test plot of an agricultural field by percolating brilliant blue through the soil. Small portions of soil (500 mg) were sampled at approx. 1-cm....... Compared to the matrix soil, increased density of heterotrophic bacteria, respiratory activity, growth activity, and bromoxynil mineralization was observed in the biopores in the subsoil layer, but not in the transition zone. By contrast, the density of MCPA degraders and MCPA mineralization activity were......Soil biopores can serve as preferential flow paths for downward transport of inorganic nutrients and organic compounds. Pesticides may also be transported down through the subsoil in biopores, thereby posing a threat to the groundwater resource. However, biopores may also constitute hot spots...

  6. Pesticide distribution in an agricultural environment in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewy, Ruth M; Monza, Liliana B; Kirs, Veronica E; Savini, Monica C

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of the off-site migration of pesticides from agricultural activity into the environment in the Neuquen River Valley was performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of pesticides in several compartments of a small agricultural sub-catchment. Soil, surface water, shallow groundwater and drift deposition were analyzed for pesticide residues. Results showed the presence of some pesticide residues in soil, surface water and shallow groundwater compartments. The highest detection frequencies in water (surface and subsurface) were found for azinphos-methyl and chlorpyrifos (>70%). In terms of concentration, the highest levels were observed in shallow groundwater for azinphos methyl (22.5 μg/L) and carbaryl (45.7 μg/L). In the soil, even before the application period had started, accumulation of residues was present. These residues increased during the period studied. Spray drift during pesticide application was found to be a significant pathway for the migration of pesticide residues in surface water, while leaching and preferential flows were the main transport routes contributing to subsurface contamination.

  7. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dousset, S., E-mail: sylvie.dousset@limos.uhp-nancy.f [Nancy-Universite, CNRS, LIMOS, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Thevenot, M. [Universite de Lille 1, CNRS, Geosystemes, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Schrack, D. [INRA-SAD ASTER, 88500 Mirecourt (France); AFSSA, Laboratoire d' Etudes et de Recherches en Hydrologie, 54000 Nancy (France); Gouy, V.; Carluer, N. [UR Milieux Aquatiques, Ecologie et Pollution, Cemagref, 69336 Lyon Cedex (France)

    2010-07-15

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. - Grass-covered soils reduce the amount of pesticide leaching, due mainly to their higher organic matter contents, thereby reducing the risk of groundwater contamination.

  8. Leaching of two fungicides in spent mushroom substrate amended soil: Influence of amendment rate, fungicide ageing and flow condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Martín, Alba; Sánchez-Martín, María J; Ordax, José M; Marín-Benito, Jesús M; Sonia Rodríguez-Cruz, M

    2017-04-15

    A study has been conducted on the leaching of two fungicides, tebuconazole and cymoxanil, in a soil amended with spent mushroom substrate (SMS), with an evaluation of how different factors influence this process. The objective was based on the potential use of SMS as a biosorbent for immobilizing pesticides in vulnerable soils, and the need to know how it could affect the subsequent transport of these retained compounds. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) for 14C-fungicides, non-incubated and incubated over 30days, were obtained in columns packed with an unamended soil (S), and this soil amended with SMS at rates of 5% (S+SMS5) and 50% (S+SMS50) under saturated and saturated-unsaturated flows. The highest leaching of tebuconazole (>50% of the total 14C added) was found in S when a saturated water flow was applied to the column, but the percentage of leached fungicide decreased when a saturated-unsaturated flow was applied in both SMS-amended soils. Also a significant decrease in leaching was observed for tebuconazole after incubation in the column, especially in S+SMS50 when both flows were applied. Furthermore, cymoxanil leaching was complete in S and S+SMS when a saturated flow was applied, and maximum peak concentrations were reached at 1pore volume (PV), although BTCs showed peaks with lower concentrations in S+SMS. The amounts of cymoxanil retained only increased in S+SMS when a saturated-unsaturated flow was applied. A more relevant effect of SMS for reducing the leaching of fungicide was observed when cymoxanil was previously incubated in the column, although mineralization was enhanced in this case. These results are of interest for extending SMS application on the control of the leaching of fungicides with different physicochemical characteristics after different ageing times in the soil and water flow conditions applied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pesticides and oncogenic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakonaki, Elena; Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Liesivuori, Jyrki; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides constitute a diverse class of chemicals used for the protection of agricultural products. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides can cause malignant transformation of cells in in vitro and in vivo models. In the current minireview a comprehensive summary of recent in vitro findings is presented along with data reported from human population studies, regarding the impact of pesticide exposure on activation or dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Substantial mechanistic work suggests that pesticides are capable of inducing mutations in oncogenes and increase their transcriptional expression in vitro, whereas human population studies indicate associations between pesticide exposure levels and mutation occurrence in cancer-related genes. Further work is required to fully explore the exact mechanisms by which pesticide exposure affects the integrity and normal function of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. New Labeling for Neonicotinoid Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    These documents, a graphic of the bee advisory box and letters to pesticide registrants, describe steps by EPA to change pesticide labels to better protect pollinators by being clearer and more precise in their directions for pesticide application.

  11. Models for Pesticide Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA considers the toxicity of the pesticide as well as the amount of pesticide to which a person or the environments may be exposed in risk assessment. Scientists use mathematical models to predict pesticide concentrations in exposure assessment.

  12. Toxicology of pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    Dubská, Veronika

    2008-01-01

    Toxykology of pesticides Pesticides are substances or mixtures substances as a natural so synthetic origin. By effect of pesticides is removing of pest and undesirable plants. However owing to their toxicity and unaware manipulation with these substances may go to a waste of another than target organism, plants, rivers and land. The target of this graduation theses has been draw up possibility hazards resulting of using these substances.

  13. Control of Pesticides 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krongaard, T.; Petersen, K. K.; Christoffersen, C.

    Three different groups of products covered by the pesticide regulation have been included in the 2000 analytical chemical authority control: 1) herbicides containing aclonifen, clopyralid, dicamba, quinoclamine, bromoxynil, ioxynil, simazine, and terbuthylazine. 2) Fungicides containing fenpropidin......, fluazinam, and kresoxim-methyl, and among insecticides containing fenazaquin. Thus, all the eighteen analysed samples of these pesticides complied with the accepted tolerances with respect to content of active ingredients set by the Danish regulation of pesticides. The only product containing buprofezin...

  14. Understanding Pesticide Risks: Toxicity and Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Muntz, Helen; Miller, Rhonda; Alston, Diane

    2016-01-01

    This fact sheet provides information about pesticide risks to human health, primary means of pesticide exposure, standardized measures of pesticide toxicity, pesticide signal words and type of pesticide formulations.

  15. Microbial biosensors for organophosphate pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2011-09-01

    Organophosphates, amongst the most toxic substance known, are used widely in agriculture around the world. Their extensive use, however, has resulted in their occurrence in the water and food supply threatening humans and animals. Therefore, there is a need for determination of these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, and rapidly in the field. The present work is a brief review on the recent advancements in amperometric, potentiometric, and optical biosensors using genetically engineered microorganisms expressing organophosphate hydrolyzing enzyme intracellularly or anchored on the cell surface for the detection of organophosphate pesticides. The benefits and limitations associated with such microbial biosensors are delineated.

  16. Rapid analysis of multi-pesticides in Morinda officinalis by GC-ECD with accelerated solvent extraction assisted matrix solid phase dispersion and positive confirmation by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongmei; Kong, Weijun; Gong, Bao; Miao, Qing; Qi, Yun; Yang, Meihua

    2015-01-01

    In this work, 33 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 9 pyrethroid pesticides (PYPs) in Morinda officinalis were effectively and selectively extracted and cleaned up by accelerated solvent extraction assisted matrix solid phase dispersion (ASE/MSPD) method, followed by gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). Carbophenothion was selected as the internal standard and added into the final extracts to improve the precision and accuracy of the method. Parameters for ASE/MSPD procedure including ratio of acetone to n-hexane, temperature and amount of Florisil were optimized to improve the performance of the method through orthogonal experimental design. Under the optimized conditions, the average recoveries (six replicates) for all pesticides (spiked at 0.05, 0.5 and 1.0 mg kg(-1)) ranged from 69.3% to 112% with RSD less than 14.14%. A wide linear range of 10-1000 ng mL(-1) was observed with r values of 0.9963-0.9999. Meanwhile, the method gave high selectivity and sensitivity (LODs<3 μg kg(-1) and LOQs<8.0 μg kg (-1)), good repeatability (RSD of 9.64%, on average) and precision (RSD of 5.48%, averagely) and excellent stability (RSD <9.47%). The feasibility of the proposed method was demonstrated by applying it for preconcentration and determination of OCPs and PYPs in 40 batches of real samples. Four kinds of pesticides (beta-endosulfan, tecnazene, hexachlorobenzene and alpha-BHC) were detected in three batches of samples, which were successfully confirmed by GC-MS. The results indicated that ASE/MSPD is a reliable and half-automated extraction and purification technique, with many advantages over traditional techniques. The combination of ASE/MSPD and GC-ECD could be especially useful for trace analysis of pesticide residues in complex matrices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of Copper Ammonia Leaching from Smelter Slags: Characterization, Leaching and Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidari, Ehsan; Aghazadeh, Valeh

    2015-10-01

    Although ammonia leaching of copper from slags has been reported generally as a part of copper slag utilization methods, but no detailed studies have been reported in the literature. In this research, we tried to investigate the effect of different parameters on ammonia leaching of copper from copper smelting slag by identifying different copper-bearing phases and following them during leaching time. Mineralogical characterization of the smelting slag (1.7 pct Cu) was done using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, diagnostic leaching tests, and scanning electron microscopy. The characterization studies indicated that main copper-bearing species are soluble copper oxides and chalcocite along with minor amount of covellite, bornite, blister copper particles, and chalcopyrite. It was also found that only approximately 0.2 pct Cu was present in the insoluble bulk silicate phases. These results suggest that approximately 88 pct of the total copper of slag could be extracted by ammonia sulfide leaching. Leaching tests were carried out and the effects of various parameters, namely pH, ammonia concentration, temperature, presence of oxygen, stirring speed, and pulp density were examined on copper leaching. The temperature and stirring speed had the most pronounced effect on the copper leaching, whereas ammonia affected the leaching yield at low concentrations of ammonia. It was found that 78 pct of Cu could be extracted within 4 hours and under optimum conditions: T = 343 K (70 °C), 2M ammonia, pH 10.5, stirring speed = 900 rpm, pulp density = 10 pct ( w s/ v). The kinetic data were analyzed with the shrinking core models, and it was found that the leaching process is controlled by both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer and the activation energy is calculated to be 49.4 kJ mol-1.

  18. Direct Acid Leaching of Vanadium from Stone Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Gao, Zhaoguo; Liu, Hongzhao; Wang, Wei; Cao, Yaohua

    2017-09-01

    This paper focused on optimizing the process conditions of direct acid leaching process to enhance the leaching efficiency of leaching vanadium from the stone coal. Orthogonal experiments and single factor experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the influential factors of direct acid leaching on vanadium leaching ratio. The results showed that the vanadium leaching ratio reached the maximum value of 89.22 % under the optimal process conditions of CaF2 dosage 5 mass%, H2SO4 dosage 40 mass%, leaching temperature 95 °C and leaching time 10 h. Furthermore, the reaction mechanisms of the main influencing factors were analyzed. Finally, the two-stage counter-current leaching process was adopted to decrease the consumption of sulfuric acid and neutralizer, and the results indicated that the consumption of sulfuric acid decreased 12.50 % as well as neutralizer decreased 35.80 %.

  19. Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee, a permanent, broadly representative advisory committee, meets with EPA on a regular basis to discuss pesticide regulatory, policy, and program implementation issues.

  20. Pesticide Product Information System (PPIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Information System contains information concerning all pesticide products registered in the United States. It includes registrant name and...

  1. Geothermal energy for copper dump leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    This report evaluates the possibility of using geothermal energy to heat a sulfuric acid leaching solution for the purpose of faster and more efficient copper recovery from copper-containing minerals. Experimental studies reported in the literature have shown that this technique can be economically feasible for the extraction of copper from low-grade dump ores. Its main advantage appears to be the considerable reduction in long-term leaching periods; it could also be less expensive than other conventional processing operations if an economical geothermal resource were provided. However, this process has some pitfalls which might restrict the extent of geothermal energy use. Nevertheless, the process is still technologically sound, especially if groundwaters are used directly in the leaching operation.

  2. Kinetics of Leaching Calcium from Dolomite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizi, A.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesia is obtained from magnesite ore and the production process applied should remove accompanying minerals that reduce its refractoriness. Given that magnesite reservoirs are more exploited and largely exhausted, there is a growing need for production of magnesia on the basis of other magnesium minerals. Dolomite is a promising source of magnesia because it forms large deposits, is easy to exploit, and generally contains a small quantity of impurities.The kinetics of calcium leaching from dolomite by magnesium-nitrate solution has been studied. The research program included the influence of temperature, mass fraction of magnesium nitrate in solution, dolomite particle size and leaching time. Time dependence of calcium leaching is described by relevant kinetic equations. Rate coefficients, their temperature dependence and Arrhenius activation energy have been determined.

  3. Microwave assisted leaching and electrochemical recovery of copper from printed circuit boards of computer waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivănuş R.C.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid technological progress, the replacement of electronic equipment is very often necessary, leading to huge amounts that end up as waste. In addition, waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE contains metals of high commercial value and others that are supposed to be hazardous for the environment. Consequently, WEEE could be considered as a significant source for recovery of nonferrous metals. Among these wastes, computers appear to be distinctive, as far as further exploitation is concerned. The most ″useful″ parts of the computers are the printed circuit boards that contain many metals of interest. A study on microwave assisted electronic scrap (printed circuit boards of computer waste – PCBs leaching was carried out with a microwave hydrothermal reactor. The leaching was conducted with thick slurries (50-100 g/L. The leaching media is a mixed solution of CuCl2 and NaCl. Preliminary electrolysis from leaching solution has investigated the feasibility of electrodeposition of copper. The results were discussed and compared with the conventional leaching method and demonstrated the potential for selective extraction of copper from PCBs.

  4. Microwave assisted leaching and electrochemical recovery of copper from printed circuit boards of computer waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivǎnuş, R. C.; ǎnuş, D., IV; Cǎlmuc, F.

    2010-06-01

    Due to the rapid technological progress, the replacement of electronic equipment is very often necessary, leading to huge amounts that end up as waste. In addition, waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) contains metals of high commercial value and others that are supposed to be hazardous for the environment. Consequently, WEEE could be considered as a significant source for recovery of nonferrous metals. Among these wastes, computers appear to be distinctive, as far as further exploitation is concerned. The most ″useful″ parts of the computers are the printed circuit boards that contain many metals of interest. A study on microwave assisted electronic scrap (printed circuit boards of computer waste - PCBs) leaching was carried out with a microwave hydrothermal reactor. The leaching was conducted with thick slurries (50-100 g/L). The leaching media is a mixed solution of CuCl2 and NaCl. Preliminary electrolysis from leaching solution has investigated the feasibility of electrodeposition of copper. The results were discussed and compared with the conventional leaching method and demonstrated the potential for selective extraction of copper from PCBs.

  5. Biosensor technology for pesticides--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neelam; Bhardwaj, Atul

    2015-03-01

    Pesticides, due to their lucrative outcomes, are majorly implicated in agricultural fields for crop production enhancement. Due to their pest removal properties, pesticides of various classes have been designed to persist in the environment over a longer duration after their application to achieve maximum effectiveness. Apart from their recalcitrant structure and agricultural benefits, pesticides also impose acute toxicological effects onto the other various life forms. Their accumulation in the living system may prove to be detrimental if established in higher concentrations. Thus, their prompt and accurate analysis is a crucial matter of concern. Conventional techniques like chromatographic techniques (HPLC, GC, etc.) used for pesticides detection are associated with various limitations like stumpy sensitivity and efficiency, time consumption, laboriousity, requirement of expensive equipments and highly trained technicians, and many more. So there is a need to recruit the methods which can detect these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, rapidly, and easily in the field. Present work is a brief review of the pesticide effects, their current usage scenario, permissible limits in various food stuffs and 21st century advancements of biosensor technology for pesticide detection. Due to their exceptional performance capabilities, easiness in operation and on-site working, numerous biosensors have been developed for bio-monitoring of various environmental samples for pesticide evaluation immensely throughout the globe. Till date, based on sensing element (enzyme based, antibody based, etc.) and type of detection method used (Electrochemical, optical, and piezoelectric, etc.), a number of biosensors have been developed for pesticide detection. In present communication, authors have summarized 21st century's approaches of biosensor technology for pesticide detection such as enzyme-based biosensors, immunosensors, aptamers, molecularly imprinted polymers, and

  6. Pesticides in Ground Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    1996-01-01

    Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588.......Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588....

  7. Food and Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA sets limits on how much of a pesticide may be used on food during growing and processing, and how much can remain on the food you buy. Learn about regulation of pesticides on food and how you can limit exposure.

  8. Coal fly ash interaction with environmental fluids: Geochemical and strontium isotope results from combined column and batch leaching experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, Tonya M; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Schroeder, Karl T; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Vesper, Dorothy J; Cardone, Carol R; Rohar, Paul C

    2013-05-01

    The major element and Sr isotope systematics and geochemistry of coal fly ash and its interactions with environmental waters were investigated using laboratory flow-through column leaching experiments (sodium carbonate, acetic acid, nitric acid) and sequential batch leaching experiments (water, acetic acid, hydrochloric acid). Column leaching of Class F fly ash samples shows rapid release of most major elements early in the leaching procedure, suggesting an association of these elements with soluble and surface bound phases. Delayed release of certain elements (e.g., Al, Fe, Si) signals gradual dissolution of more resistant silicate or glass phases as leaching continues. Strontium isotope results from both column and batch leaching experiments show a marked increase in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio with continued leaching, yielding a total range of values from 0.7107 to 0.7138. For comparison, the isotopic composition of fluid output from a fly ash impoundment in West Virginia falls in a narrow range around 0.7124. The experimental data suggest the presence of a more resistant, highly radiogenic silicate phase that survives the combustion process and is leached after the more soluble minerals are removed. Strontium isotopic homogenization of minerals in coal does not always occur during the combustion process, despite the high temperatures encountered in the boiler. Early-released Sr tends to be isotopically uniform; thus the Sr isotopic composition of fly ash could be distinguishable from other sources and is a useful tool for quantifying the possible contribution of fly ash leaching to the total dissolved load in natural surface and ground waters.

  9. PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2010-05-21

    This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

  10. PESTICIDES: BENEFITS AND HAZARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Maksymiv

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are an integral part of modern life used to prevent growth of unwanted living  organisms. Despite the fact that scientific statements coming from many toxicological works provide indication on the low risk of the pesticides and their residues, the community especially last years is deeply concerned about massive application of pesticides in diverse fields. Therefore evaluation of hazard risks particularly in long term perspective is very important. In the fact there are at least two clearly different approaches for evaluation of pesticide using: the first one is defined as an objective or probabilistic risk assessment, while the second one is the potential economic and agriculture benefits. Therefore, in this review the author has considered scientifically based assessment of positive and negative effects of pesticide application and discusses possible approaches to find balance between them.

  11. Control of Pesticides 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krongaard, T.; Petersen, K. K.; Christoffersen, C.

    The analytical chemical authority control on pesticide products on the Danish market performed in 2001 is reported. Samples of selected groups of pesticides have been collected from the market and analysed to verify whether the actual contents of the respective active ingredients in the products...... comply with the label-claimed content. The tolerance of deviation from the label-claimed content of active ingredient is set by the Danish pesticide regulation. Three different groups of products covered by the pesticide regulation have been included in the 2001 analytical chemical authority control: 1....... Satisfactory results were found among herbicides containing pendimethalin and methabenzthiazuron, among fungicides containing azaconazole, tolylfluanid, propamocarb and cyprodinil, and among insecticides containing amitraz, phosalone and diflubenzuron. Thus, the twelve analysed samples of these pesticides...

  12. Ecotoxicological evaluation of pesticides in groundwater. Ecotoxicologische evaluatie van bestrijdingsmiddelen in grondwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notenboom, J.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Linders, J.B.H.J.

    1992-02-01

    A preliminary ecotoxicological risk assessment of pesticides in ground water has been performed. Predictable environmental concentrations in shallow ground water, based on both calculations of pesticide leaching and detected levels during monitoring programs, have been compared with aquatic ecotoxicity data. Among pesticides detected in ground water only the levels of aldicarb (including metabolites), 1,3-dichloropropene, and ethoprophos exceed risk boundaries. Among pesticides of which calculations show that they can be expected in concentrations of 0.1 microgram/l or higher a much large number of substances exceed risk boundaries. In particular, cypermethrin, 1,3-dichloropropene, fenpropathrin, pendimethalin, pirimicarb, pirimiphos-methyl, propoxur, terbufos, thiram, and trichlorphon have a large potential risk for groundwater ecosystems.

  13. Irrigation management in Mediterranean salt affected agriculture: how leaching operates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Libutti

    2012-03-01

    and relative drainage volumes according to a three steps procedure of covariance analysis. A simple, general and comprehensive leaching model is thus presented. Results showed that salt build up into the soil can be very rapid, generally occurring within a single irrigated summer crop cycle. Rainfalls of the autumn-winter period had a crucial role in the removal of salts brought into the soil by summer irrigation. This paper strongly emphasises that additional fresh water supply is of great importance to establish acceptable soil conditions. Two suitable periods for intentional leaching were identified.

  14. Thiacloprid adsorption and leaching in soil: Effect of the composition of irrigation solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Liébana, José Antonio; Mingorance, M Dolores; Peña, Aránzazu

    2018-01-01

    Pressure on groundwater resources has increased during the last decades due to the growing demand, especially in arid and semiarid regions, such as the Mediterranean basin, with frequent drought periods. In order to partially remediate this environmental problem of world concern, irrigation of agricultural lands with adequately treated wastewaters (TWW) is becoming a common management practice. The complex composition of these low-quality waters may influence the behavior of organic contaminants in soils. A calcareous soil with low organic carbon content was selected for the assessment of the adsorption and leaching of the neonicotinoid insecticide thiacloprid (THC). Different solutions were evaluated: TWW after a secondary treatment, a saline solution and solutions with a range of dissolved organic carbon concentration (DOC, 3-300mgL-1). The addition of an organic fertilizer (fertiormont) to the soil was also assessed, in an attempt to reduce THC mobility. Sorption of thiacloprid, a relatively polar pesticide, was similar under all the conditions considered, though an adsorption decrease was observed when DOC concentration increased. The transport of THC through soil columns was retarded with all the treatments, with the lower effects corresponding to TWW and the saline solution. Addition of fertiormont and irrigation with DOC at 3mgL-1 resulted in a reduction of pesticide leached (34% and 38%, respectively) in comparison with the control (66%), but surprisingly not for DOC at high concentration (55%), possibly due to co-elution of the pesticide with DOC. Therefore the transport of polar compounds, like THC, could be affected by the composition of the irrigation solutions, altering their impact to environmental water resources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Duality properties of Gorringe Leach equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandati, Yves; Bérard, Alain; Mohrbach, Hervé

    2009-02-01

    In the category of motions preserving the angular momentum direction, Gorringe and Leach exhibited two classes of differential equations having elliptical orbits. After enlarging slightly these classes, we show that they are related by a duality correspondence of the Arnold Vassiliev type. The specific associated conserved quantities (Laplace Runge Lenz vector and Fradkin Jauch Hill tensor) are then dual reflections of each other.

  16. Simulating cement microstructural evolution during calcium leaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, R.A.; Perko, J.; Jacques, D.; De Schutter, G.; Van Breugel, K.; Ye, G.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium leaching is one of the important degradation mechanisms causing dissolution of the crystalline phases such as, AFm, portlandite increasing capillary porosity. Further it leads to decalcification of an amorphous C-S-H phase causing increase in the gel porosity and in turn degrading the long

  17. Column leaching from biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of biomass combustion ashes for forest soil liming and fertilizing has been addressed in literature. Though, a deep understanding of the ash chemical composition and leaching behavior is necessary to predict potential benefits and environmental risks related to this practice...

  18. Leaching of Plastic Additives to Marine Organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Besseling, E.; Foekema, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that ingestion of microplastics by aquatic species leads to increased exposure to plastic additives. However, experimental data or model based evidence is lacking. Here we assess the potential of leaching of nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in the intestinal tracts of

  19. Implementation of the Leaching Environmental Assessment ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEAF provides a uniform and integrated approach for evaluating leaching from solid materials (e.g., waste, treated wastes such as by solidification/stabilization, secondary materials such as blast furnace slags, energy residuals such as coal fly ash, soil, sediments, mining and mineral processing wastes). Assessment using LEAF applies a stepwise approach that considers the leaching behavior of COPCs in response to chemical and physical factors that control and material properties across a range of plausible field conditions (US EPA, 2010). The framework provides the flexibility to tailor testing to site conditions and select the extent of testing based on assessment objectives and the level of detailed information needed to support decision-making. The main focus will be to discuss the implementation of LEAF in the US and the How to Guide that has recently been completed. To present the How To Guide for the implementation of the leaching environmental assessment framework to an international audience already familiar with comparable leaching tests in use in Europe. Will be meeting with European colleagues on their interest in expanding methods to include organics.

  20. Recovery of uranium from low concentration leach liquor of acid in-situ leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhenqian; Niu, Yuqing

    2017-04-01

    For problems of environment protection and cost in uranium recycle, the process flows of ion exchange and Eluex, which recovered uranium from low concentration leach liquor of acid in-situ leaching, were studied. Although the flow sheet of ion exchange process was simple, the Eluex process had an advantage over it due to large quantity of effluent and high processing cost in ion exchange process by comparative studies.

  1. Modeling the Factors Impacting Pesticide Concentrations in Groundwater Wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aisopou, Angeliki; Binning, Philip John; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effect of pumping, hydrogeology, and pesticide characteristics on pesticide concentrations in production wells using a reactive transport model in two conceptual hydrogeologic systems; a layered aquifer with and without a stream present. The pumping rate can significantly......, for example, if the application of bentazone in a region with a layered aquifer stops today, the concentration at the well can continue to increase for 20 years if a low pumping rate is applied. This study concludes that because of the rapid response of the pesticide concentration at the drinking water well...

  2. Effects of acid leaching aluminum from reservoir bottom sediment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of before and after leaching, the spectra showed that the mineral composition of chlorite disappeared after acid leaching with a sound effect. Among the three acids, sulfuric acid is the best leaching solution under same operating conditions. The best combination for maximum extraction in this study is 5 N ...

  3. 77 FR 74003 - Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on Antimicrobial Pesticide Products With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... label changes are designed to improve protection of public health through proper use of mold-related... AGENCY Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on Antimicrobial Pesticide Products With Mold... Registration Notice (PR Notice) titled ``Guidance on Antimicrobial Pesticide Products with Mold-Related Label...

  4. Effects of Pregnant Leach Solution Temperature on the Permeability of Gravelly Drainage Layer of Heap Leaching Structures

    OpenAIRE

    mehdi amini

    2013-01-01

    In copper heap leaching structures, the ore is leached by an acidic solution. After dissolving the ore mineral, the heap is drained off in the acidic solution using a drainage system (consisting of a network of perforated polyethylene pipes and gravelly drainage layers) and is, then, transferred to the leaching plant for copper extraction where the copper is extracted and the remaining solution is dripped over the ore heap for re-leaching. In this process, the reaction between the acidic solu...

  5. Phosphorus and nitrogen leaching before and after tillage and urea application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kun; Kleinman, Peter J A; Saporito, Lou S; Church, Clinton; McGrath, Joshua M; Reiter, Mark S; Tingle, Shawn C; Allen, Arthur L; Wang, L Q; Bryant, Ray B

    2015-03-01

    Leaching of nutrients through agricultural soils is a priority water quality concern on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. This study evaluated the effect of tillage and urea application on leaching of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) from soils of the Delmarva Peninsula that had previously been under no-till management. Intact soil columns (30 cm wide × 50 cm deep) were irrigated for 6 wk to establish a baseline of leaching response. After 2 wk of drying, a subset of soil columns was subjected to simulated tillage (0-20 cm) in an attempt to curtail leaching of surface nutrients, especially P. Urea (145 kg N ha) was then broadcast on all soils (tilled and untilled), and the columns were irrigated for another 8 wk. Comparison of leachate recoveries representing rapid and slow flows confirmed the potential to manipulate flow fractions with tillage, albeit with mixed results across soils. Leachate trends in the finer-textured soil suggest that tillage impeded macropore flow and forced greater matrix flow. Despite significant vertical stratification of soil P that suggested tillage could prevent leaching of P via macropores from the surface to the subsoil, tillage had no significant impact on P leaching losses. Relatively high levels of soil P below 20 cm may have served as the source of P enrichment in leachate waters. However, tillage did lower losses of applied urea in leachate from two of the three soils, partially confirming the study's premise that tillage would destroy macropore pathways transmitting surface constituents to the subsoil. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Root growth and nitrate-nitrogen leaching of catch crops following spring wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Juan M; Feil, Boy; Stamp, Peter; Liedgens, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Growing nitrogen (N) catch crops can reduce NO(3)-N leaching after cultivating cereals. The objective of this study was to relate NO(3)-N leaching to variation in the uptake of N and the size and distribution of the root systems of different catch crops species. In a 3-yr lysimeter experiment, phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), and a Brassica species (yellow mustard [Brassica alba L.] or a hybrid of turnip rape [B. rapa L. spp. oleifera (DC.) Metzg.] and Chinese cabbage [B. rapa L. ssp. chinensis (L.) Hanelt]) were grown after the harvest of spring wheat under two levels of N supply. Bare soil lysimeters served as the control. Water percolation from the lysimeters and the NO(3)(-) concentration in the leachate were measured weekly from the sowing until the presumed frost-kill of the catch crops. Minirhizotrons were used to assess the spatial and temporal patterns of root growth from 0.10 to 1.00 m. The catch crop species differed in their shoot biomass, N uptake, total NO(3)-N leaching, and root growth. The results suggested that there was no strict relationship between the total NO(3)-N leaching of each catch crop species and the N uptake or parameters that indicate static characteristics of the root system. In contrast, the ranking of each catch crop species by parameters that indicate early root growth was inversely related to the ranking of each catch crop species in NO(3)-N leaching. The rapid establishment of the root system is essential for a catch crop following spring wheat to reduce the amount of NO(3)-N leaching after the harvest of spring wheat.

  7. Rapid determination of residues of pesticides in honey by µGC-ECD and GC-MS/MS: Method validation and estimation of measurement uncertainty according to document No. SANCO/12571/2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, Angela; Alunni, Sabrina; Pelliccia, Alessandro; Pecorelli, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    A simple and straightforward method for simultaneous determination of residues of 13 pesticides in honey samples (acrinathrin, bifenthrin, bromopropylate, cyhalothrin-lambda, cypermethrin, chlorfenvinphos, chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, deltamethrin, fluvalinate-tau, malathion, permethrin and tetradifon) from different pesticide classes has been developed and validated. The analytical method provides dissolution of honey in water and an extraction of pesticide residues by n-Hexane followed by clean-up on a Florisil SPE column. The extract was evaporated and taken up by a solution of an injection internal standard (I-IS), ethion, and finally analyzed by capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-µECD). Identification for qualitative purpose was conducted by gas chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (GC-MS/MS). A matrix-matched calibration curve was performed for quantitative purposes by plotting the area ratio (analyte/I-IS) against concentration using a GC-µECD instrument. According to document No. SANCO/12571/2013, the method was validated by testing the following parameters: linearity, matrix effect, specificity, precision, trueness (bias) and measurement uncertainty. The analytical process was validated analyzing blank honey samples spiked at levels equal to and greater than 0.010 mg/kg (limit of quantification). All parameters were satisfactorily compared with the values established by document No. SANCO/12571/2013. The analytical performance was verified by participating in eight multi-residue proficiency tests organized by BIPEA, obtaining satisfactory z-scores in all 70 determinations. Measurement uncertainty was estimated according to the top-down approaches described in Appendix C of the SANCO document using the within-laboratory reproducibility relative standard deviation combined with laboratory bias using the proficiency test data.

  8. Effect of rainfall regimes and mulch decomposition on the dissipation and leaching of S-metolachlor and glyphosate: a soil column experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Sohaib; Iqbal, Akhtar; Deschamps, Marjolaine; Recous, Sylvie; Garnier, Patricia; Benoit, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Interception by plant residues is a major process affecting pesticide persistence and leaching in conservation agriculture. Dissipation and leaching of S-metolachlor and glyphosate was studied in repacked soil columns covered with a mulch of maize and lablab residues. The columns were submitted to two contrasting simulated rainfall regimes: one with light but frequent rain (LF) and one with less frequent but more intense rain (HI). In both treatments, columns received the same amount of rainwater by the end of the experiment. Decomposing crop residues on the soil surface retained more than 50% of the applied amount of pesticide. S-metolachlor dissipation in mulch residues was faster under the LF rainfall regime. This was attributed to more humid surface conditions, under which mulch decomposition was also faster. The formation of metabolites of both molecules was higher under the LF rainfall regime. However, leaching of S-metolachlor and its metabolites to deeper soil layers was greater under the HI rainfall regime, whereas they accumulated in the surface layer under the LF rainfall regime. Glyphosate remained in the surface soil layer because of its strong adsorption capacity, whereas aminomethylphosphonic acid leached down in small amounts without any difference between the two rainfall regimes. The impact of mulch residues on herbicide dissipation was strongly dependent on molecule type and rainfall regime. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Development of leaching tests for non-volatile organic contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskam, G.D.; Comans, R.N.J. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of our research was to investigate the processes that control the leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a group of organic contaminants with an aqueous solubility that varies over more than 5 orders of magnitude. The obtained insight in the leaching processes is used as the basis for an ''availability'' leaching test that is intended to indicate the maximum amount of the organic contaminants that can be leached from soil or waste materials. This presentation is largely based on work performed in the framework of two EU projects on the development of leaching tests for organic contaminants, and on groundwater risk assessment at contaminated sites. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of transfer rates of multiple pesticides from green tea into infusion using water as pressurized liquid extraction solvent and ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongping; Pan, Meiling; Liu, Xin; Lu, Chengyin

    2017-02-01

    Pesticide residues could be transferred from tea into its infusion and by-products, and subsequently consumed by humans. Extra extraction conditions may induce more pesticide leaching into the infusion and by-products of tea and cause greater damage to humans. The aim of this study is to evaluate the infusion of multiple pesticides from green tea into hot water via pressurized liquid extraction. The results showed that pesticides in spiked samples generally have higher leaching (0.8-45.0%) than those in the positive samples. There was a marked rise of transfer rates when water solubility increased from 20mgL(-1) to 450mgL(-1) and LogKow decreased from 6 to 4. All pesticides had more leaching into hot water using pressurized liquid extraction than traditional tea brewing. This study helps in risk assessment of pesticide residues and in the formulation of maximum residue levels (MRLs) in tea and its by-products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reducing Pesticide Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides information about pesticide spray drift, including problems associated with drift, managing risks from drift and the voluntary Drift Reduction Technology program that seeks to reduce spray drift through improved spray equipment design.

  12. Pesticide-Exposure Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    The "Pesticide-exposure Matrix" was developed to help epidemiologists and other researchers identify the active ingredients to which people were likely exposed when their homes and gardens were treated for pests in past years.

  13. Pesticide Registration Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — PRISM provides an integrated, web portal for all pesticide related data, communications, registrations and transactions for OPP and its stakeholders, partners and...

  14. Why We Review Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    As required by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), EPA periodically reviews existing registered pesticides to ensure they can be used safely, without unreasonable risks to human health and the environment.

  15. [Acute pesticide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Nah, J J; Collí-Quintal, J

    2000-01-01

    To describe the epidemiologic pattern of acute pesticide poisoning (APP) in a general hospital in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. From 1994 to 1998, 33 patients 13 years of age or older with diagnosis of APP were studied. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze information. Males were frequently affected (82%), specially those coming from rural areas (60%). The mean age of the group was 34 +/- 15.8 years. In 79% of the cases, pesticides were used to commit suicide and 33% of poisoning cases were due to organophospate pesticides. The mortality rate was 12%. In this small sample, acute poisoning from pesticides in the agricultural setting may be underestimated, since it was less frequent than in the general population. APP was more commonly used by indigent people to commit suicide.

  16. The Danish Pesticide Tax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Branth; Nielsen, Helle Ørsted; Andersen, Mikael Skou

    2015-01-01

    This case study analyses the effects of the Danish pesticide tax (1996-2013) on agriculture which was introduced as an ad valorem tax in 1996, doubled in 1998, and redesigned in 2013 as a tax based on the toxicity of the pesticides. The Danish pesticide taxes probably represent the world’s highest...... pesticide taxes on agriculture, which makes it interesting to analyze how effective they have been. Here the effects of the ad valorem tax (1996-2013) are analyzed. The case study demonstrates the challenges of choosing an optimal tax design in a complex political setting where, additionally, not all...... individuals in the target group necessarily react to the economic incentives as predicted by economic modeling. It also demonstrates that a small first green-tax-step over time might develop into a better tax design....

  17. Control of Pesticides 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krongaard, Teddy; Petersen, Kitty Kastalag; Christoffersen, Christel

    The analytical chemical authority control of pesticide products on the Danish market in 2006 is described in this report. Samples of selected groups of pesticides have been collected from the market and analysed to verify whether the actual contents of the respective active ingredients in the pro......The analytical chemical authority control of pesticide products on the Danish market in 2006 is described in this report. Samples of selected groups of pesticides have been collected from the market and analysed to verify whether the actual contents of the respective active ingredients...... analytical chemical authority control: Herbicides containing metamitron, propaquizafop and haloxyfop-ethoxyethyl. Fungicides containing azoxystrobin, propiconazole, cyprodinil, picoxystrobin and fenpropidin. Insecticides containing pirimicarb. Plant growth regulators containing chlormequat chloride, mepiquat...

  18. Control of Pesticides 2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krongaard, T.; Petersen, K. K.; Christoffersen, C.

    Four different groups of products covered by the pesticide regulation were included in the 2004 analytical chemical authority control: 1) Herbicides containing bentazone, dicamba, dichlorprop-P, mecoprop-P, MCPA, foramsulfuron, iodosulfuron-methylsodium, rimsulfuron and triasulfuron. 2) Fungicides...

  19. What are Antimicrobial Pesticides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial pesticides are substances or mixtures of substances used to destroy or suppress the growth of harmful microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, or fungi on inanimate objects and surfaces.

  20. Applicability of ELISA-based Determination of Pesticides for Groundwater Quality Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchihara, Takeo; Yoshimoto, Shuhei; Ishida, Satoshi; Imaizumi, Masayuki

    The principals and procedures of ELISA (Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay)-based determination of pesticides (Fenitrothion) in environmental samples were reviewed, and the applicability of the ELISA method for groundwater quality monitoring were validated through the experimental tracer tests in soil columns and the field test in Okinoerabu Island. The test results showed that the ELISA method could be useful not only for screening but also for quantitative analysis of pesticides. In the experimental tracer tests in soil columns, the retardation of pesticides leaching compared with conservative tracers were observed. In the field test, the contamination of the pesticide was detected in groundwater samples in Okinoerabu Island, even though the targeted pesticide was considered to be applied to the upland field 4 months ago. In order to investigate the transport and fate of pesticides in groundwater taking into account retardation from the field to groundwater table and the residue in groundwater, continuous observations of pesticides in groundwater are in a strong need, and the ELISA method is applicable to the long-term quality groundwater monitoring.

  1. Mechanochemical leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate by sulfuric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadabad, Farhad Khorramshahi; Hejazi, Sina; khaki, Jalil Vahdati; Babakhani, Abolfazl

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to introduce a new cost-effective methodology for increasing the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite concentrates at ambient temperature and pressure. Mechanical activation was employed during the leaching (mechanochemical leaching) of chalcopyrite concentrates in a sulfuric acid medium at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. High energy ball milling process was used during the leaching to provide the mechanochemical leaching condition, and atomic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to determine the leaching behavior of chalcopyrite. Moreover, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the chalcopyrite powder before and after leaching. The results demonstrated that mechanochemical leaching was effective; the extraction of copper increased significantly and continuously. Although the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite was very low at ambient temperature, the percentages of copper dissolved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3) after 20 h of mechanochemical leaching reached 28% and 33%, respectively. Given the efficiency of the developed method and the facts that it does not require the use of an autoclave and can be conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, it represents an economical and easy-to-use method for the leaching industry.

  2. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil. PMID:25538691

  3. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud eDechesne

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays nonrandom spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage, while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modelling and experimental systems that do not include soil’s full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil.

  4. Gold and Silver Extraction from Leach Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagdaulet K. Kenzhaliyev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been carried out an investigation on the extraction of gold and silver from thiosulfate solutions: standard test and technological solutions of chemical and electrochemical leaching. The influence of related metals on the process of extracting gold from solution was studied. There has been conducted a comparative study of the IR spectra of solutions after the sorption of gold, silver and related metals.

  5. Long-term leaching from MSWI air-pollution-control residues: Leaching characterization and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    Long-term leaching of Ca, Fe, Mg, K, Na, S, Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, Mo, Sb, Si, Sri, Sr, Ti, V, P, Cl, and dissolved organic carbon from two different municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) air-pollution-control residues was monitored during 24 months of column percolat......Long-term leaching of Ca, Fe, Mg, K, Na, S, Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, Mo, Sb, Si, Sri, Sr, Ti, V, P, Cl, and dissolved organic carbon from two different municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) air-pollution-control residues was monitored during 24 months of column...... percolation experiments; liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios of 200-250 L/kg corresponding to more than 10,000 years in a conventional landfill were reached. Less than 2% of the initially present As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, and Sb had leached during the Course of the experiments. Concentrations of Cd, Fe, Mg, Hg, Mn, Ni, Co......, Sn, Ti, and P were generally bellow 1 mu g/L; overall less than 1% of their mass leached. Column leaching data were further used in a two-step geochemical modeling in PHREEQC in order to (i) identify solubility controlling minerals and (ii) evaluate their interactions in a water-percolated column...

  6. Mechanical Activation-Assisted Reductive Leaching of Cadmium from Zinc Neutral Leaching Residue Using Sulfur Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Jianqiang; Wang, Mi

    2015-12-01

    In this work, zinc neutral leaching residue was mechanically activated by ball-milling. The subsequent leaching behavior and kinetics of cadmium extraction in a mixed SO2-H2SO4 system were studied. Changes in the crystalline phase, lattice distortion, particle size and morphology, which were induced by mechanical activation, were also investigated. The activated samples showed different physicochemical characteristics, and cadmium extraction was found to be easier than for the un-activated samples. Under the same conditions, mechanical activation contributed to higher cadmium leaching. The cadmium extraction kinetics at 75-95°C was found to fit the shrinking core model. The raw neutral leaching residue, and the samples activated for 60 min and 120 min had a calculated activation energy of 65.02 kJ/mol, 59.45 kJ/mol and 53.46 kJ/mol, respectively. The leaching residue was characterized by ICP, XRD and SEM analysis. According to XRD analysis, the main phases in the residue were lead sulfate (PbSO4), zinc sulfide (ZnS) and cadmium sulfide (CdS).

  7. PREDICTION OF PESTICIDE RISKS TO HUMAN HEALTH BY DRINKING WATER EXTRACTED FROM UNDERGROUND SOURCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, A; Vavrinevych, O; Omelchuk, S; Korshun, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our work was to develop the method of prediction of the risk of contamination of groundwater with different classes' fungicides in soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine and other European countries, as well as hygienic assessment of their impact on public health. The calculation and comparative evaluation of various indices of pesticides migration into groundwater were conducted. It was established that the most optimal and complete is an LEACN index according to which in soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine the risk of contamination of ground and surface water by all studied fungicides is low, except penconazole and tebuconazole for which there is medium contamination risk. We have developed a method of integrated assessment of the potential hazard of pesticide exposure on the human organism when it enters ground and surface waters, which are intensive used for drinking water supplying. Integral index of this method - IGCHI - is obtained by adding of scores assigned to main indicators characterizing the danger to humans in pesticides gets into the water: index of leaching (LEACН), half life period in water (DT50) and the allowable daily intake (ADI). According developed method all studied fungicides are low hazard for human, except benalaxy-M and tebuconazole which are hazard and highly hazard, respectively. It was established that, benalaxy-M is hazard when it leached into groundwater and surface water, tebuconazole is highly hazard, which is primarily due to their high stability in water (in both cases) and significant potential for leaching (in the latter case).

  8. Pesticides in drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Grmek-Košnik

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of pesticides deceives of indisputable advantage, however remainders of pesticides in drinking water might represent potential danger for health on foodstuffs. In European Union (EU pesticides and their relevant metabolic, degrading and reactive products, with exception for aldrin, dieldrin, heptaclor and heptaclor epoxide, should not exceed the concentration of 0.10 μg/l. At limit value 0.10 μg/l we wish to achieve null value these substances in drinking water.Methods: In years 2004 and 2005 monitoring of pesticides in drinking waters on pipes of consumers in all larger towns in state was done. Majority of pesticides were analysed by gas chromatography in combination with mass spectrometry while fluid cromatography was used primarily for badly volatile or polar and termolabile compound.Results: Results of analyses of drinking water and of ground waters for years 2004 and 2005 showed that levels of atrazine, desethyl-atrazine and 2.6 dichlorobenzamide were exceeded few times when compared to required levels. In 2005 bentazone, MCPP, metolachlor, terbuthylazin were exceeded. In 2004 concentration of pesticides were exceeded in 25 samples in 15 different areas, supplying 183,881 inhabitants. In 2005 concentration of pesticides were exceeded in 31 samples in 14 different areas, supplying 151,297 inhabitants. The distribution shows, that contamination was present mostly in the northeast part of Slovenia, where intensive agriculture takes place.Conclusions: Received status review acquired by monitoring of pesticides in drinking water is only an assessment of circumstances that will gain in representativity by enlarged number of sampling locations and longer observation time. For assessment of trends of pollution of drinking water in Slovenia it will be necessary to monitor concentration of pesticides through longer period. We could have unpolluted drinking water only with restricted use of pesticides on water-protection ranges or

  9. Assessment of Fate of Thiodicarb Pesticide in Sandy Clay Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bajeer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In present study the fate of thiodicarb pesticide in sandy clay loam soil was investigated through its adsorption and leaching using HPLC. Experimental results revealed that thiodicarb follows first order kinetic with rate constant value of 0.711 h-1 and equilibrium study showed that Freundlich model was best fitted with multilayer adsorption capacity 3.749 mol/g and adsorption intensity 1.009. Therefore, adsorption of thiodicarb was multilayer, reversible and non-ideal. Leaching study has indicated intermediate mobility of thiodicarb with water due to its solubility, while field study showed the non-leacher nature. However both adsorption and leaching were heavily affected by soil characteristics. As the soil taken was sandy clay loam hence due to clay texture adsorption was higher because of vacant sites existing and greater surface area. For this the pesticide has remained adsorbed in above 20 cm soil layer as clearly seen from field study, minor amount was recorded in third layer of soil having 21-30 cm depth. The leached amount of thiodicarb in first and last part of water was 1.075 and 0.003 ng/µl. The general trend observed for adsorption in column and field soil was decreased downwards from 2.027 to 0.618 and 5.079 to 0.009 ng/µl.

  10. Variation of MCPA, metribuzine, methyltriazine-amine and glyphosate degradation, sorption, mineralization and leaching in different soil horizons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Carsten S. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Department of Geochemistry, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Department of Natural Sciences, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C (Denmark)], E-mail: csj@geus.dk; Keur, Peter van der [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Department of Hydrology, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Iversen, Bo V. [University of Aarhus, Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Agroecology, Research Centre Foulum, DK-8830 Tjele (Denmark); Rosenberg, Per [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Department of Geochemistry, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Barlebo, Heidi C. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Department of Hydrology, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Torp, Soren [University of Aarhus, Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Agroecology, Research Centre Foulum, DK-8830 Tjele (Denmark); Vosgerau, Henrik [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Department of Quaternary Geology, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Juhler, Rene K.; Ernstsen, Vibeke; Rasmussen, Jim; Brinch, Ulla Catrine [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Department of Geochemistry, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Jacobsen, Ole Horbye [University of Aarhus, Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Agroecology, Research Centre Foulum, DK-8830 Tjele (Denmark)

    2008-12-15

    Pesticide mineralization and sorption were determined in 75 soil samples from 15 individually drilled holes through the vadose zone along a 28 km long transect of the Danish outwash plain. Mineralization of the phenoxyacetic acid herbicide MCPA was high both in topsoils and in most subsoils, while metribuzine and methyltriazine-amine was always low. Organic matter and soil pH was shown to be responsible for sorption of MCPA and metribuzine in the topsoils. The sorption of methyltriazine-amine in topsoil was positively correlated with clay and negatively correlated with the pH of the soil. Sorption of glyphosate was tested also high in the subsoils. One-dimensional MACRO modeling of the concentration of MCPA, metribuzine and methyltriazine-amine at 2 m depth calculated that the average concentration of MCPA and methyltriazine-amine in the groundwater was below the administrative limit of 0.1 {mu}g/l in all tested profiles while metribuzine always exceeded the 0.1 {mu}g/l threshold value. - Variation in pesticide sorption and degradation ability in 15 soil profiles are highly dependent on the pesticide but can often be described by pedo-transfer functions and used to differentiate pesticide leaching ability.

  11. Predicting honey bee sensitivity based on the conservation of the pesticide molecular initiating event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concern surrounding the potential adverse impacts of pesticides to honey bee colonies has led to the need for rapid/cost efficient methods for aiding decision making relative to the protection of this important pollinator species. Neonicotinoids represent a class of pesticides th...

  12. Human Health Benchmarks for Pesticides

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Advanced testing methods now allow pesticides to be detected in water at very low levels. These small amounts of pesticides detected in drinking water or source...

  13. Antimicrobial Pesticide Use Site Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Use Site Index provides guidance to assist applicants for antimicrobial pesticide registration by helping them identify the data requirements necessary to register a pesticide or support their product registrations.

  14. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousset, S; Thévenot, M; Schrack, D; Gouy, V; Carluer, N

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Testing of leachability and persistence of sixteen pesticides in three agricultural soils of a semiarid Mediterranean region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido, I.; Vela, N.; Fenoll, J.; Navarro, G.; Pérez-Lucas, G.; Navarro, S.

    2015-07-01

    Leaching, the movement of water and chemicals into deeper soil layers and groundwater is a subject of worldwide interest because a high percentage of drinking water is extracted from groundwater. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential leaching and persistence of sixteen pesticides (one fungicide, three nematicides/insecticides, and twelve herbicides) for three Mediterranean agricultural soils with similar texture (clay loam) but different organic matter content (1.2-3.1%). Adsorption was studied in batch experiments and leaching was tested using disturbed soil columns (40 cm length × 4 cm i.d.). Degradation studies were carried out during 120 days under laboratory conditions. Mobility experiments showed that pesticides can be grouped according to their potential leaching. Thus, pesticides showing medium leachability were included in group 1 (referred as G1) while those with high leachability were termed as G2. The differences observed in the leachability can be attributed to the different organic carbon (OC) content in the soils (0.7-1.8%). Values of log KOC were higher in the order: soil C > soil B > soil A, which agrees with the OC content in each soil. The calculated half-lives ranged from 4.2 days for carbofuran in soil A to 330 days for prometon in soil C. As a general rule, when higher OC content in the soil the greater persistence of the pesticide was observed as a consequence of the increased adsorption. The first order kinetics model satisfactorily explains the disappearance of the studied pesticides in the soil. (Author)

  16. Nutrient leaching losses in lowland forests converted to oil palm and rubber plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Syahrul; Corre, Marife D.; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-04-01

    In the last two decades, Sumatra, Indonesia is experiencing rapid expansion of oil palm and rubber plantations by conversion of rainforest. This is evident from the 2.9 thousand km2 decrease in forest area in this region over the last 15 years. Such rapid land-use change necessitates assessment of its environmental impacts. Our study was aimed to assess the impact of forest conversion to oil palm and rubber plantations on nutrient leaching losses. Land-use conversion increases nutrient leaching losses due to changes in vegetation litter input, rooting depth, nutrient cycling and management (e.g. fertilization) practices. Our study area was in Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia. We selected two soil landscapes in this region: loam and clay Acrisol soils. At each soil landscape, we investigated four land-use systems: lowland secondary rainforest, secondary forest with regenerating rubber (referred here as jungle rubber), rubber (7-17 years old) and oil palm plantations (9-16 years old). Each land use in each soil landscape was represented by four sites as replicates, totaling to 32 sites. We measured leaching losses using suction lysimeters installed at 1.5-m soil depth, which was well below the rooting depth, with bi-weekly to monthly sampling from February to December 2013. In general, the loam Acrisol landscape, particularly the forest and oil palm plantations, had lower soil solution pH and higher leaching fluxes of dissolved organic N, Na, Ca, Mg, total Al, total S and Cl than the clay Acrisol of the same land uses (all P ≤ 0.05). Among land uses in the loam Acrisol landscape, oil palm had lower soil solution pH and higher leaching fluxes of NH4+, NO3-, dissolved organic C, total P, total S and Cl than rubber plantation whereas forest and jungle rubber showed intermediate fluxes (all P ≤ 0.05, except P ≤ 0.09 for total P); oil palm had also higher Na, Ca, Mg and total Al leaching fluxes than all the other land uses (all P ≤ 0.05, except P ≤ 0.09 for Na

  17. In Case of Pesticide Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Consumers Contact Us Share In Case of Pesticide Emergency If someone has swallowed or inhaled a pesticide or gotten it in the eye or on ... for help with first aid information. The National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) (1-800-858-7378) also ...

  18. Pesticides: A Community Action Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumstead, Cynthia, Ed.; And Others

    Developed to provide an introduction to the issues surrounding the use of chemical pesticides, this booklet encourages individuals and communities to become active in determining the safe use and regulation of pesticides. The major components of the guide include: (1) an explanation of the issue; (2) pesticides and their effect on human health;…

  19. Quantitative of pesticide residue on the surface of navel orange by confocal microscopy Raman spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yande Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy in the quantitative analysis of pesticide (Chlorpyrifos, Omethoate residues on orange surface is investigated in this work. Quantitative analysis models were established by partial least squares (PLS using different preprocessing methods (Smoothing, First derivative, MSC, Baseline for pesticide residues. For pesticide residues, the higher correlation coefficients (r is 0.972 and 0.943, the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP is 2.05% and 2.36%, respectively. It is therefore clear that Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy techniques enable rapid, nondestructive and reliable measurements, so Raman spectrometry appears to be a promising tool for pesticide residues.

  20. Leaching of Uranium and Vanadium from Korean Domestic Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon Soo; Chung, Kyeong Woo; Lee, Hoo In; Lee, Jin-Young; Kumar, J. Rajesh

    Countries like Korea having very limited uranium resources and founded deposits having low grade metal values. Uranium is the main source to generate the nuclear power as cheap and more quantity of the electricity will generate. For this reasons the upcoming researchers in developed/developing countries are establishing more research and development on extraction and separation technologies for uranium. The present scientific study focused on leaching process of Korean domestic ore. The following experiments are carryout for optimization of the leaching process. Acid influence on leaching process was tested and noted that 2.0 M sulfuric acid concentration is the optimized conditions for present study. The time influence on leaching process was observed and its optimized 2 h for complete leaching process. The temperature influence tested and optimized the 80°C for complete leaching process and pulp density is 50% (wt %).

  1. Chalcopyrite concentrate leaching with biologically produced ferric sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, P H-M; Heimala, S; Riekkola-Vanhanen, M-L; Puhakka, J A

    2006-09-01

    Biological ferric iron production was combined with ferric sulphate leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate and the effects of pH, Fe3+, temperature and solids concentration on the leaching were studied. The copper leaching rates were similar at pH of 1.0-1.8 and in the presence of 7-90 g L-1 Fe3+ despite massive iron precipitation with 90 g L-1 Fe3+. Increase of the leaching temperature from 50 degrees C to 86 degrees C and solids concentration from 1% to 10% increased the copper leaching rate. Increase in solids concentration from 1% to 10% decreased the copper yields from 80% to 40%. Stepwise addition of ferric iron did not improve the copper yields. CuFeS2, Ag and Cu1.96S potentials indicated the formation of a passivating layer, which consisted of jarosite and sulphur precipitates and which was responsible for the decreased leaching rates.

  2. Studies on Leaching of Oxidized Copper Ore from South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Deqing; Wu, Tengjiao; Guo, Zhenqi; Pan, Jian; Li, Ziyun

    A leaching study was conducted on South America oxidized copper ore assaying 3.10% Cu, and the process parameters were optimized, including leaching temperature, leaching time, acid consumption, liquid-solid ratio and stirring rate. The results show that copper leaching rate of 92.02% were achieved under the optimized conditions as follows: raw ore crushed to 100% passing 1mm, leaching by sulfuric acid at 70°C for 1.5h with a sulfuric acid consumption of 150kg/t, liquid-solid ratio of 2:1, stirring rate of 300r/min. The leaching solution is a good feed for the subsequent extraction-electrowinning processes due to its high copper concentration and low contents of impurities like calcium and iron ions.

  3. Impact of weather variability on nitrate leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Karl; Premrov, Alina; Hackett, Richard; Coxon, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The loss of nitrate (NO3 - N) to water via leaching and overland flow contributes to eutrophication of freshwaters, transitional and near coastal waters with agriculture contributing significantly to nitrogen (N) loading to these water. Environmental regulations, such as the Nitrates and Water Framework Directives, have increased constraints on farmers to improve N management in regions at risk of NO3--N loss to water. In addition, farmers also have to manage their systems within a changing climate as the imapcts of climate change begin to impact resulting in more frequent extreme events such as floods and droughts. The objective of this study was to investigate the link between weather volatility and the concentration of leached NO3--N spring barley. Leaching was quantified under spring barley grown on a well-drained, gravelly sandy soil using ceramic cup samplers over 6 drainage years under the same farming practices and treatments. Soil solution NO3--N concentrations under spring barley grown by conventional inversion ploughing and reduced tillage were compared to weather parameters over the period. Weather was recorded at a national Met Eireann weather station on site. Soil solution NO3--N varied significantly between years. Within individual years NO3--N concentrations varied over the drainage season, with peak concentrations generally observed in the autumn time, decreasing thereafter. Under both treatments there was a three-fold difference in mean annual soil solution NO3--N concentration over the 6 years with no change in the agronomic practices (crop type, tillage type and fertiliser input). Soil solution nitrate concentrations were significantly influenced by weather parameters such as rainfall, effective drainage and soil moisture deficit. The impact of climate change in Ireland could lead to increased NO3--N loss to water further exacerbating eutrophication of sensitive estuaries. The increased impact on eutrophication of waters, related to climatic

  4. Leaching of radioactive isotopes from ash

    OpenAIRE

    Aycik, G.A.; Paul, M.; Sandström, Åke; Paul, Jan

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study is to reduce the environmental impact of ash deposits. Ash from coal and biomass combustion, containing uranium and thorium from Yatagan-Silopi and Tuncbilek coal; cesium-137 from forests in northeastern Turkey and central Sweden. Turkey is dependent on coal for power generation and huge volumes of ash (>15 Mton/yr) are produced every year. Because of that certain coals, in particular Yatagan, with known problems from Mo and U leaching to the ground water, and Silopi o...

  5. A mathematical model for isothermal heap and column leaching

    OpenAIRE

    Lima L.R.P. de Andrade

    2004-01-01

    Leaching occurs in metals recovery, in contaminated soil washing, and in many natural processes, such as fertilizer dissolution and rock weathering. This paper presents a model developed to simulate the transient evolution of the dissolved chemical species in the heap and column isothermal leaching processes. In this model, the solid bed is numerically divided into plane layers; the recovery of the chemical species, the enrichment of the pregnant leach solution, and the residual concentration...

  6. Leaching studies for metals recovery from waste printed wiring boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyima, Alex; Shi, Honglan; Zhang, Lifeng

    2011-08-01

    The leaching behavior of most metals present in printed wiring boards is evaluated, aiming at its recycling by hydrometallurgy. Two leaching reagents (nitric acid and aqua regia) are compared. The effects of acid concentration, particle size of sample, leaching time, and temperature are examined. The results reveal that small particle size and a combination of both nitric acid and aqua regia are capable of dissolving most of the metals content of printed wiring boards.

  7. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lanigan, David C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    This revision to the original report adds two longer term leach sets of data to the report and provides more discussion and graphics on how to interpret the results from long-term laboratory leach tests. The leach tests were performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams.

  8. Reduced leaching of the herbicide MCPA after bioaugmentation with a formulated and stored Sphingobium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önneby, Karin; Håkansson, Sebastian; Pizzul, Leticia; Stenström, John

    2014-04-01

    The use of pesticides on sandy soils and on many non-agricultural areas entails a potentially high risk of water contamination. This study examined leaching of the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) after bioaugmentation in sand with differently formulated and stored Sphingobium sp. T51 and at different soil moisture contents. Dry formulations of Sphingobium sp. T51 were achieved by either freeze drying or fluidised bed drying, with high initial cell viability of 67-85 %. Storage stability of T51 cells was related to formulation excipient/carrier and storage conditions. Bacterial viability in the fluidised bed-dried formulations stored at 25 °C under non-vacuum conditions was poor, with losses of at least 97 % within a month. The freeze-dried formulations could be stored substantially longer, with cell survival rates of 50 %, after 6 months of storage at the same temperature under partial vacuum. Formulated and long-term stored Sphingobium cells maintained their MCPA degradation efficacy and reduced MCPA leaching as efficiently as freshly cultivated cells, by at least 73 % when equal amounts of viable cells were used. The importance of soil moisture for practical field bioaugmentation techniques is discussed.

  9. Control of pesticides 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krongaard, T.; Petersen, K. K.; Christoffersen, C.

    Four different groups of products covered by the pesticide regulation were included in the 2003 analytical chemical authority control: 1) Herbicides containing clodinafop- propargyl, clomazone, fluroxypyr and glyphosate. 2) Fungicides containing bitertanol, fuberidazole, fenhexamid and pencycuron...... containing methoprene complied with the accepted tolerance limits with respect to the content of the active ingredient as specified in Danish Statutory Order on pesticides. None of the 44 examined samples contained OPEO, but 5 of the samples contained NPEO. Three of these five samples were produced before...

  10. Selenite adsorption using leached residues generated by reduction roasting-ammonia leaching of manganese nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, N S; Das, N N; Jana, R K

    2012-11-30

    This study was carried out to investigate the adsorption characteristics of leached manganese nodule residue (MNR), generated from the reduction roasting-ammonia leaching process, towards aqueous selenite. Physicochemical characterization revealed that the leached residue was a complex mixture of oxides of mainly manganese and iron along with MnCO(3). Adsorption studies of the water washed leached residue (wMNR) at varying the pH, selenite ion concentration, wMNR dosage, heat treatment condition indicated that selenite uptake increased with increasing pH and heat-treatment temperature of wMNR. The maximum value of selenite uptake was obtained at pH ~5.0 with wMNR heat-treated at 400°C and thereafter decreased on increasing the pH and heat-treatment temperature further. The adsorption data were best fitted by the Freundlich isotherm model. The derived monolayer selenite adsorption capacities increased from, X(m)=9.50 mg Se/g (for untreated wMNR) to 15.08 mg Se/g (for wMNR heat-treated at 400°C). The results of the studies may be useful for possible utilization of MNR as an adsorbent for the removal of selenite ions from contaminated water bodies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mineralogy and uranium leaching of ores from Triassic Peribaltic sandstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Dorota; Kiegiel, Katarzyna; Zakrzewska-Koltuniewicz, Grazyna; Chajduk, Ewelina; Bartosiewicz, Iwona; Wolkowicz, Stanislaw

    The recovery of uranium and other valuable metals from Polish Peribaltic sandstones were examined. The solid-liquid extraction is the first stage of the technology of uranium production and it is crucial for the next stages of processing. In the laboratory experiments uranium was leached with efficiencies 71-100 % by acidic lixiviants. Satisfactory results were obtained for the alkaline leaching process. Almost 100 % of uranium was leached with alkaline carbonate solution. In post leaching solutions only uranium and small amounts of vanadium were present.

  12. Cadmium leaching from thermal treated and gamma irradiated Mexican aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila-Rangel, J.I. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico 11801, D.F. (Mexico); Unidad Academica Centro Regional de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas Cipres 10, Frac. La Penuela, Zacatecas, Zacatecas 98068 (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100 Col. Centro C.P. 50000, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Solache-Rios, M. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico 11801, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: msr@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-10-15

    Thermal and radiation effects on the leaching of cadmium from two cadmium exchanged zeolitic tuffs and one clay were determined. The cadmium exchanged aluminosilicates were heated at different temperatures (500, 700, 900 and 1100 {sup o}C), and the materials were then treated with NaCl (1 M and 5 M) and HNO{sub 3} (0.001 M and 1 M) solutions to determine the leaching behaviour of cadmium from the materials. The stability of cadmium in the materials increased as the heating temperature was increased. Cadmium leaching from gamma irradiated and heated materials at 1100 {sup o}C was higher than leaching from non-irradiated samples.

  13. Application of Anova on Fly Ash Leaching Kinetics for Value Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Ranjita; Mohapatro, Rudra Narayana; Bhima Rao, Raghupatruni

    2016-04-01

    Fly ash is a major problem in power plant sectors as it is dumped at the plant site. Fly ash generation increases day to day due to rapid growth of steel industries. Ceramic/refractory industries are growing rapidly because of more number of steel industries. The natural resources of the ceramic/refractory raw materials are depleting with time due to its consumption. In view of this, fly ash from thermal power plant has been identified for use in the ceramic/refractory industries after suitable beneficiation. In this paper, sample was collected from the ash pond of Vedanta. Particle size (d80 passing size) of the sample is around 150 micron. The chemical analysis of the sample shows that 3.9 % of Fe2O3 and CaO is more than 10 %. XRD patterns show that the fly ash samples consist predominantly of the crystalline phases of quartz, hematite and magnetite in a matrix of aluminosilicate glass. Leaching of iron oxide is 98.3 % at 3 M HCl concentration at 90 °C for 270 min of leaching time. Kinetic study on leaching experiment was carried out. ANOVA software is utilized for curve fitting and the process is optimized using MATLAB 7.1. The detailed study of properties for ceramic material is compared with the standard ceramic materials. The product contains 0.3 % of iron. The other properties of the product have established the fact that the product obtained can be a raw material for ceramic industries.

  14. Reduction of the movement and persistence of pesticides in soil through common agronomic practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoll, José; Ruiz, Encarnación; Flores, Pilar; Hellín, Pilar; Navarro, Simón

    2011-11-01

    Laboratory and field studies were conducted in order to determine the leaching potential of eight pesticides commonly used during pepper cultivation by use of disturbed soil columns and field lysimeters, respectively. Two soils with different organic matter content (soils A and B) were used. Additionally, soil B was amended with compost (sheep manure). The tested compounds were cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos-methyl, bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, cyfluthrin, endosulfan, malathion and tolclofos-methyl. In soil B (lower organic matter content), only endosulfan sulphate, malathion and tolclofos-methyl were found in leachates. For the soil A (higher organic matter content) and amended soil B, pesticide residues were not found in the leachates. In addition, this paper reports on the use of common agronomic practices (solarization and biosolarization) to enhance degradation of these pesticides from polluted soil A. The results showed that both solarization and biosolarization enhanced the degradation rates of endosulfan, bifenthrin and tolclofos-methyl compared with the control. Most of the studied pesticides showed similar behavior under solarization and biosolarization conditions. However, chlorpyrifos was degraded to a greater extent in the solarization than in biosolarization treatment. The results obtained point to the interest in the use of organic amendment in reducing the pollution of groundwater by pesticide drainage and in the use of solarization and biosolarization in reducing the persistence of pesticides in soil. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Porosity and Permeability of Round Top Mountain Rhyolite (Texas, USA Favor Coarse Crush Size for Rare Earth Element Heap Leach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Negron

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Water-saturation porosity and dye-penetration permeability measurements of Round Top Mountain rhyolite confirm that a ½-inch (13-mm crush size would permit efficient acid heap leaching of yttrium and heavy rare earth elements (YHREEs hosted in yttrofluorite, a YHREE-substituted variety of fluorite. Laboratory acid leaching has extracted up to 90% of the YHREEs. The bulk insoluble gangue mineralogy of the rhyolite, 90% to 95% quartz and feldspars, assures low acid consumption. Different crush sizes were weighed, soaked in water, and reweighed over time to determine water-penetration estimated porosity. Typical porosities were 1% to 2% for gray and 3% to 8% for pink varieties of Round Top rhyolite. The same samples were re-tested after soaking in dilute sulfuric to simulate heap leaching effects. Post-leach porosity favorably increased 15% in pink and 50% in gray varieties, due to internal mineral dissolution. Next, drops of water-based writing ink were placed on rhyolite slabs up to ~10 mm thick, and monitored over time for visual dye breakthrough to the lower side. Ink penetration through 0.5 to 2.5-mm-thick slabs was rapid, with breakthrough in minutes to a few hours. Pink rhyolite breakthrough was faster than gray. Thicker slabs, 4 to 10 mm, took hours to three days for breakthrough. Porosity and permeability of the Round Top rhyolite and acid solubility of the yttrofluorite host should permit liberation of YHREEs from the bulk rock by inexpensive heap leaching at a coarse and inexpensive nominal ½-inch (13-mm crush size. The rate-limiting step in heap leach extraction would be diffusion of acid into, and back-diffusion of dissolution products out of, the crushed particles. The exceptional porosity and permeability that we document at Round Top suggest that there may be other crystalline rock deposits that economically can be exploited by a coarse-crush bulk heap leach approach.

  16. Water Quality and Evaluation of Pesticides in Lakes in the Ridge Citrus Region of Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquette, Anne F.; Kroening, Sharon E.

    2009-01-01

    Water chemistry, including major inorganic constituents, nutrients, and pesticide compounds, was compared between seven lakes surrounded by citrus agriculture and an undeveloped lake on the Lake Wales Ridge (herein referred to as the Ridge) in central Florida. The region has been recognized for its vulnerability to the leaching of agricultural chemicals into the subsurface due to factors including soils, climate, and land use. About 40 percent of Florida's citrus cultivation occurs in 'ridge citrus' areas characterized by sandy well drained soils, with the remainder in 'flatwoods citrus' characterized by high water tables and poorly drained soils. The lakes on the Ridge are typically flow-through lakes that exchange water with adjacent and underlying aquifer systems. This study is the first to evaluate the occurrence of pesticides in lakes on the Ridge, and also represents one of the first monitoring efforts nationally to focus on regional-scale assessment of current-use pesticides in small- to moderate-sized lakes (5 to 393 acres). The samples were collected between December 2003 and September 2005. The lakes in citrus areas contained elevated concentrations of major inorganic constituents (including alkalinity, total dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate), total nitrogen, pH, and pesticides compared to the undeveloped lake. Nitrate (as N) and total nitrogen concentrations were typically elevated in the citrus lakes, with maximum values of 4.70 and 5.19 mg/L (milligrams per liter), respectively. Elevated concentrations of potassium, nitrate, and other inorganic constituents in the citrus lakes likely reflect inputs from the surficial ground-water system that originated predominantly from agricultural fertilizers, soil amendments, and inorganic pesticides. A total of 20 pesticide compounds were detected in the lakes, of which 12 compounds exceeded the standardized reporting level of 0.06 ug/L (microgram per liter). Those

  17. levels of pesticide residues and metabolites in soil at vikuge farm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E-flask that contained oven pre-dried anhydrous sodium sulphate ..... humidity and solar radiation on the rapid dissipation of HCH .... explain its being found in a single surface soil sample. ... Pesticides Project of the Faculty of Science,. UDSM.

  18. A Simulator for Copper Ore Leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, B.

    1999-05-14

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Copper is a strategic metal and the nation needs a secure supply both for industrial use and military needs. However, demand is growing worldwide and is outstripping the ability of the mining industry to keep up. Improved recovery methods are critically needed to maintain the balance of supply and demand. The goal of any process design should be to increase the amount of copper recovered, control movement of acid and other environmentally harmful chemicals, and reduce energy requirements. To achieve these ends, several improvements in current technology are required, the most important of which is a better understanding of, and the ability to quantify, how fluids move through heterogeneous materials in a complex chemical environment. The goal of this project is create a new modeling capability that couples hydrology with copper leaching chemistry . once the model has been verified and validated, we can apply the model to specific problems associated with heap leaching (flow channeling due to non-uniformities in heap structure, precipitation/dissolution reactions, and bacterial action), to understand the causes of inefficiencies, and to design better recovery systems. We also intend to work with representatives of the copper mining industry to write a coordinated plan for further model development and application that will provide economic benefits to the industry and the nation.

  19. YACON INULIN LEACHING DURING HOT WATER BLANCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Fenner Scher

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTYacon roots contain inulin, which has prebiotic properties and it may be used as sucrose or fat substitutes. However, inulin is very soluble in water. The loss of this important nutrient during blanching is caused mainly by diffusion or leaching, which might be diminished if blanching temperature - time conditions are correctly employed. The aim of this study was to determine the leaching of the sugars inulin, glucose and fructose, present in yacon roots, during hot water blanching under different time/temperature conditions. The samples were cleaned and peeled and cut into geometric forms of 1.75 ± 0.35 mm thick disks. A complete factorial experimental design was used, and the treatments of the samples were compared using the Tukey test. The results indicated that the time and temperature were significant in the dissolution of the sugars. The lowest inulin losses occurred at temperatures and times lower than 60 ºC and 3 minutes. For all temperatures, the lowest glucose and fructose losses were obtained at time lower than 3 and 5 minutes, respectively.

  20. Modeling water infiltration and pesticides transport in unsaturated zone of a sedimentary aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoli, Pauline; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Baran, Nicole; Lassabatère, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater quality monitoring has become an important environmental, economic and community issue since increasing needs drinking water at the same time with high anthropic pressure on aquifers. Leaching of various contaminants as pesticide into the groundwater is closely bound to water infiltration in the unsaturated zone which whom solute transport can occur. Knowledge's about mechanisms involved in the transfer of pesticides in the deep unsaturated zone are lacking today. This study aims to evaluate and to model leaching of pesticides and metabolites in the unsaturated zone, very heterogeneous, of a fluvio-glacial aquifer, in the South-East of France, where contamination of groundwater resources by pesticides is frequently observed as a consequence of intensive agricultural activities. Water flow and pesticide transport were evaluated from column tests under unsaturated conditions and from adsorption batch experiments onto the predominant lithofacies collected, composed of a mixture of sand and gravel. A maize herbicide, S-metolachlor, applied on the study site and worldwide and its two major degradation products (metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid and metolachlor oxanilic acid) were studied here. A conservative tracer, bromide ion, was used to determine water dispersive parameters of porous media. Elution curves were obtained from pesticide concentrations analyzed by an ultra-performance liquid chromatography system interfaced to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and from bromide concentrations measured by ionic chromatography system. Experimental data were implemented into Hydrus to model flow and solute transfer through a 1D profile in the vadose zone. Nonequilibrium solute transport model based on dual-porosity model with mobile and immobile water is fitting correctly elution curves. Water dispersive parameters show flow pattern realized in the mobile phase. Exchanges between mobile and immobile water are very limited. Because of low adsorptions onto

  1. Epigenetics and pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collotta, M; Bertazzi, P A; Bollati, V

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides, a wide class of environmental contaminants, may cause both acute and delayed health effects in exposed subjects. These effects can range from simple irritation of the skin and eyes to more severe effects such as affecting the nervous system, the reproductive system and cancer. The molecular mechanisms underlying such effects are still under investigation. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression that occur without a change in the DNA sequence. Several epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNA expression, can be triggered by environmental factors. We review current evidences indicating that epigenetic modifications may mediate pesticide effects on human health. In vitro, animal, and human investigations have identified several classes of pesticides that modify epigenetic marks, including endocrine disruptors, persistent organic pollutants, arsenic, several herbicides and insecticides. Several investigations have examined the effects of environmental exposures and epigenetic markers, and identified toxicants that modify epigenetic states. These modifications are similar to the ones found in pathological tissue samples. In spite of the current limitations, available evidence supports the concept that epigenetics holds substantial potential for furthering our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of pesticides health effects, as well as for predicting health-related risks due to conditions of environmental exposure and individual susceptibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pesticide emissions from greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink BJWG; SEC

    2004-01-01

    There are very few measurements of aerial pesticide concentrations nearby greenhouses, useful for human risk assessments. Therefore, RIVM has improved a computer module in USES, an integral risk-decision system for authorities, for assessing the acute environmental exposure. The exposure of nearby

  3. Monitoring for Pesticides in Groundwater and Surface Water in Nevada, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thodal, Carl E.; Carpenter, Jon; Moses, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    Commercial pesticide applicators, farmers, and homeowners apply about 1 billion pounds of pesticides annually to agricultural land, non-crop land, and urban areas throughout the United States (Gilliom and others, 2006, p. 1). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) defines a pesticide as any substance used to kill or control insects, weeds, plant diseases, and other pest organisms. Although there are important benefits from the proper use of pesticides, like crop protection and prevention of human disease outbreaks, there are also risks. One risk is the contamination of groundwater and surface-water resources. Data collected during 1992-2001 from 51 major hydrologic systems across the United States indicate that one or more pesticide or pesticide breakdown product was detected in more than 50 percent of 5,057 shallow (less than 20 feet below land surface) wells and in all of the 186 stream sites that were sampled in agricultural and urban areas (Gilliom and others, 2006, p. 2-4). Pesticides can contaminate surface water and groundwater from both point sources and non-point sources. Point sources are from specific locations such as spill sites, disposal sites, pesticide drift during application, and application of pesticides to control aquatic pests. Non-point sources represent the dominant source of surface water and groundwater contamination and may include agricultural and urban runoff, erosion, leaching from application sites, and precipitation that has become contaminated by upwind applications. Pesticides typically enter surface water when rainfall or irrigation exceeds the infiltration capacity of soil and resulting runoff then transports pesticides to streams, rivers, and other surface-water bodies. Contamination of groundwater may result directly from spills near poorly sealed well heads and from pesticide applications through improperly designed or malfunctioning irrigation systems that also are used to apply pesticides (chemigation; Carpenter and

  4. Dissipation and leaching of acephate, chlorpyrifos, and their main metabolites in field soils of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, L K; Mohd-Tahir, N; Hansen, S; Hansen, H C B

    2009-01-01

    Preventive treatment with insecticides at high dosing rates before planting of a new crop- soil drenching- is a common practice in some tropical intensive cropping systems, which may increase the risk of leaching, soil functioning, and pesticide uptake in the next crop. The degradation rates and migration of acephate and chlorpyrifos and their primary metabolites, methamidophos and 3,5,6-trichloropyridinol (TCP), have been studied in clayey red yellow podzolic (Typic Paleudults), alluvial (Typic Udorthents), and red yellow podzolic soils (Typic Kandiudults) of Malaysia under field conditions. The initial concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in topsoils were found to strongly depend on solar radiation. Both pesticides and their metabolites were detected in subsoils at the deepest sampling depth monitored (50 cm) and with maximum concentrations up to 2.3 mg kg(-1) at soil depths of 10 to 20 cm. Extraordinary high dissipation rates for weakly sorbed acephate was in part attributed to preferential flow which was activated due to the high moisture content of the soils, high precipitation and the presence of conducting macropores running from below the A horizons to at least 1 m, as seen from a dye tracer experiment. Transport of chlorpyrifos and TCP which both sorb strongly to soil organic matter was attributed to macropore transport with soil particles. The half-lives for acephate in topsoils were 0.4 to 2.6 d while substantially longer half-lives of between 12.6 and 19.8 d were observed for chlorpyrifos. The transport through preferential flow of strongly sorbed pesticides is of concern in the tropics.

  5. Assessment of Leaching of some Heavy Metals from Domestic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to assess the possible leaching of heavy metals from ceramic wares into different solutions. Ceramic spoon, pot, soup bowl, plate, mug and cup were leached in batch process using hot water and 4 % solutions of glacial acetic acid, HCl acid, NaOH and Na2CO3 respectively. Chromium, manganese ...

  6. Feasiblity of collecting naturally leached rice straw for thermal conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.R.; Jenkins, B.M.

    2003-01-01

    The practical application of field or natural leaching to rice straw was evaluated with the goal of improving biomass fuel value. Observations on three rice farms in the Sacramento Valley, California indicated that potassium, chlorine and total ash are leached from rice straw by rainfall regardless

  7. Quantitative leaching of galena | Olanipekun | Bulletin of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-09-25

    Abstract. (Received September 25, 1999; revised January 19, 2000) Experiments on the quantitative leaching of lead from galena in hydrochloric acid solutions are reported. The effects of contact time, acid concentration, number of leaching stages, solid to liquid ratio, particle size, temperature, and stirring speed, on the ...

  8. PLEASE: a simple model to determine P losses by leaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoumans, O.F.; Salm, van der C.; Groenendijk, P.

    2013-01-01

    Non-point phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural land to streams is caused mainly by overland flow and leaching. In many countries P-index methods are used to identify areas at risk of P loss to streams. In flat areas with shallow groundwater levels, where losses by leaching are important, these

  9. Water flow and nitrate leaching in a layered silt loam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.A.; Hesterberg, D.L.R.; Raats, P.A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching was studied for a winter leaching period in a layered calcareous silt loam with tile-drains at about 1-m depth and 12-m spacing. Groundwater levels, drain discharge rates, and NO3 concentrations in the drainage water were monitored, and the soil hydraulic characteristics were

  10. Siltation of Ore Particles in Leaching Tanks: Causative Factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2016-12-02

    Dec 2, 2016 ... Comminution is the progressive reduction in the size of an ore to a suitable size range to liberate the mineral of interest from the worthless gangue material or shorten the travel distance of reagents during leaching. In a typical gold extraction plant where agitation leaching is employed, comminution may be ...

  11. Aluminium leaching from utensils--a kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K S; Rao, G V

    1995-02-01

    Aluminium leaching from low quality (Al-Pb alloy) and high quality (Al-Mn alloy) utensils by water has been studied under different conditions of pH, boiling time and NaF concentrations. High fluoride concentration and low pH were found to enhance the leaching of Al more from low quality utensils than from high quality utensils.

  12. Leaching of Added Selenium in Soils Low in Native Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel; Hamdy, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    A soil column experiment was performed to evaluate the influence of organic matter and lime on the leaching and distribution of added selenite. 75Se-labeled Na2SeO3 was added to water-saturated soil columns with a diameter of 4.25 cm and a length of 16-20 cm. Leaching started immediately, one l w...

  13. Oxidative leaching of chromium from layered double hydroxides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The layered double hydroxide (LDH) of Zn with Cr on treatment with a hypochlorite solution releases chromate ions as a result of oxidative leaching by a dissolution–reprecipitation mechanism. The residue is found to be -Zn(OH)2. The LDH of Mg with Cr on the other hand is resistant to oxidative leaching. In contrast, a ...

  14. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARRINGTON SJ

    2011-01-06

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  15. Microbiological leaching of a chalcopyrite concentrate by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, H; Silver, M

    1976-08-01

    The microbiological leaching of a chalcopyrite concentrate has been investigated using a pure strain of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The optimum leaching conditions regarding pH, temperature, and pulp density were found to be 2.3, 35 degrees C, and 22% respectively. The energy of activation was calculated to be 16.7 kcal/mol. During these experiments the maximum rate of copper dissolution was about 215 mg/liters/hr and the final copper concentration was as high as 55 g/liter. This latter value is in the range of copper concentrations which may be used for direct electrorecovery of copper. Jarosite formation was observed during the leaching of the chalcopyrite concentrate. When the leach residue was reground to expose new substrate surface, subsequent leaching resulted in copper extractions up to about 80%. On the basis of this experimental work, a flow sheet has been proposed for commercial scale biohydrometallurgical treatment of high-grade chalcopyrite materials.

  16. Modeling the Factors Impacting Pesticide Concentrations in Groundwater Wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisopou, Angeliki; Binning, Philip J; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Bjerg, Poul L

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effect of pumping, hydrogeology, and pesticide characteristics on pesticide concentrations in production wells using a reactive transport model in two conceptual hydrogeologic systems; a layered aquifer with and without a stream present. The pumping rate can significantly affect the pesticide breakthrough time and maximum concentration at the well. The effect of the pumping rate on the pesticide concentration depends on the hydrogeology of the aquifer; in a layered aquifer, a high pumping rate resulted in a considerably different breakthrough than a low pumping rate, while in an aquifer with a stream the effect of the pumping rate was insignificant. Pesticide application history and properties have also a great impact on the effect of the pumping rate on the concentration at the well. The findings of the study show that variable pumping rates can generate temporal variability in the concentration at the well, which helps understanding the results of groundwater monitoring programs. The results are used to provide guidance on the design of pumping and regulatory changes for the long-term supply of safe groundwater. The fate of selected pesticides is examined, for example, if the application of bentazone in a region with a layered aquifer stops today, the concentration at the well can continue to increase for 20 years if a low pumping rate is applied. This study concludes that because of the rapid response of the pesticide concentration at the drinking water well due to changes in pumping, wellhead management is important for managing pesticide concentrations. © 2014, National GroundWater Association.

  17. A column leaching test for inorganic contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopp, L.; Buczko, U. [Dept. of Hydrology, Univ. of Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany); Durner, W. [Inst. of Geoecology, Technical Univ. of Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Peiffer, S. [Dept. of Hydrogeology, RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The knowledge of soluble and mobilisable substances in the deep percolating water is the basis for the assessment of the risk of groundwater contamination by a contaminated soil. In accordance with the current version of the German Soil Protection Regulation (July 1999, Paragraph 2) this evaluation is specified as an estimation of pollutant entries that derive from contaminated sites. It consists therefore of an emission estimation and a transport prognosis through the vadose zone. All investigation procedures used so far for judging contaminated sites consider neither the influence of the heterogeneous structure of the flow zone in the soil which can lead to preferential flow nor the effect of speciation on mobility of heavy metals. In addition to that, most leaching tests are carried out under conditions which correspond little to the local natural conditions in the field (e.g. water/solid phase relation or chemical environment). (orig.)

  18. SULPHUR DIOXIDE LEACHING OF URANIUM CONTAINING MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunaes, A.; Rabbits, F.T.; Hester, K.D.; Smith, H.W.

    1958-12-01

    A process is described for extracting uranlum from uranium containing material, such as a low grade pitchblende ore, or mill taillngs, where at least part of the uraniunn is in the +4 oxidation state. After comminuting and magnetically removing any entrained lron particles the general material is made up as an aqueous slurry containing added ferric and manganese salts and treated with sulfur dioxide and aeration to an extent sufficient to form a proportion of oxysulfur acids to give a pH of about 1 to 2 but insufficient to cause excessive removal of the sulfur dioxide gas. After separating from the solids, the leach solution is adjusted to a pH of about 1.25, then treated with metallic iron in the presence of a precipitant such as a soluble phosphate, arsonate, or fluoride.

  19. Predicting and measuring environmental concentration of pesticides in air after soil application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Federico; Trevisan, Marco; Capri, Ettore

    2003-01-01

    Pesticides can volatilize into the atmosphere, which affects the air quality. The ability to predict pesticide volatilization is an essential tool for human risk and environmental assessment. Even though there are several mathematical models to assess and predict the fate of pesticides in different compartments of the environment, there is no reliable model to predict volatilization. The objectives of this study were to evaluate pesticide volatilization under agricultural conditions using malathion [ O,O-dimethyl-S-(1,2-dicarbethoxyethyl)-dithiophosphate], ethoprophos (O-ethyl S,S-dipropylphosphorodithioate), and procymidone [N-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-1,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1,2-dicarboximide] as test compounds and to evaluate the ability of the Pesticide Leaching Model (PELMO) to calculate the predicted environmental concentrations of pesticides in air under field conditions. The volatilization rate of procymidone, malathion, and ethoprophos was determined in a field study during two different periods (December 1998 and September 1999) using the Theoretical Profile Shape (TPS) method. The experiments were performed on bare silty soil in the Bologna province, Italy. Residues in the air were continuously monitored for 2 to 3 wk after the pesticide applications. The amount of pesticide volatilized was 16, 5, and 11% in December 1998 and 41, 23, and 19% in September 1999 for procymidone, malathion, and ethoprophos, respectively. In both these experiments, the PELMO simulations of the concentration of ethoprophos and procymidone were in good agreement with the measured data (factor +/- 1.1 on average). The volatilization of malathion was underestimated by a factor of 30 on average. These results suggest that volatilization described by PELMO may be reliable for volatile substances, but PELMO may underpredict volatilization for less-volatile substances.

  20. Sorption characteristics of pesticides on matrix substrates used in biopurification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wilde, Tineke; Spanoghe, Pieter; Ryckeboer, Jaak; Jaeken, Peter; Springael, Dirk

    2009-03-01

    pesticides, such as bentazon, should be taken with care as these will easily leach through the system. Additional chemical treatment might be necessary for these type of pesticides.

  1. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: The importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Butera, Stefania; Kosson, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    , due to the potential leaching of toxic substances. In waste LCA studies where residue utilisation is included, leaching has generally been neglected. In this study, municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI BA) was used as a case study into three LCA scenarios having different system...... boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic......Residues from industrial processes and waste management systems (WMSs) have been increasingly reutilised, leading to landfilling rate reductions and the optimisation of mineral resource utilisation in society. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic methodology allowing for the analysis...

  2. Risks assessment of water pollution by pesticides at local scale (PESTEAUX project): study of polluting pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Stéphanie; Billo Bah, Boubacar

    2009-01-01

    Pollution of water resources (surface waters and ground waters) by pesticide uses is one of the key point of the European policy with the implementation of the Water Frame Work Directive (2000/60/EC) and the thematic Strategy on the Sustainable use of pesticides. According to this legislation, the Member States must initiate measures to limit environmental and toxicological effects caused by pesticide uses. The Agricultural Research Centre of Wallonia (CRA-W) emphasized the need of a tool for spatial risk analysis and develOPs it within the framework of PESTEAUX project. The originality of the approach proposed by the CRA-W is to generate maps to identify the risk of pollution at locale scale (agricultural parcel). The risk will be assessed according to the study of different factors, grouped under 3 data's layers: polluting pressure, vulnerability of the physical environment (soil) and meteorological data. This approach is directly based on the risk's definition which takes into account the polluting pressure, linked to the human activities, and the vulnerability of the soil, defined by factors of physical environment which characterize the water flow in the parcel. Moreover, meteorological data influence the intensity and likelihood flow of water, and indirectly pesticide by leaching or runoff. The PESTEAUX's approach to study the pollution is based on the model "source-vector-target". The source is the polluting pressure, in other words, the pesticides which could reach the targets. The main vector is the water which vehicles the pesticide on and trough the soil until the target which are the surface waters or ground waters. In this paper we introduce the factors contributing to the polluting pressure. These factors are linking to the human activities and more precisely, to the pesticide uses. The factors considered have an influence on pesticide's transport by water (in its solid state or in dissolved state by leaching, run-off, or erosion) but also on a set of

  3. A single method for detecting 11 organophosphate pesticides in human plasma and breastmilk using GC-FPD

    OpenAIRE

    Naksen, Warangkana; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Mangklabruks, Ampica; Chantara, Somporn; Thavornyutikarn, Prasak; Robson, Mark G.; Ryan, P Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd; Panuwet, Parinya

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticides are widely used for crop protection in many countries including Thailand. Aside from causing environmental contamination, they affect human health especially by over-stimulating of the neurotransmission system. OP pesticides, as with other non-persistent pesticides, degrade quickly in the environment as well as are metabolized quite rapidly in humans. Assessing human exposures to these compounds requires analytical methods that are sensitive, robust, and most i...

  4. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus Reduces Organophosphate Pesticide Absorption and Toxicity to Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinder, Mark; McDowell, Tim W; Daisley, Brendan A; Ali, Sohrab N; Leong, Hon S; Sumarah, Mark W; Reid, Gregor

    2016-10-15

    Organophosphate pesticides used in agriculture can pose health risks to humans and wildlife. We hypothesized that dietary supplementation with Lactobacillus, a genus of commensal bacteria, would reduce absorption and toxicity of consumed organophosphate pesticides (parathion and chlorpyrifos [CP]). Several Lactobacillus species were screened for toleration of 100 ppm of CP or parathion in MRS broth based on 24-h growth curves. Certain Lactobacillus strains were unable to reach stationary-phase culture maxima and displayed an abnormal culture morphology in response to pesticide. Further characterization of commonly used, pesticide-tolerant and pesticide-susceptible, probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (LGG) and L. rhamnosus strain GR-1 (LGR-1), respectively, revealed that both strains could significantly sequester organophosphate pesticides from solution after 24-h coincubations. This effect was independent of metabolic activity, as L. rhamnosus GG did not hydrolyze CP and no difference in organophosphate sequestration was observed between live and heat-killed strains. Furthermore, LGR-1 and LGG reduced the absorption of 100 μM parathion or CP in a Caco-2 Transwell model of the small intestine epithelium. To determine the effect of sequestration on acute toxicity, newly eclosed Drosophila melanogaster flies were exposed to food containing 10 μM CP with or without supplementation with live LGG. Supplementation with LGG simultaneously, but not with administration of CP 3 days prior (prophylactically), mitigated CP-induced mortality. In summary, the results suggest that L. rhamnosus may be useful for reducing toxic organophosphate pesticide exposure via passive binding. These findings could be transferable to clinical and livestock applications due to affordability and practical ability to supplement products with food-grade bacteria. The consequences of environmental pesticide pollution due to widespread usage in agriculture and soil leaching are becoming a

  5. PESTICIDE SCREENING RESULTS FROM EIGHT DAYCARE CENTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To improve assessments of children's exposures to pesticides in support of the Food Quality Protection Act, priority research and data needs include: pesticide use patterns, pesticide residue distributions, and dermal exposure assessment approaches. To address these gaps, the ...

  6. 75 FR 8939 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has received applications to register pesticide products containing an active ingredient not included in any previously registered pesticide products. Pursuant to the...

  7. 76 FR 38160 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has received applications to register pesticide products containing an active ingredient not included in any previously registered pesticide products. Pursuant to the...

  8. 75 FR 24694 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has received applications to register pesticide products containing an active ingredient not included in any previously registered pesticide product. Pursuant to the provisions...

  9. 75 FR 80490 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has received applications to register pesticide products containing active ingredients not included in any previously registered pesticide products. Pursuant to the provisions of...

  10. 77 FR 14362 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces receipt of applications to register pesticide products... by the docket identification (ID) number and the file symbol for the pesticide of interest as shown...

  11. 75 FR 71695 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has received applications to register new uses for pesticide products containing... Pesticide Programs (OPP) Regulatory Public Docket (7502P), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200...

  12. 75 FR 32767 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces receipt of applications to register new uses for pesticide...: Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) Regulatory Public Docket (7502P), Environmental Protection Agency...

  13. 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP) covers discharges of biological pesticides, and chemical pesticides that leave a residue, in areas where EPA is the NPDES...

  14. Tips for Reducing Pesticide Impacts on Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web page provides tips for pesticide users in residential and agricultural settings, as well as tips for certified pesticide applicators for ways to protect wildlife from potentially harmful effects of pesticides.

  15. Radiation induced microbial pesticide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Sang Jae

    2000-01-01

    To control plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria (K1, K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 13 kinds of fungi. Mutants of K1 and YS1 strains were induced by gamma-ray radiation and showed promising antifungal activities. These wild type and mutants showed resistant against more than 27 kinds of commercial pesticides among 30 kinds of commercial pesticides test particularly, YS1-1006 mutant strain showed resistant against hydrogen oxide. And mutants had increased antifungal activity against Botryoshaeria dothidea. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful method for the induction of functional mutants. (author)

  16. A Multi Residue GC-MS Method for Determination of 12 Pesticides in Cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Azadeh; Amirahmadi, Maryam; Mousavi, Zahra; Shoeibi, Shahram; Khajeamiri, Alireza; Kobarfard, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber is one of the main vegetables in Iranian food basket. A wide range of pesticides are used for crops protection during the cultivation of vegetables such as cucumber due to heavy pest infestation. Analysis of pesticide residues in food and other environmental commodities have become essential requirement for consumers, producers, and food quality control authorities. This study was aimed at determination of pesticides residues in cucumber as a main vegetable in Iranian food basket. A reliable, rapid and accurate method based on spiked calibration curves and modified QuEChERS sample preparation was developed for determination of 12 pesticide residues in cucumber by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The use of spiked calibration standards for constructing the calibration curve substantially reduced adverse matrix-related effects. The recovery of pesticides at 5 concentration levels (n = 3) was in the range of 80.6-112.3. The method was proved to be repeatable with RSD lower than 20%. The limits of detection and quantification for all pesticides were pesticides in 60 greenhouse and garden cucumber samples. Among the 60 analyzed samples, 41.7% of them were contaminated with pesticide residues which 31.7% of samples had pesticide residues lower than maximum residue limit and 10% of samples had residue higher than maximum residue limit.

  17. Microbial degradation of the organophosphate pesticide, Ethion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, L John R; Kwan, Bia H; Vancov, Tony

    2004-11-01

    The organophosphate pesticide, Ethion, remains a major environmental contaminant in rural Australia and poses a significant threat to environmental and public health. The aerobic degradation of Ethion by mesophilic bacteria isolated from contaminated soils surrounding disused cattle dip sites was investigated. Two isolates, identified as Pseudomonas and Azospirillum species, were capable of biodegrading Ethion when cultivated in minimal salts medium. The abiotic hydrolytic degradation products of Ethion such as Ethion Dioxon and O,O-diethylthiosphosphate were not detected. The data suggest the rapid degradation of Ethion to support microbial growth. The results have implications for the development of a bioremediation strategy.

  18. Monitoring pesticides in wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustman, E.H.; Martin, W.E.; Heath, R.G.; Reichel, W.L.

    1971-01-01

    Early in the development of the wildlife monitoring program, certain criteria were recognized as being important in the selection of species of wild animals suitable for pesticide monitoring purposes. Ideally, the forms selected should be geographically well distributed, and they should be reasonably abundant and readily available for sampling. In addition, animals occurring near the top of food chains have the capacity to reflect residues in organisms occurring at lower levels in the same food chains. Based on these criteria, species chosen for monitoring include the starling (Sturnus vulgaris), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and black ducks (Anas rubripes), and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). The black duck is substituted for the mallard in States where suitable numbers of mallards cannot be obtained. The Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife is held responsible for the execution of the wildlife portion of the National Pesticide Monitoring Program. The primary objective is to ascertain on a nationwide basis and independent of specific treatments the levels and trends of certain pesticidal chemicals and other pollutants in the bodies of selected forms of wildlife. The program was first described by Johnson et al. (4) in 1967. The purpose of this report is to update and redescribe the wildlife monitoring program and briefly review accomplishments.

  19. Pesticide loss to the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plimmer, J R

    1990-01-01

    Pesticides may be transformed by chemical and biological processes or transported from the site of application by several processes including runoff, movement through the soil to ground water, volatilization, transport on soil particles, and wind erosion. Contamination of water by pesticide residues is a matter of concern as is contamination of the earth's atmosphere. The form in which a pesticide enters the air and the dimensions of pesticide-containing particulate matter affect movement and deposition. Local transport over distances of several miles may be responsible for adverse effects on nontarget species. Effects of long-range transport are more difficult to assess, but pesticides increase the burden of organic chemicals in the atmosphere. Field measurements of pesticide volatilization and deposition of residues in rainfall, particulate matter, fog, etc., provide information on the relative importance of these processes. Adequate information concerning chemical reactions of pesticides in air is lacking. Because it is desirable to minimize low-level human and environmental exposure resulting from airborne pesticide residues, potential for losses to the air should be taken into account in selecting pesticide formulations and application methods.

  20. Interactive effects of pesticide mixtures, predators, and environmental regimes on the toxicity of two pesticides to red-eyed tree frog larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Laura A; Welch, Bill; Whitfield, Steven M

    2013-10-01

    Global amphibian declines have many corroborative causes, and the use of pesticides in agriculture is a likely contributor. In places with high pesticide usage, such as Costa Rica, agrochemical pesticides may interact with other factors to contribute to rapid species losses. Classical ecotoxicological studies rarely address the effects of a pesticide in combination with other stressors. The present study investigated the synergistic roles of 2 pesticides (chlorothalonil and endosulfan), predator stress, and environmental regimes (controlled laboratory environments versus ambient conditions) on the survival of red-eyed tree frog larvae (Agalychnis callidryas). No synergistic effects of pesticide mixtures or predator stress were found on the toxicity of either chlorothalonil or endosulfan. Both pesticides, however, were considerably more toxic under realistic ambient temperature regimes than in a climate-controlled laboratory. Overall, endosulfan displayed the highest toxicity to tadpoles, although chlorothalonil was also highly toxic. The median lethal concentration estimated to kill 50% of a tested population (LC50) for endosulfan treatments under ambient temperatures was less than one-half of that for laboratory treatments (3.26 µg/L and 8.39 µg/L, respectively). Studies commonly performed in stable temperature-controlled laboratories may significantly underestimate toxicity compared with more realistic environmental regimes. Furthermore, global climatic changes are leading to warmer and more variable climates and may increase impacts of pesticides on amphibians. © 2013 SETAC.

  1. Thiosulfate leaching of gold from waste mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Vinh Hung; Lee, Jae-chun; Jeong, Jinki; Hai, Huynh Trung; Jha, Manis K

    2010-06-15

    The present communication deals with the leaching of gold from the printed circuit boards (PCBs) of waste mobile phones using an effective and less hazardous system, i.e., a copper-ammonia-thiosulfate solution, as an alternative to the conventional and toxic cyanide leaching of gold. The influence of thiosulfate, ammonia and copper sulfate concentrations on the leaching of gold from PCBs of waste mobile phones was investigated. Gold extraction was found to be enhanced with solutions containing 15-20 mM cupric, 0.1-0.14 M thiosulfate, and 0.2-0.3 M ammonia. Similar trends were obtained for the leaching of gold from two different types of scraps and PCBs of waste mobile phones. From the scrap samples, 98% of the gold was leached out using a solution containing 20 mM copper, 0.12 M thiosulfate and 0.2 M ammonia. Similarly, the leaching of gold from the PCBs samples was also found to be good, but it was lower than that of scrap samples in similar experimental conditions. In this case, only 90% of the gold was leached, even with a contact time of 10h. The obtained data will be useful for the development of processes for the recycling of gold from waste mobile phones. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Acidic leaching of copper and tin from used consumer equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orac D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on studying thermal pretreatment and leaching of copper and tin from printed circuit boards (PCBs from used consumer equipment. Thermal treatment experiments were realized with and without presence of oxygen at 300°C, 500°C, 700°C and 900°C for 30 minutes. Leaching experiments were performed at 80°C in 2M HCl in two stages. The first stage consisted of classic leaching experiments of samples without and after thermal treatment. The second stage consisted of oxidative leaching experiments (blowing of air or oxygen with the aim to intensify metals leaching. The results of thermal treatment experiments show that maximal mass loss after burning (combustion was 53 % (700°C and after pyrolysis 47 % (900 %. Oxidative leaching resulted in complete dissolution of copper and tin after 60. or 90 minutes of thermally treated samples. Pyrolysis and combustion have positive effects on metals dissolution in comparison with samples without thermal pretreatment. Moreover, the dissolution of metals is more effective and needs shorter leaching time.

  3. Analysis of SPR salt cavern remedial leach program 2013.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Paula D.; Gutierrez, Karen A.; Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith

    2013-09-01

    The storage caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) exhibit creep behavior resulting in reduction of storage capacity over time. Maintenance of oil storage capacity requires periodic controlled leaching named remedial leach. The 30 MMB sale in summer 2011 provided space available to facilitate leaching operations. The objective of this report is to present the results and analyses of remedial leach activity at the SPR following the 2011 sale until mid-January 2013. This report focuses on caverns BH101, BH104, WH105 and WH106. Three of the four hanging strings were damaged resulting in deviations from normal leach patterns; however, the deviations did not affect the immediate geomechanical stability of the caverns. Significant leaching occurred in the toes of the caverns likely decreasing the number of available drawdowns until P/D ratio criteria are met. SANSMIC shows good agreement with sonar data and reasonably predicted the location and size of the enhanced leaching region resulting from string breakage.

  4. A mathematical model for isothermal heap and column leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima L.R.P. de Andrade

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaching occurs in metals recovery, in contaminated soil washing, and in many natural processes, such as fertilizer dissolution and rock weathering. This paper presents a model developed to simulate the transient evolution of the dissolved chemical species in the heap and column isothermal leaching processes. In this model, the solid bed is numerically divided into plane layers; the recovery of the chemical species, the enrichment of the pregnant leach solution, and the residual concentration of the leaching agent are calculated by interactions among the layers. The solution flow in the solid bed is assumed as unidirectional without dispersion, and the solid-fluid reaction is described by a diffusive control model that is integrated analytically for each time step. The data set used in the model include physical-chemical, geometrical, and operational variables, such as: leachable chemical species content, leaching agent flow rate and concentration, particles size distribution, solution residence time in the solid bed, and solid bed length, weight and irrigated area. The results for two case studies, namely, an industrial gold heap leaching and a pilot column copper acid leaching, showed that the model successful predict the general features of the process time evolution.

  5. Use pattern of pesticides and their predicted mobility into shallow groundwater and surface water bodies of paddy lands in Mahaweli river basin in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravinna, Piyal; Priyantha, Namal; Pitawala, Amarasooriya; Yatigammana, Sudharma K

    2017-01-02

    Pesticides applied on agricultural lands reach groundwater by leaching, and move to offsite water bodies by direct runoff, erosion and spray drift. Therefore, an assessment of the mobility of pesticides in water resources is important to safeguard such resources. Mobility of pesticides on agricultural lands of Mahaweli river basin in Sri Lanka has not been reported to date. In this context, the mobility potential of 32 pesticides on surface water and groundwater was assessed by widely used pesticide risk indicators, such as Attenuation Factor (AF) index and the Pesticide Impact Rating Index (PIRI) with some modifications. Four surface water bodies having greater than 20% land use of the catchment under agriculture, and shallow groundwater table at 3.0 m depth were selected for the risk assessment. According to AF, carbofuran, quinclorac and thiamethoxam are three most leachable pesticides having AF values 1.44 × 10(-2), 1.87 × 10(-3) and 5.70 × 10(-4), respectively. Using PIRI, offsite movement of pesticides by direct runoff was found to be greater than with the erosion of soil particles for the study area. Carbofuran and quinclorac are most mobile pesticides by direct runoff with runoff fractions of 0.01 and 0.08, respectively, at the studied area. Thiamethoxam and novaluron are the most mobile pesticides by erosion with erosion factions of 1.02 × 10(-4) and 1.05 × 10(-4), respectively. Expected pesticide residue levels in both surface and groundwater were predicted to remain below the USEPA health advisory levels, except for carbofuran, indicating that pesticide pollution is unlikely to exceed the available health guidelines in the Mahaweli river basin in Sri Lanka.

  6. Using microbiological leaching method to remove heavy metals from sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuyu Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial leaching is one of the most effective methods to remove heavy metals from sludge. In the conducted researches, the sludge samples were processed with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans obtained via cultivation, extraction and purification processes. Heavy metals such as Pb, Cd, Cu and Ni were leached from sludge by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans within different substrate concentration and pH value conditions. It is defined that from the point of view of economy and efficiency the optimal concentration of FeSO4.7H2O and sulfur for bio-leaching process was 0.2 g. The leaching rates of heavy metals such as Pb, Cd, Cu and Ni of the same concentration were 74.72%, 81.54%, 70.46% and 77.35% respectively. However, no significant differences depending on the pH value among the leaching rates were defined, even for the pH value of 1.5. Along with the removal of heavy metals from sludge, the organic matter, N, P, K were also leached to some extent. The losing rate of phosphorus was the highest and reached 38.44%. However, the content of organic matter, N, P, K in the processed sludge were higher in comparison with level I of the National Soil Quality Standards of China. Ecological risk of heavy metals in sludge before and after leaching was assessed by Index of Geo-accumulation (Igeo and comprehensive potential risk (RI. The results of research defined that the content of heavy metals in sludge meets the level of low ecological risk after leaching and their contents is lower in comparison with the National Agricultural Sludge Standard of China. Sludge leached by biological methods is possible to use for treatment for increasing soil fertility.

  7. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  8. Fresh water leaching of alkaline bauxite residue after sea water neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Neal W; Fulton, Ian M; Kopittke, Rosemary A; Kopittke, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    Processing of bauxite to extract alumina produces a strongly alkaline waste, bauxite refining residue, which is commonly stored in engineered structures. Once full, these waste dumps must be revegetated. In many alumina refineries, the waste is separated into fine-textured red mud and coarse-textured residue sand (RS). The sand component has physical characteristics that make it a suitable plant growth medium, provided the adverse chemical characteristics can be addressed. Neutralization of the highly saline-sodic RS with sea water lowers pH, reduces Na saturation, and adds plant nutrients. However, sea water-neutralized RS remains saline sodic and needs fresh water leaching before use as a plant growth medium. Columns containing sea water-neutralized RS were leached with 30 m depth-equivalent of fresh water to evaluate the effects of rainfall on the RS and its leachate. Entrained cations were rapidly displaced by the fresh water, lowering salinity to non-plant-limiting levels (< or =0.3 dS m(-1)). The percentage of the effective cation exchange capacity (ECEC) saturated by Na decreased from 71 to 62% due to a reduction in soil solution ionic strength (causing a decrease in the ECEC) and the preferential displacement of Na(+) (and K(+)) from the exchange. Fresh water leaching increased pH (leachate pH increased from 8.0 to 10.1). This pH increase is attributed to the slow dissolution of the Na-containing mineral sodalite. Under the current experimental conditions, the application of 30 m depth-equivalent of leaching reduced the total RS sodalite content by <10%.

  9. Dissolution Behaviour of Metal Elements from Several Types of E-waste Using Leaching Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Nik Hisyamudin Muhd; Amira Nordin, Nurul; Mohamad, Fariza; Jaibee, Shafizan; Ismail, Al Emran; Omar, Badrul; Fauzi Ahmad, Mohd; Rahim, Abd Khalil Abd; Kamaruddin, Muhamad Khalif Ikhwan Mohd; Turan, Faiz Mohd; Abu Bakar, Elmi; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2017-08-01

    Rapid development of the electrical and electronic was increasing annually due to the demand by the human being. Increasing production of electrical and electronic product led to the increasing of electric and electronic waste or can be called as the e-waste. The UN Environment Programme estimates that the world generates 20-50 million tons of the e-waste each year and the amount is raising three times faster than other forms of municipal waste. This study is focusing on the investigation of the dissolution behaviour of metal element from several types of e-waste by hydrometallurgical process. Leaching test was conducted on the e-waste by using acid as the reagent solution. Prior to the leaching test, manual dismantling, separation, and crushing process were carried out to the e-waste. The e-waste were characterized by Scanning Electron Microcopy (SEM) and the Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to define the elements inside the sample of e-waste. While the liquid residue from leaching test was analyzed by using Inductively Couple Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) to define the dissolution behaviour of the metal element that contain in the e-waste. It was found that the longest time for dismantling process was the dismantling of laptop. The dissolution behaviour of Fe, Al, Zn and Pb elements in the e-waste has affected to the increase of pH. The increasing pH led to the reduction of the metals element during leaching process.

  10. A study on the selection of indigenous leaching-bacteria for effective bioleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S. J.; Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    Bioleaching technology, which is based on the ability of microorganisms to transform solid compounds into soluble and extractable valuable elements that can be recovered, has been rapidly developed in recent decades for its advantages, which include mild reaction condition, low energy consumption, simple process, low environmental impact and being suitable for low grade mine tailings and residues. The bacteria activities (survival, adaptation of toxically environments etc.) in the bioleaching technology play a key role in the solubilization of metals. The purpose of this study was to selection of optimal leaching-bacteria through changed pH and redox potential on bio-oxidation in batch experiments for successful bioleaching technology. Twenty three indigenous bacteria used throughout this study, leaching-bacteria were obtained from various geochemical conditions; bacteria inhabitation type (acid mine drainage, mine wastes leachate and sulfur hot springs) and base-metal type (sulfur, sulfide, iron and coal). Bio-oxidation experiment result was showed that 9 cycles (1 cycle - 28days) after the leaching-bacteria were inoculated to a leaching medium, pH was observed decreasing and redox potential increased. In the bacteria inhabitation type, bio-oxidation of sulfur hot springs bacteria was greater than other types (acid mine drainage and mine wastes leachate). In addition, bio-oxidation on base-metal type was appeared sulfur was greater than other types (sulfide, iron and coal). This study informs basic knowledge when bacteria apply to eco-/economic resources utilization studies including the biomining and the recycling of mine waste system.

  11. Methods for Determination of Pesticide Adsorption Properties and Examination of Their Mobility in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Đurović

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pesticide destiny in soil depends on a number of factors, as well as on presence and intensity of the processes such as adsorption, degradation, evaporation, rinsing and leaching. Since adsorption processes govern concentration of the free fraction of pesticide molecules, researches in this area are primarily focused on examination of this process, more precisely on determination of adsorption constants and adsorption/desorption isotherms which provide determination of the most responsible soil properties for the retention of the tested pesticides in the soil. Since rinsing across the soil profile is the most frequent and its intensity is indirectly determined by intensity of adsorption processes, determination of adsorption constants of pesticides provides determination of rinsing potential for these substances across the soil profile. Methods for determination of pesticides adsorption properties and examination of their mobility in soil, primarily across the soil profile, are presented in the paper. Special emphasisis placed on the „batch“ method, which is currently the most common, and which was actually proposed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD.

  12. Impact of macroporosity on pesticide losses from tile-drained soils in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiktak, A.; Hendriks, R. F. A.; Boesten, J. J. T. I.

    2009-04-01

    Spatially-distributed pesticide leaching models are now commonly accepted in pesticide registration procedures and policy evaluations. For example, in the Netherlands the GeoPEARL model (Tiktak et al., 2002) is used to evaluate leaching to groundwater and surface waters. In surface waters, the peak concentration of pesticides is considered an important ecological endpoint. So far, the leaching models were less suitable to describe this endpoint, because procedures to fully parameterise fast transfer routes (amongst others by macropores) through the soil were not available at the national scale. For this reason, a macropore flow version of the pesticide leaching model GeoPEARL model has been developed. The model describes the transport of pesticides through the soil matrix and through two preferential flow domains, i.e. a bypass domain and an internal catchment domain (Kroes et al., 2008). Macropores can be either permanent or temporary (due to shrinking of soils). Exchange between the macropores and the soil matrix in the saturated zone is described by Darcy flow, infiltration from macropores into the unsaturated zone is described with Philip's sorptivity. The maximum depth of the macropores in both domains is related to the mean lowest groundwater depth. Experimental studies showed a good correspondence between macroporosity and the Coefficient of Linear Extensibility (COLE). The COLE is related to organic matter and clay content. Parameters of the shrinkage characteristics were related to organic matter, clay content and moisture content at saturation. Mean aggregate size (necessary in the description of exchange between the macropores and the matrix) is described by an equation published by Jarvis et al. (2007). Application of the model to a tile-drained field-site showed that the model could adequately describe the peak concentration and the later decline of the concentration for two different pesticides. Application of the model at the national scale shows

  13. Leaching mechanism of semiconducting minerals a historical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habashi F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available mechanism of leaching of semiconducting minerals such as CuS, ZnS, UO2, etc., has been the subject of intensive speculation by hydrometallurgy researchers in the early 1950s who assumed the formation of intermediate surface complexes that could be neither separated nor identified by physico-chemical techniques. The electrochemical theory of leaching introduced in the late 1960s resolved this problem by comparing the leaching process to a corrosion phenomenon similar to the corrosion of metals. A historical summary of these proposals is presented.

  14. PEP Support Laboratory Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2009-09-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A and B, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in

  15. Influence of soil structure on contaminant leaching from injected slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, M. G. Mostofa; Pedersen, Christina Østerballe; Forslund, Anita

    2016-01-01

    of water through the macropore flow path in the intact soil. Estrogen leached from the intact soil in the first event only, but for the disturbed soil it was detected in the leachates of last two events also. Leaching from the later events was attributed to higher colloid transport from the disturbed soils...... macropore flow paths. The slurry constituents that ended up in or near the macropore flow paths of the intact soil were presumably washed out relatively quickly in the first event. For the last three events the intact soil leached fewer microorganisms than the disturbed soil due to the bypassing effect...

  16. Leaching of nutrient salts from fly ash from biomass combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj; Vu, Duc Thuong; Stenby, Mette

    2005-01-01

    Methods to selectively leach nutrient salts from fly ash, while leaving cadmium un-dissolved were studied. Temperature, pH, water to fly ash ratio are all expected to influence the kinetics and the equilibrium boundaries for this process. Three different leaching methods were investigated...... moving bed process with agitation/centrifugation. It was found that a satisfactory leaching of the nutrient salts could be achieved with the third method using only two or three stages, depending on the water to fly ash ratio. It is an advantage to perform the process at temperatures above 50°C...

  17. Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee and Pesticide Regulatory Reform Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs will hold a public meeting of the Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC) on Wednesday, May 3, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., and on Thursday, May 4, from 8:30 a.m. to noon.

  18. Evaluation System for Pesticides (ESPE). 1. Agricultural pesticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans HJB; Beek MA; Linders JBHJ

    1992-01-01

    In this report a risk assessment or evaluation system for agricultural pesticides is presented, which estimates the hazards for man and environment resulting from the use of these pesticides. The evaluation system has also been placed within the context of the Uniform System for the Evaluation of

  19. Meta-analysis of pesticide sorption in subsoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    It has been known for several decades that sorption koc values tend to be larger in soils that are low in organic carbon (i.e. subsoils). Nevertheless, in a regulatory context, the models used to assess leaching of pesticides to groundwater still rely on a constant koc value, which is usually measured on topsoil samples. This is mainly because the general applicability of any improved model approach that is also simple enough to use for regulatory purposes has not been demonstrated. The objective of this study was therefore first to summarize and generalize available literature data in order to assess the magnitude of any systematic increase of koc values in subsoil and to test an alternative model of subsoil sorption that could be useful in pesticide risk assessment and management. To this end, a database containing the results of batch sorption experiments for pesticides was compiled from published studies in the literature, which placed at least as much emphasis on measurements in subsoil horizons as in topsoil. The database includes 967 data entries from 46 studies and for 34 different active substances (15 non-ionic compounds, 13 weak acids, 6 weak bases). In order to minimize pH effects on sorption, data for weak acids and bases were only included if the soil pH was more than two units larger than the compound pKa. A simple empirical model, whereby the sorption constant is given as a power law function of the soil organic carbon content, gave good fits to most data sets. Overall, the apparent koc value, koc(app), for non-ionic compounds and weak bases roughly doubled as the soil organic carbon content decreased by a factor of ten. The typical increase in koc(app) was even larger for weak acids: on average koc(app) increased by a factor of six as soil organic carbon content decreased by a factor of ten. These results suggest the koc concept currently used in leaching models should be replaced by an alternative approach that gives a more realistic

  20. Effects of Pregnant Leach Solution Temperature on the Permeability of Gravelly Drainage Layer of Heap Leaching Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi amini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In copper heap leaching structures, the ore is leached by an acidic solution. After dissolving the ore mineral, the heap is drained off in the acidic solution using a drainage system (consisting of a network of perforated polyethylene pipes and gravelly drainage layers and is, then, transferred to the leaching plant for copper extraction where the copper is extracted and the remaining solution is dripped over the ore heap for re-leaching. In this process, the reaction between the acidic solution and copper oxide ore is exothermal and the pregnant leach solution (PLS, which is drained off the leaching heap, has a higher temperature than the dripped acidic solution. The PLS temperature variations cause some changes in the viscosity and density which affect the gravelly drainage layer's permeability. In this research, a special permeability measuring system was devised for determining the effects of the PLS temperature variations on the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer of heap leaching structures. The system, consisting of a thermal acid resistant element and a thermocouple, controls the PLS temperature, which helps measure the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer. The PLS and gravelly drainage layer of Sarcheshmeh copper mine heap leaching structure No. 1 were used in this study. The permeability coefficient of the gravelly soil was measured against the PLS and pure water at temperatures varying between 3°C to 60°C. Also, the viscosity and density of the PLS and pure water were measured at these temperatures and, using existing theoretical relations, the permeability coefficient of the gravel was computed. A comparison between the experimental and theoretical results revealed a good conformity between the two sets of results. Finally, a case (Taft heap leaching structure, Yazd, Iran was studied and its gravelly drainage layer was designed based on the results of the present research.

  1. Towards the field-scale experiments and numerical modeling of pesticides in tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, J.; Ray, C.; Sanda, M.; Vogel, T.; Green, R.; Loo, B.

    2004-12-01

    Intensive use of pesticides in agriculture inevitably poses an increased threat to groundwater. Recent findings of pesticide residues in selected drinking water wells in Hawaii brings further attention to this problem since the primary source for potable water in Hawaii is groundwater from basal or dike-confined aquifers. A challenging research project was carried out at the University of Hawaii to elucidate potential impacts of selected pesticides on groundwater and to understand pesticide behavior in tropical soils. The major outcome of the project will be a recommendation to the Hawaii Department of Agriculture whether to restrict or approve these pesticide products entering Hawaii's agricultural market. Three sites on Oahu, one on Maui, and one on Kauai were selected for field evaluation of leaching. The soil types on Oahu are Wahiawa Oxisol (Poamoho), Molokai Oxisol (Kunia), and Waialua Vertisol (Waimanalo). The soil at Kula, Maui is an andisol (loam of Kula series) and that at Mana, Kauai is a Vertisol of Malama series. Three herbicides (S-metolachlor, imazaquin, sulfometuron methyl), one fungicide (trifloxystrobin), and one insecticide (imidacloprid) were used in our study. In addition, a commonly used herbicide (atrazine) and potassium bromide tracer were applied as reference chemicals. After spraying, the plots were covered with straw to decrease evaporation from bare soil surface and irrigated with aerial sprinklers for a period of 16 weeks. Disturbed soil samples from various depths were taken at regular intervals for pesticide analysis. Water flow dynamics was monitored with TDR probes and tensiometers installed at three depths. Weather data were acquired simultaneously. In-situ measurements of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity were done using a tension disc infiltrometer. Laboratory experiments of soil-water retention, as well as degradation, sorption, and column displacement experiments for the selected pesticides were conducted. Hence, comprehensive

  2. [Detection of organophosphorus pesticide residue on the surface of apples using SERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Zhou; Yu, Zhuang; Yang, Tian-Yue; Ding, Jian-Hua

    2013-10-01

    Traditional pesticide residue detection methods are usually complicated, time-consuming, and destructive. Rapid, nondestructive, online real-time is the development direction of the pesticide testing. In the present paper, we use surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique to detect the organophosphorus pesticide residue of phorate and fenthion on apple to investigate a fast, nondestructive detection method for the pesticide of phorate and tiguron on apples. The results show that the characteristic frequencies of the two organophosphorus pesticides are easier to identify using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. We select Raman signal at 728 cm(-1) for phorate and that at 1 512 cm(-1) for fenthion as target peak for quantitative analysis, and use an internal standard to establish phorate and fenthion linear regression model. This method can be used as a quantitative analysis reference of phorate and fenthion.

  3. [Determination of pesticides in Chinese dumplings using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, You; Takatori, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Yoko; Okihashi, Masahiro; Fukui, Naoki; Murata, Hiroshi; Sumimoto, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Yukio; Obana, Hirotaka

    2009-02-01

    A rapid and easy multiresidue method for determination of pesticide residues in Chinese dumplings using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed. Pesticide residues were extracted with ethyl acetate in the presence of anhydrous magnesium sulfate in a disposable tube using a homogenizer. The extract was concentrated and reconstituted in hexane, followed by acetonitrile-hexane partition to remove lipids. The acetonitrile layer was purified with a double-layered cartridge column (graphite carbon black/primary secondary amine silica gel). After removal of the solvent, the extract was resolved in methanol/water and analyzed with LC-MS/MS. Recovery tests of 99 pesticide residues from Chinese dumpling were performed at 20 and 100 ng/g, and 72 pesticides exhibited acceptable recoveries (70-120%) with low relative standard deviations (pesticide residues in the Chinese dumplings.

  4. Pesticides and human chronic diseases: Evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca

    2013-04-15

    Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. - Highlights: ► There is a link between exposure to pesticides and incidence of chronic diseases. ► Genotoxicity and proteotoxicity are two main involved mechanisms. ► Epigenetic knowledge may help diagnose the relationships. ► Efficient policies on safe use of pesticides should be set up.

  5. Behavior of pesticides in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan A. Norris

    1974-01-01

    A number of chemicals of diverse characteristics have arbitrarily been classed together on the basis of their use and given the descriptive name "pesticides." An unfortunate aura of mystery has developed about these chemicals. However, there is nothing unique or mysterious about the chemicals we refer to as "pesticides." Like other chemicals, they...

  6. Reductive Leaching of Low-Grade Pyrolusite with Formic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Youzhi; Ma, Huaju; Huang, Runjun; Yuan, Aiqun; Huang, Zengwei; Zhou, Zeguang

    2015-08-01

    The extraction of manganese from low-grade pyrolusite is investigated using formic acid as reductant in sulfuric acid medium. The effects of volumes of formic acid, concentration of sulfuric acid, liquid to solid ratio (L/S), leaching time, and temperature on leaching efficiency of manganese, iron, and aluminum are valuated with single-factor experiments. The results show that the leaching efficiency of manganese reached 90.08 pct with 80.70 pct of iron and 31.55 pct of aluminum under the optical conditions: 15 pct H2SO4(v/v) 60 ml, 4 ml formic acid, and 2 hours leaching time at 363 K (90 °C).

  7. Pesticides and human chronic diseases: evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-04-15

    Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fenamiphos and related organophosphorus pesticides: environmental fate and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Tanya; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; Sethunathan, Nambrattil; Naidu, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we emphasize recent research on the fate, transport, and metabolism of tree selected organophosphorus pesticides (fenamiphos, isofenphos, and coumaphos) in soil an water environments. This review is also concerned with the side effects of these pesticides on nontarget organisms. Despite the fact that fenamiphos is not very mobile, its oxides have been detected in the groundwaters of Western Australia. Most organophosphorus pesticides generally are chemically unstable and underfo microbial degradation in soil and water environments. Enhanced biodegradation of many organophosphorus pesticides upon their repeted applications to soil and water is well established. Myriads of soil microorganisms, bacteria in particular, exhibit an exceptional capacity to transform many organophosphorus pesticides. Fenamiphos can undergo rapid microbially mediated degradation via oxidation to its oxides (sulfoxide and sulfone) and eventually to CO2 and water in soils, or via hydrolysis, in cultures of the soil bacterium, Brevinbacterium sp. There is evidence for enhanced biodegradation of (i) isofenphos in soils with a long history of use and (ii) coumaphos in cattle dip by bacterial cultures to chlorferon and diethylthiophosphoric acid.

  9. Steady-state leaching of tritiated water from silica gel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, H.A.; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion.......Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion....

  10. Carbonate heap leach of uranium-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turney, W.R.; Mason, C.F.V.; Longmire, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    A new approach to removal of uranium from soils based on existing heap leach mining technologies proved highly effective for remediation of soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) near Cincinnati, Ohio. In laboratory tests, remediation of uranium-contaminated soils by heap leaching with carbonate salt solutions was demonstrated in column experiments. An understanding of the chemical processes that occur during carbonate leach of uranium from soils may lead to enhancement of uranium removal. Carbonate leaching requires the use of an integrated and closed circuit process, wherein the leach solutions are recycled and the reagents are reused, resulting in a minimum secondary waste stream. Carbonate salt leach solution has two important roles. Primarily, the formation of highly soluble anionic carbonate uranyl species, including uranyl dicarbonate (UO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{sub 2}{sup =}) and uranyl tricarbonate (UO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{sub 3}{sup 4-}), allows for high concentration of uranium in a leachate solution. Secondly, carbonate salts are nearly selective for dissolution of uranium from uranium contaminated soils. Other advantages of the carbonate leaching process include (1) the high solubility, (2) the selectivity, (3) the purity of the solution produced, (4) the relative ease with which a uranium product can be precipitated directly from the leachate solution, and (5) the relatively non-corrosive and safe handling characteristics of carbonate solutions. Experiments conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated the effectiveness of carbonate leach. Efficiencies of uranium removal from the soils have been as high as 92 percent. Higher molar strength carbonate solutions ({approx}0.5M) proved more effective than lower molar strength solutions ({approx} 0.1M). Uranium removal is also a function of lixiviant loading rate. Furthermore, agglomeration of the soils with cement resulted in less effective uranium removal.

  11. [Leaching of uranium containing phosphorites with heterotrophic microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, K H; Schwartz, W

    1982-01-01

    The problem of heterotrophic leaching of metals was tested with uranium-containing phosphorites under laboratory conditions with regard to possible technical applications. As leaching agents we used the acids of citric and lactic acid fermentation, carried out with a strain of Aspergillus niger in sulfite liquor under different conditions and with lactic acid bacteria in wheye. Up to 12% uranium were soluted with citric acid fermentation of Marocco phosphorite containing 153 ppm U in Aspergillus niger cultures within 27 days.

  12. Residue analysis of multi-class pesticides in watermelon by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Semin; Lee, Sung Joong; Kim, Hae Gyeong; Jeong, Won Young; Shim, Jae-Han; Abd El-Aty, A M; Jeong, Sung Woo; Lee, Won Sup; Kim, Soo Taek; Shin, Sung Chul

    2010-03-01

    As watermelon is farmed primarily by protected and successive cultivation techniques, a number of pesticides are required for the control of pests and diseases. To evaluate the harmful effects of pesticides in watermelon and to guarantee consumers' safety, a rapid screening process for pesticides is required. A LC-MS/MS method was applied for the direct quantitation of 44 pesticide residues in watermelon. A Zorbax XDB-C(18) column was selected for analysis, with a mobile phase consisting of a gradient system of water and 5 mM methanolic ammonium formate. MS/MS experiments were performed in ESI positive ion and multiple reaction monitoring modes. The LOQs were in the range of 1-26 microg/kg, thereby indicating good sensitivity. Most of the recoveries ranged between 70-131% with RSDs pesticide residues such as pyroquilon (pyn), boscalid (bd), and dimethomorph (di) in amides (AM) and cinosulfuron (ci) in ureas (UR) may have been overestimated for the pesticides owing to increased alpha-error risk, whereas the amounts of pesticide residues, such as imibenconazole (ie) in the triazoles (TR) and fenpyroximate (fee) in the imidazoles (IM), may have been underestimated as the result of increased beta-error risk. The current method allowed for the rapid quantitation and identification of low pesticide levels in the watermelon samples. No pesticide residues were detected in any of the surveyed watermelons obtained from eight local markets in the Republic of Korea. Statistical analysis of the recoveries classified the 44 pesticides into nine groups and three overall categories.

  13. Training Manual Occupational Pesticide Exposure & Health and Safe & Responsible Handling of Pesticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maden, van der E.C.L.J.; Koomen, I.

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides are commonly used in the horticulture sector. While emphasis is often on the correct and efficient application of pesticides, the risk associated with application of pesticides receives less attention. Those working with pesticides need to know about occupational pesticide exposure and

  14. Estimating Leaching Requirements for Barley Growth under Saline Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Busaidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of marginal water resources for agriculture is receiving considerable attention. The lands irrigated with saline water are required to reduce salt accumulations through leaching and/or drainage practices. A field experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of saline irrigation and leaching fraction on barley (Hordeum vulgare L. growth. For this purpose highly saline water was diluted to the salinity levels of 3, 6 and 9 dS m-1 and applied by drip irrigation at 0.0, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25 leaching fractions (LF. The results of the experiment showed that both quantity and quality of water regulated salts distribution within the soil in the following manner: a the salts were found higher near or immediate below the soil surface; b an enhanced LF carried more salts down the soil horizon but there was no significant difference in plant yield between different treatments of leaching fractions. Salinity of water significantly impaired barley growth. The good drainage of sandy soil enhanced the leaching process and minimized the differences between leaching fractions. The increment in saline treatments (3, 6 and 9 dS m-1 added more salts and stressed plant growth. However, the conjunctive use of marginal water at proportional LF could be effective in enhancing the yield potential of crops in water-scarce areas.

  15. 75 FR 28012 - Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on False or Misleading Pesticide Product...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... Brand Names AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The Agency is announcing the availability of and seeking public comment on a draft Pesticide Registration Notice (PR Notice) entitled ``False or Misleading Pesticide Product Brand Names.'' PR Notices are issued...

  16. 75 FR 34448 - Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on False or Misleading Pesticide Product...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Brand Names; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice..., announcing the availability of and seeking public comment on a draft Pesticide Registration Notice (PR Notice) entitled ``False or Misleading Pesticide Product Brand Names.'' This document extends the comment period...

  17. High frequency monitoring of pesticides in runoff water from a vineyard: ecotoxicological and hysteresis pattern analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrancq, Marie; Jadas-Hécart, Alain; La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Landry, David; Payraudeau, Sylvain

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall-induced peaks in pesticide concentrations can occur rapidly; therefore, low frequency sampling may largely underestimate maximum pesticide concentrations and fluxes. Detailed storm-based sampling of pesticide concentrations in runoff water to better predict pesticide sources, transport pathways and toxicity within the headwater catchments is actually lacking. High frequency monitoring (2 min) of dissolved concentrations and loads for seven pesticides (Dimetomorph, Fluopicolide, Glyphosate, Iprovalicarb, Tebuconazole, Tetraconazole and Triadimenol) and one degradation product (AMPA) were assessed for 20 runoff events from 2009 to 2012 at the outlet of a vineyard catchment in the Layon catchment in France. The pesticide concentrations reached 387 µg/L. All of the runoff events exceeded the mandated acceptable concentrations of 0.1 µg/L for each pesticide (European directive 2013/39/EC). High resolution sampling used to detect the peak pesticide levels revealed that Toxic Units (TU) for algae, invertebrates and fish often exceeded the European Uniform principles (25%). The instantaneous and average (time or discharge-weighted) concentrations indicated an up to 30- or 4-fold underestimation of the TU obtained when measuring the maximum concentrations, respectively, highlighting the important role of the sampling methods for assessing peak exposure. High resolution sampling combined with concentration-discharge hysteresis analyses revealed that clockwise responses were predominant (52%), indicating that Hortonian runoff is the prevailing surface runoff trigger mechanism in the study catchment. The hysteresis patterns for suspended solids and pesticides were highly dynamic and storm- and chemical-dependent. Intense rainfall events induced stronger C-Q hysteresis (magnitude). This study provides new insights into the complexity of pesticide dynamics in runoff water and highlights the ability of hysteresis analysis to improve the understanding of pesticide

  18. Transformation of organophosphorus pesticides in the presence of aqueous chlorine: kinetics, pathways, and structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duirk, Stephen E; Desetto, Lisa M; Davis, Gary M

    2009-04-01

    The fate of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides in the presence of aqueous chlorine was investigated under simulated drinking water treatment conditions. Intrinsic rate coefficients were found for the reaction of hypochlorous acid (k(HOCl,OP)) and hypochlorite ion (k(OCl,OP) for several OP pesticides. The reaction of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) with each OP pesticide was relatively rapid near neutral pH, k(HOCl,OP) = 0.86 - 3.56 x 10(6) M(-1)h(-1). HOCI reacts at the thiophosphate (P = S) moiety of the OP pesticide resulting in the formation of the corresponding oxon (P=0), which is more toxic than the parent pesticide. Hypochlorite ion (OCl-) was found not to oxidize OP pesticides but act like a nucleophile accelerating hydrolysis, k(OCl,OP) = 37.3-15910 M(-1)h(-1). Both the k(HOCl,OP) and the k(OCl,OP) were found to correlate well with molecular descriptors within each subgroup of the OP pesticide class. A model was developed to predict the transformation of OP pesticides in the presence of aqueous chlorine. With hydrolysis rate coefficients, the transformation of OP pesticides under drinking water treatment conditions was found to be adequately predicted. The structure-activity relationships and model developed here could be used by risk assessors to determine exposure to OP pesticides and their transformation products in potable water.

  19. Characterization of dissolved organic carbon leached from a woodchip bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusallout, Ibrahim; Hua, Guanghui

    2017-09-01

    Woodchip bioreactors are increasingly being applied to remove nitrate from agricultural subsurface drainage. However, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) released from woodchips may negatively affect the aquatic ecosystems and drinking water supplies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the leaching characteristics, disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation potentials, and treatability of DOC derived from a laboratory woodchip bioreactor. Initial flush of woodchips resulted in the release of high organic content from woodchips. The DOC concentration in the bioreactor effluent decreased rapidly from 71.8 to 20.7 mg/L during the first week of operation, and then gradually decreased to 3.0 mg/L after 240 days of operation under a hydraulic retention time of 24 h. A recycled steel chip filter removed an average of 44.2% of the DOC in the bioreactor effluent. Hydrophobic carbons and organic compounds with molecular weight of 10-100 KDa were the most abundant organic fractions in the DOC released from woodchips. These two DOC fractions were also the most important precursors to the formation of total organic halogen (TOX) during chlorination and chloramination. The TOX yields of woodchip DOC were similar to those of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid, suggesting that organic compounds released from woodchips have great potentials for DBP formation. Alum and polyaluminium chloride were more effective at removing woodchip DOC than ferric chloride during coagulation. Drinking water treatment plants may need to adjust coagulant types and doses in order to remove woodchip DOC in the source water to reduce the DBP formation potential. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Leaching behavior of microtektite glass compositions in sea water and the effect of precipitation on glass leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The present study attempts to account for the slow corrosion rates of microtektite glass in nature by comparing the leach rates of synthetic microtektite glass samples in deionized water and in sea-water, respectively. In order to obtain systematic data about leachant composition effects, leach tests were also carried out with synthetic leachant compositions enriched with respect to silica or depleted with respect to certain major components of sea-water (Mg, Ca).

  1. The effect of fluorescent tracers on droplet spectrum, viscosity, and density of pesticide formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleier, Jerome J; Preftakes, Collin; Peterson, Robert K D

    2010-10-01

    The most important factor affecting efficacy and drift of pesticide applications is the droplet spectrum. To measure pesticide drift, researchers utilize fluorescent tracers to rapidly quantify spray deposition. Although fluorescent tracers have been used for more than 50 years, no experiments have been performed on the effect they have on the properties of pesticide formulations (density and viscosity) or droplet spectrum, which affect the drift of pesticides. Therefore, we examined the effect of an oil- and water-based tracer on the volume median diameter (VMD), viscosity, and density of oil- and water-based pesticide formulations. In addition, we experimentally fit and demonstrate the utility of using distributions to characterize pesticide droplet spectra. The addition of tracers to both water- and oil-based formulations did not significantly alter the VMD, viscosity, and density. Lognormal distributions provided the best fit for the water- and oil-based formulations with and without tracer. Our results demonstrated that the addition of oil- and water-based tracers do not significantly alter pesticide formulations properties and droplet spectrum, and most likely do not alter the movement of pesticide droplets in the environment.

  2. Inspection of pesticide residues on food by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Chetan; Gift, Alan; Inscore, Frank; Maksymiuk, Paul; Farquharson, Stuart

    2004-03-01

    Modern agriculture depends on pesticides to curb infestations, increase crop yield and to produce the quantity and quality of food demanded by today's society. However, potential pesticide residue contamination of food is of critical concern to the food industry and the regulators responsible for health and safety. For example, many pesticides kill insects by attacking the central nervous system, and the use of these pesticides above the EPA set tolerance levels (from 0.1 to 50 ppm) could pose a threat to humans, in particular infants. Unfortunately, rapid, chemical analysis of pesticide residues is unavailable, and only a very small fraction of foods are inspected. The greatest concern is food imported from nations that simply ignore US regulations. In an effort to address this need, we have been developing a simple device to collect residues from food surfaces, perform a rapid chemical separation, and detect and identify pesticides by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Capillaries are coated with a metal-doped sol-gel that both separates chemicals and generates SER spectra when irradiated. SERS of pesticides at ppm concentrations, and a preliminary product to aid inspectors is presented.

  3. A Perspective Discussion on Rising Pesticide Levels and Colon Cancer Burden in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Akira Uyemura

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture is a mainstay of many developing countries’ economy, such as Brazil. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Brazil is the major global consumer of pesticides. Irrespective of the fact that the International Agency for Research on Cancer suggests that pesticides promote human cancer risk, a prospective study reports that colorectal cancer (CRC burden will increase in developing countries by approximately 60% in the coming decades. Here, we review the literature and public data from the Brazilian Federal Government to explore why pesticides levels and new cases of colon cancer (CC are rising rapidly in the country. CC incidence is the second most common malignancy in men and women in the South and the Southeast of Brazil. However, while these regions have almost doubled their pesticide levels and CC mortality in 14 years, the amount of sold pesticides increased 5.2-fold with a corresponding 6.2-fold increase in CC mortality in Northern and Northeastern states. Interestingly, mortality from endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases are rapidly increasing, in close resemblance with the pesticide detection levels in food. Taken together, we discuss the possibility that pesticides might alter the risk of CC.

  4. Leaching from waste incineration bottom ashes treated in a rotary kiln

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyks, Jiri; Nesterov, Igor; Mogensen, Erhardt

    2011-01-01

    Leaching from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash treated in a rotary kiln was quantified using a combination of lab-scale leaching experiments and geochemical modelling. Thermal treatment in the rotary kiln had no significant effect on the leaching of Al, Ba, Ca, Mg, Si, Sr, Zn, sulfate...... the thermal treatment. Overall, rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended to reduce the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl and DOC; however, increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected....

  5. Nanomaterials-Based Optical Techniques for the Detection of Acetylcholinesterase and Pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The large amount of pesticide residues in the environment is a threat to global health by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Biosensors for inhibition of AChE have been thus developed for the detection of pesticides. In line with the rapid development of nanotechnology, nanomaterials have attracted great attention and have been intensively studied in biological analysis due to their unique chemical, physical and size properties. The aim of this review is to provide insight into nanomaterial-based optical techniques for the determination of AChE and pesticides, including colorimetric and fluorescent assays and surface plasmon resonance.

  6. Social and Economic Dimensions of Pesticide Residues

    OpenAIRE

    Burçak, Aydan Alev

    2015-01-01

    Given their affordable price, ease of use and labour effective nature, pesticides are highly used in agriculture and a variety of sectors and are acknowledged as an effective method for pest control.Pesticide usage resides in several problems such as human health and environmental. The pesticides on or in the agricultural products and in the environment are called pesticide residues. The consumers have an increasing concern about their health because of the pesticide residues on food and wate...

  7. 75 FR 33744 - Pesticide Management and Disposal; Standards for Pesticide Containers and Containment; Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Containers and Containment; Proposed Change to Labeling Compliance Date AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to amend the pesticide container and... ``Pesticide Management and Disposal; Standards for Pesticide Containers and Containment'' (71 FR 47330...

  8. Impact of aging on leaching characteristics of recycled concrete aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, Aiyoub; Tanyu, Burak F; Cetin, Bora

    2016-10-01

    The focus of this study was to evaluate the effects of stockpiling (aging) on leaching of elements in recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) that may contribute to tufaceous constituent formation. Speciation and leaching controlling mechanisms of these elements were identified via geochemical modeling. The effects of stockpiling were simulated by comparing freshly produced RCA with RCA aged as part of this study for 1 year both in the laboratory and in the field. Leachate samples were generated following batch water leach test (WLT) and US Geological Survey leach test (USGSLT) methods. USGSLTs were conducted both on the laboratory and field samples while WLT was only conducted on laboratory samples. During the laboratory aging, it is observed that the carbonate content of RCA, measured as calcite equivalent, increased 20 % (i.e., from ∼100 to 120 mg/g) within a year time frame. The leachate extracted from RCA showed minor changes in pH and more significant decreases in electrical conductivity (i.e., ∼300 to 100 μS/cm). A comparison between laboratory and field samples revealed that the RCA aged much slower in the field than in the laboratory within a year. Comparisons between two leach extraction methods on the laboratory conditions showed that the total leached concentrations (TLCs) of most of the constituents from USGSLT were appreciably lower than the ones measured via WLT method. The results of geochemical modeling analyses showed that Al, Si, Fe, Ca, Mg, and Cu exist in their oxidized forms as Al 3+ , Fe 3+ , Si 4+ , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , and Cu 2+ and results revealed that these elements are primarily controlled by the solubility of gibbsite, hematite, silica gel, calcite, magnesite, and tenorite solid phases, respectively. One of the significant findings of the study was to identify the changes in leaching behavior of Ca, Si, Mg, Al, Fe, and Cu due to carbonation.

  9. Pesticide use and application: An Indian scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhilash, P.C., E-mail: pcabhilash@gmail.com [Eco-Auditing Group, National Botanical Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Singh, Nandita, E-mail: nanditasingh8@yahoo.co.in [Eco-Auditing Group, National Botanical Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2009-06-15

    Agricultural development continues to remain the most important objective of Indian planning and policy. In the process of development of agriculture, pesticides have become an important tool as a plant protection agent for boosting food production. Further, pesticides play a significant role by keeping many dreadful diseases. However, exposure to pesticides both occupationally and environmentally causes a range of human health problems. It has been observed that the pesticides exposures are increasingly linked to immune suppression, hormone disruption, diminished intelligence, reproductive abnormalities and cancer. Currently, India is the largest producer of pesticides in Asia and ranks twelfth in the world for the use of pesticides. A vast majority of the population in India is engaged in agriculture and is therefore exposed to the pesticides used in agriculture. Although Indian average consumption of pesticide is far lower than many other developed economies, the problem of pesticide residue is very high in India. Pesticide residue in several crops has also affected the export of agricultural commodities in the last few years. In this context, pesticide safety, regulation of pesticide use, proper application technologies, and integrated pest management are some of the key strategies for minimizing human exposure to pesticides. There is a dearth of studies related to these issues in India. Therefore, the thrust of this paper was to review the technology of application of pesticides in India and recommend future strategies for the rational use of pesticides and minimizing the problems related to health and environment.

  10. Pesticide Reduction Campaign: Greener Pesticides for Cleaner Waterways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Greener Pesticides for Cleaner Waterways project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  11. Monitoring of Nitrate and Pesticide Pollution in Mnasra, Morocco Soil and Groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouane, Bouchra; Dahchour, Abdelmalek; Dousset, Sylvie; El Hajjaji, Souad

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluates the levels of nitrates and pesticides occurring in groundwater and agricultural soil in the Mnasra, Morocco area, a zone with intensive agricultural activity. A set of 108 water samples and 68 soil samples were collected from ten selected sites in the area during agricultural seasons, from May 2010 to September 2012. The results reveal that 89.7% of water samples exceeded the standard limit of nitrate concentrations for groundwater (50 mg/L). These results can be explained by the prevailing sandy nature of the soil in the area, the frequency of fertilizer usage, and the shallow level of the water table, which favors the leaching of nitrate from field to groundwater. In contrast, the selected pesticide molecules were not detected in the analysed soil and water samples; levels were below the quantification limit in all samples. This situation could be explained by the probable partial or total transformation of the molecules in soil.

  12. A two-step leaching method designed based on chemical fraction distribution of the heavy metals for selective leaching of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Pb from metallurgical sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Yu, Junxia; Xiong, Wanli; Xu, Yuanlai; Chi, Ru-An

    2018-01-01

    For selective leaching and highly effective recovery of heavy metals from a metallurgical sludge, a two-step leaching method was designed based on the distribution analysis of the chemical fractions of the loaded heavy metal. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) was used as a leaching agent in the first step to leach the relatively labile heavy metals and then ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) was applied to leach the residual metals according to their different fractional distribution. Using the two-step leaching method, 82.89% of Cd, 55.73% of Zn, 10.85% of Cu, and 0.25% of Pb were leached in the first step by 0.7 M HCl at a contact time of 240 min, and the leaching efficiencies for Cd, Zn, Cu, and Pb were elevated up to 99.76, 91.41, 71.85, and 94.06%, by subsequent treatment with 0.2 M EDTA at 480 min, respectively. Furthermore, HCl leaching induced fractional redistribution, which might increase the mobility of the remaining metals and then facilitate the following metal removal by EDTA. The facilitation was further confirmed by the comparison to the one-step leaching method with single HCl or single EDTA, respectively. These results suggested that the designed two-step leaching method by HCl and EDTA could be used for selective leaching and effective recovery of heavy metals from the metallurgical sludge or heavy metal-contaminated solid media.

  13. Effects of occupational pesticide exposure on children applying pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Rasoul, Gaafar M; Abou Salem, Mahmoud E; Mechael, Atef A; Hendy, Olfat M; Rohlman, Diane S; Ismail, Ahmed A

    2008-09-01

    Nearly 40% of the Egyptian workforce is employed in agriculture. The cotton industry relies on children and adolescents, who work seasonally, to apply pesticides to the cotton crops. Although previous research has examined adult pesticide exposures in this workforce in Egypt, no research has examined the health effects in adolescents. This study attempts to systematically replicate findings examining the impact of organophosphate pesticide (OP) exposure in adults on Arabic speaking children working as applicators. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of pesticide exposure on children and adolescents spraying cotton fields. Male children currently applying pesticides between the ages of 9 and 15 (Younger, n=30) and 16 and 19 (Older, n=20) were recruited for the study. They completed a neurobehavioral test battery; personality inventory; work, health, and exposure questionnaires; and medical and neurological screening exams. Blood samples were collected to measure acetylcholinesterase. Children not working in agriculture, matched on age and education, served as controls. Both Younger and Older applicator groups, performed significantly worse than the controls on the majority of neurobehavioral tests controlling for age and years of education. The applicators reported significantly more neurological symptoms than the controls and had lower acetylcholinesterase activity. A dose-effect relationship demonstrated that increased years of exposure to organophosphate pesticides is associated with cognitive deficits. This is one of the several studies demonstrating that functional cognitive effects are positively correlated with increased years of exposure to OP pesticides, though primarily in adult populations, building confidence in the association. Since children around the world are exposed to OP pesticides, these studies suggest that the need to evaluate this potential problem is urgent.

  14. Research on the effect of alkali roasting of copper dross on leaching rate of indium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafang, Liu; Fan, Xingxiang; Shi, Yifeng; Yang, Kunbin

    2017-11-01

    The byproduct copper dross produced during refining crude lead was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and fluorescence spectrometer (XRF), which showed that copper dross mainly contained lead, copper, zinc, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, sulfur and a small amount of indium and silver etc. The mineralogical phase change of oxidation roasting of copper dross by adding sodium hydroxide was analyzed with the help of XRD and SEM. The effects of water leaching, ratio of sodium hydroxide, roasting time, and roasting temperature on leaching rate of indium were investigated mainly. The experimental results showed that phase of lead metal and sulfides of lead, copper and zinc disappeared after oxidation roasting of copper dross by adding sodium hydroxide, new phase of oxides of lead, copper, zinc and sodium salt of arsenic and antimony appeared. Water leaching could remove arsenic, and acid leaching residue obtained was then leached with acid. The leaching rate of indium was higher 6.98% compared with alkali roasting of copper dross-acid leaching. It showed that removing arsenic by water leaching and acid leaching could increase the leaching rate of indium and be beneficial to reducing subsequent acid consumption of extracting indium by acid leaching. The roasting temperature had a significant effect on the leaching rate of indium, and leaching rate of indium increased with the rise of roasting temperature. When roasting temperature ranged from 450°C to 600°C, leaching rate of indium increased significantly with the rise of roasting temperature. When roasting temperature rose from 450°C to 600°C, leaching rate of indium increased by 60.29%. The amount of sodium hydroxide had an significant effect on the leaching rate of indium, and the leaching of indium increased with the increase of the amount of sodium hydroxide, and the leaching rate of indium was obviously higher than that of copper dross blank roasting and acid leaching.

  15. The role of storm flows in concentration of pesticides associated with particulate and dissolved fractions as a threat to aquatic ecosystems - Case study: the agricultural watershed of Save river (Southwest of France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghavi L.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the fluxes of pesticides was carried out for a year, ending in March 2009, in the Save catchment, in the vicinity of Toulouse. The hydrograph separation technique was used to evaluate the respective contribution of stormflow and baseflow in transport of 12 pesticide molecules. Transport of over 59% of pesticides and their controlling factors such as total suspended matter (TSM, particulate organic carbon (POC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC occurred during storm periods. Hysteresis patterns could be observed in the concentration-discharge relationships only for some molecules between rising and falling periods of the storm hydrograph. Clockwise hysteresis was noticed for low to moderately soluble pesticide molecules and for particulate fractions, which explains the role of surface runoff in pesticide displacement. In contrast, anticlockwise hysteresis was registered for soluble molecules and dissolved fractions, explaining the role of subsurface flows and soil leaching processes. The important role of TSM, POC and DOC in pesticide transport was clearly established. We also came to the conclusion that the role of stormy periods in pesticide movement and their controlling factors worked as a threat to aquatic ecosystems. And there was a positive relation between riverine TSM, POC, DOC and pesticides according to pesticide properties.

  16. Pesticide reducing instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lars-Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Andersen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    -mentioned models and tools. All three scenarios are constructed such that they result in the same welfare implication (measured by national consumption in the CGE model). The scenarios are: 1) pesticide taxes resulting in a 25 percent overall reduction; 2) use of unsprayed field margins, resulting in the same...... welfare loss as in scenario 1; and finally 3) increased conversion to organic farming also resulting in the same welfare loss as in scenario 1. Biological and geological results from the first part of our analysis suggest that the use of unsprayed field margins is the most cost-effective instrument...... for improving bio-diversity and securing drinking water. That is, combining economic modeling with physical biological modeling and geological evaluation allows us to select unsprayed field margins as the most effective instrument. Sensitivity analysis conducted on bio-diversity suggest that this result...

  17. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants.

  18. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    This PhD project was carried out as part of the Microbial Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Resources (MIRESOWA) project, funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant number 2104-08-0012). The environment is contaminated with various xenobiotic compounds e.g. pesticides....... Bioaugmentation i.e. addition of specific degrader organisms, has been suggested as an environmentally friendly and economically competitive strategy for cleaning polluted sites. Several organisms have been isolated, capable of degrading different compounds. However the capacity to degrade the desired compound...... is just one requirement for successful bioaugmentation. There are several challenges that need to be overcome in order for bioaugmentation to be sufficiently efficient. The purpose of this PhD project was to study the degradative abilities of different bacteria, and, in collaboration with a fellow Ph...

  19. [Effects of controlling specific dangerous pesticides on prevention of acute pesticide poisoning in rural area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Jiang-xia; Chang, Xiu-li; Zhou, Zhi-jun

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the effects of controlling the specific dangerous pesticides on prevention of acute pesticide poisoning in rural area. The data of reported cases of pesticide poisoning were analyzed to find out the specific dangerous pesticide in acute pesticide poisoning. Then the occurrence of occupational pesticide poisoning and fatality of non-occupational pesticide poisoning were estimated under the hypothesis of removing the specific dangerous pesticides. The data indicated that parathion (including methyl parathion) was the specific dangerous pesticide inducing occupational pesticide poisoning. After removing the use of parathion, the hazard of pesticides which caused occupational pesticide poisoning would be significantly decreased (P pesticide which caused non-occupational pesticide poisoning, with its fatality up to 15.8%. If parathion was well controlled, the fatality of non-occupational pesticide poisoning would be declined from 9.4% to 7.4%. The analyses of related literatures also revealed the similar results. The occurrence of occupational pesticide poisoning and fatality of non-occupational pesticide poisoning may decrease if the most dangerous pesticides are well supervised.

  20. In situ fabrication of macroporous polymer networks within microfluidic devices by living radical photopolymerization and leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Helen M; Brotherton, Christopher M; Good, Brian T; Davis, Robert H; Anseth, Kristi S; Bowman, Christopher N

    2005-02-01

    Novel fabrication techniques and polymer systems are being explored to enable mass production of low cost microfluidic devices. In this contribution we discuss a new fabrication scheme for making microfluidic devices containing porous polymer components in situ. Contact lithography, a living radical photopolymer (LRPP) system and salt leaching were used to fabricate multilayer microfluidic devices rapidly with various channel geometries and covalently attached porous polymer plugs made of various photopolymerizable substrates. LRPP systems offer the advantages of covalent attachment of microfluidic device layers and facile surface modification via grafting. Several applications of the porous plugs are also explored, including a static mixer, a high surface area-to-volume reactor and a rapidly responding hydrogel valve. Quantitative and qualitative data show an increase in mixing of a fluorescein and a water stream for channels containing porous plugs relative to channels with no porous plugs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images demonstrate the ability to graft a functional material onto porous plug surfaces. A reaction was carried out on the grafted pore surfaces, which resulted in fluorescent labelling of the grafted material throughout the pores of the plug. Homogenous fluorescence throughout the depth of the porous plug and along pore surfaces indicated that the porous plugs were surface modified by grafting and that reactions can be carried out on the pore surfaces. Finally, porous hydrogel valves were fabricated which swelled in response to contact with various pH solutions. Results indicate that a porous hydrogel valve will swell and close more rapidly than other valve geometries made with the same polymer formulation. The LRPP-salt leaching method provides a means for rapidly incorporating porous polymer components into microfluidic devices, which can be utilized for a variety of pertinent applications upon appropriate selection of porous plug

  1. Direct and indirect effects of climate change on herbicide leaching--a regional scale assessment in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Karin; Jarvis, Nicholas; Lewan, Elisabet; Lindström, Bodil; Kreuger, Jenny; Kjellström, Erik; Moeys, Julien

    2015-05-01

    Climate change is not only likely to improve conditions for crop production in Sweden, but also to increase weed pressure and the need for herbicides. This study aimed at assessing and contrasting the direct and indirect effects of climate change on herbicide leaching to groundwater in a major crop production region in south-west Sweden with the help of the regional pesticide fate and transport model MACRO-SE. We simulated 37 out of the 41 herbicides that are currently approved for use in Sweden on eight major crop types for the 24 most common soil types in the region. The results were aggregated accounting for the fractional coverage of the crop and the area sprayed with a particular herbicide. For simulations of the future, we used projections of five different climate models as model driving data and assessed three different future scenarios: (A) only changes in climate, (B) changes in climate and land-use (altered crop distribution), and (C) changes in climate, land-use, and an increase in herbicide use. The model successfully distinguished between leachable and non-leachable compounds (88% correctly classified) in a qualitative comparison against regional-scale monitoring data. Leaching was dominated by only a few herbicides and crops under current climate and agronomic conditions. The model simulations suggest that the direct effects of an increase in temperature, which enhances degradation, and precipitation which promotes leaching, cancel each other at a regional scale, resulting in a slight decrease in leachate concentrations in a future climate. However, the area at risk of groundwater contamination doubled when indirect effects of changes in land-use and herbicide use, were considered. We therefore concluded that it is important to consider the indirect effects of climate change alongside the direct effects and that effective mitigation strategies and strict regulation are required to secure future (drinking) water resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B

  2. Pollution potential leaching index as a tool to assess water leaching risk of arsenic in excavated urban soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jining; Kosugi, Tomoya; Riya, Shohei; Hashimoto, Yohey; Hou, Hong; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2018-01-01

    Leaching of hazardous trace elements from excavated urban soils during construction of cities has received considerable attention in recent years in Japan. A new concept, the pollution potential leaching index (PPLI), was applied to assess the risk of arsenic (As) leaching from excavated soils. Sequential leaching tests (SLT) with two liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios (10 and 20Lkg(-1)) were conducted to determine the PPLI values, which represent the critical cumulative L/S ratios at which the average As concentrations in the cumulative leachates are reduced to critical values (10 or 5µgL(-1)). Two models (a logarithmic function model and an empirical two-site first-order leaching model) were compared to estimate the PPLI values. The fractionations of As before and after SLT were extracted according to a five-step sequential extraction procedure. Ten alkaline excavated soils were obtained from different construction projects in Japan. Although their total As contents were low (from 6.75 to 79.4mgkg(-1)), the As leaching was not negligible. Different L/S ratios at each step of the SLT had little influence on the cumulative As release or PPLI values. Experimentally determined PPLI values were in agreement with those from model estimations. A five-step SLT with an L/S of 10Lkg(-1) at each step, combined with a logarithmic function fitting was suggested for the easy estimation of PPLI. Results of the sequential extraction procedure showed that large portions of more labile As fractions (non-specifically and specifically sorbed fractions) were removed during long-term leaching and so were small, but non-negligible, portions of strongly bound As fractions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Alkaline Leaching of Low Zinc Content Iron-Bearing Sludges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargul K.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Various types of waste materials containing zinc (e.g. dusts and sludges from gas dedusting process are obtained in steel industry. The contents of Zn in these materials may vary considerably. Even a low concentration of zinc in recirculated products precludes their recycling in ferrous metallurgy aggregates. Long storage of this type of material can lead to contamination of soil and water by zinc compounds which can be leached out by acid rain, for example. This paper focuses on research involving alkaline leaching tests of low zinc content iron-bearing materials. These tests were preceded by the analysis of the elemental, phase and grain size composition, and analysis of the thermodynamic conditions of the leaching process. The main aim of research was to decrease the content of the zinc in the sludge to the level where it is suitable as an iron-bearing material for iron production (~1% Zn. Leaching at elevated temperatures (368 K, 60 min has led to a decrease in the zinc content in the sludge of about 66%. The research revealed that long hour leaching (298 K, 100 hours carried out at ambient temperatures caused a reduction in zinc content by 60% to the value of 1.15-1.2% Zn.

  4. Sulfur dioxide leaching of spent zinc-carbon-battery scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraamides, J.; Senanayake, G.; Clegg, R.

    Zinc-carbon batteries, which contain around 20% zinc, 35% manganese oxides and 10% steel, are currently disposed after use as land fill or reprocessed to recover metals or oxides. Crushed material is subjected to magnetic separation followed by hydrometallurgical treatment of the non-magnetic material to recover zinc metal and manganese oxides. The leaching with 2 M sulfuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide recovers 93% Zn and 82% Mn at 25 °C. Alkaline leaching with 6 M NaOH recovers 80% zinc. The present study shows that over 90% zinc and manganese can be leached in 20-30 min at 30 °C using 0.1-1.0 M sulfuric acid in the presence of sulfur dioxide. The iron extraction is sensitive to both acid concentration and sulfur dioxide flow rate. The effect of reagent concentration and particle size on the extraction of zinc, manganese and iron are reported. It is shown that the iron and manganese leaching follow a shrinking core kinetic model due to the formation of insoluble metal salts/oxides on the solid surface. This is supported by (i) the decrease in iron and manganese extraction from synthetic Fe(III)-Mn(IV)-Zn(II) oxide mixtures with increase in acid concentration from 1 M to 2 M, and (ii) the low iron dissolution and re-precipitation of dissolved manganese and zinc during prolonged leaching of battery scrap with low sulfur dioxide.

  5. Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudeen, David Keith; Weber, Paula D.; Lord, David L.

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage volume in the existing Bryan Mound 113 cavern from a starting volume of 7.4 million barrels (MMB) to its design volume of 11.2 MMB. The first stage was terminated several months earlier than expected in August, 2012, as the upper section of the leach zone expanded outward more quickly than design. The oil-brine interface was then re-positioned with the intent to resume leaching in the second stage configuration. This report evaluates the as-built configuration of the cavern at the end of the first stage, and recommends changes to the second stage plan in order to accommodate for the variance between the first stage plan and the as-built cavern. SANSMIC leach code simulations are presented and compared with sonar surveys in order to aid in the analysis and offer projections of likely outcomes from the revised plan for the second stage leach.

  6. Pesticide Product Information System (PPIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    PPIS includes registrant name and address, chemical ingredients, toxicity category, product names, distributor brand names, site/pest uses, pesticidal type, formulation code, and registration status for all products registered in the U.S.

  7. Evaluating Pesticides for Carcinogenic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA reviews pesticides for potential carcinogenicity. Learn about EPA's guidelines for evaluating a chemical's potential carcinogenicity and updates to EPA's guidelines to reflect increased understanding of ways chemicals may cause cancer.

  8. Pesticides on fruits and vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... serve organic produce. Organic growers use approved organic pesticides. You may want to consider it for thin-skinned items such as peaches, grapes, strawberries, and nectarines. To remove harmful bacteria, you must wash both organic and ...

  9. Data Requirements for Pesticide Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    In evaluating a pesticide registration application, we assess a wide variety of potential human health and environmental effects associated with use of the product. Learn about these data requirements.

  10. Leaching study of trace elements from coal ashes: A case study of Bokaro Thermal Power Station "B".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bihari; Kumar, Sanjay; Kumar, Madanjeet

    2004-07-01

    Electricity generation has been increasing at a rapid rate due to rapid industrialization and changing life styles. In our Country coal is the major source of energy since India has vast reserves of thermal power grade coal. Nearly every naturally occurring element is likely to be present in coal and these get entertained in the resultant coal ash. Indian coals contain high ash coupled with low calorific value and consequently resulting huge amount of coal ashes. This ash accumulates in on site piles and ponds thereby resulting in serious environmental problems particularly trace elements contamination of ground and surface waters. This study envisages the environmental assessment of coal ashes from Bokaro Thermal Power Station- Leaching study of coal ashes was made through analysis of leachates from open percolation leaching column experiments over a period of 300 days. Trace elements were observed within the regulatory limits. Many of the trace elements evaluated viz. Ni., Co, Se, Al, As, B, Ba, Sb, Hg, were observed at below detection limits of AAS. Na, K, Ca, Fe, Pb, Cd and other dissolved ions leached at significant concentration levels. This study suggests low cost high volume utilisation of bottom ash as fill material for reclaiming surrounding abandoned mined out areas in an environmentally acceptable manner.

  11. Short-Term Increase of Nitrogen Leaching in a Tea Field after Heavy Application of Organic Fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Nobuyuki; Uchimura, Koji; Nakamura, Takahisa; Karasuyama, Mitsuaki; Ae, Noriharu

    Since 1999, the annual amount of fertilizer applied to tea fields has been restricted to 50 kgN/10a as much as possible to avoid nitrate pollution of groundwater; however, the nitrogen application tends to be similar to the previous high fertilizer levels to sustain high yields and superior tea quality in recent years. We investigated how this restoration of the previous heavy application affects nitrogen leaching and the forms of nitrogen in the soil. According to our measurements, the increase in the application of organic fertilizer from 50 to 87-100 kgN/10a increased the concentration of nitrate leaching into underdrainage after ten months of heavy application. After another month, the nitrate concentration in the underdrainage reached the levels obtained previously under heavy application of organic fertilizer. This period (11 months) was six months shorter than the period required for the reduction of nitrate concentration to a prescribed plateau following the restriction of nitrogen application. Protein-like organic nitrogen in the soil increased one year after the heavy application of organic fertilizer with little increase in total nitrogen content. These results show that restoration of reduced nitrogen application to areas with previous heavy application rapidly increases nitrate leaching from the tea field with little increase in nitrogen accumulation in the soil. Our results suggest that restoration of the previous heavy application of organic fertilizer has the effect of rapidly increasing nitrogen loading to groundwater in tea cultivation areas.

  12. Monod kinetics rather than a first-order degradation model explains atrazine fate in soil mini-columns: Implications for pesticide fate modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheyns, K., E-mail: Karlien.Cheyns@ees.kuleuven.b [Division soil and water management, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Mertens, J.; Diels, J.; Smolders, E.; Springael, D. [Division soil and water management, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Pesticide transport models commonly assume first-order pesticide degradation kinetics for describing reactive transport in soil. This assumption was assessed in mini-column studies with associated batch degradation tests. Soil mini-columns were irrigated with atrazine in two intermittent steps of about 30 days separated by 161 days application of artificial rain water. Atrazine concentration in the effluent peaked to that of the influent concentration after initial break-through but sharply decreased while influx was sustained, suggesting a degradation lag phase. The same pattern was displayed in the second step but peak height and percentage of atrazine recovered in the effluent were lower. A Monod model with biomass decay was successfully calibrated to this data. The model was successfully evaluated against batch degradation data and mini-column experiments at lower flow rate. The study suggested that first-order degradation models may underestimate risk of pesticide leaching if the pesticide degradation potential needs amplification during degradation. - Population dynamics of pesticide degrading population should be taken into account when predictions of pesticide fate are made to avoid underestimation of pesticide break-through towards groundwater.

  13. Effects of two different organic amendments addition to soil on sorption-desorption, leaching, bioavailability of penconazole and the growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Lin, Jing Ling; Jia, Lin Xian; Liu, Ying; Pan, Bo; Yang, Yi; Lin, Yong

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of sugarcane bagasse compost (SBC) and chicken manure compost (CMC) on the sorption-desorption, leaching and bioavailability of the fungicide penconazole in soil in a laboratory setting. The autoclave-treated SBC or CMC was applied at 2.5% and 5.0% (w/w). Results of batch equilibrium experiments exhibited that the sorption capacity of soils for penconazole was significantly promoted by the addition of SBC or CMC, whereas desorption of penconazole was drastically reduced; the influence was enhanced as the amount of organic amendments increased. Results of column leaching experiment indicated that the addition of SBC or CMC significantly limited the vertical movement of penconazole through the soil columns, considerably decreasing the content of penconazole in the soil leachate. Furthermore, results of bioavailability experiments demonstrated that the addition of organic amendments (SBC or CMC) remarkably influenced the uptake and translocation of penconazole, decreased penconazole accumulation in the plant tissues and increased the plant elongation and biomass. These data revealed important changes in pesticide behavior under SBC or CMC application, which should be useful for developing strategies to protect groundwater and crops from contamination from the residual pesticides in soil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pesticides' influence on wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboni, Pierluigi; Cabras, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Wine quality strongly depends on the grape quality. To obtain high-quality wines, it is necessary to process healthy grapes at the correct ripeness stage and for this reason the farmer has to be especially careful in the prevention of parasite attacks on the grapevine. The most common fungal diseases affecting grape quality are downy and powdery mildew (Plasmopara viticola and Uncinula necator), and gray mold (Botrytis cinerea). On the other hand, the most dangerous insects are the grape moth (Lobesia botrana), vine mealybug (Planococcus ficus), and the citrus mealybug (Planococcus citri). Farmers fight grape diseases and insects applying pesticides that can be found at harvest time on grapes. The persistence of pesticides depends on the chemical characteristic of the active ingredients as well as on photodegradation, thermodegradation, codistillation, and enzymatic degradation. The pesticide residues on grapes can be transferred to the must and this can influence the selection and development of yeast strains. Moreover, yeasts can also influence the levels of the pesticides in the wine by reducing or adsorbing them on lees. During the fermentative process, yeasts can cause the disappearance of pesticide residues by degradation or absorption at the end of the fermentation when yeasts are deposited as lees. In this chapter, we reviewed the effect of commonly used herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides on yeasts. We also studied the effect of alcoholic and malolactic fermentation on pesticide residues. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Remediation of soil contaminated with pesticides by treatment with gamma radiation;Remediacao de solos contaminados com agrotoxicos pelo tratamento com radiacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Janilson Silva

    2009-07-01

    The discharge of empty plastic packaging of pesticides can be an environmental concern mainly by soil contamination. Nowadays, Brazil figures in third place among the leading world pesticide markets. An understanding of the processes that affect the transport and fate of pesticides is crucial to assess their potential for contamination of soil and groundwater, and to develop efficient and cost-effective site management and soil remediation strategies. Due to its impact on soil remediation has made sorption a major topic of research on soil-pesticide interactions. The main objective of this study is the evaluation of the pesticides transferring from contaminated mixture of commercial polymeric packing of high-density polyethylene, HDPE, used in agriculture to soil and their removal by gamma irradiation. Two soil samples of argyles compositions and media composition were exposed to a mixture of commercial polymeric packing contaminated with the pesticides methomyl, dimethoate, carbofuran, methidathion, triazine, thiophos, atrazine, ametryne, endosulfan, chloropyrifos, thriazophos and trifluralin. The pesticides leaching from packaging to soil was homogeneous considering a experimental research. The radiation treatment presented high efficiency on removal pesticides from both soil, but it depends on the physical-chemical characteristics of the contaminated soil. The higher efficiency was obtained in soils with higher organic material and humidity. The higher efficiency was obtained for the medium texture soil, with 20 kGy all present pesticides were removed in all layers. In the case of argyles texture soil, it was necessary a 30 kGy to remove the totality of present pesticides. (author)

  16. "LOVE TO HATE" pesticides: felicity or curse for the soil microbial community? An FP7 IAPP Marie Curie project aiming to establish tools for the assessment of the mechanisms controlling the interactions of pesticides with soil microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpouzas, D G; Tsiamis, G; Trevisan, M; Ferrari, F; Malandain, C; Sibourg, O; Martin-Laurent, F

    2016-09-01

    Pesticides end up in soil where they interact with soil microorganisms in various ways. On the Yin Side of the interaction, pesticides could exert toxicity on soil microorganisms, while on the Yang side of interaction, pesticides could be used as energy source by a fraction of the soil microbial community. The LOVE TO HATE project is an IAPP Marie Curie project which aims to study these complex interactions of pesticides with soil microorganisms and provide novel tools which will be useful both for pesticide regulatory purposes and agricultural use. On the Yin side of the interactions, a new regulatory scheme for assessing the soil microbial toxicity of pesticides will be proposed based on the use of advanced standardized tools and a well-defined experimental tiered scheme. On the Yang side of the interactions, advanced molecular tools like amplicon sequencing and functional metagenomics will be applied to define microbes that are involved in the rapid transformation of pesticides in soils and isolate novel pesticide biocatalysts. In addition, a functional microarray has been designed to estimate the biodegradation genetic potential of the microbial community of agricultural soils for a range of pesticide groups.

  17. Acid leaching of natural chrysotile asbestos to mesoporous silica fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletaškić, Jelena; Stanković, Nadežda; Daneu, Nina; Babić, Biljana; Stoiljković, Milovan; Yoshida, Katsumi; Matović, Branko

    2017-10-01

    Nanofibrous silica with a high surface area was produced from chrysotile by the acid-leaching method. Natural mineral chrysotile asbestos from Stragari, Korlace in Serbia was used as the starting material. The fibers were modified by chemical treatment with 1 M HCl and the mineral dissolution was monitored by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, inductively coupled plasma spectrometry and low-temperature nitrogen adsorption techniques to highlight the effects of the leaching process. The results showed that the applied concentration of acid solution and processing time of 4 h were sufficient to effectively remove the magnesium hydroxide layer and transform the crystal structure of the hazardous starting chrysotile to porous SiO2 nanofibers. With prolonged acid leaching, the specific surface area, S BET, calculated by BET equation, was increased from 147 up to 435 m2 g- 1, with micropores representing a significant part of the specific surface.

  18. Leaching kinetics of gibbsitic bauxite with sodium hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aal El-Sayed A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the results of a leaching kinetics study of bauxite ore with sodium hydroxide are presented. The effect of ore particle size, sodium hydroxide concentration and reaction temperature on the Al2O3 extraction rate was determined. The results obtained showed that 99% of Al2O3 was leached out using −200+270 mesh ore particle size at a reaction temperature of 105 °C for 60 min reaction time with 250 g/L NaOH. The solid-to-liquid ratio was maintained constant at 1:20. The results indicated that leaching of bauxite is the rate controlling process. The activation energy was determined to be 46.04 kJ/mole, which was characteristic for a chemically controlled process.

  19. BACTERIAL LEACHING OF ELECTRONIC SCRAP: INFLUENCE OF PROCESS PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Harue Yamane

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of bacterial leaching in the ore treatment is already known and also can be applied such as treatment of electronic waste to copper recovery. This paper investigates the influence of process parameters (pulp density, inoculums volume, rotation speed and initial concentration of ferrous iron on bacterial leaching of copper from printed circuit board of computers using the bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans–LR. Printed circuit boards from computers were comminuted using a hammer mill. The powder obtained was magnetically separated and the non-magnetic material used in this study. A shake flask study was carried out on the non-magnetic material using a shaker. The results show that Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans–LR can leach 99% of copper from printed circuit boards (non–magnetic material under the determined conditions through of the studies.

  20. Assessment of weathering and leaching rates of Thule hot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Outola, I. (STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)); Nygren, U.; Ramebaeck, H. (FOI CBRN Defence and Security (Sweden)); Sidhu, R. (Institute of Energy Technology, Environmental Monitoring Section, Health and Safety Dept. (Norway))

    2010-03-15

    Within the current project a methodology for separating actinide particles originating from the Thule 1968 accident has been developed. Particles were completely isolated in water using visual and radiometric methods. The particles were attached electrostatic to a plastic support and could easily be moved to any container for leaching studies or other type of studies. Leaching and dissolution studies performed within the project indicate that some particles are relatively easily destroyed or leached while others are more refractory. The results shows that even though the oxide particles are hard to completely dissolve they release material even when exposed to weak solvents like water and salt solutions. Exposures to lung simulant fluids show relatively slow dissolution rates comparable to what is found using only water. Sequential extraction of particles shows that variation between particles is very large; some dissolve easily while some does not. Of radiological importance is the disruption of particles when exposed to dissolution. (author)

  1. Stability and leaching of cobalt smelter fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vítková, Martina; Hyks, Jiri; Ettler, Vojtěch

    2013-01-01

    The leaching behaviour of fly ash from a Co smelter situated in the Zambian Copperbelt was studied as a function of pH (5–12) using the pH-static leaching test (CEN/TS 14997). Various experimental time intervals (48h and 168h) were evaluated. The leaching results were combined with the ORCHESTRA...... elements, the released concentrations were very similar after 48h and 168h, indicating near-equilibrium conditions in the system. Calcite, clinopyroxenes, quartz and amorphous phases predominated in the fly ash. Various metallic sulfides, alloys and the presence of Cu, Co and Zn in silicates and glass were...... and Cu. However, there is a high risk of Co, Cu, Pb and Zn mobility in the acidic soils around the smelter facility. Therefore, potential local options for “stabilisation” of the fly ash were evaluated on the basis of the modelling results using the PHREEQC code....

  2. Investigations into Recycling Zinc from Used Metal Oxide Varistors via pH Selective Leaching: Characterization, Leaching, and Residue Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Gutknecht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide varistors (MOVs are a type of resistor with significantly nonlinear current-voltage characteristics commonly used in power lines to protect against overvoltages. If a proper recycling plan is developed MOVs can be an excellent source of secondary zinc because they contain over 90 weight percent zinc oxide. The oxides of antimony, bismuth, and to a lesser degree cobalt, manganese, and nickel are also present in varistors. Characterization of the MOV showed that cobalt, nickel, and manganese were not present in the varistor material at concentrations greater than one weight percent. This investigation determined whether a pH selective dissolution (leaching process can be utilized as a starting point for hydrometallurgical recycling of the zinc in MOVs. This investigation showed it was possible to selectively leach zinc from the MOV without coleaching of bismuth and antimony by selecting a suitable pH, mainly higher than 3 for acids investigated. It was not possible to leach zinc without coleaching of manganese, cobalt, and nickel. It can be concluded from results obtained with the acids used, acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, and sulfuric, that sulfate leaching produced the most desirable results with respect to zinc leaching and it is also used extensively in industrial zinc production.

  3. Investigations into Recycling Zinc from Used Metal Oxide Varistors via pH Selective Leaching: Characterization, Leaching, and Residue Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutknecht, Toni; Gustafsson, Anna; Forsgren, Christer; Ekberg, Christian; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxide varistors (MOVs) are a type of resistor with significantly nonlinear current-voltage characteristics commonly used in power lines to protect against overvoltages. If a proper recycling plan is developed MOVs can be an excellent source of secondary zinc because they contain over 90 weight percent zinc oxide. The oxides of antimony, bismuth, and to a lesser degree cobalt, manganese, and nickel are also present in varistors. Characterization of the MOV showed that cobalt, nickel, and manganese were not present in the varistor material at concentrations greater than one weight percent. This investigation determined whether a pH selective dissolution (leaching) process can be utilized as a starting point for hydrometallurgical recycling of the zinc in MOVs. This investigation showed it was possible to selectively leach zinc from the MOV without coleaching of bismuth and antimony by selecting a suitable pH, mainly higher than 3 for acids investigated. It was not possible to leach zinc without coleaching of manganese, cobalt, and nickel. It can be concluded from results obtained with the acids used, acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, and sulfuric, that sulfate leaching produced the most desirable results with respect to zinc leaching and it is also used extensively in industrial zinc production.

  4. Leaching of Light Rare Earth Elements from Sichuan Bastnaesite: A Facile Process to Leach Trivalent Rare Earth Elements Selectively from Tetravalent Cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yueyue; Jiang, Ying; Qiu, Xianying; Zhao, Shilin

    2017-10-01

    The effects of the nitric acid concentration, leaching time, leaching temperature, and solid-to-liquid ratio on leaching efficiency were examined. From those results, a facile process for the selective leaching of trivalent rare earth elements (RE(III)) from tetravalent cerium (Ce(IV)) was proposed. The roasted bastnaesite was used to leach 34.87% of RE(III) and 2.15% of Ce(IV) at 60°C for 0.5 h with an acid concentration of 0.5 mol/L. This selective leaching process can be described by the shrinking-core model that follows the kinetic model 1 - 2/3 α - (1 - α)2/3. Subsequently, the leached slag was hydrothermally treated and followed by thorough leaching with 4.0-mol/L nitric acid. Furthermore, the specific surface area of the final leached slag is 57.7 m2/g, which is approximately 650 times higher than that of raw ore. Finally, selective leaching of RE(III) (>90%) was achieved without using an organic solvent for extraction, whereas lower value Ce(IV)was presented in the leached slag (>92%).

  5. Modeling, simulation, and optimization of bacterial leaching reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crundwell, F K

    Bacterial leaching represents an unusual problem in biochemical engineering, because the substrate for bacterial growth is not supplied directly, but is a product of another reaction, the leaching of mineral particles. In addition, leaching is a heterogeneous reaction dependent on the particle-size distribution in the feed and on the kinetics of particle shrinkage. In this study, these effects are incorporated in the material balance for each mineral by the number balance. Examination of the number balance gives rise to a novel analysis of the competing technologies for leaching. The model is completed by the addition of material balances for the ferrous and ferric ions, the dissolved oxygen, and for each bacterial species to the number balance for each mineral present in the feed. The model is compared with pilot plant data for three different ores. It is shown that the model is in excellent agreement with the data. The performance of a bacterial leaching reactor is explored using the model, and the washout and sensitivity criteria are determined. It is shown that there are three washout conditions, in which the leaching conversion drops to zero. The washout conditions are dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria, on the rate of dissolution of the mineral, and on the rate of mass transfer of oxygen to the reactor. The critical washout condition is that arising from the rate of mineral dissolution. The optimization of a plant in which continuous tank reactors are configured in series is addressed. This analysis shows that the primary reactor should be between 1.5 and 2 times the size of each of the secondary reactors in a series combination.

  6. Effect of Simulated Rainfall on Leaching and Efficacy of Fenamiphos

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, A. W.; Wauchope, R. D.; Burgoa, B.

    1995-01-01

    There is increasing concern in the United States about the pesticide movement in soil, groundwater contamination, and pesticide residue in food. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy, degradation, and movement of fenamiphos (Nemacur 15G) in the soil and residues in squash fruit as influenced by four simulated rainfall treatments (2.5 or 5.0 cm each applied 1 or 3 days after nematicide application) under field conditions. In 1990, concentrations of fenamiphos were greater i...

  7. Influence of soil structure on contaminant leaching from injected slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M G Mostofa; Pedersen, Christina Østerballe; Forslund, Anita; Veith, Tamie L; Laegdsmand, Mette

    2016-12-15

    Animal manure application to agricultural land provides beneficial organic matter and nutrients but can spread harmful contaminants to the environment. Contamination of fresh produce, surface water and shallow groundwater with the manure-borne pollutants can be a critical concern. Leaching and persistence of nitrogen, microorganisms (bacteriophage, E. coli, and Enterococcus) and a group of steroid hormone (estrogens) were investigated after injection of swine slurry into either intact (structured) or disturbed (homogeneous repacked) soil. The slurry was injected into hexaplicate soil columns at a rate of 50 t ha-1 and followed with four irrigation events: 3.5-h period at 10 mm h-1 after 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks. The disturbed columns delayed the leaching of a conservative tracer and microorganisms in the first irrigation event compared to the intact columns due to the effect of disturbed macropore flow paths. The slurry constituents that ended up in or near the macropore flow paths of the intact soil were presumably washed out relatively quickly in the first event. For the last three events the intact soil leached fewer microorganisms than the disturbed soil due to the bypassing effect of water through the macropore flow path in the intact soil. Estrogen leached from the intact soil in the first event only, but for the disturbed soil it was detected in the leachates of last two events also. Leaching from the later events was attributed to higher colloid transport from the disturbed soils. In contrast, NO3-N leaching from the intact soil was higher for all events except the first event, probably due to a lower nitrification rate in the disturbed soil. A week after the last irrigation event, the redistribution of all slurry constituents except NO3-N in most of the sections of the soil column was higher for the disturbed soil. Total recovery of E. coli was significantly higher from the disturbed soil and total leaching of mineral nitrogen was significantly lower

  8. Imouraren - uranium leaching tests and specificities with analcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattinne-Morice, A., E-mail: aurelia.wattinne@areva.com [AREVA - Tour Areva, Paris la Defense (France); Belieres, M. [AREVA - Service d' Etudes de Procede et Analyses (SEPA), Bessines sur Gartempe (France)

    2010-07-01

    Imouraren is a sedimentary uranium deposit (total > 150 000 tU, average U ~ 0.08 %), located in Niger (~ 100 km from Agadez). Uranium mineralization is trapped in sandstones and is widely oxidized (uranotyle, metatuyamunite), but a part remains reduced (pitchblende, uraninite). The sandstones have a peculiar mineralogical assemblage (analcite partly chloritized) which can affect uranium recovery. Several acid heap leaching tests have been completed to determine the most suitable process parameters. Microscopic studies and XRD analysis performed on fresh ore and on leached residue highlight the complex behavior of uranium and the associated mineralogical families during the tests. (author)

  9. Valorisation de la Carte Numérique des Sols de Wallonie et d'une base de données disponible en analyse de sols, dans le cadre de l'évaluation du risque de pollution des eaux souterraines par les pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bah, BB.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Making use of the Digital Soil Map of Wallonia and of an available soil analysis database for assessing the risk of pesticide leaching to groundwater. This study shows how the Digital Soil Map of Wallonia and the associated soil database Aardewerk can be combined with the MetaPEARL model to assess the sensitivity of agricultural soils to pesticide transfer into underground water tables in Wallonia (Southern Belgium. MetaPEARL is based on an analytical expression which describes the concentration of leached pesticides at the soil profile bottom depending on available data on soil characteristics, climate and pesticide properties. The results show an important soil sensitivity to pesticide transfer with a coefficient of retention on organic matter (Kom very weak (about 10 dm3.kg-1 or with a relatively high half-life time (DT50 about 60 days. In this case, the pesticide is weakly retained by soil organic matter or slowly degraded and then stays available in the soil and can be quickly leached during rainfalls. In other respects, the pesticide sensitivity to leaching is strongly correlated with soil texture and its organic matter content. It is also observed that the concentration of leached pesticide is strongly depending of the rainfall surplus (water flux into the soil or hydrous balance. A sensitivity analysis has shown that the model is very sensitive to soil thickness, to organic matter content, to the bulk density of the mineral fraction by textural classes and of the organic matter. Therefore, these pedological variables have to be assessed with the highest precision to avoid adding further uncertainty to the predictions obtained. On the basis of the most sensitive soil variables, the analysis of "spatial" uncertainty related to the results delivered by MetaPEARL, due to the consideration of an unique representative value by soil type and by region (deterministic approach, shows that this approach tends to under-estimate the concentration of

  10. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify the...

  11. 40 CFR 152.175 - Pesticides classified for restricted use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pesticides classified for restricted...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Classification of Pesticides § 152.175 Pesticides classified for restricted use. The following uses of pesticide products containing the...

  12. The study of environmental impact quotient (EIQ of pesticides used in wheat and barley farms in Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L maleki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The environmental impact quotient (EIQ developed by Kovach et al (1992 is used an effort to fill an important gap; i.e. the need to provide farmers and others with easy-to-use information about the adverse effects of pesticides. It represents a method for calculating the environmental impacts of pesticides, and the values obtained from these calculations can be used to compare different pesticides and pest management programs with each other to ultimately determine which program or pesticide is likely to have the lowest environmental impact. The EIQ value for a particular active ingredient is calculated according to a formula that includes parameters for toxicity (dermal, chronic, bird, bee, fish, and beneficial arthropod, soil half-life, systemicity, leaching potential, and plant surface half-life. Each of these parameters is given a rating of 1, 3 or 5 to reflect its potential of causing harm. Six of these ratings are based on measured or known properties and the other five are based on judgments according to their potentially low, moderate or severe impact. Since the EIQ value is mainly a hazard indicator, additional calculations are required to obtain an indication of the pesticide risk. To account for exposure, an equation called the Field Use EIQ has been developed. This rating is calculated by multiplying the EIQ value for a specific chemical from the tables by the percent active ingredient in the formulation and its dosage rate used per hectare (usually in liters or kilograms of the formulated product. EIQ is used in different studies to compare the environmental effects of different pesticides and/or different production systems (Avila et al., 2011; Doris et al., 2011; Gallivan et al., 2001; Macharia et al., 2009. The aim of this study was to evaluate management strategies in using pesticides in wheat and barley farms in the city of Mashhad located in the Khorasan Razavi province in Iran. Materials and Methods Data related

  13. Household organophosphorus pesticide use and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Shilpa; Liew, Zeyan; Paul, Kimberly; Lee, Pei-Chen; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Bronstein, Jeff M; Ritz, Beate

    2013-10-01

    Household pesticide use is widespread in the USA. Since the 1970s, organophosphorus chemicals (OPs) have been common active ingredients in these products. Parkinson's disease (PD) has been linked to pesticide exposures but little is known about the contributions of chronic exposures to household pesticides. Here we investigate whether long-term use of household pesticides, especially those containing OPs, increases the odds of PD. In a population-based case-control study, we assessed frequency of household pesticide use for 357 cases and 807 controls, relying on the California Department of Pesticide Regulation product label database to identify ingredients in reported household pesticide products and the Pesticide Action Network pesticide database of chemical ingredients. Using logistic regression we estimated the effects of household pesticide use. Frequent use of any household pesticide increased the odds of PD by 47% [odds ratio (OR)=1.47, (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13, 1.92)]; frequent use of products containing OPs increased the odds of PD more strongly by 71% [OR=1.71, (95% CI: 1.21, 2.41)] and frequent organothiophosphate use almost doubled the odds of PD. Sensitivity analyses showed that estimated effects were independent of other pesticide exposures (ambient and occupational) and the largest odds ratios were estimated for frequent OP users who were carriers of the 192QQ paraoxonase genetic variant related to slower detoxification of OPs. We provide evidence that household use of OP pesticides is associated with an increased risk of developing PD.

  14. Impact of pesticide use by smallholder farmers on water quality in the Wakiso District, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltramare, Christelle; Weiss, Frederik T.; Atuhaire, Aggrey; Staudacher, Philipp; Niwagaba, Charles; Stamm, Christian

    2017-04-01

    As in many tropical countries, farmers of the Wakiso District rely on heavy use of pesticides to protect crops and animals. This may impair human and environmental health due to poor application techniques, misuse of pesticide bins or diffuse pesticide losses from the treated fields during intense tropical rainstorms. The extent of pollution in different environmental compartments however, are generally only poorly documented. The same holds true for quantitative data on the relevance of different transport pathways of pesticides into the environment. Part of the limited knowledge is caused by the demanding sampling and analytical techniques that are necessary to obtain robust data on the actual pollution status. Especially in surface waters, pesticide concentration may vary rapidly in time such that grab samples may yield a very incomplete picture. This incompleteness was often enhanced because of limited analytical windows that covered only a small fraction of the pesticides actually used. In this presentation, we describe an approach to overcome these limitations to a large extent by using three different passive sampling devices and two broad analytical techniques (GC-MS/MS, LC HR-MS) that allow the quantification of about 260 different pesticides. We will present how these approaches are implemented in the catchment area of the Wakiso District in Uganda. This area is intensively used by smallholder farmers who grow a large set of different crops. Diffuse losses are expected to occur mainly during the two rainy seasons (March to May and September to November). Accordingly, the study will focus on this situation.

  15. Measuring and predicting environmental concentrations of pesticides in air after application to paddy water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Federico; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G; Trevisan, Marco; Capri, Ettore

    2005-05-01

    In this study, the volatilization of five pesticides applied to an artificial flooded paddy field was assessed using the theoretical profile shape (TPS) and the integrate horizontal flux (IHF) techniques. The dataset derived was utilized to improve the volatilization routine of the rice water quality (RICEWQ) model. The masses of pesticides ethoprophos, procymidone, metalaxyl, chlorpyrifos, and chlorpyrifos methyl volatilized from paddy water and their concentrations in paddy water were determined for a period of 6 d after application. The highest and lowest volatilization losses were observed for chlorpyrifos and metalaxyl, respectively, accounting for 3.3% and 0.03% of their initially applied amount. A rapid pesticide dissipation was evident in paddy water during the study period. The RICEWQ model was used to simulate the fate of pesticides in the artificial paddy system. The Kvolat, an empiric coefficient used by the model as an input parameter, was calculated for all pesticides through model calibration. RICEWQ simulated well the fate of pesticides in paddy water. A significant regression correlation between Henry's law constant (Hk) and Kvolat of the studied compounds was established which could facilitate the parametrization of the model for describing pesticide volatilization.

  16. A novel device based on a fluorescent cross-responsive sensor array for detecting pesticide residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Hou, Changjun; Lei, Jincan; Huo, Danqun; Luo, Xiaogang; Dong, Liang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a novel, simple, rapid, and low-cost detection device for pesticide residue was constructed. A sensor array based on a cross-responsive mechanism was designed. The data collection and processing system was used to detect fluorescent signal of the sensor arrays, and to extract unique patterns of the tested pesticide residue. Four selected pesticides, carbendazim, diazine, fenvalerate, and pentachloronitrobenzene, were detected by the proposed device. Unsupervised pattern recognition methods, hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis, were used to analyze the data. The results showed that the methods could 100% discriminate the four pesticide residues. According to the standard regression linear curve of the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of pesticide, the quantitative value of the pesticide was detected, and the device obtained responses at concentrations below 8 ppb, and it has a good linear relationship in the range of 0.01-1 ppm. According to the results, the proposed detection device showed excellent selectivity and discrimination ability for the pesticide residues. However, our preliminary study demonstrated that the proposed detection device has excellent potential application for the safety inspection of food.

  17. Cannabis, pesticides and conflicting laws: the dilemma for legalized States and implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Dave

    2014-08-01

    State laws on the legalization of medical and recreational cannabis are rapidly evolving. Similar to other crops, cannabis is susceptible to multiple pests during cultivation. Growers have an economic incentive to produce large yields and high quality plants, and may resort to pesticides to achieve these outcomes. Currently, there are no pesticides registered for cannabis in the United States, given its illegal status by the federal government. This discrepancy creates a regulatory vacuum and dilemma for States with legal medical and recreational cannabis that seek to balance lawful compliance with pesticides and worker or public health. Pesticide use presents occupational safety issues that can be mitigated through established worker protection measures. The absence of approved products for cannabis may result in consumer exposures to otherwise more hazardous pesticides or higher residue levels. While many legal and scientific hurdles exist to register conventional pesticides for use on cannabis, legalized States have explored other opportunities to leverage the present regulatory infrastructure. Stakeholder engagement and outreach to the cannabis industry from credible sources could mitigate pesticide misuse and harm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Residual pesticide detection on food with particle-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Huang, LiChuan; Masui, Kyoko; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2014-08-01

    Modern farming relies highly on pesticides to protect agricultural food items from insects for high yield and better quality. Increasing use of pesticide has raised concern about its harmful effects on human health and hence it has become very important to detect even small amount of pesticide residues. Raman spectroscopy is a suitable nondestructive method for pesticide detection, however, it is not very effective for low concentration of pesticide molecules. Here, we report an approach based on plasmonic enhancement, namely, particle enhanced Raman spectroscopy (PERS), which is rapid, nondestructive and sensitive. In this technique, Raman signals are enhanced via the resonance excitation of localized plasmons in metallic nanoparticles. Gold nanostructures are promising materials that have ability to tune surface plasmon resonance frequency in visible to near-IR, which depends on shape and size of nanostructures. We synthesized gold nanorods (GNRs) with desired shape and size by seed mediated growth method, and successfully detected very tiny amount of pesticide present on food items. We also conformed that the detection of pesticide was not possible by usual Raman spectroscopy.

  19. Challenges in Regulating Pesticide Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lydy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the field of mixture toxicity and the challenges in regulating pesticide mixtures. Even though pesticides are unique chemical stressors designed to have biological activity that can affect a number of nontarget species, they are intentionally placed into the environment in large quantities. Currently, methods and terminology for evaluating mixture toxicity are poorly established. The most common approach used is the assumption of additive concentration, with the concentrations adjusted for potency to a reference toxicant. Using this approach, the joint action of pesticides that have similar chemical structures and modes of toxic action can be predicted. However, this approach and other modeling techniques often provide little insight into the observed toxicity produced by mixtures of pesticides from different classes. Particularly difficult to model are mixtures that involve a secondary toxicant that changes the toxicokinetics of a primary toxicant. This may result in increased activation or a change in the persistence of the primary toxicant within the organism and may be responsible for a several-fold increase or decrease in toxicity. At present, the ecological effects caused by mixtures of pesticides are given little consideration in the regulatory process. However, mixtures are being considered in relation to human health in the pesticide registration process, setting a precedent that could be followed for ecological protection. Additionally, pesticide mixtures may be regulated through toxicity testing of surface water under the Clean Water Act. The limits of our basic knowledge of how mixtures interact are compromising both these avenues for regulating mixtures. We face many challenges to adequately protecting the environment from mixture toxicity; these challenges include understanding the interactions of toxicants within an organism, identifying the mixtures that most commonly occur and cause adverse effects, and

  20. Pesticide use in ornamental production: what are the benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, James A; Cloyd, Raymond A

    2009-04-01

    Pest control in ornamental production is challenging owing to the diversity of crops grown, the desired aesthetic perfection, the potential economic loss due to failure and the multitude of arthropod pests encountered. Agricultural crops of less value per acre, such as row crops, can tolerate a certain level of damage from arthropod pests without compromising yields. Damage thresholds for ornamentals, however, are essentially zero. Pesticides are a viable method of protection for such a crop in lieu of alternatives. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of pesticides to the ornamental industry. Pesticides provide many benefits to ornamental producers, including: (1) consistent availability; (2) rapid kill; (3) reliable and consistent control; (4) increased crop production and quality; (5) they may be used to prevent movement of invasive pests; (6) they are less expensive (in general) than alternatives; (7) they may reduce plant pathogenic transmission; (8) they may be used in conjunction with natural enemies. Pesticide use will continue to be a significant strategy for dealing with arthropod pests so that ornamental producers can stay competitive in both national and international markets. Copyright (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Uptake and persistence of pesticides in plants: measurements and model estimates for imidacloprid after foliar and soil application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraske, Ronnie; Castells, Francesc; Vijay, Ashwin; Muñoz, Pere; Antón, Assumpció

    2009-06-15

    The uptake and persistence behaviour of the insecticide imidacloprid in tomato plants treated by (i) foliar spray application and (ii) soil irrigation was studied using two plant uptake models. In addition to a pesticide deposition model, a dynamic root uptake and translocation model was developed, and both models predict residual concentrations of pesticides in or on fruits. The model results were experimentally validated. The fraction of imidacloprid ingested by the human population is on average 10(-2) to 10(-6), depending on the time between pesticide application and ingestion, the processing step, and the application method. Model and experimentally derived intake fractions deviated by less than a factor of 2 for both application techniques. Total imidacloprid residues were up to five times higher in plants treated by foliar spray application than by soil irrigation. However, peeling tomatoes treated by spray application reduces the human intake fraction by up to three orders of magnitude. Model calculations suggest that drip-irrigation in a closed hydroponic system minimizes worker and consumer exposure to pesticides and prevents runoff of pesticide by spray drift and leaching into the environment.

  2. Sulfuric Acid and Ammonium Sulfate Leaching of Alumina from Lampang Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweena Numluk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of the global alumina industry has led to a considerable increase in the production alumina and processing of alumina from non-bauxitic sources. Lampang clays comprise various minerals that contain about 22.70 wt% of extractable alumina. Local clay was ground, activated by calcination and treated with sulfuric acid to extract alumina. In the activation step, the effects of temperature and time on the extraction of alumina and iron were investigated. The leaching experiments were performed on clay samples with particle sizes less than 200 mesh. The samples were calcined at different temperatures, ranging from 450°C to 1050°C, and for different periods, ranging from 30 to 150 min. The optimum conditions for the extraction of alumina from Lampang clay include grinding the clay to pass through a 200 mesh sieve, calcining the ground clay at 750°C for 30 min, extracting the alumina from the calcined clay by leaching with 3M sulfuric acid, and using an acid to clay ratio of 80 wt% at 100°C for 120 min. An aluminum dissolution efficiency of 95.1 % was achieved under the conditions that resulted in the maximum dissolution efficiency of iron (26.6 %.

  3. 75 FR 62323 - Pesticide Management and Disposal; Standards for Pesticide Containers and Containment; Change to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ...-0327; FRL-8848-8] RIN 2070-AJ74 Pesticide Management and Disposal; Standards for Pesticide Containers...). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is amending the pesticide container and containment regulations to... Disposal; Standards for Pesticide Containers and Containment'' (71 FR 47330) (container and containment...

  4. Linking pesticides and human health: a geographic information system (GIS) and Landsat remote sensing method to estimate agricultural pesticide exposure

    OpenAIRE

    VoPham, Trang; Wilson, John P.; Ruddell, Darren; Rashed, Tarek; Brooks, Maria M.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Talbott, Evelyn O.; Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Weissfeld, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate pesticide exposure estimation is integral to epidemiologic studies elucidating the role of pesticides in human health. Humans can be exposed to pesticides via residential proximity to agricultural pesticide applications (drift). We present an improved geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing method, the Landsat method, to estimate agricultural pesticide exposure through matching pesticide applications to crops classified from temporally concurrent Landsat satellite remo...

  5. Leaching of soil calcium, magnesium, and potassium in irrigated orchard lysimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, G.H.; Stevenson, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of N fertilizer and grass cover vs. clean cultivation on Ca, Mg, and K leaching were measured and the changes in concentrations of these cations in soil and leaf and fruit tissue of McIntosh apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh were determined. Twelve lysimeters, each containing an Osoyoos sandy loam soil and a single McIntosh apple tree, have been monitored for Ca, Mg, and K concentration of soil, drainage water, and tree leaves and fruit from 1976 to 1980. Lysimeter treatments included factorial combinations of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) and clean cultivation and two N fertilization rates (162 (N1) and 324 kg N ha/sup -1/ year/sup -1/ (N2) as NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/). Clean cultivation had the greatest effect on cation leaching with significantly higher Ca and Mg concentrations and higher Ca, Mg, and K losses frequently measured in drainage from these plots. By 1981, exchangeable Ca, Mg, and soil pH at the 0- to 0.10-m soil depth in the cultivated plots had declined by 4.3 mmol kg/sup -1/, 2.2 mmol kg/sup -1/, and 0.3 units, respectively, relative to the grass plots. Drainage from N2 relative to N1 lysimeters had a significantly higher Mg concentration for 4 years but significantly higher Ca and Mg loss rates in only 1 year because of lack of differences in drainage volumes between N2 and N1 plots. For all lysimeters Ca and Mg leached more rapidly than K. Annual losses over all treatments, 1976 through 1980, average 387 kg Ca ha/sup -1/, 118 kg Mg ha/sup -1/, and 44 kg K ha/sup -1/. Such leaching would eventually lead to enrichment of local soils with K relative to Mg and Ca. This is undesirable since McIntosh trees are susceptible to Mg deficiency and K:Ca antagonism. Therefore, periodic additions of Ca and Mg as through dolomitic liming should be considered for these orchards. Also, K fertilization accelerates existing trends to relative enrichment of these soils with K. 21 references, 5 tables.

  6. Test Guidelines for Pesticides and Toxic Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents that specify methods EPA recommends to generate data submitted to EPA to support the registration of a pesticide, setting of a tolerance or tolerance exemption for pesticide residues, or the decision making process for an industrial chemical.

  7. Assessing Human Health Risk from Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA protects human health and the environment by evaluating the risk associated with pesticides before allowing them to be used in the United States. Learn about the tools and processes used in risk assessment for pesticides.

  8. Pesticide risks around the home (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticides are substances which kill or deter unwanted pests, such as insects or rodents. These substances can ... avoid an accidental ingestion is to keep all pesticides out of the reach of children.

  9. Neurobehavioral and neurodevelopmental effects of pesticide exposures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    London, L.; Beseler, C.; Bouchard, M.F.; Bellinger, D.C.; Colosio, C.; Grandjean, P.; Harari, R.; Kootbodien, T.; Kromhout, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; Little, F.; Meijster, T.; Moretto, A.; Rohlman, D.S.; Stallones, L.

    2012-01-01

    The association between pesticide exposure and neurobehavioral and neurodevelopmental effects is an area of increasing concern. This symposium brought together participants to explore the neurotoxic effects of pesticides across the lifespan. Endpoints examined included neurobehavioral, affective and

  10. Neurobehavioral and neurodevelopmental effects of pesticide exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    London, Leslie; Beseler, Cheryl; Bouchard, Maryse F

    2012-01-01

    The association between pesticide exposure and neurobehavioral and neurodevelopmental effects is an area of increasing concern. This symposium brought together participants to explore the neurotoxic effects of pesticides across the lifespan. Endpoints examined included neurobehavioral, affective ...

  11. How We Engage Our Pesticide Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The success of EPA's pesticide program is directly connected to our efforts to engage all stakeholders. In addition to meetings on pesticide-specific actions, we sponsor advisory committees that include diverse, independent stakeholders.

  12. Secondary Containers and Service Containers for Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secondary containers and service containers are used by pesticide applicators in the process of applying a pesticide. EPA does not require secondary containers or service containers to be labeled or to meet particular construction standards. Learn more.

  13. 75 FR 6656 - Pesticide Product; Registration Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... Pollution Prevention Division (7511P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200... be reproduced. vi. Provide specific examples to illustrate your concerns and suggest alternatives.... Keith A. Matthews, Acting Director, Biopesticides and Pollution Prevention Division, Office of Pesticide...

  14. Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings: 6th Edition manual gives healthcare providers a quick reference resource for the best toxicology and treatment information for patients with pesticide exposures.

  15. Pesticide runoff from greenhouse production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseth, Roger; Haarstad, Ketil

    2010-01-01

    A research has been undertaken studying pesticide residues in water from greenhouses and the use of soils and filter materials to reduce such losses. The pesticides detected in water samples collected downstream greenhouses include 9 fungicides, 5 herbicides and 4 insecticides. 10 compounds from flower and vegetable productions were frequently found to exceed environmental risk levels, and with a few exceptions the compounds were found in higher concentrations than those typically found in agricultural runoff. Some compounds were found in high concentrations (>1 microg/l) in undiluted runoff from greenhouses producing vegetables. Nutrient concentrations in the runoff were also sporadically very high, with phosphorous values varying between 0.85 and 7.4 mg P/l, and nitrogen values between 7.5 and 41.4 mg N/l. Undiluted runoff from the productions showed values of 60 mg P/l and 300 mg N/l. High values of pesticides correlated with high values of nutrients, especially P. Column experiments using a sandy agricultural soil and stock solutions of non-polar and slightly polar pesticides mixed with a complex binder and nutrients showed a significant reduction for nearly all of the compounds used, indicating that transport through soil will reduce the concentrations of the studied pesticides. The pesticide adsorption capacity of the filter materials pine bark, peat, Sphagnum moss, compost, oat straw, ferrous sand and clay soil were tested in batch and column experiments. Adsorption were studied contacting the filter materials with aqueous solutions containing greenhouse production pesticides. The batch experiments showed that pine bark and peat, both combining a high content of organic matter with a low ph, provided the highest adsorption for most of the tested pesticides. Sphagnum moss, compost and oat straw also showed high adsorption for most of the pesticides, while the mineral filters provided the lowest adsorption (30-55%). Further column experiments confirmed these

  16. Organochlorine Pesticides in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.

    1968-01-01

    Each year for nearly 20 years, thousands of pounds of persistent organochlorine pesticides have been applied to outdoor areas in many countries. These compounds may last for a very long time in the environment, and be carried by wind, water, and animals to places far distant from where they are used. As a result, most living organisms now contain organochlorine residues. This paper constitutes a selective review of the literature concerning the occurrence, distribution, and effects of organochlorines in the environment. Highest concentrations generally occur in carnivorous species. Thus predatory and fish-eating birds ordinarily have higher residues than do herbivores; quantities are similar in birds of similar habits in different countries. Any segment of the ecosystem - marshland, pond, forest, or field - receives various amounts and kinds of pesticides at irregular intervals. The different animals absorb, detoxify, store, and excrete pesticides at different rates. Different degrees of magnification of pesticide residues by living organisms in an environment are the practical result of many interactions that are far more complex than implied by the statement of magnification up the food chain. These magnifications may be millions of times from water to mud or only a few times from food to first consumer. Direct mortality of wild animals as an aftermath of recommended pesticide treatments has been recorded in the literature of numerous countries. However, accidents and carelessness also accompany pesticide use on a percentage basis and are a part of the problem. More subtle effects on the size and species composition of populations are more difficult to perceive in time to effect remedies. The possibility of ecological effects being mediated through changes in physiology and behavior has received some attention and has resulted in some disquieting findings. These include discovery of the activity of organochlorines in stimulating the breakdown of hormones or in

  17. Research Progress on Pesticide Residue Analysis Techniques in Agro-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Ze-ying

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There are constant occurrences of acute pesticide poisoning among consumers and pesticide residue violations in agro-products import/export trading. Pesticide residue analysis is the important way to protect the food safety and the interest of import/export enterprises. There has been a rapid development in pesticide residue analysis techniques in recent years. In this review, the research progress in the past five years were discussed in the respects of samples preparation and instrument determination. The application, modification and development of the QuEChERS method in samples preparation and the application of tandem mass spectrometry and high resolution mass spectrometry were reviewed. And the implications for the future of the field were discussed.

  18. Wildlife ecotoxicology of pesticides: can we track effects to the population level and beyond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Heinz-R; Triebskorn, Rita

    2013-08-16

    During the past 50 years, the human population has more than doubled and global agricultural production has similarly risen. However, the productive arable area has increased by just 10%; thus the increased use of pesticides has been a consequence of the demands of human population growth, and its impact has reached global significance. Although we often know a pesticide's mode of action in the target species, we still largely do not understand the full impact of unintended side effects on wildlife, particularly at higher levels of biological organization: populations, communities, and ecosystems. In these times of regional and global species declines, we are challenged with the task of causally linking knowledge about the molecular actions of pesticides to their possible interference with biological processes, in order to develop reliable predictions about the consequences of pesticide use, and misuse, in a rapidly changing world.

  19. Defective zoospore encystment and suppressed cyst germination of Phytophthora palmivora caused by transient leaching treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksterhuis, J; Deacon, J W

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of encysting zoospores of Phytophthora palmivora during leaching conditions was studied. Zoospores encysted and germinated successfully on polycarbonate membranes after mechanical agitation. Transient (10 min) leaching treatments with nutrient-free buffer underneath the membranes

  20. Influence of chalcopyrite structure on their leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Sokić

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the chalcopyrite leaching by sodium nitrate and sulfuric acid solution, leaching rate decreases with increasing the time and a part of chalcopyrite mineral grains remains in the leach residue. In chalcopyrite concentrate, 95.5 % of chalcopyrite mineral occurs as in liberated grains, and the rest is in association with gangue minerals, which is very favorably from the aspect of hydrometallurgical treatment. Complex forms, like impregnations and complex intergrowths, do not exist. After experiments carried out, leaching of copper achieved 84 % at temperature 80 o C and time 240 min. In the all leach residues, 97 % chalcopyrite mineral grains occur as liberated with highly corroded surfaces. Therefore, the structural assembly of chalcopyrite grains is favorable and no reason to reduce the leaching rate in the final stage of reaction. Reason for this is elemental sulfur, which was formed during the reaction, precipitated at the particle surfaces, and slowed down the leaching rate in the final stage of leaching process.

  1. Quantitative leaching of a Nigerian chalcopyrite ore by nitric acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Due to increasing uses of copper nitrate, Cu(NO3)2, as catalysts, textile and polishing agents for other metals, experiment on the leaching of a Nigerian chalcopyrite ore by nitric acid for possible production of copper nitrate was examined. The effects of acid concentration, temperature and particle size on the dissolution ...

  2. Mass Loss and Nutrient Release through Leaching in Tectona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    West African Journal of Applied Ecology, vol. 24(1), 2016: 43–58. Mass Loss and Nutrient Release through Leaching in Tectona grandisand Theobroma cacao leaf litter in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. A. I. Odiwe*, C. F. Akinye and O. O. Agboola. Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife,. 22005, Osun ...

  3. Teaching Paleontology with an Acid-Leaching Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talent, John A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Described is an acid-leaching facility at Macquarie University in Australia for teaching paleontology. The facility is used for teaching both undergraduate and graduate students and for research by staff and graduate students. Drawings of the facility are included and courses are described. (Author/RH)

  4. Environmental Hazard Assessment of Jarosite Waste Using Batch Leaching Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kerolli – Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jarosite waste samples from Trepça Zinc Industry in Kosovo were subjected to two batch leaching tests as an attempt to characterize the leaching behavior and mobility of minor and major elements of jarosite waste. To achieve this, deionized water and synthetic acidic rain leaching tests were employed. A two-step acidic treatment in microwave digestion system were used to dissolve jarosite waste samples, followed by determination of Al, Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, S, Si, Sr, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. The validation of the procedure was performed by the analysis of two geochemical reference materials, S JR-3 and S Jsy-1. Two toxicity leaching tests revealed a high metal releasing of Cd, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, Zn, and As, and the metal release risk for these elements is still very high due the low pH and acid rain. The statistical analysis showed useful data information on the relationship between elements in jarosite samples in two different extraction conditions (deionized water and synthetic acid rain.

  5. Investigation of Chemical and Microbial Leaching of Iron ore in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    ABSTRACT: Investigations on the chemical and microbial leaching of a Nigerian Iron-ore in sulphuric acid have been carried out. The influence of ... and Awaruite, formed by the association of nickel with iron. Other minerals of .... Characterization of the thiobaccilus bacteria:- The solidified nutrient agar was melted in a ...

  6. Leaching of Silver from Silver-Impregnated Food Storage Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, James F.; Niece, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The use of silver in commercial products has proliferated in recent years owing to its antibacterial properties. Food containers impregnated with micro-sized silver promise long food life, but there is some concern because silver can leach out of the plastic and into the stored food. This laboratory experiment gives students the opportunity to…

  7. The Rhizocephalan parasite of the crab Xantho incisus (Leach)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1955-01-01

    As shown by Holthuis (1954), the correct name for the European crab commonly referred to as Xantho floridus (Montagu) is Xantho incisus (Leach). A Rhizocephalan parasite of this crab was first mentioned (without an indication of specific characters) by Gerbe (1862); afterwards specimens were

  8. Estimated water requirements for gold heap-leach operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a perspective on the amount of water necessary for conventional gold heap-leach operations. Water is required for drilling and dust suppression during mining, for agglomeration and as leachate during ore processing, to support the workforce (requires water in potable form and for sanitation), for minesite reclamation, and to compensate for water lost to evaporation and leakage. Maintaining an adequate water balance is especially critical in areas where surface and groundwater are difficult to acquire because of unfavorable climatic conditions [arid conditions and (or) a high evaporation rate]; where there is competition with other uses, such as for agriculture, industry, and use by municipalities; and where compliance with regulatory requirements may restrict water usage. Estimating the water consumption of heap-leach operations requires an understanding of the heap-leach process itself. The task is fairly complex because, although they all share some common features, each gold heap-leach operation is unique. Also, estimating the water consumption requires a synthesis of several fields of science, including chemistry, ecology, geology, hydrology, and meteorology, as well as consideration of economic factors.

  9. Characterisation of Oyster Shell for Neutralisation of Bio-leached ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterisation studies of Oyster Shell (Mercenera mercenera) collected from coastal towns of Ghana and its neutralising effect on bio-leached effluent has been studied using XRF, XRD, Zeta Meter, BET and SEM/EDX. The study confirmed that OS contains high calcium equivalent to about 54% CaO. The OS consists ...

  10. Leach and radiolysis data for FUETAP concretes containing SRP wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, L.R.; Rogers, G.C.; Morgan, M.T.; Stinton, D.P.; Kessler, J.H.; Robinson, S.M.; Moore, J.G.

    1983-04-01

    This supplement to ORNL/TM-8579 contains experimental results for leach tests and alpha-radiolysis tests made on FUETAP concretes containing Savannah River Plant waste. The results, presented in two sections, consist of both the raw data and calculated values for individual experiments. This information is summarized and analyzed in Sections 5 and 7 of ORNL/TM-8579.

  11. Leach and mold resistance of essential oil metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2011-01-01

    Purified primary metabolites from essential oils were previously shown to be bioactive inhibitors of mold fungi on unleached Southern pine sapwood, either alone or in synergy with a second metabolite. This study evaluated the leachability of these compounds in Southern pine that was either dip- or vacuum-treated. Following laboratory leach tests, specimens were...

  12. Mass Loss and Nutrient Release through Leaching in Tectona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study looked at the mass loss and rate of leaching of nutrients in the two tree species. Bulk of fallen senescent leaf litters were collected from the plantations, air-dried and thoroughly mixed. Two grammes of each species was weighed into a 500 ml beaker and 250 ml of distilled water added and were retrieved at ...

  13. Selective removal of chromium from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The selective removal of chromium, a trace impurity that degrades the whiteness of titanium(IV) oxide pigments, from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ilmenite, was investigated by solvent extraction with xylene solutions of trioctylamine. Important factors of commercial significance affecting the extraction operation have been ...

  14. Leaching studies of inorganic and organic compounds from fly ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariese, F.; Swart, K.; Morabito, R.; Brunori, C.; Balzamo, S.; Slobodnik, J.; Korenkova, E.; Janos, P.; Wildnerova, M.; Hlavay, J.; Polyak, K.; Fodor, P.; Muntau, H.

    2002-01-01

    Fly ash is produced in massive quantities by fossil fuel based power plants and waste incinerators, and contains high levels of potentially toxic chemicals. Various leaching tests exist to determine the available fractions, but the outcome is strongly dependent on the experimental conditions, and

  15. Speciation of arsenic and selenium during leaching of fly ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, E.E. van der

    1995-01-01

    The leaching (release) of large amounts of oxyanions, such as those of arsenic and selenium, is an major environmental problem when it comes to the disposal or use of coal fly ash. To predict environmentally safe conditions for the disposal or use of fly ash in, for example,

  16. Study on indium leaching from mechanically activated hard zinc residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, changes in physicochemical properties and leachability of indium from mechanically activated hard zinc residue by planetary mill were investigated. The results showed that mechanical activation increased specific surface area, reaction activity of hard zinc residue, and decreased its particle size, which had a positive effect on indium extraction from hard zinc residue in hydrochloric acid solution. Kinetics of indium leaching from unmilled and activated hard zinc residue were also investigated, respectively. It was found that temperature had an obvious effect on indium leaching rate. Two different kinetic models corresponding to reactions which are diffusion controlled, [1-(1- x1/3]2=kt and (1-2x/3-(1-x2/3=kt were used to describe the kinetics of indium leaching from unmilled sample and activated sample, respectively. Their activation energies were determined to be 17.89 kJ/mol (umilled and 11.65 kJ/mol (activated within the temperature range of 30°C to 90°C, which is characteristic for a diffusion controlled process. The values of activation energy demonstrated that the leaching reaction of indium became less sensitive to temperature after hard zinc residue mechanically activated by planetary mill.

  17. Comparative studies on acid leaching of zinc waste materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnik, Ewa; Włoch, Grzegorz; Szatan, Leszek

    2017-11-01

    Three industrial waste materials were characterized in terms of their elemental and phase compositions, leaching behaviour in 10% sulfuric acid solution as well as leaching thermal effects. Slag from melting of mixed metallic scrap contained about 50% Zn and 10% Pb. It consisted mainly of various oxides and oxy-chlorides of metals. Zinc spray metallizing dust contained about 77% Zn in form of zinc and/or zinc-iron oxides, zinc metal and Zn-Fe intermetallic. Zinc ash from hot dip galvanizing was a mixture of zinc oxide, metallic zinc and zinc hydroxide chloride and contained about 80% Zn. Dissolution efficiency of zinc from the first material was 80% (independently on the solid to liquid ratio, 50–150 kg/m3), while decrease of the efficacy from 80% to 60% with increased solid to liquid ratio for the two remaining materials was observed. Both increase in the temperature (20 °C to 35 °C) and agitation rate (300 rpm to 900 rpm) did not improve seriously the leaching results. In all cases, transfer of zinc ions to the leachate was accompanied by different levels of solution contamination, depending on the type of the waste. Leaching of the materials was exothermic with the similar reaction heats for two high oxide-type products (slag, zinc ash) and higher values for the spray metallizing dust.

  18. Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank S-110 Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carson, Katharine J.; Darnell, Lori P.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoopes, Francis V.; Sell, Richard L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, John J.

    2001-10-31

    This report describes the Hanford Tank S-110 sludge caustic leaching test conducted in FY 2001 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The data presented here can be used to develop the baseline and alternative flowsheets for pretreating Hanford tank sludge. The U.S. Department of Energy funded the work through the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP; EM﷓50).

  19. Base Cation Leaching From the Canopy of a Rubber ( Hevea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Base cations are essential to the sustainability of forest ecosystems. They are important for neutralizing the acidifying effects of atmospheric deposition. There is the need for in-depth understanding of base cation depletion and leaching from forest canopy. This is important particularly due to the increasing acidification and ...

  20. Geoenvironmental Characterisation of Heap Leach Materials at Abandoned Mines: Croydon Au-Mines, QLD, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Parbhakar-Fox

    2016-01-01

    Heap leaching is a well-established metallurgical technology which allows metal recovery (e.g., Au, Cu, U) from low-grade ores. However, spent heap leach materials remaining at abandoned or historic mine sites may represent a potential source of contamination. At the Croydon Au-mines, heap leaching operations (1984–1985) were performed on mineralized rhyolites hosting sulphides including pyrite, galena, arsenopyrite and minor sphalerite. Characterization of spent heap leach materials (n = 14)...

  1. DETERMINANTS OF PESTICIDE REGISTRATION FOR FOOD CROPS

    OpenAIRE

    Courbois, Claude B.

    1998-01-01

    An examination of intertemporal, crop-specific pesticide registration data to assess claims that EPA requirements discourage registration of safer pesticides, especially for minor crops. Results show that the likelihood of registration is increasing in crop market value and decreasing in pesticide safety, but these biases diminished between 1991 and 1995.

  2. Pest and pesticide management on southern forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Miller; Ken L. McNabb; Brad Barber; Larry M. Bishop; Michael L. Thompson; John W. Taylor

    1994-01-01

    Federal law requires certification for all commercial pesticide applicators. The law also requires private applicator certification for the purchase or application of "restricted use" pesticides. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set minimum competency standards for certification of pesticide applicators. These standards include a practical...

  3. Pesticides in South African fresh waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansara-Ross, T.; Wepener, V.; Brink, van den P.J.; Ross, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Public concern has recently escalated over pesticide contamination of South African aquatic ecosystems. This review of published literature on the occurrence of pesticides within South African freshwater systems indicates that fewer than 50 studies of selected pesticides have been undertaken, with

  4. Fact Sheets on Pesticides in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Coalition against the Misuse of Pesticides, Washington, DC.

    This document consists of a collection of fact sheets about the use of pesticides in schools and how to reduce it. The sheets are: (1) "Alternatives to Using Pesticides in Schools: What Is Integrated Pest Management?"; (2) "Health Effects of 48 Commonly Used Pesticides in Schools"; (3) "The Schooling of State Pesticide…

  5. Pesticide use in Vietnamese vegetable production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoi, P.V.; Mol, A.P.J.; Oosterveer, Peter; Brink, van den P.J.; Huong, P.T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Vietnam has had varying success over the past decade with its pesticides policy. Some of the most toxic pesticides have been banned from the market. But while many countries have successfully decreased agricultural pesticide use per hectare, this has not (yet) happened in Vietnam. Due to

  6. Phosphorus leaching from biosolids-amended sandy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, H A; O'Connor, G A; Brinton, S

    2002-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on phosphorus (P)-based nutrient management underscores the need to understand P behavior in soils amended with biosolids and manures. Laboratory and greenhouse column studies characterized P forms and leachability of eight biosolids products, chicken manure (CM), and commercial fertilizer (triple superphosphate, TSP). Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) was grown for 4 mo on two acid, P-deficient Florida sands, representing both moderate (Candler series: hyperthermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments) and very low (Immokalee series: sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Alaquods) P-sorbing capacities. Amendments were applied at 56 and 224 kg P(T) ha(-1), simulating P-based and N-based nutrient loadings, respectively. Column leachate P was dominantly inorganic and lower for biosolids P sources than TSP. For Candler soil, only TSP at the high P rate exhibited P leaching statistically greater (alpha = 0.05) than control (soil-only) columns. For the high P rate and low P-sorbing Immokalee soil, TSP and CM leached 21 and 3.0% of applied P, respectively. Leachate P for six biosolids was biological P removal process, exhibited significantly greater leachate P in both cake and pelletized forms (11 and 2.5% of applied P, respectively) than other biosolids. Biosolids P leaching was correlated to the phosphorus saturation index (PSI = [Pox]/[Al(ox) + Fe(ox)]) based on oxalate extraction of the pre-applied biosolids. For hiosolids with PSI < or = approximately 1.1, no appreciable leaching occurred. Only Largo cake (PSI = 1.4) and pellets (PSI = 1.3) exhibited P leaching losses statistically greater than controls. The biosolids PSI appears useful for identifying biosolids with potential to enrich drainage P when applied to low P-sorbing soils.

  7. Study of the relation between hydrated portland cement composition and leaching resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, R.J.; Brouwers, Jos

    1998-01-01

    The present paper addresses cement compositions that have an optimal resistance against acid attack and hence, low leaching rates and optimal waste containment. To this end a shrinking core leaching model is used that describes the leaching of metals from a cement sample. This process is directly

  8. Geochemical modeling of leaching from MSWI air-pollution control residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astrup, T.; Dijkstra, J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.; Sloot, van der H.A.; Christensen, T.H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an improved understanding of the leaching behavior of waste incineration air-pollution-control (APC) residues in a long-term perspective. Leaching was investigated by a series of batch experiments reflecting leaching conditions after initial washout of highly soluble salts from

  9. Technical Note: Comparison of accelerated methods for evaluating leaching from preservative-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow; Patricia K. Lebow; Kolby C. Hirth

    2017-01-01

    Current standardized methods are not well-suited for estimating in-service preservative leaching from treated wood products. This study compared several alternative leaching methods to a commonly used standard method, and to leaching under natural exposure conditions. Small blocks or lumber specimens were pressure treated with a wood preservative containing borax and...

  10. Pesticide use in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecobichon, D J

    2001-03-07

    Chemical pesticides have been a boon to equatorial, developing nations in their efforts to eradicate insect-borne, endemic diseases, to produce adequate food and to protect forests, plantations and fibre (wood, cotton, clothing, etc.). Controversy exists over the global dependence on such agents, given their excessive use/misuse, their volatility, long-distance transport and eventual environmental contamination in colder climates. Many developing countries are in transitional phases with migration of the agricultural workforce to urban centres in search of better-paying jobs, leaving fewer people responsible for raising traditional foods for themselves and for the new, industrialized workforce. Capable of growing two or three crops per year, these same countries are becoming "breadbaskets" for the world, exporting nontraditional agricultural produce to regions having colder climates and shorter growing seasons, thereby earning much needed international trade credits. To attain these goals, there has been increased reliance on chemical pesticides. Many older, nonpatented, more toxic, environmentally persistent and inexpensive chemicals are used extensively in developing nations, creating serious acute health problems and local and global environmental contamination. There is growing public concern in these countries that no one is aware of the extent of pesticide residue contamination on local, fresh produce purchased daily or of potential, long-term, adverse health effects on consumers. Few developing nations have a clearly expressed "philosophy" concerning pesticides. There is a lack of rigorous legislation and regulations to control pesticides as well as training programs for personnel to inspect and monitor use and to initiate training programs for pesticide consumers.

  11. Estimation of pesticide and transformation product export pathways in a headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Matthias; Olsson, Oliver; Stamm, Christian; Weiler, Markus; Lange, Jens; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Following their application, pesticide residues are exported towards rivers along several hydrological pathways in agricultural areas. The importance of each pathway is influenced by the substances' physico-chemical characteristics, mainly sorption and degradation. Incomplete mineralization results in the formation of transformation products (TPs) which have generally different environmental fate characteristics than their parent compounds (PCs). Therefore, the export pathways of pesticides and their transformation products towards rivers may also be different. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we extended a distributed process-based hydrological model (ZIN-AgriTra) by the environmental fate of pesticides and their TPs. The process-based nature of the model allowed for an analysis of PC and TP export pathways including overland flow, lateral preferential flow in soils and soil water flow to tile drains. The model was applied to a Swiss headwater catchment using three pesticides and their TPs as test substances. It was successfully calibrated to three sampling stations in the catchment. At the end of the simulated three-months period, most of the applied pesticides were either fully mineralized or incompletely transformed. Less than 2% of each pesticide was exported to the river as PC or TP. Although all three pesticides could be classified as slightly mobile they remained in the top soil layer during the whole period, whereas the more mobile TPs were additionally leached through the soil towards tile drains. Accordingly, PCs were exported largely by surface runoff, while a larger share of TPs was exported via tile drains. Additionally, the delayed formation and degradation of TPs led to an export under different hydrological conditions resulting in an increased subsurface export of TPs towards the end of the simulation period. A consequence of the different export pathways of PCs and TPs could be shown by an assessment of critical source areas (CSA) in the

  12. XRF and leaching characterization of waste glasses derived from wastewater treatment sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragsdale, Jr, Robert G. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Purpose of this study was to investigate use of XRF (x-ray fluorescence spectrometry) as a near real-time method to determine melter glass compositions. A range of glasses derived from wastewater treatment sludges associated with DOE sites was prepared. They were analyzed by XRF and wet chemistry digestion with atomic absorption/inductively coupled emission spectrometry. Results indicated good correlation between these two methods. A rapid sample preparation and analysis technique was developed and demonstrated by acquiring a sample from a pilot-scale simulated waste glass melter and analyzing it by XRF within one hour. From the results, XRF shows excellent potential as a process control tool for waste glass vitrification. Glasses prepared for this study were further analyzed for durability by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and product consistency test and results are presented.

  13. Catchment scale modelling of pesticide fate and transport using a simple parsimonious process-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullan, Stephanie; Whelan, Mick; Holman, Ian

    2013-04-01

    Pesticides continue to be detected in surface water resources around the world. In the UK to ensure the safety of drinking water supplies, water companies are required to create drinking water safety plans, which take a catchment risk management approach. Models can be used to predict peak pesticide concentrations in raw surface water supplies, these predictions can then be utilised in risk assessments. There is therefore a need to model pesticide fate and transport from agricultural land to surface water resources at the catchment scale. We present a simple soil water balance model linked with a pesticide fate and transport model to predict hydrological response and pesticide exposures at the catchment outlet which is intended for use in risk assessment of raw drinking water resources. The model considers two soil water stores (a topsoil store and a subsoil store) for each soil type in the catchment. It employs a daily time-step and simulates changes in soil water content, actual evapotranspiration, overland flow, drainflow, lateral throughflow and potential recharge to a groundwater store which contributes to baseflow. The model is semi-lumped (not spatially explicit). Calculations are performed for soil type and crop combinations which are weighted by their proportion within the catchment. The model utilises soil properties from the national soil database and can, therefore, be applied to any catchment in England and Wales. The pesticide fate model assumes first-order degradation kinetics, a linear sorption isotherm and leaching at the rate of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. Following application the pesticide is assumed to diffuse into the soil and be evenly distributed in the "non-excluded" pore water (pesticides are assumed to be unable to diffuse into the very small pores). Pesticide concentrations and loads to surface water resources are calculated for rainfall events that generate a hydrological response, assuming that a proportion of the most

  14. High frequency monitoring of pesticides in runoff water to improve understanding of their transport and environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrancq, Marie; Jadas-Hécart, Alain; La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Landry, David; Payraudeau, Sylvain

    2017-06-01

    Rainfall-induced peaks in pesticide concentrations can occur rapidly. Low frequency sampling may therefore largely underestimate maximum pesticide concentrations and fluxes. Detailed storm-based sampling of pesticide concentrations in runoff water to better predict pesticide sources, transport pathways and toxicity within the headwater catchments is lacking. High frequency monitoring (2min) of seven pesticides (Dimetomorph, Fluopicolide, Glyphosate, Iprovalicarb, Tebuconazole, Tetraconazole and Triadimenol) and one degradation product (AMPA) were assessed for 20 runoff events from 2009 to 2012 at the outlet of a vineyard catchment in the Layon catchment in France. The maximum pesticide concentrations were 387μgL-1. Samples from all of the runoff events exceeded the legal limit of 0.1μgL-1 for at least one pesticide (European directive 2013/39/EC). High resolution sampling used to detect the peak pesticide levels revealed that Toxic Units (TU) for algae, invertebrates and fish often exceeded the European Uniform principles (25%). The point and average (time or discharge-weighted) concentrations indicated up to a 30- or 4-fold underestimation of the TU obtained when measuring the maximum concentrations, respectively. This highlights the important role of sampling methods for assessing peak exposure. High resolution sampling combined with concentration-discharge hysteresis analyses revealed that clockwise responses were predominant (52%), indicating that Hortonian runoff is the prevailing surface runoff trigger mechanism in the study catchment. The hysteresis patterns for suspended solids and pesticides were highly dynamic and storm- and chemical-dependent. Intense rainfall events induced stronger C-Q hysteresis (magnitude). This study provides new insights into the complexity of pesticide dynamics in runoff water and highlights the ability of hysteresis analysis to improve understanding of pesticide supply and transport. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  15. Silylation of leached-vermiculites following reaction with imidazole and copper sorption behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Saloana S.G.; Pereira, Mariana B.B. [Chemistry Department of Paraíba Federal University, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Almeida, Ramon K.S. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Caixa Postal 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Souza, Antônio G. [Chemistry Department of Paraíba Federal University, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Fonseca, Maria G., E-mail: mgardennia@quimica.ufpb.br [Chemistry Department of Paraíba Federal University, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Jaber, M. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 8220, Laboratoire d' archéologie moléculaire et structurale (LAMS), Boîte courrier 225, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Silylated vermiculites reacted covalently with imidazole. • Modified vermiculites adsorbed copper from aqueous solution. • Copper retention in all solids occurred at rapid time of 80 min. • Higher organic content on the solid improved the copper adsorption. - Abstract: Organically modified vermiculites were synthesized by previous silylation of three leached vermiculites, V0.3Cl, V0.5Cl and V0.8Cl, under anhydrous conditions following reaction with imidazole (Im), which acted as chelating agent for copper retention. Elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C NMR and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements were used to characterize pristine, leached and organofunctionalized solids. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to evaluate the surface after copper sorption. Parameters such as contact time, pH and initial cation concentration for the adsorption of Cu(II) ions were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted using the Langmuir isotherm model and the monolayer adsorption capacities were 2.38, 2.52 and 2.69 mmol g{sup −1} for V0.5Cl-Im, V0.3Cl-Im and V0.8Cl-Im, respectively, at pH 6.0 and 298 K for a time reaction of 80 min. The sorption rates were described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The chloropropyl imidazole vermiculites are promising adsorbents for the rapid removal of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution.

  16. Earthworm tolerance to residual agricultural pesticide contamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givaudan, Nicolas; Binet, Françoise; Le Bot, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    conventional cultivation to organic pasture. Soil multiresidual pesticide analysis revealed up to 9 molecules including atrazine up to 2.4 ng g -1 dry soil. Exposure history of endogeic Aporrectodea caliginosa and Allolobophora chlorotica modified their responses to pesticides. In the field, activities...... of soluble glutathione-S-transferases (sGST) and catalase increased with soil pesticide contamination in A. caliginosa. Pesticide stress was reflected in depletion of energy reserves in A. chlorotica. Acute exposure of pre-adapted and naïve A. caliginosa to pesticides (fungicide Opus ®, 0.1 μg active...

  17. Nitrogen Deposition and Leaching from Two Forested Catchments in Southwest China — Preliminary Data and Research Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Larssen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased nitrogen deposition has resulted in increased nitrogen pools and nitrogen leaching in European and North American forest soils. The development in Asia in general, and China in particular, suggests increased deposition of reduced nitrogen from changes in agricultural practices and of oxidized nitrogen from rapid growth of the transportation sector. Decreased nitrogen retention in forested areas in the future may cause increased NO3– leaching and, thus, acidification and eutrophication in surface waters. The differences in climate, ecosystems, land use, and deposition history make direct application of knowledge from studies in Europe and North America difficult. In Southwest China the potential for nitrogen mobilization from forest soils may be high because of the warm and humid climate, resulting in high decomposition rates of soil organic matter. However, there are very few data available for quantifying the suspected potential for increased nitrogen leaching in forest ecosystems. Here we present data from two forested catchments, dominated by Masson pine (Pinus massoniana, near Guiyang and Chongqing, respectively, in Southwest China. The present nitrogen deposition is moderate, estimated in the range from 10 to 40 kg N ha–1 year–1. The C/N ratios of the soils are generally below 15. Nitrate concentrations in soil water are rather variable in space, with highest values of several hundred microequivalents per liter. The turnover rate of nitrogen in the forest ecosystem is quite high compared to the atmospheric deposition rate. At present, nitrate runoff from the catchments is low and intermediate in Guiyang and Chongqing, respectively. More research is needed to improve our ability to predict future nitrogen leaching from subtropical Asian coniferous forests.

  18. Soil fungi as indicators of pesticide soil pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić Leka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil fungi, with their pronounced enzymic activity and high osmotic potential, represent a significant indicator of negative effects of different pesticides on the agroecosystem as a whole. In that respect, a trial was set up on the alluvium soil type with the aim to investigate the effect of different herbicides (Simazine, Napropamid, Paraquat, fungicides (Captan and Mancozeb and insecticides (Fenitrothion and Dimethoate on a number of soil fungi under apple trees. The number of soil fungi was determined during four growing seasons by an indirect method of dilution addition on the Czapek agar. The study results indicate that the fungi belong to the group of microorganisms that, after an initial sensible response to the presence of pesticides in the soil, very rapidly establish normal metabolism enabling them even to increase their number. The fungicides and insecticides applied were found to be particularly effective in that respect.

  19. Leaching of rapidly quenched Al65Cu20Fe15 quasicrystalline ribbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    22

    the surface of melt spun QC ribbons with 10 mole of NaOH and understand the evolution of various phases. 2. Experimental details. A nominal alloy composition of a stable QC Al65Cu20Fe15 has been prepared from pure elements with purities of 99.98 wt. % of Al, 99.99 wt.% of Cu and 99.98 wt.% of Fe. The 10.

  20. Occupational pesticide exposure among Yemeni women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zaemey, Sonia; Fritschi, Lin; Heyworth, Jane

    2013-04-01

    Limited research on the nature and extent of pesticide exposure among women in developing countries is available. The aim of this study was to describe potential pesticide exposure among women living in Yemen that occurs through agricultural work. In this cross-sectional study, 410 women who had a daughter enrolled in high school during 2011-2012 were surveyed regarding pesticide exposure. Of the 410 women who responded to the survey, 171 women reported working on farms during their lifetime. Of these 171 women, 147 reported working on a farm prior to marriage and 108 reported working on a farm after marriage. Among the women who reported working on a farm before marriage, 47% had worked on farms where pesticides were used. Among those women who reported working on farms after marriage, 69% of women worked on farms where pesticides were used. Among women who reported working on a farm before marriage where pesticides were used, 45% reported not using any protective equipment. This proportion was 33% among women who worked on a farm after marriage. Among the 28 commercial pesticides that were listed within the questionnaire, the banned compound dimethoate was the most commonly reported pesticide to be used on farms. The findings suggest that improving safe pesticide management practices among farmers and enforcing effective banning of the most toxic pesticides is needed to reduce pesticide exposure among Yemeni women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of sulphide minerals on uranium oxidation state in in-situ leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, A. M.; Skripchenko, S. Yu.

    2017-09-01

    The thermodynamic model of uranium in-situ leaching process at the stages of acidification and active leaching were investigated. It was demonstrated that in the frontal zone of acid leaching solutions reduction of uranium(VI) up to uranium(IV) was possible due to the nature of redox processes involving hydrogen sulfide. At the same time uranium was precipitated as U(OH)4. In order to eliminate the negative influence of sulfide minerals and hydrogen sulfide, artificial oxidizers were proposed to be used at the both stages of in-situ leaching process, i.e. active leaching and acidification of new process cells.

  2. Assessment of long-term leaching from waste incineration air-pollution-control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Mosbæk, Hans; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of long-term leaching from MSWI air-pollution-control (APC) residues is discussed with respect to use in environmental impact assessment, such as life-cycle assessment (LCA). A method was proposed for estimating leaching as a function of the liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio in a long-term p...... that uncritical use of batch leaching data for assessing the potential leaching is highly problematic, and evaluations of residue disposal should include scenario specific quantification of the long-term leaching....

  3. Ligand Selection Model for Leaching of Low Grade Zinc Oxide Ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianzu; Rao, Shuai; Zhang, Duchao; Chen, Lin; Liu, Weifeng

    A new ligand selection model is proposed for leaching of low grade zinc oxide ores. The model demonstrates that the formation constant between ligand and zinc ions plays a significant role in the leaching process. A series of leaching experiments with different ligand concentration are conducted to assess the selection model. The results show that when nitrilotriacetic acid is used as the leaching agent, the highest zinc extraction is obtained. The zinc leaching rate is 84.33% in the presence of 0.4 mol/L nitrilotriacetic acid and liquid-solid ratio of 10 mL/g.

  4. New insights into pesticide photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivella, Aurélien; Richard, Claire

    2014-04-01

    Photolysis may be a significant route of pesticide dissipation on crops, leading to an increase of pesticide use. Spraying strong absorbing compounds (photoprotector) along with pesticide is an attractive strategy to prevent the photodegradation phenomenon. The aim of this study is to get a better understanding of the parameters governing the photoprotection efficiency. Experiments were conducted using formulated sulcotrione as a pesticide and a grape wine extract as a photoprotector. These compounds were irradiated using simulated solar light as dried deposits on carnauba wax films or on disks of tobacco leaves and analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography ultraviolet (UV), spectroscopy, and microscopy. It is shown that photolysis is faster on leaves than on carnauba wax and that the photoprotection effect of grape wine extract is more efficient on leaves than on wax. Images recorded by microscopy bring evidence that deposits are very different on the two supports both in the absence and in the presence of the photoprotector. The grape wine extract plays a double role; it is antioxidant and UV screen. Photoprotection by the grape wine extract is a complex mixing of UV screen and antioxidant effects. The UV screen effect can be rationalized by considering the rate of light absorption by sulcotrione. Our results demonstrate that the rates of sulcotrione phototransformation are mainly governed by the repartition of the deposit on the solid support.

  5. Use of dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) fertilizers to reduce phosphorus leaching from sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G C; He, Z L; Stoffella, P J; Yang, X E; Yu, S; Calvert, D

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing concern over P leaching from sandy soils applied with water-soluble P fertilizers. Laboratory column leaching experiments were conducted to evaluate P leaching from a typical acidic sandy soil in Florida amended with DPR fertilizers developed from dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) and N-Viro soil. Ten leaching events were carried out at an interval of 7 days, with a total leaching volume of 1,183 mm equivalent to the mean annual rainfall of this region during the period of 2001-2003. Leachates were collected and analyzed for total P and inorganic P. Phosphorus in the leachate was dominantly reactive, accounting for 67.7-99.9% of total P leached. Phosphorus leaching loss mainly occurred in the first three leaching events, accounting for 62.0-98.8% of the total P leached over the whole period. The percentage of P leached (in the total P added) from the soil amended with water-soluble P fertilizer was higher than those receiving the DPR fertilizers. The former was up to 96.6%, whereas the latter ranged from 0.3% to 3.8%. These results indicate that the use of N-Viro-based DPR fertilizers can reduce P leaching from sandy soils.

  6. Literature Survey Concerning the Feasibility of Remedial Leach for Select Phase I Caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Paula D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flores, Karen A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lord, David L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Bryan Mound 5 ( BM5 ) and West Hackberry 9 ( WH9 ) have the potential to create a significant amount of new storage space should the caverns be deemed "leach - ready". This study discusses the original drilling history of the caverns, surrounding geology, current stability, and, based on this culmination of data, makes a preliminary assessment of the leach potential for the cavern. The risks associated with leaching BM5 present substantial problems for the SPR . The odd shape and large amount of insoluble material make it difficult to de termine whether a targeted leach would have the desired effect and create useable ullage or further distort the shape with preferential leaching . T he likelihood of salt falls and damaged or severed casing string is significant . In addition, a targeted le ach would require the relocation of approximately 27 MMB of oil . Due to the abundance of unknown factors associated with this cavern, a targeted leach of BM5 is not recommended. A targeted leaching of the neck of WH 9 could potentially eliminate or diminis h the mid - cavern ledge result ing in a more stable cavern with a more favorable shape. A better understanding of the composition of the surrounding salt and a less complicated leaching history yields more confidence in the ability to successfully leach this region. A targeted leach of WH9 can be recommended upon the completion of a full leach plan with consideration of the impacts upon nearby caverns .

  7. Effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interface temperature and surface energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Wen

    Full Text Available The microwave-assisted leaching was a new approach to intensify the copper recovery from chalcopyrite by hydrometallurgy. In this work, the effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interfacial reaction temperature and surface energy were investigated. The activation energy of chalcopyrite leaching was affected indistinctively by the microwave-assisted heating (39.1 kJ/mol compared with the conventional heating (43.9 kJ/mol. However, the boiling point of the leaching system increased through microwave-assisted heating. Because of the improved boiling point and the selective heating of microwave, the interfacial reaction temperature increased significantly, which gave rise to the increase of the leaching recovery of copper. Moreover, the surface energy of the chalcopyrite through microwave-assisted heating was also enhanced, which was beneficial to strengthen the leaching of chalcopyrite. Keywords: Microwave-assisted heating, Chalcopyrite, Leaching kinetics, Interface temperature, Surface energy

  8. Vanadium Extraction from Shale via Sulfuric Acid Baking and Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qihua; Zhang, Yimin; Liu, Tao; Huang, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Fluorides are widely used to improve vanadium extraction from shale in China. Sulfuric acid baking-leaching (SABL) was investigated as a means of recovering vanadium which does not require the use of fluorides and avoids the productions of harmful fluoride-containing wastewater. Various effective factors were systematically studied and the experimental results showed that 90.1% vanadium could be leached from the shale. On the basis of phase transformations and structural changes after baking the shale, a mechanism of vanadium extraction from shale via SABL was proposed. The mechanism can be described as: (1) sulfuric acid diffusion into particles; (2) the formation of concentrated sulfuric acid media in the particles after water evaporation; (3) hydroxyl groups in the muscovite were removed and transient state [SO4 2-] was generated; and (4) the metals in the muscovite were sulfated by active [SO4 2-] and the vanadium was released. Thermodynamics modeling confirmed this mechanism.

  9. Aluminium leaching from red mud by filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urík, Martin; Bujdoš, Marek; Milová-Žiaková, Barbora; Mikušová, Petra; Slovák, Marek; Matúš, Peter

    2015-11-01

    This contribution investigates the efficient and environmentally friendly aluminium leaching from red mud (bauxite residue) by 17 species of filamentous fungi. Bioleaching experiments were examined in batch cultures with the red mud in static, 7-day cultivation. The most efficient fungal strains in aluminium bioleaching were Penicillium crustosum G-140 and Aspergillus niger G-10. The A. niger G-10 strain was capable to extract up to approximately 141 mg·L(-1) of aluminium from 0.2 g dry weight red mud. Chemical leaching with organic acids mixture, prepared according to A. niger G-10 strain's respective fungal excretion during cultivation, proved that organic acids significantly contribute to aluminium solubilization from red mud. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Water driven leaching of biocides from paints and renders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bester, Kai; Vollertsen, Jes; Bollmann, Ulla E

    intensity, length of dry period, rain intensity etc. did not have a detectable influence on the leaching. Only the water amount that due to driving rain indeed reached the wall had an effect to the leaching of biocides from building materials. It turned out that for some compounds transformation is relevant......During the project it could be shown, that the biocide emissions from stormwater and combined sewers lead to considerable concentrations of biocides in urbanized surface waters. These concentrations were highly dependent on the building structures in the catchment as well as on the weather....... Regularly rainfall led to elevated concentrations in those waters that are heavily influenced by biocides. An assessment of a best case for stormwater contamination (separated sewers in a rural catchment with mostly brick surfaces) resulted in still high concentrations of biocides in water. High values...

  11. Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford Tank C-106 sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Hoopes, F.V.; Steele, R.T.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the results of a laboratory-scale washing and caustic leaching test performed on sludge from Hanford Tank C-106. The purpose of this test was to determine the behavior of important sludge components when subjected to washing with dilute or concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions. The results of this laboratory-scale test were used to support the design of a bench-scale washing and leaching process used to prepare several hundred grams of high-level waste solids for vitrification tests to be done by private contractors. The laboratory-scale test was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in FY 1996 as part of the Hanford privatization effort. The work was funded by the US Department of Energy through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS; EM-30).

  12. Stability Analysis and Stabilization of Miduk Heap Leaching Structure, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Amini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available To construct copper heap leaching structures, a stepped heap of ore is placed over an isolated sloping surface and then washed with sulphuric acid. The isolated bed of such a heap consists of some natural and geosynthetic layers. Shear strength parameters between these layers are low, so they form the possible sliding surfaces of the heaps. Economic and environmental considerations call for studying such slides. In this study, firstly, results of the laboratory tests carried on the materials of the heap leaching structures bed are presented. Then, the instability mechanisms of such structures are investigated and proper approaches are summarized for their stabilization. Finally, stability of the Miduk copper heap is evaluated as a case history, and appropriate approaches and their effects are discussed for its stabilization.

  13. Plutonium Speciation in Support of Oxidative-Leaching Demonstration Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.

    2007-10-31

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the plutonium speciation in caustic solutions that reasonably represent the process streams from the oxidative-leaching demonstration test. Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to develop a spectrophotometric method to measure plutonium speciation at submicromolar (< 10-6 M) concentrations in alkaline solutions in the presence of chromate and carbonate. Data obtained from the testing will be used to identify the oxidation state of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) species, which potentially could exist in caustic leachates. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan TSS A-219 to evaluate the speciation of chromium, plutonium, and manganese before and after oxidative leaching. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Operating Contract MOA: 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001.

  14. Quantitative leaching of a Nigerian iron ore in hydrochloric acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on the quantitative leaching of iron ore in hydrochloric acid solution has been undertaken. The elemental composition of the iron ore was also carried out using ICP-MS technique. The major elements in the iron ore include: Fe(66.7%); Al (0.2%); Si (5.2%); Ti (0.02%) and O (28.0%). Some traces of V, Ni, Zn, Ce, Cr, ...

  15. Nitrate leaching from short-hydroperiod floodplain soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, B.; Luster, J.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Shrestha, J.; Graf Pannatier, E.

    2012-11-01

    Numerous studies have shown the importance of riparian zones to reduce nitrate (NO3-) contamination coming from adjacent agricultural land. Much less is known about nitrogen (N) transformations and nitrate fluxes in riparian soils with short hydroperiods (1-3 days of inundation) and there is no study that could show whether these soils are a N sink or source. Within a restored section of the Thur River in NE Switzerland, we measured nitrate concentrations in soil solutions as an indicator of the net nitrate production. Samples were collected along a quasi-successional gradient from frequently inundated gravel bars to an alluvial forest, at three different depths (10, 50 and 100 cm) over a one-year period. Along this gradient we quantified N input (atmospheric deposition and sedimentation) and N output (leaching) to create a nitrogen balance and assess the risk of nitrate leaching from the unsaturated soil to the groundwater. Overall, the main factor explaining the differences in nitrate concentrations was the field capacity (FC). In subsoils with high FCs and VWC near FC, high nitrate concentrations were observed, often exceeding the Swiss and EU groundwater quality criterions of 400 and 800 μmol L-1, respectively. High sedimentation rates of river-derived nitrogen led to apparent N retention up to 200 kg N ha-1 yr-1 in the frequently inundated zones. By contrast, in the mature alluvial forest, nitrate leaching exceeded total N input most of the time. As a result of the large soil N pools, high amounts of nitrate were produced by nitrification and up to 94 kg N-NO3- ha-1 yr-1 were leached into the groundwater. Thus, during flooding when water fluxes are high, nitrate from soils can contribute up to 11% to the total nitrate load in groundwater.

  16. Laboratory study on the leaching potential of spent alkaline batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Xará, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda N.; Almeida, Manuel F.; Carlos A. Costa

    2009-01-01

    Four different leaching tests were carried out with spent alkaline batteries as an attempt to quantify the environmental potential burdens associated with landfilling. The tests were performed in columns filled up with batteries either entire or cross-cut, using either deionized water or nitric acid solution as leachant. In a first set of tests, the NEN 7343 standard procedure was followed, with leachant circulating in open circuit from bottom to top through columns. These tests w...

  17. Leaching of basic oxygen furnace sludge with sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Miškufová

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the hydrometallurgical processing of BOF sludge in the sulphuric acid solutions under atmospheric pressureand temperatures up to 100 °C is investigated on a laboratory scale. The influence of sulphuric acid concentration, temperature, timeand liquid to solid ratio (L:S on the leaching process was studied. The main aim of this study was to determine optimal conditions whenthe maximum amount of zinc passes into the solution.

  18. Development of mathematic model for coffee decaffeination with leaching method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple mathematic model for caffeine kinetic description during the extraction process (leaching of coffee bean was developed. A non­steady diffusion equation coupled with a macroscopic mass transfer equation for solvent was developed and them solved analytically. The kinetic of caffeine extraction from coffee bean is depend on initial caffeine content, final caffeine content, caffeine content at certain time, mass­transfer coefficient, solvent volume, surface area of coffee beans, process time, radius of coffee bean, leaching rate of caffeine, caffeine diffusivity and a are constan, solvent concentration, activation energy, temperature absolute and gas constant. Caffeine internal mass diffusivity was estimated by fitting the model to an experiment using acetic acid and liquid waste of cocoa beans fermentation. The prediction equation for leaching rate of caffeine in coffee beans has been found. It was found that Dk (m2/sec=1.345x10­7—4.1638x10­7, and kL (m/sec=2.445x10­5—5.551x10­5 by acetic acid as solvent depended on temperature and solvent concentration. The prediction equation for length of time to reduce initial caffeine content to certain concentration in coffee beans has been developed, Caffeine diffusivity (Dk and mass­transfer coefficient (kL was found respectively 1.591x 10­7—2.122x10­7 m2/sec and 4.897x10­5—6.529x10­5 m/sec using liquid waste of cocoa bean fermentation as solvent which depend on temperature and solvent concentration. Key words: Coffee, caffeine, decaffeination, leaching, mathematic model.

  19. Pesticides in water supply wells in Zealand, Denmark: a statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Thorling, Lærke; Binning, Philip John

    2012-01-01

    Data from the Danish National Borehole Database are used to predict drinking water well vulnerability to contamination by pesticides, and to identify the dominant mechanisms leading to well pollution in Zealand, Denmark. The frequency of detection and concentrations of 4 herbicides and 3 herbicide metabolites are related to factors accounting for geology (thicknesses of sand, clay and chalk layers), geographical location (distance to surface water and distance to contaminated sites), redox conditions and well depth using logistic regression, the binomial test and Spearman correlation techniques. Results show that drinking water wells located in urban areas are more vulnerable to BAM and phenoxy acids contamination, while non-urban area wells are more subject to bentazone contamination. Parameters accounting for the hydraulic connection between the well and the surface (well depth and thickness of the clay confining layer) are often strongly related to well vulnerability. Results also show that wells close to surface water are more vulnerable to contamination, and that sandy layers provide better protection against the leaching of oxidizable pesticides than clay aquitards, because they are more likely to be aerobic. 4-CPP is observed more often at greater well depth, perhaps because of anaerobic dechlorination of dichlorprop. The field data are used to create a set of probabilistic models to predict well vulnerability to contamination by pesticides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Systemic Pesticides Imidacloprid and Metalaxyl on the Phyllosphere of Pepper Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Moulas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbes inhabiting the phyllosphere of crops are exposed to pesticides applied either directly onto plant foliage or indirectly through soil. Although, phyllosphere microbiology has been rapidly evolving, little is still known regarding the impact of pesticides on the epiphytic microbial community and especially on fungi. We determined the impact of two systemic pesticides (metalaxyl and imidacloprid, applied either on foliage or through soil, on the epiphytic fungal and bacterial communities via DGGE and cloning. Both pesticides induced mild effects on the fungal and the bacterial communities. The only exception was the foliage application of imidacloprid which showed a more prominent effect on the fungal community. Cloning showed that the fungal community was dominated by putative plant pathogenic ascomycetes (Erysiphaceae and Cladosporium, while a few basidiomycetes were also present. The former ribotypes were not affected by pesticides application, while selected yeasts (Cryptococcus were stimulated by the application of imidacloprid suggesting a potential role in its degradation. A less diverse bacterial community was identified in pepper plants. Metalaxyl stimulated an Enterobacteriaceae clone which is an indication of the involvement of members of this family in fungicide degradation. Further studies will focus on the isolation of epiphytic microbes which appear to be stimulated by pesticides application.