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Sample records for rapid nitric acid

  1. A rapid technique for determination of nitrate and nitric acid by acid reduction and diazotization at elevated temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, S A

    2008-07-14

    A rapid technique for determination of nitrate by acid reduction and diazotization at elevated temperature has been standardized. The technique is based on quantitative diazotization of sulfanilamide by nitrate on incubation in boiling water bath for 3, 5 or 10 min in presence of high concentration of HCl, ca. 64.5%. The diazotized sulfanilamide is coupled at room temperature to N-1-(naphthyl)-ethylenediamine dihydrochloride, and the chromophore evaluated spectrophotometrically at 540 nm. The technique provides linear estimate of nitrate over the test range of 0.5 through 10 microg N mL(-1) sample with all test incubation time periods using alkali nitrate and nitric acid as sources of nitrate anion. Urea treatment enables selective determination of nitrate in presence of nitrite with overall 99+/-1% recovery, and without affecting nitrate determination (P>0.1) or its regression coefficient. The technique has obvious advantages over metal-reduction technique. It is simple, rapid, selective in presence of nitrite, and an inexpensive method for routine determination of nitrate with detection range 0.5-10 microg N mL(-1) sample. Besides, the technique provides opportunity to detect nitric acid as low as 35 microM even in presence of other acids.

  2. Nitric Acid and Benomyl Stimulate Rapid Height Growth of Longleaf Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.G. Kais; R.C. Hare; J.P. Barnett

    1984-01-01

    Rapid height growth of longleaf pine seedlings, important to production of uniform, even-aged stands, can be promoted by controlling brown-spot needle blight and weed competition, and by increasing soil fertility. Root systems of container-grown longleaf pine seedlings were dip-treated in either benomyl/clay mix (10 percent a.i. benomyl) or clay control and planted...

  3. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as...

  4. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  5. Revised reference model for nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, J. C.; Bailey, P. L.; Craig, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    A nearly global set of data on the nitric acid distribution was obtained for seven months by the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The evaluation of the accuracy, precision, and resolution of these data is described, and a description of the major features of the nitric acid distributions is presented. The zonal mean for nitric acid is distributed in a stratospheric layer that peaks near 30 mb, with the largest mixing ratios occurring in polar regions, especially in winter.

  6. Isomers of nitric acid and chlorine nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, M.P.; Francl, M.M.; Rowland, F.S.; Hehre, W.J.

    1988-09-22

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the HF/6-31G* and MP2/6-31G* levels have been performed on nitric acid and chlorine nitrate. Equilibrium geometries and electric dipole moments obtained from the MP2/6-31G* calculations are in good agreement with the respective experimental values, normal-mode (harmonic) vibrational frequencies and frequency shifts due to isotopic substitution calculated at this level support the most recent gas-phase infrared assignments for chlorine nitrate but suggest a reversal in the assignment of v/sub 5/ and v/sub 6/ for nitric acid. Calculations at the same levels of theory were also performed on peroxynitrous acid (HOONO) and chlorine peroxynitrite (ClOONO). The former is found to be 35 kcal/mol less stable than nitric acid at the MP2/6-31G* level; chlorine peroxynitrite is 30 kcal/mol higher in energy than chlorine nitrate. The possible role of these high-energy isomers in atmospheric processes is discussed.

  7. Titanium interaction with zirconium during hydrolysis in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurov, A.A.; Sinegribova, O.A.; Yagodin, G.A. (Moskovskij Khimiko-Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-05-01

    The titanium behaviour in nitric acid solutions in the presence of zirconium is studied. The fact of stabilization of titanium nitric acid solutions by zirconium is found that permits to obtain highly concentrated (> 100 g/l TiO/sub 2/) titanium nitric acid solutions with low acidity (< 1.0 mol./l HNO/sub 3/) stable for 1.5-2.0 moths. The reason of stabilization is the interaction between hydrolized compounds of zirconium and titanium. Precipitates from mixed zirconium-titanium nitric acid solutions following a long-term hold-up present mainly hydrated polymerized titanium dioxide.

  8. Adverse experiences with nitric acid at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, W.S.; Craig, D.K.; Vitacco, M.J.; McCormick, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Nitric acid is used routinely at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in many processes. However, the site has experienced a number of adverse situations in handling nitric acid. These have ranged from minor injuries to personnel to significant explosions. This document compiles many of these events and includes discussions of process upsets, fires, injuries, and toxic effects of nitric acid and its decomposition products. The purpose of the publication is to apprise those using the acid that it is a potentially dangerous material and can react in many ways as demonstrated by SRS experience. 10 refs.

  9. Acute chemical pneumonitis caused by nitric acid inhalation: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Hyung Shim; Lee, In Jae; Ko, Eun Young; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation is a rare clinical condition. The previously reported radiologic findings of this disease include acute permeability pulmonary edema, delayed bronchiolitis obliterans, and bronchiectasis. In very few published rare radiologic reports has this disease manifested as acute alveolar injury; we report a case of acute chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation which at radiography manifested as bilateral perihilar consolidation and ground-glass attenuation, suggesting acute alveolar injury.

  10. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  11. Quantitative leaching of a Nigerian chalcopyrite ore by nitric acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Due to increasing uses of copper nitrate, Cu(NO3)2, as catalysts, textile and polishing agents for other metals, experiment on the leaching of a Nigerian chalcopyrite ore by nitric acid for possible production of copper nitrate was examined. The effects of acid concentration, temperature and particle size on the dissolution ...

  12. Some dilute solution properties of highly isotactic polyacrylonitrile in aq. nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Yukio; Saito, Masatoshi; Kamide, Kenji (Asahi Chemical Industry Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan))

    1991-06-01

    An attempt was made to investigate the dilute solution properties of highly isotactic polyacrylonitrile (PAN) dissolved in aq. nitric acid and to estimate the molecular parameters, such as the unperturbed chain dimension A and the characteristic ratio C{sub {infinity}}. For this purpose a highly isotactic polymer with isotactic triad content of 73.4% was synthesized by irradiating {gamma}-ray on acrylonitrile-urea canal complex at -78degC and was subjected to successive precipitation fractionation, using dimethyl sulfoxide as solvent and toluene as precipitant, into 7 fractions. Among them 2 fractions with isotactic triad of 71.0 and 77.9%, respectively were employed for further study. The weight-average molecular weight M{sub w} and the second virial coefficient A{sub 2} of these fractions in 70wt% aq. nitric acid soln. were measured by the light scattering method. The 70wt% aq. nitric acid soln. was predicted to be able to dissolve perfectly-isotactic PAN with M{sub w} of 1.5-2.6 x 10{sup 5} at room temperature. The Mark-Houwink-Sakurada equations in aq. nitric acid solutions differ significantly depending on the stereoregularity of PAN employed, even if highly concentrated acids are used. A 57.5wt% aq. nitric acid soln. is determined, by the dependence of A{sub 2} on the nitric acid concentration, to be a Flory's theta solvent for PAN with isotactic triad of 71.0% at 25degC. A of PAN increases rapidly with isotactic triad content, especially in the range higher than 50%. C{sub {infinity}} of PAN is always far larger than the calculated value of non-polar Monte Carlo chain for polypropyrene (P. J. Flory et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 88, 639 (1966)) over the whole range higher than 50% isotactic diad. (author).

  13. A new 2-oxy-N,N-dioctylacetamide grafted resin for the separation of trivalent actinides from nitric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvan, B. Robert; Prathibha, T.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2015-05-01

    A novel 2-oxy-N,N-dioctylacetamide anchored on Merrifield resin was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, TG-DTA and IR spectroscopy, for the first time. The extraction behavior of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium in the dioctylacetamide anchored resin (R-DOA) was studied as a function of various parameters such as duration of equilibration, concentration of nitric acid and sodium nitrate etc. The distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) of Am(III) and Eu(III) in R-DOA increased with increase in concentration of nitric acid. The K{sub d} values reached a maximum at 3-4 M nitric acid concentration in both cases, followed by decrease in K{sub d} values. Rapid extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium was observed in the initial stages of equilibration followed by the establishment of equilibrium occurred within 60 min. The extraction data was fitted in to the first order rate equation. The recovery of Am(III) and Eu(III) from the loaded organic phase was studied using dilute nitric acid. The results revealed that 2-oxyacetamide functionalized resin is the promising candidate for the separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from nitric acid medium.

  14. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  15. Simulated dry deposition of nitric acid near forest edges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeJong, JJM; Klaassen, W; Jong, J.J.M. de

    1997-01-01

    Dry deposition is simulated to understand and generalize observations of enhanced deposition of air pollution near forest edges. Nitric acid is taken as an example as its deposition velocity is often assumed to be determined by turbulent transport only. The simulations are based on the

  16. AMERICIUM SEPARATIONS FROM NITRIC ACID PROCESS EFFLUENT STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. BARR; G. JARVINEN; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    The aging of the US nuclear stockpile presents a number of challenges, including the ever-increasing radioactivity of plutonium residues from {sup 241}Am. Minimization of this weak gamma-emitter in process and waste solutions is desirable to reduce both worker exposure and the effects of radiolysis on the final waste product. Removal of americium from plutonium nitric acid processing effluents, however, is complicated by the presence of large.quantities of competing metals, particularly Fe and Al, and-strongly oxidizing acidic solutions. The reprocessing operation offers several points at which americium removal maybe attempted, and we are evaluating two classes of materials targeted at different steps in the process. Extraction chromatography resin materials loaded with three different alkylcarbamoyl phosphinates and phosphine oxides were accessed for Am removal efficiency and Am/Fe selectivity from 1-7 molar nitric acid solutions. Commercial and experimental mono- and bifunctional anion-exchange resins were evaluated for total alpha-activity removal from post-evaporator solutions whose composition, relative to the original nitric acid effluent, is reduced in acid and greatly increased in total salt content. With both classes of materials, americium/total alpha emission removal is sufficient to meet regulatory requirements even under sub-optimal conditions. Batch distribution coefficients, column performance data, and the effects of Fe-masking agents will be presented.

  17. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thorn, Kevin A; Cox, Larry G

    2016-01-01

    ...) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22...

  18. Experimental study on thermal hazard of tributyl phosphate-nitric acid mixtures using micro calorimeter technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Qi; Jiang, Lin; Gong, Liang; Sun, Jin-Hua, E-mail: sunjh@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Heat flows after mixing TBP with nitric acid are of different orders of magnitude. • Thermodynamics and kinetics of tributyl phosphate-nitric acid mixtures are derived. • Tributyl phosphate directly reacts with nitric acid and form organic red oil. • Thermal runaway could occur at 79 °C with a high nitric acid concentration. - Abstract: During PUREX spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, mixture of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and hydrocarbon solvent are employed as organic solvent to extract uranium in consideration of radiation contaminated safety and resource recycling, meanwhile nitric acid is utilized to dissolve the spent fuel into small pieces. However, once TBP contacts with nitric acid or nitrates above 130 °C, a heavy “red oil” layer would occur accompanied by thermal runaway reactions, even caused several nuclear safety accident. Considering nitric acid volatility and weak exothermic detection, C80 micro calorimeter technique was used in this study to investigate thermal decomposition of TBP mixed with nitric acid. Results show that the concentration of nitric acid greatly influences thermal hazard of the system by direct reactions. Even with a low heating rate, if the concentration of nitric acid increases due to evaporation of water or improper operations, thermal runaway in the closed system could start at a low temperature.

  19. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  20. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  1. Mechanisms of neptunium redox reactions in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sayandev; Bryan, Samuel A.; Casella, Amanda J.; Peterson, James M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2017-01-01

    First transuranium element neptunium (Np) exhibits complicated behavior in acidic solutions because it can adopt wide range of oxidation states typically from +3 to +6 and coordinate large variety of ligands. In particular, accurate determination of Np redox potentials in nitric acid solutions is challenging due to overlapping chemical and electrochemical reactions leading to significant experimental uncertainties. Furthermore, over past decades spectrophotometry has been extensively applied to identify and characterize Np solution species in different oxidation states. However, relevant spectral database of Np in nitric acid solutions that can serve for the reference purposes has yet to be established due to the experimental difficulty to isolate and stabilize Np species in pure oxidation states without compromising solution optical properties. This work demonstrates that combination of voltammetry and controlled-potential in situ thin-layer spectropotentiometry overcomes these challenges so that Np species in pure +3, +4, +5, or +6 oxidation states were electrochemically generated in the systematically varied 0.1 – 5 M nitric acid solutions, and corresponding vis-NIR spectral signatures were obtained. In situ optical monitoring of the interconversion between adjacent Np oxidation states resulted in elucidation of the mechanisms of the involved redox reactions, in-depth understanding of the relative stability of the Np oxidation states, and allowed benchmarking of the redox potentials of the NpO22+/NpO2+, NpO2+/Np4+ and Np4+/Np3+ couples. Notably, the NpO2+/Np4+ couple was distinguished from the proximal Np4+/Np3+ process overcoming previous concerns and challenges encountered in accurate determination of the respective potentials.

  2. Redox chemistry of americium in nitric acid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picart, S.; Jobelin, I.; Armengol, G.; Adnet, JM

    2004-07-01

    The redox properties of the actinides are very important parameters for speciation studies and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing based on liquid-liquid extraction of actinides at different oxidation states (as in the Purex or Sesame process). They are also very useful for developing analytical tools including coulometry and redox titration. This study addressed the americium(IV)/americium(III) and americium(VI)/americium(V) redox couples, focusing on exhaustive acquisition of the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of americium oxidation at an electrode in a complexing nitric acid medium. (authors)

  3. Use of extractive distillation to produce concentrated nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, P.C.; Griffin, T.P.; Irwin, C.F.

    1981-04-01

    Concentrated nitric acid (> 95 wt %) is needed for the treatment of off-gases from a fuels-reprocessing plant. The production of concentrated nitric acid by means of extractive distillation in the two-pot apparatus was studied to determine the steady-state behavior of the system. Four parameters, EDP volume (V/sub EDP/) and temperature (T/sub EDP/), acid feed rate, and solvent recycle, were independently varied. The major response factors were percent recovery (CPRR) and product purity (CCP). Stage efficiencies also provided information about the system response. Correlations developed for the response parameters are: CPRR = 0.02(V/sub EDP/ - 800 cc) + 53.5; CCP = -0.87 (T/sub EDP/ - 140/sup 0/C) + 81; eta/sub V,EDP/ = 9.1(F/sub feed/ - 11.5 cc/min) - 0.047(V/sub EDP/ - 800 cc) - 2.8(F/sub Mg(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2// - 50 cc/min) + 390; and eta/sub L,EDP/ = 1.9(T/sub EDP/ - 140/sup 0/C) + 79. A computer simulation of the process capable of predicting steady-state conditions was developed, but it requires further work.

  4. Amino acids as modulators of endothelium-derived nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoki, Masao; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Edgell, Cora-Jean S; Maeda, Nobuyo; Smithies, Oliver; Mattson, David L

    2006-08-01

    To examine the mechanisms whereby amino acids modulate nitric oxide (NO) production and blood flow in the renal vasculature, chemiluminescence techniques were used to quantify NO in the renal venous effluent of the isolated, perfused rat kidney as different amino acids were added to the perfusate. The addition of 10(-4) or 10(-3) M cationic amino acids (l-ornithine, l-lysine, or l-homoarginine) or neutral amino acids (l-glutamine, l-leucine, or l-serine) to the perfusate decreased NO and increased renal vascular resistance. Perfusion with anionic amino acids (l-glutamate or l-aspartate) had no effect on either parameter. The effects of the cationic and neutral amino acids were reversed with 10(-3) M l-arginine and prevented by deendothelialization or NO synthase inhibition. The effects of the neutral amino acids but not the cationic amino acids were dependent on extracellular sodium. Cationic and neutral amino acids also decreased calcimycin-induced NO, as assessed by DAF-FM-T fluorescence, in cultured EA.hy926 endothelial cells. Inhibition of system y(+) or y(+)L by siRNA for the cationic amino acid transporter 1 or the CD98/4F2 heavy chain diminished the NO-depleting effects of these amino acids. Finally, transport studies in cultured cells demonstrated that cationic or neutral amino acids in the extracellular space stimulate efflux of l-arginine out of the cell. Thus the present experiments demonstrate that cationic and neutral amino acids can modulate NO production in endothelial cells by altering cellular l-arginine transport through y(+) and y(+)L transport mechanisms.

  5. Sulfuric, hydrochloric, and nitric acid-catalyzed triacetone triperoxide (TATP) reaction mixtures: an aging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Mark; Bilusich, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    The organic peroxide explosive triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is regularly encountered by law enforcement agents in various stages of its production. This study utilizes solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to examine sulfuric acid-, hydrochloric acid-, and nitric acid-catalyzed TATP syntheses during the initial 24 h of these reactions at low temperatures (5-9°C). Additionally, aging of the reaction mixtures was examined at both low and ambient temperatures (19-21°C) for a further 9 days. For each experiment, TATP could be readily identified in the headspace above the reaction mixture 1 h subsequent to the combination of reagents; at 24 h, TATP and diacetone diperoxide (DADP) were prominent. TATP degraded more rapidly than DADP. Additionally, chlorinated acetones chloroacetone and 1,1,-dichloroacetone were identified in the headspace above the hydrochloric acid-catalyzed TATP reaction mixture. These were not present when the catalyst was sulfuric acid or nitric acid. 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Published 2011. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  6. reaction between nitric acid and tin in presence of catalysts-part 1.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neither nitrous acid nor hydrazine were formed under the conditions studied. From the results it was pointed out that the variations in the stannic tin and the gaseous reduction products of the excess nitric acid go hand in hand; likewise the variations of stannous tin and the reduction products of excess nitric acid in solution.

  7. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Thorn

    Full Text Available Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  8. Nitrosation and nitration of fulvic acid, peat and coal with nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  9. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Kevin A; Cox, Larry G

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  10. Liquid-Phase Heat-Release Rates of the Systems Hydrazine-Nitric Acid and Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine-Nitric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Dezso; Feiler, Charles E.

    1960-01-01

    The initial rates of heat release produced by the reactions of hydrazine and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine with nitric acid were determined in a bomb calorimeter under conditions of forced mixing. Fuel-oxidant weight ratio and injection velocity were varied. The rate of heat release apparently depended on the interfacial area between the propellants. Above a narrow range of injection velocities representing a critical amount of interfacial area, the rates reached a maximum and were almost constant with injection velocity. The maximum rate for hydrazine was about 70 percent greater than that for unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine. The total heat released did not vary with mixture ratio over the range studied.

  11. Impact of scaling on the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is considering using glycolic acid as a replacement for formic acid in Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Catalytic decomposition of formic acid is responsible for the generation of hydrogen, a potentially flammable gas, during processing. To prevent the formation of a flammable mixture in the offgas, an air purge is used to dilute the hydrogen concentration below the 60% of the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL). The offgas is continuously monitored for hydrogen using Gas Chromatographs (GCs). Since formic acid is much more volatile and toxic than glycolic acid, a formic acid spill would lead to the release of much larger quantities to the environment. Switching from formic acid to glycolic acid is expected to eliminate the hydrogen flammability hazard leading to lower air purges, thus downgrading of Safety Significant GCs to Process Support GCs, and minimizing the consequence of a glycolic acid tank leak in DWPF. Overall this leads to a reduction in process operation costs and an increase in safety margin. Experiments were completed at three different scales to demonstrate that the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet scales from the 4-L lab scale to the 22-L bench scale and 220-L engineering scale. Ten process demonstrations of the sludge-only flowsheet for SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed using Sludge Batch 8 (SB8)-Tank 40 simulant. No Actinide Removal Process (ARP) product or strip effluent was added during the runs. Six experiments were completed at the 4-L scale, two experiments were completed at the 22-L scale, and two experiments were completed at the 220-L scale. Experiments completed at the 4-L scale (100 and 110% acid stoichiometry) were repeated at the 22-L and 220-L scale for scale comparisons.

  12. Extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from nitric acid solutions by di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid dissolved in kerosene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsai, Hung-Sheng; Tsai, Teh-Hua

    2012-01-01

    The extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from a nitric acid solution using di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as an acidic extractant of organophosphorus compounds dissolved in kerosene was studied...

  13. Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.R.

    1995-05-16

    This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ.

  14. Analysis of Steam Heating of a Two-Layer TBP/N-Paraffin/Nitric Acid Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hassan, N.M.; Rudisill, T.S.; Askew, N.M.

    1998-07-22

    This report presents an analysis of steam heating of a two-layer tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/n-paraffin-nitric acid mixture.The purpose of this study is to determine if the degree of mixing provided by the steam jet or by bubbles generated by the TBP/nitric acid reaction is sufficient to prevent a runaway reaction.

  15. Airborne measurements of the nitric acid partitioning in persistent contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. Peter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the first systematic measurements of nitric acid (HNO3 uptake in contrail ice particles at typical aircraft cruise altitudes. During the CIRRUS-III campaign cirrus clouds and almost 40 persistent contrails were probed with in situ instruments over Germany and Northern Europe in November 2006. Besides reactive nitrogen, water vapor, cloud ice water content, ice particle size distributions, and condensation nuclei were measured during 6 flights. Contrails with ages up to 12 h were detected at altitudes 10–11.5 km and temperatures 211–220 K. These contrails had a larger ice phase fraction of total nitric acid (HNO3ice/HNO3tot = 6% than the ambient cirrus layers (3%. On average, the contrails contained twice as much HNO3ice as the cirrus clouds, 14 pmol/mol and 6 pmol/mol, respectively. Young contrails with ages below 1 h had a mean HNO3ice of 21 pmol/mol. The contrails had higher nitric acid to water molar ratios in ice and slightly higher ice water contents than the cirrus clouds under similar meteorological conditions. The differences in ice phase fractions and molar ratios between developing contrails and cirrus are likely caused by high plume concentrations of HNO3 prior to contrail formation. The location of the measurements in the upper region of frontal cirrus layers might account for slight differences in the ice water content between contrails and adjacent cirrus clouds. The observed dependence of molar ratios as a function of the mean ice particle diameter suggests that ice-bound HNO3 concentrations are controlled by uptake of exhaust HNO3 in the freezing plume aerosols in young contrails and subsequent trapping of ambient HNO3 in growing ice particles in older (age > 1 h contrails.

  16. Recovery of Tin and Nitric Acid from Spent Solder Stripping Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Jae-Woo; Ryu, Seong-Hyung; Kim, Tae-young [Daejin University, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Spent solder-stripping solutions containing tin, copper, iron, and lead in nitric acid solution, are by-products of the manufacture of printed-circuit boards. The recovery of these metals and the nitric acid, for re-use has economic and environmental benefits. In the spent solder-stripping solution, a systematic method to determine a suitable process for recovery of valuable metals and nitric acid was developed. Initially, more than 90% of the tin was successfully recovered as high-purity SnO{sub 2} by thermal precipitation at 80 ℃ for 3 hours. About 94% of the nitric acid was regenerated effectively from the spent solutions by diffusion dialysis, after which there remained copper, iron, and lead in solution. Leakage of tin through the anion-exchange membrane was the lowest (0.026%), whereas Pb-leakage was highest (4.26%). The concentration of the regenerated nitric acid was about 5.1 N.

  17. Millimeter-Wave Rotational Spectrum of Deuterated Nitric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rebecca A. H.; Coplan, Camren; Petkie, Doug; Medvedev, Ivan; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies of the pure rotational spectrum of deuterated nitric acid, DNO3, have focused on the ground and first excited state, νb{9}. This paper focuses on the next lowest energy vibrational states, covering the spectral range from 128-360 GHz. Two of them are unperturbed,νb{7} and νb{8}, and two of them, νb{6} and 2νb{9} are highly perturbed. The unperturbed states are fit separately, while the two perturbed states are fit together using both Coriolis and Fermi interaction terms. Each state is fit to within experimental accuracy. We also extend the assignments and update the rotational constants for νb{9}.

  18. Image analysis of epicuticular damage to foliage caused by dry deposition of the air pollutant nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela E. Padgett; Sally D. Parry; Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Robert L. Heath

    2009-01-01

    Nitric acid vapor is produced by the same photochemical processes that produce ozone. In the laboratory, concentrated nitric acid is a strong acid and a powerful oxidant. In the environment, where the concentrations are much lower, it is an innocuous source of plant nitrogen. As an air pollutant, which mode of action does dry deposition of nitric...

  19. Effect of Nitric Acid Concentrations on Synthesis and Stability of Maghemite Nanoparticles Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Nurdin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles have been synthesized using a chemical coprecipitation method at different nitric acid concentrations as an oxidizing agent. Characterization of all samples performed by several techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, alternating gradient magnetometry (AGM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and zeta potential. The XRD patterns confirmed that the particles were maghemite. The crystallite size of all samples decreases with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. TEM observation showed that the particles have spherical morphology with narrow particle size distribution. The particles showed superparamagnetic behavior with decreased magnetization values at the increasing concentration of nitric acid. TGA measurement showed that the stability temperature decreases with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. DLS measurement showed that the hydrodynamic particle sizes decrease with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. Zeta potential values show a decrease with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. The increasing concentration of nitric acid in synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles produced smaller size particles, lower magnetization, better thermal stability, and more stable maghemite nanoparticles suspension.

  20. Thermal Hazard Evaluation of Lauroyl Peroxide Mixed with Nitric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Min Shu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many thermal runaway incidents have been caused by organic peroxides due to the peroxy group, –O–O–, which is essentially unstable and active. Lauroyl peroxide (LPO is also sensitive to thermal sources and is incompatible with many materials, such as acids, bases, metals, and ions. From the thermal decomposition reaction of various concentrations of nitric acid (HNO3 (from lower to higher concentrations with LPO, experimental data were obtained as to its exothermic onset temperature (T0, heat of decomposition (ΔHd, isothermal time to maximum rate (TMRiso, and other safety parameters exclusively for loss prevention of runaway reactions and thermal explosions. As a novel finding, LPO mixed with HNO3 can produce the detonation product of 1-nitrododecane. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermal activity monitor III (TAM III, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS analyses of the reactivity for LPO and itself mixed with HNO3 to corroborate the decomposition reactions and reaction mechanisms in these investigations.

  1. Nitric oxide antagonizes the acid tolerance response that protects Salmonella against innate gastric defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J Bourret

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive nitrogen species (RNS derived from dietary and salivary inorganic nitrogen oxides foment innate host defenses associated with the acidity of the stomach. The mechanisms by which these reactive species exert antimicrobial activity in the gastric lumen are, however, poorly understood.The genetically tractable acid tolerance response (ATR that enables enteropathogens to survive harsh acidity was screened for signaling pathways responsive to RNS. The nitric oxide (NO donor spermine NONOate derepressed the Fur regulon that controls secondary lines of resistance against organic acids. Despite inducing a Fur-mediated adaptive response, acidified RNS largely repressed oral virulence as demonstrated by the fact that Salmonella bacteria exposed to NO donors during mildly acidic conditions were shed in low amounts in feces and exhibited ameliorated oral virulence. NO prevented Salmonella from mounting a de novo ATR, but was unable to suppress an already functional protective response, suggesting that RNS target regulatory cascades but not their effectors. Transcriptional and translational analyses revealed that the PhoPQ signaling cascade is a critical ATR target of NO in rapidly growing Salmonella. Inhibition of PhoPQ signaling appears to contribute to most of the NO-mediated abrogation of the ATR in log phase bacteria, because the augmented acid sensitivity of phoQ-deficient Salmonella was not further enhanced after RNS treatment.Since PhoPQ-regulated acid resistance is widespread in enteric pathogens, the RNS-mediated inhibition of the Salmonella ATR described herein may represent a common component of innate host defenses.

  2. Transuranic contamination of stainless steel in nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Timothy; Banford, Anthony W.; Thompson, Olivia R.; Carey, Thomas; Schild, Dieter; Geist, Andreas; Sharrad, Clint A.

    2017-09-01

    Stainless steels coupons have been exposed to transuranic species in conditions representative of those found in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Stainless steel was prepared to different surface finishes and exposed to nitric acid of varying concentrations containing 237Np, 239Pu or 243Am for one month at 50 °C. Contamination by these transuranics has been observed on all surfaces exposed to the solution through the use of autoradiography. This technique showed that samples held in 4 M HNO3 bind 2-3 times as much radionuclide as those held in 10.5 M HNO3. It was also found that the polished steel surfaces generally took up more transuranic contamination than the etched and ;as received; steel finishes. The extent of corrosion on the steel surfaces was found, by scanning electron microscopy, to be greater in solutions containing Np and Pu in comparison to that observed from contact with Am containing solutions, indicating that redox activity of transuranics can influence the mechanism of stainless steel corrosion.

  3. MLS/Aura L2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  4. MLS/Aura L2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  5. MLS/Aura Level 2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  6. HIRDLS/Aura Level 3 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Zonal Fourier Coefficients V007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The "HIRDLS/Aura Level 3 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Zonal Fourier Coefficients" version 7 data product (H3ZFCHNO3) contains the entire mission (~3 years) of HIRDLS data...

  7. Study on reduction and back extraction of Pu(IV) by urea derivatives in nitric acid conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, G.A.; Xiao, S.T.; Yan, T.H.; Lin, R.S.; Zhu, Z.W. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O.Box 275(26), Beijing 102413 (China)

    2013-07-01

    The reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) by hydroxyl-semicarbazide (HSC), hydroxyurea (HU) and di-hydroxyurea (DHU) in nitric acid solutions were investigated separately with adequate kinetic equations. In addition, counter-current cascade experiments were conducted for Pu split from U in nitric acid media using three kinds of reductant, respectively. The results show that urea derivatives as a kind of novel salt-free reductant can reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III) rapidly in the nitric acid solutions. The stripping experimental results showed that Pu(IV) in the organic phase can be stripped rapidly to the aqueous phase by the urea derivatives, and the separation factors of plutonium /uranium can reach more than 10{sup 4}. This indicates that urea derivatives is a kind of promising salt-free agent for uranium/plutonium separation. In addition, the complexing effect of HSC with Np(IV) was revealed, and Np(IV) can be back-extracted by HSC with a separation factor of about 20.

  8. Timescale for hygroscopic conversion of calcite mineral particles through heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ryan C; Moore, Meagan J K; Petters, Markus D; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Roberts, Greg C; Prather, Kimberly A

    2009-09-28

    Atmospheric heterogeneous reactions can potentially change the hygroscopicity of atmospheric aerosols as they undergo chemical aging processes in the atmosphere. A particle's hygroscopicity influences its cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties with potential impacts on cloud formation and climate. In this study, size-selected calcite mineral particles were reacted with controlled amounts of nitric acid vapour over a wide range of relative humidities in an aerosol flow tube to study the conversion of insoluble and thus apparently non-hygroscopic calcium carbonate into soluble and hygroscopic calcium nitrate. The rate of hygroscopic change particles undergo during a heterogeneous reaction is derived from experimental measurements for the first time. The chemistry of the reacted particles was determined using an ultrafine aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (UF-ATOFMS) while the particles' hygroscopicity was determined through measuring CCN activation curves fit to a single parameter of hygroscopicity, kappa. The reaction is rapid, corresponding to atmospheric timescales of hours. At low to moderate HNO3 exposures, the increase in the hygroscopicity of the particles is a linear function of the HNO3(g) exposure. The experimentally observed conversion rate was used to constrain a simple but accurate kinetic model. This model predicts that calcite particles will be rapidly converted into hygroscopic particles (kappa>0.1) within 4 h for low HNO3 mixing ratios (10 pptv) and in less than 3 min for 1000 pptv HNO3. This suggests that the hygroscopic conversion of the calcite component of atmospheric mineral dust aerosol will be controlled by the availability of nitric acid and similar reactants, and not by the atmospheric residence time.

  9. Nitric acid trihydrate nucleation and denitrification in the Arctic stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grooß, J.-U.; Engel, I.; Borrmann, S.; Frey, W.; Günther, G.; Hoyle, C. R.; Kivi, R.; Luo, B. P.; Molleker, S.; Peter, T.; Pitts, M. C.; Schlager, H.; Stiller, G.; Vömel, H.; Walker, K. A.; Müller, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles in the polar stratosphere have been shown to be responsible for vertical redistribution of reactive nitrogen (NOy). Recent observations by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard the CALIPSO satellite have been explained in terms of heterogeneous nucleation of NAT on foreign nuclei, revealing this to be an important formation pathway for the NAT particles. In state of the art global- or regional-scale models, heterogeneous NAT nucleation is currently simulated in a very coarse manner using a constant, saturation-independent nucleation rate. Here we present first simulations for the Arctic winter 2009/2010 applying a new saturation-dependent parametrisation of heterogeneous NAT nucleation rates within the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS). The simulation shows good agreement of chemical trace species with in situ and remote sensing observations. The simulated polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) optical properties agree much better with CALIOP observations than those simulated with a constant nucleation rate model. A comparison of the simulated particle size distributions with observations made using the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) aboard the high altitude research aircraft Geophysica, shows that the model reproduces the observed size distribution, except for the very largest particles above 15 μm diameter. The vertical NOy redistribution caused by the sedimentation of the NAT particles, in particular the denitrification and nitrification signals observed by the ACE-FTS satellite instrument and the in situ SIOUX instrument aboard the Geophysica, are reproduced by the improved model, and a small improvement with respect to the constant nucleation rate model is found.

  10. Nitric oxide and salicylic acid signaling in plant defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klessig, Daniel F.; Durner, Jörg; Noad, Robert; Navarre, Duroy A.; Wendehenne, David; Kumar, Dhirendra; Zhou, Jun Ma; Shah, Jyoti; Zhang, Shuqun; Kachroo, Pradeep; Trifa, Youssef; Pontier, Dominique; Lam, Eric; Silva, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical signaling role in the activation of plant defense responses after pathogen attack. We have identified several potential components of the SA signaling pathway, including (i) the H2O2-scavenging enzymes catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, (ii) a high affinity SA-binding protein (SABP2), (iii) a SA-inducible protein kinase (SIPK), (iv) NPR1, an ankyrin repeat-containing protein that exhibits limited homology to IκBα and is required for SA signaling, and (v) members of the TGA/OBF family of bZIP transcription factors. These bZIP factors physically interact with NPR1 and bind the SA-responsive element in promoters of several defense genes, such as the pathogenesis-related 1 gene (PR-1). Recent studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) is another signal that activates defense responses after pathogen attack. NO has been shown to play a critical role in the activation of innate immune and inflammatory responses in animals. Increases in NO synthase (NOS)-like activity occurred in resistant but not susceptible tobacco after infection with tobacco mosaic virus. Here we demonstrate that this increase in activity participates in PR-1 gene induction. Two signaling molecules, cGMP and cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR), which function downstream of NO in animals, also appear to mediate plant defense gene activation (e.g., PR-1). Additionally, NO may activate PR-1 expression via an NO-dependent, cADPR-independent pathway. Several targets of NO in animals, including guanylate cyclase, aconitase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (e.g., SIPK), are also modulated by NO in plants. Thus, at least portions of NO signaling pathways appear to be shared between plants and animals. PMID:10922045

  11. Modelling of nitric and nitrous acid chemistry for solvent extraction purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, H.; McLachlan, F. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Building D5, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); MacDonald-Taylor, J. [National Nuclear Laboratory, 5th Floor, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Orr, R.; Woodhead, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    Nitric acid plays an integral role in the reprocessing of irradiated fuel. It is well known that nitric acid degrades; its often yellow hue signifies the presence of decomposition products. The decomposition of nitric acid is accelerated by temperature and radiolysis; therefore it is an important consideration in the reprocessing of nuclear fuels. Thermal and radiolytic reactions of nitric acid result in the formation of redox active nitrogen species, of which nitrous acid is of particular concern, largely due to its redox reactions with plutonium and neptunium. Such reactions are important to understand as plutonium and neptunium can exist in a number of oxidation states; the oxidation state has a direct effect on the species extractability. The effect of nitrous acid is exacerbated as it catalyzes its own production and its reactions with actinides are typically autocatalytic; thus even micromolar quantities can have a large effect. A full understanding of solvent extraction requires us to understand actinide valence states which in turn require us to understand what nitrogen species are present and their concentrations. As a first step in the overall objective of enhancing process models, the kinetic data for nitric acid decomposition reactions has been investigated in order to produce an initial dynamic model of decomposition under aqueous conditions. The identification of a set of kinetic reactions suitable for modelling has been the primary focus of this work. A model of nitric acid thermal decomposition will help develop a better understanding of nitric acid decomposition chemistry and enable better prediction of the oxidation states of species in solution. It is intended to later extend the model to include radiolytic reactions and then further to incorporate an organic phase in order to have a model which covers all decomposition routes for nitric acid within a nuclear fuel reprocessing scheme. The model will be used as a sub model for process models

  12. Nitrous-acid-mediated synthesis of iron-nitrosyl-porphyrin: pH-dependent release of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2012-11-01

    Two iron-nitrosyl-porphyrins, nitrosyl[meso-tetrakis(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylporphyrin]iron(II) acetic acid solvate (3) and nitrosyl[meso-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenylporphyrin]iron(II) CH(2)Cl(2) solvate (4), were synthesized in quantitative yield by using a modified procedure with nitrous acid, followed by oxygen-atom abstraction by triphenylphosphine under an argon atmosphere. These nitrosyl porphyrins are in the {FeNO}(7) class. Under an argon atmosphere, these compounds are relatively stable over a broad range of pH values (4-8) but, under aerobic conditions, they release nitric oxide faster at high pH values than that at low pH values. The generated nitric-oxide-free iron(III)-porphyrin can be re-nitrosylated by using nitrous acid and triphenylphosphine. The rapid release of NO from these Fe(II) complexes at high pH values seems to be similar to that in nitrophorin, a nitric-oxide-transport protein, which formally possesses Fe(III). However, because the release of NO occurs from ferrous-nitrosyl-porphyrin under aerobic conditions, these compounds are more closely related to nitrobindin, a recently discovered heme protein. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Adsorption mechanism of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid onto nitric-acid-modified activated carbon fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Sun, Jie; Ren, Tianhao; Guo, Lin; Yang, Zhilin; Yang, Qi; Chen, Hai

    2018-04-01

    Adsorption by carbon materials is one of the relatively fast methods in present research, which is widely used in emergency events. Activated carbon fiber (ACF) modified by nitric acid (N-ACF) was studied in this research to determine the adsorption performance for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Subsequently, influence factors, adsorption isotherm models, kinetics and thermodynamic were investigated in a batch system to realize this adsorption. Experimental results showed that ACF modified by 0.1M nitric acid had a better removal ability than 2,4-D. Removal rate of 2,4-D by N-ACF was greatly influenced by pH with the optimum pH at 2. The superiority of the Langmuir isotherm model in describing the adsorption equilibrium was revealed by correlation coefficients R2 (R 2  ≥ 0.997). Furthermore, adsorption kinetics was well described by pseudo-second-order model. The results of thermodynamic showed that adsorption was a spontaneous, endothermic process with randomness increasing. Additionally, surface structure properties of adsorbent were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Specific surface area analysis of Brunauer, Emmett and Teller and Boehm's titration. It turned out that the micropore structure and functional groups on N-ACF all can contribute to the removal of 2,4-D.

  14. Extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from nitric acid solutions by di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid dissolved in kerosene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hung-Sheng; Tsai, Teh-Hua

    2012-01-04

    The extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from a nitric acid solution using di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as an acidic extractant of organophosphorus compounds dissolved in kerosene was studied. By graphical and numerical analysis, the compositions of indium-D2EHPA complexes in organic phase and stoichiometry of the extraction reaction were examined. Nitric acid solutions with various indium concentrations at 25 °C were used to obtain the equilibrium constant of InR₃ in the organic phase. The experimental results showed that the extraction distribution ratios of indium(III) between the organic phase and the aqueous solution increased when either the pH value of the aqueous solution and/or the concentration of the organic phase extractant increased. Finally, the recovery efficiency of indium(III) in nitric acid was measured.

  15. Effects of nitric acid on carbachol reactivity of the airways in normal and allergic sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, W.M.; Kim, C.S.; King, M.M.; Oliver, W. Jr.; Yerger, L.

    1982-01-01

    The airway effects of a 4-hr exposure (via a Plexiglas hood) to 1.6 ppm nitric acid vapor were evaluated in seven normal and seven allergic sheep, i.e., animals that have a history of reacting with bronchospasm to inhalation challenge with Ascaris suum antigen. The nitric acid vapor was generated by ultrasonic nebulization of a 2% nitric acid solution. Airway effects were assessed by measuring the change in specific pulmonary flow resistance before and after a standard inhalation challenge with 2.5% carbachol aerosol. Nitric acid exposure did not produce bronchoconstriction in either group. Pre-exposure increases in specific pulmonary flow resistance after carbachol inhalation were 68% (SD+/- 13%) and 82% (SD+/- 35%) for the normal and allergic sheep, respectively. Within 24 hr, the largest post-exposure increases in specific pulmonary flow resistance for the normal and allergic sheep were 108% (SD+/- 51%(P<.06)) and 175% (SD+/- 87% (p<.02)), respectively. We conclude that a short-term exposure to nitric acid vapor at levels below the industrial threshold limit (2 ppm), produces airway hyperreactivity to aerosolized carbachol in allergic sheep.

  16. Characteristics and mechanism of explosive reactions of Purex solvents with Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Teijiro [Radiation Application Development Association, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Takada, Junichi; Koike, Tadao; Tsukamoto, Michio; Watanabe, Koji [Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ida, Masaaki [JGC PLANTECH CO., LTD (Japan); Nakagiri, Naotaka [JGC Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nishio, Gunji [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    This investigation was undertaken to make clear the energetic properties and mechanism of explosive decomposition of Purex solvent systems (TBP/n-Dodecane/HNO{sub 3}) by Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures using a calorimetric technique (DSC, ARC) and a chromatographic technique (GC, GC/MS). The measurement of exothermic events of solvent-HNO{sub 3} reactions using DSC with a stainless steel sealed cell showed distinct two peaks with maxima at around 170 and 320degC, respectively. The peak at around 170degC was mainly attributed to the reactions of dealkylation products (n-butyl nitrate) of TBP and the solvent with nitric acid, and the peak at around 320degC was attributed to the exothermic decomposition of nitrated dodecanes formed in the foregoing exothermic reaction of dodecane with nitric acid. By using the data obtained in ARC experiments, activation energies of 123.2 and 152.5 kJ/mol were determined for the exothermic reaction of TBP with nitric acid and for the exothermic pyrolysis of n-butyl nitrate, respectively. Some possible pathways were considered for the explosive decomposition of TBP by nitric acid at elevated temperatures. (author)

  17. Batch salicylic acid nitration by nitric acid/acetic acid mixture under isothermal, isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, R; Canterino, M; Caprio, V; Di Somma, I; Sanchirico, R

    2006-12-01

    Runaway phenomena and thermal explosions can originate during the nitration of salicylic acid by means of a nitric acid/acetic acid mixture when the thermal control is lost, mainly as a result of the formation and thermal decomposition of picric acid. The prediction of the behaviour of this system is thus of great importance in view of possible industrial applications and the need to avoid the occurrence of unwanted dangerous events. During a previous investigation a model was developed to simulate its behaviour when the starting concentration of the substrate is too low, thus, preventing the precipitation of poor soluble intermediates. In this work this model is extended to deal with more concentrated systems even in case of a solid phase separating during the process. To this purpose the previously assessed dependence of the solubility of 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids upon temperature and nitric acid concentration is included in the model. It is assumed that when 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids are partially suspended in the reacting medium a kinetic regime of "dissolution with reaction" is established; that is, the redissolution of these species is a fast process compared to the successive nitration to give dinitroderivatives. Good results are obtained in the comparison of the experimental data with those calculated both in isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions when the revised model is used.

  18. Serum uric acid levels and leukocyte nitric oxide production in multiple sclerosis patients outside relapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, JP; Ramsaransing, GSM; Heerserna, DJ; Heerings, M; Wilczak, N; De Keyser, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: A number of studies found that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have low serum levels of uric acid. It is unclear whether this represents a primary deficit or secondary effect. Uric acid is a scavenger of peroxynitrite, which is the product of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide.

  19. Photolysis of nitric acid in solid argon: The infrared absorption of peroxynitrous acid (HOONO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingming Cheng; Jengwen Lee; Yuanpern Lee (National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan))

    1991-04-04

    Nitric acid (HONO{sub 2}) in solid argon at 12 K was irradiated with ultraviolet light from various sources. Recombination of the fragments OH and NO{sub 2} from photolysis within the argon lattice site has led to the formation of peroxynitrous acid (HOONO). IR absorption lines at 3545.5, 1703.6, 1364.4, 952.0, and 772.8 cm{sup {minus}1} have been assigned to this molecule on the basis of isotopic shifts. Under certain conditions the lines at 3563.3, 1708.3, 1372.7, 957.4, and 782.9 cm{sup {minus}1} were also observed, and they have been attributed to HOONO in a less stable matrix site. The observed vibrational frequencies are in agreement with recent theoretical calculations on HOONO. The implication of the formation of HOONO from HONO{sub 2} to atmospheric chemistry is also discussed.

  20. Determination of Copper-Based Fungicides by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Digestion Procedure with Sulfuric and Nitric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Milinović

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper-based fungicides can be effectively digested by treatment with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric and nitric acid in exactly 15 minutes for the rapid determination via copper using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. Under optimum conditions, the results of copper fungicide analysis were consistent to those obtained by the AOAC’s recommended method. Recovery values ranged from 98.63 to 103.40%. Relative standard deviation values are lower than 2%. The proposed digestion procedure applied for determination of copper ranged from 100 to 594 g Cu kg-1 in different commercial fungicideproducts.

  1. Observation of gaseous nitric acid production at a high-energy proton accelerator facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kanda, Y; Nakajima, H

    2005-01-01

    High-energy protons and neutrons produce a variety of radionuclides as well as noxious and oxidative gases, such as ozone and nitric acid, in the air mainly through the nuclear spallation of atmospheric elements. Samples were collected from the surfaces of magnets, walls, and floors in the neutrino beamline tunnel and the target station of the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron facility by wiping surfaces with filter paper. Considerably good correlations were found between the amounts of nitrate and tritium and between those of nitrate and /sup 7/Be. This finding gives evidence that at high-energy proton facilities, nitric acid is produced in the radiolysis of air in beam- loss regions. Also, the nitric acid on the surfaces was found to be desorbed and tended to be more uniform throughout the tunnel due to air circulation. The magnitude of diminishing from the surfaces was in the order of tritium>nitrate>/sup 7/Be1).

  2. TESTING OF 304L STAINLESS STEEL IN NITRIC ACID ENVIRONMENTS WITH FLUORIDES AND CHLORIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2010-10-04

    Impure radioactive material processed in nitric acid solutions resulted in the presence of chlorides in a dissolver fabricated from 304L stainless steel. An experimental program was conducted to study the effects of chloride in nitric acid/fluoride solutions on the corrosion of 304L stainless steel. The test variables included temperature (80, 95, and 110 C) and the concentrations of nitric acid (6, 12, and 14 M), fluoride (0.01, 0.1, and 0.2 M) and chloride (100, 350, 1000, and 2000 ppm). The impact of welding was also investigated. Results showed that the chloride concentration alone was not a dominant variable affecting the corrosion, but rather the interaction of chloride with fluoride significantly affected corrosion.

  3. Page 1 Chromones—IV - 35 acetic acid (10.0 c.c.) and nitric acid (d ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    methylchromone (I, R = R1 = Me) at 0° : 5-Methoxy-2-methyl-8-nitrochromone (III, R = R1 = Me). 5-Methoxy-2-methylchromone (1-0 g.) was cooled externally to 0°, and a cooled mixture of concentrated Sulphuric acid (5.0 c.c.) and nitric acid (d. 1.42 ...

  4. Stabilization and Solidification of Nitric Acid Effluent Waste at Y-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dileep [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lorenzo-Martin, Cinta [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-16

    Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC (CNS) at the Y-12 plant is investigating approaches for the treatment (stabilization and solidification) of a nitric acid waste effluent that contains uranium. Because the pH of the waste stream is 1-2, it is a difficult waste stream to treat and stabilize by a standard cement-based process. Alternative waste forms are being considered. In this regard, Ceramicrete technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is being explored as an option to solidify and stabilize the nitric acid effluent wastes.

  5. Material compatibility evaluation for DWPF nitric-glycolic acid-literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Skidmore, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-06-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid.

  6. Indole-3-butyric acid induces lateral root formation via peroxisome-derived indole-3-acetic acid and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicht, Markus; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Burbach, Christian; Volkmann, Dieter; Baluska, Frantisek

    2013-10-01

    Controlled plant growth requires regulation through a variety of signaling molecules, including steroids, peptides, radicals of oxygen and nitrogen, as well as the 'classical' phytohormone groups. Auxin is critical for the control of plant growth and also orchestrates many developmental processes, such as the formation of new roots. It modulates root architecture both slowly, through actions at the transcriptional level and, more rapidly, by mechanisms targeting primarily plasma membrane sensory systems and intracellular signaling pathways. The latter reactions use several second messengers, including Ca(2+) , nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we investigated the different roles of two auxins, the major auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and another endogenous auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in the lateral root formation process of Arabidopsis and maize. This was mainly analyzed by different types of fluorescence microscopy and inhibitors of NO production. This study revealed that peroxisomal IBA to IAA conversion is followed by peroxisomal NO, which is important for IBA-induced lateral root formation. We conclude that peroxisomal NO emerges as a new player in auxin-induced root organogenesis. In particular, the spatially and temporally coordinated release of NO and IAA from peroxisomes is behind the strong promotion of lateral root formation via IBA. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Modelling of the nitric acid reduction process: Application to materials behavior in reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sicsic, D.; Balbaud-Celerier, F. [CEA, DEN SCCME, Laboratoire d' Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tribollet, B. [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques, UPR15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2012-07-01

    In France, the recycling process of nuclear waste fuels involves the use of hot concentrated nitric acid. The understanding and the prediction of the structural materials (mainly austenitic stainless steels) behaviour requires the determination of the nitric acid reduction process. Nitric acid is indirectly reduced by an autocatalytic mechanism depending on the cathodic overpotential and the acid concentration. This mechanism has been widely studied. All the authors agree on its autocatalytic nature, characterized by the predominant role of the reduction products. It is also generally admitted that nitric acid or the nitrate ion are not the electro-active species. However, uncertainties remain concerning the nature of the electro-active species, the place where the catalytic species regenerates and the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of the reaction intermediates. The aim of this study is to clarify some of these uncertainties by performing an electrochemical investigation of the 4 mol.L -1 nitric acid reduction process at 40 deg. C occurring on an inert electrode (platinum or gold). An inert electrode was chosen as a working electrode in a first step in order to avoid its oxidation and focus the research on the reduction mechanism. This experimental work enabled to suggest a coherent sequence of electrochemical and chemical reactions. Then, a kinetic modelling of this sequence was carried out for a gold rotating disk system. In this objective, a thermodynamic study at 25 deg. C led to the evaluation of the composition of liquid and gaseous phases for nitric acid solutions from 0.5 to 22 mol.L -1. The kinetics of the reduction process of nitric acid 4 mol.L -1 was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chrono-amperometry on an inert electrode at 40 deg. C. A coupling of chrono-amperometry and FTIR in gaseous phase led to the identification of the gaseous reduction products as a function of the cathodic overpotential. These different results showed that for

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF H CANYON CONDUCTIVITY METER INDICATIONS WITH ELEVATED URANIUM IN NITRIC ACID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C

    2007-10-31

    Solution conductivity data from the 1CU conductivity meter in H-Canyon shows that uranium concentration in the 0 to 30 gram per liter (g/L) range has no statistically significant effect on the calibration of free nitric acid measurement. Based on these results, no additional actions are needed on the 1CU Conductivity Meter prior to or during the processing of uranium solutions in the 0 to 30 g/L range. A model based only on free nitric acid concentration is shown to be appropriate for explaining the data. Data uncertainties for the free acid measurement of uranium-bearing solutions are 8.5% or less at 95% confidence. The analytical uncertainty for calibrating solutions is an order of magnitude smaller only when uranium is not present, allowing use of a more accurate analytical procedure. Literature work shows that at a free nitric acid level of 0.33 M, uranium concentration of 30 g/L and 25 C, solution conductivity is 96.4% of that of a uranium-free solution. The level of uncertainties in the literature data and its fitting equation do not justify calibration changes based on this small depression in solution conductivity. This work supports preparation of H-Canyon processing of Super Kukla fuel; however, the results will be applicable to the processing of any similar concentration uranium and nitric acid solution. Super Kukla fuel processing will increase the uranium concentration above the nominal zero to 10 g/L level, though not above 30 g/L. This work examined free nitric acid levels ranging from 0.18 to 0.52 molar. Temperature ranged from 27.9 to 28.3 C during conductivity testing. The data indicates that sequential order of measurement is not a significant factor. The conductivity meter was thus flushed effectively between measurements as desired.

  9. Brightening of the global cloud field by nitric acid and the associated radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Makkonen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Clouds cool Earth's climate by reflecting 20% of the incoming solar energy, while also trapping part of the outgoing radiation. The effect of human activities on clouds is poorly understood, but the present-day anthropogenic cooling via changes of cloud albedo and lifetime could be of the same order as warming from anthropogenic addition in CO2. Soluble trace gases can increase water condensation to particles, possibly leading to activation of smaller aerosols and more numerous cloud droplets. We have studied the effect of nitric acid on the aerosol indirect effect with the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5.5-HAM2. Including the nitric acid effect in the model increases cloud droplet number concentrations globally by 7%. The nitric acid contribution to the present-day cloud albedo effect was found to be −0.32 W m−2 and to the total indirect effect −0.46 W m−2. The contribution to the cloud albedo effect is shown to increase to −0.37 W m−2 by the year 2100, if considering only the reductions in available cloud condensation nuclei. Overall, the effect of nitric acid can play a large part in aerosol cooling during the following decades with decreasing SO2 emissions and increasing NOx and greenhouse gases.

  10. Foliar loading and metabolic assimilation of dry deposited nitric acid air pollutants by trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela E. Padgett; Hillary Cook; Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Robert L. Heath

    2009-01-01

    Dry deposition of nitric acid vapor (HNO(3)) is a major contributor to eutrophication of natural ecosystems. Although soil fertilization by nitrogen deposition is considered to be the primary pathway for changes in plant nutrient status and shifts in ecological structure, the aerial portion of plants offer many times the surface area in which to...

  11. Ultrasonic cleaning of depleted uranium material as an alternative to nitric acid cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, L.E.; Senviel, C.B.

    1991-05-28

    Nitric acid is used to clean depleted uranium in the form of cast billets, and cast and wrought parts in the processing cycle and is the largest contributor of waste to the West End Treatment Facility (WETF). An estimated 27,000 gallons of liquid and 75 to 95% of all uranium received was sent to the WETF for processing from this facility in our baseline year. Because wrought parts account for the largest throughput at the nitric acid facility, an alternative cleaning method for these parts was examined first. Test results on the first part type from the wrought family showed ultrasonic cleaning to be an effective cleaning method. Since the geometry for this part presented the most difficulty in terms of ultrasonic cleaning, the entire wrought family is expected to be moved from the nitric acid facility to the ultrasonic cleaning facility. As a result, there will be an 83% reduction part throughput at the nitric acid facility which corresponds to a significant decrease in wastes sent to the WETF and a reduction in the generation and associated costs of waste overall. This change also eliminated two building moves involving two RAD areas resulting in a part movement reduction of approximately 25% which is a significant cost savings.

  12. Corrosion behavior of ODS steels with several chromium contents in hot nitric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Takashi; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Kaito, Takeji

    2017-10-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel cladding tubes have been developed for fast reactors. Tempered martensitic ODS steels with 9 and 11 wt% of chromium (9Cr-, 11Cr-ODS steel) are the candidate material in research being carried out at JAEA. In this work, fundamental immersion tests and electrochemical tests of 9 to 12Cr-ODS steels were systematically conducted in various nitric acid solutions at 95 °C. The corrosion rate decreased exponentially with effective solute chromium concentration (Creff) and nitric acid concentration. Addition of vanadium (V) and ruthenium (Ru) also decreased the corrosion rate. The combination of low Creff and dilute nitric acid could not avoid the active mass dissolution during active domain at the beginning of immersion, and the corrosion rate was high. Higher Creff decreased the partial anodic current during the active domain and assisted the passivation of the surface of the steel. Concentrated nitric acid and addition of Ru and V increased partial cathodic current and shifted the corrosion potential to noble side. These effects should have prevented the active mass dissolution and decreased the corrosion rate.

  13. [Case of dyspnea due to toilet cleaner containing nitric acid for household use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Hirano, Yohei; Ri, Tetsunari; Aihara, Koichiro; Iba, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    A 40-year-old male tried to clean a urinal at his home storing 900 mL of a toilet cleaner containing 9.8% nitric acid to remove calcium deposit, and clean the toilet floor for twenty minutes. Immediately after using the cleaner, he experienced eye irritation. He washed out the toilet cleaner. However, he thereafter experienced dyspnea, a compressive sensation in his chest, and chest and back pain about 40 minutes after the cleaning the toilet. He monitored his symptoms overnight and found them to gradually improve. However, the symptoms still remained the next morning and therefore he came to our department on foot. He had no particular past or family history. On arrival, his physiological findings and chest computed tomography scan were negative for any abnormalities. His arterial blood gas analysis revealed a mild abnormality of oxygenation. Observation without any drugs revealed that a complete remission of his symptoms occurred after approximately 4 weeks. Based on the results of the experiments, contact with the mucosal membrane and nitric acid gas produced by any accidentally coexisting metals or contact with moisture, including nitric acid produced by a reaction between CaCO3 and cleaner, may have been the mechanism of occurrence for the symptoms observed in this case. This is the first reported case of nitric acid poisoning due to the use of a toilet cleanser intended for household use.

  14. White Paper on Potential Hazards Associated with Contaminated Cheesecloth Exposed to Nitric Acid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-20

    This white paper addresses the potential hazards associated with waste cheesecloth that has been exposed to nitric acid solutions. This issue was highlighted by the cleanup of a 100 ml leak of aqueous nitric acid solution containing Heat Source (HS) plutonium on 21 June 2016. Nitration of cellulosic material is a well-understood process due to industrial/military applications of the resulting material. Within the Department of Energy complex, nitric acids have been used extensively, as have cellulosic wipes. If cellulosic materials are nitrated, the cellulosic material can become ignitable and in extreme cases, reactive. We have chemistry knowledge and operating experience to support the conclusion that all current wastes are safe and compliant. There are technical questions worthy of further experimental evaluation. An extent of condition evaluation has been conducted back to 2004. During this time period there have been interruptions in the authorization to use cellulosic wipes in PF-4. Limited use has been authorized since 2007 (for purposes other than spill cleanup), so our extent of condition includes the entire current span of use. Our evaluation shows that there is no indication that process spills involving high molarity nitric acid were cleaned up with cheesecloth since 2007. The materials generated in the 21 June leak will be managed in a safe manner compliant with all applicable requirements.

  15. Physiological responses of lichens to factorial fumigations with nitric acid and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Riddell; P.E. Padgett; T. Nash

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the effects of gaseous nitric acid (HNO3) and ozone (O3), two important air pollutants, on six lichen species with different morphological, ecological, and biological characteristics. The treatment chambers were set up in a factorial design consisting of control chambers, chambers fumigated with HNO

  16. Corrosion behaviour of AISI type 304L stainless steel in nitric acid media containing oxidizing species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ningshen, S. [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kamachi Mudali, U., E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.i [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Ramya, S.; Raj, Baldev [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Corrosion behaviour of 304L stainless steel has been evaluated in the presence of oxidizing species in nitric acid medium. No significant change in corrosion potential even with increase in temperature and nitric acid concentration in presence of oxidizing ions. Faster passive film dissolution as indicated by low film polarization resistance, with increase in nitric acid concentration and temperature. The presence of oxidizing species further aggravates the corrosion of 304L SS along with increased temperature and nitric acid concentration. - Abstract: The corrosion behaviour of AISI type 304L stainless steel (SS) in different concentration of 0.01 M, 1 M and 5 M HNO{sub 3} in presence of oxidizing ions at different temperatures has been evaluated. The main objective of this study is to assess the corrosion resistance of type 304L SS in non-radioactive conditions encountered during storage of liquid nuclear waste. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) has clearly brought out the deleterious effect of oxidizing species on the passive film leading to increased corrosion along with increase in HNO{sub 3} concentration and higher temperature.

  17. Preliminary Appraisal of Ferrocene as an Igniting Agent for JP-4 Fuel and Fuming Nitric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, RIley O.

    1953-01-01

    A preliminary experimental study was made of the properties of ferrocene as a solute and as a suspension in JP-4 fuel, and of the ignition delays of ferrocene - JP-4 mixture with A.F. specification 14104 white fuming nitric acid (WFNA). The investigation covered concentrations of 4 to 10 percent by weight ferrocene, and a temperature range of -40 to 80 F. The solubility of ferrocene in JP-4 is about 5 percent at room temperature and about 1 percent (extrapolated) at -80 F. The solubility is increased somewhat by increased aromatics content. Undissolved ferrocene particles of 100 mesh and smaller settle rapidly in JP-4. Clear solutions of 4 and 5 percent ferrocene in JP-4 fuels containing 10 and 25 percent by volume aromatics, respectively, do not ignite with WFNA at room temperature. Mixtures containing 10 percent ferrocene (100- mesh and smaller undissolved particles in suspension) ignited with vigorous persistent flames at room temperature, but did not ignite at -38 F. The ignition delays at room temperature, however, were widely varied; the range from 85 milliseconds to over 1 second perhaps reflected differences in degree of sedimentation.

  18. Nitric acid treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes optimized by Taguchi method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsuddin, Shahidah Arina; Hashim, Uda; Halim, Nur Hamidah Abdul [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Derman, Mohd Nazree, E-mail: nazree@unimap.edu.my; Tahir, Muhammad Faheem Mohd [Centre of Excellence Geopolymer & Green Technology (CEGeoGTech), School of Material Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Kashif, Muhammad [Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 94300, Kota Samarahan, Sarawak (Malaysia); Adam, Tijjani [Faculty of Engineering Technology, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 02100, Padang Besar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    Electron transfer rate (ETR) of CNTs can be enhanced by increasing the amounts of COOH groups to their wall and opened tips. With the aim to achieve the highest production amount of COOH, Taguchi robust design has been used for the first time to optimize the surface modification of MWCNTs by nitric acid oxidation. Three main oxidation parameters which are concentration of acid, treatment temperature and treatment time have been selected as the control factors that will be optimized. The amounts of COOH produced are measured by using FTIR spectroscopy through the absorbance intensity. From the analysis, we found that acid concentration and treatment time had the most important influence on the production of COOH. Meanwhile, the treatment temperature will only give intermediate effect. The optimum amount of COOH can be achieved with the treatment by 8.0 M concentration of nitric acid at 120 °C for 2 hour.

  19. Nitric Acid Revamp and Upgrading of the Alarm & Protection Safety System at Petrokemija, Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoško, I.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Every industrial production, particularly chemical processing, demands special attention in conducting the technological process with regard to the security requirements. For this reason, production processes should be continuously monitored by means of control and alarm safety instrumented systems. In the production of nitric acid at Petrokemija d. d., the original alarm safety system was designed as a combination of an electrical relay safety system and transistorized alarm module system. In order to increase safety requirements and modernize the technological process of nitric acid production, revamping and upgrading of the existing alarm safety system was initiated with a new microprocessor system. The newly derived alarm safety system, Simatic PCS 7, links the function of "classically" distributed control (DCS and logical systems in a common hardware and software platform with integrated engineering tools and operator interface to meet the minimum safety standards with safety integrity level 2 (SIL2 up to level 3 (SIL3, according to IEC 61508 and IEC 61511. This professional paper demonstrates the methodology of upgrading the logic of the alarm safety system in the production of nitric acid in the form of a logical diagram, which was the basis for a further step in its design and construction. Based on the mentioned logical diagram and defined security requirements, the project was implemented in three phases: analysis and testing, installation of the safety equipment and system, and commissioning. Developed also was a verification system of all safety conditions, which could be applied to other facilities for production of nitric acid. With the revamped and upgraded interlock alarm safety system, a new and improved safety boundary in the production of nitric acid was set, which created the foundation for further improvement of the production process in terms of improved analysis.

  20. O2 electrocatalysis in acid media on iron naphthalocyanine impregnations. Effect of nitric acid treatment on different carbon black supports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coowar, F.; Contamin, O.; Savy, M.; Scarbeck, G.; van den Ham, D.; Riga, J.; Verbist, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    O2 electrocatalysis on (2,3)FeNPc impregnations on different carbon blacks was investigated in H2SO4 medium. The effect of nitric acid treatment on the carbon black support is to enhance both the activity and stability of the catalyst. Moreover, as seen by XPS, the dissolution of iron is impeded by

  1. Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ ethylene plant defense pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mur, Luis A. J.; Prats, Elena; Pierre, Sandra; Hall, Michael A.; Hebelstrup, Kim H.

    2013-01-01

    Plant defense against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defense responses to be tailored to particular biotic stresses. Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a major signal influencing resistance mediated by both signaling pathways but no attempt has been made to integrate NO into established SA/JA/ET interactions. NO has been shown to act as an inducer or suppressor of signaling along each pathway. NO will initiate SA biosynthesis and nitrosylate key cysteines on TGA-class transcription factors to aid in the initiation of SA-dependent gene expression. Against this, S-nitrosylation of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1) will promote the NPR1 oligomerization within the cytoplasm to reduce TGA activation. In JA biosynthesis, NO will initiate the expression of JA biosynthetic enzymes, presumably to over-come any antagonistic effects of SA on JA-mediated transcription. NO will also initiate the expression of ET biosynthetic genes but a suppressive role is also observed in the S-nitrosylation and inhibition of S-adenosylmethionine transferases which provides methyl groups for ET production. Based on these data a model for NO action is proposed but we have also highlighted the need to understand when and how inductive and suppressive steps are used. PMID:23818890

  2. the roles of gastric acid and nitric oxide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Fujishita, T., Furutani, K and Okabe, S. (2003):. Pharmacological control of gastric acid secretion for the treatment of acid-related peptic disease: past, present and future. Pharmacol. Ther. 98:109-127. Amure, B.O., and Ginsburg, M. (1964). Inhibitors of histamine catabolism and the action of gastrin in the rat. Br. J. Pharmacol.

  3. Activity coefficients of uranyl nitrate and nitric acid in aqueous mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochkin, A.; Gladilov, D.; Nekhaevskiy, S.; Merkushkin, A. [D. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, 9 Miusskay Sqr., Moscow, 125047 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    The activity coefficients of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate in aqueous mixtures are necessary to model the extracting system H{sub 2}O-HNO{sub 3}-UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-TBP-diluent used in the PUREX process. Three methods have been compared in this work to determine activity coefficients based on experimental data, Pitzer's equation or Zdanovskiy's rule. Acid activities have been calculated from the data of the two first methods. These results were compared with the data of the third method. Errors were about 3.3%. Activity coefficients of uranyl nitrate γ{sub U} as a function of concentration of uranyl nitrate and nitric acid were determined in 76 mixed solutions. The equation to calculate γ{sub U} is proposed. (authors)

  4. the roles of gastric acid and nitric oxide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    metavanadate at (0, 50 and 200 ppm) in drinking water for 10weeks after which ulcer was induced using pylorus ... that can reduce or curb the aggressive factors (gastric acid, abnormal .... Table 4 shows the effects of vanadium on gastric.

  5. Kinetics of the Autoreduction of Hexavalent Americium in Aqueous Nitric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Travis S; Horne, Gregory P; Dares, Christopher J; Pimblott, Simon M; Mezyk, Stephen P; Mincher, Bruce J

    2017-07-17

    The rate of reduction of hexavalent 243 Am due to self-radiolysis was measured across a range of total americium and nitric acid concentrations. These so-called autoreduction rates exhibited zero-order kinetics with respect to the concentration of hexavalent americium, and pseudo-first-order kinetics with respect to the total concentration of americium. However, the rate constants did vary with nitric acid concentration, resulting in values of 0.0048 ± 0.0003, 0.0075 ± 0.0005, and 0.0054 ± 0.0003 h -1 for 1.0, 3.0, and 6.5 M HNO 3 , respectively. This indicates that reduction is due to reaction of hexavalent americium with the radiolysis products of total americium decay. The concentration changes of Am(III), Am(V), and Am(VI) were determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. The Am(III) molar extinction coefficients are known; however, the unknown values for the Am(V) and Am(VI) absorbances across the studied range of nitric acid concentrations were determined by sensitivity analysis in which a mass balance with the known total americium concentration was obtained. The new extinction coefficients and reduction rate constants have been tabulated here. Multiscale radiation chemical modeling using a reaction set with both known and optimized rate coefficients was employed to achieve excellent agreement with the experimental results, and indicates that radiolytically produced nitrous acid from nitric acid radiolysis and hydrogen peroxide from water radiolysis are the important reducing agents. Since these species also react with each other, modeling indicated that the highest concentrations of these species available for Am(VI) reduction occurred at 3.0 M HNO 3 . This is in agreement with the empirical finding that the highest rate constant for autoreduction occurred at the intermediate acid concentration.

  6. Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co (III) mediator in a nitric acid based system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, G. Bryan; Chiba, Zoher; Lewis, Patricia R.; Nelson, Norvell; Steward, G. Anthony

    1999-01-01

    An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and nitric acid electrolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble transuranic compounds and is regenerated at the anode until the organics are converted to CO.sub.2. The nitric acid is an excellent oxidant that facilitates the destruction of the organic components. The anode is not readily attacked by the nitric acid solution, thus the cell can be used for extended continual operation without electrode replacement.

  7. Changes in oxidative potential of soil and fly ash after reaction with gaseous nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ying; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Shafer, Martin M.; Rudich, Yinon; Pardo, Michal; Katra, Itzhak; Katoshevski, David; Schauer, James J.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the impact of simulated atmospheric aging on the oxidative potential of inorganic aerosols comprised primarily of crustal materials. Four soil samples and one coal fly ash sample were artificially aged in the laboratory through exposure to the vapor from 15.8 M nitric acid solution for 24 h at room temperature. Native and acid-aged samples were analyzed with a cellular macrophage and acellular dithionthreitol assays to determine oxidative potential. Additionally, the samples were analyzed to determine the concentration of 50 elements, both total and the water-soluble fraction of these elements by Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (SF-ICMS) and crystalline mineral composition using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The results show that reactions with gaseous nitric acid increase the water-soluble fraction of many elements, including calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and lead. The mineral composition analysis documented that calcium-rich minerals present in the soils (e.g., calcite) are converted into different chemical forms, such as calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2). The nitric acid aging process, which can occur in the atmosphere, leads to a 200-600% increase in oxidative potential, as measured by cellular and acellular assays. This laboratory study demonstrates that the toxic effects of aged versus freshly emitted atmospheric dust may be quite different. In addition, the results suggest that mineralogical analysis of atmospheric dust may be useful in understanding its degree of aging.

  8. Multivariate Analysis for Quantification of Plutonium(IV) in Nitric Acid Based on Absorption Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lines, Amanda M. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Adami, Susan R. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Sinkov, Sergey I. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Lumetta, Gregg J. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Bryan, Samuel A. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States

    2017-08-09

    Development of more effective, reliable, and fast methods for monitoring process streams is a growing opportunity for analytical applications. Many fields can benefit from on-line monitoring, including the nuclear fuel cycle where improved methods for monitoring radioactive materials will facilitate maintenance of proper safeguards and ensure safe and efficient processing of materials. On-line process monitoring with a focus on optical spectroscopy can provide a fast, non-destructive method for monitoring chemical species. However, identification and quantification of species can be hindered by the complexity of the solutions if bands overlap or show condition-dependent spectral features. Plutonium (IV) is one example of a species which displays significant spectral variation with changing nitric acid concentration. Single variate analysis (i.e. Beer’s Law) is difficult to apply to the quantification of Pu(IV) unless the nitric acid concentration is known and separate calibration curves have been made for all possible acid strengths. Multivariate, or chemometric, analysis is an approach that allows for the accurate quantification of Pu(IV) without a priori knowledge of nitric acid concentration.

  9. Nitric Acid-Treated Carbon Fibers with Enhanced Hydrophilicity for Candida tropicalis Immobilization in Xylitol Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitric acid (HNO3-treated carbon fiber (CF rich in hydrophilic groups was applied as a cell-immobilized carrier for xylitol fermentation. Using scanning electron microscopy, we characterized the morphology of the HNO3-treated CF. Additionally, we evaluated the immobilized efficiency (IE of Candida tropicalis and xylitol fermentation yield by investigating the surface properties of nitric acid treated CF, specifically, the acidic group content, zero charge point, degree of moisture and contact angle. We found that adhesion is the major mechanism for cell immobilization and that it is greatly affected by the hydrophilic–hydrophilic surface properties. In our experiments, we found 3 hto be the optimal time for treating CF with nitric acid, resulting in an improved IE of Candida tropicalis of 0.98 g∙g−1 and the highest xylitol yield and volumetric productivity (70.13% and 1.22 g∙L−1∙h−1, respectively. The HNO3-treated CF represents a promising method for preparing biocompatible biocarriers for multi-batch fermentation.

  10. A Kinetic study of leaching of coal pyrite with nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eung Ha; Chang, Kevin H.; Rollins, Ronald R.

    1983-09-01

    The leaching of coal pyrite with nitric acid has been investigated. The temperature ranged from 313 to 363 K, and the concentration of nitric acid was varied from 0.154 to 1.54 mol/l. A coal sample of 50 grams was leached in a reactor containing 500 ml of solution in an open system. It was observed that the leaching reaction could remove 47 pct of the pyrite sulfur in seven minutes and 88 pct in 30 minutes at 343 K with 1.54 mol/l of nitric acid. The reaction order with respect to hydrogen and nitrate ion activity was found to be first order. The activation energy for the initial stage of the reaction was determined to be 14.7 K cal/mol (61.5 kJ/mol). A mathematical model was developed on the basis of mixed kinetics (reaction zone model) to explain the leaching rates. Good agreement between experimental rate data and predicted rate curves by the developed model was obtained. Ultimate analysis was used to determine the extent of nitration of the leached coal. This nitration was found to be insensitive to the reaction temperature and acidity of the solution.

  11. (TBBI) on copper corrosion in 1 M nitric acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIAMIEN PAULIN

    Copper is widely used in various industrial operations; therefore the study of its corrosion inhibition is a subject ... corrosion or dissolution; it is one of the most used metals in the industry because of its mechanical, ...... N-Heterocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors for aluminium-copper alloy in Hydrochloric acid. Corros.

  12. Passive Sampler for Measurements of Atmospheric Nitric Acid Vapor (HNO3 Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bytnerowicz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric acid (HNO3 vapor is an important nitrogenous air pollutant responsible for increasing saturation of forests with nitrogen and direct injury to plants. The USDA Forest Service and University of California researchers have developed a simple and inexpensive passive sampler for monitoring air concentrations of HNO3. Nitric acid is selectively absorbed on 47-mm Nylasorb nylon filters with no interference from particulate NO3-. Concentrations determined with the passive samplers closely corresponded with those measured with the co-located honeycomb annular denuder systems. The PVC protective caps of standardized dimensions protect nylon filters from rain and wind and allow for reliable measurements of ambient HNO3 concentrations. The described samplers have been successfully used in Sequoia National Park, the San Bernardino Mountains, and on Mammoth Mountain in California.

  13. Effect of Different Electrode Materials on the Electropolymerization Process of Aniline in Nitric Acid Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaozong; Yi, Yun; Yang, Weifang; Liu, Xiaoqing; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The electropolymerization process of aniline on different electrode surfaces such as Pt, Au, RuTi and polyaniline film in nitric acid solution containing 1 M aniline was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Proposed electrical equivalent circuits were used to give a further analysis. Results show that the electrode materials accelerate the aniline electropolymerization remarkably as a catalyst, especially the electrochemical oxidation process of monomer aniline to its cation radical, which is the key step to incur the electropolymerization reaction of aniline on the electrode surface. The polymerization of aniline on RuTi electrode has the lowest reaction resistance for its adsorption sites, and the catalytic effects of these different electrodes decrease in the order: RuTi > polyaniline film > Pt > Au. The results also show that several states of polyaniline films are formed during the potential linear scan process in nitric acid solution and the corresponding oxidation and reduction reaction are reversible.

  14. Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2000-09-28

    This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

  15. The innervation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex: nitric acid maceration rediscovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R; Nelson, S D; Baker, J; Jones, N F; Meals, R A

    2001-01-01

    Injury to the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is frequently implicated in the etiology of ulnar-sided wrist pain. This study examines the nervous anatomy of the TFCC using a nitric acid maceration technique and attempts to correlate this information with known tear patterns. Ten fresh frozen cadaveric specimens were studied in detail. Gross dissection of each upper-extremity specimen included removal of all flexor and extensor tendons. After identification and labeling with permanent color of the ulnar nerve, dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve, posterior interosseous nerve, anterior interosseous nerve, and median nerve, an en bloc excision of the distal radioulnar region was performed. Digestion of the soft tissue was performed with nitric acid at sequential concentrations of 50% and 33% for 9 of 10 specimens. The digestion was halted by immersing the specimen in a mixture of 10% formaldehyde and 1% glycerine. After removal of bone, the specimens were fixed in paraffin, sectioned, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Nine of the 10 specimens were studied microscopically to determine the contribution of the grossly identified nerves to each zone of the triangular fibrocartilage complex as defined by Palmer's classification of acute TFCC tears. The anterior interosseous, median, and superficial radial nerves did not contribute to the innervation of the TFCC. The intraarticular course of the peripheral nerves could not be defined in the one specimen that was not digested with nitric acid. Nitric acid maceration is a rediscovered technique for identifying the nervous anatomy of soft tissues. The study showed that the triangular fibrocartilage complex is innervated by branches of the posterior interosseous, ulnar, and dorsal sensory ulnar nerves in a fairly consistent manner. Improved treatment of TFCC tears may result from an enhanced understanding of the supporting structures' innervation and mechanical function.

  16. Kinetic and safety assessment for salicylic acid nitration by nitric acid/acetic acid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, R; Caprio, V; Di Somma, I; Sanchirico, R

    2006-06-30

    The nitration process of salicylic acid for the production of the important intermediate 5-nitrosalicylic acid is studied from thermokinetic and safety points of view. Investigations carried out by considering, as process deviations, the loss of the thermal control point out the possibility of runaway phenomena due to the occurrence of polynitration reactions. Isothermal experiments are carried out in various conditions to assess the involved reaction network and reaction kinetics.

  17. GOZCARDS Merged Data for Nitric Acid Monthly Zonal Means on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid V1.01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GOZCARDS Merged Data for Nitric Acid Monthly Zonal Averages on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid product (GozMmlpHNO3) contains zonal means and related...

  18. GOZCARDS Source Data for Nitric Acid Monthly Zonal Means on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid V1.01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GOZCARDS Source Data for Nitric Acid Monthly Zonal Averages on a Geodetic Latitude and Pressure Grid product (GozSmlpHNO3) contains zonal means and related...

  19. MLS/Aura Level 2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V004 (ML2HNO3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  20. MLS/Aura Level 2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V003 (ML2HNO3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  1. MLS/Aura Near-Real-Time L2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3_NRT is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Near-Real-Time (NRT) product for nitric acid (HNO3). This product contains daily HNO3 profiles taken from...

  2. Material Compatibility Evaluation for DWPF Nitric-Glycolic Acid - Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Skidmore, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-30

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid. The reported corrosion rates and degradation characteristics have shown the following for the materials of construction.

  3. An investigation into the surface heterogeneity of nitric acid oxidized carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhead, Andrea L., E-mail: andrea.woodhead@csiro.au [CSIRO Manufacturing, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Souza, Mandy L. de [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Church, Jeffrey S. [CSIRO Manufacturing, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A series of nitric acid treated CFs were produced to explore surface heterogeneity. • Several surface analysis techniques, SEM, XPS, AFM and Raman, were compared. • Raman spectral maps were used to explore chemical effects of the treatments on CF. • These maps provided information at a spatial resolution unattainable by XPS. • CFs subjected to the harshest treatment displayed increased surface heterogeneity. - Abstract: The carbon fiber surface plays a critical role in the performance of carbon fiber composite materials and, thus it is important to have a thorough understanding of the fiber surface. A series of nitric acid treated intermediate modulus carbon fibers with increasing treatment level was prepared and characterized using a range of surface sensitive techniques including Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. The results, which were found to be consistent with increasing treatment levels, were compared to the literature. Raman spectral mapping has been used to investigate the heterogeneity of the carbon fiber surface after nitric acid oxidation. The mapping enabled the effects of surface treatment on carbon fiber to be investigated at a spatial resolution unattainable by XPS and provided chemical structure information not provided by SEM or AFM. The highest level of treatment resulted in the most heterogeneous surface. Raman mapping, while time consuming, can provide valuable information which can lead to an enhanced understanding of the heterogeneity of the carbon fiber surface.

  4. Chemical behavior of neptunium in the presence of technetium in nitric acid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xianming; Ye, Guo-an; Zhang, Hu; Li, Li; Luo, Fangxiang; Meng, Zhaokai [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    2014-04-01

    The chemical behavior of Np is influenced by many factors, such as U(IV), hydrazine, Pu and Tc, which coexist in U/Pu separation stage of PUREX process. Firstly, the reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) by Tc(IV) was studied in nitric acid media, and the rate equation could be expressed as -d[Np(V)]/dt = k[Np(V)][Tc(IV)]{sup 0.8}[HNO{sub 3}]{sup 1.2}, k = 28.5 ± 0.9 (L/mol){sup 2}/min at 25 , the activation energy was E{sub a} = 70.0 kJ/mol. Thereafter, the chemical behavior of Np was investigated in aqueous nitric acid solution containing Tc(VII), U(IV) and N{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Np(V) was reduced to Np(IV) quickly, Tc(VII) was reduced to Tc(IV) and U(IV) was oxidized to U(VI) at the same time. Thereafter Np(IV) was entirely reoxidized to Np(V) when U(IV) and hydrazine were completely consumed. The fast reduction of Np(V) was mainly ascribed to Tc(IV). In addition, Tc(VII) and nitric acid had little influence on the fast oxidation of Np(IV). (orig.)

  5. [Comparative analysis between diatom nitric acid digestion method and plankton 16S rDNA PCR method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun-ge; Wang, Cheng-bao; Li, Xing-biao; Fan, Yan-yan; Feng, Xiang-ping

    2013-10-01

    To compare and explore the application value of diatom nitric acid digestion method and plankton 16S rDNA PCR method for drowning identification. Forty drowning cases from 2010 to 2011 were collected from Department of Forensic Medicine of Wenzhou Medical University. Samples including lung, kidney, liver and field water from each case were tested with diatom nitric acid digestion method and plankton 16S rDNA PCR method, respectively. The Diatom nitric acid digestion method and plankton 16S rDNA PCR method required 20 g and 2 g of each organ, and 15 mL and 1.5 mL of field water, respectively. The inspection time and detection rate were compared between the two methods. Diatom nitric acid digestion method mainly detected two species of diatoms, Centriae and Pennatae, while plankton 16S rDNA PCR method amplified a length of 162 bp band. The average inspection time of each case of the Diatom nitric acid digestion method was (95.30 +/- 2.78) min less than (325.33 +/- 14.18) min of plankton 16S rDNA PCR method (P plankton 16S rDNA PCR method was both 80%, higher than 40% and 30% of diatom nitric acid digestion method (P plankton 16S rDNA PCR method has practice values with such advantages as less quantity of samples, huge information and high specificity.

  6. Plutonium and Americium Alpha Radiolysis of Nitric Acid Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Gregory P; Gregson, Colin R; Sims, Howard E; Orr, Robin M; Taylor, Robin J; Pimblott, Simon M

    2017-02-02

    The yield of HNO 2 , as a function of absorbed dose and HNO 3 concentration, from the α-radiolysis of aerated HNO 3 solutions containing plutonium or americium has been investigated. There are significant differences in the yields measured from solutions of the two different radionuclides. For 0.1 mol dm -3 HNO 3 solutions, the radiolytic yield of HNO 2 produced by americium α-decay is below the detection limit, whereas for plutonium α-decay the yield is considerably greater than that found previously for γ-radiolysis. The differences between the solutions of the two radionuclides are a consequence of redox reactions involving plutonium and the products of aqueous HNO 3 radiolysis, in particular H 2 O 2 and HNO 2 and its precursors. This radiation chemical behavior is HNO 3 concentration dependent with the differences between plutonium and americium α-radiolysis decreasing with increasing HNO 3 concentration. This change may be interpreted as a combination of α-radiolysis direct effects and acidity influencing the plutonium oxidation state distribution, which in turn affects the radiation chemistry of the system.

  7. Electrochemistry and Spectroelectrochemistry of the Pu (III/IV) and (IV/VI) Couples in Nitric Acid Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lines, Amanda M.; Adami, Susan R.; Casella, Amanda J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2017-12-18

    The solution chemistry of Pu in nitric acid is explored via electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry. By utilizing and comparing these techniques, an improved understanding of Pu behavior and its dependence on nitric acid concentration can be achieved. Here the Pu (III/IV) couple is characterized using cyclic voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, and a spectroelectrochemical Nernst step. Results indicate the formal reduction potential of the couple shifts negative with increasing acid concentration and reversible electrochemistry is no longer attainable above 6 M HNO3. Spectroelectrochemistry is also used to explore the irreversible oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) and shine light on the mechanism and acid dependence of the redox reaction.

  8. Simultaneous Quantification of Iodine and Other Elements in Infant Formula by ICP-MS Following an Acid Digestion with Nitric Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    FUJISAKI, Koji; MATSUMOTO, Hiroshi; SHIMOKAWA, Yukiko; KIYOTAKI, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    A method for quantifying iodine in infant formula is described. Nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide converted iodine into iodate in microwave-assisted digestion and prevented iodine volatilization and memory effects...

  9. Sludge batch 9 simulant runs using the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Brandenburg, C. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Luther, M. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Woodham, W. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Testing was completed to develop a Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) nitric-glycolic acid chemical process flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility’s (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). CPC simulations were completed using SB9 sludge simulant, Strip Effluent Feed Tank (SEFT) simulant and Precipitate Reactor Feed Tank (PRFT) simulant. Ten sludge-only Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycles and four SRAT/Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles, and one actual SB9 sludge (SRAT/SME cycle) were completed. As has been demonstrated in over 100 simulations, the replacement of formic acid with glycolic acid virtually eliminates the CPC’s largest flammability hazards, hydrogen and ammonia. Recommended processing conditions are summarized in section 3.5.1. Testing demonstrated that the interim chemistry and Reduction/Oxidation (REDOX) equations are sufficient to predict the composition of DWPF SRAT product and SME product. Additional reports will finalize the chemistry and REDOX equations. Additional testing developed an antifoam strategy to minimize the hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) peak at boiling, while controlling foam based on testing with simulant and actual waste. Implementation of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in DWPF is recommended. This flowsheet not only eliminates the hydrogen and ammonia hazards but will lead to shorter processing times, higher elemental mercury recovery, and more concentrated SRAT and SME products. The steady pH profile is expected to provide flexibility in processing the high volume of strip effluent expected once the Salt Waste Processing Facility starts up.

  10. Activation of Secretagogue Independent Gastric Acid Secretion via Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Stimulation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Miriam Kitay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: L-arginine is an important mediator of cell division, wound healing, and immune function. It can be transformed by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS to nitric oxide (NO, an important cell signaling molecule. Recent studies from our laboratory demonstrate specific effects of L-arginine (10mM exposure on gastric acid secretion in rat parietal cells. Methods: Studies were performed with isolated gastric glands and the pH sensitive dye BCECF-AM +/- L-arginine to examine its effects on acid secretion. The direct NO-donor diethylamine NONOate sodium salt hydrate, was also used while monitoring intracellular pH. The specific inhibitor of the intracellular NO signal cascade ODQ was also used. Results: We found that gastric proton extrusion was activated with application of L-arginine (10mM, in a separate series when L-arginine (10mM + L-NAME (30µM were added there was no acid secretion. Addition of the NO-donor diethylamine NONOate sodium salt hydrate (10µM also induced acid secretion. When the selective sGC-inhibitor ODQ was added with NONOate we did not observe acid secretion. Conclusion: We conclude that L-arginine is a novel secretagogue, which can mediate gastric acid secretion. Furthermore, the intake of L-arginine causes direct activation of the H+, K+ ATPase and increased proton extrusion from parietal cells resulting in the increased risk for acid-related diseases. The NO/sGC/cGMP pathway has never been described as a possible intracellular mechanism for H+, K+ ATPase activation before and presents a completely new scientific finding. Moreover, our studies demonstrate a novel role for L-NAME to effectively eliminate NOS induced acid secretion and thereby reducing the risk for L-arginine inducible ulcer disease.

  11. FY13 GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATIONS OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SIMULANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Zamecnik, J.; Best, D.

    2014-03-13

    Savannah River Remediation is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility flowsheet to replace formic acid with glycolic acid in order to improve processing cycle times and decrease by approximately 100x the production of hydrogen, a potentially flammable gas. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Processing Cell since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the safety significant gas chromatographs and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, eliminating the use of formic acid is highly desirable. Previous testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with glycolic acid allows the reduction and removal of mercury without significant catalytic hydrogen generation. Five back-to-back Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycles and four back-to-back Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were successful in demonstrating the viability of the nitric/glycolic acid flowsheet. The testing was completed in FY13 to determine the impact of process heels (approximately 25% of the material is left behind after transfers). In addition, back-to-back experiments might identify longer-term processing problems. The testing was designed to be prototypic by including sludge simulant, Actinide Removal Product simulant, nitric acid, glycolic acid, and Strip Effluent simulant containing Next Generation Solvent in the SRAT processing and SRAT product simulant, decontamination frit slurry, and process frit slurry in the SME processing. A heel was produced in the first cycle and each subsequent cycle utilized the remaining heel from the previous cycle. Lower SRAT purges were utilized due to the low hydrogen generation. Design basis addition rates and boilup rates were used so the processing time was shorter than current processing rates.

  12. Nitric Acid Dehydration Using Perfluoro Carboxylate and Mixed Sulfonate/Carboxylate Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Richard L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Perfluoro ionomer membranes are tetrafluoro ethylene-based materials with microheterogeneous structures consisting of a hydrophobic polymer backbone and a hydrophilic side-chain cluster region. Due to the ionomer cluster morphology, these films exhibit unique transport properties. Recent investigations with perfluoro sulfonate and perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate composite polymers have demonstrated their value in the dehydration of nitric acid and they show potential as an alternative to conventional, energy intensive unit operations in the concentration of acid feeds. As a result, investigations were conducted to determine the feasibility of using pure perfluoro carboxylate and mixed perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate films for the dehydration of nitric acid because of the speculation of improved water selectivity of the carboxylate pendant chain. During the first phase of these investigations the effort was focused on generating a thin, solution cast perfluoro carboxylate ionomer film, to evaluate the general, chemical and physical characteristics of the polymer, and to assess the material's aqueous transport performance (flux and nitrate separation efficiencies) in pervaporation and high-pressure environments. Results demonstrated that generating robust solution-cast films was difficult yet a number of membranes survived high trans-membrane pressures up to 700 psig. General characterization of the solution cast product showed reduced ion exchange capacities when compared with thicker, ''as received'' perfluoro carboxylate and similar sulfonate films. Small angle x-ray scattering analysis results suggested that the solution cast carboxylate films contained a small fraction of sulfonate terminated side-chains. Aqueous transport experimentation showed that permeate fluxes for both pure water and nitric acid were approximately two orders of magnitude smaller for the carboxylate solution cast membranes when compared to their sulfonate

  13. Role of folic acid in nitric oxide bioavailability and vascular endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Kenney, W Larry

    2017-01-01

    Folic acid is a member of the B-vitamin family and is essential for amino acid metabolism. Adequate intake of folic acid is vital for metabolism, cellular homeostasis, and DNA synthesis. Since the initial discovery of folic acid in the 1940s, folate deficiency has been implicated in numerous disease states, primarily those associated with neural tube defects in utero and neurological degeneration later in life. However, in the past decade, epidemiological studies have identified an inverse relation between both folic acid intake and blood folate concentration and cardiovascular health. This association inspired a number of clinical studies that suggested that folic acid supplementation could reverse endothelial dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recently, in vitro and in vivo studies have begun to elucidate the mechanism(s) through which folic acid improves vascular endothelial function. These studies, which are the focus of this review, suggest that folic acid and its active metabolite 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate improve nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability by increasing endothelial NO synthase coupling and NO production as well as by directly scavenging superoxide radicals. By improving NO bioavailability, folic acid may protect or improve endothelial function, thereby preventing or reversing the progression of CVD in those with overt disease or elevated CVD risk. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Ferulic acid and its water-soluble derivatives inhibit nitric oxide production and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in rat primary astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikugawa, Masaki; Ida, Tomoaki; Ihara, Hideshi; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    2017-08-01

    We recently reported that two water-soluble derivatives of ferulic acid (1-feruloyl glycerol, 1-feruloyl diglycerol) previously developed by our group exhibited protective effects against amyloid-β-induced neurodegeneration in vitro and in vivo. In the current study, we aimed to further understand this process by examining the derivatives' ability to suppress abnormal activation of astrocytes, the key event of neurodegeneration. We investigated the effects of ferulic acid (FA) derivatives on nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in rat primary astrocytes. The results showed that these compounds inhibited NO production and iNOS expression in a concentration-dependent manner and that the mechanism underlying these effects was the suppression of the nuclear factor-κB pathway. This evidence suggests that FA and its derivatives may be effective neuroprotective agents and could be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  15. Corrosion of aluminium and aluminium alloys in nitric acid. Zur Korrosion von Aluminium-Werkstoffen in Salpetersaeure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, E.M.; Schoeller, K. (Bayer AG, Leverkusen (Germany, F.R.)); Doelling, H. (Vereinigte Aluminium-Werke AG, Bonn (Germany, F.R.). Leichtmetall-Forschungsinstitut)

    1990-06-01

    A literature survey was made to show the suitability of aluminium and aluminium alloys in contact with highly concentrated nitric acid, particularly with regard to the corrosion behaviour of weld joints made using various welding processes. The corrosion resistance of Al99.5 in nitric acid was investigated as functions of temperature and acid concentrations. The linear corrosion rates are plotted in an Arrhenius diagram. Decreasing nitric acid concentrations are causing a parallel shift of the lines in the Arrhenius diagram towards higher corrosion rates. Starting with Al99.5, the corrosion rates in nitric acid at and above 99.8 concentration decrease as the Al contents of the materials increase. Doping with copper should be avoided. After exposure of wrought as well as continuously cast Al and Al alloys to highly concentrated technical grade nitric acid at 30deg C (1 year test period), the corrosion behaviour of a number of alloys was comparable to that of pure aluminium grades. (orig.).

  16. Trans fatty acids induce vascular inflammation and reduce vascular nitric oxide production in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi G Iwata

    Full Text Available Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA, which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from ruminant-derived-dairy products and meat on endothelial NF-κB activation and nitric oxide (NO production. Human endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Elaidic (trans-C18:1 (9 trans, Linoelaidic (trans-C18:2 (9 trans, 12 trans, and Transvaccenic (trans-C18:1 (11 trans for 3 h. Both Elaidic and Linoelaidic acids were associated with increasing NF-κB activation as measured by IL-6 levels and phosphorylation of IκBα, and impairment of endothelial insulin signaling and NO production, whereas Transvaccenic acid was not associated with these responses. We also measured superoxide production, which has been hypothesized to be necessary in fatty acid-dependent activation of NF-κB. Both Elaidic acid and Linoelaidic acid are associated with increased superoxide production, whereas Transvaccenic acid (which did not induce inflammatory responses did not increase superoxide production. We observed differential activation of endothelial superoxide production, NF-κB activation, and reduction in NO production by different C18 isomers suggesting that the location and number of trans double bonds effect endothelial NF-κB activation.

  17. Development of ion-exchange properties of bamboo charcoal modified with concentrated nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, S.; Kuba, T.; Toyohara, Y.; Kamida, S.; Uchikawa, Y.

    2017-08-01

    The surface chemistry and the structural properties of activated carbon can be altered by the acidic modification. The objective of this study is to investigate the changes occurring in bamboo charcoal (BC) during activation with concentrated nitric acid. Low temperature (500°C) carbonized BC has been prepared and oxidized with 70% concentrated boiling nitric acid (BC-AC). The porous properties of the BC are analyzed with nitrogen adsorption isotherm at 77 K. The surface structure is observed by Field emission scanning electronic microscope (FESEM) and the surface functional groups are examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the pH of the point of zero charge (pHPZC). The results reveal that severe oxidation with HNO3 considerably decreases the surface area of BC with enhanced pore widening and FESEM observation demonstrates the erosive effect of oxidation. The FTIR analysis detects that some absorption bands are assigned for carboxyl, aldehyde and ketone groups on BC-AC. The XPS analysis also clearly shows that the ratio of oxygen and acidic functional groups has been enriched significantly on the BC-AC. The low pHPZC value of BC-AC confirms that the surface is highly acidic for the fixation of acidic functional groups on surface. In general, the existence of the abundant amount of acidic functional groups on adsorbents enhances the sorption of heavy metals ions in aqueous solution. Therefore, it is strongly expected that the modified BC, activated under the proposed conditions would be a promising ion exchanger in aqueous solution and can be applied for the adsorption of different heavy metal ions and radioactive materials from effluent.

  18. Extraction of rare earth elements from a contaminated cropland soil using nitric acid, citric acid, and EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hailong; Shuai, Weitao; Wang, Xiaojing; Liu, Yangsheng

    2017-08-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) contamination to the surrounding soil has increased the concerns of health risk to the local residents. Soil washing was first attempted in our study to remediate REEs-contaminated cropland soil using nitric acid, citric acid, and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) for soil decontamination and possible recovery of REEs. The extraction time, washing agent concentration, and pH value of the washing solution were optimized. The sequential extraction analysis proposed by Tessier was adopted to study the speciation changes of the REEs before and after soil washing. The extract containing citric acid was dried to obtain solid for the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. The results revealed that the optimal extraction time was 72 h, and the REEs extraction efficiency increased as the agent concentration increased from 0.01 to 0.1 mol/L. EDTA was efficient to extract REEs over a wide range of pH values, while citric acid was around pH 6.0. Under optimized conditions, the average extraction efficiencies of the major REEs in the contaminated soil were 70.96%, 64.38%, and 62.12% by EDTA, nitric acid, and citric acid, respectively. The sequential extraction analyses revealed that most soil-bounded REEs were mobilized or extracted except for those in the residual fraction. Under a comprehensive consideration of the extraction efficiency and the environmental impact, citric acid was recommended as the most suitable agent for extraction of the REEs from the contaminated cropland soils. The XRF analysis revealed that Mn, Al, Si, Pb, Fe, and REEs were the major elements in the extract indicating a possibile recovery of the REEs.

  19. Formation of substrate-based gold nanocage chains through dealloying with nitric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziren Yan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal nanocages have raised great interest because of their new properties and wide applications. Here, we report on the use of galvanic replacement reactions to synthesize substrate-supported Ag–Au nanocages from silver templates electrodeposited on transparent indium tin oxide (ITO film coated glass. The residual Ag in the composition was dealloyed with 10% nitric acid. It was found that chains of Au nanocages were formed on the substrate surface during dealloying. When the concentration of HNO3 increased to 20%, the structures of nanocages were damaged and formed crescent or semi-circular shapes. The transfer process on the substrate surface was discussed.

  20. The effect of random precipitation times on the scavenging rate for tropospheric nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the effective scavenging rate of a soluble species has been developed. The model takes into account the possibility of positive as well as negative correlations between departures from the mean of the scavenging rate and species concentration. The model is demonstrated for the case of late afternoon rainout of nitric acid occurring just prior to the nighttime cessation of its chemical production. The calculations give effective scavenging rates which are about a factor of 2 to 3 greater than those calculated using the models of Rodhe and Grandell (1972) and Giorgi and Chameides (1985).

  1. Microsystems for anion exchange separation of radionuclides in nitric acid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losno, M.; Brennetot, R.; Mariet, C. [DEN/Service d' Etudes Analytiques et de Reactivite des Surfaces - SEARS, CEA, Centre de Saclay, Universite Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif sur Yvette (France); Ferrante, I.; Descroix, S. [MMBM Group, Institut Curie Research Center, CNRS UMR 168, Paris (France)

    2016-07-01

    An efficient and reproducible photo-polymerized poly(ethylene glycol methacrylate methacrylate-co- allyl methacrylate) monolith was synthesized and a photo-grafting process based on the ene-thiol click-chemistry has been performed to give anion exchange properties to the monolith. Since their introduction in the early 1990's polymethacrylate monoliths have emerged as a powerful alternative for microscale separations or sample treatment. Their relatively simple implementation in columns with small internal diameters makes them particularly attractive for the new chromatographic challenges of complex matrices analysis and on-chip separations. Despite their relatively poor ion-exchange capacity due to their highly porous structure, their use as anion exchangers is of large interest for nuclear analysis as numerous separations are based on this process. This paper presents a systematic study of the synthesis of the polymeric porous monolith and the versatile and robust functionalization method developed for the specific strong acidic media used in radiochemical procedures. The robustness of the stationary phase was tested in concentrated nitric acid. It appears that the C-S bond formed via thiol-ene chemistry is strong enough to be used to graft function of interest for separation in strong nitric acid medium. The photo-grafted anion exchanger, a quaternary ammonium, presents sufficient resistance to be used for radionuclide separation in [HNO{sub 3}]=5 mol.L{sup -1}so the next step is its integration in the cyclo olefin copolymer (COC) micro-system.

  2. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation: Parameter Optimization of Citric Acid Passivation for Stainless Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters chartered the Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) to coordinate agency activities affecting pollution prevention issues identified during system and component acquisition and sustainment processes. The primary objectives of NASA TEERM are to: Reduce or eliminate the use of hazardous materials or hazardous processes at manufacturing, remanufacturing, and sustainment locations. Avoid duplication of effort in actions required to reduce or eliminate hazardous materials through joint center cooperation and technology sharing. Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA). The damaging effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. NASA and ESA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Passivation is defined by The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language as to treat or coat (a metal) in order to reduce the chemical reactivity of its surface. Passivation works by forming a shielding outer (metal oxide) layer that reduces the impact of destructive environmental factors such as air or water. Consequently, this process necessitates a final product that is very clean and free of iron and other contaminants. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid is an alternative to nitric acid for the passivation of stainless steels. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and

  3. Diglycolic acid modified zirconium phosphate and studies on the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from dilute nitric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvan, B. Robert; Suneesh, A.S.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Division; Dasthaiah, K.; Gardas, R.L. [Indian Institute of Technology - Madras, Chennai (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-06-01

    Diglycolic acid modified zirconium phosphate (ZrP-DGA) was prepared and studied for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from dilute nitric acid medium. The distribution coefficient (K{sub d}, mL.g{sup -1}) of Am(III) and Eu(III) was measured as a function of time, pH and concentration of Eu(III) ion etc. The K{sub d} of Am(III) and Eu(III) increased with increase of pH, reached a maximum value of distribution coefficient at pH 1.5 - 2, followed by decrease in K{sub d} values. Rapid extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) in ZrP-DGA was observed followed by the establishment of equilibrium occurred in 100 min. Kinetics of extraction was fitted in to pseudo second order rate equation. The amount of Eu(III) loaded in ZrP-DGA increased with increase in the concentration of Eu(III) ion in aqueous phase and the isotherm was fitted in to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The extraction of Am(III) in ZrP-DGA was higher as compared to Eu(III) and the interference of Eu(III) on the extraction of Am(III) was studied. The distribution coefficient of some lanthanides in ZrP-DGA was measured and the K{sub d} of lanthanides increased across the lanthanide series. The extracted trivalent metal ions were recovered in three contacts of loaded ZrP-DGA with 0.5 M nitric acid.

  4. Bronchoconstriction induced by citric acid inhalation in guinea pigs: role of tachykinins, bradykinin, and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardolo, F L; Rado, V; Fabbri, L M; Sterk, P J; Di Maria, G U; Geppetti, P

    1999-02-01

    Gastroesophageal acid reflux into the airways can trigger asthma attacks. Indeed, citric acid inhalation causes bronchoconstriction in guinea pigs, but the mechanism of this effect has not been fully clarified. We investigated the role of tachykinins, bradykinin, and nitric oxide (NO) on the citric acid- induced bronchoconstriction in anesthetized and artificially ventilated guinea pigs. Citric acid inhalation (2-20 breaths) caused a dose-dependent increase in total pulmonary resistance (RL). RL value obtained after 10 breaths of citric acid inhalation was not significantly different from the value obtained after 20 breaths (p = 0.22). The effect produced by a half-submaximum dose of citric acid (5 breaths) was halved by the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist HOE 140 (0.1 micromol x kg-1, intravenous) and abolished by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist SR 48968 (0.3 micromol x kg-1, intravenous). Bronchoconstriction induced by a submaximum dose of citric acid (10 breaths) was partially reduced by the administration of HOE 140, SR 48968, or the NK1 receptor antagonist CP-99,994 (8 micromol x kg-1, intravenous) alone and completely abolished by the combination of SR 48968 and CP-99,994. Pretreatment with the NO synthase inhibitor, L-NMMA (1 mM, 10 breaths every 5 min for 30 min) increased in an L-arginine-dependent manner the effect of citric acid inhalation on RL. HOE 140 and CP-99,994 markedly reduced the L-NMMA-potentiated bronchoconstriction to inhaled citric acid. We conclude that citric acid-induced bronchoconstriction is caused by tachykinin release from sensory nerves, which, in part, is mediated by endogenously released bradykinin. Simultaneous release of NO by citric acid inhalation counteracts tachykinin-mediated bronchoconstriction. Our study suggests a possible implication of these mechanisms in asthma associated with gastroesophageal acid reflux and a potential therapeutic role of tachykinin and bradykinin antagonists.

  5. Enhancement of nitric oxide release and hemocompatibility by surface chirality of D-tartaric acid grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Honghong; Wang, Ke; Fan, Yonghong; Pan, Xiaxin; Huang, Nan; Weng, Yajun

    2017-12-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) generation from endogenous NO-donors catalyzed by diselenide modified biomaterials has been reported. Here we reported surface chirality by L-tartaric acid and D-tartaric acid grafting on the outermost showed a significant impact on diselenide modified biomaterials, which modulated protein adsorption, NO release and anti-platelet adhesion properties. D-tartaric acid grafted surface showed more blood protein adsorption than that of L-surfaces by QCM analysis, however, ELISA analysis disclosed less fibrinogen denatured on the D surfaces. Due to the surface ratio of selenium decreasing, NO release catalyzed by L-tartaric acid grafting on the outermost significantly decreased in comparison to that of only selenocystamine immobilized surfaces. While NO release catalyzed by D-tartaric acid grafting on the outermost didn't decrease and was similar with that of selenocystamine immobilized surfaces. Surface chirality combined with NO release had synergetic effects on platelet adhesion, and it showed the lowest number of platelets adhered on the D-tartaric acid grafted surfaces. Thus surface chirality from D-tartaric acid grafting enhanced hemocompatibility of the surface in this study. Our work provides new insights into engineering novel blood contacting biomaterials by taking into account surface chirality.

  6. Procedure of Destructive Chemical Recovery of Precious Metals in Nitric Acid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubičić, M.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The heart of the nitric acid production process is the chemical reactor containing a platinum-based catalyst pack and an associated catchment system, which allows the ammonia oxidation reaction to take place efficiently. Under the severe operating conditions imposed by the high-pressure ammonia oxidation process, the catalyst gauzes experience progressive deterioration, as shown by the restricted surface of the catalyst wires, the loss of catalytic activity and the loss of catalytic materials. The higher the pressure of gaseous ammonia oxidation, the greater the loss of platinum group metals from the surface of the applied selective heterogeneous catalysts. Total losses for one batch over the whole period of using selective heterogeneous catalysts may account in the range from 20 to 40 % of the total installed quantity of precious metals. An important part of the platinum removed from the platinum-rhodium alloy wires can be recovered at the outlet of the reactor by means of palladium catchment gauzes. However, this catchment process, which is based on the great ability of palladium to alloy with platinum, is not 100 % effective and a fraction of the platinum and practically all of the rhodium lost by the catalyst wires, evades the catchment package and is then deposited in other parts of the plant, especially heat exchangers. From the above mentioned operating equipment, the retained mass of precious metals can be recovered by the technical procedure of non-destructive and destructive chemical solid-liquid extraction.Shown is the technical procedure of destructive chemical recovery of preheater and boiler for preheating and production of steam by applying sulfuric acid (w = 20 % and subsequent procedure of raffination of derived sludge, to the final recovery of precious metals. The technical procedure of destructive chemical recovery of precious metals from preheater and boiler for preheating and production of steam in nitric acid production is

  7. [Recovery process of nitric acid, copper and nickel in deplating wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenhai; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Hongquan; Chen, Zhichuan

    2002-03-01

    The recovery process of nitric acid, copper and nickel in deplating wastewater was developed by using the combined technique of distillation, solvent extraction and precipitation. The conditions of the separation of copper and nickel by solvent extraction using P507 in kerosene and stripping copper with H2SO4 were specially investigated and the optimal parameters were determined. The results of experiment indicated that the recovery ratio of nitric acid was 97.8%, and under the optimized conditions of extraction process, concentration of original effluence ranged in 15-20 mg/mL copper, 5-10 mg/mL nickel, pH 1-2, concentration of extractant was 35% (V/V), saponification degree was 60%, phase ratio was 1:1, reaction time was 2 min, temperature ranged in 20 degrees C-25 degrees C, the one stage extraction efficiency of copper was higher than 90%, the separation ratio of copper and nickel was up to 75; copper and nickel could be completely separated by a continuous countercurrent three-stage extraction. The nickel could be recovered from the water phase by precipitating with NaOH and the recovery ratio of nickel reached up to 99.9% by controlling pH in solution within 10-11. After these treatment, the effluent could meet the national standards of wastewater discharge.

  8. Temperature effects on the nitric acid oxidation of industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Nadia F., E-mail: nadia@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Martinez, Diego Stefani T., E-mail: diegostefani.br@gmail.com; Paula, Amauri J., E-mail: amaurijp@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido (LQES), Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Silveira, Jose V. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Alves, Oswaldo L., E-mail: oalves@iqm.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido (LQES), Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Souza Filho, Antonio G., E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    In this study, we report an oxidative treatment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by using nitric acid at different temperatures (25-175 Degree-Sign C). The analyzed materials have diameters varying from 10 to 40 nm and majority lengths between 3 and 6 {mu}m. The characterization results obtained by different techniques (e.g., field emission scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy, Braunauer, Emmet and Teller method, {zeta}-potential and confocal Raman spectroscopy) allowed us to access the effects of temperature treatment on the relevant physico-chemical properties of the MWCNTs samples studied in view of an integrated perspective to use these samples in a bio-toxicological context. Analytical microbalance measurements were used to access the purity of samples (metallic residue) after thermogravimetric analysis. Confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements were used to evaluate the density of structural defects created on the surface of the tubes due to the oxidation process by using 2D Raman image. Finally, we have demonstrated that temperature is an important parameter in the generation of oxidation debris (a byproduct which has not been properly taken into account in the literature) in the industrial grade MWCNTs studied after nitric acid purification and functionalization.

  9. Dissolution of uranium dioxide in nitric acid media: what do we know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article draws a state of knowledge of the dissolution of uranium dioxide in nitric acid media. The chemistry of the reaction is first investigated, and two reactions appear as most suitable to describe the mechanism, leading to the formation of monoxide and dioxide nitrogen as reaction by-products, while the oxidation mechanism is shown to happen before solubilization. The solid aspect of the reaction is also investigated: manufacturing conditions have an impact on dissolution kinetics, and the non-uniform attack at the surface of the solid results in the appearing of pits and cracks. Last, the existence of an autocatalytic mechanism is questionned. The second part of this article presents a compilation of the impacts of several physico-chemical parameters on the dissolution rates. Even though these measurements have been undertaken under a broad variety of conditions, and that the rate determining step of the reaction is usually not specified, general trends are drawn from these results. Finally, it appears that several key points of knowledge still have to be clarified concerning the dissolution of uranium dioxide in nitric acid media, and that the macroscopic scale which has been used in most studies is probably not suitable.

  10. The observation of nitric acid-containing particles in the tropical lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Popp

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne in situ measurements over the eastern Pacific Ocean in January 2004 have revealed a new category of nitric acid (HNO3-containing particles in the tropical lower stratosphere. These particles are most likely composed of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT. They were intermittently observed in a narrow layer above the tropopause (18±0.1 km and over a broad geographic extent (>1100 km. In contrast to the background liquid sulfate aerosol, these particles are solid, much larger (1.7-4.7 µm vs. 0.1µm in diameter, and significantly less abundant (-4 cm-3 vs. 10 cm-3. Microphysical trajectory models suggest that the NAT particles grow over a 6-14 day period in supersaturated air that remains close to the tropical tropopause and might be a common feature in the tropics. The small number density of these particles implies a highly selective or slow nucleation process. Understanding the formation of solid NAT particles in the tropics could improve our understanding of stratospheric nucleation processes and, therefore, dehydration and denitrification.

  11. Homogeneous nucleation rates of nitric acid dihydrate (NAD at simulated stratospheric conditions – Part II: Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation energies ΔGact for the nucleation of nitric acid dihydrate (NAD in supercooled binary HNO3/H2O solution droplets were calculated from volume-based nucleation rate measurements using the AIDA (Aerosol, Interactions, and Dynamics in the Atmosphere aerosol chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The experimental conditions covered temperatures T between 192 and 197 K, NAD saturation ratios SNAD between 7 and 10, and nitric acid molar fractions of the nucleating sub-micron sized droplets between 0.26 and 0.28. Based on classical nucleation theory, a new parameterisation for ΔGact=A×(T ln SNAD−2+B is fitted to the experimental data with A=2.5×106 kcal K2 mol−1 and B=11.2−0.1(T−192 kcal mol−1. A and B were chosen to also achieve good agreement with literature data of ΔGact. The parameter A implies, for the temperature and composition range of our analysis, a mean interface tension σsl=51 cal mol−1 cm−2 between the growing NAD germ and the supercooled solution. A slight temperature dependence of the diffusion activation energy is represented by the parameter B. Investigations with a detailed microphysical process model showed that literature formulations of volume-based (Salcedo et al., 2001 and surface-based (Tabazadeh et al., 2002 nucleation rates significantly overestimate NAD formation rates when applied to the conditions of our experiments.

  12. Electrochemical mechanism of uranium mononitride dissolution in aqueous solutions of nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershov, Boris G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Inst. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry

    2017-09-01

    It was shown that the dissolution of UN with metallic conduction follows an electrochemical mechanism when it proceeds in contact with an electrically conductive medium (HNO{sub 3} solution). According to this mechanism, the oxidation of UN (at the anode) passes an electron into the UN matrix, which is a conductor, and can then reduce nitric acid in a parallel reaction a short distance away at another exposed surface of the UN (at the cathode). As a result, the reduction of HNO{sub 3} affords NO and NO{sub 2}, while oxidation of uranium mononitride affords NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O. The occurrence of these two separate processes accounts for the composition and yields of the products formed from UN and HNO{sub 3} as well as for the nitrogen isotope distribution between them when UN and HNO{sub 3} were labeled with {sup 14} N or {sup 15}N. A mathematical equation describing the dependence of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O yields on HNO{sub 3} concentration was derived. It was also shown that the calculated value of standard electromotive force of the galvanic pair formed on the UN surface during its dissolution in HNO{sub 3} is high enough to initiate and support the electrochemical mechanism of its dissolution in nitric acid.

  13. Effect of Plasma-Nitric Acid Treatment on the Electrical Conductivity of Flexible Transparent Conductive Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong Pham, Viet; Jo, Young Woo; Oh, Jong Sik; Kim, Soo Min; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Sung Hee; Jhon, Myung S.; Yeom, Geun Young

    2013-07-01

    A flexible transparent electrically conductive film (FTCF) was formed on a poly(ethylene terephthalate) film by spraying single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed with sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate in water and, to improve the electrical conductivity of FTCF, the effect on plasma treatment followed by nitric acid treatment was investigated. The Ar plasma treatment was effective in dissociating the surfactant and removing impurities attached to the surface of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Therefore, through a cyclic treatment composed of an Ar plasma treatment and nitric acid treatment, more effective removal of surfactant and impurities attached to the spray-coated CNTs could be obtained than a cyclic treatment without the plasma treatment. With the optimized cyclic treatment, the sheet resistance (Ωs) of the spray-coated CNTs could be decreased up to 45% by removing most of the surfactant and impurities. Using the repeated cyclic treatment, the FTCF having the Ωs of 160 Ω/square at 81.5% optical transmittance at the wavelength of 550 nm could be obtained.

  14. Antisecretory Effect of Hydrogen Sulfide on Gastric Acid Secretion and the Involvement of Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ali Mard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the effect of H2S on distention-induced gastric acid secretion. Fifty-two rats were randomly assigned to seven experimental groups. The gastric acid secretion was stimulated by gastric distention. Two groups of rats received L-cysteine or saline for 5 days before stimulation of the gastric acid secretion. Two groups of animals also received NaHS or saline just prior to stimulation of the gastric acid secretion. The effect of L-NAME and propargylglycine was also investigated. The mucosal levels of the gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, and H+/K+-ATPase α-subunit were quantified by qPCR and luminal concentrations of NO were determined. NaHS and L-cysteine decreased the gastric acid output in response to distention. The mRNA expression of H+/K+-ATPase α-subunit decreased by NaHS and L-cysteine as compared with the control group while gene expression of eNOS and COX-2 was upregulated. The inhibitory effect of NaHS on distention-induced gastric acid secretion was mitigated by pretreatment of L-NAME. These findings suggest the involvement of NO in mediating the antisecretory effect of H2S.

  15. Electrochemical oxidation of 243Am(III) in nitric acid by a terpyridyl-derivatized electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dares, C. J.; Lapides, A. M.; Mincher, B. J.; Meyer, T. J.

    2015-11-05

    A high surface area, tin-doped indium oxide electrode surface-derivatized with a terpyridine ligand has been applied to the oxidation of trivalent americium to Am(V) and Am(VI) in nitric acid. Potentials as low as 1.8 V vs. the saturated calomel electrode are used, 0.7 V lower than the 2.6 V potential for one-electron oxidation of Am(III) to Am(IV) in 1 M acid. This simple electrochemical procedure provides, for the first time, a method for accessing the higher oxidation states of Am in non-complexing media for developing the coordination chemistries of Am(V) and Am(VI) and, more importantly, for separation of americium from nuclear waste streams.

  16. Millimeter wave spectroscopic measurements over the South Pole: 3. The behavior of stratospheric nitric acid through polar fall, winter, and spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zafra, R. L.; Chan, V.; Crewell, S.; Trimble, C.; Reeves, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    We present data from a 9-month series of ground-based measurements of stratospheric nitric acid, made over the South Pole from mid-April 1993 to mid-January 1994. Observations were typically made at 3- to 6-day intervals. Both profiles and column densities have been retrieved from pressure-broadened millimeter-wave emission spectra. These measurements provide the first quasi-continuous series of vertical mixing ratio profiles for this species in the heart of the south polar votex. Conversion of NOx to nitric acid by heterogeneous reactions, and its incorporation into polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles, along with subsequent gravitational settling, is considered to be the main denitrifying mechanism in the Antarctic stratosphere, setting up conditions for ozone destruction at the end of winter. In our observations, a small increase in HNO3 was seen between April and the end of May, after which a rapid loss took place below 25 km. Column density above ˜15 km decreased to ≤1/4 its maximum within 30 days, and depletion continued until middle to late July, by which time the nitric acid column above 15 km had diminished by more than a factor of 10. The initial depletion was coincident with the onset of a rapid increase in lidar backscatter from polar stratospheric cloud formation at the same altitude range. Gas-phase depletion was tracked as a function of altitude and temperature and found to be consistent with the temperature and partial pressure relationship for formation of ternary mixtures of HNO3, H2SO4, and H2O. Depletion occurred ˜3 weeks earlier in 1993 than was seen in 1992 column density measurements by Van Allen et al. [1995]. In late June a new layer of HNO3 was generated in the vicinity of 40-km altitude and, subsequently, appeared to be carried downward with general vertical transport of air within the vortex. In spring, as temperatures increased, no rapid increase of gas-phase HNO3 was seen, indicating that gravitational settling had carried PSC

  17. The effect of fatty acid surfactants on the uptake of nitric acid to deliquesced NaCl aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmler, K.; Vlasenko, A.; Guimbaud, C.; Ammann, M.

    2008-09-01

    Surface active organic compounds have been observed in marine boundary layer aerosol. Here, we investigate the effect such surfactants have on the uptake of nitric acid (HNO3), an important removal reaction of nitrogen oxides in the marine boundary layer. The uptake of gaseous HNO3 on deliquesced NaCl aerosol was measured in a flow reactor using HNO3 labelled with the short-lived radioactive isotope 13N. The uptake coefficient γ on pure deliquesced NaCl aerosol was γ=0.5±0.2 at 60% relative humidity and 30 ppb HNO3(g). The uptake coefficient was reduced by a factor of 5 50 when the aerosol was coated with saturated linear fatty acids with carbon chain lengths of 18 and 15 atoms in monolayer quantities. In contrast, neither shorter saturated linear fatty acids with 12 and 9 carbon atoms, nor coatings with the unsaturated oleic acid (C18, cis-double bond) had a detectable effect on the rate of HNO3 uptake. It is concluded that it is the structure of the monolayers formed, which determines their resistance towards HNO3 uptake. Fatty acids (C18 and C15), which form a highly ordered film in the so-called liquid condensed state, represent a significant barrier towards HNO3 uptake, while monolayers of shorter-chain fatty acids (C9, C12) and of the unsaturated oleic acid form a less ordered film in the liquid expanded state and do not hinder the uptake. Similarly, high contents of humic acids in the aerosol, a structurally inhomogeneous, quite water soluble mixture of oxidised high molecular weight organic compounds did not affect HNO3 uptake. As surfactant films on naturally occurring aerosol are expected to be less structured due to their chemical inhomogeneity, it is likely that their inhibitory effect on HNO3 uptake is smaller than that observed here for the C15 and C18 fatty acid monolayers.

  18. Rapid scavenging of peroxynitrous acid by monohydroascorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Christophe R; Kissner, Reinhard; Nauser, Thomas; Perrin, Daniel; Koppenol, Willem H

    2003-12-15

    The reaction of peroxynitrous acid with monohydroascorbate, over the concentration range of 250 microM to 50 mM of monohydroascorbate at pH 5.8 and at 25 degrees C, was reinvestigated and the rate constant of the reaction found to be much higher than reported earlier (Bartlett, D.; Church, D. F.; Bounds, P. L.; Koppenol, W. H. The kinetics of oxidation of L-ascorbic acid by peroxynitrite. Free Radic. Biol. Med. 18:85-92; 1995; Squadrito, G. L.; Jin, X.; Pryor, W. A. Stopped-flow kinetics of the reaction of ascorbic acid with peroxynitrite. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 322:53-59; 1995). The new rate constants at pH 5.8 are k1 = 1 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) and k(-1) = 500 s(-1) for 25 degrees C and k1 = 1.5 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) and k(-1) = 1 x 10(3) s(-1) for 37 degrees C. These values indicate that even at low monohydroascorbate concentrations most of peroxynitrous acid forms an adduct with this antioxidant. The mechanism of the reaction involves formation of an intermediate, which decays to a second intermediate with an absorption maximum at 345 nm. At low monohydroascorbate concentrations, the second intermediate decays to nitrate and monohydroascorbate, while at monohydroascorbate concentrations greater than 4 mM, this second intermediate reacts with a second monohydroascorbate to form nitrite, dehydroascorbate, and monohydroascorbate. EPR experiments indicate that the yield of the ascorbyl radical is 0.24% relative to the initial peroxynitrous acid concentration, and that this small amount of ascorbyl radicals is formed concomitantly with the decrease of the absorption at 345 nm. Thus, the ascorbyl radical is not a primary reaction product. Under the conditions of these experiments, no homolysis of peroxynitrous acid to nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radical was observed. Aside from monohydroascorbate's ability to "repair" oxidatively modified biomolecules, it may play a role as scavenger of peroxynitrous acid.

  19. Evidence that nitric acid increases relative humidity in low-temperature cirrus clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, R S; Popp, P J; Fahey, D W; Marcy, T P; Herman, R L; Weinstock, E M; Baumgardner, D G; Garrett, T J; Rosenlof, K H; Thompson, T L; Bui, P T; Ridley, B A; Wofsy, S C; Toon, O B; Tolbert, M A; Kärcher, B; Peter, Th; Hudson, P K; Weinheimer, A J; Heymsfield, A J

    2004-01-23

    In situ measurements of the relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) and of nitric acid (HNO3) were made in both natural and contrail cirrus clouds in the upper troposphere. At temperatures lower than 202 kelvin, RHi values show a sharp increase to average values of over 130% in both cloud types. These enhanced RHi values are attributed to the presence of a new class of HNO3-containing ice particles (Delta-ice). We propose that surface HNO3 molecules prevent the ice/vapor system from reaching equilibrium by a mechanism similar to that of freezing point depression by antifreeze proteins. Delta-ice represents a new link between global climate and natural and anthropogenic nitrogen oxide emissions. Including Delta-ice in climate models will alter simulated cirrus properties and the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor.

  20. Studies of dissolution solutions of ruthenium metal, oxide and mixed compounds in nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousset, F.; Eysseric, C.; Bedioui, F

    2004-07-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products generated by irradiated nuclear fuel. It is present throughout all the steps of nuclear fuel reprocessing-particularly during extraction-and requires special attention due to its complex chemistry and high {beta}{gamma} activity. An innovative electro-volatilization process is now being developed to take advantage of the volatility of RuO{sub 4} in order to eliminate it at the head end of the Purex process and thus reduce the number of extraction cycles. Although the process operates successfully with synthetic nitrato-RuNO{sup 3+} solutions, difficulties have been encountered in extrapolating it to real-like dissolution solutions. In order to better approximate the chemical forms of ruthenium found in fuel dissolution solutions, kinetic and speciation studies on dissolved species were undertaken with RuO{sub 2},xH{sub 2}O and Ru{sup 0} in nitric acid media. (authors)

  1. Potentiality of uranium biosorption from nitric acid solutions using shrimp shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S H; El Sheikh, E M; Morsy, A M A

    2014-08-01

    Biosorption has gained important credibility during recent years because of its good performance and low cost. This work is concerned with studying the potentiality of the chitin component of the shrimp shells for uranium biosorption from nitric acid liquid solutions. The structural characteristics of the working chitin have been determined via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The surface morphology was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The adsorption capacity of biomass was investigated experimentally. The influence of contact time, pH, metal ion concentration, solution volume to mass ratio and temperature were evaluated and the results were fitted using adsorption isotherm models. The kinetic of uranium biosorption was also investigated as well as biosorption thermodynamic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling of uranyl nitrate and nitric acid extraction in diluted TBP using Chem-Unifac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, M.; Rat, B. [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification, DRRV, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    Chem-UNIFAC model is applied to TBP/dodecane/water/UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and TBP/dodecane/water/HNO{sub 3} systems, following our previous studies on TBP/diluent (alkane, HCCl{sub 3}, CCl{sub 4}) and TBP/diluent/water/salting out agent (same diluents) systems. New Chem-UNIFAC parameters for TBP/water pair are calculated and an unique set of parameters is proposed to describe the TBP/dodecane/water/UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} system, for a wide range of TBP/diluent volume proportions (10%, 30%, 50%, 100%) and a wide range of uranyl nitrate aqueous concentration. Nitric acid and water extraction in TBP/dodecane/water/HNO{sub 3} is also calculated and an improvement is found in the description of the corresponding isotherms. (authors)

  3. Study on Purification Diatomite with nitric acid by Thermal Closed System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang Meng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a purification approach using nitric acid leaching at thermal closed system was developed to improve the porous structure of raw diatomite by removal of impurities from its surface and clogged pores. The feasibility and efficiency of this approach were determined by XRF for chemical constitution of diatomite, SEM for morphology and BET for specific surface area of purified diatomite. The investigations indicated that the content of SiO2 was in order of 85.14% for raw diatomite and 98% for purified diatomite, the content of Fe2O3 decreases after purified; the integrity of the porous structure was confirmed by SEM, and increase in specific surface area from 18m2·g-1 to 36m2·g-1.

  4. Contrasting physiological responses of ozone-tolerant Phaseolus vulgaris and Nicotiana tobaccum varieties to ozone and nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cara M. Stripe; Louis S. Santiago; Pamela E. Padgett

    2014-01-01

    Ozone (O3) and nitric acid (HNO3) are synthesized by the same atmospheric photochemical processes and are almost always co-pollutants. Effects of O3 on plants have been well-elucidated, yet less is known about the effects of HNO3 on plants. We investigated the physiological...

  5. Neural networks for modelling of chemical reaction systems with complex kinetics: oxidation of 2-octanol with nitric acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molga, E.J.; van Woezik, B.A.A.; Westerterp, K.R.

    2000-01-01

    Application of neural networks to model the conversion rates of a heterogeneous oxidation reaction has been investigated — oxidation of 2-octanol with nitric acid has been considered as a case study. Due to a more complex and unknown kinetics of the investigated reaction the proposed approach based

  6. Variation in isotopologues of atmospheric nitric acid in passively collected samples along an air pollution gradient in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Bell; James O. Sickman; Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Pamela E. Padgett; Edith B. Allen

    2014-01-01

    The sources and oxidation pathways of atmospheric nitric acid (HNO3) can be evaluated using the isotopic signatures of oxygen (O) and nitrogen (N). This study evaluated the ability of Nylasorb nylon filters to passively collect unbiased isotopologues of atmospheric HNO3 under controlled and field conditions. Filters...

  7. Spatial and temporal distribution of ambient nitric acid and ammonia in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Bytnerowicz; W. Fraczek; S. Schilling; D. Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Monthly average ambient concentrations of gaseous nitric acid (HNO3) and ammonia (NH3) were monitored at the Athabasca Oils Sands Region (AOSR), Alberta, Canada, between May 2005 and September 2008. Generally, concentrations of both pollutants were elevated and highly variable in space and time. The highest atmospheric...

  8. Oleic acid increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and decreases endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in cultured endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gremmels, Hendrik; Bevers, Lonneke M.; Fledderus, Joost O.; Braam, Branko; Jan Van Zonneveld, Anton; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Joles, Jaap A.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFA) are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. This may be related to FFA-induced elevation of oxidative stress in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that, in addition to mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial nitric

  9. Optimization of the nitrous vapors experimental conditions production by nitric acid electrochemical reduction; Optimisation des conditions operatoires de production de vapeurs nitreuses par reduction electrochimique d`acide nitrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, M.

    1996-11-22

    Gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}) involved as oxidizing agents in nuclear fuel reprocessing can be produced by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid. This is an interesting alternative to the existing process because no wastes are generated. voltammetric studies on a platinum electrode show that two reduction potential regions are observed in concentrated nitric acid solutions, between 0,05 V{sub SHE} and between 0,5 V{sub SHE} and 1 V{sub SHE}. The highest potential region reduction mechanism was studied by: classical micro-electrolysis methods, macro-electrolysis methods, infrared spectroscopy coupled to electrochemistry. It was determined that the origin of nitric acid reduction is the electrochemical reduction of nitrous acid in nitric oxide which chemically reduces nitric acid. This reaction produces nitrous acid back which indicate an auto-catalytic behaviour of nitric acid reduction mechanism. Nitrogen dioxide evolution during nitric reduction can also explained by an other chemical reaction. If the potential value of platinum electrode is above 0,8 V{sub SHE}, products of the indirect nitric acid reduction are nitrous acid, nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Below this value nitric oxide can be reduced in nitrous oxide. Thus the potential value is the most important parameter for the nitrogen oxides production selectivity. However, owing to the auto-catalytic character of the reduction mechanism, potential value can be controlled during intentiostatic industrial electrolysis. (author). 91 refs.

  10. Interaction between abscisic acid and nitric oxide in PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Chen, Zunwei; Lu, Li; Jin, Haihong; Sun, Lina; Yu, Qin; Xu, Hongke; Yang, Fengxia; Fu, Mengna; Li, Shengchao; Wang, Huizhong; Xu, Maojun

    2013-01-01

    Elicitations are considered to be an important strategy to improve production of secondary metabolites of plant cell cultures. However, mechanisms responsible for the elicitor-induced production of secondary metabolites of plant cells have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we report that treatment of Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures with PB90, a protein elicitor from Phytophthora boehmeriae, induced rapid increases of abscisic acid (ABA) and nitric oxide (NO), subsequently followed by the enhancement of catharanthine production and up-regulation of Str and Tdc, two important genes in catharanthine biosynthesis. PB90-induced catharanthine production and the gene expression were suppressed by the ABA inhibitor and NO scavenger respectively, showing that ABA and NO are essential for the elicitor-induced catharanthine biosynthesis. The relationship between ABA and NO in mediating catharanthine biosynthesis was further investigated. Treatment of the cells with ABA triggered NO accumulation and induced catharanthine production and up-regulation of Str and Tdc. ABA-induced catharanthine production and gene expressions were suppressed by the NO scavenger. Conversely, exogenous application of NO did not stimulate ABA generation and treatment with ABA inhibitor did not suppress NO-induced catharanthine production and gene expressions. Together, the results showed that both NO and ABA were involved in PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of C. roseus cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that ABA acted upstream of NO in the signaling cascade leading to PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of C. roseus cells. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. Enhanced Fischer-Tropsch synthesis performance of iron-based catalysts supported on nitric acid treated N-doped CNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhua; Liu, Renjie; Xu, Yan; Ma, Xinbin

    2015-08-01

    Iron-based catalysts supported on N-doped CNTs (NCNTs) treated by various concentrations of nitric acid for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) were investigated. An improved catalytic performance for the iron catalyst supported on acid treated NCNTs was obtained and the suitable nitric acid concentration was 10 M. The physiochemical properties of the NCNTs and the corresponding catalysts were characterized by BET, TEM, XRD, XPS, TGA and H2-TPR. The acid treatment removed the impurity and amorphous carbon, damaged the bamboo-like structure and increased the number of oxygen-containing functional groups and graphitization degree on the NCNTs. The more iron particles located inside the channels of NCNTs, the better catalytic FTS performance due to high dispersion and reducibility.

  12. Application of Primary Abatement Technology for Reduction of N2O Emmision in Petrokemija Nitric Acid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćosić, L.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial nitric acid production by oxidation of gaseous ammonia with Ostwald procedure produces an unwanted by-product – colorless nitrous oxide, N2O. As emission of N2O represents a very serious problem due of its huge contribution to global warming, certain measures focused on its maximum reduction should be undertaken. Minimization of N2O emission in nitric acid production can be achieved in different parts of the process flow, depending on the applied available technologies. For the abatement of N2O emissions in Petrokemija's nitric acid production processes from the list of the best available technologies chosen were primary and secondary abatement technologies. The mentioned ensures reduction of N2O by use of improved selective heterogeneous catalysts in the step of gaseous ammonia oxidation. Precious metals in the shape of gauzes are used as selective heterogeneous catalyst in primary technology, while in the case of secondary technology the Fe2 O3 catalyst on Al2O3 support in the shape of spherical pellets is chosen. Shown is the application of primary technology for the abatement of N2O in both nitric acid production facilities and their comparison with classical heterogeneous catalyst and preparation for the installation of secondary selective catalyst. N2O emissions with the application of primary technology in both production facilities were reduced from 12 kg of N2O to 7 kg of N2O per ton of pure HNO3. With the primary reduction in N2O emissions the foundation was established for further reduction with the secondary technology to the final value of 0.7 kg of N2O per ton of pure HNO3, which represents mass concentration in the tail gas below 200 mg m-3 (at n. c.. With the applied technologies for the abatement of N2O emissions in Petrokemija's nitric acid production the future prescribed emission limit value will be satisfied.

  13. Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ethylene plant defense pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mur, Luis A J; Prats, Elena; Pierre, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Plant defence against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defence responses...

  14. Oxidation-reduction reactions of simple hydroxamic acids and plutonium(IV) ions in nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrott, M.J.; Fox, O.D.; LeGurun, G.; Jones, C.J.; Mason, C.; Taylor, R.J. [British Technology Centre, Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Seascale (United Kingdom); Andrieux, F.P.L.; Boxall, C. [Univ. of Central Lancashire, Preston (United Kingdom). Centre for Materials Science

    2008-07-01

    Simple hydroxamic acids such as formo- and aceto-hydroxamic acids have been proposed as suitable reagents for the separation of either Pu and/or Np from U in modified or single cycle Purex based solvent extraction processes designed to meet the emerging requirements of advanced fuel cycles. The stability of these hydroxamic acids is dominated by their decomposition through acid hydrolysis. Kinetic studies of the acid hydrolysis of formo- and aceto-hydroxamic acids are reported in the absence and the presence of Pu(IV) ions. The slow reduction of these plutonium(IV) hydroxamate complexes to Pu(III) aquo-ions has been characterised by spectrophotometry and cyclic voltammetry. The reductions of Pu(IV) in the presence of FHA and AHA are consistent with a mechanism in which free hydroxamic acid in solution is hydrolysed whilst Pu(IV) ions remain fully complexed to hydroxamate ligands; then at some point close to a 1: 1 Pu(IV): XHA ratio, some free Pu{sup 4+} is released from the complex and reduction is initiated. Electrochemical and kinetic data suggest that the reductant is the hydroxamic acid rather than the hydroxylamine. (orig.)

  15. Validation Testing of the Nitric Acid Dissolution Step Within the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AJ Schmidt; CH Delegard; KL Silvers; PR Bredt; CD Carlson; EW Hoppe; JC Hayes; DE Rinehart; SR Gano; BM Thornton

    1999-03-24

    The work described in this report involved comprehensive bench-scale testing of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) dissolution of actual sludge materials from the Hanford K East (KE) Basin to confirm the baseline chemical pretreatment process. In addition, process monitoring and material balance information was collected to support the development and refinement of process flow diagrams. The testing was performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)for the US Department of Energy's Office of Spent Fuel Stabilization (EM-67) and Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to assist in the development of the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process. The baseline chemical pretreatment process for K Basin sludge is nitric acid dissolution of all particulate material passing a 1/4-in. screen. The acid-insoluble fraction (residual solids) will be stabilized (possibly by chemical leaching/rinsing and grouting), packaged, and transferred to the Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The liquid fraction is to be diluted with depleted uranium for uranium criticality safety and iron nitrate for plutonium criticality safety, and neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The liquid fraction and associated precipitates are to be stored in the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) pending vitrification. It is expected that most of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), associated with some K Basin sludges, will remain with the residual solids for ultimate disposal to ERDF. Filtration and precipitation during the neutralization step will further remove trace quantities of PCBs within the liquid fraction. The purpose of the work discussed in this report was to examine the dissolution behavior of actual KE Basin sludge materials at baseline flowsheet conditions and validate the.dissolution process step through bench-scale testing. The progress of the dissolution was evaluated by measuring the solution electrical conductivity and concentrations of key species in the

  16. Fabrication of silica ceramic membrane via sol-gel dip-coating method at different nitric acid amount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlib, N. A. Z.; Daud, F. D. M.; Mel, M.; Hairin, A. L. N.; Azhar, A. Z. A.; Hassan, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    Fabrication of silica ceramics via the sol-gel method has offered more advantages over other methods in the fabrication of ceramic membrane, such as simple operation, high purity homogeneous, well defined-structure and complex shapes of end products. This work presents the fabrication of silica ceramic membrane via sol-gel dip-coating methods by varying nitric acid amount. The nitric acid plays an important role as catalyst in fabrication reaction which involved hydrolysis and condensation process. The tubular ceramic support, used as the substrate, was dipped into the sol of Tetrethylorthosilicate (TEOS), distilled water and ethanol with the addition of nitric acid. The fabricated silica membrane was then characterized by (Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope) FESEM and (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) FTIR to determine structural and chemical properties at different amount of acids. From the XRD analysis, the fabricated silica ceramic membrane showed the existence of silicate hydrate in the final product. FESEM images indicated that the silica ceramic membrane has been deposited on the tubular ceramic support as a substrate and penetrate into the pore walls. The intensity peak of FTIR decreased with increasing of amount of acids. Hence, the 8 ml of acid has demonstrated the appropriate amount of catalyst in fabricating good physical and chemical characteristic of silica ceramic membrane.

  17. Comparative effects of sulfuric and nitric acid rain on litter decomposition and soil microbial community in subtropical plantation of Yangtze River Delta region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Wenrui; Wang, Ling; Xie, Dejin; Huo, Wentong; Wu, Yanwen; Zhang, Jinchi

    2017-12-01

    Acid rain is mainly caused by dissolution of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere, and has a significant negative effect on ecosystems. The relative composition of acid rain is changing gradually from sulfuric acid rain (SAR) to nitric acid rain (NAR) with the rapidly growing amount of nitrogen deposition. In this study, we investigated the impact of simulated SAR and NAR on litter decomposition and the soil microbial community over four seasons since March 2015. Results first showed that the effects of acid rain on litter decomposition and soil microbial were positive in the early period of the experiment, except for SAR on soil microbes. Second, soil pH with NAR decreased more rapidly with the amount of acid rain increased in summer than with SAR treatments. Only strongly acid rain (both SAR and NAR) was capable of depressing litter decomposition and its inhibitory effect was stronger on leaf than on fine root litter. Meanwhile, NAR had a higher inhibitory effect on litter decomposition than SAR. Third, in summer, autumn and winter, PLFAs were negatively impacted by the increased acidity level resulting from both SAR and NAR. However, higher acidity level of NAR (pH=2.5) had the strongest inhibitory impact on soil microbial activity, especially in summer. In addition, Gram-negative bacteria (cy19:0) and fungi (18:1ω9) were more sensitive to both SAR and NAR, and actinomycetes was more sensitive to SAR intensity. Finally, soil total carbon, total nitrogen and pH were the most important soil property factors affecting soil microbial activity, and high microbial indices (fungi/bacteria) with high soil pH. Our results suggest that the ratio of SO4(2-) to NO3(-) in acid rain is an important factor which could affect litter decomposition and soil microbial in subtropical forest of China. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. High pressure Raman spectroscopic study of the effects of n-ethylamines and water on the 2-nitropropane/Nitric acid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobin, Cedric; Petitet, Jean Pierre [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, CNRS, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris XIII, 99 av. J-B Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2005-12-01

    High pressure Raman spectroscopy measurements in a diamond anvil cell (0-10 GPa) on 2-nitropropane/nitric acid/X (X=triethylamine, diethylamine, and water) ternary systems and 2-nitropropane/nitric acid/water/Y (Y=triethylamine and diethylamine) quaternary systems are reported. The modifications of the chemical behavior of the 2-nitropropane/nitric acid model system, induced by the presence of triethylamine, diethylamine, and/or water, were studied at ambient and high pressure. At ambient pressure, the ionization of the nitric acid has been observed with each of the additives. Moreover, in the case of ethylamines, new peaks have been observed and the hypothesis of a 2-nitropropane/ethylamine complex is advanced. At high pressure, the decomposition of the 2-nitropropane/nitric acid system, with an oxygen balance near zero, has been observed only in presence of triethylamine. The role of each additive to the 2-nitropropane/nitric acid system in the modification of the respective reducing and oxidizing character of the components, and in the reactivity of the system, is discussed. Several hypotheses are advanced concerning the sensitizing effect of the additives on the 2-nitropropane/nitric acid system. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. The bonding of heavy metals on nitric acid-etched coal fly ashes functionalized with 2-mercaptoethanol or thioglycolic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, M.I. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Physics, Area of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Campus de Vegazana, s/n, University of León, E-24071 León (Spain); Aller, A.J., E-mail: aj.aller@unileon.es [Department of Applied Chemistry and Physics, Area of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Campus de Vegazana, s/n, University of León, E-24071 León (Spain); Littlejohn, D. [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, 295 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G1 1XL (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-14

    Coal fly ash is a waste by-product of the coal fire industry, which generates many environmental problems. Alternative uses of this material would provide efficient solutions for this by-product. In this work, nitric acid-etched coal fly ash labelled with 2-mercaptoethanol or thioglycolic acid was assessed for retention of Al(III), As(III), Cu(II), Cd(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Hg(II), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions. The bonding characteristics between the organic compounds with the solid support, as well as with the metal ions, were evaluated using various surface analytical techniques. Visualization of the organically-functionalized coal fly ash particle was possible using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the elemental composition of the functionalized material, before and after retention of the metal ions, was obtained by energy dispersive (ED)-X ray spectrometry (XRS) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry and Raman spectrometry were used to obtain information about the functional groups. It was found that some metal(oid) ions (As, Ni, Pb, Zn) were coordinated through the mercaptan group, while other metal(oid)s (Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn) were apparently bonded to oxygen atoms. A low-cost and effective solid phase retention system for extraction of heavy metals from aqueous solutions was thus developed. - Graphical abstract: Nitric acid-etched coal fly ash labelled with 2-mercaptoethanol or thioglycolic acid was intended for the retention of heavy metals. The bonding characteristics between the organic compounds with the solid support, as well as with the metal ions, were evaluated using surface analytical techniques. - Highlights: • Coal fly ashes were organically-functionalized. • Organically-functionalized coal fly ashes were spectrometrically characterized. • Organically-functionalized coal fly ashes can be used as an effective solid sorbent for metal(oid)s. • This retention

  20. A safer and flexible method for the oxygen functionalization of carbon nanotubes by nitric acid vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santangelo, Saveria, E-mail: saveria.santangelo@unirc.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, dell’Energia, dell’Ambiente e dei Materiali (DICEAM), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Piperopoulos, Elpida [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Fazio, Enza [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra (DFST), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Faggio, Giuliana [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Ansari, Shabana [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Lanza, Maurizio [Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (IPCF) del CNR, 98158 Messina (Italy); Neri, Fortunato [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra (DFST), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Messina, Giacomo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Milone, Candida [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    The functionalization by nitric acid vapors at azeotropic concentration has been recently proposed to eliminate drawbacks of the widely utilized liquid phase functionalization method. This work suggests to exploit the so-called “salt effect” to improve the vapor phase oxidation method in terms of safety and flexibility. Increasing the relative volatility of acid, the addition of Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt to the HNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O solution allows (i) obtaining vapors with HNO{sub 3} at the azeotropic concentration from a more diluted liquid solution (i.e. operating under safer conditions), and (ii) varying the concentration of HNO{sub 3} in the vapor phase even above the azeotropic concentration limit (with improved process flexibility). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetry, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy systematic analyses are carried out on pristine and oxidized nanotubes in order to assess their functionalization degree, surface chemistry and structural evolution. The most relevant finding of this preliminary study is that the nanotube functionalization extent increases linearly with the HNO{sub 3} vapor concentration.

  1. The effect of fatty acid surfactants on the uptake of nitric acid to deliquesced NaCl aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ammann

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface active organic compounds have been observed in marine boundary layer aerosol. Here, we investigate the effect such surfactants have on the uptake of nitric acid (HNO3, an important removal reaction of nitrogen oxides in the marine boundary layer. The uptake of gaseous HNO3 on deliquesced NaCl aerosol was measured in a flow reactor using HNO3 labelled with the short-lived radioactive isotope 13N. The uptake coefficient γ on pure deliquesced NaCl aerosol was γ=0.5±0.2 at 60% relative humidity and 30 ppb HNO3(g. The uptake coefficient was reduced by a factor of 5–50 when the aerosol was coated with saturated linear fatty acids with carbon chain lengths of 18 and 15 atoms in monolayer quantities. In contrast, neither shorter saturated linear fatty acids with 12 and 9 carbon atoms, nor coatings with the unsaturated oleic acid (C18, cis-double bond had a detectable effect on the rate of HNO3 uptake. It is concluded that it is the structure of the monolayers formed, which determines their resistance towards HNO3 uptake. Fatty acids (C18 and C15, which form a highly ordered film in the so-called liquid condensed state, represent a significant barrier towards HNO3 uptake, while monolayers of shorter-chain fatty acids (C9, C12 and of the unsaturated oleic acid form a less ordered film in the liquid expanded state and do not hinder the uptake. Similarly, high contents of humic acids in the aerosol, a structurally inhomogeneous, quite water soluble mixture of oxidised high molecular weight organic compounds did not affect HNO3 uptake. As surfactant films on naturally occurring aerosol are expected to be less structured due to their chemical inhomogeneity, it is likely that their inhibitory effect on HNO3 uptake is smaller than that observed here for the C15 and C18 fatty acid monolayers.

  2. Effect of ascorbic acid supplementation on nitric oxide metabolites and systolic blood pressure in rats exposed to lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Amani; Ali, Noroozzadeh; Reza, Badalzadeh; Ali, Khoshbaten

    2010-04-01

    Extended exposure to low levels of lead causes high blood pressure in human and laboratory animals. The mechanism is not completely recognized, but it is relatively implicated with generation of free radicals, oxidant agents such as ROS, and decrease of available nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we have demonstrated the effect of ascorbic acid as an antioxidant on nitric oxide metabolites and systolic blood pressure in rats exposed to low levels of lead. The adult male Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were divided into four groups: control, lead acetate (receiving 100 ppm lead acetate in drinking water), lead acetate plus ascorbic acid (receiving 100 ppm lead acetate and 1 g/l ascorbic acid in drinking water), and ascorbic acid (receiving 1 g/l ascorbic acid in drinking water) groups. The animals were anesthetized with ketamin/xylazine (50 and 7 mg/kg, respectively, ip) and systolic blood pressure was then measured from the tail of the animals by a sphygmomanometer. Nitric oxide levels in serum were measured indirectly by evaluation of its stable metabolites (total nitrite and nitrate (NOchi)). After 8 and 12 weeks, systolic blood pressure in the lead acetate group was significantly elevated compared to the control group. Ascorbic acid supplementation could prevent the systolic blood pressure rise in the lead acetate plus ascorbic acid group and there was no significant difference relative to the control group. The serum NOchi levels in lead acetate group significantly decreased in relation to the control group, but this reduction was not significantly different between the lead acetate plus ascorbic acid group and the control group. Results of this study suggest that ascorbic acid as an antioxidant prevents the lead induced hypertension. This effect may be mediated by inhibition of NOchi oxidation and thereby increasing availability of NO.

  3. Acidity and organic matter stimulate abiotic nitric oxide emissions in drying soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homyak, P. M.; Kamiyama, M. T.; Sickman, J. O.; Schimel, J.

    2016-12-01

    Soils are an important source of nitric oxide (NO) to the atmosphere, particularly in dry lands because of tradeoffs that develop between biotic and abiotic NO-producing processes as soils dry. Understanding how increasingly drier climates may offset the balance of these tradeoffs is critical to estimating N budgets, especially because regions on Earth are expected to become drier. We measured NO emission pulses after wetting soils from similar lithologies along an altitudinal gradient in the Sierra Nevada, CA, where mean annual precipitation varied from 670 to 1,500 mm. Along the gradient, we measured field NO emissions, and used chloroform in the laboratory to partition between biotic and abiotic NO-producing processes. Field NO emission pulses were lowest in acidic and organic matter-rich soils (4-72 ng NO-N m-2 s-1), presumably because topography and vegetation influenced soil moisture and substrate availability, but were highest in the high-elevation barren site ( 560 ng NO-N m-2 s-1). In the laboratory, NO emission pulses were up to 19× greater in chloroform-treated soils than in the controls, and in contrast to field measurements, these pulses increased with elevation as pH decreased (6.2 to 4.4) and soil organic matter (SOM) increased (18 to 157 mg C g-1). Drought can favor abiotic NO-producing processes (i.e., chemodenitrification) during periods when biological processes become stressed. Acidic and SOM-rich soils, which typically develop under mesic conditions, are most vulnerable to N loss as interactions between drought, acidity, and SOM stimulate chemodenitrification.

  4. Evaluation of nitric and acetic acid resistance of cement mortars containing high-volume black rice husk ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents the performance of cement mortar containing black rice husk ash (BRHA) under nitric and acetic acid attacks. The BRHA, collected from an electrical generating power plant that uses rice husk as fuel, was ground using a grinding machine. The compressive strength loss, weight loss, and expansion of mortars under nitric and acetic acid attack were investigated. The test results of BRHA properties in accordance with the ASTM C 618 standard found that the optimal grinding time was 4 h as this achieved a Blaine fineness of 5370 cm(2)/g. For parametric study, BRHA were used as a Portland cement Type 1 replacement at the levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% by weight of binder. The water-to-binder ratios were 0.55, 0.60, and 0.65. From test results, when the percentage replacements of BRHA in cement increased, it was observed that the strength loss and weight loss of mortars containing BRHA under acetic acid attack were higher than those of the mortars against nitric acid attack. It was found that, of the various BHRA mortars, the strength loss and weight loss due to nitric and acetic acid attacks were the lowest in the mortar with 10% BRHA replacement. For 10%, 20% and 30% BRHA replacements, the rate of expansion of the BRHA mortar decreased when compared with the control mortar. For the mortars with other percentage replacements of BRHA, the rate of expansion increased. Furthermore, the effective water-to-binder ratios of control and BRHA mortars were the primary factor for determining the durability of mortar mixed with BRHA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds – Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM. The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  6. Characteristic of wet method of phosphorus recovery from polish sewage sludge ash with nitric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorazda Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sewage Sludge Ash (SSA is a concentrated source of phosphorus and can be successfully recycled via a number of different routes. This paper presents research results on phosphorus recovery from differently combusted sewage sludge with the use of nitric acid extraction. Different SSA forms from Polish thermal utilization stations were compared. It was revealed that sewage treatment technology as well as combustion technology influence many physical and chemical parameters of ashes that are crucial for further phosphorus recovery from such waste according to the proposed method. Presented research defines extraction efficiency, characterized extracts composition and verifies the possibility of using SSA as cheaper and alternative sources of phosphorus compounds. Gdynia, Kielce and Kraków SSA have the best properties for the proposed technology of phosphorus recovery with high extraction efficiency greater than 86%. Unsuitable results were obtained for Bydgoszcz, Szczecin Slag and Warszawa SSA. Extraction process for Łódź and Szczecin Dust SSA need to be improved for a higher phosphorus extraction efficiency greater than 80%.

  7. Vertical Distribution of Ozone and Nitric Acid Vapor on the Mammoth Mountain, Eastern Sierra Nevada, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bytnerowicz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In August and September 1999 and 2000, concentrations of ozone (O3 and nitric acid vapor (HNO3 were monitored at an elevation gradient (2184–3325 m on the Mammoth Mountain, eastern Sierra Nevada, California. Passive samplers were used for monitoring exposure to tropospheric O3 and HNO3 vapor. The 2-week average O3 concentrations ranged between 45 and 72 ppb, while HNO3 concentrations ranged between 0.06 and 0.52 μg/m3. Similar ranges of O3 and HNO3 were determined for 2 years of the study. No clear effects of elevation on concentrations of the two pollutants were detected. Concentrations of HNO3 were low and at the background levels expected for the eastern Sierra Nevada, while the measured concentrations of O3 were elevated. High concentrations of ozone in the study area were confirmed with an active UV absorption O3 monitor placed at the Mammoth Mountain Peak (September 5–14, 2000, average 24-h concentration of 56 ppb.

  8. Modeling the impact of energetic particle precipitation on stratospheric nitric acid polar enhancements using WACCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsolini, Yvan; Kvissel, Ole Kristian; Stordal, Frode

    The wintertime abundance of nitric acid (HNO3) in the polar upper stratosphere displays a strong inter-annual variability. It is known to be strongly influenced by energetic particle precipitation, not only on a fast time scale by solar proton events, but also on a slower time scale by descent of mesospheric air enriched in NOx by precipitating electrons. Measurements by SMR aboard the Odin satellite, by MIPAS aboard the ENVISAT satellite, or by MLS aboard the Aura satellite, have shown occasional enhancements in excess of 10 ppb, leading to a double-peaked HNO3 profile with a secondary maximum descending from the upper stratosphere. N2O5 heterogeneous conversion upon hydrated ion clusters has long been proposed as the likely mechanism for the slower effect. Here we introduce this predominantly wintertime source of HNO3 in the NCAR Whole Atmo-sphere Community Climate Model (WACCM version 3.1.9) as a pseudo first-order reaction, assuming a simple, temporarily fixed, meridional distribution of hydrated ion clusters. The 4-year simulation is compared to a control one, with the new reaction omitted. Realistic enhancements of HNO3 are produced when air masses with high level of NOx descend into the stratosphere during the long polar night. As HNO3 is a key component influencing the stratospheric ozone distribution, complex chemical but also radiative and dynamical feedbacks appear, which impact in particular the ozone depletion in the southern hemisphere spring, and the NOx distribution in summer high latitudes.

  9. Adenosine deaminase, xanthine oxidase, uric acid, and nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of disease in patients with colon polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafet Mete

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Protrusion of colonic mucosa to the lumen is called polyp. Since adenomatous polyps are neoplastic polyps, determining the factors contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease would be helpful in terms of reducing mortality and morbidity. Variety studies have showed that increased oxidative stress might play an important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between adenosine deaminase, xanthine oxidase nitric oxide, uric acid levels and oxidative stress in patients with colonic polyps to help the elucidation of pathophysiology of the disease. Methods: The study was conducted at Gastroenterology Clinics of Namik Kemal University Training and Research Hospital. Thirty-five subjects who underwent colonoscopy because of any gastrointestinal symptom and whose pathologic evaluation of colonoscopic biopsy revealed adenomatous polyps were enrolled as patient group. Control group was consisted of 36 healthy subjects. Uric acid was measured by an autoanalyzer using photometric method. Adenosine deaminase, xanthine oxidase, and nitric oxide were measured manually using a spectrophotometric method. Results: Xanthine oxidase, uric acid, and nitric oxide levels were found to be significantly higher in patients with colonic polyp compared that of the healthy controls. (p = 0.007; p = 0.02; p<0.001, respectively.Although adenosine deaminase levels were significantly higher in patient group, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.07 Conclusion: Increased serum levels of adenosine deaminase, xanthine oxidase, nitric oxide, and uric acid levels in patients with colonic adenomatous polyp may indicate the increased oxidative stress and the oxidative impairment of the colonic mucosa which may play an important role in the pathophysiology of the disease. Further studies would be useful to assess antioxidant treatment options in these patients.

  10. Corrosion investigations on zircaloy-4 and titanium dissolver materials for MOX fuel dissolution in concentrated nitric acid containing fluoride ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraj, J.; Krishnaveni, P.; Krishna, D. Nanda Gopala; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi, E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.in

    2016-05-15

    Aqueous reprocessing of plutonium-rich mixed oxide fuels require fluoride as a dissolution catalyst in boiling nitric acid for an effective dissolution of the spent fuel. High corrosion rates were obtained for the candidate dissolver materials zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) and commercial pure titanium (CP-Ti grade 2) in boiling 11.5 M HNO{sub 3} + 0.05 M NaF. Complexing the fluoride ions either with Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} or ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} aided in decreasing the corrosion rates of Zr-4 and CP-Ti. From the obtained corrosion rates it is concluded that CP-Ti is a better dissolver material than Zr-4 for extended service life in boiling 11.5 M HNO{sub 3} + 0.05 M NaF, when complexed with 0.15 M ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. XPS analysis confirmed the presence of TiO{sub 2} and absence of fluoride on the surface of CP-Ti samples, indicating that effective complexation had occurred in solution leading to passivation of the metal and imparting high corrosion resistance. - Highlights: • Zr-4 and CP-Ti exhibited high corrosion rate in boiling fluorinated nitric acid. • Corrosion rate decreased in fluorinated nitric acid containing ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. • High inhibiting efficiency is exhibited by 0.15 M ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} when compared to Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. • Corrosion rates of CP-Ti were negligible in complexed fluorinated nitric acid. • XPS analysis on CP-Ti confirmed the presence of TiO{sub 2} and absence of fluoride.

  11. Thermal And Spectroscopic Analyses Of Next Generation Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Solvent Contacted With 3, 8, And 16 Molar Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

    2011-12-07

    A new solvent system referred to as Next Generation Solvent or NGS, has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the removal of cesium from alkaline solutions in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process. The NGS is proposed for deployment at MCU{sup a} and at the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This work investigated the chemical compatibility between NGS and 16 M, 8 M, and 3 M nitric acid from contact that may occur in handling of analytical samples from MCU or, for 3 M acid, which may occur during contactor cleaning operations at MCU. This work shows that reactions occurred between NGS components and the high molarity nitric acid. Reaction rates are much faster in 8 M and 16 M nitric acid than in 3 M nitric acid. In the case of 16 M and 8 M nitric acid, the nitric acid reacts with the extractant to produce initially organo-nitrate species. The reaction also releases soluble fluorinated alcohols such as tetrafluoropropanol. With longer contact time, the modifier reacts to produce a tarry substance with evolved gases (NO{sub x} and possibly CO). Calorimetric analysis of the reaction product mixtures revealed that the organo-nitrates reaction products are not explosive and will not deflagrate.

  12. A-train CALIOP and MLS observations of early winter Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds and nitric acid in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lambert

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A-train Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS observations are used to investigate the development of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs and the gas-phase nitric acid distribution in the early 2008 Antarctic winter. Observational evidence of gravity-wave activity is provided by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS radiances and infrared spectroscopic detection of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT in PSCs is obtained from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS. Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 DAS analyses are used to derive Lagrangian trajectories and to determine temperature-time histories of air parcels. We use CALIOP backscatter and depolarization measurements to classify PSCs and the MLS measurements to determine the corresponding gas-phase HNO3 as a function of temperature. For liquid PSCs the uptake of HNO3 follows the theoretical equilibrium curve for supercooled ternary solutions (STS, but at temperatures about 1 K lower as determined from GEOS-5. In the presence of solid phase PSCs, above the ice frost-point, the HNO3 depletion occurs over a wider range of temperatures (+2 to −7 K distributed about the NAT equilibrium curve. Rapid gas-phase HNO3 depletion is first seen by MLS from from 23–25 May 2008, consisting of a decrease in the volume mixing ratio from 14 ppbv (parts per billion by volume to 7 ppbv on the 46–32 hPa (hectopascal pressure levels and accompanied by a 2–3 ppbv increase by renitrification at the 68 hPa pressure level. The observed region of depleted HNO3 is substantially smaller than the region bounded by the NAT existence temperature threshold. Temperature-time histories of air parcels demonstrate that the depletion is more clearly correlated with prior exposure to temperatures a few kelvin above the frost-point. From the combined data we infer the presence

  13. Development of a Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Detector for Ammonia and Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; McManus, J. Barry; Shorter, Joanne H.; Herndon, Scott C.; Jimenez, Rodrigo

    2005-12-31

    We have developed a compact, robust, atmospheric trace gas detector based on mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using pulsed quantum cascade (QC) lasers. The spectrometer is suitable for airborne measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, formaldehyde, formic acid, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and other gases that have line-resolved absorption spectra in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC laser light source operates near room temperature with thermal electric cooling instead of liquid nitrogen which has been previously required for semiconductor lasers in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC lasers have sufficient output power so that thermal electric cooled detectors may be used in many applications with lower precision requirements. The instrument developed in this program has been used in several field campaigns from both the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory and from the NOAA WP3 aircraft. The Phase II program has resulted in more than 10 archival publications describing the technology and its applications. Over 12 instruments based on this design have been sold to research groups in Europe and the United States making the program both a commercial as well as a technological success. Anticipated Benefits The development of a sensitive, cryogen-free, mid-infrared absorption method for atmospheric trace gas detection will have wide benefits for atmospheric and environmental research and broader potential commercial applications in areas such as medical diagnostic and industrial process monitoring of gaseous compounds. Examples include air pollution monitoring, breath analysis, combustion exhaust diagnostics, and plasma diagnostics for semi-conductor fabrication. The substitution of near-room temperature QC lasers for cryogenic lead salt TDLs and the resulting simplifications in instrument design and operation will greatly expand the range of applications.

  14. Inhibition of Aluminum Alloy Corrosion in 0.5 M Nitric Acid Solution by 4-4-Dimethyloxazolidine-2-thione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Ahmed Y.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Tabal, Yousef Bashir A.

    2011-04-01

    The corrosion inhibition of Al-Alloy (Al2024) in 0.5 M nitric acid solution at 30 °C was achieved using 4-4-dimethyloxazolidine-2-thione (DMT) as a corrosion inhibitor. The electrochemical performance of the DMT was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization measurements, and scanning electron microscopic study (SEM). The results indicated that DMT acts as an inhibitor for Al2024 in 0.5 M nitric acid. Polarization curves indicated that DMT was a mixed-type inhibitor. Inhibition efficiencies were observed to be increased with an increase in DMT concentration and attains approximately to 93.4% at 2 mM of DMT in 0.5 M nitric acid. The adsorption of DMT model on Al2024 surface obeyed in accordance with Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The value of the free energy of adsorption Δ G ads indicated that the adsorption of DMT molecule was a spontaneous process and was typical of physical and chemical adsorption.

  15. Remedial investigation report on the abandoned nitric acid pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    Upper East Fork Poplar Creek OU-2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline. This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes {approximately} 4,800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. A total of nineteen locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The nineteen samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Y-12 Plant laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health via incidental ingestion of soil, inhalation of dust, dermal contact with the soil, or external exposure to radionuclides in the ANAP soils, under the construction worker and/or the residential land-use scenarios.

  16. Comparative analysis of the effect of pretreating aspen wood with aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of sulfuric and nitric acid on its reactivity during enzymatic hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dotsenko, Gleb; Osipov, D. O.; Zorov, I. N.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of aspen wood pretreatment methods with the use of both aqueous solutions of sulfuric and nitric acids and aqueous-organic solutions (ethanol, butanol) of sulfuric acid (organosolv) on the limiting degree of conversion of this type of raw material into simple sugars during enzymatic...... hydrolysis are compared. The effects of temperature, acid concentration, composition of organic phase (for sulfuric acid), and pressure (for nitric acid) on the effectiveness of pretreatment were analyzed. It is shown that the use of organosolv with 0.5% sulfuric acid allows us to increase the reactivity...... of ground wood by 300–400%, compared to the initial raw material. Pretreatment with a 4.8% aqueous solution of nitric acid (125°C, 1.8 MPa, 10 min) is shown to be most effective, as it increases the reactivity of the ground aspen wood by more than 500%....

  17. Low Temperature Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides in Production of Nitric Acid by the Use of Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabljanac, Ž.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of nitrous oxides in the tail gas of the dual-pressure process of nitric acid production. The process of selective catalytic reduction is carried out using the TiO2/WO3 heterogeneous catalyst applied on a ceramic honeycomb structure with a high geometric surface area per volume. The process design parameters for nitric acid production by the dual-pressure procedure in a capacity range from 75 to 100 % in comparison with designed capacity for one production line is shown in the Table 1. Shown is the effectiveness of selective catalytic reduction in the temperature range of the tail gas from 180 to 230 °C with direct application of liquid ammonia, without prior evaporation to gaseous state. The results of inlet and outlet concentrations of nitrous oxides in the tail gas of the nitric acid production process are shown in Figures 1 and 2. Figure 3 shows the temperature dependence of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrous oxides expressed as NO2in the tail gas of nitric acid production with the application of a constant mass flow of liquid ammonia of 13,0 kg h-1 and average inlet mass concentration of the nitrous oxides expressed as NO2of 800,0 mgm-3 during 100 % production capacity. The specially designed liquid-ammonia direct-dosing system along with the effective homogenization of the tail gas resulted in emission levels of nitrous oxides expressed as NO2 in tail gas ranging from 100,0 to 185,0 mg m-3. The applied low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of the nitrous oxides in the tail gases by direct use of liquid ammonia is shown in Figure 4. It is shown that low-temperature selective catalytic reduction with direct application of liquid ammonia opens a new opportunity in the reduction of nitrous oxide emissions during nitric acid production without the risk of dangerous ammonium nitrate occurring in the process of subsequent energy utilization of

  18. The examination of analysis and evaluation model and analysis method of the exothermic reaction between solvent and nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yoshihiko; Hirumachi, Suguru [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Safety Engineering Group, Health and Safety Division, Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Koyama, Kazuya; Miki, Junichi

    1999-02-01

    In advanced nuclear fuel recycling technological R and D, the upgrading research in the fast reactor fuel cycle which the transuranics is separated and collected for the high-level activity liquid waste and is made to burn using fast reactor is carried out. In CMPO which is new extracting agent that the use is examined and TRUEX solvent which is the CMPO mixed solvent, for the purpose of evaluating accurately exothermic reaction behavior and gas generation behavior of the exothermic reaction between solvent and nitric acid in the evaporator in research installation in the future, analysis and evaluation model and investigation and examination of the physical property necessary for the analysis evaluation were carried out, while analysis and evaluation example of the exothermic reaction between solvent and nitric acid in the evaporator are investigated, and the test calculation was carried out. On the exothermic reaction between organic solvent and nitric acid in the evaporator examples, of analysis and evaluation carried out until now were investigated. It was found that there are a method for deducing the temperature of self accelerated reaction from the steady heat balance equation and a method for doing a transient analysis of temperature rise by exothermic reaction of nitric acid with organic solvent, that is, a method for deciding the reaction rate of exothermic reaction in proportion to various conditions. It was then confirmed that the method for doing the transient analysis of temperature rise by exothermic reaction between organic solvent and nitric acid is the most safe side and the most realistic evaluation technique in the method of the superscription. Based on the examination of the superscription, it carried out preparation of analysis and evaluation model of the exothermic reaction between organic solvent and nitric acid in the evaporator and examination of the analysis method, and it became possible that it realistically handles the behavior of the

  19. Low concentrations of salicylic acid delay methyl jasmonate-induced leaf senescence by up-regulating nitric oxide synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yingbin; Liu, Jian; Xing, Da

    2016-09-01

    In plants, extensive efforts have been devoted to understanding the crosstalk between salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling in pathogen defenses, but this crosstalk has scarcely been addressed during senescence. In this study, the effect of SA application on methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced leaf senescence was assessed. We found that low concentrations of SA (1-50 μM) played a delayed role against the senescence promoted by MeJA. Furthermore, low concentrations of SA enhanced plant antioxidant defenses and restricted reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in MeJA-treated leaves. When applied simultaneously with MeJA, low concentrations of SA triggered a nitric oxide (NO) burst, and the elevated NO levels were linked to the nitric oxide associated 1 (NOA1)-dependent pathway via nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. The ability of SA to up-regulate plant antioxidant defenses, reduce ROS accumulation, and suppress leaf senescence was lost in NO-deficient Atnoa1 plants. In a converse manner, exogenous addition of NO donors increased the plant antioxidant capacity and lowered the ROS levels in MeJA-treated leaves. Taken together, the results indicate that SA at low concentrations counteracts MeJA-induced leaf senescence through NOA1-dependent NO signaling and strengthening of the antioxidant defense. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Optimization of conditions to produce nitrous gases by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid; Optimisation des conditions operatoires de production de vapeurs nitreuses par reduction electrochimique d`acide nitrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 -Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[CEA Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 -Marcoule (France). Direction du Cycle du Combustible

    1996-11-22

    Gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}) involved as oxidizing agents in nuclear fuel reprocessing can be an produced by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid. This could be an interesting alternative to the usual process because no wastes are generated. Voltammetric studies on a platinum electrode show that two reduction potential regions are observed in concentrated nitric acid solutions, between 0.05 V{sub S}HE and 0.3 V{sub S}HE and O.5 V{sub S}HE and 1 V{sub S}HE. The highest potential region reduction mechanism was studies by: classical micro-electrolysis methods; macro-electrolysis methods; infra-red spectroscopy couplet to electrochemistry. It was determined that the origin of nitric acid reduction is the electrochemical reduction of nitrous acid in nitric oxide which chemically reduces nitric acid. This reaction produces nitrous acid back which indicate an auto-catalytic behaviour of nitric acid reduction mechanism. Nitrogen dioxide evolution during nitric acid reduction can also be explained by an other chemical reaction. In the potential value of platinum electrode is above 0.8 V{sub S}HE, products of the indirect nitric acid reduction are nitrous acid, nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Below this value nitric oxide can be reduced in nitrous oxide. Thus the potential value is the most important parameter for the nitrogen oxides production selectivity. However, owing to the auto-catalytic character of the reduction mechanism, potential value can be controlled during intentiostatic industrial electrolysis. (author). 91 refs.

  1. Densification of ∼5 nm-thick SiO2 layers by nitric acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Joo, Soyeong; Park, Tae Joo; Kim, Woo-Byoung

    2017-08-01

    Low-temperature nitric acid (HNO3) oxidation of Si (NAOS) has been used to improve the interface and electrical properties of ∼5 nm-thick SiO2/Si layers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Investigations of the physical properties and electrical characteristics of these thin films revealed that although their thickness is not changed by NAOS, the leakage current density at a gate bias voltage of -1 V decreases by about two orders of magnitude from 1.868 × 10-5 A/cm2. This leakage current density was further reduced by post-metallization annealing (PMA) at 250 °C for 10 min in a 5 vol.% hydrogen atmosphere, eventually reaching a level (5.2 × 10-8 A/cm2) approximately three orders of magnitude less than the as-grown SiO2 layer. This improvement is attributed to a decrease in the concentration of suboxide species (Si1+, Si2+ and Si3+) in the SiO2/Si interface, as well as a decrease in the equilibrium density of defect sites (Nd) and fixed charge density (Nf). The barrier height (Vt) generated by a Poole-Frenkel mechanism also increased from 0.205 to 0.371 eV after NAOS and PMA. The decrease in leakage current density is therefore attributed to a densification of the SiO2 layer in combination with the removal of OH species and increase in interfacial properties at the SiO2/Si interface.

  2. Intergranular corrosion testing of austenitic stainless steels in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillock, G.O.H.; Dunnett, B. F. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, BNFL, B170, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In hot strong nitric acid solutions, stainless steels exhibit intergranular corrosion. Corrosion rates are often measured from immersion testing of specimens manufactured from the relevant material (e.g. plate or pipe). The corrosion rates, measured from weight loss, are found to increase with time prior to reaching steady state, which can take thousands of hours to achieve. The apparent increase in corrosion rate as a function of time was found to be an artefact due to the surface area of the specimen's being used in the corrosion rate calculations, rather than that of the true area undergoing active corrosion i.e. the grain boundaries. The steady state corrosion rate coincided with the onset of stable grain dropping, where the use of the surface area of the specimen to convert the weight loss measurements to corrosion rates was found to be appropriate. This was confirmed by sectioning of the specimens and measuring the penetration depths. The rate of penetration was found to be independent of time and no induction period was observed. A method was developed to shorten considerably the testing time to reach the steady state corrosion rate by use of a pre-treatment that induces grain dropping. The long-term corrosion rates from specimens which were pre-treated was similar to that achieved after prolonged testing of untreated (i.e. initially ground) specimens. The presence of cut surfaces is generally unavoidable in the simple immersion testing of specimens in test solutions. However, inaccuracy in the results may occur as the measured corrosion rate is often influenced by the orientation of the microstructure, the highest rates typically being observed on the cut surfaces. Two methods are presented which allow deconvolution of the corrosion rates from immersion testing of specimens containing cut surfaces, thus allowing reliable prediction of the long-term corrosion rate of plate surfaces. (authors)

  3. Chronic exposure to ozone and nitric acid vapor results in increased levels of rat pulmonary putrescine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindhu, R.K.; Kikkawa, Yutaka [Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, University of California at Irvine, Irvine (United States); Mautz, W.J. [Department of Community and Environmental Medicine, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In the past decade, there has been growing public concern for the human health effects of exposure to environmental pollutants. Ozone (O{sub 3}) is one of the most reactive components of photochemical air pollution. Despite extensive investigations by many laboratories on the functional, biochemical, and cellular effects of O{sub 3} exposure in humans, animals, and in vitro systems, questions remain concerning the potential adverse effects to human health represented by chronic near-ambient exposure to this environmental pollutant. In the present investigation, the influence of inhalation of O{sub 3} and nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) vapor on polyamine levels was examined in rat lungs. Male F344/N rats were exposed nose-only to 0.15 ppm O{sub 3} and 50 {mu}g/m{sup 3} HNO{sub 3} vapor alone and in combination for 4 hours/day, 3 days/week for a total of 40 weeks. At this time the animals were sacrificed and their lungs were examined for polyamine contents. Exposure to O{sub 3} and O{sub 3} plus HNO{sub 3} vapor caused a significant increase in the putrescine content of the lung compared to the air-exposed controls (P < 0.05). The concentrations of pulmonary spermidine and spermine were not significantly increased by exposure to either O{sub 3} or HNO{sub 3} vapor alone or in combination compared to the air-exposed controls. The role of polyamines in repair and anti-inflammatory processes has been discussed. (orig.) (orig.) With 1 fig., 1 tab., 30 refs.

  4. Influence of Fe loadings on desulfurization performance of activated carbon treated by nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia-Xiu; Shu, Song; Liu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Yin, Hua-Qiang; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2017-02-01

    A series of Fe supported on activated carbon treated by nitric acid are prepared by incipient wetness impregnation with ultrasonic assistance and characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It has shown that Fe loadings significantly influence the desulfurization activity. Fe/NAC5 exhibits an excellent removal ability of SO2, corresponding to breakthrough sulfur capacity of 323 mg/g. With the increasing Fe loadings, the generated Fe3O4 and Fe2SiO4 increase, but Fe2(SO4)3 is observed after desulfurization. Fe/NAC1 has a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 925 m(2)/g with micropore surface area of 843 m(2)/g and total pore volume of 0.562 cm(3)/g including a micropore volume of 0.300 cm(3)/g. With the increasing Fe loadings, BET surface area and micropore volume decrease, and those of Fe/NAC10 decrease to 706 m(2)/g and 0.249 cm(3)/g. The Fe loadings influence the pore-size distribution, and SO2 adsorption mainly reacts in micropores at about 0.70 nm. C=O and C-O are observed for all samples before SO2 removal. After desulfurization, the C-O stretching is still detected, but the C=O stretching vibration of carbonyl groups disappears. The stretching of S-O or S=O in sulfate is observed at 592 cm(-1) for the used sample, proving that the existence of [Formula: see text].

  5. Validation of nitric acid retrieved by the IMK-IAA processor from MIPAS/ENVISAT measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS onboard the ENVISAT satellite provides profiles of temperature and various trace-gases from limb-viewing mid-infrared emission measurements. The stratospheric nitric acid (HNO3 from September 2002 to March 2004 was retrieved from the MIPAS observations using the science-oriented data processor developed at the Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung (IMK, which is complemented by the component of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE treatment from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA. The IMK-IAA research product, different from the ESA operational product, is validated in this paper by comparison with a number of reference data sets. Individual HNO3 profiles of the IMK-IAA MIPAS show good agreement with those of the balloon-borne version of MIPAS (MIPAS-B and the infrared spectrometer MkIV, with small differences of less than 0.5 ppbv throughout the entire altitude range up to about 38 km, and below 0.2 ppbv above 30 km. However, the degree of consistency is largely affected by their temporal and spatial coincidence, and differences of 1 to 2 ppbv may be observed between 22 and 26 km at high latitudes near the vortex boundary, due to large horizontal inhomogeneity of HNO3. Statistical comparisons of MIPAS IMK-IAA HNO3 VMRs with respect to those of satellite measurements of Odin/SMR, ILAS-II, ACE-FTS, as well as the MIPAS ESA product show good consistency. The mean differences are generally ±0.5 ppbv and standard deviations of the differences are of 0.5 to 1.5 ppbv. The maximum differences are 2.0 ppbv around 20 to 25 km. This gives confidence in the general reliability of MIPAS HNO3 VMR data and the other three satellite data sets.

  6. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of nitric acid uptake on frost point hygrometer performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Thornberry

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Chilled mirror hygrometers (CMH are widely used to measure water vapour in the troposphere and lower stratosphere from balloon-borne sondes. Systematic discrepancies among in situ water vapour instruments have been observed at low water vapour mixing ratios (<5 ppm in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Understanding the source of the measurement discrepancies is important for a more accurate and reliable determination of water vapour abundance in this region. We have conducted a laboratory study to investigate the potential interference of gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3 with the measurement of frost point temperature, and consequently the water vapour mixing ratio, determined by CMH under conditions representative of operation in the UT/LS. No detectable interference in the measured frost point temperature was found for HNO3 mixing ratios of up to 4 ppb for exposure times up to 150 min. HNO3 was observed to co-condense on the mirror frost, with the adsorbed mass increasing linearly with time at constant exposure levels. Over the duration of a typical balloon sonde ascent (90–120 min, the maximum accumulated HNO3 amounts were comparable to monolayer coverage of the geometric mirror surface area, which corresponds to only a small fraction of the actual frost layer surface area. This small amount of co-condensed HNO3 is consistent with the observed lack of HNO3 interference in the frost point measurement because the CMH utilizes significant reductions (>10% in surface reflectivity by the condensate to determine H2O.

  7. Dialkylmethyl-2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamidoammonium iodide as a ruthenium selective ligand from nitric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Shikha [Bio-Organic Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ghosh, Sunil K., E-mail: ghsunil@barc.gov.in [Bio-Organic Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, Joti N., E-mail: jnsharma@barc.gov.in [Process Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A new class of quart-ammonium based ligands have been designed and synthesized. • Ligand showed high extractability and selectivity for Ru in nitric acid medium. • Results are better compared to other extractants reported so far. • The iodide ion played key role in extraction process. • The composition of the extracted complex was found to be L[Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}I]. - Abstract: A new class of quaternary ammonium iodide based ligands with 2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamide as an alkyl appendage have been designed, synthesized and tested for their ability to extract ruthenium selectively from nitric acid medium. The 2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamido ammonium iodide with two propyl and a methyl substituents showed best results for the recovery of ruthenium. The optimized concentration of the solvent was found to be 0.2 M in 30% isodecyl alcohol/n-dodecane. The stoichiometry of the complex was ascertained by slope analysis method and was found to be 1:1 with respect to ligand L{sup +}I{sup −} and Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Ruthenium formed an adduct of structure LRu(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}I in the extraction medium. Iodide ion played an important role in the formation of the stable and extractable complex of ruthenium. No extraction was observed when iodide was replaced by nitrate anion in the ligand. The ligand also showed good selectivity for ruthenium in the presence of other metal ions commonly found in nitric acid solutions of nuclear waste.

  8. Nitric acid in the stratosphere based on Odin observations from 2001 to 2009 – Part 1: A global climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Urban

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR on board the Odin satellite, launched in February 2001, observes thermal emissions of stratospheric nitric acid (HNO3 originating from the Earth limb in a band centred at 544.6 GHz. Height-resolved measurements of the global distribution of nitric acid in the stratosphere were performed approximately on two observation days per week. An HNO3 climatology based on more than 7 years of observations from August 2001 to April 2009 covering the vertical range between typically ~19 and 45 km (~1.5–60 hPa or ~500–1800 K in terms of potential temperature was created. The study highlights the spatial and seasonal variation of nitric acid in the stratosphere, characterised by a pronounced seasonal cycle at middle and high latitudes with maxima during late fall and minima during spring, strong denitrification in the lower stratosphere of the Antarctic polar vortex during winter (the irreversible removal of NOy by the sedimentation of cloud particles containing HNO3, as well as large quantities of HNO3 formed every winter at high-latitudes in the middle and upper stratosphere. A strong inter-annual variability is observed in particular at high latitudes. A comparison with a stratospheric HNO3 climatology, based on over 7 years of UARS/MLS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite/Microwave Limb Sounder measurements from the 1990s, shows good consistency and agreement of the main morphological features in the potential temperature range ~465 to ~960 K, if the different characteristics of the data sets such as the better altitude resolution of Odin/SMR as well as the slightly different altitude ranges are considered. Odin/SMR reaches higher up and UARS/MLS lower down in the stratosphere. An overview from 1991 to 2009 of stratospheric nitric acid is provided (with a short gap between 1998 and 2001, if the global measurements of both experiments are taken together.

  9. Effect of Nitric Acid on the Low Fluorescing Performance of Drilling Fluid Lubricant Based Animal and Vegetable Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-shan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After synthesis of mixed fatty acid triethanolamine ester surfactant based on animal and vegetable mixed oils, the reaction solution was added into 4% (wt/wt liquid nitric acid or 9% (wt/wt solid nitric acid as eliminating fluorescent agent continuing to react from 1 to 2 hours. The low fluorescence lubricant named E167 for drilling fluid was prepared, in which maximum fluorescence intensity (Fmax was less than 10 in three-dimensional fluorescence spectra of excitation wavelength range. When the E167 was added into fresh water based drilling fluid at the dosage of 0.5% (wt/wt, the sticking coefficient reduced rate (ΔKf is 78% and the extreme pressure (E-P friction coefficient reduced rate (Δf is 79%. In the case of 4% brine mud with 0.5% (wt/wt E167 in it, the ΔKf and Δf are 75% and 62%, respectively. After the hot rolling ageing test 180°C × 16 h with the E167 was added into fresh water based drilling fluid at the dosage of 1% (wt/wt, the ΔKf and Δf are greater than 70%, which shows a much better lubrication properties of strong resistance to high temperature. The fresh water based drilling fluid which contains 1% (wt/wt E167 is almost nonfoaming even after hot rolling ageing 120°C × 16 h.

  10. [Effects of exogenous nitric oxide on physiological characteristics of longan (Dimocarpus longana) seedlings under acid rain stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-fu; Wang, Ming-yuan; Yang, Chen; Zhu, Ai-jun

    2013-08-01

    This paper studied the effects of exogenous nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the chlorophyll content, antioxidant enzyme activities, and osmotic regulation substances of longan (Dimocarpus longana 'Fuyan') seedlings under acid rain (pH 3.0) stress. Under the acid rain stress, the seedling leaf superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) activities and chlorophyll, soluble protein and soluble sugar contents decreased obviously, while the leaf malondialdedyde content had a remarkable increase, suggesting the toxic effect of the acid rain on the seedlings. Exogenous nitric oxide had dual nature on the physiological characteristics of longan seedlings under acid rain stress. Applying 0.1-0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP improved the SOD, POD and CAT activities and the chlorophyll, soluble protein and soluble sugar contents significantly, and decreased the malondialdedyde content. Low concentrations SNP reduced the oxidative damage caused by the acid rain stress, and 0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP had the best effect. Under the application of 0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP, the total chlorophyll, soluble protein, and soluble sugar contents and the SOD, POD and CAT activities increased by 76.0%, 107.0%, 216.1%, 150. 0%, 350.9% and 97.1%, respectively, and the malondialdedyde content decreased by 46.4%. It was suggested that low concentration (0.1-0.5 mmol x L(-1)) SNP could alleviate the toxic effect of acid rain stress on longan seedlings via activating the leaf antioxidant enzyme activities and reducing oxidative stress, while high concentration SNP (1.0 mmol x L(-1)) lowered the mitigation effect.

  11. Inside versus Outside: Ion Redistribution in Nitric Acid Reacted Sea Spray Aerosol Particles as Determined by Single Particle Analysis (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, A. P.; Guasco, T.; Ryder, O. S.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Collins, D. B.; Ruppel, M. J.; Bertram, T. H.; Prather, K. A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles were generated under real-world conditions using natural seawater and a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves or a marine aerosol reference tank (MART) that replicates those conditions. The SSA particles were exposed to nitric acid in situ in a flow tube and the well-known chloride displacement and nitrate formation reaction was observed. However, as discussed here, little is known about how this anion displacement reaction affects the distribution of cations and other chemical constituents within and phase state of individual SSA particles. Single particle analysis of individual SSA particles shows that cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) within individual particles undergo a spatial redistribution after heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid, along with a more concentrated layer of organic matter at the surface of the particle. These data suggest that specific ion and aerosol pH effects play an important role in aerosol particle structure in ways that have not been previously recognized. The ordering of organic coatings can impact trace gas uptake, and subsequently impact trace gas budgets of O3 and NOx.

  12. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SLUDGE AND SUPERNATE SIMULANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2012-08-28

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  13. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESSING CELL WITH MATRIX SIMULANTS AND SUPERNATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.

    2012-05-07

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current DWPF flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the CPC since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT and QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  14. Regulation of amino acid arginine transport by lipopolysaccharide and nitric oxide in intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, QingHe; Choudry, Haroon A; Souba, Wiley W; Karinch, Anne M; Huang, JingLi; Lin, ChengMao; Vary, Thomas C; Pan, Ming

    2005-12-01

    As a precursor for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and an immune-enhancing nutrient, amino acid L-arginine plays a critical role in maintaining intestine mucosal integrity and immune functions in sepsis. However, the relationship between intestinal arginine transport and NO synthesis in sepsis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and NO on the arginine transport in cultured rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cell. Near-confluent IEC-6 cells were incubated with LPS (0-50 microg/ml) in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagles's medium, in the presence and absence of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 0-500 micromol/L) and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor N-omega-nitro-L-arginine (NNA, 0-1000 micromol/L) for various periods of time (0-48 hours). Arginine transport activity, arginine transporter CAT1 mRNA and protein levels were measured with transport assay, Northern blot analysis, and Western blot analysis, respectively. LPS increased arginine transport activity in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Prolonged incubation of LPS (24 hours, 25 microg/ml) resulted in a 3-fold increase of arginine transport activity (control: 28 +/- 5; LPS: 92 +/- 20 pmol/mg/min, P System y(+) as the predominant arginine transport system, and a 2-fold increase of System y(+)CAT1 mRNA and transporter protein levels (P System y(+) maximal velocity (V(max), control: 1484 +/- 180; LPS: 2800 +/- 230 pmol/mg/min, P System y(+) mRNA levels and transporter protein levels. The LPS-stimulated arginine transport activity is regulated by the availability of nitric oxide.

  15. Triterpenoic Acids from Apple Pomace Enhance the Activity of the Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbauer, Katharina; Seiringer, Günter; Nguyen, Dieu Linh; Winkler, Johannes; Blaschke, Michael; McKinnon, Ruxandra; Urban, Ernst; Ladurner, Angela; Dirsch, Verena M; Zehl, Martin; Kopp, Brigitte

    2016-01-13

    Pomace is an easy-accessible raw material for the isolation of fruit-derived compounds. Fruit consumption is associated with health-promoting effects, such as the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Increased vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, for example, due to an enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, could be one molecular mechanism mediating this effect. To identify compounds from apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) pomace that have the potential to amplify NO bioavailability via eNOS activation, a bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol/water (70:30) extract has been performed using the (14)C-L-arginine to (14)C-L-citrulline conversion assay (ACCA) in the human endothelium-derived cell line EA.hy926. Phytochemical characterization of the active fractions was performed using the spectrophotometric assessment of the total phenolic content, as well as TLC, HPLC-DAD-ELSD, and HPLC-MS analyses. Eleven triterpenoic acids, of which one is a newly discovered compound, were identified as the main constituents in the most active fraction, accompanied by only minor contents of phenolic compounds. When tested individually, none of the tested compounds exhibited significant eNOS activation. Nevertheless, cell stimulation with the reconstituted compound mixture restored eNOS activation, validating the potential of apple pomace as a source of bioactive components.

  16. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescence detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  17. Effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibition on the exchange of glucose and fatty acids in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Saltin, Bengt; Kemppainen, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in controlling substrate metabolism in humans is incompletely understood.......The role of nitric oxide in controlling substrate metabolism in humans is incompletely understood....

  18. Anomalous HNO3/NOx ratio of remote tropospheric air: Conversion of nitric acid to formic acid and NOx?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Robert B.

    1994-12-01

    The N oxidation ratio, [HNO3]/ [NOx], in the free troposphere is measured at ˜ 1 to 9 (averaging ˜5), consistently lower than the values of 15-100 which known theory suggests to be reached rapidly. This discrepancy casts doubt on current models' abilities to predict effects of NO sources on remote [NO], and so also [O3] and [OH]. HNO3-to-NOx recycling processes involving HCHO in solution are appealing explanations for the ratio. Known chemical theory are illustrated using a Lagrangian box model of the mid-troposphere which simulates characteristic episodes from NOx input to HNO3 washout. Ratio and budget constraint equations for NOy, can usefully restrict conceivable explanations of missing chemistry of fast nitrogen cycling; most explanations could be called “fast-cycles” or “re-NOx-ification.” These equations also show how current global models may suggest spuriously good N oxidation ratios and errors in OH. Aerosol or cloud droplets reactions with HCHO may produce (a) formic acid (which needs an appropriate source) and NOx, or alternatively, (b) hydroxymethyl nitrate (or methyl dinitrate), which might supply a large, variable amount of “missing NOy” not currently measurable except by NOy instruments.

  19. Heterogeneous Reactivity of Nitric Acid with Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol: Large Differences Observed between and within Individual Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Andrew P; Guasco, Timothy L; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Ryder, Olivia S; Trueblood, Jonathan V; Collins, Douglas B; Ruppel, Matthew J; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Prather, Kimberly A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2014-08-07

    Current climate and atmospheric chemistry models assume that all sea spray particles react as if they are pure NaCl. However, recent studies of sea spray aerosol particles have shown that distinct particle types exist (including sea salt, organic carbon, and biological particles) as well as mixtures of these and, within each particle type, there is a range of single-particle chemical compositions. Because of these differences, individual particles should display a range of reactivities with trace atmospheric gases. Herein, to address this, we study the composition of individual sea spray aerosol particles after heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid. As expected, a replacement reaction of chloride with nitrate is observed; however, there is a large range of reactivities spanning from no reaction to complete reaction between and within individual sea spray aerosol particles. These data clearly support the need for laboratory studies of individual, environmentally relevant particles to improve our fundamental understanding as to the properties that determine reactivity.

  20. Dietary Supplementation of Honey Bee Larvae with Arginine and Abscisic Acid Enhances Nitric Oxide and Granulocyte Immune Responses after Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Pedro; Ramirez, Leonor; Quintana, Silvina; Szawarski, Nicolás; Maggi, Matías; Le Conte, Yves; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Eguaras, Martin

    2017-08-15

    Many biotic and abiotic stressors impact bees' health, acting as immunosupressors and contribute to colony losses. Thus, the importance of studying the immune response of honey bees is central to develop new strategies aiming to enhance bees' fitness to confront the threats affecting them. If a pathogen breaches the physical and chemical barriers, honey bees can protect themselves from infection with cellular and humoral immune responses which represent a second line of defense. Through a series of correlative studies we have previously reported that abscisic acid (ABA) and nitric oxide (NO) share roles in the same immune defenses of Apis mellifera (A. mellifera). Here we show results supporting that the supplementation of bee larvae's diet reared in vitro with l-Arginine (precursor of NO) or ABA enhanced the immune activation of the granulocytes in response to wounding and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection.

  1. Laboratory Investigation of the Growth and Crystal Structure of Nitric Acid Hydrates by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A great deal of recent laboratory work has focussed on the characterization of the nitric acid hydrates, thought to be present in type I Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). Phase relationships and vapor pressure measurements (1-3) and infrared characterizations (4-5) have been made. However, the observed properties of crystalline solids (composition, melting point, vapor pressure, surface reactivity, thermodynamic stability, extent of solid solution with other components, etc.) are controlled by their crystal structure. The only means of unequivocal structural identification for crystalline solids is diffraction (using electrons, X-rays, neutrons, etc.). Other observed properties of crystalline solids, such as their infrared spectra, their vapor pressure as a function of temperature, etc. yield only indirect information about what phases are present, their relative proportions, or whether they are crystalline or amorphous.

  2. Non-chromate deoxidation of AA2024-T3: Sodium bromate nitric acid (20 60 °C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, T. G.; Hughes, A. E.; Hardin, S. G.; Nikpour, T.; Toh, S. K.; Boag, A.; McCulloch, D.; Horne, M.

    2008-03-01

    The effect of a non-chromate deoxidiser (bromate-nitric acid) on AA2024-T3 has been examined by SEM, TEM/EELS and XPS. At low temperatures (20 °C) the deoxidiser removed all intermetallics but had little effect on the surface oxide. At 40 °C, attack on the intermetallics was again extensive but there was also evidence of attack on the surface oxide covering the matrix after 10 min of immersion, leaving a roughened porous oxide. At 60 °C, removal of intermetallics was complete and longer immersion times resulted in a characteristic scalloped structure across the surface which became more pronounced with increasing immersion time.

  3. Gene expression profiles of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cytokines in Leishmania major-infected macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells treated with gallic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radtke, O.A.; Kiderlen, A.F.; Kayser, Oliver; Kolodziej, H

    2004-01-01

    The effects of gallic acid on the gene expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1, IL-10, IL-12, IL-18, TNF-alpha, and interferon (IFN)-gamma were investigated by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The experiments were performed

  4. Runaway behavior and thermally safe operation of multiple liquid-liquid reactions in the semi-batch reactor. The nitric acid oxidation of 2-octanol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woezik, B.A.A.; Westerterp, K.R.

    2001-01-01

    The thermal runaway behavior of an exothermic, heterogeneous, multiple reaction system has been studied in a cooled semi-batch reactor. The nitric acid oxidation of 2-octanol has been used to this end. During this reaction, 2-octanone is formed, which can be further oxidized to unwanted carboxylic

  5. Violent explosion after inadvertent mixing of nitric acid and isopropanol – Review 15 years later finds basic accident data corrupted, no evidence of broad learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess; Folmer Nielsen, Merete; Hagen Mikkelsen, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    to produce isopropyl nitrate (nitric acid 1-methylethyl ester, CAS 1712-64-7), a rocket propellant. It is argued that the accident has broad learning potential because of the widespread usage of the two chemicals across industries, the innocent nature of the human error and the severity of the consequence...

  6. Diazeniumdiolate-Doped Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-Based Nitric Oxide Releasing Films as Antibiofilm Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenyi; Wu, Jianfeng; Xi, Chuanwu; Meyerhoff, Mark, E.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) releasing films with a bilayer configuration are fabricated by doping dibutyhexyldiamine diazeniumdiolate (DBHD/N2O2) in a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) layer and further encapsulating this base layer with a silicone rubber top coating. By incorporating pH sensitive dyes within the films, pH changes in the PLGA layer are visualized and correlated with the NO release profiles (flux vs. time). It is demonstrated that PLGA acts as both a promoter and controller of NO release from the coating by providing protons through its intrinsic acid residues (both end-groups and monomeric acid impurities) and hydrolysis products (lactic acid and glycolic acid). Control of the pH changes within the PLGA layer can be achieved by adjusting the ratio of DBHD/N2O2 and utilizing PLGAs with different hydrolysis rates. Coatings with a variety of NO release profiles are prepared with lifetimes of up to 15 d at room temperature (23 °C) and 10 d at 37 °C. When incubated in a CDC flow bioreactor for a one-week period at RT or 37 °C, all the NO releasing films exhibit considerable antibiofilm properties against gram-positive S. aureus and gram-negative E. coli. In particular, compared to the silicone rubber surface alone, an NO releasing film with a base layer of 30 wt% DBHD/N2O2 mixed with poly(lactic acid) exhibits an ~98.4% reduction in biofilm biomass of S. aureus and ~ 99.9% reduction for E. coli at 37 °C. The new diazeniumdiolate-doped PLGA-based NO releasing coatings are expected to be useful antibiofilm coatings for a variety of indwelling biomedical devices (e.g., catheters). PMID:22841918

  7. Oleic Acid, deglycosylated vitamin D-binding protein, nitric oxide: a molecular triad made lethal to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Marco; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Branca, Jacopo J V; Noakes, David; Morucci, Gabriele; Taubmann, Margit; Thyer, Lynda; Pacini, Stefania

    2014-07-01

    Oleic Acid (OA) has been shown to have anticancer properties mediated by interaction with proteins such as α-lactalbumin and lactoferrins. Therefore, we synthesized complexes of OA and Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) that inhibits per se cancer cell proliferation and metastatic potential. We hypothesised that OA-GcMAF complexes could exploit the anticancer properties of both OA and GcMAF in a synergistic manner. We postulated that the stimulating effects of GcMAF on macrophages might lead to release of nitric oxide (NO). Patients with advanced cancer were treated at the Immuno Biotech Treatment Centre with OA-GcMAF-based integrative immunotherapy in combination with a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet, fermented milk products containing naturally-produced GcMAF, Vitamin D3, omega-3 fatty acids and low-dose acetylsalicylic acid. Measuring the tumour by ultrasonographic techniques, we observed a decrease of tumour volume of about 25%. These observations demonstrate that OA, GcMAF and NO can be properly combined and specifically delivered to advanced cancer patients with significant effects on immune system stimulation and tumour volume reduction avoiding harmful side-effects. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Reactions between water-soluble organic acids and nitrates in atmospheric aerosols: Recycling of nitric acid and formation of organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2) occurs when nitrogen oxides and nitric acid (HNO3) react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory-generated particles composed of water-soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e., NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates and release gaseous HNO3 during the dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase because of its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that, in turn, may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling that may further affect concentrations of gas and condensed phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  9. Nitric Oxide Mediates 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Leaves of Elymus nutans Griseb. Exposed to Chilling Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juanjuan; Chu, Xitong; Sun, Yongfang; Miao, Yanjun; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) are both extremely important signalling molecules employed by plants to control many aspects of physiology. In the present study, the role of NO in ALA-induced antioxidant defense in leaves of two sources of Elymus nutans Griseb. (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD) was investigated. Chilling stress enhanced electrolyte leakage, accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide radical in two E. nutans, which were substantially alleviated by exogenous ALA and NO application. Pretreatment with NO scavenger PTIO or NOS inhibitor L-NNA alone and in combination with ALA induced enhancements in electrolyte leakage and the accumulation of MDA, H2O2 and superoxide radical in leaves of DX and ZD exposed to chilling stress, indicating that the inhibition of NO biosynthesis reduced the chilling resistance of E. nutans and the ALA-enhanced chilling resistance. Further analyses showed that ALA and NO enhanced antioxidant defense and activated plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and decreased the accumulation of ROS induced by chilling stress. A pronounced increase in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and NO release by exogenous ALA treatment was found in chilling-resistant DX plants exposed to chilling stress, while only a little increase was observed in chilling-sensitive ZD. Furthermore, inhibition of NO accumulation by PTIO or L-NNA blocked the protective effect of exogenous ALA, while both exogenous NO treatment and inhibition of endogenous NO accumulation did not induce ALA production. These results suggested that NO might be a downstream signal mediating ALA-induced chilling resistance in E. nutans.

  10. Folic Acid Promotes Recycling of Tetrahydrobiopterin and Protects Against Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension by Recoupling Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalupsky, Karel; Kračun, Damir; Kanchev, Ivan; Bertram, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nitric oxide (NO) derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) has been implicated in the adaptive response to hypoxia. An imbalance between 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (BH2) can result in eNOS uncoupling and the generation of superoxide instead of NO. Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) can recycle BH2 to BH4, leading to eNOS recoupling. However, the role of DHFR and eNOS recoupling in the response to hypoxia is not well understood. We hypothesized that increasing the capacity to recycle BH4 from BH2 would improve NO bioavailability as well as pulmonary vascular remodeling (PVR) and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) as indicators of pulmonary hypertension (PH) under hypoxic conditions. Results: In human pulmonary artery endothelial cells and murine pulmonary arteries exposed to hypoxia, eNOS was uncoupled as indicated by reduced superoxide production in the presence of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Concomitantly, NO levels, BH4 availability, and expression of DHFR were diminished under hypoxia. Application of folic acid (FA) restored DHFR levels, NO bioavailability, and BH4 levels under hypoxia. Importantly, FA prevented the development of hypoxia-induced PVR, right ventricular pressure increase, and RVH. Innovation: FA-induced upregulation of DHFR recouples eNOS under hypoxia by improving BH4 recycling, thus preventing hypoxia-induced PH. Conclusion: FA might serve as a novel therapeutic option combating PH. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1076–1091. PMID:26414244

  11. Nitric Oxide Mediates 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Leaves of Elymus nutans Griseb. Exposed to Chilling Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Fu

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA are both extremely important signalling molecules employed by plants to control many aspects of physiology. In the present study, the role of NO in ALA-induced antioxidant defense in leaves of two sources of Elymus nutans Griseb. (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD was investigated. Chilling stress enhanced electrolyte leakage, accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and superoxide radical in two E. nutans, which were substantially alleviated by exogenous ALA and NO application. Pretreatment with NO scavenger PTIO or NOS inhibitor L-NNA alone and in combination with ALA induced enhancements in electrolyte leakage and the accumulation of MDA, H2O2 and superoxide radical in leaves of DX and ZD exposed to chilling stress, indicating that the inhibition of NO biosynthesis reduced the chilling resistance of E. nutans and the ALA-enhanced chilling resistance. Further analyses showed that ALA and NO enhanced antioxidant defense and activated plasma membrane (PM H+-ATPase and decreased the accumulation of ROS induced by chilling stress. A pronounced increase in nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity and NO release by exogenous ALA treatment was found in chilling-resistant DX plants exposed to chilling stress, while only a little increase was observed in chilling-sensitive ZD. Furthermore, inhibition of NO accumulation by PTIO or L-NNA blocked the protective effect of exogenous ALA, while both exogenous NO treatment and inhibition of endogenous NO accumulation did not induce ALA production. These results suggested that NO might be a downstream signal mediating ALA-induced chilling resistance in E. nutans.

  12. Comparing the effects of inorganic nitrate and allopurinol in renovascular complications of metabolic syndrome in rats: role of nitric oxide and uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essawy, Soha S; Abdel-Sater, Khaled A; Elbaz, Amani A

    2014-06-29

    The epidemic of metabolic syndrome is increasing worldwide and correlates with elevation in serum uric acid and marked increase in total fructose intake. Fructose raises uric acid and the latter inhibits nitric oxide bioavailability. We hypothesized that fructose-induced hyperuricemia may have a pathogenic role in metabolic syndrome and treatment of hyperuricemia or increased nitric oxide may improve it. Two experiments were performed. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a control diet or a high-fructose diet to induce metabolic syndrome. The latter received either sodium nitrate or allopurinol for 10 weeks starting with the 1(st) day of fructose to evaluate the preventive role of the drugs or after 4 weeks to evaluate their therapeutic role. A high-fructose diet was associated with significant (p metabolic syndrome and obesity due to its ability to raise uric acid. Either sodium nitrate or allopurinol can prevent this pathological condition by different mechanisms of action.

  13. Macroscopic, thermodynamic, kinetic and microscopic study of nitric acid pickling of Elektron 21 (EV31A magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Mouls

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of pickling of the EL21T6 substrate in a nitric acid bath firstly provided knowledge of the influence of the different experimental parameters (concentration of acid, temperature and stirring of the solution in relation to the etching rate. This experimental part led to the choice of standard pickling (Tbath = 25 °C, moderate stirring (250 rpm, [HNO3] = 1.20 mol/L, duration of 2 min so as to obtain constant removal of material, even after several uses of the pickling bath. SEM observations also confirmed that in these operating conditions, pickling concerns both the grains of the matrix and the precipitates of type Mg3(Nd, Gd, leading to uniform removal of material from the surface. Working from a number of assumptions, thermodynamic and chemical kinetic studies then allowed a pickling mechanism to be proposed and led to obtaining values for the corresponding kinetic parameters (order of reaction, constant of mean rate, activation energy to be obtained.

  14. Oxytocin induces penile erection when injected into the ventral subiculum: role of nitric oxide and glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Maria Rosaria; Succu, Salvatora; Cocco, Cristina; Caboni, Emanuela; Sanna, Fabrizio; Boi, Antonio; Ferri, Gian Luca; Argiolas, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Oxytocin (100 ng) induces penile erection when injected unilaterally into the ventral subiculum of the hippocampus of male rats. The pro-erectile effect started mostly 30 min after treatment and occurred 15 min after an increase in both nitric oxide (NO) production, measured by the concentration of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-), the main metabolites of newly formed NO, and extra-cellular glutamic acid concentration in the dialysate obtained from the ventral subiculum by intracerebral microdialysis. These responses were abolished by d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin (2 microg), an oxytocin receptor antagonist, S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC), a selective inhibitor of neuronal NO-synthase (25 microg), and haemoglobin, a NO scavenger (25 microg), given into the ventral subiculum before oxytocin. Unlike d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, SMTC and haemoglobin, (+)MK-801 (5 microg), a noncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors abolished oxytocin-induced penile erection, but reduced only partially the increase in NO production and extra-cellular glutamic acid. As NMDA (0.25-1 microg) injected into the ventral subiculum induces penile erection episodes, which also occurred with an increase of NO production and extra-cellular glutamic acid, and NMDA responses were abolished by (+)MK-801 (5 microg), but not by SMTC (25 microg) or haemoglobin (25 microg), injected into the ventral subiculum, these results show that oxytocin injected into the ventral subiculum increases NO production by activating its own receptors. NO in turn increases glutamic acid neurotransmission, leading to penile erection, possibly through neural (glutamatergic) efferent projections from the ventral subiculum to extra-hippocampal brain areas (e.g., prefrontal cortex) modulating the activity of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a Technology for Treating Wastewater Contaminated with Nitric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Mabel Ríos Hidalgo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The production process of nitroaromatic hazardous compounds, with the generation of acidic wastewater, represents a significant danger for the health and safety of the workers and the environment. The present study is focused on the development of an efficient installation to treat acidic wastewater resulting from the synthesis process of nitroaromatic compound, considering workers safety and environmental criteria. In this research, a detailed study of the different alternatives that can be used for effective and safe treatment of acidic wastewater was performed. The analysis of several technological schemes for the acidic wastewaters neutralization and the selection of the most feasible alternative from a technical-economic point of view were carried out. The simulation and mathematical modeling developed in this research represent a significant advance in the knowledge of this process for working in a much more secure form. The technological scheme of the process was defined, and the design of the main and auxiliary equipment as well as the piping system was carried out using different computational programs. Finally, this paper proposes a technological design for the treatment of acidic wastewater generated by the production process of nitroaromatic compound, which represents the basic criteria for the further design, construction, and equipment installation of the plant.

  16. Interannual variations of early winter Antarctic polar stratospheric cloud formation and nitric acid observed by CALIOP and MLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lambert

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We use satellite-borne measurements collected over the last decade (2006–2015 from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP to investigate the nitric acid distribution and the properties of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs in the early winter Antarctic vortex. Frequently, at the very start of the winter, we find that synoptic-scale depletion of HNO3 can be detected in the inner vortex before the first lidar detection of geophysically associated PSCs. The generation of "sub-visible" PSCs can be explained as arising from the development of a solid particle population with low number densities and large particle sizes. Assumed to be composed of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT, the sub-visible PSCs form at ambient temperatures well above the ice frost point, but also above the temperature at which supercooled ternary solution (STS grows out of the background supercooled binary solution (SBS distribution. The temperature regime of their formation, inferred from the simultaneous uptake of ambient HNO3 into NAT and their Lagrangian temperature histories, is at a depression of a few kelvin with respect to the NAT existence threshold, TNAT. Therefore, their nucleation requires a considerable supersaturation of HNO3 over NAT, and is consistent with a recently described heterogeneous nucleation process on solid foreign nuclei immersed in liquid aerosol. We make a detailed investigation of the comparative limits of detection of PSCs and the resulting sequestration of HNO3 imposed by lidar, mid-infrared, and microwave techniques. We find that the temperature history of air parcels, in addition to the local ambient temperature, is an important factor in the relative frequency of formation of liquid/solid PSCs. We conclude that the initiation of NAT nucleation and the subsequent development of large NAT particles capable of sedimentation and denitrification in the early winter do not emanate from an

  17. Interactions of Gas-Phase Nitric/Nitrous Acids and Primary Organic Aerosol in the Atmosphere of Houston, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Whitlow, S. I.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of aerosol and gas-phase pollutants were measured on the roof of an 18-story building during the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) from August 15 through September 28, 2006. Aerosol measurements included size-resolved, non-refractory mass concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and organic aerosol in submicron particles using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS). Particulate water-soluble organic carbon (PWSOC) was quantified using a mist chamber/total organic carbon analysis system. Concentration data for gas-phase pollutants included those for nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) collected using a mist chamber/ion chromatographic technique, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) collected using a chemiluminescent method, and carbon monoxide (CO) collected using an infrared gas correlation wheel instrument. Coincident increases in nitrate and organic aerosol mass concentrations were observed on many occasions throughout the measurement campaign, most frequently during the morning rush hour. Based on the lack of organic aerosol processing (defined by the ratio of m/z = 44/57 in the Q-AMS spectra), strong correlation with NOx and CO, and a lack of significant increase in PWSOC concentration, the spikes in organic aerosol were likely associated with primary organic aerosol (POA). During these events, gas-phase HNO3 concentration decreases were observed simultaneously with increases in gas-phase HONO concentrations. These data likely indicate uptake of HNO3 and subsequent heterogeneous conversion to HONO involving POA. Preliminary calculations show that HNO3 partitioning could account for the majority of the observed HONO and aerosol nitrate concentrations during these events. Q-AMS chloride and HCl data also indicate uptake of chloride by particles during these events. This phenomenon was also observed during the night, but these nocturnal events were less

  18. IMPROVEMENT UPON THE CARRIER PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONIUM IONS FROM NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, R.A.; Thompson, S.G.

    1958-12-23

    A process is reported for improving the removal of plutonlum by carrier precipitation by the addition of nitrite ions to a nitrlc acid solutlon of neutronirradiated unanium so as to destroy any hydrazine that may be present in the solution since the hydrazine tends to complex the tetravalent plutonium and prevents removal by the carrier precipltate, such as bismuth phospbate.

  19. Investigation of the direct and indirect electrochemical oxidation of hydrazine in nitric acid medium on platinum; Etude de l`oxydation electrochimique directe et indirecte de l`hydrazine en milieu acide nitrique sur platine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cames, B

    1997-12-31

    In nuclear fuel processing by the PUREX process, the purification of plutonium in nitric acid medium requires the oxidation of Pu(III) to Pu(IV), and of hydrazinium nitrate to nitrogen. The study helped to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the oxidation of hydrazinium nitrate and the reduction of nitric acid to nitrous acid, a compound which can chemically oxidize hydrazinium nitrate and Pu(III). Electro-analytical studies on polycrystalline platinum showed that hydrazine is oxidized in two potential zones, which depend on the surface texture of the platinum anode. Electrolysis in separate compartments, carried out in medium-acid media (2 and 4 mo/l) in the potential zone where these processes take place, showed that, at 0.9 V/ECS, the hydrazine oxidation reactions involved are: a four-electron process (75 %) with nitrogen formation and a one-electron process (25 %) with formation of nitrogen and ammonium ion. By contrast, electrolysis carried out at 0.65 V/ECS (with reactivation of the electrode at - 0.2 V/ECS to remove the poison from the platinum) allowed the selective oxidation of hydrazine to nitrogen by the four-electron reaction. Nitric acid can only be reduced to nitrous acid in the absence of hydrazine. For medium-acid media ({<=} 6 mol/l), this reaction takes place at potentials below - 0.2 V/ECS. However, the production rate of nitrous acid (partial order 0 with respect to nitric acid) is very low compared with the values obtained for strongly-acid media (6 to 10 mol/l) at the potential of - 0.1 V/ECS. Note that, in concentrated nitric medium, the selectivity of the reduction reaction is 47 to 85 % for nitrous acid, depending on the nitric acid concentration (6 to 10 mol/l) and the potential imposed (- 0.1 {<=} E {<=} 0.6 V/ECS). A kinetic study helped to determine the hydrazine oxidation rates as a function of the operating conditions. In all cases, the reaction rate is of partial order 0 with respect to hydrazine. These studies accordingly

  20. [Determination of nine hazardous elements in textiles by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer after microwave-assisted dilute nitric acid extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Xu, Dian-dou; Tang, Xiao-ping; Cao, Jing; Liu, Ya-ting; Deng, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Textiles are easily contaminated by heavy metals in the course of processing. In order to monitor the quality of textiles, a new method was developed for simultaneous determination of arsenic, antimony, lead, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, nickel and mercury in textiles by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after microwave-assisted dilute nitric acid extraction. After optimizing extraction conditions, we ultimately selected 5% nitric acid as extractant and 5 min as extraction time with the extraction temperature of 120 degrees C and instrument power of 400W in the microwave-assisted extraction procedure. Nine hazardous elements were detected sequentially by ICP-OES. The results showed that the detection limits were 0.3-15 microg x L(-1) and the recoveries 73.6%-105% with the RSDs (n = 3) of 0.1%-3%. The proposed method was successfully used to determine nine elements in cotton, wool, terylene and acrylic.

  1. Interactive effects of Salicylic acid and nitric oxide in alleviating zinc toxicity of Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdjoyan, Shahram; Kermanian, Hossein; Abolhasani Soorki, Ali; Modarres Tabatabaei, Sedigheh; Elyasi, Nazli

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the possible protective role of exogenous salicylic acid (SA), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a donor of nitric oxide, and their combination on 21-day-old safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) seedlings grown under zinc (Zn) stress. The results revealed that exposure to 500 µM ZnSO4.7H2O for 10 days markedly reduced the root and shoot dry weights in Zn-treated plants, while the application of SA, SNP and specially SA + SNP significantly increased the root and shoot dry weights in seedlings subjected to Zn stress. Addition of SA, SNP and SA + SNP interestingly reduced root-to-shoot translocation of zinc and increased significantly the level of glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (ASC) in leaves of Zn-stressed plants. The Zn-treated plants supplemented with SA and SNP revealed an improved activity of ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes and those enzymes which are involved in glyoxalase system as compared to the plants treated with Zn only. However, no significant relationship was found between SA or SNP supplementation and glutathione S-transferase activity in Zn-stressed plants. These findings demonstrate that exogenous application of SA or SNP could ameliorate the negative effects of Zn on safflower plants probably by stimulation of antioxidant defense and glyoxalase systems.

  2. Improvement of microwave-assisted digestion of milk powder with diluted nitric acid using oxygen as auxiliary reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizzi, Cezar A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Bioanalitica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Barin, Juliano S. [Departamento de Tecnologia e Ciencia dos Alimentos, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Garcia, Edivaldo E. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, 87100-900, Maringa, PR (Brazil); Nobrega, Joaquim A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Dressler, Valderi L. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Bioanalitica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Flores, Erico M.M., E-mail: ericommf@gmail.com [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Bioanalitica, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    The feasibility of using diluted HNO{sub 3} solutions under oxygen pressure for decomposition of whole and non-fat milk powders and whey powder samples has been evaluated. Digestion efficiency was evaluated by determining the carbon content in solution (digests) and the determination of Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Pb and Zn was performed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and Hg by chemical vapor generation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Samples (up to 500 mg) were digested using HNO{sub 3} solutions (1 to 14 mol L{sup -1}) and the effect of oxygen pressure was evaluated between 2.5 and 20 bar. It was possible to perform the digestion of 500 mg of milk powder using 2 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} with oxygen pressure ranging from 7.5 to 20 bar with resultant carbon content in digests lower than 1700 mg L{sup -1}. Using optimized conditions, less than 0.86 mL of concentrated nitric acid (14 mol L{sup -1}) was enough to digest 500 mg of sample. The accuracy was evaluated by determination of metal concentrations in certified reference materials, which presented an agreement better than 95% (Student's t test, P < 0.05) for all the analytes.

  3. Ozone, nitric acid, and ammonia air pollution is unhealthy for people and ecosystems in southern Sierra Nevada, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Ricardo; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Schweizer, Donald; Zhong, Sharon; Traina, Samuel; Bennett, Deborah H

    2010-10-01

    Two-week average concentrations of ozone (O3), nitric acid vapor (HNO3) and ammonia (NH3) were measured with passive samplers during the 2002 summer season across the central Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, along the San Joaquin River drainage. Elevated concentrations of the pollutants were determined with seasonal means for individual sites ranging between 62 and 88 ppb for O3, 1.0-3.8 microg m(-3) for HNO3, and 2.6-5.2 microg m(-3) for NH3. Calculated O3 exposure indices were very high, reaching SUM00-191 ppm h, SUM60-151 ppm h, and W126-124 ppm h. Calculated nitrogen (N) dry deposition ranged from 1.4 to 15 kg N ha(-1) for maximum values, and 0.4-8 kg N ha(-1) for minimum values; potentially exceeding Critical Loads (CL) for nutritional N. The U.S., California, and European 8 h O3 human health standards were exceeded during 104, 108, and 114 days respectively, indicating high risk to humans from ambient O3.

  4. Recovery of Nickel from Reformer Catalysts of Direct Reduction, Using the Pressurized Dissolving Method in Nitric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Abrar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the process of direct reduction of iron pellet and production of sponge iron, NiO/Al2O3 act as a catalyst for the generation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by vapor and natural gas. As an expensive material used in MIDREX method for steel units, this type of catalyst has major environmental problems after accumulation. The steel industry in Iran hopes to employ the MIDREX technique for the 80 percent of the 50 million tons of steel. Thus, the problem of spent catalysts will become a serious environmental challenge. Through the hydrometallurgy method, the present study investigates a possible solution to the problem of catalyst depot (due to heavy metals such as nickel via nickel recovery, which may increase the possibility of selling or re-using the precious and expensive metal. The present research studied the Nickel recovery from spent catalysts of NiO/Al2O¬3 used in reduction gas reliefs of the production of sponge iron unit. In this study, the parameters of temperature, concentration, time and Rpm were studied using pressurized dissolving method. 100% efficiency was achieved at 140 °C for 120 minutes, nitric acid concentration of 1.5 mm, Rpm of 600 and 40 s/l 40 grams per liter.

  5. Aminolevulinic acid and nitric oxide regulate oxidative defense and secondary metabolisms in canola (Brassica napus L.) under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Iqbal, Majid; Muhammad, Atta; Ashraf, Muhammad; Al-Qurainy, Fahad; Shafiq, Sidra

    2018-01-01

    To minimize the damaging effects of stresses, plant growth regulators (PGRs) are widely used to sustain the plant life under stress-prone environments. So, a study was carried out to evaluate the response of two canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars, Dunkeld and Cyclone, to foliar-applied two potential PGRs, nitric oxide (NO) and 5-aminolevulinic acid, under water deficit conditions. In this study, the levels of NO and ALA used were 0.02 and 0.895 mM, respectively. Plants of both canola cultivars were subjected to control (100% field capacity) and water deficit (60% field capacity). Drought stress significantly decreased growth, chlorophyll pigments, relative water contents (RWC), and soluble proteins, while it increased relative membrane permeability (RMP), proline, glycinebetaine (GB), malondialdehyde (MDA), total phenolics, and activities of catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) enzymes in both cultivars. Foliar application of PGRs improved growth, chlorophyll a, GB, total phenolics, CAT activity, and total soluble proteins, while it decreased RMP, MDA, and POD activity in both canola cultivars. Other physio-biochemical attributes such as chlorophyll b, RWC, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and proline contents as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity remained unaffected due to application of PGRs. So, the results of the present study suggest that exogenous application of NO and ALA could be useful to enhance the drought tolerance of canola plants by up-regulating the oxidative defense system, osmoprotectant accumulation, and minimizing the lipid peroxidation.

  6. Jacaric acid is rapidly metabolized to conjugated linoleic acid in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijima, Ryo; Honma, Taro; Ito, Junya; Yamasaki, Masao; Ikezaki, Aya; Motonaga, Chihiro; Nishiyama, Kazuo; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have shown previously that jacaric acid (JA; 8c,10t,12c-18:3), which has a conjugated triene system, has a strong anti-tumor effect. However, the characteristics of absorption and metabolism of JA have yet to be determined in vivo, and the details of absorption and metabolism of JA in the small intestine are particularly unclear. This information is required for effective use of JA in humans. Therefore, in this study we examined absorption and metabolism of JA using cannulation of the thoracic duct in rats. Emulsions of two test oils, jacaranda seed oil and tung oil, which contain JA and α-eleostearic acid (α-ESA; 9c,11t,13t-18:3), respectively, were administered to rats and lymph from the thoracic duct was collected over 24 h. We examined the rate of absorption of JA and possible conversion to a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)containing a conjugated diene system. The positional isomerism of the CLA produced by JA metabolism was determined using gas chromatography-electron impact/mass spectrometry. The rate of absorption and percentage conversion of JA were compared with those of α-ESA. We found that JA is rapidly absorbed and converted to a CLA in rats and that the percentage conversion of JA was lower than that of α-ESA. This is the first report on the absorption and metabolism of JA and this information may be important for application of JA as a functional food.

  7. Interaction of Polyamines, Abscisic Acid, Nitric Oxide, and Hydrogen Peroxide under Chilling Stress in Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Qiannan; Song, Yongjun; Shi, Dongmei; Qi, Hongyan

    2017-01-01

    Polyamines (PAs) play a vital role in the responses of higher plants to abiotic stresses. However, only a limited number of studies have examined the interplay between PAs and signal molecules. The aim of this study was to elucidate the cross-talk among PAs, abscisic acid (ABA), nitric oxide (NO), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under chilling stress conditions using tomato seedlings [(Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cv. Moneymaker]. The study showed that during chilling stress (4°C; 0, 12, and 24 h), the application of spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) elevated NO and H2O2 levels, enhanced nitrite reductase (NR), nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like, and polyamine oxidase activities, and upregulated LeNR relative expression, but did not influence LeNOS1 expression. In contrast, putrescine (Put) treatment had no obvious impact. During the recovery period (25/15°C, 10 h), the above-mentioned parameters induced by the application of PAs were restored to their control levels. Seedlings pretreated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) showed elevated Put and Spd levels throughout the treatment period, consistent with increased expression in leaves of genes encoding arginine decarboxylase (LeADC. LeADC1), ornithine decarboxylase (LeODC), and Spd synthase (LeSPDS) expressions in tomato leaves throughout the treatment period. Under chilling stress, the Put content increased first, followed by a rise in the Spd content. Exogenously applied SNP did not increase the expression of genes encoding S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (LeSAMDC) and Spm synthase (LeSPMS), consistent with the observation that Spm levels remained constant under chilling stress and during the recovery period. In contrast, exogenous Put significantly increased the ABA content and the 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (LeNCED1) transcript level. Treatment with ABA could alleviate the electrolyte leakage (EL) induced by D-Arg (an inhibitor of Put). Taken together, it is concluded that, under chilling

  8. Nitro-fatty acids in plant signaling: New key mediators of nitric oxide metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capilla Mata-Pérez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in animal systems have shown that NO can interact with fatty acids to generate nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs. They are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species and unsaturated fatty acids, and are considered novel mediators of cell signaling based mainly on a proven anti-inflammatory response. Although these signaling mediators have been described widely in animal systems, NO2-FAs have scarcely been studied in plants. Preliminary data have revealed the endogenous presence of free and protein-adducted NO2-FAs in extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO, which appear to be contributing to the cardiovascular benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet. Importantly, new findings have displayed the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant's development. Furthermore, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant-defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing the chaperone network and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Thus, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions, highlighting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the plant-protection mechanism. Finally, the potential of NO2-Ln as a NO donor has recently been described both in vitro and in vivo. Jointly, this ability gives NO2-Ln the potential to act as a signaling molecule by the direct release of NO, due to its capacity to induce different changes mediated by NO or NO-related molecules such as nitration and S-nitrosylation, or by the electrophilic capacity of these molecules through a nitroalkylation mechanism. Here, we describe the current state of the art regarding the advances performed in the field of NO2-FAs in plants and their

  9. Biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres loaded with S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D-penicillamine for controlled nitric oxide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautner, Gergely; Meyerhoff, Mark E; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2016-03-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a fascinating and important endogenous free-radical gas with potent antimicrobial, vasodilating, smooth muscle relaxant, and growth factor stimulating effects. However, its wider biomedical applicability is hindered by its cumbersome administration, since NO is unstable especially in biological environments. In this work, to ultimately develop site-specific controlled release vehicles for NO, the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D-penicillamine (SNAP) was encapsulated within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) 50:50 (PLGA) microspheres by using a solid-in-oil-in-water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The highest payload was 0.56(±0.01) μmol SNAP/mg microspheres. The in vitro release kinetics of the donor were controlled by the bioerosion of the PLGA microspheres. By using an uncapped PLGA (Mw=24,000-38,000) SNAP was slowly released for over 10days, whereas by using the ester capped PLGA (Mw=38,000-54,000) the release lasted for over 4weeks. The presence of copper ions and/or ascorbate in solution was necessary to efficiently decompose the released NO donor and obtain sustained NO release. It was also demonstrated that light can be used to induce rapid NO release from the microspheres over several hours. SNAP exhibited excellent storage stability when encapsulated in the PLGA microspheres. These new microsphere formulations may be useful for site-specific administration and treatment of pathologies associated with dysfunction in endogenous NO production, e.g. treatment of diabetic wounds, or in diseases involving other biological functions of NO including vasodilation, antimicrobial, anticancer, and neurotransmission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Study of immiscibilities in the trilaurylamine - dodecane - nitric acid - plutonium system; Etude des immiscibilites dans le systeme trilaurylamine - dodecane - acide nitrique - plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saey, J.C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    Phase equilibrium in systems made up of trilaurylamine, dodecane, nitric acid tetravalent plutonium is shown by drawing the triangular diagrams. the study of these diagrams provides informations concerning the causes of immiscibility. Heterogeneity of the organic mixtures can be related to some characteristics of the components- dipole moment, molecular polarizability and hydrogen bond exchanging ability-Depending on these, some rules may be established which can be used to make a proper choice of an additive in order to improve the miscibility. As an application a study on the partial substitution of dodecane with decalin, in plutonium extraction experiments, has been done showing a possible improvement of the extraction process. (author) [French] L equilibre des phases dans les systemes formes a partir de trilaurylamine, de dodecane, d'acide nitrique et de plutonium tetravalent est represente en tracant les diagrammes triangulaires. L'examen de ces diagrammes permet d'apporter certaines precisions en ce qui concerne l'origine des immiscibilites. Celles ci sont ensuite reliees a certaines caracteristiques des constituants: le moment dipolaire, la polarisabilite moleculaire et la tendance a former des liaisons hydrogene. Sur les memes bases, il est possible d'etablir un certain nombre de regles pouvant servir a guider le choix d'un additif ameliorant la miscibilite. En application, une etude sur le remplacement partiel du dodecane par la decaline montre l'interet de l'emploi de ce compose dans le procede de purification du plutonium. (auteur)

  11. Development of novel process for Ru CMP using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN)-containing nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woo-Jin; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2004-04-30

    In the present study, electrochemical and surface analytical techniques were employed to study the mechanism of chemical mechanical planarisation (CMP) process for highly inert noble ruthenium (Ru) film in ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) additives-containing acidic slurry. The steady-state polarisation curves with surface abrasion exhibited increment in the corrosion potential and cathodic current, suggesting that the partially exposed bare Ru acts as a cathodic site for CAN reduction on Ru{sub 2}O{sub 3}-covered Ru film as validated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Based upon the combined results of open-circuit potential (OCP) and anodic current transients, with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we may assert that the mechanical removal of Ru{sub 2}O{sub 3} enhances the local formation rate of RuO{sub 2} or RuO{sub 4} film, resulting in a loss of Ru by successive galvanic corrosion at the anodic sites. Using CAN-containing acidic slurry, Ru CMP process for manufacturing a bottom electrode for capacitors in DRAM device was satisfactorily accomplished as validated by SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM)

  12. Liquid-liquid extraction of palladium(II) from nitric acid by bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulphoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, J.P. (Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Bombay 400085 (India)); Singh, R.K.; Sawant, S.R.; Varadarajan, N. (Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Bombay 400085 (India))

    1993-04-15

    The extraction of palladium(II) nitrate by bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulphoxide (BESO) was evaluated over a wide range of acidity, and BESO was shown to have a strong extraction ability toward this thiophilic 'soft' metal. Essentially quantitative extraction of trace and macro amounts of palladium is easily accomplished from about 8 M HNO 8 M HNO[sub 3] down to pH 2 solutions by 0.2 M BESO into toluene. Optimum conditions such as aqueous phase acidity, solvent, period of equilibration, aqueous to organic phase ratios, reagent concentration and strippant were established for the selective and reversible extraction and separation of palladium. Slope analyses applied to Pd(II) distribution experiments from nitrate solutions showed a predominant formation of the solvated organic phase complex Pd(NO[sub 3])[sub 2].2BESO. Recovery of the extractant from loaded palladium is easily accomplished by using sodium thiosulphate or a mixture of 2 M sodium carbonate+0.5 M ammonia solution. The extracted complex was characterized by elemental analysis and IR and UV-visible spectrometry, and its composition was confirmed to be Pd(NO[sub 3])[sub 2].2BESO

  13. Reconsideration of the rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.S.; Talukdar, R.K.; Ravishankara, A.R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.]|[Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1999-04-22

    The authors report rate coefficients for the reaction of OH with HNO{sub 3}, k{sub 1}, between 10 and 500 Torr of He, SF{sub 6}, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} and at 10 different temperatures between 200 and 375 K. They generated OH via pulsed photolysis of HNO{sub 3} and monitored the [OH] temporal profile via pulsed laser induced fluorescence. Below 300 K the value of k{sub 1} increases rapidly with decreasing temperature and depends on pressure. The pressure dependence of k{sub 1} at low temperature is significantly larger than that obtained by extrapolation of the currently available data. The pressure and temperature dependence is most likely due to a competition between direct abstraction and reactive complex formation. A rate constant expression derived from such a mechanism gives a global fit for k{sub 1} that is applicable to atmospheric conditions. The new rate constant alters the calculated NO{sub 2} to HNO{sub 3} ratio in the lower stratosphere.

  14. Laboratory Measurement of the Gas-Phase Rate Constant for Formation of Nitric Acid from the Reaction of OH and NO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollner, A. K.; Feng, L.; Sprague, M. K.; Okumura, M.; Vallavudasan, S.; Sander, S. P.; Martien, P. T.; Harley, R. A.; McCoy, A. B.

    2007-12-01

    The rate constant for the reaction OH + NO2 + M → HONO2 + M is among the most influential parameters affecting air pollution levels. There remains significant uncertainty about this rate, due to lack of laboratory data at 1 atm and to the unknown yield of a secondary channel forming peroxynitrous acid (HOONO). New experimental measurements of both the kinetics and HOONO/HONO2 branching ratios at 760 Torr are presented. The results are compared with current recommendations; when incorporated in models, the new parameters lead to significantly higher modeled ozone levels and reduced formation of nitric acid.

  15. Impact of sulfuric and nitric acids on carbonate dissolution, and the associated deficit of CO2 uptake in the upper-middle reaches of the Wujiang River, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi-bo; Qin, Xiao-qun; Liu, Peng-yu; Zhang, Lian-kai; Su, Chun-tian

    2017-08-01

    Carbonate weathering and the CO2 consumption in karstic area are extensive affected by anthropogenic activities, especially sulfuric and nitric acids usage in the upper-middle reaches of Wujiang River, China. The carbonic acid would be substituted by protons from sulfuric and nitric acids which can be reduce CO2 absorption. Therefore, The goal of this study was to highlight the impacts of sulfuric and nitric acids on carbonate dissolution and the associated deficit of CO2 uptaking during carbonate weathering. The hydrochemistries and carbon isotopic signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon from groundwater were measured during the rainy season (July; 41 samples) and post-rainy season (October; 26 samples). Our results show that Ca2 + and Mg2 + were the dominant cations (55.87-98.52%), and HCO3- was the dominant anion (63.63-92.87%). The combined concentrations of Ca2 + and Mg2 + commonly exceeded the equivalent concentration of HCO3-, with calculated [Ca2 + + Mg2 +]/[HCO3-] equivalent ratios of 1.09-2.12. The mean measured groundwater δ13CDIC value (- 11.38‰) was higher than that expected for carbonate dissolution mediated solely by carbonic acid (- 11.5‰), and the strong positive correlation of these values with [SO42 - + NO3-]/HCO3- showed that additional SO42 - and NO3- were required to compensate for this cation excess. Nitric and sulfuric acids are, therefore, suggested to have acted as the additional proton-promoted weathering agents of carbonate in the region, alongside carbonic acid. The mean contribution of atmospheric/pedospheric CO2 to the total aquatic HCO3- decreased by 15.67% (rainy season) and 14.17% (post-rainy season) due to the contributions made by these acids. The annual mean deficit of soil CO2 uptake by carbonate weathering across the study area was 14.92%, which suggests that previous workers may have overestimated the absorption of CO2 by carbonate weathering in other karstic areas worldwide.

  16. Acidification with nitric acid improves chemical characteristics and reduces phytotoxicity of alkaline chars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornes, Fernando; Belda, Rosa Maria

    2017-04-15

    Charred organic matter is recently receiving attention for its potential use as soilless growth medium. However, depending on its origin and on the manufacturing technology, it can result toxic for plants. This fact implies that a detoxifying treatment ought to be devised in order to reclaim char in this way. We have studied three materials which combine these factors: two pyrolyzed biochars, one from forest waste (BCH-FW) and another from olive mill waste (BCH-OMW), and one hydrothermally carbonized hydrochar from forest waste (HYD-FW). These materials are suspicious of phytotoxicity due to their high pH, high salinity, or presence of organic toxics. For these new materials, it is mandatory to select fast and reliable bioassays to predict their potential phytotoxicity. In order to achieve this goal water extracts of the three chars were subjected to bioassays of seed germination and bioassays of seedling growth in hydroponic conditions. The biochar from olive mill waste and the hydrochar, but not the biochar from forest waste, showed considerable phytotoxicity as seed germination and plant growth were negatively affected (e.g. BCH-OMW reduced seed germination by 80% and caused early seedling death). In order to adjust pH and electrical conductivity for plant growth, treatments of acidification and salt leaching with optimal diluted HNO 3 solutions (0.3 N, 0.2 N, and 0.75 N for BCH-OMW, BCH-FW, and HYD-FW, respectively) as calculated from titration curves, were conducted. The acid treatment reduced electrical conductivity in BCH-OMW (from 9.2 to 4.5 dS m -1 ), pH (maximum in BCH-FW from 9.6 to 6.2) and water soluble carbonaceous compounds (maximum in HYD-FW from 5969 to 2145 mg kg -1 ) in the three chars, and increased N content (maximum in BCH-OMW from 50 to 6342 mg kg -1 ) in the three chars. Bioassays on acid-treated chars demonstrated the absence of phytotoxicity and even stimulation of seedling growth over the control (increase of 86% and 56% for BCH

  17. Nitric acid oxidation of Si to form ultrathin silicon dioxide layers with a low leakage current density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi Asuha, Hikaru; Maida, Osamu; Takahashi, Masao; Iwasa, Hitoo

    2003-12-01

    Ultrathin silicon dioxide (SiO2) layers with excellent electrical characteristics can be formed using the nitric acid oxidation of Si (NAOS) method, i.e., by immersion of Si in nitric acid (HNO3) solutions. The SiO2 layer formed with 61 wt % HNO3 at its boiling temperature of 113 °C has a 1.3 nm thickness with a considerably high density leakage current. When the SiO2 layer is formed in 68 wt % HNO3 (i.e., azeotropic mixture with water), on the other hand, the leakage current density (e.g., 1.5 A/cm2 at the forward gate bias, VG, of 1 V) becomes as low as that of thermally grown SiO2 layers, in spite of the nearly identical SiO2 thickness of 1.4 nm. Due to the relatively low leakage current density of the NAOS oxide layer, capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves can be measured in spite of the ultrathin oxide thickness. However, a hump is present in the C-V curve, indicating the presence of high-density interface states. Fourier transformed infrared absorption measurements show that the atomic density of the SiO2 layers increases by 7% with an increase in the HNO3 concentration from 61 to 68 wt %. Measurements of valence band spectra clarify that this concentration increase causes the enhancement of the valence band discontinuity at the Si/SiO2 interface from 4.1 to 4.3 eV. When postmetallization annealing (PMA) treatment is performed at 400 °C in hydrogen on chemical SiO2/Si(100)> metal-oxide-semiconductor diodes, the leakage current density markedly increases, and this increase is attributed to a reaction between the Al electrode and the chemical SiO2 layer, resulting in a decrease in the SiO2 thickness. With PMA at 200 °C in hydrogen, on the other hand, the SiO2 thickness decreases only slightly to 1.3 nm. In this case, the leakage current density greatly decreases (e.g., 0.4 A/cm2 at VG=1 V and 5×10-3 A/cm2 at VG=-1 V), and consequently it becomes 1/3-1/10 of those for thermally grown SiO2 layers with the same thickness. The hump in the C-V curves disappears after

  18. The electrochemical oxidation of organic waste and activated graphite by Ag{sup 2+} in nitric acid: a literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Alsenoy, V.; Rahier, A.

    1996-08-01

    Organic wastes and activated moderator graphite can be processed by means of combustion, but the incineration of organic waste poses emission problems. The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has experience with the treatment of organic wastes. Moreover, the treatment of radioactive graphite will be required since the BR-1 reactor is moderated with 492 tons of graphite. The strong oxidising properties of Ag{sup 2+} are already used in the chemical and nuclear industry to destroy organic waste. We aim to apply the process on radioactive graphite, organic resins and effluents. The reaction mechanisms will be studied, taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the different reactions involved. As a first step, this document gives a literature study of the electrochemical oxidation using Ag{sup 2+}. This document presents a thorough literature study, and shows that the oxidative properties of the Ag{sup 2+} ion, which can easily be formed in nitric acid by means of electrolysis, make it an ideal candidate to oxidize organic molecules into carbon dioxide and water on a perfectly well controlled manner. The process has already been used to destroy explosives and toxic organic waste in the nuclear and chemical industry. Chemical, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of some of the reactions involved are already known and described, other reaction mechanisms are still unknown. On the basis of the information collected so far, the Research and Development group of the Radioactive Waste and Cleanup unit has proposed to start a research programme to define, test, demonstrate and finally apply a safe process for the treatment of radioactive organic material and graphite by electrochemical oxidation using Ag{sup 2+}. Available data confirm that the oxidation of organic material can be carried out safely, leading to the formation of water and carbon dioxide.

  19. Gibberellic acid alleviates cadmium toxicity by reducing nitric oxide accumulation and expression of IRT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiao Fang [State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Jiang, Tao [Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology for Endangered Wildlife of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wang, Zhi Wei [State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Lei, Gui Jie [Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology for Endangered Wildlife of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Shi, Yuan Zhi [The Key Laboratory of Tea Chemical Engineering, Ministry of Agriculture, Yunqi Road 1, Hangzhou 310008 (China); Li, Gui Xin, E-mail: guixinli@zju.edu.cn [College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zheng, Shao Jian [State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology for Endangered Wildlife of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd reduces endogenous GA levels in Arabidopsis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GA exogenous applied decreases Cd accumulation in plant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GA suppresses the Cd-induced accumulation of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased NO level downregulates the expression of IRT1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppressed IRT1 expression reduces Cd transport across plasma membrane. - Abstract: Gibberellic acid (GA) is involved in not only plant growth and development but also plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here it was found that treating the plants with GA concentrations from 0.1 to 5 {mu}M for 24 h had no obvious effect on root elongation in the absence of cadmium (Cd), whereas in the presence of Cd{sup 2+}, GA at 5 {mu}M improved root growth, reduced Cd content and lipid peroxidation in the roots, indicating that GA can partially alleviate Cd toxicity. Cd{sup 2+} increased nitric oxide (NO) accumulation in the roots, but GA remarkably reduced it, and suppressed the up-regulation of the expression of IRT1. In contrary, the beneficial effect of GA on alleviating Cd toxicity was not observed in an IRT1 knock-out mutant irt1, suggesting the involvement of IRT1 in Cd{sup 2+} absorption. Furthermore, the GA-induced reduction of NO and Cd content can also be partially reversed by the application of a NO donor (S-nitrosoglutathione [GSNO]). Taken all these together, the results showed that GA-alleviated Cd toxicity is mediated through the reduction of the Cd-dependent NO accumulation and expression of Cd{sup 2+} uptake related gene-IRT1 in Arabidopsis.

  20. A simple and rapid nucleic acid preparation method for reverse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-03-29

    Mar 29, 2010 ... Key words: Nucleic acid preparation, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, dormant tubers, potato leafroll virus, potato virus S. INTRODUCTION. The vegetative propagation of potato (Solano tuberous. L.) presents ample opportunity for .... were amplified in 35 cycles. Annealing temperature was ...

  1. Rapidly directional biotransformation of tauroursodeoxycholic acid through engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie; Wang, Jie; Yu, Lu; Yang, Li; Zhao, Shujuan; Wang, Zhengtao

    2017-07-01

    Bear bile powder is a precious medicinal material. It is characterized by high content of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) at a ratio of 1.0-1.5 to taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA). Here, we reported the biotransformation of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) through Escherichia coli engineered with a two-step mimic biosynthetic pathway of TUDCA from taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA). Two 7α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (7α-HSDH) and two 7β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (7β-HSDH) genes (named as α 1 , α 2 , β 1 , and β 2 ) were selected and synthesized to create four pathway variants using ePathBrick. All could convert TCDCA to TUDCA and the one harboring α 1 and β 2 (pα 1 β 2 ) showed the strongest capability. Utilizing the oxidative and reductive properties of 7α- and 7β-HSDH, an ideal balance between TUDCA and TCDCA was established by optimizing the fermentation conditions. By applying the optimal condition, E. coli containing pα 1 β 2 (BL-pα 1 β 2 ) produced up to 1.61 ± 0.13 g/L of TUDCA from 3.23 g/L of TCDCA at a ratio of 1.3 to TCDCA. This study provides a potential approach for bear bile substitute production from cheap and readily available chicken bile.

  2. Influence of gas-particle partitioning on ammonia and nitric acid fluxes above a deciduous forest in the Midwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K.; Sørensen, L. L.; Hornsby, K. E.; Boegh, E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the atmosphere-biosphere exchange of reactive nitrogen gasses (including ammonia (NH3) and nitric acid (HNO3)) is crucial to assessing the impact of anthropogenic activities on natural and semi-natural ecosystems. However, measuring the deposition of reactive nitrogen is challenging due to bi-directionality of the flux, and the dynamics of the chemical gas/aerosol equilibrium of NH3 and HNO3 (or other atmospheric acids) with aerosol-phase ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). NH3 and HNO3 are both very reactive and typically exhibit higher deposition velocities than aerosol NH4+. Therefore, the phase partitioning between gas and aerosol phases can have a significant effect on local budgets and atmospheric transport distances (Nemitz et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2004). In this study, fluxes of NH3, HNO3 and carbon dioxide (CO2) along with size-resolved N-aerosol concentrations are measured above the deciduous forest, Morgan Monroe State Forest (MMSF) in south-central Indiana (39°53'N, 86°25'W) during a field campaign. Two relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) systems are used to measure fluxes and concentrations of NH3 and HNO3 at 44 m. The NH3 REA system operates based on wet effluent diffusion denuders with detection by florescence and half-hourly flux measurements are calculated. HNO3 REA system is based on gas capture on sodium chloride (NaCl) coated denuders with subsequent analysis by ion-chromatography, and the resulting fluxes have a resolution of 3-4 hours. CO2 fluxes are measured by eddy covariance using a closed-path Licor LI-7500, while two MSP MOUDI-110 impactors are used to measure the 24-hourly average inorganic and 48 hourly averaged organic ion concentrations in 11 size bins, respectively, just above the canopy level (28 m). The results of this field campaign are used to quantify the fluxes of NH3, HNO3, CO2 to/from the forest during the transition towards senescence, and to investigate process-level controls (e.g. the role of phase

  3. [Nitric oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide and Nitric Oxide are Involved in Salicylic Acid-Induced Salvianolic Acid B Production in Salvia miltiorrhiza Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Guo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO are key signaling molecules in cells whose levels are increased in response to various stimuli and are involved in plant secondary metabolite synthesis. In this paper, the roles of H2O2 and NO on salvianolic acid B (Sal B production in salicylic acid (SA-induced Salvia miltiorrhiza cell cultures were investigated. The results showed that H2O2 could be significantly elicited by SA, even though IMD (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase or DMTU (a quencher of H2O2 were employed to inhibit or quench intracellular H2O2. These elicited H2O2 levels significantly increased NO production by 1.6- and 1.46 fold in IMD+SA and DMTU+SA treatments, respectively, and induced 4.58- and 4.85-fold Sal B accumulation, respectively. NO was also markedly elicited by SA, in which L-NNA (an inhibitor of NO synthase and cPTIO (a quencher of NO were used to inhibit or quench NO within cells, and the induced NO could significantly enhance H2O2 production by 1.92- and 1.37-fold in L-NNA+SA and cPTIO+SA treatments, respectively, and 3.27- and 1.50-fold for Sal B accumulation, respectively. These results indicate that elicitation of SA for either H2O2 or NO was independent, and the elicited H2O2 or NO could act independently or synergistically to induce Sal B accumulation in SA-elicited cells.

  5. Nitric oxide in the rat vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, A; Blythe, W R; Zdanski, C J; Prazma, J; Pillsbury, H C

    1994-10-01

    Nitric oxide is known to function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. It is also known to be involved in the central nervous system excitatory amino acid neurotransmission cascade. Activation of excitatory amino acid receptors causes an influx of calcium, which activates nitric oxide synthase. The resulting increase in intracellular nitric oxide activates soluble guanylate cyclase, leading to a rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate are found in the vestibular system and have been postulated to function as vestibular system neurotransmitters. Although nitric oxide has been investigated as a neurotransmitter in other tissues, no published studies have examined the role of nitric oxide in the vestibular system. Neuronal NADPH-diaphorase has been characterized as a nitric oxide synthase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, producing nitric oxide during the reaction. We used a histochemical stain characterized by Hope et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci 1991;88:2811) as specific for neuronal nitric oxide synthase to localize the enzyme in the rat vestibular system. An immunocytochemical stain was used to examine rat inner ear tissue for the presence of the enzyme's end product, L-citrulline, thereby demonstrating nitric oxide synthase activity. Staining of vestibular ganglion sections showed nitric oxide synthase presence and activity in ganglion cells and nerve fibers. These results indicate the presence of active nitric oxide synthase in these tissues and suggest modulation of vestibular neurotransmission by nitric oxide.

  6. Rapid genotyping using pyrene-perylene locked nucleic acid complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Santhosh T.; Myznikova, Anna; Samokhina, Evgeniya

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an assay for single strand DNA and RNA detection which is based on novel pyrene-perylene FRET pairs attached to short LNA/DNA probes. The assay is based on ratiometric emission upon binding of target DNA/RNA by three combinations of fluorescent LNA/DNA reporter strands. Specific...... is achieved with advantages of large Stokes shift (115 nm), high fluorescence quantum yields and low limit of target detection values (... geometry of the pyrene fluorophore attached to the 2'-amino group of 2'-amino-LNA in position 4 allows for the first time to efficiently utilize dipole-dipole orientation parameter for sensing of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nucleic acid targets by FRET. Using novel probes, SNP detection...

  7. Nitric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertilizers Substances used to clean metals (such as gun barrels) Note: This list may not be all ... mouth (intubation), and breathing machine (ventilator) Blood and urine tests Camera down the throat (endoscopy) to see ...

  8. Network analysis and percolation transition in hydrogen bonded clusters: nitric acid and water extracted by tributyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servis, Michael J; Wu, David T; Braley, Jenifer C

    2017-05-10

    Extraction of polar molecules by amphiphilic species results in a complex variety of clusters whose topologies and energetics control phase behavior and efficiency of liquid-liquid separations. A computational approach including quantum mechanical vibrational frequency calculations and molecular dynamics simulation with intermolecular network theory is used to provide a robust assessment of extractant and polar solute association through hydrogen bonding in the tributyl phosphate (TBP)/HNO3/H2O/dodecane system for the first time. The distribution of local topologies of the TBP/HNO3/H2O hydrogen bonded clusters is shown to be consistent with an equilibrium binding model. Mixed TBP/HNO3/H2O clusters are predicted that have not been previously observable in experiment due to limitations in scattering and spectroscopic resolution. Vibrational frequency calculations are compared with experimental data to validate the experimentally observed TBP-HNO3-HNO3 Chain structure. At high nitric acid and water loading, large hydrogen-bonded clusters of 20 to 80 polar solutes formed. The cluster sizes were found to be exponentially distributed, consistent with a constant average solute association free energy in that size range. Due to the deficit of hydrogen bond donors in the predominantly TBP/HNO3 organic phase, increased water concentrations lower the association free energy and enable growth of larger cluster sizes. For sufficiently high water concentrations, changes in the cluster size distribution are found to be consistent with the formation of a percolating cluster rather than reverse micelles, as has been commonly assumed for the occurrence of an extractant-rich third phase in metal-free solvent extraction systems. Moreover, the compositions of the large clusters leading to percolation agrees with the 1 : 3 TBP : HNO3 ratio reported in the experimental literature for TBP/HNO3/H2O third phases. More generally, the network analysis of cluster formation from atomic

  9. Densification of ∼5 nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layers by nitric acid oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jaeyoung [Department of Energy Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan 311-16 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Soyeong [Institute for Advanced Engineering (IAE), Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Youngin 449-863 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae Joo [Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Byoung, E-mail: woo7838@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Energy Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan 311-16 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Leakage current density of the commercial PECVD grown ∼5 nm SiO{sub 2} layer has been decreased about three orders of magnitude by densification. • The densification of SiO{sub 2} layer is achieved by high oxidation ability of O·. • Densities of suboxide, fixed charge (N{sub f}) and defect state (N{sub d}) in SiO{sub 2}/Si interface are decreased by NAOS and PMA. • Tunneling barrier height (Φ{sub t}) is increased because of the increase of atomic density in SiO{sub 2} layer. - Abstract: Low-temperature nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) oxidation of Si (NAOS) has been used to improve the interface and electrical properties of ∼5 nm-thick SiO{sub 2}/Si layers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Investigations of the physical properties and electrical characteristics of these thin films revealed that although their thickness is not changed by NAOS, the leakage current density at a gate bias voltage of −1 V decreases by about two orders of magnitude from 1.868 × 10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2}. This leakage current density was further reduced by post-metallization annealing (PMA) at 250 °C for 10 min in a 5 vol.% hydrogen atmosphere, eventually reaching a level (5.2 × 10{sup −8} A/cm{sup 2}) approximately three orders of magnitude less than the as-grown SiO{sub 2} layer. This improvement is attributed to a decrease in the concentration of suboxide species (Si{sup 1+}, Si{sup 2+} and Si{sup 3+}) in the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, as well as a decrease in the equilibrium density of defect sites (N{sub d}) and fixed charge density (N{sub f}). The barrier height (Φ{sub t}) generated by a Poole-Frenkel mechanism also increased from 0.205 to 0.371 eV after NAOS and PMA. The decrease in leakage current density is therefore attributed to a densification of the SiO{sub 2} layer in combination with the removal of OH species and increase in interfacial properties at the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface.

  10. Fatty acid metabolites in rapidly proliferating breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T O'Flaherty

    Full Text Available Breast cancers that over-express a lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase are associated with poor survival possibly because they overproduce metabolites that alter the cancer's malignant behaviors. However, these metabolites and behaviors have not been identified. We here identify which metabolites among those that stimulate breast cancer cell proliferation in vitro are associated with rapidly proliferating breast cancer.We used selective ion monitoring-mass spectrometry to quantify in the cancer and normal breast tissue of 27 patients metabolites that stimulate (15-, 12-, 5-hydroxy-, and 5-oxo-eicosatetraenoate, 13-hydroxy-octadecaenoate [HODE] or inhibit (prostaglandin [PG]E2 and D2 breast cancer cell proliferation. We then related their levels to each cancer's proliferation rate as defined by its Mib1 score.13-HODE was the only metabolite strongly, significantly, and positively associated with Mib1 scores. It was similarly associated with aggressive grade and a key component of grade, mitosis, and also trended to be associated with lymph node metastasis. PGE2 and PGD2 trended to be negatively associated with these markers. No other metabolite in cancer and no metabolite in normal tissue had this profile of associations.Our data fit a model wherein the overproduction of 13-HODE by 15-lipoxygenase-1 shortens breast cancer survival by stimulating its cells to proliferate and possibly metastasize; no other oxygenase-metabolite pathway, including cyclooxygenase-PGE2/D2 pathways, uses this specific mechanism to shorten survival.

  11. Copper(II Extraction from Nitric Acid Solution with 1-Phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone as a Cation Carrier by Liquid Membrane Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baharuddin Hamzah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper(II extraction from nitric acid solution with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoil-5-pyrazolone (HPMBP as a cation carrier by liquid membrane emulsion (LME was investigated. The HPMBP initially was synthesized and the synthesis yield is a yellow crystal with melting point of 87-89 °C. The synthesis efficiency is 72.04% and generally the spectra of IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR agree with HPMBP structure. The optimum condition for copper(II extraction were found as follows: concentration of mixed surfactant (span 80+span 20 was 3%, volume ratio of membrane and internal phase was 1, concentration of HPMBP was 0.020 M, concentration of HCl was 1 M, volume ratio of emulsion and external phase was 0.143. By using these optimum conditions, 30 mL of LME can extract 1000 ppm of copper(II within 210 mL of nitric acid solution with extraction percentage of 97.97%.

  12. Comparison of MP AES and ICP-MS for analysis of principal and selected trace elements in nitric acid digests of sunflower (Helianthus annuus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Stefan; Sjöberg, Viktor; Ogar, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The use of nitrogen as plasma gas for microwave plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (MP AES) is an interesting development in analytical science since the running cost can be significantly reduced in comparison to the inductively coupled argon plasma. Here, we evaluate the performance of the Agilent 4100 MP AES instrument for the analysis of principal metals (Ca, K, Mg, and Na), lithogenic metals (Al, Fe, and Mn) and selected trace metals (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn) in nitric acid plant digests. The digests were prepared by microwave-assisted dissolution of dry plant material from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) in concentrated nitric acid. Comparisons are made with analysis of the same solutions with ICP-MS (Agilent 7500cx) using the octopole reaction system (ORS) in the collision mode for As, Fe, and V. The limits of detection were usually in the low µg L(-1) range and all principal and lithogenic metals were successfully determined with the MP AES and provided almost identical results with the ICP-MS. The same applies for the selected trace metals except for As, Co and Mo where the concentrations were below the detection limit with the MP AES. For successful analysis we recommend that (i) only atom lines are used, (ii) ionization is minimized (e.g. addition of CsNO3) and (iii) the use of internal standards should be considered to resolve spectral interferences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Improved performance of membrane free single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells with nitric acid and ethylenediamine surface modified activated carbon fiber felt anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Nengwu; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Pingxiao; Li, Ping; Wu, Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    Surface modifications of anode materials are important for enhancing power generation of microbial fuel cell (MFC). Membrane free single-chamber air-cathode MFCs, MFC-A and MFC-N, were constructed using activated carbon fiber felt (ACF) anodes treated by nitric acid and ethylenediamine (EDA), respectively. Experimental results showed that the start-up time to achieve the maximum voltages for the MFC-A and MFC-N was shortened by 45% and 51%, respectively as compared to that for MFC-AT equipped with an unmodified anode. Moreover, the power output of MFCs with modified anodes was significantly improved. In comparison with MFC-AT which had a maximum power density of 1304 mW/m(2), the MFC-N achieved a maximum power density of 1641 mW/m(2). The nitric acid-treated anode in MFC-A increased the power density by 58% reaching 2066 mW/m(2). XPS analysis of the treated and untreated anode materials indicated that the power enhancement was attributable to the changes of surface functional groups. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nitric oxide-induced hyperpermeability of human intestinal epithelial monolayers is augmented by inhibition of the amiloride-sensitive Na(+)-H+ antiport: potential role of peroxynitrous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, N; Menconi, M J; Fink, M P

    1997-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO.) increases the permeability of cultured intestinal epithelial monolayers. NO. reacts with superoxide anion to form peroxynitrite anion, which can be protonated under mildly acidic conditions to form the potent and versatile oxidizing agent, peroxynitrous acid. We hypothesized that intracellular acidosis induced by the Na(+)-H+ antiport blocker, amiloride, would favor the formation of peroxynitrous acid and thereby augment hyperpermeability induced by the NO. donor, SIN-1. Caco-2BBe human intestinal epithelial monolayers were grown on permeable supports in bicameral chambers. The permeability of monolayers was assessed by measuring the transepithelial flux of fluorescein disulfonic acid (FS). Incubation of monolayers with SIN-1 increased permeability to FS. Adding amiloride augmented SIN-1-induced hyperpermeability. SIN-1 plus amiloride also decreased cellular adenosine triphosphate content and caused derangements of the actin-based cytoskeleton as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. Coincubation of monolayers with several free-radical or peroxynitrous acid scavengers (deferoxamine, mannitol, dimethyl sulfoxide, or ascorbate) ameliorated hyperpermeability induced by SIN-1 plus amiloride. Amiloride augments NO.-induced intestinal epithelial permeability, apparently by promoting the development of intracellular acidosis and thereby favoring the formation of the peroxynitrous acid.

  15. Rapid flip-flop of oleic acid across the plasma membrane of adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Frits; Guo, Wen; Souto, Ricardo; Pilch, Paul F; Corkey, Barbara E; Hamilton, James A

    2003-03-07

    Nonesterified long-chain fatty acids may enter cells by free diffusion or by membrane protein transporters. A requirement for proteins to transport fatty acids across the plasma membrane would imply low partitioning of fatty acids into the membrane lipids, and/or a slower rate of diffusion (flip-flop) through the lipid domains compared to the rates of intracellular metabolism of fatty acids. We used both vesicles of the plasma membrane of adipocytes and intact adipocytes to study transmembrane fluxes of externally added oleic acid at concentrations below its solubility limit at pH 7.4. Binding of oleic acid to the plasma membrane was determined by measuring the fluorescent fatty acid-binding protein ADIFAB added to the external medium. Changes in internal pH caused by flip-flop and metabolism were measured by trapping a fluorescent pH indicator in the cells. The metabolic end products of oleic acid were evaluated over the time interval required for the return of intracellular pH to its initial value. The primary findings were that (i) oleic acid rapidly binds with high avidity in the lipid domains of the plasma membrane with an apparent partition coefficient similar to that of protein-free phospholipid bilayers; (ii) oleic acid rapidly crosses the plasma membrane by the flip-flop mechanism (both events occur within 5 s); and (iii) the kinetics of esterification of oleic acid closely follow the time dependence of the recovery of intracellular pH. Any postulated transport mechanism for facilitating translocation of fatty acid across the plasma membrane of adipocytes, including a protein transporter, would have to compete with the highly effective flip-flop mechanism.

  16. Rapid identification of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia by peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nanna Reumert; Rasmussen, A. K. I.; Fiandaca, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a novel peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia identification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The probe was evaluated using 33 human and veterinary clinical S. maltophilia isolates and 45 reference strains...... horses. Altogether the study shows that this species-specific PNA FISH probe facilitates rapid detection of S. maltophilia in biological specimens....

  17. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  18. Rapid Bedside Inactivation of Ebola Virus for Safe Nucleic Acid Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe; Karlberg, Helen; Bragstad, Karoline

    2016-01-01

    for nucleic acid extraction inactivates Ebola virus. A rapid bedside inactivation method for nucleic acid tests is obtained by simply adding Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer directly into vacuum blood collection EDTA tubes using a thin needle and syringe prior to sampling. The ready-to-use inactivation vacuum......Rapid bedside inactivation of Ebola virus would be a solution for the safety of medical and technical staff, risk containment, sample transport, and high-throughput or rapid diagnostic testing during an outbreak. We show that the commercially available Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer used...... tubes are stable for more than 4 months, and Ebola virus RNA is preserved in the Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer for at least 5 weeks independent of the storage temperature. We also show that Ebola virus RNA can be manually extracted from Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer-inactivated samples using...

  19. Detection of Elevated Signaling Amino Acids in Human Diabetic Vitreous by Rapid Capillary Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao-Jen Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated glutamate is implicated in the pathology of PDR. The ability to rapidly assess the glutamate and amino acid content of vitreous provides a more complete picture of the chemical changes occurring at the diabetic retina and may lead to a better understanding of the pathology of PDR. Vitreous humor was collected following vitrectomies of patients with PDR and control conditions of macular hole or epiretinal membrane. A capillary electrophoresis method was developed to quantify glutamate and arginine. The analysis is relatively fast (<6 minutes and utilizes a poly(ethyleneoxide and sodium dodecylsulfate run buffer. Both amino acid levels show significant increases in PDR patients versus controls and are comparable to other reports. The levels of vitreal glutamate vary inversely with the degree of observed hemorrhage. The results demonstrate a rapid method for assessment of a number of amino acids to characterize the chemical changes at the diabetic retina to better understand tissue changes and potentially identify new treatments.

  20. The Nitric Oxide Donor SNAP-Induced Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Release in Cortical Neurons. Effects of Blockers of Voltage-Dependent Sodium and Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, José Joaquín; Arce, Carmen; Naddaf, Ahmad; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, Maria Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Background The discovery that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Findings The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA) in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated. Conclusions Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons. PMID:24598811

  1. Interaction of nitric acid and Zn intermetallides of Fe, Cr, Ni obtained after stripping Zn from EP823 steel solutions in zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvoeglazov, K.N.; Shadrin, A.Y. [Innovation and Technology Center of the Project - PRORYV, State Atomic Energy Corporation - Rosatom, 119017, B. Ordynka str., 24, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzin, M.A.; Makarov, A.O. [JSC State Scientific Center - Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, 433510, Zapadnoye shosse, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation); Pavlyukevich, E.Y. [Joint Stock Company - The High Technological Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, 123098, Rogova str., 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    Two samples of the steel EP823 solution in zinc were prepared. The samples have undergone zinc vacuum distillation. X-ray analysis showed that the residue particles have a different structure and element ratio, depending on zinc residual content. Needle-type particles consist mainly of iron (over 60 wt%) and 9-12% of zinc. Sponge-type particles consist mainly of zinc (over 70%). Chromium localize in zinc-rich particles. In the nitric acid treatment (4 and 8 mole/l) and 6 hours boiling, from 60 wt% to 70 wt% of the sample passed into solution. X-ray spectrum analysis shows that the main phase of the insoluble residue is a solid solution of (Cr,Zn,Fe)O{sub 4}. (authors)

  2. REACT-Mod: a mathematical model for transient calculation of chemical reactions with U-Pu-Np-Tc in the aqueous nitric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachimori, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kitamura, Tatsuaki

    1996-10-01

    A computer code REACT-Mod which simulates various chemical reactions in an aqueous nitric acid solution involving uranium, plutonium, neptunium, technetium etc. e.g., redox, radiolytic and disproportionation reactions of 68, was developed based on the kinetics model. The numerical solution method adopted in the code are two, a kinetics model totally based on the rate law of which differential equations are solved by the modified Porsing method, and a two-step model based on both the rate law and equilibrium law. Only the former treats 27 radiolytic reactions. The latter is beneficially used to have a quick and approximate result by economical computation. The present report aims not only to explain the concept, chemical reactions treated and characteristics of the model but also to provide details of the program for users of the REACT-Mod code. (author)

  3. Determination of plutonium in nitric acid solutions using energy dispersive L X-ray fluorescence with a low power X-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Py, J. [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, F-25030 Besançon (France); Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Groetz, J.-E., E-mail: jegroetz@univ-fcomte.fr [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, F-25030 Besançon (France); Hubinois, J.-C.; Cardona, D. [Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2015-04-21

    This work presents the development of an in-line energy dispersive L X-ray fluorescence spectrometer set-up, with a low power X-ray generator and a secondary target, for the determination of plutonium concentration in nitric acid solutions. The intensity of the L X-rays from the internal conversion and gamma rays emitted by the daughter nuclei from plutonium is minimized and corrected, in order to eliminate the interferences with the L X-ray fluorescence spectrum. The matrix effects are then corrected by the Compton peak method. A calibration plot for plutonium solutions within the range 0.1–20 g L{sup −1} is given.

  4. LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage CAT-2-mediated l-arginine uptake and nitric oxide biosynthesis is inhibited by omega fatty acid lipid emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian; Huang, Chuanjiang; Zhao, Yunzhao; Wang, Bin; Ren, Jianan; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid (ω-3 FA) lipid emulsion has been reported to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production and alter inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages. However, the role of cellular uptake of l-arginine and iNOS transcription in ω-3 FA emulsion-induced inhibition of NO has not been explored. In addition, cationic amino acid transporter-2 (CAT-2) can regulate iNOS activity. The effect of ω-3 FA emulsion on CAT-2 expression is unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that ω-3 FA emulsion pretreatment would decrease the production of NO in LPS-stimulated macrophages and that this effect would occur through alterations in the cellular uptake of l-arginine and CAT-2 expression, in addition to iNOS expression. Confluent immortalized murine macrophages (RAW264.7cells) were incubated with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, ω-3 FA emulsion, or an isoenergetic ω-6 lipid emulsion for 4 h. The cells were washed and then stimulated with LPS (1 μg/mL) or media alone for 12 or 24 h before harvesting. Greiss reagent was used to assess NO production of plate well supernatants. Cellular uptake of l-arginine was assessed through [(3)H]-l-arginine. The expression of iNOS and CAT-2 mRNA in harvested RAW264.7 was quantified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. NO production of unstimulated RAW264.7 cells was similar in all groups. After LPS stimulation, ω-3 FA pretreatment at 12 and 24 h produced significantly less NO (P anti-inflammatory effects, ω-3 FA lipid emulsion also significantly lowers NO production and l-arginine transport through altered expression of iNOS and CAT-2 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-element analysis of milk by ICP-oa-TOF-MS after precipitation of calcium and proteins by oxalic and nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husáková, Lenka; Urbanová, Iva; Šrámková, Jitka; Konečná, Michaela; Bohuslavová, Jana

    2013-03-15

    In this work a simple technique employing oxalic and nitric acid to cow's milk samples prior to analysis by inductively coupled plasma orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ICP-oa-TOF-MS) was introduced. After the precipitation of calcium and proteins via oxalic and nitric acid, respectively, the resulting liquid phase was aspirated with a concentric glass nebulizer for ICP-TOF-MS determination of trace elements. Precipitation of proteins is essential for better separation of solid and liquid phase of modified samples. Separation of calcium as a precipitated non-soluble oxalate enables the elimination of spectral interferences originating from different calcium containing species like (40)Ca(35)Cl(+), (40)Ca(37)Cl(+), (43)Ca(16)O(+), (40)Ca(18)O(+), (44)Ca(16)O(+), (43)Ca(16)O(1)H(+) onto the determination of As, Se, Co and Ni whose assay is more difficult when using conventional quadrupole instruments. High detection capability is further an advantage as the approach enables the analysis without dilution. The methodology may serve, in addition, for a fast and sensitive determination of some other elements. After that, direct, reliable and simultaneous determination of 16 elements (Li, Be, B, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Co, Ga, As, Se, Mo, Sn, Sb, Cs, Tl) at trace and ultra-trace levels in milk can be performed under optimum instrumental conditions and by using Rh as an internal standard. Accuracy and precision was assessed by measuring NCS ZC73015 milk powder control standard, yielding results in agreement with certified values and RSD <10%. The accuracy was also checked by comparison of the results of the proposed method with those found by a method based on a microwave-assisted digestion of real samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Catalysis by nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marletta, M A; Hurshman, A R; Rusche, K M

    1998-10-01

    The enzyme nitric oxide synthase catalyzes the oxidation of the amino acid L-arginine to L-citrulline and nitric oxide in an NADPH-dependent reaction. Nitric oxide plays a critical role in signal transduction pathways in the cardiovascular and nervous systems and is a key component of the cytostatic/cytotoxic function of the immune system. Characterization of nitric oxide synthase substrates and cofactors has outlined the broad details of the overall reaction and suggested possibilities for chemical steps in the reaction; however, the molecular details of the reaction mechanism are still poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests a role for the reduced bound pterin in the first step of the reaction--the hydroxylation of L-arginine.

  7. [Rapid determination of eight organic acids in plant tissue by sequential extraction and high performance liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianzhi; Wang, Shijie; Liu Xiuming; Liu, Hong; Wu, Yanyou; Luo Xuqiang

    2014-12-01

    A sequential extraction method was developed to determine different forms of oxalate and seven oxalate-metabolism-related organic acids (glyoxylic acid, tartaric acid, glycolic acid, malic acid, acetic acid, citric acid, succinic acid) in plant tissue. The ultra-pure water was used as the extraction medium to obtain water-soluble oxalic acid and the other seven water-soluble organic acids. After the extraction of the water-soluble organic acids, the residues were extracted by dilute hydrochloric acid successively to get the acid-soluble oxalate which entered the liquid phase. A Hypersil ODS column was used with 5 mmol/L potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer solution (pH 2. 8) as the mobile phase. The diode array detector was set at 210 nm and the column temperature at 30 °C with the injection volume of 5 µL. The flow rate was controlled at different times which allowed a good and rapid separation of the organic acids and hydrochloric acid. Under these conditions, the linear ranges of the method were 1-2000 mg/L for oxalic acid, 25-2,000 mg/L for acetic acid, and 10-2,000 mg/L for glyoxylic acid, tartaric acid, glycolic acid, malic acid, citric acid and succinic acid, with the correlation coefficients of the eight organic acids ≥ 0. 9996. The average recoveries of the eight organic acids in leaves and roots were 93. 5%-104. 4% and 85. 3%-105. 4% with RSDs of 0. 15% -2.43% and 0. 31%-2. 9% (n=7), respectively. The limits of detection ranged from 1 to 10 ng (S/N=3). The results indicated that the method is accurate, rapid and reproducible for the determination of organic acids in plant samples.

  8. The Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in Perfluorooctanoic Acid-Induced Developmental Cardiotoxicity and l-Carnitine Mediated Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA is an environmental contaminant that could induce developmental cardiotoxicity in a chicken embryo, which may be alleviated by l-carnitine. To explore the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO in such changes and the potential effects of l-carnitine, fertile chicken eggs were exposed to PFOA via an air cell injection, with or without l-carnitine co-treatment. The ROS and NO levels in chicken embryo hearts were determined with electron spin resonance (ESR, and the protein levels of the nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in chicken embryo hearts were assessed with western blotting. The results of ESR indicated that PFOA exposure induced an elevation in the ROS levels in ED19 chicken embryo hearts and hatchling chicken hearts, while l-carnitine could alleviate such changes. Meanwhile, increased NO levels were observed in ED19 embryo hearts and hatchling hearts following PFOA exposure, while l-carnitine co-treatment exerted modulatory effects. Western blotting revealed that p65 translocation in ED19 embryo hearts and hatchling hearts was enhanced by PFOA, while l-carnitine co-treatment alleviated such changes. iNOS expression levels in ED19 embryo hearts followed the same pattern as NO levels, while a suppression of expression was observed in hatchling hearts exposed to PFOA. ROS/NF-κB p65 and iNOS/NO seem to be involved in the late stage (ED19 and post hatch of PFOA-induced developmental cardiotoxicity in a chicken embryo. l-carnitine could exert anti-oxidant and NO modulatory effects in the developing chicken embryo hearts, which likely contribute to its cardioprotective effects.

  9. Rapid induction of omega-3 fatty acids (EPA) in Nannochloropsis sp. by UV-C radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kalpesh; Schenk, Peer M

    2015-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), provide substantial health benefits. As global fish stocks are declining and in some cases are contaminated with heavy metals, there is a need to find more sustainable land-based sources of these essential fatty acids. The oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis sp. has been identified as a highly efficient producer of omega-3 fatty acids. In this study, we present a new process to rapidly induce biosynthesis of essential fatty acids, including EPA in Nannochloropsis sp. BR2. Short exposure to UV-C at a dose of 100 or 250 mJ/cm(2) led to a significant increase in total cellular lipid contents when compared to mock-treated controls. A low dosage of 100 mJ/cm(2) also led to a twofold increase in total EPA content within 24 h that constituted 30% of total fatty acids and up to 12% of total dry weight at higher dosages. UV-C radiation may find uses as an easily applicable external inducer for large-scale production of omega-3 production from microalgae. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Rapid Characterization of Fatty Acids in Oleaginous Microalgae by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Jin; Chen, Tianpeng; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yue; Wei, Dong; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The key properties of microalgal biodiesel are largely determined by the composition of its fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The gas chromatography (GC) based techniques for fatty acid analysis involve energy-intensive and time-consuming procedures and thus are less suitable for high-throughput screening applications. In the present study, a novel quantification method for microalgal fatty acids was established based on the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique. The lyophilized cells of oleaginous Chlorella containing different contents of lipids were scanned by NIRS and their fatty acid profiles were determined by GC-MS. NIRS models were developed based on the chemometric correlation of the near-infrared spectra with fatty acid profiles in algal biomass. The optimized NIRS models showed excellent performances for predicting the contents of total fatty acids, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1 and C18:3, with the coefficient of determination (R2) being 0.998, 0.997, 0.989, 0.991 and 0.997, respectively. Taken together, the NIRS method established here bypasses the procedures of cell disruption, oil extraction and transesterification, is rapid, reliable, and of great potential for high-throughput applications, and will facilitate the screening of microalgal mutants and optimization of their growth conditions for biodiesel production. PMID:25826532

  11. Rapid Characterization of Fatty Acids in Oleaginous Microalgae by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The key properties of microalgal biodiesel are largely determined by the composition of its fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs. The gas chromatography (GC based techniques for fatty acid analysis involve energy-intensive and time-consuming procedures and thus are less suitable for high-throughput screening applications. In the present study, a novel quantification method for microalgal fatty acids was established based on the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS technique. The lyophilized cells of oleaginous Chlorella containing different contents of lipids were scanned by NIRS and their fatty acid profiles were determined by GC-MS. NIRS models were developed based on the chemometric correlation of the near-infrared spectra with fatty acid profiles in algal biomass. The optimized NIRS models showed excellent performances for predicting the contents of total fatty acids, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1 and C18:3, with the coefficient of determination (R2 being 0.998, 0.997, 0.989, 0.991 and 0.997, respectively. Taken together, the NIRS method established here bypasses the procedures of cell disruption, oil extraction and transesterification, is rapid, reliable, and of great potential for high-throughput applications, and will facilitate the screening of microalgal mutants and optimization of their growth conditions for biodiesel production.

  12. Evaluation of sampling methods for measuring exposure to volatile inorganic acids in workplace air. Part 1: sampling hydrochloric acid (HCl) and nitric acid (HNO₃) from a test gas atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Alan; Musgrove, Darren; Breuer, Dietmar; Gusbeth, Krista; Moritz, Andreas; Demange, Martine; Oury, Véronique; Rousset, Davy; Dorotte, Michel

    2011-08-01

    Historically, workplace exposure to the volatile inorganic acids hydrochloric acid (HCl) and nitric acid (HNO(3)) has been determined mostly by collection on silica gel sorbent tubes and analysis of the corresponding anions by ion chromatography (IC). However, HCl and HNO(3) can be present in workplace air in the form of mist as well as vapor, so it is important to sample the inhalable fraction of airborne particles. As sorbent tubes exhibit a low sampling efficiency for inhalable particles, a more suitable method was required. This is the first of two articles on "Evaluation of Sampling Methods for Measuring Exposure to Volatile Inorganic Acids in Workplace Air" and describes collaborative sampling exercises carried out to evaluate an alternative method for sampling HCl and HNO(3) using sodium carbonate-impregnated filters. The second article describes sampling capacity and breakthrough tests. The method was found to perform well and a quartz fiber filter impregnated with 500 μL of 1 M Na(2)CO(3) (10% (m/v) Na(2)CO(3)) was found to have sufficient sampling capacity for use in workplace air measurement. A pre-filter is required to remove particulate chlorides and nitrates that when present would otherwise result in a positive interference. A GSP sampler fitted with a plastic cone, a closed face cassette, or a plastic IOM sampler were all found to be suitable for mounting the pre-filter and sampling filter(s), but care has to be taken with the IOM sampler to ensure that the sampler is tightly closed to avoid leaks. HCl and HNO(3) can react with co-sampled particulate matter on the pre-filter, e.g., zinc oxide, leading to low results, and stronger acids can react with particulate chlorides and nitrates removed by the pre-filter to liberate HCl and HNO(3), which are subsequently collected on the sampling filter, leading to high results. However, although there is this potential for both positive and negative interferences in the measurement, these are unavoidable

  13. Mitochondrial-driven ubiquinone enhances extracellular calcium-dependent nitric oxide production and reduces glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rubio, Sandra; Hidalgo, Ana B; Ferrín, Gustavo; Bello, Rosario I; González, Raul; Gahete, Manuel D; Ranchal, Isidora; Rodríguez, Blanca A; Barrera, Pilar; Aguilar-Melero, Patricia; Linares, Clara I; Castaño, Justo P; Victor, Victor M; De la Mata, Manuel; Muntané, Jordi

    2009-12-01

    Ca(2+) mobilization, nitric oxide (NO), and oxidative stress have been involved in cell death induced by hydrophobic bile acid in hepatocytes. The aim of the study was the elucidation of the effect of the antioxidant mitochondrial-driven ubiquinone (Mito Q) on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, NO production, and cell death in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated HepG2 cells. The role of the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration by Ca(2+) chelators (EGTA or BAPTA-AM), agonist of Ca(2+) entrance (A23187) or NO (L-NAME or NO donor), was assessed during Mito Q cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. Cell death, NO synthase (NOS)-1, -2, and -3 expression, Ca(2+) mobilization, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and NOS-3 expression and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented and L-NAME enhanced GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca(2+) entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, reduced the expression of NOS-3 and enhanced cell death in control and GCDCA-treated cells. Mito Q prevented the reduction of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, NOS-3 expression, NO production, and cell death in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The conclusion is that the recovery of Ca(2+)-dependent NOS-3 expression by Mito Q may be considered an additional cytoprotective property of an antioxidant.

  14. Promotional effect of nitric acid treatment on CO sensing properties of SnO2/MWCNT nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Kazemi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, SnO2/MWCNT nanocomposites with different types of MWCNTs, namely as-received, acid treated and Ag-decorated, were synthesized via a facile method and their CO gas sensing properties were investigated. Microstructure and phase formation of the synthesized composites were studied using FE-SEM and XRD, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR was employed to study the functional groups on the surface of MWCNTs after acid treatment. CO gas sensing results showed that the samples containing 0.8 wt.% MWCNT with 2 h acid treatment by HNO3 have the best response to CO gas.

  15. Rapid and sensitive screening of some acidic micronutrients in infant foods by HPLC with fluorescent detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoliang; Kong, Weiheng; Fan, Guangsen; Wang, Wenli; Hu, Na; Chen, Guang; Zhao, Xianen; You, Jinmao

    2016-06-01

    Currently, commercially prepared complementary foods have become an important part of the diet of many infants and toddlers. But the method for simultaneous analysis of different types of micronutrient remains poorly investigated, which hinders the rapid and comprehensive quality control of infant foods. In the presented study, we first tried to employ the fluorescence labeling strategy combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection for simultaneous determination of some acidic micronutrients including biotin, nicotinic acid, linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid and linoleic acid in infant foods. 2-(5-Benzoacridine) ethyl-p-toluenesulfonate was used as the fluorescence labeling reagent for simultaneous labeling of the seven components. The labeling conditions were optimized systematically by response surface methodology. The correlation coefficients for the calibration curves of the tested compounds ranged from 0.9991 to 0.9998. Limits of detection were in the range of 1.99-3.05 nmol L(-1) . Relative standard deviation values of retention time and peak area of seven compounds were less than 0.05% and 0.75%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precision was in the range of 1.81-3.80% and 3.21-4.30%, respectively. When applied to analysis of several infant foods it showed good applicability. The developed method has been proven to be simple, inexpensive, selective, sensitive, accurate and reliable for analysis of some acidic micronutrients in infant foodstuffs. Furthermore, this developed method also has powerful potential in the analysis of many other complementary foodstuffs. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Effect of nitric oxide scavengers, carboxy-PTIO on endotoxin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research evidence shows that sepsis-associated vascular relaxation is mediated by nitric oxide. Nitric oxide formation is stimulated by endotoxin, cytokines such as Tumor necrosis factor, and Interleukines. The stimulation is due to the activation of an inducible nitric oxide synthase, which transforms an amino acid ...

  17. Safflor yellow B reduces hypoxia-mediated vasoconstriction by regulating endothelial micro ribonucleic acid/nitric oxide synthase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaoyun; Yang, Ying; Li, Miao; Liu, Xin; Wang, Qiaoyun; Xin, Wenyu; Sun, Hongliu; Zheng, Qingyin

    2017-11-07

    Hypoxia-induced generation of vasoconstrictors reduces cerebral blood flow (CBF) while nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) and microRNAs (miRNA) in endothelial cells (ECs) suppress vasoconstriction. Safflor yellow B (SYB), a natural plant compound, previously attenuated angiotensin II-mediated injury of ECs and maintained endothelial function. This study investigated the putative involvement of NOS and miRNAs in SYB-mediated resistance to hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction. In vivo , chronic hypoxia was induced in rats, and SYB was administered intravenously. In vitro , rat primary aortic ECs were cultured under oxygen and glucose deprivation. After treatment with anti-microR-199a, as well as the NOS inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, SYB, or both, cell viability, NO and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) levels, NOS expression, and miRNA levels were evaluated. SYB significantly alleviated hypoxia-mediated vasoconstriction and increased CBF endothelium-dependently. SYB upregulated miR-199a, increased EC viability, decreased endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels, inhibited protein kinase C (PKC) activity, and suppressed hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression. Furthermore, the SYB-mediated reduction of inducible NOS reduced ONOO- levels. In addition, SYB downregulated miR-138 and, thereby, enhanced S100A1 and endothelial NOS activity. Hypoxia-mediated regulation of miR-138 and miR-199a inhibited endothelial NOS expression and activation, which triggered ET-1 release and vasoconstriction. Therefore, SYB treatment reduced hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction through miR-199a/endothelial NOS signaling.

  18. Rapid validated HPTLC method for estimation of betulinic acid in Nelumbo nucifera (Nymphaeaceae) rhizome extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debajyoti; Kumar, N Satheesh; Khatua, Taraknath; Mukherjee, Pulok K

    2010-01-01

    Betulinic acid (pentacyclic triterpenoid) is an important marker component present in Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. rhizome. N. nucifera rhizome has several medicinal uses including hypoglycaemic, antidiarrhoeal, antimicrobial, diuretic, antipyretic, psychopharmacological activities. To establish a simple, sensitive, reliable, rapid and validated high-performance thin-layer chromatography method for estimation of betulinic acid in hydro-alcoholic extract of N. nucifera Gaertn. rhizome. The separation was carried out on a thin-layer chromatography aluminium plate pre-coated with silica gel 60F(254) , eluted with chloroform, methanol and formic acid (49 : 1 : 1 v/v). Post chromatographic derivatisation was done with anisaldehyde-sulphuric acid reagent and densitometric scanning was performed using a Camag TLC scanner III, at 420 nm. The system was found to produce a compact spot for betulinic acid (R(f) = 0.30). A good linear precision relationship between the concentrations (2-10 µg) and peak areas were obtained with the correlation coefficient (r) of 0.99698. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of betulinic acid were detected to be 0.4 and 2.30 µg per spot. The percentage of recovery was found to be 98.36%. The percentage relative standard deviations of intra-day and inter-day precisions were 0.82-0.394 and 0.85-0.341, respectively. This validated HPTLC method provides a new and powerful approach to estimate betulinic acid as phytomarker in the extract. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Nitric oxide production and nitric oxide synthase expression in acute human renal allograft rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, EWJA; van Goor, H; Tiebosch, ATMG; Moshage, H; Tegzess, Adam; Stegeman, CA

    2000-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS), which are either constitutively expressed in the kidney or inducible, in resident and infiltrating cells during inflammation and allograft rejection. NO is rapidly degraded to the stable end products nitrite and nitrate, which

  20. Rapid identification of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia by peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, N; Rasmussen, A K I; Fiandaca, M J; Kragh, K N; Bjarnsholt, T; Høiby, N; Stender, H; Guardabassi, L

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a novel peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia identification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The probe was evaluated using 33 human and veterinary clinical S. maltophilia isolates and 45 reference strains representing common bacterial species in the respiratory tract. The probe displayed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity on pure cultures and allowed detection in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients. The detection limit was 10(4) CFU/mL in spiked tracheal aspirate and bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy horses. Altogether the study shows that this species-specific PNA FISH probe facilitates rapid detection of S. maltophilia in biological specimens.

  1. Evidence that nitric oxide may mediate the ovarian steroid-induced luteinizing hormone surge: involvement of excitatory amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, J J; Sahu, A; Kalra, P S; Kalra, S P

    1993-12-01

    The involvement of excitatory N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the hypothalamic control of pituitary LH secretion is well recognized. Recent evidence shows that nitric oxide (NO), a free radical gas, may act as neurotransmitter in the brain, and its efflux is stimulated by activation of NMDA receptors. Studies were undertaken to determine whether NO is involved in the hypothalamic release of LHRH and in the LH surge induced by progesterone (P) in estrogen-primed ovariectomized rats. Rats were ovariectomized and 2 weeks later received estradiol benzoate (30 micrograms sc) at 1000 h. Two days later, P was injected at 1000 h to potentiate the estradiol benzoate-induced LH surge in the afternoon. Serial blood samples were collected at hourly intervals from 1400-1800 h via an intraatrial cannula implanted the day before P injection. Additionally, at various times before onset of the LH surge at 1400 h, the rats were injected sc with one of three inhibitors of NO synthase, the enzyme that generates NO. Control, saline-injected rats showed unambiguous LH surges in the afternoon. However, either a single injection at 1000 h of NG-methyl-L-arginine (20 mg/kg) or three injections at 1000, 1200, and 1400 h of either Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (NAME, 40 mg/kg) or Nw-nitro-L-arginine (60 mg/kg) to inhibit NO efflux markedly suppressed the P-induced LH surge in the afternoon. To ascertain whether suppression of LH surge was due to blockade of hypothalamic LHRH release, a series of in vitro studies were performed in steroid-primed rats. First we examined the effects of sodium nitroprusside (NPS), a compound that spontaneously generates and releases NO. NPS increased basal and KCl-induced LHRH release in vitro from the medial basal hypothalamus-preoptic area and median eminence fragments. No direct effect of NO at the pituitary level was seen, since NPS did not alter basal or LHRH-induced LH in vitro release from hemipituitaries. In addition, we tested the effects of

  2. Rapid, efficient charging of lead-acid and nickel-zinc traction cells. [for electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Lead-acid and nickel-zinc traction cells were rapidly and efficiently charged using a high rate taped dc charge (HRTDC) method which could possibly be used for on-the-road service recharge of electric vehicles. The HRTDC method takes advantage of initial high cell charge acceptance and uses cell gassing rate and temperature as an indicator of charging efficiency. On the average, 300 amp-hour nickel-zinc traction cells were given a HRTDC to 78% of rated amp-hour capacity within 53 minutes at an amp-hour efficiency of 92% and an energy efficiency of 52%. Three-hundred amp-hour lead-acid traction cells were charged to 69% of rated amp-hour capacity within 46 minutes at an amp-hour efficiency of 91% with an energy efficiency of 64%.

  3. Influence of nitric oxide on histamine and carbachol – induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to determine the influence of nitric oxide (NO) on the action of histamine and carbachol on acid secretion in the common African toad – Bufo regularis. Gastric acidity was determined by titration method. The acid secretion was determined when nitric oxide was absent following administration of NO synthase ...

  4. Rapid assessment of selected free amino acids during Edam cheese ripening by near infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Mlček

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on rapid determination of free amino acids produced during the ripening of cheese, by using near infrared spectroscopy. Analyses of 96 samples of Edam cheese (30% and 45% of fat in dry matter were performed at monthly intervals up to the ripening age of 6 months. In total, 19 amino acids were analysed with infrared spectrometer using two different methods, either in the regime of reflectance in the integrating sphere of the apparatus or using a fibre optic apparatus with the fibre optic probe. Reference data based on high-performance liquid chromatography were used for calibration of the spectrophotometer. Calibration models were developed using a partial least square algorithm and tested by means of cross-validation. When measured with the integrating sphere and with the probe, the values of correlation coefficients ranged from 0.835 to 0.993 and from 0.739 to 0.995, respectively. Paired t-test did not show significant differences between the reference and predicted values (P < 0.05. The results of this new calibration method showed the possibility of near infrared technology for fast determination of free amino acids, which occur during the ripening of Edam cheese. The content of free amino acids allow us to prepare Edam cheese quickly and efficiently for sale or to prepare the material for processed cheese.

  5. Rapid Photodegradation of Methyl Orange (MO Assisted with Cu(II and Tartaric Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    Full Text Available Cu(II and organic carboxylic acids, existing extensively in soil and aquatic environments, can form complexes that may play an important role in the photodegradation of organic contaminants. In this paper, the catalytic role of Cu(II in the removal of methyl orange (MO in the presence of tartaric acid with light was investigated through batch experiments. The results demonstrate that the introduction of Cu(II could markedly enhance the photodegradation of MO. In addition, high initial concentrations of Cu(II and tartaric acid benefited the decomposition of MO. The most rapid removal of MO assisted by Cu(II was achieved at pH 3. The formation of Cu(II-tartaric acid complexes was assumed to be the key factor, generating hydroxyl radicals (•OH and other oxidizing free radicals under irradiation through a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer pathway that was responsible for the efficient degradation of MO. Some intermediates in the reaction system were also detected to support this reaction mechanism.

  6. Rapid Biodegradation of the Herbicide 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid by Cupriavidus gilardii T-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangwei; Wang, Wenbo; Liu, Junwei; Pan, Dandan; Tu, Xiaohui; Lv, Pei; Wang, Yi; Cao, Haiqun; Wang, Yawen; Hua, Rimao

    2017-05-10

    Phytotoxicity and environmental pollution of residual herbicides have caused much public concern during the past several decades. An indigenous bacterial strain capable of degrading 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), designated T-1, was isolated from soybean field soil and identified as Cupriavidus gilardii. Strain T-1 degraded 2,4-D 3.39 times more rapidly than the model strain Cupriavidus necator JMP134. T-1 could also efficiently degrade 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), MCPA isooctyl ester, and 2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid (2,4-DP). Suitable conditions for 2,4-D degradation were pH 7.0-9.0, 37-42 °C, and 4.0 mL of inoculums. Degradation of 2,4-D was concentration-dependent. 2,4-D was degraded to 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) by cleavage of the ether bond and then to 3,5-dichlorocatechol (3,5-DCC) via hydroxylation, followed by ortho-cleavage to cis-2-dichlorodiene lactone (CDL). The metabolites 2,4-DCP or 3,5-DCC at 10 mg L-1 were completely degraded within 16 h. Fast degradation of 2,4-D and its analogues highlights the potential for use of C. gilardii T-1 in bioremediation of phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides.

  7. Reevaluation of JACS code system benchmark analyses of the heterogeneous system. Fuel rods in U+Pu nitric acid solution system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Tomoyuki; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Katakura, Jun-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    In order to perform accuracy evaluation of the critical calculation by the combination of multi-group constant library MGCL and 3-dimensional Monte Carlo code KENO-IV among critical safety evaluation code system JACS, benchmark calculation was carried out from 1980 in 1982. Some cases where the neutron multiplication factor calculated in the heterogeneous system in it was less than 0.95 were seen. In this report, it re-calculated by considering the cause about the heterogeneous system of the U+Pu nitric acid solution systems containing the neutron poison shown in JAERI-M 9859. The present study has shown that the k{sub eff} value less than 0.95 given in JAERI-M 9859 is caused by the fact that the water reflector below a cylindrical container was not taken into consideration in the KENO-IV calculation model. By taking into the water reflector, the KENO-IV calculation gives a k{sub eff} value greater than 0.95 and a good agreement with the experiment. (author)

  8. Photosynthetic and antioxidant responses of Liquidambar formosana and Schima superba seedlings to sulfuric-rich and nitric-rich simulated acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Liu, Ting-Wu; Wu, Fei-Hua; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-03-01

    To study whether differential responses occur in photosynthesis and antioxidant system for seedlings of Liquidambar formosana, an acid rain (AR)-sensitive tree species and Schima superba, an AR-tolerant tree species treated with three types of pH 3.0 simulated AR (SiAR) including sulfuric-rich (S-SiAR), nitric-rich (N-SiAR), sulfate and nitrate mixed (SN-SiAR), we investigated the changes of leaf necrosis, chlorophyll content, soluble protein and proline content, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, reactive oxygen species production, membrane lipid peroxidation, small molecular antioxidant content, antioxidant enzyme activities and related protein expressions. Our results showed that SiAR significantly caused leaf necrosis, inhibited photosynthesis, induced superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide generation, aggravated membrane lipid peroxidation, changed antioxidant enzyme activities, modified related protein expressions such as Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), l-ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1. 11. 1. 11), glutathione S transferase (GST, EC 2. 5. 1. 18) and Rubisco large subunit (RuBISCO LSU), altered non-protein thiols (NPT) and glutathione (GSH) content in leaves of L. formosana and S. superba. Taken together, we concluded that the damages caused by SiAR in L. formosana were more severe and suffered from more negative impacts than in S. superba. S-SiAR induced more serious damages for the plants than did SN-SiAR and N-SiAR. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced production of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in very long chain saturated fatty acid-accumulated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyanagi Takashi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deterioration of peroxisomal β-oxidation activity causes an accumulation of very long chain saturated fatty acids (VLCSFA in various organs. We have recently reported that the levels of VLCSFA in the plasma and/or membranes of blood cells were significantly higher in patients with metabolic syndrome and in patients with coronary artery disease than the controls. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of VLCSFA accumulation on inflammatory and oxidative responses in VLCSFA-accumulated macrophages derived from X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD protein (ALDP-deficient mice. Results Elevated levels of VLCSFA were confirmed in macrophages from ALDP-deficient mice. The levels of nitric oxide (NO production stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interluekin-6 (IL-6, and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70, were significantly higher in macrophages from ALDP-deficient mice than in those from wild-type mice. The inducible NO synthase (iNOS mRNA expression also showed an increase in macrophages from ALDP-deficient mice. Conclusion These results suggested that VLCSFA accumulation in macrophages may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases through the enhancement of inflammatory and oxidative responses.

  10. Techno-Economic Feasibility Study of Renewable Power Systems for a Small-Scale Plasma-Assisted Nitric Acid Plant in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Anastasopoulou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The expected world population growth by 2050 is likely to pose great challenges in the global food demand and, in turn, in the fertilizer consumption. The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations has forecasted that 46% of this projected growth will be attributed to Africa. This, in turn, raises further concerns about the sustainability of Africa’s contemporary fertilizer production, considering also its high dependence on fertilizer imports. Based on these facts, a novel “green” route for the synthesis of fertilizers has been considered in the context of the African agriculture by means of plasma technology. More precisely, a techno-economic feasibility study has been conducted for a small-scale plasma-assisted nitric acid plant located in Kenya and South Africa with respect to the electricity provision by renewable energy sources. In this study, standalone solar and wind power systems, as well as a hybrid system, have been assessed for two different electricity loads against certain economic criteria. The relevant simulations have been carried out in HOMER software and the optimized configurations of each examined renewable power system are presented in this study.

  11. Nitric acid activation of graphite granules to increase the performance of the non-catalyzed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for MFC applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erable, Benjamin [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne - NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, CNRS-Universite de Toulouse, 5 rue Paulin Talabot, BP1301, 31106 Toulouse (France); Duteanu, Narcis [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne - NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Faculty of Industrial Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, University ' ' POLITEHNICA' ' Timisoara, 300006 Timisoara (Romania); Kumar, S.M. Senthil; Scott, Keith [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne - NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Feng, Yujie [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 202, Haihe Road, Harbin 150090 (China); Ghangrekar, Makarand M. [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne - NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur - 721302 (India)

    2009-07-15

    Nitric acid and thermal activation of graphite granules were explored to increase the electrocatalytic performance of dissolved oxygen reduction at neutral pH for microbial fuel cell (MFC) applications. Electrochemical experiments showed an improvement of +400 mV in open circuit potential for graphite granules when they were activated. The improvement of ORR performance observed with activated granules was correlated to the increase of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface of the activated material and the emergence of nitrogen superficial groups revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis on its surface. The use of activated graphite granules in the cathodic compartment of a dual-chamber MFC led to a high open circuit voltage of 1050 mV, which is among one of the highest reported so far. The stable performance of this cathode material (current density of 96 A m{sup -3} at +200 mV/Ag-AgCl) over a period of 10 days demonstrated its applicability as a cathode material without any costly noble metal. (author)

  12. The influence of nitric oxide and oxalic acid on Triticum aestivum L. infected by Septoria tritici Blotch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna V. Zhuk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The realization of productivity of Triticum aestivumL. modern cultivars is limited by yield losses caused by fungus diseases which intensively develop under high level of humidity and air temperatures. The usage of elicitors is the way to induce the plant immunity of cereals and minimize the pesticide pollution of the environment. It is established that the additive effect of elicitor (oxalic acid and NO signal molecule decrease the stress after the action of biotic factor (Septoria triticiBlotch in two spring wheat cultivars – ‘Nedra’and ‘Etud’in the field experiment conditions. The effect of oxalic acid was to decrease the yield losses by the way of decreasing the degree of corns’ infection by pathogen. NO donor manifests the qualities of signal molecule and growth regulator under biotic stress that promoted the realization of wheat potential productivity.

  13. Rapid dissolution of ZnO nanocrystals in acidic cancer microenvironment leading to preferential apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Abhilash; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Raman, Sreerekha; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-09-01

    The microenvironment of cancer plays a very critical role in the survival, proliferation and drug resistance of solid tumors. Here, we report an interesting, acidic cancer microenvironment-mediated dissolution-induced preferential toxicity of ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) against cancer cells while leaving primary cells unaffected. Irrespective of the size-scale (5 and 200 nm) and surface chemistry differences (silica, starch or polyethylene glycol coating), ZnO NCs exhibited multiple stress mechanisms against cancer cell lines (IC50 ~150 μM) while normal human primary cells (human dermal fibroblast, lymphocytes, human umbilical vein endothelial cells) remain less affected. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ZnO NCs undergo rapid preferential dissolution in acidic (pH ~5-6) cancer microenvironment causing elevated ROS stress, mitochondrial superoxide formation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, and cell cycle arrest at S/G2 phase leading to apoptosis. In effect, by elucidating the unique toxicity mechanism of ZnO NCs, we show that ZnO NCs can destabilize cancer cells by utilizing its own hostile acidic microenvironment, which is otherwise critical for its survival.The microenvironment of cancer plays a very critical role in the survival, proliferation and drug resistance of solid tumors. Here, we report an interesting, acidic cancer microenvironment-mediated dissolution-induced preferential toxicity of ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) against cancer cells while leaving primary cells unaffected. Irrespective of the size-scale (5 and 200 nm) and surface chemistry differences (silica, starch or polyethylene glycol coating), ZnO NCs exhibited multiple stress mechanisms against cancer cell lines (IC50 ~150 μM) while normal human primary cells (human dermal fibroblast, lymphocytes, human umbilical vein endothelial cells) remain less affected. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ZnO NCs undergo rapid preferential dissolution in

  14. Rapid discrimination of fatty acid composition in fats and oils by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Shoji; Yamaguchi, Kazutaka; Nagai, Masatoshi

    2005-12-01

    Fatty acids in 42 types of saponified vegetable and animal oils were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for the development of their rapid discrimination. The compositions were compared with those analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), a more conventional method used in the discrimination of fats and oils. Fatty acids extracted with 2-propanol were-detected as deprotonated molecular ions ([M-H]-) in the ESI-MS spectra of the negative-ion mode. The composition obtained by ESI-MS corresponded to the data of the total ion chromatograms by GC-MS. The ESI-MS analysis discriminated the fats and oils within only one minute after starting the measurement. The detection limit for the analysis was approximately 10(-10) g as a sample amount analyzed for one minute. This result showed that the ESI-MS analysis discriminated the fats and oils much more rapidly and sensitively than the GC-MS analysis, which requires several tens of minutes and approximately 10(-9) g. Accordingly, the ESI-MS analysis was found to be suitable for a screening procedure for the discrimination of fats and oils.

  15. Fatty acids are rapidly delivered to and extracted from membranes by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunaldi, Kellen; Huang, Nasi; Hamilton, James A

    2010-01-01

    We performed detailed biophysical studies of transfer of long-chain fatty acids (FAs) from methyl-beta-CD (MBCD) to model membranes (egg-PC vesicles) and cells and the extraction of FA from membranes by MBCD. We used i) fluorescein phosphatidylethanolamine to detect transfer of FA anions arriving in the outer membrane leaflet; ii) entrapped pH dyes to measure pH changes after FA diffusion (flip-flop) across the lipid bilayer; and iii) soluble fluorescent-labeled FA binding protein to measure the concentration of unbound FA in water. FA dissociated from MBCD, bound to the membrane, and underwent flip-flop within milliseconds. In the presence of vesicles, MBCD maintained the aqueous concentration of unbound FA at low levels comparable to those measured with albumin. In studies with cells, addition of oleic acid (OA) complexed with MBCD yielded rapid (seconds) dose-dependent OA transport into 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and HepG2 cells. MBCD extracted OA from cells and model membranes rapidly at concentrations exceeding those required for OA delivery but much lower than concentrations commonly used for extracting cholesterol. Compared with albumin, MBCD can transfer its entire FA load and is less likely to extract cell nutrients and to introduce impurities.

  16. The nitric oxide-donating derivative of acetylsalicylic acid, NCX 4016, stimulates glucose transport and glucose transporters translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddai, V; Gonzalez, T; Bolla, M; Le Marchand-Brustel, Y; Cormont, M

    2008-07-01

    NCX 4016 is a nitric oxide (NO)-donating derivative of acetylsalicylic acid. NO and salicylate, in vivo metabolites of NCX 4016, were shown to be potential actors in controlling glucose homeostasis. In this study, we evaluated the action of NCX 4016 on the capacity of 3T3-L1 adipocytes to transport glucose in basal and insulin-stimulated conditions. NCX 4016 induced a twofold increase in glucose uptake in parallel with the translocation of the glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4 to the plasma membrane, leaving unaffected their total expression levels. Importantly, NCX 4016 further increased glucose transport induced by a physiological concentration of insulin. The stimulatory effect of NCX 4016 on glucose uptake appears to be mediated by its NO moiety. Indeed, it is inhibited by a NO scavenger and treatment with acetylsalicylic or salicylic acid had no effect. Although NO is involved in the action of NCX 4016, it did not mainly depend on the soluble cGMP cyclase/protein kinase G pathway. Furthermore, NCX 4016-stimulated glucose transport did not involve the insulin-signaling cascade required to stimulate glucose transport. NCX 4016 induces a small activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and no activation of other stress-activated signaling molecules, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase, inhibitory factor kappaB, or AMP-activated kinases. Interestingly, NCX 4016 modified the content of S-nitrosylated proteins in adipocytes. Taken together, our results indicate that NCX 4016 induced glucose transport in adipocytes through a novel mechanism possibly involving S-nitrosylation. NCX 4016 thus possesses interesting characteristics to be considered as a candidate molecule for the treatment of patients suffering from metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

  17. DNA fragmentation dynamics allows the assessment of cryptic sperm damage in human: Evaluation of exposure to ionizing radiation, hyperthermia, acidic pH and nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiso, Rebeca; Tamayo, Maria [Laboratorio de Genetica Molecular y Radiobiologia, Centro Oncologico de Galicia, Doctor Camilo Veiras 1, 15009-A Coruna (Spain); Genetics Unit, INIBIC-Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruna (CHUAC), As Xubias, 84, 15006-A Coruna (Spain); Gosalvez, Jaime [Genetics Unit, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Johnston, Steve [School of Agriculture and Food Science, University of Queensland, Gatton 4343 (Australia); Marino, Alfonso [Servicio de Oncologia Radioterapica, Centro Oncologico de Galicia, Doctor Camilo Veiras 1, 15009-A Coruna (Spain); Fernandez, Carlos; Losada, Carlos [Servicio de Radiofisica, Centro Oncologico de Galicia, Doctor Camilo Veiras 1, 15009-A Coruna (Spain); Fernandez, Jose Luis, E-mail: Jose.Luis.Fernandez.Garcia@sergas.es [Laboratorio de Genetica Molecular y Radiobiologia, Centro Oncologico de Galicia, Doctor Camilo Veiras 1, 15009-A Coruna (Spain); Genetics Unit, INIBIC-Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruna (CHUAC), As Xubias, 84, 15006-A Coruna (Spain)

    2012-06-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) is not a static seminal parameter, since the longevity of sperm DNA decreases progressively with time following ejaculation or thawing. While the dynamics of SDF is a species-specific characteristic, in the case of humans, there is still significant variation within patients. To evaluate the suitability of the dynamic SDF assay to assess the adverse effects of agents that cause genetic damage, fresh semen samples from different donors were exposed in vitro to (1) increasing acute doses of ionizing radiation, (2) elevated temperature (41 Degree-Sign C and 45 Degree-Sign C), (3) acidic pH (pH 4) and (4) the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Sperm DNA fragmentation was analyzed after an incubation period of chronic (24 h), or acute (1 h) exposure to each treatment followed by incubation at 37 Degree-Sign C over a period of 24 h. SDF was assessed using the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test. Dynamic SDF for each treatment was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. All agents, except for ionizing radiation, accelerated SDF kinetics following chronic exposure over a 24 h period. Transient exposure to NO and heat but not acidic pH increased the basal (T0) level of SDF. Despite the removal of the three toxicants, the remaining sperm following acute exposure showed a decrease in their expected DNA longevity. It is concluded that the assessment of sperm DNA fragmentation dynamics is an effective methodological approach for revealing latent damage associated with toxicants that is not initially expressed following a single initial observation of SDF.

  18. Influence of gas-particle partitioning on ammonia and nitric acid fluxes above a deciduous forest in the Midwestern USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Hornsby, Karen E.

    to bi-directionality of the flux, and the dynamics of the chemical gas/aerosol equilibrium of NH3 and HNO3 (or other atmospheric acids) with aerosol-phase ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). NH3 and HNO3 are both very reactive and typically exhibit higher deposition velocities than aerosol NH4...... diffusion denuders with detection by florescence and half-hourly flux measurements are calculated. HNO3 REA system is based on gas capture on sodium chloride (NaCl) coated denuders with subsequent analysis by ion-chromatography, and the resulting fluxes have a resolution of 3-4 hours. CO2 fluxes...

  19. Rapid and near-complete dissolution of wood lignin at ≤80°C by a recyclable acid hydrotrope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liheng Chen; Jinze Dou; Qianli Ma; Ning Li; Ruchun Wu; Huiyang Bian; Daniel J. Yelle; Tapani Vuorinen; Shiyu Fu; Xuejun Pan; Junyong (J.Y.) Zhu

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery of the hydrotropic properties of a recyclable aromatic acid, p-toluenesulfonic acid (p-TsOH), for potentially low-cost and efficient fractionation of wood through rapid and near-complete dissolution of lignin. Approximately 90% of poplar wood (NE222) lignin can be dissolved at 80°C in 20 min. Equivalent delignification using...

  20. Dietary phenolic antioxidants, caffeic acid and Trolox, protect rainbow trout gill cells from nitric oxide-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Mi Ja; Walker, Paul A; Hogstrand, Christer

    2006-12-30

    Caffeic acid (CA) and Trolox are phenolic acids that have beneficial antioxidant effect, but the underlying mechanisms involved are not fully understood. The extent to which CA and Trolox protect against sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced oxidative cell injury was investigated in cultured rainbow trout gill cells. The cells exposed to SNP for 24 h displayed a dose-dependent leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and decreased cell viability as indicated by the MTT assay (mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity). Both effects were prevented by treatment with 50 microM CA or Trolox. CA or Trolox, protected against SNP-induced caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation, indicating a reduction of apoptosis. Thus, the results indicate that SNP induced cell death is caspase-3 related apoptosis and the treatment with CA inhibited the apoptotic pathway. In addition, we studied the effect of CA and Trolox on expression of zinc-responsive antioxidant genes such as metallothioneins (MT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST Class pi) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) in cultured gill cells. CA, 100 microM, increased accumulation of mRNA for MTA, MTB, GST and G6PD in cells. Thus, in addition to its ability to sequester free radicals, CA may protect against oxidative stress through expression of zinc-induced antioxidant proteins. Because of these properties we suggest that CA could be a beneficial additive to fish feeds in aquaculture.

  1. Lateral flow microarrays: a novel platform for rapid nucleic acid detection based on miniaturized lateral flow chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Darren J.; Cary, R. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Widely used nucleic acid assays are poorly suited for field deployment where access to laboratory instrumentation is limited or unavailable. The need for field deployable nucleic acid detection demands inexpensive, facile systems without sacrificing information capacity or sensitivity. Here we describe a novel microarray platform capable of rapid, sensitive nucleic acid detection without specialized instrumentation. The approach is based on a miniaturized lateral flow device that makes use of...

  2. Effect of fish oils containing different amounts of EPA, DHA, and antioxidants on plasma and brain fatty acids and brain nitric oxide synthase activity in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Karin; Saldeen, Ann-Sofie; Yang, Baichun; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The interest in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has expanded significantly in the last few years, due to their many positive effects described. Consequently, the interest in fish oil supplementation has also increased, and many different types of fish oil supplements can be found on the market. Also, it is well known that these types of fatty acids are very easily oxidized, and that stability among supplements varies greatly. Aims of the study In this pilot study we investigated the effects of two different types of natural fish oils containing different amounts of the n-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and antioxidants on plasma and brain fatty acids, blood lipids, vitamin E, and in vivo lipid peroxidation, as well as brain nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, an enzyme which has been shown to be important for memory and learning ability. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups and fed regular rat chow pellets enriched with 5% (w/w) of butter (control group), a natural fish oil (17.4% EPA and 11.7% DHA, referred to as EPA-rich), and a natural fish oil rich in DHA (7.7% EPA and 28.0% DHA, referred to as DHA-rich). Both of the fish oils were stabilized by a commercial antioxidant protection system (Pufanox®) at production. The fourth group received the same DHA-rich oil, but without Pufanox® stabilization (referred to as unstable). As an index of stability of the oils, their peroxide values were repeatedly measured during 9 weeks. The dietary treatments continued until sacrifice, after 10 days. Results Stability of the oils varied greatly. It took the two stabilized oils 9 weeks to reach the same peroxide value as the unstable oil reached after only a few days. Both the stabilized EPA- and DHA-rich diets lowered the triacylglycerols and total cholesterol compared to control (-45%, P < 0.05 and -54%, P < 0.001; -31%, P < 0.05 and -25%, P < 0.01) and so did the unstable oil, but less efficiently

  3. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; comparison of a nitric acid in-bottle digestion procedure to other whole-water digestion procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, John R.; Hoffman, Gerald L.

    1999-01-01

    A hydrochloric acid in-bottle digestion procedure is used to partially digest wholewater samples prior to determining recoverable elements by various analytical methods. The use of hydrochloric acid is problematic for some methods of analysis because of spectral interference. The inbottle digestion procedure has been modified to eliminate such interference by using nitric acid instead of hydrochloric acid in the digestion. Implications of this modification are evaluated by comparing results for a series of synthetic whole-water samples. Results are also compared with those obtained by using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (1994) (USEPA) Method 200.2 total-recoverable digestion procedure. Percentage yields that use the nitric acid inbottle digestion procedure are within 10 percent of the hydrochloric acid in-bottle yields for 25 of the 26 elements determined in two of the three synthetic whole-water samples tested. Differences in percentage yields for the third synthetic whole-water sample were greater than 10 percent for 16 of the 26 elements determined. The USEPA method was the most rigorous for solubilizing elements from particulate matter in all three synthetic whole-water samples. Nevertheless, the variability in the percentage yield by using the USEPA digestion procedure was generally greater than the in-bottle digestion procedure, presumably because of the difficulty in controlling the digestion conditions accurately.

  4. Nitric oxide supersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Thomsen, L L

    1993-01-01

    Nitroglycerin, which may be regarded as a prodrug for nitric oxide, induces a mild to moderate headache in healthy subjects. In order to study whether migraine patients are more sensitive to nitric oxide than non-migrainous subjects, four different doses of intravenous nitroglycerin were given...... previously shown a similar supersensitivity to histamine which in human cerebral arteries activates endothelial H1 receptors and causes endothelial production of nitric oxide. Migraine patients are thus supersensitive to exogenous nitric oxide from nitroglycerin as well as to endothelially produced nitric...... oxide. It is suggested that nitric oxide may be partially or completely responsible for migraine pain....

  5. Extraction of thorium(IV) from aqueous nitric acid solutions by Tri-iso-Amyl phosphate (TAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaiswal, S.; Rupainwar, D.C. (Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India). Inst. of Tech.)

    1984-03-01

    The indigenously prepared solvent tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TAP) obtained from fusel oil, a byproduct of Indian alcohol industry, has been successfully utilized to extract thorium(IV) from its aqueous nitrate solutions. Maximum extraction of the metal has been found under two different conditions; at 5.5 M (H/sub 3/O/sup +/), 94% of Th(IV) can be extracted by using 55% TAP in carbon tetrachloride (vol/vol) while at a lower acidity viz. pH range of 4.06-4.5 already 18% TAP in CCl/sub 4/ extracts thorium(IV) almost quantitatively. The effect of parameters such as (H/sub 3/O/sup +/), (Th(IV)) and diluent for TAP were investigated and discussed. In the above cases the species which is eventually extracted into the organic phase is found to be disolvated and trisolvated at pH 4.06 and (H/sub 3/O/sup +/)=5.5 M, resp. The mechanism of the extractions under two different conditions is suggested. 13 refs.

  6. Characteristic and mechanism of Th{sup 4+} sorption from nitric acid solutions by rice and wheat bran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monji, Akbar Boveiri [Kharazmi Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Chemistry; Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoulipour, Vanik [Kharazmi Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Chemistry; Mallah, Mohammad Hassan [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    In line with our previously conducted researches, various instrumental methods were applied to evaluate the adsorption features and mechanism of Th{sup 4+} from highly acidic solution (4M HNO{sub 3}) by rice and wheat bran. Although the results of cation exchange confirmed the existence of ion-exchange interaction in Th{sup 4+} adsorption, it had a trivial contribution in the biosorption process. The presence of Th{sup 4+} ions on the biomass surface was obviously revealed in SEM images and EDS elemental analysis. Moreover, the linkage of C=O, O-H and N-H functional groups on the biomass surface with Th{sup 4+} ions was clearly represented in the ATR-FTIR spectroscopic analysis. Additionally, desorption studies indicated that ammonium oxalate (>81.3%) and ammonium carbonate (>75.4%) were effective in desorbing Th{sup 4+} from the biomass surface due to strong interactions of hard functional groups of C=O with Th{sup 4+}. The overall observations unfold the fact that electrostatic complexation mechanism is dominant between biomass and Th{sup 4+} ions.

  7. Rapid Molecular Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis by PCR-Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphee, Hatairat; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Prammananan, Therdsak; Wiriyachaiporn, Natpapas; Kanchanatavee, Airin; Dharakul, Tararaj

    2015-01-01

    Several existing molecular tests for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) are limited by complexity and cost, hindering their widespread application. The objective of this proof of concept study was to develop a simple Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow (NALF) immunoassay as a potential diagnostic alternative, to complement conventional PCR, for the rapid molecular detection of MDR-TB. The NALF device was designed using antibodies for the indirect detection of labeled PCR amplification products. Multiplex PCR was optimized to permit the simultaneous detection of the drug resistant determining mutations in the 81-bp hot spot region of the rpoB gene (rifampicin resistance), while semi-nested PCR was optimized for the S315T mutation detection in the katG gene (isoniazid resistance). The amplification process additionally targeted a conserved region of the genes as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) DNA control. The optimized conditions were validated with the H37Rv wild-type (WT) Mtb isolate and Mtb isolates with known mutations (MT) within the rpoB and katG genes. Results indicate the correct identification of WT (drug susceptible) and MT (drug resistant) Mtb isolates, with the least limit of detection (LOD) being 104 genomic copies per PCR reaction. NALF is a simple, rapid and low-cost device suitable for low resource settings where conventional PCR is already employed on a regular basis. Moreover, the use of antibody-based NALF to target primer-labels, without the requirement for DNA hybridization, renders the device generic, which could easily be adapted for the molecular diagnosis of other infectious and non-infectious diseases requiring nucleic acid detection. PMID:26355296

  8. Rapid Molecular Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis by PCR-Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow Immunoassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatairat Kamphee

    Full Text Available Several existing molecular tests for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB are limited by complexity and cost, hindering their widespread application. The objective of this proof of concept study was to develop a simple Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow (NALF immunoassay as a potential diagnostic alternative, to complement conventional PCR, for the rapid molecular detection of MDR-TB. The NALF device was designed using antibodies for the indirect detection of labeled PCR amplification products. Multiplex PCR was optimized to permit the simultaneous detection of the drug resistant determining mutations in the 81-bp hot spot region of the rpoB gene (rifampicin resistance, while semi-nested PCR was optimized for the S315T mutation detection in the katG gene (isoniazid resistance. The amplification process additionally targeted a conserved region of the genes as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb DNA control. The optimized conditions were validated with the H37Rv wild-type (WT Mtb isolate and Mtb isolates with known mutations (MT within the rpoB and katG genes. Results indicate the correct identification of WT (drug susceptible and MT (drug resistant Mtb isolates, with the least limit of detection (LOD being 104 genomic copies per PCR reaction. NALF is a simple, rapid and low-cost device suitable for low resource settings where conventional PCR is already employed on a regular basis. Moreover, the use of antibody-based NALF to target primer-labels, without the requirement for DNA hybridization, renders the device generic, which could easily be adapted for the molecular diagnosis of other infectious and non-infectious diseases requiring nucleic acid detection.

  9. Rapid fluorometric determination of perfluorooctanoic acid by its quenching effect on the fluorescence of quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Huang, Aizhen; Wang, Nan, E-mail: nwang@hust.edu.cn; Zheng, Guan; Zhu, Lihua

    2015-05-15

    Analysis of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) usually requires a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, which is expensive and time-consuming. In the present work, water-soluble CdS quantum dots (QDs) were employed to develop a simple and rapid fluorometric method for the determination of PFOA. Strongly fluorescent CdS QDs were prepared by using 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a stabilizer. It was observed that PFOA strongly quenched the fluorescence emission of the MPA-CdS QDs because PFOA promotes the aggregation of MPA-CdS QDs through a fluorine–fluorine affinity interaction. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity of MPA-CdS QDs was observed to decrease linearly with an increase in the concentration of PFOA from 0.5 to 40 μmol L{sup −1}, with a limit of detection of 0.3 μmol L{sup −1}. This new method was successfully implemented for the analysis of PFOA-spiked textile samples, with recoveries ranging from 95% to 113%. - Highlights: • PFOA significantly quenched the fluorescence emission of quantum dots (QDs). • A rapid and simple fluorescence sensor was proposed for determining PFOA by QDs. • PFOA determination could be completed within approximately 10 min. • The developed method had a working range of 0.5 to 40 μmol L{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.3 μmol L{sup −1}.

  10. Rapid determination of hyaluronic acid concentration in fermentation broth with near-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Dong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA concentration is an important parameter in fermentation process. Currently, carbazole assay is widely used for HA content determination in routine analysis. However, this method is time-consuming, environment polluting and has the risk of microbial contamination, as well as the results lag behind fermentation process. This paper attempted the feasibility to predict the concentration of HA in fermentation broth by using near infrared (NIR spectroscopy in transmission mode. In this work, a total of 56 samples of fermentation broth from 7 batches were analyzed, which contained HA in the range of 2.35–9.69 g/L. Different data preprocessing methods were applied to construct calibration models. The final optimal model was obtained with first derivative using Savitzky–Golay smoothing (9 points window, second-order polynomial and partial least squares (PLS regression with leave-one-block-out cross validation. The correlation coefficient and Root Mean Square Error of prediction set is 0.98 and 0.43 g/L, respectively, which show the possibility of NIR as a rapid method for microanalysis and to be a promising tool for a rapid assay in HA fermentation.

  11. Synergic induction of human periodontal ligament fibroblast cell death by nitric oxide and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Taegun; Cha, Seho; Woo, Kyung Mi; Park, Yun-Soo; Cho, Yun-Mi; Lee, Jeong-Soon; Kim, Tae-Il

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been known as an important regulator of osteoblasts and periodontal ligament cell activity. This study was performed to investigate the relationship between NO-mediated cell death of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLFs) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist (+)-5-methyl-10, 11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5, 10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK801). Human PDLFs were treated with various concentrations (0 to 4 mM) of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) with or without 200 µM MK801 in culture media for 16 hours and the cell medium was then removed and replaced by fresh medium containing MTS reagent for cell proliferation assay. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate the effects of SNP on the expression of Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase-3 proteins. The differences for each value among the sample groups were compared using analysis of variance with 95% confidence intervals. In the case of SNP treatment, as a NO donor, cell viability was significantly decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, a synergistic effect was shown when both SNP and NMDA receptor antagonist was added to the medium. SNP treated PDLFs exhibited a round shape in culture conditions and were dramatically reduced in cell number. SNP treatment also increased levels of apoptotic marker protein, such as Bax and cytochrome c, and reduced caspase-3 in PDLFs. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling was activated by treatment of SNP and NMDA receptor antagonist. These results suggest that excessive production of NO may induce apoptosis and that NMDA receptor may modulate NO-induced apoptosis in PDLFs.

  12. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 1 (SNAT1 modulates L-citrulline transport and nitric oxide (NO signaling in piglet pulmonary arterial endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dikalova

    Full Text Available There is evidence that impairments in nitric oxide (NO signaling contribute to chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The L-arginine-NO precursor, L-citrulline, has been shown to ameliorate pulmonary hypertension. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporters (SNATs are involved in the transport of L-citrulline into pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs. The functional link between the SNATs, L-citrulline, and NO signaling has not yet been explored.We tested the hypothesis that changes in SNAT1 expression and transport function regulate NO production by modulating eNOS coupling in newborn piglet PAECs.A silencing RNA (siRNA technique was used to assess the contribution of SNAT1 to NO production and eNOS coupling (eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios in PAECs from newborn piglets cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in the presence and absence of L-citrulline. SNAT1 siRNA reduced basal NO production in normoxic PAECs and prevented L-citrulline-induced elevations in NO production in both normoxic and hypoxic PAECs. SNAT1 siRNA reduced basal eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios in normoxic PAECs and prevented L-citrulline-induced increases in eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios in hypoxic PAECs.SNAT1 mediated L-citrulline transport modulates eNOS coupling and thus regulates NO production in hypoxic PAECs from newborn piglets. Strategies that increase SNAT1-mediated transport and supply of L-citrulline may serve as novel therapeutic approaches to enhance NO production in patients with pulmonary vascular disease.

  13. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 1 (SNAT1) modulates L-citrulline transport and nitric oxide (NO) signaling in piglet pulmonary arterial endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikalova, Anna; Fagiana, Angela; Aschner, Judy L; Aschner, Michael; Summar, Marshall; Fike, Candice D

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that impairments in nitric oxide (NO) signaling contribute to chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The L-arginine-NO precursor, L-citrulline, has been shown to ameliorate pulmonary hypertension. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporters (SNATs) are involved in the transport of L-citrulline into pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs). The functional link between the SNATs, L-citrulline, and NO signaling has not yet been explored. We tested the hypothesis that changes in SNAT1 expression and transport function regulate NO production by modulating eNOS coupling in newborn piglet PAECs. A silencing RNA (siRNA) technique was used to assess the contribution of SNAT1 to NO production and eNOS coupling (eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios) in PAECs from newborn piglets cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in the presence and absence of L-citrulline. SNAT1 siRNA reduced basal NO production in normoxic PAECs and prevented L-citrulline-induced elevations in NO production in both normoxic and hypoxic PAECs. SNAT1 siRNA reduced basal eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios in normoxic PAECs and prevented L-citrulline-induced increases in eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios in hypoxic PAECs. SNAT1 mediated L-citrulline transport modulates eNOS coupling and thus regulates NO production in hypoxic PAECs from newborn piglets. Strategies that increase SNAT1-mediated transport and supply of L-citrulline may serve as novel therapeutic approaches to enhance NO production in patients with pulmonary vascular disease.

  14. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis capsule induces nitric oxide production via the platelet activating factor receptor signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Kyu; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Jungchan; Rhie, Gi-Eun

    2015-12-01

    The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule, a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, confers protection of the bacillus from phagocytosis and allows its unimpeded growth in the host. PGA capsules released from B. anthracis are associated with lethal toxin in the blood of experimentally infected animals and enhance the cytotoxic effect of lethal toxin on macrophages. In addition, PGA capsule itself activates macrophages and dendritic cells to produce proinflammatory cytokine such as IL-1β, indicating multiple roles of PGA capsule in anthrax pathogenesis. Here we report that PGA capsule of Bacillus licheniformis, a surrogate of B. anthracis capsule, induces production of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. NO production was induced by PGA in a dose-dependent manner and was markedly reduced by inhibitors of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), suggesting iNOS-dependent production of NO. Induction of NO production by PGA was not observed in macrophages from TLR2-deficient mice and was also substantially inhibited in RAW264.7 cells by pretreatment of TLR2 blocking antibody. Subsequently, the downstream signaling events such as ERK, JNK and p38 of MAPK pathways as well as NF-κB activation were required for PGA-induced NO production. In addition, the induced NO production was significantly suppressed by treatment with antagonists of platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) or PAFR siRNA, and mediated through PAFR/Jak2/STAT-1 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that PGA capsule induces NO production in macrophages by triggering both TLR2 and PAFR signaling pathways which lead to activation of NF-kB and STAT-1, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Formation of stratospheric nitric acid by a hydrated ion cluster reaction: chemical and dynamical effects of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvissel, O. K.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Stordal, F.

    2012-04-01

    In order to Improve our understanding of the effects of energetic particle precipitation upon the nitrogen family (NOy) and ozone (O3), we have modelled the chemical and dynamical middle atmosphere response to the introduction of a chemical pathway that produces nitric acid (HNO3) by conversion of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) upon hydrated water clusters H+•(H2O)n. We have used an ensemble of simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole-Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) chemistry-climate model. The introduced chemical pathway alters the internal partitioning of NOy during winter months in both hemispheres, and ultimately triggers statistically significant changes in the climatological distributions of constituents including: i) a cold season production of HNO3 with a corresponding loss of N2O5, and ii) a cold season decrease in NOx/NOy-ratio and an increase of O3, in polar regions. We see an improved seasonal evolution of modelled HNO3 compared to satellite observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), albeit not enough HNO3 is produced at high altitudes. Through O3 changes, both temperature and dynamics are affected, allowing for complex chemical-dynamical feedbacks beyond the cold season when the introduced pathway is active. Hence, we also find a NOx polar increase in spring-to-summer in the SH, and in spring in the NH. The springtime NOx increase arises from anomalously strong poleward transport associated with a weaker polar vortex. In the southern hemisphere, a statistical significant weakening of the stratospheric jet is altered down to the lower stratosphere, and we argue that it is caused by strengthened planetary waves induced by mid-latitude zonal asymmetries in O3 and short-wave heating.

  16. Microflow Visualization of Tri-n-butyl-Phosphate/Dodecane and Nitric Acid in a Centrifugal Contactor. Part I: Flow Regimes, Transitions and Hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor [Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States); Birdwell Jr, Joseph F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DePaoli, David W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Despite the common use of centrifugal contactors in nuclear solvent extraction ap- plications, much is unknown about the underlying micro ow structure. This lack of knowledge hampers the development of a modern continuum theory able to predict mixing and transport phenomena for solvent extraction processes. The ability to observe the micromixing ow and distinguish the motion and con guration of the phases involved is of great importance theoretically and practically. To that end, we report on direct, high-speed visualization of the micro ow structure for the tri-n- butyl-phosphate (TBP)/dodecane/nitric acid system. Further insight is obtained by simultaneous measurement of the electrical resistance of the phase mixture to support visual observations. This work sheds light on a fluid micro ow region at the foot of the mixing zone of the contactor resolving the microsecond/micrometer motion of the continuous and dispersed phases. The system in this study is the most prevalent solvent extraction combination used in the nuclear reprocessing industry to extract metal ions from spent nuclear fuel from a nitric acid aqueous solution into an organic mixture of TBP and dodecane. The purpose of this work is to describe salient features of the behavior of this system, heretofore unknown, to guide the development of a predictive modeling and simulation approach. The time and space resolution of the high-speed video imaging equipment used allowed for the identification of the dispersed phases for various combinations of ow rates of the organic and aqueous streams at realistic operating conditions. Two ow regimes were found, namely, an aqueous-continuous (organic-dispersed) regime, and an organic-continuous (aqueous-dispersed) regime with an associated hysteresis loop. In addition, in both ow regimes there was always a dispersed gas phase resulting from significant air entrainment. This study identified local details of the dispersed phase state at all ow conditions. For

  17. Mechanism of the extraction of nitric acid and water by organic solutions of tertiary alkyl-amines; Mecanisme d'extraction de l'acide nitrique et de l'eau par les solutions organiques d'alcoylamines tertiaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourisse, D

    1966-06-01

    The micellar aggregation of tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrates in low polarity organic solvents has been verified by viscosity, conductivity and sedimentation velocity measurements. The aggregation depends upon the polarity of solvent, the length of the alkyl radicals and the organic concentration of the various constituents (tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrate, tri-alkyl-amine, nitric acid, water). The amine salification law has been established and the excess nitric acid and water solubilities in the organic solutions have been measured. Nitric acid and water are slightly more soluble in micellar organic solutions than in molecular organic solutions. A description of excess nitric acid containing tri-alkyl-ammonium nitrate solutions is proposed. (author) [French] Mecanisme d'extraction de l'acide nitrique et de l'eau par les solutions organiques d'alcoylamines tertiaires. L'agregation micellaire des nitrates de trialcoylammonium dans les solvants peu polaires a ete verifiee par viscosimetrie, conductimetrie et ultracentrifugation des solutions organiques. L'agregation depend de la polarite du solvant, de la longueur des radicaux alcoyle, et des concentrations des differents constituants de la solution organique (nitrate de trialcoylammonium, alcoylamine tertiaire, acide nitrique, eau). La loi de salification de l'amine a ete determinee et les solubilites de l'acide nitrique en exces et de l'eau dans les solutions organiques ont ete mesurees. L'acide nitrique et l'eau sont legerement plus solubles dans les organiques micellaires que dans les solutions organiques moleculaires. Une description des solutions de nitrate de trialcoylammonium contenant de l'acide nitrique en exces est proposee. (auteur)

  18. Comparison of Xpert Flu rapid nucleic acid testing with rapid antigen testing for the diagnosis of influenza A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaio, Michael A; Sahoo, Malaya K; Waggoner, Jesse; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2012-12-01

    Influenza infections are associated with thousands of hospital admissions and deaths each year. Rapid detection of influenza is important for prompt initiation of antiviral therapy and appropriate patient triage. In this study the Cepheid Xpert Flu assay was compared with two rapid antigen tests, BinaxNOW Influenza A & B and BD Directigen EZ Flu A+B, as well as direct fluorescent antibody testing for the rapid detection of influenza A and B. Using real-time, hydrolysis probe-based, reverse transcriptase PCR as the reference method, influenza A sensitivity was 97.3% for Xpert Flu, 95.9% for direct fluorescent antibody testing, 62.2% for BinaxNOW, and 71.6% for BD Directigen. Influenza B sensitivity was 100% for Xpert Flu and direct fluorescent antibody testing, 54.5% for BinaxNOW, and 48.5% for BD Directigen. Specificity for influenza A was 100% for Xpert Flu, BinaxNOW, and BD Directigen, and 99.2% for direct fluorescent antibody testing. All methods demonstrated 100% specificity for influenza B. These findings support the use of the Xpert Flu assay in settings requiring urgent diagnosis of influenza A and B. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Catalytic abatement of nitrous oxide from nitric and production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric acid production is identified as a main source of nitrous oxide. Options for emission reduction however are not available. TNO and Hydro Agri studied the technological and economic feasibility of catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide in nitric acid tail-gases. Although in literature

  20. Hydrogen Sulfide Generated by l-Cysteine Desulfhydrase Acts Upstream of Nitric Oxide to Modulate Abscisic Acid-Dependent Stomatal Closure1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuffi, Denise; Álvarez, Consolación; Laspina, Natalia; Gotor, Cecilia; Lamattina, Lorenzo; García-Mata, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a well-studied regulator of stomatal movement. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a small signaling gas molecule involved in key physiological processes in mammals, has been recently reported as a new component of the ABA signaling network in stomatal guard cells. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), H2S is enzymatically produced in the cytosol through the activity of l-cysteine desulfhydrase (DES1). In this work, we used DES1 knockout Arabidopsis mutant plants (des1) to study the participation of DES1 in the cross talk between H2S and nitric oxide (NO) in the ABA-dependent signaling network in guard cells. The results show that ABA did not close the stomata in isolated epidermal strips of des1 mutants, an effect that was restored by the application of exogenous H2S. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that ABA induces DES1 expression in guard cell-enriched RNA extracts from wild-type Arabidopsis plants. Furthermore, stomata from isolated epidermal strips of Arabidopsis ABA receptor mutant pyrabactin-resistant1 (pyr1)/pyrabactin-like1 (pyl1)/pyl2/pyl4 close in response to exogenous H2S, suggesting that this gasotransmitter is acting downstream, although acting independently of the ABA receptor cannot be ruled out with this data. However, the Arabidopsis clade-A PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE2C mutant abscisic acid-insensitive1 (abi1-1) does not close the stomata when epidermal strips were treated with H2S, suggesting that H2S required a functional ABI1. Further studies to unravel the cross talk between H2S and NO indicate that (1) H2S promotes NO production, (2) DES1 is required for ABA-dependent NO production, and (3) NO is downstream of H2S in ABA-induced stomatal closure. Altogether, data indicate that DES1 is a unique component of ABA signaling in guard cells. PMID:25266633

  1. L-theanine, a Component of Green Tea Prevents 3-Nitropropionic Acid (3-NP)-Induced Striatal Toxicity by Modulating Nitric Oxide Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Sumit; Kumar, Puneet

    2017-04-01

    L-theanine is unique amino acid which readily crosses blood brain barrier and possesses neuroprotective potential against neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington disease (HD). HD is characterized by selective loss of GABAergic medium spiny neurons. 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) induces a spectrum of HD-like neuropathology in rat striatum and widely used as experimental tool to study HD. Therefore, the present study was intended to investigate the effect of L-theanine against 3-NP-induced striatal toxicity and to explore its possible mechanism. Rats were administered with 3-NP for 21 days. L-theanine was given once a day, 1 h prior to 3-NP treatment for 21 days and L-NAME (10 mg/kg, i.p.), NO inhibitor and L-arginine (50 mg/kg; i.p.), NO precursor were administered 1 h prior to L-theanine treatment. Body weight and behavioral observation were made on weekly basis. On the 22nd day, animals were sacrificed, and the striatum was isolated for biochemical (LPO, GSH, and nitrite), pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurochemical analysis. 3-NP treatment significantly altered body weight, locomotor activity, motor coordination, mitochondrial complex-II activity, oxidative defense, pro-inflammatory mediators, and striatal neurotransmitters level. L-theanine pre-treatment (25 and 50 mg/kg/day, p.o.) significantly prevented these alterations. In addition, concurrent treatment of L-NAME with L-theanine (25 mg/kg/day, p.o.) significantly enhanced protective effect of L-theanine (25 mg/kg/day, p.o.) whereas concurrent treatment of L-arginine with L-theanine (50 mg/kg/day, p.o.) significantly ameliorated the protective effect of L-theanine (50 mg/kg/day, p.o.). The neuroprotective potential of L-theanine involves inhibition of detrimental nitric oxide production and prevention of neurotransmitters alteration in the striatum.

  2. Characterization of Group V Dubnium Homologs on DGA Extraction Chromatography Resin from Nitric and Hydrofluoric Acid Matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Despotopulos, J D; Sudowe, R

    2012-02-21

    somewhere between Nb and Pa. Much more recent studies have examined the properties of Db from HNO{sub 3}/HF matrices, and suggest Db forms complexes similar to those of Pa. Very little experimental work into the behavior of element 114 has been performed. Thermochromatography experiments of three atoms of element 114 indicate that the element 114 is at least as volatile as Hg, At, and element 112. Lead was shown to deposit on gold at temperatures about 1000 C higher than the atoms of element 114. Results indicate a substantially increased stability of element 114. No liquid phase studies of element 114 or its homologs (Pb, Sn, Ge) or pseudo-homologs (Hg, Cd) have been performed. Theoretical predictions indicate that element 114 is should have a much more stable +2 oxidation state and neutral state than Pb, which would result in element 114 being less reactive and less metallic than Pb. The relativistic effects on the 7p{sub 1/2} electrons are predicted to cause a diagonal relationship to be introduced into the periodic table. Therefore, 114{sup 2+} is expected to behave as if it were somewhere between Hg{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Pb{sup 2+}. In this work two commercially available extraction chromatography resins are evaluated, one for the separation of Db homologs and pseudo?homologs from each other as well as from potential interfering elements such as Group IV Rf homologs and actinides, and the other for separation of element 114 homologs. One resin, Eichrom's DGA resin, contains a N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide extractant, which separates analytes based on both size and charge characteristics of the solvated metal species, coated on an inert support. The DGA resin was examined for Db chemical systems, and shows a high degree of selectivity for tri-, tetra-, and hexavalent metal ions in multiple acid matrices with fast kinetics. The other resin, Eichrom's Pb resin, contains a di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 extractant with isodecanol solvent

  3. Rapid analysis of formic acid, acetic acid, and furfural in pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and ethanol in a bioethanol fermentation using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) offers advantages as a rapid analytical technique for the quantification of three biomass degradation products (acetic acid, formic acid and furfural) within pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and the analysis of ethanol during fermentation. The data we obtained using APCI-MS correlated significantly with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis whilst offering the analyst minimal sample preparation and faster sample throughput. PMID:21896164

  4. Rapid adhesion of nerve cells to muscle fibers from adult rats is mediated by a sialic acid-binding receptor

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Single viable muscle fibers isolated from adult rats by collagenase digestion rapidly bind dissociated spinal neurons or PC-12 cells but not a variety of other cells tested. The adhesion process is calcium- independent, temperature-sensitive, and is not blocked by pretreating cells with inhibitors of energy metabolism or actin polymerization. Adhesion is mediated by a carbohydrate-binding protein and can be inhibited by N-acetylneuraminic acid or mucin, a glycoprotein with high sialic acids c...

  5. A Rapid and Efficient Sonogashira Protocol and Improved Synthesis of Free Fatty Acid 1 (FFA1) Receptor Agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E; Ulven, Trond

    2010-01-01

    A protocol for rapid and efficient Pd/Cu-catalyzed coupling of aryl bromides and iodides to terminal alkynes has been developed with use of 2-(di-tert-butylphosphino)-N-phenylindole (cataCXium PIntB) as ligand in TMEDA and water. The new protocol successfully couples substrates which failed with ...... with standard Sonogashira conditions, and enables an efficient general synthetic route to free fatty acid 1 (FFA1) receptor ligands from 3-(4-bromophenyl)propionic acid....

  6. Supplementing essential amino acids with the nitric oxide precursor, l-arginine, enhances skeletal muscle perfusion without impacting anabolism in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, W Kyle; Phillips, Bethan E; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Williams, John P; Rankin, Debbie; Lund, Jonathan N; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2017-12-01

    Postprandial limb blood flow and skeletal muscle microvascular perfusion reduce with aging. Here we tested the impact of providing bolus essential amino acids (EAA) in the presence and absence of the nitric oxide precursor, l-Arginine (ARG), upon skeletal muscle blood flow and anabolism in older men. Healthy young (YOUNG: 19.7 ± 0.5 y, N = 8) and older men (OLD, 70 ± 0.8 y, N = 8) received 15 g EAA or (older only) 15 g EAA +3 g ARG (OLD-ARG, 69.2 ± 1.2 y, N = 8). We quantified responses in muscle protein synthesis (MPS; incorporation of 13C phenylalanine into myofibrillar proteins), leg and muscle microvascular blood flow (Doppler/contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)) and insulin/EAA in response to EEA ± ARG. Plasma EAA increased similarly across groups but argininemia was evident solely in OLD-ARG (∼320 mmol, 65 min post feed); increases in plasma insulin (to ∼13 IU ml-1) were similar across groups. Increases in femoral flow were evident in YOUNG >2 h after feeding; these effects were blunted in OLD and OLD-ARG. Increases in microvascular blood volume (MBV) occurred only in YOUNG and these effects were isolated to the early postprandial phase (+45% at ∼45 min after feeding) coinciding with detectable arterio-venous differences in EAA reflecting net uptake by muscle. Increases in microvascular flow velocity (MFV) and tissue perfusion (MBV × MFV) occurred (∼2 h) in YOUNG and OLD-ARG, but not OLD. Postprandial protein accretion was greater in YOUNG than OLD or OLD-ARG; the latter two groups being indistinguishable. Therefore, ARG rescues aspects of muscle perfusion in OLD without impacting anabolic blunting, perhaps due to the "rescue" being beyond the period of active EAA-uptake. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  7. Accurate Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitric acid (HNO3) calibrated with synthetic spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Edgar; Viallon, Joële; Moussay, Philippe; Wielgosz, Robert Ian

    2013-10-01

    A novel method for determining the accuracy of laboratory-based measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitric acid (HNO3) mole fractions using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy 1 cm(-1) resolution instruments calibrated with synthetic spectra has been developed. The traceability of these measurement results is to the reference line strength data contained within the high-resolution transmission molecular absorption (HITRAN) database. Incorporating a proper estimate of the uncertainty of this data into the measurement results will ensure that the SI traceable values are encompassed within the uncertainty of the measurement results. The major contributors to the uncertainties of the results are, in descending order of importance, the uncertainty in the line strength values (HITRAN 2004), the uncertainty attributed to the generation of reference spectra (including knowledge of the optical path length of the FT-IR gas cell), and temperature measurements of the gas. The stability of the FT-IR instrument itself is only a minor contributor to the overall uncertainty of the measurements. FT-IR measurements of NO2 mole fractions at nominal values of 10 μmol mol(-1) calibrated with synthetic spectra lead to standard uncertainties of 0.34 μmol mol(-1) (3.4% relative). In contrast, calibration of the FT-IR instrument with SI traceable gas standards generated by a dynamic weighing system resulted in measurements results with standard uncertainties of 0.04 μmol mol(-1) (0.4% relative). When comparing the consistency of measurement results based on the synthetic calibration method against those obtained by calibrations with SI traceable gas standards, the existence of a potential bias of ~5% was observed, although this was within the stated uncertainties of the results. The FT-IR measurements of HNO3 mole fractions at nominal values of 200 nmol mol(-1) calibrated with synthetic spectra resulted in values with standard uncertainties of 23 nmol mol(-1) (11

  8. Measurement of humic and fulvic acid concentrations and dissolution properties by a rapid batch procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Zomeren, A.; Comans, R.N.J. [ECN Biomass, Coal and Environmental Research, Petten (Netherlands)

    2007-08-29

    Although humic substances (HS) strongly facilitate the transport of metals and hydrophobic organic contaminants in environmental systems, their measurement is hampered by the time-consuming nature of currently available methods for their isolation and purification. We present and apply a new rapid batch method to measure humic (HA) and fulvic (FA) acid concentrations and dissolution properties in both solid and aqueous samples. The method is compared with the conventional procedures and is shown to substantially facilitate HS concentration measurements, particularly for applications such as geochemical modeling where HS purification is not required. The new method can be performed within 1.5-4 h per sample and multiple samples can be processed simultaneously, while the conventional procedures typically require approximately 40 h for a single sample. In addition, specific dissolution properties of HS are identified and are consistent with recent views on the molecular structure of HS that emphasize molecular interactions of smaller entities over distinct macromolecular components. Because the principles of the new method are essentially the same as those of generally accepted conventional procedures, the identified HA and FA properties are of general importance for the interpretation of the environmental occurrence and behavior of HS.

  9. Co-extraction and co-stripping of U(VI) and Pu(IV) using tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate in n-dodecane from nitric acid media under high loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreenivasulu, Balija; Suresh, Ammath; Sivaraman, Nagarajan; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Chemistry Group

    2016-08-01

    The extraction of Pu(IV) using 1.1 M solution of tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP)/n-dodecane (DD) from plutonium nitrate solutions in nitric acid media was examined as a function of equilibrium aqueous phase metal ion concentration and equilibrium aqueous phase acidity at 303 K. The nitric acid concentration in the organic phase was measured as a function of equilibrium organic phase plutonium concentration. The co-extraction of U(VI) and Pu(IV) was studied using 1.1 M TiAP/DD system as a function of their equilibrium aqueous phase metal ion concentration and compared with 1.1 M tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/n-DD system under identical conditions. Co-extraction and co-stripping of U(VI) and Pu(IV) were studied using 1.1 M TiAP/DD and 1.1 M TBP/DD systems in cross current mode to evaluate the number of stages required for the extraction and stripping of heavy metal ions (uranium and plutonium). The extraction and stripping efficiencies were calculated for both the systems. The saturation limit of the organic phase was also established in these studies.

  10. Rapid cycling of reactive nitrogen in the marine boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chunxiang; Zhou, Xianliang; Pu, Dennis; Stutz, Jochen; Festa, James; Spolaor, Max; Tsai, Catalina; Cantrell, Christopher; Mauldin, Roy L; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew; Hornbrook, Rebecca S; Apel, Eric C; Guenther, Alex; Kaser, Lisa; Yuan, Bin; Karl, Thomas; Haggerty, Julie; Hall, Samuel; Ullmann, Kirk; Smith, James N; Ortega, John; Knote, Christoph

    2016-04-28

    Nitrogen oxides are essential for the formation of secondary atmospheric aerosols and of atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and the hydroxyl radical, which controls the self-cleansing capacity of the atmosphere. Nitric acid, a major oxidation product of nitrogen oxides, has traditionally been considered to be a permanent sink of nitrogen oxides. However, model studies predict higher ratios of nitric acid to nitrogen oxides in the troposphere than are observed. A 'renoxification' process that recycles nitric acid into nitrogen oxides has been proposed to reconcile observations with model studies, but the mechanisms responsible for this process remain uncertain. Here we present data from an aircraft measurement campaign over the North Atlantic Ocean and find evidence for rapid recycling of nitric acid to nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides in the clean marine boundary layer via particulate nitrate photolysis. Laboratory experiments further demonstrate the photolysis of particulate nitrate collected on filters at a rate more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of gaseous nitric acid, with nitrous acid as the main product. Box model calculations based on the Master Chemical Mechanism suggest that particulate nitrate photolysis mainly sustains the observed levels of nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides at midday under typical marine boundary layer conditions. Given that oceans account for more than 70 per cent of Earth's surface, we propose that particulate nitrate photolysis could be a substantial tropospheric nitrogen oxide source. Recycling of nitrogen oxides in remote oceanic regions with minimal direct nitrogen oxide emissions could increase the formation of tropospheric oxidants and secondary atmospheric aerosols on a global scale.

  11. Rapid phosphatidic acid accumulation in response to low temperature stress in Arabidopsis is generated through diacylglycerol kinase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arisz, S.A.; van Wijk, R.; Roels, W.; Zhu, J.K.; Haring, M.A.; Munnik, T.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) is emerging as an important signaling lipid in abiotic stress responses in plants. The effect of cold stress was monitored using (32)P-labeled seedlings and leaf discs of Arabidopsis thaliana. Low, non-freezing temperatures were found to trigger a very rapid (32)P-PtdOH

  12. Solvent Extraction of Rare Earth Elements from a Nitric Acid Leach Solution of Apatite by Mixtures of Tributyl Phosphate and Di-(2-ethylhexyl) Phosphoric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdowsi, Ali; Yoozbashizadeh, Hossein

    2017-09-01

    Solvent extraction of rare earths from nitrate leach liquor of apatite using mixtures of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) was studied. The effects of nitrate and hydrogen ion concentration of the aqueous phase as well as the composition and concentration of extractants in the organic phase on the extraction behavior of lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, and yttrium were investigated. The distribution ratio of REEs increases by increasing the nitrate concentration in aqueous phase and concentration of extractants in organic phase, but the hydrogen ion concentration in aqueous phase has a decreasing effect. Yttrium as a heavy rare earth is more sensitive to these parameters than light rare earth elements. Although the composition of organic phase has a minor effect on the extraction of light rare earths, the percent of extraction of yttrium decreases dramatically by increasing the TBP content of organic phase. Mixtures of TBP and D2EHPA can show either synergism or antagonism extraction depending on the concentration and composition of extractants in organic phase. The best condition for separating rare earth elements in groups of heavy and light REEs can be achieved at high nitrate concentration, low H+ concentration, and high concentration of D2EHPA in organic phase. Separation of Ce and La by TBP and D2EHPA is practically impossible in the studied conditions; however, low nitrate concentration and high hydrogen ion concentration in aqueous phase and low concentration of extractants in organic phase favor the separation of Nd from other light rare earth elements.

  13. Solvent Extraction of Rare Earth Elements from a Nitric Acid Leach Solution of Apatite by Mixtures of Tributyl Phosphate and Di-(2-ethylhexyl) Phosphoric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdowsi, Ali; Yoozbashizadeh, Hossein

    2017-12-01

    Solvent extraction of rare earths from nitrate leach liquor of apatite using mixtures of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) was studied. The effects of nitrate and hydrogen ion concentration of the aqueous phase as well as the composition and concentration of extractants in the organic phase on the extraction behavior of lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, and yttrium were investigated. The distribution ratio of REEs increases by increasing the nitrate concentration in aqueous phase and concentration of extractants in organic phase, but the hydrogen ion concentration in aqueous phase has a decreasing effect. Yttrium as a heavy rare earth is more sensitive to these parameters than light rare earth elements. Although the composition of organic phase has a minor effect on the extraction of light rare earths, the percent of extraction of yttrium decreases dramatically by increasing the TBP content of organic phase. Mixtures of TBP and D2EHPA can show either synergism or antagonism extraction depending on the concentration and composition of extractants in organic phase. The best condition for separating rare earth elements in groups of heavy and light REEs can be achieved at high nitrate concentration, low H+ concentration, and high concentration of D2EHPA in organic phase. Separation of Ce and La by TBP and D2EHPA is practically impossible in the studied conditions; however, low nitrate concentration and high hydrogen ion concentration in aqueous phase and low concentration of extractants in organic phase favor the separation of Nd from other light rare earth elements.

  14. Rapid hydrolysis of proteins and peptides by means of microwave technology and its application to amino acid analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S T; Chiou, S H; Chu, Y H; Wang, K T

    1987-10-01

    A rapid heating method of hydrolysis by the use of microwave oven has been applied to amino acid analysis of proteins and peptides. This convenient method has been compared with the conventional 6 N HCl hydrolysis at 110 degrees for 24 h. The advantages of this new method are its expedition and the accurate and comparable results as compared to the tedious conventional technique. The method provides a rapid processing of multiple samples within minutes instead of days and inexpensive access to the important data of amino acid compositions of proteins by the commonly used microwave oven. The necessary change in the design of hydrolysis vials and the safety precautions accompanying this novel use of microwave acid-digestion method are also described.

  15. Anode material selection criteria for selective oxidation of inorganic compounds in nitric acid media; Criteres de selection de materiaux d'anodes pour l'oxydation selective de solutes mineraux en milieu nitrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eysseric, C.; Arnaud, O. [CEA Valrho, (DCC/DRRV/SPHA), 30 - Marcoule (France); Savall, A. [Universite Paul Sabatier, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2000-07-01

    Significant progress has been made since the 19606 in developing highly effective anode materials for electrochemical processes, The problem areas currently facing electrochemistry researchers include investigating new composite materials obtained by grafting or doping, improving fabrication techniques to extend the lifetime of the materials while maintaining their selectivity, studying their electrochemical properties and relating them to the material structure. Research on materials with high oxygen over-potentials-materials on which water oxidation is kinetically affected, and which open an electro-activity window on high potentials (2.0 V{sub ESH} or greater) - has opened new avenues such as the use of various metallic oxide deposits. Two oxide classes were identified from a structural standpoint on the basis of their water oxidation properties: chemisorbed active oxygen anodes (e.g. PtO{sub x}, IrO{sub 2} or RuO{sub 2}) and physi-sorbed active oxygen anodes (e.g. SnO{sub 2} or PbO{sub 2}). Selective electrochemical generation of powerful oxidants between 1.4 and 2.0 VESH in concentrated nitric acid media is used in the context of the nuclear fuel cycle, and the potential advantages of new materials with a high oxygen over-potential-other than widely used platinum-have attracted attention. The relevant physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of such materials were therefore investigated to assess their selective oxidation performance. The study focused in particular on identifying the specific aspects of concentrated nitric acid media in the processes occurring at the electrode/solution interface, using linear and cyclic voltammetry, imposed-potential electrolysis and impedance spectroscopy. This approach allowed characterization of the electron charge transfer kinetics of the medium (nitric acid, compared with other acids such as methane sulfonic acid) and of the selected redox couple (Ag(II)/Ag(I) in this case). The tests covered a wide range of

  16. Opposing effects of D-aspartic acid and nitric oxide on tuning of testosterone production in mallard testis during the reproductive cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assisi Loredana

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background D-Aspartic acid (D-Asp and nitric oxide (NO play an important role in tuning testosterone production in the gonads of male vertebrates. In particular, D-Asp promotes either the synthesis or the release of testosterone, whereas NO inhibits it. In this study, we have investigated for the first time in birds the putative effects of D-Asp and NO on testicular testosterone production in relation to two phases of the reproductive cycle of the adult captive wild-strain mallard (Anas platyrhynchos drake. It is a typical seasonal breeder and its cycle consists of a short reproductive period (RP in the spring (April-May and a non reproductive period (NRP in the summer (July, a time when the gonads are quiescent. The presence and the localization of D-Asp and NO in the testis and the trends of D-Asp, NO and testosterone levels were assessed during the main phases of the bird's reproductive cycle. Furthermore, in vitro experiments revealed the direct effect of exogenously administered D-Asp and NO on testosterone steroidogenesis. Methods By using immunohistochemical (IHC techniques, we studied the presence and the distributional pattern of D-Asp and NO in the testes of RP and NRP drakes. D-Asp levels were evaluated by an enzymatic method, whereas NO content, via nitrite, was assessed using biochemical measurements. Finally, immunoenzymatic techniques determined testicular testosterone levels. Results IHC analyses revealed the presence of D-Asp and NO in Leydig cells. The distributional pattern of both molecules was in some way correlated to the steroidogenic pathway, which is involved in autocrine testosterone production. Indeed, whereas NO was present only during the NRP, D-Asp was almost exclusively present during the RP. Consistently, the high testosterone testicular content occurring during RP was coupled to a high D-Asp level and a low NO content in the gonad. By contrast, in sexually inactive drakes (NRP, the low testosterone

  17. Absorption of nitric oxide into aqueous solutions of ferrous chelates accompanied by instantaneous reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demmink, J.F; vanGils, I.C.F.; Beenackers, A.A C M

    1997-01-01

    The absorption of nitric oxide (NO) into aqueous solutions of ferrous chelates of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) was studied in a stirred cell reactor. Experimental

  18. Potential of fermentation profiling via rapid measurement of amino acid metabolism by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalluge, Joseph J; Smith, Sean; Sanchez-Riera, Fernando; McGuire, Chris; Hobson, Russell

    2004-07-16

    Monitoring amino acid metabolism during fermentation has significant potential from the standpoint of strain selection, optimizing growth and production in host strains, and profiling microbial metabolism and growth state. A method has been developed based on rapid quantification of underivatized amino acids using liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to monitor the metabolism of 20 amino acids during microbial fermentation. The use of a teicoplanin-based chiral stationary phase coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry allows complete amino acid analyses in less than 4 min. Quantification is accomplished using five isotopically labeled amino acids as internal standards. Because comprehensive chromatographic separation and derivatization are not required, analysis time is significantly less than traditional reversed- or normal-phase LC-based amino acid assays. Intra-sample precisions for amino acid measurements in fermentation supernatants using this method average 4.9% (R.S.D.). Inter-day (inter-fermentation) precisions for individual amino acid measurements range from 4.2 to 129% (R.S.D.). Calibration curves are linear over the range 0-300 microg/ml, and detection limits are estimated at 50-450 ng/ml. Data visualization techniques for constructing semi-quantitative fermentation profiles of nitrogen source utilization have also been developed and implemented, and demonstrate that amino acid profiles generally correlate with observed growth profiles. Further, cellular growth events, such as lag-time and cell lysis can be detected using this methodology. Correlation coefficients for the time profiles of each amino acid measured illustrate that while several amino acids are differentially metabolized in similar fermentations, a select group of amino acids display strong correlations in these samples, indicating a sub-population of analytes that may be most useful for fermentation profiling.

  19. Heterogeneous uptake of gaseous nitric acid on dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2) and calcite (CaCO3) particles: a Knudsen cell study using multiple, single, and fractional particle layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth R; Sciegienka, Joanna; Carlos-Cuellar, Sofia; Grassian, Vicki H

    2005-08-11

    In this study, the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous nitric acid on dolomite, CaMg(CO3)2, and calcite, CaCO3, particles under dry conditions at 296 K was investigated. A Knudsen cell reactor was used to measure heterogeneous uptake coefficients for these reactions. Several different experiments were performed including those on many, single, and fractional layers of particles. For experiments using multiple particle layers, the Knudsen cell data were modeled to take into account gas diffusion into the underlying layers of the sample. From this analysis, initial heterogeneous uptake coefficients, gamma(o,t), were determined to be (5 +/- 2) x 10(-4) and (2 +/- 1) x 10(-3), for dolomite and calcite, respectively, at a nitric acid concentration of 6.5 x 10(10) molecules cm(-3). For experiments that employed single or fractional particle layers, the initial heterogeneous uptake coefficient was analyzed using a recent method described in the literature. Values of the initial heterogeneous uptake coefficient using this analysis were in agreement with the above analysis and determined to be (7 +/- 4) x 10(-4) and (2 +/- 0.4) x 10(-3) for CaMg(CO3)2 and CaCO3, respectively. In addition, these results are compared to previous literature values.

  20. Simple and Rapid Determination of Ferulic Acid Levels in Food and Cosmetic Samples Using Paper-Based Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee-ngam, Prinjaporn; Nunant, Namthip; Rattanarat, Poomrat; Siangproh, Weena; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2013-01-01

    Ferulic acid is an important phenolic antioxidant found in or added to diet supplements, beverages, and cosmetic creams. Two designs of paper-based platforms for the fast, simple and inexpensive evaluation of ferulic acid contents in food and pharmaceutical cosmetics were evaluated. The first, a paper-based electrochemical device, was developed for ferulic acid detection in uncomplicated matrix samples and was created by the photolithographic method. The second, a paper-based colorimetric device was preceded by thin layer chromatography (TLC) for the separation and detection of ferulic acid in complex samples using a silica plate stationary phase and an 85:15:1 (v/v/v) chloroform: methanol: formic acid mobile phase. After separation, ferulic acid containing section of the TLC plate was attached onto the patterned paper containing the colorimetric reagent and eluted with ethanol. The resulting color change was photographed and quantitatively converted to intensity. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection of ferulic acid was found to be 1 ppm and 7 ppm (S/N = 3) for first and second designs, respectively, with good agreement with the standard HPLC-UV detection method. Therefore, these methods can be used for the simple, rapid, inexpensive and sensitive quantification of ferulic acid in a variety of samples. PMID:24077320

  1. Rapid determination of ginkgolic acids in Ginkgo biloba kernels and leaves by direct analysis in real time-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongping; Xu, Yueting; Huang, Yilei; Liu, Charles; Jiang, Kezhi; Wang, Lili

    2017-11-14

    A novel method based on direct analysis in real time integrated with mass spectrometry was established and applied into rapid determination of ginkgolic acids in Ginkgo biloba kernels and leaves. Instrument parameter settings were optimized to obtain the sensitive and accurate determination of ginkgolic acids. At the sample introduction speed of 0.2 mm/s, high intensity of [M-H]- ions for ginkgolic acids were observed in the negative ion mode by utilization of high-purity helium gas at 450°C. Two microliters of methanol extract of G. biloba kernels or leaves dropped on the surface of Quick-Strip module was analyzed after solvent evaporated to dryness. A series of standard solutions of ginkgolic acid 13:0 in the range of 2-50 mg/L were analyzed with a correlation coefficient r = 0.9981 and relative standard deviation (n = 5) from 12.5 to 13.7%. The limit of detection was 0.5 mg/L. The results of direct analysis in real time-mass spectrometry were in agreement with those observed by thermochemolysis gas chromatography. The proposed method demonstrated significant potential in the application of the high-throughput screening and rapid analysis for ginkgolic acids in dietary supplements. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Titania nanotube powders obtained by rapid breakdown anodization in perchloric acid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Saima; Hannula, Simo-Pekka

    2017-05-01

    Titania nanotube (TNT) powders are prepared by rapid break down anodization (RBA) in a 0.1 M perchloric acid (HClO4) solution (Process 1), and ethylene glycol (EG) mixture with HClO4 and water (Process 2). A study of the as-prepared and calcined TNT powders obtained by both processes is implemented to evaluate and compare the morphology, crystal structure, specific surface area, and the composition of the nanotubes. Longer TNTs are formed in Process 1, while comparatively larger pore diameter and wall thickness are obtained for the nanotubes prepared by Process 2. The TNTs obtained by Process 1 are converted to nanorods at 350 °C, while nanotubes obtained by Process 2 preserve tubular morphology till 350 °C. In addition, the TNTs prepared by an aqueous electrolyte have a crystalline structure, whereas the TNTs obtained by Process 2 are amorphous. Samples calcined till 450 °C have XRD peaks from the anatase phase, while the rutile phase appears at 550 °C for the TNTs prepared by both processes. The Raman spectra also show clear anatase peaks for all samples except the as-prepared sample obtained by Process 2, thus supporting the XRD findings. FTIR spectra reveal the presence of O-H groups in the structure for the TNTs obtained by both processes. However, the presence is less prominent for annealed samples. Additionally, TNTs obtained by Process 2 have a carbonaceous impurity present in the structure attributed to the electrolyte used in that process. While a negligible weight loss is typical for TNTs prepared from aqueous electrolytes, a weight loss of 38.6% in the temperature range of 25-600 °C is found for TNTs prepared in EG electrolyte (Process 2). A large specific surface area of 179.2 m2 g-1 is obtained for TNTs prepared by Process 1, whereas Process 2 produces nanotubes with a lower specific surface area. The difference appears to correspond to the dimensions of the nanotubes obtained by the two processes.

  3. Titania nanotube powders obtained by rapid breakdown anodization in perchloric acid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Saima, E-mail: saima.ali@aalto.fi; Hannula, Simo-Pekka

    2017-05-15

    Titania nanotube (TNT) powders are prepared by rapid break down anodization (RBA) in a 0.1 M perchloric acid (HClO{sub 4}) solution (Process 1), and ethylene glycol (EG) mixture with HClO{sub 4} and water (Process 2). A study of the as-prepared and calcined TNT powders obtained by both processes is implemented to evaluate and compare the morphology, crystal structure, specific surface area, and the composition of the nanotubes. Longer TNTs are formed in Process 1, while comparatively larger pore diameter and wall thickness are obtained for the nanotubes prepared by Process 2. The TNTs obtained by Process 1 are converted to nanorods at 350 °C, while nanotubes obtained by Process 2 preserve tubular morphology till 350 °C. In addition, the TNTs prepared by an aqueous electrolyte have a crystalline structure, whereas the TNTs obtained by Process 2 are amorphous. Samples calcined till 450 °C have XRD peaks from the anatase phase, while the rutile phase appears at 550 °C for the TNTs prepared by both processes. The Raman spectra also show clear anatase peaks for all samples except the as-prepared sample obtained by Process 2, thus supporting the XRD findings. FTIR spectra reveal the presence of O-H groups in the structure for the TNTs obtained by both processes. However, the presence is less prominent for annealed samples. Additionally, TNTs obtained by Process 2 have a carbonaceous impurity present in the structure attributed to the electrolyte used in that process. While a negligible weight loss is typical for TNTs prepared from aqueous electrolytes, a weight loss of 38.6% in the temperature range of 25–600 °C is found for TNTs prepared in EG electrolyte (Process 2). A large specific surface area of 179.2 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} is obtained for TNTs prepared by Process 1, whereas Process 2 produces nanotubes with a lower specific surface area. The difference appears to correspond to the dimensions of the nanotubes obtained by the two processes. - Graphical abstract

  4. Rapid determination of lipid peroxidation using a novel pyridoxamine-participating ferrous oxidation-sulfosalicylic acid spectrophotometric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingnan; Cai, Danqian; Zhang, Yu

    2016-11-15

    A novel method is developed to rapidly analyze lipid peroxidation in edible oils and fatty foods at room temperature, which is called the pyridoxamine-participating ferrous oxidation-sulfosalicylic acid (PFOS) method. The PFOS method evaluates the lipid peroxide value colorimetrically via detecting the pyridoxamine-mediated pigment produced by 5-sulfosalicylic acid and Fe(3+) at 500nm, while the latter is converted from Fe(2+) in the presence of lipid peroxides. The optimized formulation was ethanol (70%, v/v), Fe(2+) (4mmol/L), 5-sulfosalicylic acid (40mmol/L) and pyridoxamine (18mmol/L). The limit of quantitation is 0.087mmol Fe(3+)/L with acceptable reproducibility. In addition, current method has a significant linear correlation with both conventional thiobarbituric acid (R(2)=0.9999) and ferric thiocyanate assays (R(2)=0.9675). This method offers a rapid technique for evaluating lipid peroxidation without heating and sophisticated instrumental procedures. Besides, current method provides a new option to evaluate the lipid peroxidation state and improve the reproducibility of ferrous-oxidation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Highly efficient and rapid capillary electrophoretic analysis of seven organic acid additives in beverages using polymeric ionic liquid as additive].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Haifeng; Wang, Qing; Liu, Xi; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2012-05-01

    A new capillary electrophoretic method for the rapid and direct separation of seven organic acids in beverages was developed, with poly (1-vinyl-3-butylimidazolium bromide) as the reliable background electrolyte modifier to reverse the direction of anode electroosmotic flow (EOF) severely. Several factors that affected the separation efficiency were investigated in detail. The optimal running buffer consisted of 125 mmol/L sodium dihydrogen phosphate (pH 6.5) and 0.01 g/L poly (1-vinyl-3-butylimidazolium bromide). Highly efficient separation (105,000 to 636,000 plates/m) was achieved within 4 min and standard deviations of the migration times (n=3) were lower than 0.0213 min under optimal conditions. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) ranged from 0.001 to 0.05 g/L. The present method was applied to determine a beverage sample (Mirinda) for sodium citrate, benzoic acid and sorbic acid with concentration of 2.64, 0.10 and 0.08 g/L, respectively. The recoveries of the three analytes in the sample were 100.3%, 100.7% and 131.7%, respectively. The method is simple, rapid, inexpensive, and can be applied to determine organic acids as additives in beverages.

  6. Development of a Bacterial Biosensor for Rapid Screening of Yeast p-Coumaric Acid Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siedler, Solvej; Khatri, Narendar K.; Zsohar, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    R by varying its ribosomal binding site. Furthermore, we demonstrate the functionality of this p-coumaric acid biosensor in Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum. Finally, we encapsulate yeast p-coumaric acid-producing cells with E. coli-biosensing cells in picoliter droplets and, in a microfluidic...

  7. A rapid HPEAC method for determination of lactic acid produced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poste

    the food and dairy industries, because lactic acid, as well as other organic acids produced by these bacteria ... this process is a fundamental factor for the conservation of the specificity and original characteristics of ... Salt tolerance was tested by incorporating 2, 4 and 6.5% of NaCl on. M17 broth. Production of CO2 was also ...

  8. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources...

  9. Rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids including two new constituents from Tydemania expeditionis by LC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Long; Kubanek, Julia; Hay, Mark E.; Aalbersberg, William; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    Tydemania expeditionis Weber-van Bosse (Udoteaceae) is a weakly calcified green alga. In the present paper, liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and electrospray mass spectrometry was developed to identify the fingerprint components. A total of four triterpenoid sulfates and three hydroxy fatty acids in the ethyl acetate fraction of the crude extract were structurally characterized on the basis of retention time, online UV spectrum and mass fragmentation pattern. Furthermore, detailed LC-MS analysis revealed two new hydroxy fatty acids, which were then prepared and characterized by extensive NMR analyses. The proposed method provides a scientific and technical platform for the rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids in similar marine algae and terrestrial plants. PMID:21915955

  10. A SIMPLE AND RAPID METHOD FOR SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF GLYCYRRHETINIC ACID AND PIPERINE BY HPTLC IN A HERBOMINERAL FORMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Trivedi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Many of the traditional herbal formulations contain extracts of Piper longum and Glycyrrhiza glabra, piperine and glycyrrhetinic acid respectively, being active constituents of these two herbs. An attempt has been made to develop a simple, precise, rapid, and cost-effective high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC method for simultaneous estimation of these in a herbomineral formulation (Efiplus® Capsules. Precoated silica gel 60 F254 plates with toluene-ethyl acetate-glacial acetic acid 12.5:7.5:0.5, as mobile phase were used in chromatographic determinations. The plates were scanned and the compounds were quantified at their wavelengths of maximum absorption of 260 and 331 nm for glycyrrhetinic acid and piperine respectively. The respective RF values of glycyrrhetinic acid and piperine were 0.51 and 0.55. Under these experimental conditions linearity was observed between 0.8-2.6 µg/spot for glycyrrhetinic acid and between 10-50 ng/spot for piperine and average recovery was 96.25% for glycyrrhetinic acid and 98.55% for piperine.

  11. A simple and rapid method for simultaneous estimation of glycyrrhetinic acid and piperine by HPTLC in a herbomineral formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Trivedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the traditional herbal formulations contain extracts of Piper longum and Glycyrrhiza glabrcy piperine and glycyrrhetinic acid respectively, being active constituents of these two herbs. An attempt has been made to develop a simple, precise, rapid, and cost-effective high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC method for simultaneous estimation of these in a herbomineral formulation (Efiplus ® Capsules. Precoated silica gel 60 F254 plates with toluene-ethyl acetate-glacial acetic acid 12.5:7.5:0.5, as mobile phase were used in chromatographic determinations. The plates were scanned and the compounds were quantified at their wavelengths of maximum absorption of 260 and 331 nm for glycyrrhetinic acid and piperine respectively. The respective R, values of glycyrrhetinic acid and piperine were 0.51 and 0.55. Under these experimental conditions linearity was observed between 0.8-2.6 μg/ spot for glycyrrhetinic acid and between 10-50 ng/ spot for piperine and average recovery was 96.25% for glycyrrhetinic acid and 98.55% for piperine.

  12. Rapid determination of amino acids in biological samples using a monolithic silica column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanting; Funatsu, Takashi; Tsunoda, Makoto

    2012-05-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method in which fluorescence detection is used for the simultaneous determination of 21 amino acids is proposed. Amino acids were derivatized with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F) and then separated on a monolithic silica column (MonoClad C18-HS, 150 mm×3 mm i.d.). A mixture of 25 mM citrate buffer containing 25 mM sodium perchlorate (pH 5.5) and acetonitrile was used as the mobile phase. We found that the most significant factor in the separation was temperature, and a linear temperature gradient from 30 to 49°C was used to control the column temperature. The limits of detection and quantification for all amino acids ranged from 3.2 to 57.2 fmol and 10.8 to 191 fmol, respectively. The calibration curves for the NBD-amino acid had good linearity within the range of 40 fmol to 40 pmol when 6-aminocaproic acid was used as an internal standard. Using only conventional instruments, the 21 amino acids could be analyzed within 10 min. This method was found to be suitable for the quantification of the contents of amino acids in mouse plasma and adrenal gland samples.

  13. Simple and rapid hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol with aqueous formic acid in catalytic flow reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Javaid

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The inner surface of a metallic tube (i.d. 0.5 mm was coated with a palladium (Pd-based thin metallic layer by flow electroless plating. Simultaneous plating of Pd and silver (Ag from their electroless-plating solution produced a mixed distributed bimetallic layer. Preferential acid leaching of Ag from the Pd–Ag layer produced a porous Pd surface. Hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol was examined in the presence of formic acid simply by passing the reaction solution through the catalytic tubular reactors. p-Aminophenol was the sole product of hydrogenation. No side reaction occurred. Reaction conversion with respect to p-nitrophenol was dependent on the catalyst layer type, the temperature, pH, amount of formic acid, and the residence time. A porous and oxidized Pd (PdO surface gave the best reaction conversion among the catalytic reactors examined. p-Nitrophenol was converted quantitatively to p-aminophenol within 15 s of residence time in the porous PdO reactor at 40 °C. Evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2 was observed during the reaction, although hydrogen (H2 was not found in the gas phase. Dehydrogenation of formic acid did not occur to any practical degree in the absence of p-nitrophenol. Consequently, the nitro group was reduced via hydrogen transfer from formic acid to p-nitrophenol and not by hydrogen generated by dehydrogenation of formic acid.

  14. Rapid analysis of bile acids in different biological matrices using LC-ESI-MS/MS for the investigation of bile acid transformation by mammalian gut bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Katrin; Just, Sarah; Gau, Laura; Mueller, Henrike; Gérard, Philippe; Lepage, Patricia; Clavel, Thomas; Rohn, Sascha

    2017-02-01

    Bile acids are important signaling molecules that regulate cholesterol, glucose, and energy homoeostasis and have thus been implicated in the development of metabolic disorders. Their bioavailability is strongly modulated by the gut microbiota, which contributes to generation of complex individual-specific bile acid profiles. Hence, it is important to have accurate methods at hand for precise measurement of these important metabolites. Here, a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous identification and quantitation of primary and secondary bile acids as well as their taurine and glycine conjugates was developed and validated. Applicability of the method was demonstrated for mammalian tissues, biofluids, and cell culture media. The analytical approach mainly consists of a simple and rapid liquid-liquid extraction procedure in presence of deuterium-labeled internal standards. Baseline separation of all isobaric bile acid species was achieved and a linear correlation over a broad concentration range was observed. The method showed acceptable accuracy and precision on intra-day (1.42-11.07 %) and inter-day (2.11-12.71 %) analyses and achieved good recovery rates for representative analytes (83.7-107.1 %). As a proof of concept, the analytical method was applied to mouse tissues and biofluids, but especially to samples from in vitro fermentations with gut bacteria of the family Coriobacteriaceae. The developed method revealed that the species Eggerthella lenta and Collinsella aerofaciens possess bile salt hydrolase activity, and for the first time that the species Enterorhabdus mucosicola is able to deconjugate and dehydrogenate primary bile acids in vitro.

  15. Rapid and near-complete dissolution of wood lignin at ≤80°C by a recyclable acid hydrotrope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liheng; Dou, Jinze; Ma, Qianli; Li, Ning; Wu, Ruchun; Bian, Huiyang; Yelle, Daniel J; Vuorinen, Tapani; Fu, Shiyu; Pan, Xuejun; Zhu, Junyong J Y

    2017-09-01

    We report the discovery of the hydrotropic properties of a recyclable aromatic acid, p-toluenesulfonic acid (p-TsOH), for potentially low-cost and efficient fractionation of wood through rapid and near-complete dissolution of lignin. Approximately 90% of poplar wood (NE222) lignin can be dissolved at 80°C in 20 min. Equivalent delignification using known hydrotropes, such as aromatic salts, can be achieved only at 150°C or higher for more than 10 hours or at 150°C for 2 hours with alkaline pulping. p-TsOH fractionated wood into two fractions: (i) a primarily cellulose-rich water-insoluble solid fraction that can be used for the production of high-value building blocks, such as dissolving pulp fibers, lignocellulosic nanomaterials, and/or sugars through subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis; and (ii) a spent acid liquor stream containing mainly dissolved lignin that can be easily precipitated as lignin nanoparticles by diluting the spent acid liquor to below the minimal hydrotrope concentration. Our nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the dissolved lignin revealed that p-TsOH can depolymerize lignin via ether bond cleavage and can separate carbohydrate-free lignin from the wood. p-TsOH has a relatively low water solubility, which can facilitate efficient recovery using commercially proven crystallization technology by cooling the concentrated spent acid solution to ambient temperatures to achieve environmental sustainability through recycling of p-TsOH.

  16. A simple and rapid one-time method to evaluate the non-acidic gas content from bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassard, David; André, Laura; Dotal, Nicolas; Valentin, Ludovic; Nonus, Maurice; Pauss, André; Ribeiro, Thierry

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a rapid less than 2 min and low-cost method involving the use of alkali solution to capture the acidic gasses from a biogas, thereby providing an estimate of the percentage of non-acidic gasses. Such a method was mentioned in the literature but never fully described or optimized. After sampling an aliquot of gas from bioprocess, gas was injected in a sealed flask with a 3 M NaOH solution, and after equilibrium was obtained, the non-acidic gas volume was measured. The method was first calibrated with certified gasses with an accuracy observed between 98 and 105%. Regarding the validation step, certified standard gas mixtures and nine biogas-laboratory batch reactors were used, the overall accuracy reported was 103 + 3%. This rapid and low-cost method may either be used in laboratory conditions as a quick and low cost alternative to standard analysis equipment or in addition as a routine field control method used on full-scale plants.

  17. Kinetics of rapid covalent bond formation of aniline with humic acid: ESR investigations with nitroxide spin labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinka, Kevin; Matthies, Michael; Theiling, Marius; Hideg, Kalman; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics used in livestock farming are distributed to farmland by application of slurry as fertilizer. Previous work suggests rapid covalent binding of the aniline moiety to humic acids found in soil. In the current work, kinetics of this binding were measured in X-band EPR spectroscopy by incubating Leonardite humic acid (LHA) with a paramagnetic aniline spin label (anilino-NO (2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-oxyl)). Binding was detected by a pronounced broadening of the spectral lines after incubation of LHA with anilino-NO. The time evolution of the amplitude of this feature was used for determining the reaction kinetics. Single- and double-exponential models were fitted to the data obtained for modelling one or two first-order reactions. Reaction rates of 0.16 min-1 and 0.012 min-1, were found respectively. Addition of laccase peroxidase did not change the kinetics but significantly enhanced the reacting fraction of anilino-NO. This EPR-based method provides a technically simple and effective method for following rapid binding processes of a xenobiotic substance to humic acids.

  18. Rapid quantification of live/dead lactic acid bacteria in probiotic products using high-sensitivity flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengbin; Hong, Xinyi; Huang, Tianxun; Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhou, Yingxing; Wu, Lina; Yan, Xiaomei

    2017-06-01

    A laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM) was employed for the rapid and accurate detection of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their viability in probiotic products. LAB were stained with both the cell membrane-permeable SYTO 9 green-fluorescent nucleic acid stain and the red-fluorescent nucleic acid stain, propidium iodide, which penetrates only bacteria with compromised membranes. The side scatter and dual-color fluorescence signals of single bacteria were detected simultaneously by the HSFCM. Ultra-high temperature processing milk and skim milk spiked with Lactobacillus casei were used as the model systems for the optimization of sample pretreatment and staining. The viable LAB counts measured by the HSFCM were in good agreement with those of the plate count method, and the measured ratios between the live and dead LAB matched well with the theoretical ratios. The established method was successfully applied to the rapid quantification of live/dead LAB in yogurts and fermented milk beverages of different brands. Moreover, the concentration and viability status of LAB in ambient yogurt, a relatively new yet popular milk product in China, are also reported.

  19. Measurement of humic and fulvic acid concentrations and dissolution properties by a rapid batch procedure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomeren, van A.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2007-01-01

    Although humic substances (HS) strongly facilitate the transport of metals and hydrophobic organic contaminants in environmental systems, their measurement is hampered by the time-consuming nature of currently available methods for their isolation and purification. We present and apply a new rapid

  20. New 1,4-Dihydropyridines Down-regulate Nitric Oxide in Animals with Streptozotocin-induced Diabetes Mellitus and Protect Deoxyribonucleic Acid against Peroxynitrite Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, Elina; Sokolovska, Jelizaveta; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Isajevs, Sergejs; Rostoka, Evita; Baumane, Larisa; Sjakste, Tatjana; Sjakste, Nikolajs

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications cause numerous health and social problems throughout the world. Pathogenic actions of nitric oxide (NO) are responsible to a large extent for development of complications of DM. Search for compounds regulating NO production in patients with DM is thus important for the development of pharmacological drugs. Dihydropyridines (1,4-DHPs) are prospective compounds from this point of view. The goals of this study were to study the in vivo effects of new DHPs on NO and reactive nitrogen and oxygen species production in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of DM in rats and to study their ability to protect DNA against nocive action of peroxynitrite. STZ-induced diabetes caused an increase in NO production in the liver, kidneys, blood and muscles, but a decrease in NO in adipose tissue of STZ-treated animals. Cerebrocrast treatment was followed by normalization of NO production in the liver, kidneys and blood. Two other DHPs, etaftorone and fenoftorone, were effective in decreasing NO production in kidneys, blood and muscles of diabetic animals. Furthermore, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) decreased NO production in kidneys of diabetic animals. Treatment with etaftorone decreased expression of inducible NOS and XOR in kidneys, whereas it increased the expression of endothelial NOS. In vitro, the studied DHPs did not significantly inhibit the activities of NOS and XOR but affected the reactivity of peroxynitrite with DNA. These new DHPs thus appear of strong interest for treatment of DM complications. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  1. A rapid and sensitive assay for determination of doxycycline using thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashkhourian, Javad; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Jafari, Marzieh; Zare, Saber

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, simple and inexpensive spectrofluorimetric sensor for determination of doxycycline based on its interaction with thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (TGA/CdTe QDs) has been developed. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the sensor exhibited a fast response time of determination of doxycycline in a concentration range of 1.9 × 10-6-6.1 × 10-5 mol L-1 with a detection limit of 1.1 × 10-7 mol L-1. The sensor was applied for determination of doxycycline in honey and human serum samples.

  2. One-step and rapid synthesis of porous Pd nanoparticles with superior catalytic activity toward ethanol/formic acid electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Fang, Youxing; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2014-02-01

    Porous Pd nanoparticles are successfully prepared by a rapid, one-step, and efficient route with high yield in aqueous solution. The developed method is very simple, just by mixing sodium tetrachloropalladate, polyvinylpyrrolidone and hydroquinone and heated at 70 °C for 15 min. The structure and composition are analyzed by transmission electron microscope, selected-area electron diffraction, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrochemical catalytic measurement results prove that the as synthesized porous Pd nanoparticles exhibit superior catalytic activity towards ethanol and formic acid electrooxidation.

  3. Colorimetric deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization assay for rapid screening of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiale, M S; Klatt, M J; Mozola, M A

    1990-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed in 11 laboratories to validate a colorimetric DNA hybridization (DNAH) method for rapid detection of Salmonella in foods. The method was compared to the standard culture method for detection of Salmonella in nonfat dry milk, milk chocolate, soy isolate, dried whole egg, ground black pepper, and raw ground turkey. Samples inoculated with high (0.4-2 cells/g) and low (0.04-0.2 cells/g) levels of Salmonella and uninoculated control samples were included in each food group analyzed. There was no significant difference in the proportion of samples positive by DNAH and culture procedure for any of the 6 foods. The colorimetric DNA hybridization assay screening method has been adopted official first action as a rapid screening method for detection of Salmonella in all foods.

  4. Rapid Detection of miRNA Using Nucleic Acids-templated AgNCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pratik

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ubiquitous RNA molecules (20-24nt) that negatively regulate target gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Due to their roles in a variety of biological processes, the levels of miRNAs are dynamically changed in response to cellular and environmental signals....../AgNCs). I have showed that rapid, simple, sensitive and specific miRNA detection is possible. Two aspects of my research are 1) the implication of DNA secondary structure on the photoluminescence properties of DNA/AgNCs, 2) the development of a novel tool for miRNA detection in complex biological samples....... In the former, I revealed that the mismatched secondary structures of DNA-templates are important for the rapid formation of bright red fluorescence. Further, I suggest that the chromatic properties of DNA/AgNCs are modulated not only by sequence but also by secondary structure of DNA-templates. Moreover...

  5. Carglumic acid enhances rapid ammonia detoxification in classical organic acidurias with a favourable risk-benefit profile : a retrospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Baruteau, Julien; Delgado, Maria Bueno; Cano, Aline; Couce, Maria L; Del Toro, Mireia; Donati, Maria Alice; Garcia-Cazorla, Angeles; Gil-Ortega, David; Gomez-de Quero, Pedro; Guffon, Nathalie; Hofstede, Floris C; Kalkan-Ucar, Sema; Coker, Mahmut; Lama-More, Rosa; Martinez-Pardo Casanova, Mercedes; Molina, Agustin; Pichard, Samia; Papadia, Francesco; Rosello, Patricia; Plisson, Celine; Le Mouhaer, Jeannie; Chakrapani, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Isovaleric aciduria (IVA), propionic aciduria (PA) and methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) are inherited organic acidurias (OAs) in which impaired organic acid metabolism induces hyperammonaemia arising partly from secondary deficiency of N-acetylglutamate (NAG) synthase. Rapid reduction in

  6. Rapid synthesis of long chain fatty acid esters of steroids in ionic liquids with microwave irradiation: expedient one-pot procedure for estradiol monoesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Somdatta; Wähälä, Kristiina

    2010-10-01

    We report the rapid synthesis (1min) in high yield of fatty acid ester (FAE) derivatives of several steroids under microwave irradiation in an ionic liquid (IL). An expedient regioselective hydrolysis at C-3 of estradiol diesters is also reported.

  7. [Rapid determination of fatty acids in soybean oils by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Feng-ping; Liu, Yao-min; Wu, Zong-wen; Suo, You-rui

    2012-08-01

    In the present research, a novel method was established for determination of five fatty acids in soybean oil by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy. The optimum conditions of mathematics model of five components (C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3) were studied, including the sample set selection, chemical value analysis, the detection methods and condition. Chemical value was analyzed by gas chromatography. One hundred fifty eight samples were selected, 138 for modeling set, 10 for testing set and 10 for unknown sample set. All samples were placed in sample pools and scanned by transmission reflection-near infrared spectrum after sonicleaning for 10 minute. The 1100-2500 nm spectral region was analyzed. The acquisition interval was 2 nm. Modified partial least square method was chosen for calibration mode creating. Result demonstrated that the 1-VR of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.8839, 0.5830, 0.9001, 0.9776 and 0.9596, respectively. And the SECV of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.42, 0.29, 0.83, 0.46 and 0.21, respectively. The standard error of the calibration (SECV) of five fatty acids between the reference value of testing sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.891, 0.790, 0.900, 0.976 and 0.942, respectively. It was proved that the near infrared spectrum predictive value was linear with chemical value and the mathematical model established for fatty acids of soybean oil was feasible. For validation, 10 unknown samples were selected for analysis by near infrared spectrum. The result demonstrated that the relative standard deviation between predict value and chemical value was less than 5.50%. That was to say that transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy had a good veracity in analysis of fatty acids of soybean oil.

  8. Rapid determination of 4-aminobutyric acid and L-glutamic acid in biological decarboxylation process by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Sahori; Yamano, Naoko; Kawasaki, Norioki; Ando, Hisanori; Nakayama, Atsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    4-Aminobutylic acid (GABA) is a monomer of plastic polyamide 4. Bio-based polyamide 4 can be produced by using GABA obtained from biomass. The production of L-glutamic acid (Glu) from biomass has been established. GABA is produced by decarboxylation of Glu in biological process. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with derivatization is generally used to determine the concentration of GABA and Glu in reacted solution samples for the efficient production of GABA. In this study, we have investigated the rapid determination of GABA and Glu by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) without derivatization. The determination was achieved with the use of a shortened capillary, a new internal standard for GABA, and optimization of sheath liquid composition. Determined concentrations of GABA and Glu by CE-MS were compared with those by pre-column derivatization HPLC with phenylisothiocyanate. The determined values by CE-MS were close to those by HPLC with pre-column derivatization. These results suggest that the determination of GABA and Glu in reacted solution is rapid and simplified by the use of CE-MS. Copyright © 2012 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Rapid amplification/detection of nucleic acid targets utilizing a HDA/thin film biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenison, Robert; Jaeckel, Heidi; Klonoski, Joshua; Latorra, David; Wiens, Jacinta

    2014-08-07

    Thin film biosensors exploit a flat, optically coated silicon-based surface whereupon formation of nucleic acid hybrids are enzymatically transduced in a molecular thin film that can be detected by the unaided human eye under white light. While the limit of sensitivity for detection of nucleic acid targets is at sub-attomole levels (60 000 copies) many clinical specimens containing bacterial pathogens have much lower levels of analyte present. Herein, we describe a platform, termed HDA/thin film biosensor, which performs helicase-dependant nucleic acid amplification on a thin film biosensor surface to improve the limit of sensitivity to 10 copies of the mecA gene present in methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus. As double-stranded DNA is unwound by helicase it was either bound by solution-phase DNA primers to be copied by DNA polymerase or hybridized to surface immobilized probe on the thin film biosensor surface to be detected. Herein, we show that amplification reactions on the thin film biosensor are equivalent to in standard thin wall tubes, with detection at the limit of sensitivity of the assay occurring after 30 minutes of incubation time. Further we validate the approach by detecting the presence of the mecA gene in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from positive blood culture aliquots with high specificity (signal/noise ratio of 105).

  10. [Rapid and Dynamic Determination Models of Amino Acids and Catechins Concentrations during the Processing Procedures of Keemun Black Tea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jing-ming; Yan, Ling; Zhang, Zheng-zhu; Wei, Ling-dong; Li, Lu-qing; Fang, Jun-ting; Huang, Cai-wang

    2015-12-01

    Tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world. For the contribution to the taste and healthy functions of tea, amino acids and catechins are important components. Among different kinds of black teas in the world, Keemun black tea has the famous and specific fragrance, "Keemun aroma". During the processing procedure of Keemun black tea, the contents of amino acids and catechins changed greatly, and the differences of these concentrations during processing varied significantly. However, a rapid and dynamic determination method during the processing procedure was not existed up to now. In order to find out a rapid determination method for the contents of amino acids and catechins during the processing procedure of Keemun black tea, the materials of fresh leaves, withered leaves, twisted leaves, fermented leaves, and crude tea (after drying) were selected to acquire their corresponding near infrared spectroscopy and obtain their contents of amino acids and catechins by chemical analysis method. The original spectra data were preprocessed by the Standard Normal Variate Transformation (SNVT) method. And the model of Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy with the contents of amino acids and catechins combined with Synergy Interval Partial Least squares (Si-PLS) was established in this study. The correlation coefficients and the cross validation root mean square error are treated as the efficient indexes for evaluating models. The results showed that the optimal prediction model of amino acids by Si-PLS contained 20 spectral intervals combined with 4 subintervals and 9 principal component factors. The correlation coefficient and the root mean square error of the calibration set were 0. 955 8 and 1. 768, respectively; the correlation coefficient and the root mean square error of the prediction set were 0. 949 5 and 2. 16, respectively. And the optimal prediction model of catechins by Si-PLS contained 20 spectral intervals combined with 3 subintervals and 10 principal

  11. Rapid Method for the Determination of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural and Levulinic Acid Using a Double-Wavelength UV Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on a rapid method for the determination of levulinic acid (LA and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF in acid hydrolyze system of glucose based on UV spectroscopy. It was found that HMF and LA have a maximum absorption at the wavelengths of 284 nm and 266 nm, respectively, in a water medium, and the absorptions of HMF and LA at 284 nm and 266 nm follow Beer’s law very well. However, it was found that a major spectral interference species will arise in the quantification of HMF and LA; nonetheless, this interference can be eliminated through the absorption treatment of charcoal. Therefore, both HMF and LA can be quantified with a double-wavelength technique. The repeatability of the method had a relative standard deviation of less than 4.47% for HMF and 2.25% for LA; the limit of quantification (LOQ was 0.017 mmol/L for HMF and 4.68 mmol/L for LA, and the recovery ranged from 88% to 116% for HMF and from 94% to 105% for LA. The present method is simple, rapid, and accurate. It is suitable to use in the research of the preparation of HMF and LA in biorefinery area.

  12. Ligand Replacement Approach to Raman-Responded Molecularly Imprinted Monolayer for Rapid Determination of Penicilloic Acid in Penicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liying; Jin, Yang; Huang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Yujie; Du, Shuhu; Zhang, Zhongping

    2015-12-01

    Penicilloic acid (PA) is a degraded byproduct of penicillin and often causes fatal allergies to humans, but its rapid detection in penicillin drugs remains a challenge due to its similarity to the mother structure of penicillin. Here, we reported a ligand-replaced molecularly imprinted monolayer strategy on a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for the specific recognition and rapid detection of Raman-inactive PA in penicillin. The bis(phenylenediamine)-Cu(2+)-PA complex was first synthesized and stabilized onto the surface of silver nanoparticle film that was fabricated by a bromide ion-added silver mirror reaction. A molecularly imprinted monolayer was formed by the further modification of alkanethiol around the stabilized complex on the Ag film substrate, and the imprinted recognition site was then created by the replacement of the complex template with Raman-active probe molecule p-aminothiophenol. When PA rebound into the imprinted site in the alkanethiol monolayer, the SERS signal of p-aminothiophenol exhibited remarkable enhancement with a detection limit of 0.10 nM. The imprinted monolayer can efficiently exclude the interference of penicillin and thus provides a selective determination of 0.10‰ (w/w) PA in penicillin, which is about 1 order of magnitude lower than the prescribed residual amount of 1.0‰. The strategy reported here is simple, rapid and inexpensive compared to the traditional chromatography-based methods.

  13. Enhanced Abscisic Acid-Mediated Responses in nia1nia2noa1-2 Triple Mutant Impaired in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-Dependent Nitric Oxide Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Juste, Jorge; León, José

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates a wide range of plant processes from development to environmental adaptation. Despite its reported regulatory functions, it remains unclear how NO is synthesized in plants. We have generated a triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant that is impaired in nitrate reductase (NIA/NR)- and Nitric Oxide-Associated1 (AtNOA1)-mediated NO biosynthetic pathways. NO content in roots of nia1nia2 and noa1-2 plants was lower than in wild-type plants and below the detection limit in nia1nia2noa1-2 plants. NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated biosynthesis of NO were thus active and responsible for most of the NO production in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The nia1nia2noa1-2 plants displayed reduced size, fertility, and seed germination potential but increased dormancy and resistance to water deficit. The increasing deficiency in NO of nia1nia2, noa1-2, and nia1nia2noa1-2 plants correlated with increased seed dormancy, hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) in seed germination and establishment, as well as dehydration resistance. In nia1nia2noa1-2 plants, enhanced drought tolerance was due to a very efficient stomata closure and inhibition of opening by ABA, thus uncoupling NO from ABA-triggered responses in NO-deficient guard cells. The NO-deficient mutants in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated pathways in combination with the triple mutant will be useful tools to functionally characterize the role of NO and the contribution of both biosynthetic pathways in regulating plant development and defense. PMID:20007448

  14. Enhanced abscisic acid-mediated responses in nia1nia2noa1-2 triple mutant impaired in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-dependent nitric oxide biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Juste, Jorge; León, José

    2010-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates a wide range of plant processes from development to environmental adaptation. Despite its reported regulatory functions, it remains unclear how NO is synthesized in plants. We have generated a triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant that is impaired in nitrate reductase (NIA/NR)- and Nitric Oxide-Associated1 (AtNOA1)-mediated NO biosynthetic pathways. NO content in roots of nia1nia2 and noa1-2 plants was lower than in wild-type plants and below the detection limit in nia1nia2noa1-2 plants. NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated biosynthesis of NO were thus active and responsible for most of the NO production in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The nia1nia2noa1-2 plants displayed reduced size, fertility, and seed germination potential but increased dormancy and resistance to water deficit. The increasing deficiency in NO of nia1nia2, noa1-2, and nia1nia2noa1-2 plants correlated with increased seed dormancy, hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) in seed germination and establishment, as well as dehydration resistance. In nia1nia2noa1-2 plants, enhanced drought tolerance was due to a very efficient stomata closure and inhibition of opening by ABA, thus uncoupling NO from ABA-triggered responses in NO-deficient guard cells. The NO-deficient mutants in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated pathways in combination with the triple mutant will be useful tools to functionally characterize the role of NO and the contribution of both biosynthetic pathways in regulating plant development and defense.

  15. Fatty acids are rapidly delivered to and extracted from membranes by methyl-β-cyclodextrin

    OpenAIRE

    Brunaldi, Kellen; Huang, Nasi; Hamilton, James A.

    2010-01-01

    We performed detailed biophysical studies of transfer of long-chain fatty acids (FAs) from methyl-β-CD (MBCD) to model membranes (egg-PC vesicles) and cells and the extraction of FA from membranes by MBCD. We used i) fluorescein phosphatidylethanolamine to detect transfer of FA anions arriving in the outer membrane leaflet; ii) entrapped pH dyes to measure pH changes after FA diffusion (flip-flop) across the lipid bilayer; and iii) soluble fluorescent-labeled FA binding protein to measure the...

  16. Hyaluronic Acid-Serum Hydrogels Rapidly Restore Metabolism of Encapsulated Stem Cells and Promote Engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Angel T.; Karakas, Mehmet F.; Vakrou, Styliani; Afzal, Junaid; Rittenbach, Andrew; Lin, Xiaoping; Wahl, Richard L.; Pomper, Martin G.; Steenbergen, Charles J.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2015-01-01

    Background Cell death due to anoikis, necrosis and cell egress from transplantation sites limits functional benefits of cellular cardiomyoplasty. Cell dissociation and suspension, which are a pre-requisite for most cell transplantation studies, lead to depression of cellular metabolism and anoikis, which contribute to low engraftment. Objective We tissue engineered scaffolds with the goal of rapidly restoring metabolism, promoting viability, proliferation and engraftment of encapsulated stem cells. Methods The carboxyl groups of HA were functionalized with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) to yield HA succinimidyl succinate (HA-NHS) groups that react with free amine groups to form amide bonds. HA-NHS was cross-linked by serum to generate HA:Serum (HA:Ser) hydrogels. Physical properties of HA:Ser hydrogels were measured. Effect of encapsulating cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) in HA:Ser hydrogels on viability, proliferation, glucose uptake and metabolism was assessed in vitro. In vivo acute intra-myocardial cell retention of 18FDG-labeled CDCs encapsulated in HA:Ser hydrogels was quantified. Effect of CDC encapsulation in HA:Ser hydrogels on in vivo metabolism and engraftment at 7 days was assessed by serial, dual isotope SPECT-CT and bioluminescence imaging of CDCs expressing the Na-iodide symporter and firefly luciferase genes respectively. Effect of HA:Ser hydrogels +/− CDCs on cardiac function was assessed at 7 days & 28 days post-infarct. Results HA:Ser hydrogels are highly bio-adhesive, biodegradable, promote rapid cell adhesion, glucose uptake and restore bioenergetics of encapsulated cells within 1 h of encapsulation, both in vitro and in vivo. These metabolic scaffolds can be applied epicardially as a patch to beating hearts or injected intramyocardially. HA:Ser hydrogels markedly increase acute intramyocardial retention (~6 fold), promote in vivo viability, proliferation, engraftment of encapsulated stem cells and angiogenesis. Conclusion HA:Ser hydrogels

  17. Comparison of material properties of polyethylene design types and design type tests of dangerous goods packaging depending on the prestorage time with 55% nitric acid; Vergleich der Materialeigenschaften von Polyethylenformstoffen und der Baumusterpruefungen von Gefahrgutverpackungen in Abhaengigkeit von der Vorlagerungsdauer mit 55%-iger Salpetersaeure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weltschev, Margit; Niebergall, Ute; Haufe, Manuela; Heyer, Martina

    2010-12-22

    The material parameters melt flow rate MFR, density D, notched impact strength NIS at -30 C, stress crack resistance FNCT and resistance to oxidative degradation Ox (determined by the increase of MFR) have been selected for a comparison of the polyethylene grades for one design type in the ''European standard EN 15507: 2009 - Transport packaging for dangerous goods - Comparative material testing of polyethylene grades''. The parameters have a systematic relationship with design type tests. The notched impact strength at -30 C and the resistance to oxidative degradation of the polyethylene grades determined with test specimens of compression moulded sheets are directly comparable with drop tests at -18 C of design types produced of these grades. The design types were pre-stored with the standard liquid 55 % nitric acid for 21 days at 40 C. Tests in the dissertation: a comparison of the material parameters of high-density polyethylene grades with the behaviour of design types for the transport of dangerous goods showed that the marginal drop heights of some design types increased after pre-storage with 55 % nitric acid for 21 days rather than decreased. The effects of the marginal drop heights in drop tests at -18 C, the MFR and the tensile properties tensile strength, breaking elongation and the elastic modulus of the pre-storage time with 55 % nitric acid at 40 C and 23 C were investigated to verify and extend these test results. Packaging design types (jerricans) made of three polyethylene grades from different producers were pre-stored with 55 % nitric acid for 21, 42 and 84 days at 40 C as well as for six months at 23 C. The MFR and tensile properties of jerrican cuttings as well as the marginal drop heights of the jerricans in drop tests at -18 C were determined. The values of the notched impact strength at -30 C of the polyethylene grades are not comparable with the marginal drop heights determined in drop tests at -18 C. The marginal drop

  18. Oil palm trunk and sugarcane bagasse derived solid acid catalysts for rapid esterification of fatty acids and moisture-assisted transesterification of oils under pseudo-infinite methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezebor, Francis; Khairuddean, Melati; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Boey, Peng Lim

    2014-04-01

    The use of pseudo-infinite methanol in increasing the rate of esterification and transesterification reactions was studied using oil palm trunk (OPT) and sugarcane bagasse (SCB) derived solid acid catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by incomplete carbonisation at 400°C for 8h, followed by sulfonation at 150°C for 15h and characterised using TGA/DTA, XRD, FT-IR, SEM-EDS, EA and titrimetric determinations of acid sites. Under optimal reaction conditions, the process demonstrated rapid esterification of palmitic acid, with FAME yields of 93% and 94% in 45min for OPT and SCB catalysts, respectively. With the process, moisture levels up to 16.7% accelerated the conversion of low FFA oils by sulfonated carbon catalysts, through moisture-induced violent bumping. Moisture assisted transesterification of palm olein containing 1.78% FFA and 8.33% added water gave FAME yield of 90% in 10h, which was two folds over neat oil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel Simplified and Rapid Method for Screening and Isolation of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Producing Marine Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Tilay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial production of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs is a potential biotechnological approach for production of valuable nutraceuticals. Reliable method for screening of number of strains within short period of time is great need. Here, we report a novel simplified method for screening and isolation of PUFA-producing bacteria by direct visualization using the H2O2-plate assay. The oxidative stability of PUFAs in growing bacteria towards added H2O2 is a distinguishing characteristic between the PUFAs producers (no zone of inhibition and non-PUFAs producers (zone of inhibition by direct visualization. The confirmation of assay results was performed by injecting fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs produced by selected marine bacteria to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GCMS. To date, this assay is the most effective, inexpensive, and specific method for bacteria producing PUFAs and shows drastically reduction in the number of samples thus saves the time, effort, and cost of screening and isolating strains of bacterial PUFAs producers.

  20. Bio-electrolytic sensor for rapid monitoring of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Xiangdan; Li, Xiaohu; Zhao, Nannan

    2017-01-01

    This study presents an innovative biosensor that was developed on the basis of a microbial electrolysis cell for fast and reliable measurement of volatile fatty acids (VFA) during anaerobic digestion (AD) process. The bio-electrolytic sensor was first tested with synthetic wastewater containing...... to monitor VFA concentrations in a lab-scale AD reactor for a month. The VFA measurements from the sensor correlated well with those from GC analysis which proved the accuracy of the system. Since hydrogen was produced in the cathode as byproduct during monitoring, the system could be energy self......-sufficient. Considering the high accuracy, short response time, long-term stability and additional benefit of H2 production, this bio-electrolytic sensor could be a simple and cost-effective method for VFA monitoring during AD and other anaerobic processes....

  1. Involvement of nitric oxide in learning & memory processes

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Vanaja; Ekambaram, Perumal

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized from the amino acid, L-arginine by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has received attention as a neurotransmitter in the brain. NO has been found to induce cognitive behaviour in experimental animals. In order to show evidence for the involvement of NO in learning and memory processes, the reports indicating the effects of its precursor, donors, and inhibitors of its synthesis in mammals, birds, fishes and invertebrates have been reviewed. Further, learning and memory...

  2. NITRIC OXIDE INTERFERES WITH HYPOXIA SIGNALING DURING COLONIC INFLAMMATION

    OpenAIRE

    CARIA,Cintia Rabelo e Paiva; MOSCATO,Camila Henrique; TOMÉ,Renata Bortolin Guerra; PEDRAZZOLI Jr,José; RIBEIRO,Marcelo Lima; GAMBERO,Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Context Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Methods Colitis was induced by single (acute) or repeated (reactivated colitis) trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administ...

  3. Standard Operating Procedure for the Grinding and Extraction of Lead in Paint using Nitric Acid and a Rotor/Stator System Powered by a High Speed Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) describes a new, rapid, and relatively inexpensive one step procedure which grinds the paint samples removed from the substrate and simultaneously quantitatively extracts the Pb from the paint in only one step in preparation for quantitativ...

  4. [The rapid analysis of fatty acids in vegetable oils by near infrared spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan-Bo; Zang, Peng; Fu, Yuan-Hua; Zhang, Lu-Da; Yan, Yan-Lu; Chen, Bin

    2008-07-01

    In this research, The functional components of vegetable oils were analyzed by near infrared (NIR) spectral technology. The optimum conditions of mathematics model of four components (C16 : 0, C18 : 0, C18 : 1, C18 : 2) were studied, including the sample set selection, chemical value analysis, the detection methods and condition. Chemical value was analyzed by HPLC. 52 samples were selected, 41 for modeling set and 11 for testing set. All samples were placed in 5mm thick sample pools and swept by near infrared (NIR) with discrimination factor 8 cm(-1) without any other disposal. Using PLS methods sated model. Data were processed by first derivative method and centering method. 5 000-9 000 cm(-1) spectral region was analyzed. Correlating index (r), RMSECV and RMSEP were chose as evaluation index. The result demonstrated that the correlation between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared predictive value were r(C16 : 0) = 0.891, r(C18 : 0) = 0.837, r(C18 : 1) = 0.982, r(C18 : 2) = 0.971, respectively. And the correlation between the reference value of the testing sample set and the near infrared predictive value were 0.921, 0.891, 0.946 and 0.949, respectively. It proved that the near infrared predictive value was linear with chemical value and the mathematical model established for components of vegetable oils was feasible. For validation, 8 unknown samples were selected to be analysis by infrared (NIR). The result demonstrated that error between predict value and chemical value was less than 10%. That was to say infrared (NIR) had a good veracity in analysis components of vegetable oil. Because infrared (NIR) spectral technology is convenient, rapid than HPLC in oil components analysis, moreover, infrared (NIR) can analyze many components at the same time. It must have great application prospect in vegetable oil components analysis.

  5. Improved sensitivity of nucleic acid amplification for rapid diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Lundgren, Bettina; Tabak, Fehmi

    2004-01-01

    Early diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is essential for a positive outcome; but present microbiological diagnostic techniques are insensitive, slow, or laborious. We evaluated the standard BDProbeTec ET strand displacement amplification method (the standard ProbeTec method) for the detec......Early diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is essential for a positive outcome; but present microbiological diagnostic techniques are insensitive, slow, or laborious. We evaluated the standard BDProbeTec ET strand displacement amplification method (the standard ProbeTec method...... diagnosis was attained by culture. Thirteen specimens from 12 patients were culture positive for M. tuberculosis complex organisms; three specimens (23%) were microscopy positive for acid-fast bacilli. Among the culture-positive specimens, the standard ProbeTec method was positive for 8 (61.......5%) and the modified assay was positive for 10 (76.9%). The overall specificity by both procedures was 98.8% compared to the results of culture. After discrepancy analysis, conducted by reviewing the patients' previous laboratory data, the specificity increased to 100%. If the cutoff value for respiratory specimens...

  6. Rapid and reversible enhancement of blood–brain barrier permeability using lysophosphatidic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, Ngoc H; Savant, Sanjot; Toews, Myron; Miller, Donald W

    2013-01-01

    The present study characterizes the effects of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) on blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability focusing specifically on the time of onset, duration, and magnitude of LPA-induced changes in cerebrovascular permeability in the mouse using both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIFR). Furthermore, potential application of LPA for enhanced drug delivery to the brain was also examined by measuring the brain accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate. Exposure of primary cultured brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs) to LPA produced concentration-dependent increases in permeability that were completely abolished by clostridium toxin B. Administration of LPA disrupted BBB integrity and enhanced the permeability of small molecular weight marker gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent, the large molecular weight permeability marker, IRdye800cwPEG, and the P-glycoprotein efflux transporter probe, Rhodamine 800 (R800). The increase in BBB permeability occurred within 3 minutes after LPA injection and barrier integrity was restored within 20 minutes. A decreased response to LPA on large macromolecule BBB permeability was observed after repeated administration. The administration of LPA also resulted in 20-fold enhancement of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain. These studies indicate that administration of LPA in combination with therapeutic agents may increase drug delivery to the brain. PMID:24045401

  7. Rapid radiosynthesis of [11C] and [14C]azelaic, suberic, and sebacic acids for in vivo mechanistic studies of systemic acquired resistance in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best M.; Fowler J.; Best, M.; Gifford, A.N.; Kim, S.W.; Babst, B.; Piel, M.; Roesch, F.; Fowler, J.S.

    2011-11-25

    A recent report that the aliphatic dicarboxylic acid, azelaic acid (1,9-nonanedioic acid) but not related acids, suberic acid (1,8-octanedioic acid) or sebacic (1,10-decanedioic acid) acid induces systemic acquired resistance to invading pathogens in plants stimulated the development of a rapid method for labeling these dicarboxylic acids with {sup 11}C and {sup 14}C for in vivo mechanistic studies in whole plants. {sup 11}C-labeling was performed by reaction of ammonium [{sup 11}C]cyanide with the corresponding bromonitrile precursor followed by hydrolysis with aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. Total synthesis time was 60 min. Median decay-corrected radiochemical yield for [{sup 11}C]azelaic acid was 40% relative to trapped [{sup 11}C]cyanide, and specific activity was 15 GBq/{micro}mol. Yields for [{sup 11}C]suberic and sebacic acids were similar. The {sup 14}C-labeled version of azelaic acid was prepared from potassium [{sup 14}C]cyanide in 45% overall radiochemical yield. Radiolabeling procedures were verified using {sup 13}C-labeling coupled with {sup 13}C-NMR and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The {sup 11}C and {sup 14}C-labeled azelaic acid and related dicarboxylic acids are expected to be of value in understanding the mode-of-action, transport, and fate of this putative signaling molecule in plants.

  8. Rapid labeling of amino acid neurotransmitters with a fluorescent thiol in the presence of o-phthalaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddukuri, Naveen; Zhang, Qiyang; Zhang, Ning; Gong, Maojun

    2017-02-01

    LIF detection often requires labeling of analytes with fluorophores; and fast fluorescent derivatization is valuable for high-throughput analysis with flow-gated CE. Here, we report a fast fluorescein-labeling scheme for amino acid neurotransmitters, which were then rapidly separated and detected in flow-gated CE. This scheme was based on the reaction between primary amines and o-phthalaldehyde in the presence of a fluorescent thiol, 2-((5-fluoresceinyl)aminocarbonyl)ethyl mercaptan (FACE-SH). The short reaction time (neurotransmitters by coupling in vitro microdialysis with online derivatization and flow-gated CE. It is also anticipated that this fluorophore tagging scheme would be valuable for on-chip labeling of proteins retained on support in SPE. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the production of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide during experimental murine paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargi, S C; Dalalio, M M O; Moraes, A G; Visentainer, J E L; Morais, D R; Visentainer, J V

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the potential health effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the immune system. Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most important endemic mycosis in Latin America. Macrophages have a fundamental role and act as first line of organism defense. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of n-3 fatty acids on the production of PGE2 and NO by mice infected with Pb18 and fed a diet enriched with LNA for 8 weeks. To study the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on macrophage activity during experimental paracoccidioidomycosis, mice were infected with Pb18 and fed a diet supplemented with LNA. PGE2 in the serum of animals was analyzed and NO in the supernatants of macrophages cultured and challenged in vitro with Pb18 was measured. Omega-3 fatty acids seemed to decrease the production of PGE2 in vivo in the infected group fed an LNA-supplemented diet during the 4th and 8th weeks of the experiment. At the same time, we observed an increase in synthesis of NO by peritoneal macrophages in this group. Omega-3 fatty acids thus appear to have an immunomodulatory effect in paracoccidioidomycosis.

  10. Role of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Production of Prostaglandin E2 and Nitric Oxide during Experimental Murine Paracoccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Sargi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There has recently been increased interest in the potential health effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the immune system. Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most important endemic mycosis in Latin America. Macrophages have a fundamental role and act as first line of organism defense. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of n-3 fatty acids on the production of PGE2 and NO by mice infected with Pb18 and fed a diet enriched with LNA for 8 weeks. To study the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on macrophage activity during experimental paracoccidioidomycosis, mice were infected with Pb18 and fed a diet supplemented with LNA. PGE2 in the serum of animals was analyzed and NO in the supernatants of macrophages cultured and challenged in vitro with Pb18 was measured. Omega-3 fatty acids seemed to decrease the production of PGE2 in vivo in the infected group fed an LNA-supplemented diet during the 4th and 8th weeks of the experiment. At the same time, we observed an increase in synthesis of NO by peritoneal macrophages in this group. Omega-3 fatty acids thus appear to have an immunomodulatory effect in paracoccidioidomycosis.

  11. Remedial Investigation Report on the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Program; Y-12 Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid pipeline (ANAP). This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes {approximately}4800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. During the mid-1980s, sections of the pipeline were removed during various construction projects. A total of 19 locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The 19 samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant`s laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. Uranium activities in the soil samples ranged from 0.53 to 13.0 pCi/g for {sup 238}U, from 0.075 to 0.75 pCi/g for {sup 235}U, and from 0.71 to 5.0 pCi/g for {sup 238}U. Maximum total values for lead, chromium, and nickel were 75.1 mg/kg, 56.3 mg/kg, and 53.0 mg/kg, respectively. The maximum nitrate/nitrite value detected was 32.0 mg-N/kg. One sample obtained adjacent to a sewer line contained various organic compounds, at least some of which were tentatively identified as fragrance chemicals commonly associated with soaps and cleaning solutions. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the ANAP contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health.

  12. Rapid and non-destructive assessment of polyunsaturated fatty acids contents in Salmon using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feifei; Mba, Ogan; Liu, Li; Ngadi, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important nutrients present in Salmon. However, current methods for quantifying the fatty acids (FAs) contents in foods are generally based on gas chromatography (GC) technique, which is time-consuming, laborious and destructive to the tested samples. Therefore, the capability of near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging to predict the PUFAs contents of C20:2 n-6, C20:3 n-6, C20:5 n-3, C22:5 n-3 and C22:6 n-3 in Salmon fillets in a rapid and non-destructive way was investigated in this work. Mean reflectance spectra were first extracted from the region of interests (ROIs), and then the spectral pre-processing methods of 2nd derivative and Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing were performed on the original spectra. Based on the original and the pre-processed spectra, PLSR technique was employed to develop the quantitative models for predicting each PUFA content in Salmon fillets. The results showed that for all the studied PUFAs, the quantitative models developed using the pre-processed reflectance spectra by "2nd derivative + SG smoothing" could improve their modeling results. Good prediction results were achieved with RP and RMSEP of 0.91 and 0.75 mg/g dry weight, 0.86 and 1.44 mg/g dry weight, 0.82 and 3.01 mg/g dry weight for C20:3 n-6, C22:5 n-3 and C20:5 n-3, respectively after pre-processing by "2nd derivative + SG smoothing". The work demonstrated that NIR hyperspectral imaging could be a useful tool for rapid and non-destructive determination of the PUFA contents in fish fillets.

  13. Bio-electrolytic sensor for rapid monitoring of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiangdan; Li, Xiaohu; Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-03-15

    This study presents an innovative biosensor that was developed on the basis of a microbial electrolysis cell for fast and reliable measurement of volatile fatty acids (VFA) during anaerobic digestion (AD) process. The bio-electrolytic sensor was first tested with synthetic wastewater containing varying concentrations of VFA. A linear correlation (R(2) = 0.99) between current densities (0.03 ± 0.01 to 2.43 ± 0.12 A/m(2)) and VFA concentrations (5-100 mM) was found. The sensor performance was then investigated under different affecting parameters such as the external voltage, VFA composition ratio, and ionic strength. Linear relationship between the current density and VFA concentrations was always observed. Furthermore, the bio-electrolytic sensor proved ability to handle interruptions such as the presence of complex organic matter, anode exposure to oxygen and low pH. Finally, the sensor was applied to monitor VFA concentrations in a lab-scale AD reactor for a month. The VFA measurements from the sensor correlated well with those from GC analysis which proved the accuracy of the system. Since hydrogen was produced in the cathode as byproduct during monitoring, the system could be energy self-sufficient. Considering the high accuracy, short response time, long-term stability and additional benefit of H2 production, this bio-electrolytic sensor could be a simple and cost-effective method for VFA monitoring during AD and other anaerobic processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Abscisic Acid Induces Rapid Reductions in Mesophyll Conductance to Carbon Dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sorrentino

    Full Text Available The rate of photosynthesis (A of plants exposed to water deficit is a function of stomatal (gs and mesophyll (gm conductance determining the availability of CO2 at the site of carboxylation within the chloroplast. Mesophyll conductance often represents the greatest impediment to photosynthetic uptake of CO2, and a crucial determinant of the photosynthetic effects of drought. Abscisic acid (ABA plays a fundamental role in signalling and co-ordination of plant responses to drought; however, the effect of ABA on gm is not well-defined. Rose, cherry, olive and poplar were exposed to exogenous ABA and their leaf gas exchange parameters recorded over a four hour period. Application with ABA induced reductions in values of A, gs and gm in all four species. Reduced gm occurred within one hour of ABA treatment in three of the four analysed species; indicating that the effect of ABA on gm occurs on a shorter timescale than previously considered. These declines in gm values associated with ABA were not the result of physical changes in leaf properties due to altered turgor affecting movement of CO2, or caused by a reduction in the sub-stomatal concentration of CO2 (Ci. Increased [ABA] likely induces biochemical changes in the properties of the interface between the sub-stomatal air-space and mesophyll layer through the actions of cooporins to regulate the transport of CO2. The results of this study provide further evidence that gm is highly responsive to fluctuations in the external environment, and stress signals such as ABA induce co-ordinated modifications of both gs and gm in the regulation of photosynthesis.

  15. Rapid HPLC analysis of amino acids and biogenic amines in wines during fermentation and evaluation of matrix effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Qin; Ye, Dong-Qing; Zhu, Bao-Qing; Wu, Guang-Feng; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2014-11-15

    A rapid HPLC method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 23 amino acids, 10 biogenic amines and the ammonium ion in wine. Samples were pre-column derivatised with diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate and separated using reversed-phase HPLC within 30 min. The matrix effect was evaluated when measuring samples taken from different stages of fermentation. Most compounds showed no obvious matrix effect, whereas proline, ethanolamine and spermine had remarkably different responses to variable concentrations of sugar. High concentrations of sugar affected the pH of the derivatisation reaction system; proline, ethanolamine and spermine derivatives were sensitive to this effect. Matrix-matched calibration was used for the quantification of these compounds. Validation of the method showed that it was accurate, reproducible and efficient for the simultaneous determination of amino acids and biogenic amines in wines during fermentation. As a specific application of the method, red wine samples taken from different stages of fermentation were analysed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Carbon and nitrogen isotopes from top predator amino acids reveal rapidly shifting ocean biochemistry in the outer California Current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio I Ruiz-Cooley

    Full Text Available Climatic variation alters biochemical and ecological processes, but it is difficult both to quantify the magnitude of such changes, and to differentiate long-term shifts from inter-annual variability. Here, we simultaneously quantify decade-scale isotopic variability at the lowest and highest trophic positions in the offshore California Current System (CCS by measuring δ15N and δ13C values of amino acids in a top predator, the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus. Using a time series of skin tissue samples as a biological archive, isotopic records from individual amino acids (AAs can reveal the proximate factors driving a temporal decline we observed in bulk isotope values (a decline of ≥1 ‰ by decoupling changes in primary producer isotope values from those linked to the trophic position of this toothed whale. A continuous decline in baseline (i.e., primary producer δ15N and δ13C values was observed from 1993 to 2005 (a decrease of ∼4‰ for δ15N source-AAs and 3‰ for δ13C essential-AAs, while the trophic position of whales was variable over time and it did not exhibit directional trends. The baseline δ15N and δ13C shifts suggest rapid ongoing changes in the carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycling in the offshore CCS, potentially occurring at faster rates than long-term shifts observed elsewhere in the Pacific. While the mechanisms forcing these biogeochemical shifts remain to be determined, our data suggest possible links to natural climate variability, and also corresponding shifts in surface nutrient availability. Our study demonstrates that isotopic analysis of individual amino acids from a top marine mammal predator can be a powerful new approach to reconstructing temporal variation in both biochemical cycling and trophic structure.

  17. Observational Evidence Against Mountain-Wave Generation of Ice Nuclei as a Prerequisite for the Formation of Three Solid Nitric Acid Polar Stratospheric Clouds Observed in the Arctic in Early December 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagan, Kathy L.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Drdla, Katja; Hervig, Mark E.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Browell, Edward V.; Legg, Marion J.; Foschi, Patricia G.

    2004-01-01

    A number of recently published papers suggest that mountain-wave activity in the stratosphere, producing ice particles when temperatures drop below the ice frost point, may be the primary source of large NAT particles. In this paper we use measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting satellites to map out regions of ice clouds produced by stratospheric mountain-wave activity inside the Arctic vortex. Lidar observations from three DC-8 flights in early December 1999 show the presence of solid nitric acid (Type Ia or NAT) polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). By using back trajectories and superimposing the position maps on the AVHRR cloud imagery products, we show that these observed NAT clouds could not have originated at locations of high-amplitude mountain-wave activity. We also show that mountain-wave PSC climatology data and Mountain Wave Forecast Model 2.0 (MWFM-2) raw hemispheric ray and grid box averaged hemispheric wave temperature amplitude hindcast data from the same time period are in agreement with the AVHRR data. Our results show that ice cloud formation in mountain waves cannot explain how at least three large scale NAT clouds were formed in the stratosphere in early December 1999.

  18. Role of Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in the Vasodilator Effect of Ursolic Acid and Uvaol from Black Cherry Prunus serotina Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Luna-Vázquez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research aimed to isolate the non-polar secondary metabolites that produce the vasodilator effects induced by the dichloromethane extract of Prunus serotina (P. serotina fruits and to determine whether the NO/cGMP and the H2S/KATP channel pathways are involved in their mechanism of action. A bioactivity-directed fractionation of the dichloromethane extract of P. serotina fruits led to the isolation of ursolic acid and uvaol as the main non-polar vasodilator compounds. These compounds showed significant relaxant effect on rat aortic rings in an endothelium- and concentration-dependent manner, which was inhibited by NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, dl-propargylglycine (PAG and glibenclamide (Gli. Additionally, both triterpenes increased NO and H2S production in aortic tissue. Molecular docking studies showed that ursolic acid and uvaol are able to bind to endothelial NOS and CSE with high affinity for residues that form the oligomeric interface of both enzymes. These results suggest that the vasodilator effect produced by ursolic acid and uvaol contained in P. serotina fruits, involves activation of the NO/cGMP and H2S/KATP channel pathways, possibly through direct activation of NOS and CSE.

  19. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles to deliver nitric oxide to inhibit Escherichia coli growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reger, Nina A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Meng, Wilson S. [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Gawalt, Ellen S., E-mail: gawalte@duq.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Thin film functionalized PLGA nanoparticles were modified to release nitric oxide from an s-nitrosothiol donor. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles were bacteriostatic against Escherichia coli. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles increased the effectiveness of tetracycline against Escherichia coli. • The modified nitric oxide nanoparticles did not exhibit cytotoxic effects against fibroblasts. - Abstract: Polymer nanoparticles consisting of poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) were surface functionalized to deliver nitric oxide. These biodegradable and biocompatible nanoparticles were modified with an S-nitrosothiol molecule, S-nitrosocysteamine, as the nitric oxide delivery molecule. S-nitrosocysteamine was covalently immobilized on the nanoparticle surface using small organic molecule linkers and carbodiimide coupling. Nanoparticle size, zeta potential, and morphology were determined using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Subsequent attachment of the S-nitrosothiol resulted in a nitric oxide release of 37.1 ± 1.1 nmol per milligram of nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli culture growth by 31.8%, indicating that the nitric oxide donor was effective at releasing nitric oxide even after attachment to the nanoparticle surface. Combining the nitric oxide modified nanoparticles with tetracycline, a commonly prescribed antibiotic for E. coli infections, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 87.8%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used in order to achieve the same effect. The functionalized nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts.

  20. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors produce rapid anti-anxiety responses through amygdala long-term depression in male rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Tingting; Gu, Ning; Wang, Ying; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Jie; Fang, Yiru; Shen, Yuan; Han, Jing; Zhang, Xia

    2017-06-01

    Pathological anxiety is the most common type of psychiatric disorder. The current first-line anti-anxiety treatment, selective serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, produces a delayed onset of action with modest therapeutic and substantial adverse effects, and long-term use of the fast-acting anti-anxiety benzodiazepines causes severe adverse effects. Inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) degradative enzyme, produces anti-anxiety effects without substantial "unwanted effects" of cannabinoids, but its anti-anxiety mechanism is unclear. We used behavioural, electrophysiological, morphological and mutagenesis strategies to assess the anti-anxiety mechanism of the FAAH inhibitors PF3845 and URB597. PF3845 exerts rapid and long-lasting anti-anxiety effects in mice exposed acutely to stress or chronically to the stress hormone corticosterone. PF3845-induced anti-anxiety effects and in vivo long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic strength at the prefrontal cortical input onto the basolateral amygdala neurons are abolished in mutant mice without CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) in brain astroglial cells, but are conserved in mice without CB1R in glutamatergic neurons. Blockade of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and of synaptic trafficking of glutamate AMPA receptors also abolishes PF3845-induced anti-anxiety effects in mice and LTD production in rats. URB597 produces similar anti-anxiety effects, which are abolished by blockade of LTD induction in mice. The determination of FAAH in which types of brain cells contribute to AEA degradation for the maintenance of amygdala interstitial AEA has yet to be determined. We propose that the rapid anti-anxiety effects of FAAH inhibition are due to AEA activation of astroglial CB1R and subsequent basolateral amygdala LTD in vivo.

  1. Rapid determination of thiamine, riboflavin, niacinamide, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, folic acid and ascorbic acid in Vitamins with Minerals Tablets by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Pengfei; Xia, Lufeng; Li, Zheng; Che, Ning; Zou, Ding; Hu, Xin

    2012-11-01

    A simple, isocratic, and stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed for the rapid determination of thiamine (VB(1)), niacinamide (VB(3)), pyridoxine (VB(6)), ascorbic acid (VC), pantothenic acid (VB(5)), riboflavin (VB(2)) and folic acid (VB(9)) in Vitamins with Minerals Tablets (VMT). An Alltima C(18) column (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm) was used for the separation at ambient temperature, with 50mM ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (adjusting with phosphoric acid to pH 3.0) and acetonitrile as the mobile phase at the flow rate of 0.5 ml min(-1). VB(1), VB(3), VB(6), VC and VB(5) were extracted with a solution containing 0.05% phosphoric acid (v/v) and 0.3% sodium thiosulfate (w/v), and were then simultaneously analyzed by using the mobile phase of phosphate buffer-acetonitrile (95:5, v/v), while VB(2) and VB(9) were extracted with a solution containing 0.5% ammonium hydroxide solution (v/v), and were then simultaneously analyzed by using the mobile phase of phosphate buffer-acetonitrile (85:15, v/v). The detection wavelengths were 275 nm for VB(1), VB(3), VB(6), VC, 210 nm for VB(5), and 282 nm for VB(2) and VB(9). The method showed good system suitability, sensitivity, linearity, specificity, precision, stability and accuracy. All the seven water-soluble vitamins were well separated from other ingredients and degradation products. Method comparison indicated good concordance between the developed method and the USP method. The developed method was reliable and convenient for the rapid determination of VB(1), VB(3), VB(6), VC, VB(5), VB(2) and VB(9) in VMT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid protein disappearance rates along the small intestine advantage poultry performance and influence the post-enteral availability of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Ha H; Chrystal, Peter V; Moss, Amy F; Selle, Peter H; Liu, Sonia Yun

    2017-12-01

    A foundation diet, an intermediate blend and a summit diet were formulated with different levels of soyabean meal, casein and crystalline amino acids to compare 'slow' and 'rapid' protein diets. The diets were offered to male Ross 308 chicks from 7 to 28 d post-hatch and assessed parameters included growth performance, nutrient utilisation, apparent digestibility coefficients and disappearance rates of starch and protein (N) in four small intestinal segments. Digestibility coefficients and disappearance rates of sixteen amino acids in three small intestinal segments and amino acid concentrations in plasma from portal and systemic circulations from the foundation and summit diets were determined. The dietary transition significantly accelerated protein (N) disappearance rates in the distal jejunum and ileum. The transition from foundation to summit diets significantly increased starch digestibility coefficients in the ileum and disappearance rates in all four small intestinal segments. These starch responses were associated with significant enhancements in nutrient utilisation. The dietary transition linearly increased digestibility coefficients and disappearance rates of amino acids in the majority of cases. The summit diet increased plasma concentrations of five amino acids but decreased those of four amino acids relative to the foundation diet to significant extents. Plasma concentrations of free amino acids were higher in the portal than systemic circulations. Rapid protein disappearance rates advantaged poultry performance and influenced post-enteral availability of amino acids. If the underlying mechanisms are to be identified, further research into the impact of protein digestive dynamics on broiler performance is required but appears justified.

  3. Facile synthesis of red emitting 3-aminophenylboronic acid functionalized copper nanoclusters for rapid, selective and highly sensitive detection of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Ge; Zhang, Fei; Gao, Ya; Zhou, Qing-Meng; Zhao, Ye; Li, Yan; Huo, Jian-Zhong; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2016-12-15

    As an emerging class of fluorescent probes, copper nanoclusters (Cu NCs) have been considered as an intriguing candidate for detecting biomoleculars due to their outstanding fluorescent properties, excellent biocompatibility and low cost. Herein, we fabricated bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected Cu NCs (BSA-Cu NCs) and further functionalized them with 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) for selectively discerning glycoproteins. In aqueous solution, Cu(2+) ions were directly reduced into BSA-Cu NCs by hydrazine hydrate (N2H4·H2O) at room-temperature using BSA as the capping agent. The synthetic process was very rapid, simple and easy for controlling due to the lack of any other complicated procedure such as heating and adjusting the pH value of the reactive mixture. The APBA-Cu NCs showed strong fluorescent emission at 630nm in the red range. So it can effectively avoid the disturbance of auto-fluorescence in biosamples. The fluorescence of the APBA-Cu NCs was obviously quenched by glycoprotein samples. Then, the APBA-Cu NCs were employed as a probe for selective capture and sensitive detection of glycoproteins with a wide linear range of 5-220nM and a low detection limit of 2.60nM owing to the covalent reaction between the boric acid group of APBA and the cis-glycol groups of the glycoproteins. The developed method was also successfully applied to determine glycoproteins in egg white of chickens and human urine samples with quantitative spike recoveries from 95% to 104%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid and selective manipulation of milk fatty acid composition in mice through the maternal diet during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosting, Annemarie; Verkade, Henkjan J; Kegler, Diane; van de Heijning, Bert J M; van der Beek, Eline M

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fatty acid (FA) composition in early postnatal life can modulate growth and development and later metabolic health. Investigating programming effects of early dietary FA manipulations in rodents may be stressful and complicated due to the need of artificial feeding techniques. It is largely unknown to what extent breast milk (BM) FA composition can be directly manipulated by the diet. We exposed dams to different dietary FA compositions from postnatal day (PN) 2 until PN28. Dams with litters were randomly assigned to control (CTRL), high-medium-chain FA (MCFA), low-linoleic acid (LowLA), high-n-3 long-chain PUFA (n-3LCP) or high-n-3LCP and MCFA (n-3LCP/MCFA) diets, and diets were continued after weaning until PN28. FA compositions were determined in feeds, milk and in erythrocytes. BM MCFA content was independent from dietary MCFA intake. In contrast, the LowLA diet reduced BM LA content by about 50 % compared with the CTRL diet at PN7. BM of dams fed the n-3LCP or n-3LCP/MCFA diet contained about 6-fold more n-3 LCP than BM of the dams fed the CTRL diet at PN7. These changes in milk FA composition established after 5 d of dietary exposure did not further change over the lactation period. At PN28, the erythrocyte FA composition of the male pups correlated with analysed milk FA profiles. In conclusion, manipulation of the diet of lactating mice can strongly and rapidly affect BM FA composition, in particular of n-6 LA and n-3 LCP. Our present findings will facilitate mechanistic studies on the programming of adult metabolic health by dietary FA in the early postnatal period via direct and selective manipulation of the maternal diet.

  5. Rapid microwave-assisted acid extraction of metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Yu; Chung Y. Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    The effects of acid concentration, reaction time, and temperature in a microwave reactor on recovery of CCA-treated wood were evaluated. Extraction of copper, chromium, and arsenic metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood samples with three different acids (i.e., acetic acid, oxalic acid, and phosphoric acid) was investigated using in...

  6. Simple and rapid spectrophotometric assay of albendazole in pharmaceuticals using iodine and picric acid as CT complexing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraju Swamy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two simple, rapid and inexpensive spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of albendazole (ALB in bulk drug and in tablets. The methods are based on charge-transfer (CT complexation reaction involving ALB as n-donor and iodine as σ-acceptor (method A in dichloromethane or picric acid (PA as π-acceptor (method B in chloroform. The absorbance of CT complexes was measured at 380 nm for method A, and 415 nm for method B. The optimization of the experimental conditions is described. Under optimum conditions, Beer's law obeyed over the concentration ranges 8.0-240 and 2.4-42 μg mL-1 for method A and method B, respectively. The apparent molar absorptivity of CT complexes at the respective λmax are calculated to be 1.17×103 and 5.22×103 L mol-1cm-1 respectively, and the corresponding Sandell sensitivity values are 0.2273 and 0.0509 ng cm-2. The limits of detection (LOD and quantification (LOQ are calculated to be (0.69 and 2.08, and (0.10 and 0.30 μg mL-1 with method A, and method B, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day accuracy expressed as % RE and precision expressed as % RSD were less than 3%. The methods were applied to the determination of ALB in tablets.

  7. Rapid and scalable synthesis of innovative unnatural α,β or γ-amino acids functionalized with tertiary amines on their side-chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Séverine; Ftouni, Hussein; Niu, Songlin; Schmitt, Martine; Simonin, Frédéric; Bihel, Frédéric

    2015-07-07

    We report a selective ruthenium catalyzed reduction of tertiary amides on the side chain of Fmoc-Gln-OtBu derivatives, leading to innovative unnatural α,β or γ-amino acids functionalized with tertiary amines. Rapid and scalable, this process allowed us to build a library of basic unnatural amino acids at the gram-scale and directly usable for liquid- or solid-phase peptide synthesis. The diversity of available tertiary amines allows us to modulate the physicochemical properties of the resulting amino acids, such as basicity or hydrophobicity.

  8. Assessment of impact of peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci in the absence of antimicrobial stewardship intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Carol; Whitney, Dana; Barlam, Tamar; Miller, Nancy S

    2011-04-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) was instituted at Boston Medical Center for the rapid identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Without active notification or antimicrobial stewardship intervention, a pre- and postimpact analysis showed no benefit of this assay with respect to the length of hospital stay or vancomycin use.

  9. Rapid magnetic solid-phase extraction based on monodisperse magnetic single-crystal ferrite nanoparticles for the determination of free fatty acid content in edible oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Zhao, Qin; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Feng, Yu-Qi; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-09

    This study proposes a rapid magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) based on monodisperse magnetic single-crystal ferrite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles (NPs) for determining the quantities of eight free fatty acids (FFAs), including palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), linolenic acid (C18:3), arachidic acid (C20:0), eicosenoic acid (C20:1), and behenic acid (C22:0) in oil. The amine-functionalized mesoporous Fe(3)O(4) magnetic NPs were applied as a sorbent for MSPE of FFAs from oil samples in a process that is based on hydrophilic interaction. The extraction can be completed rapidly in a dispersive mode with the aid of vigorous vortex. Additional tedious processing steps such as centrifugation and evaporation of organic solvent were not necessary with this procedure. Furthermore, esterification of FFAs can be accomplished during the desorption procedure by using methanol/sulfuric acid (99:1, v/v) as the desorption solvent. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated, including the matrix solvent for extraction, the desorption solvent and desorption time, and the amount of sorbent and extraction time. The pretreatment process was rapid under optimal conditions, being accomplished within 15 min. When coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID), a rapid, simple, and convenient MSPE-GC-FID method for the determination of FFAs in oil samples was established with a total analysis time within 25 min. The limits of detection for the target FFAs were found to be 7.22-26.26 ng/mL. Recoveries in oil samples were in the range of 81.33-117.75%, with RSDs of <6.4% (intraday) and <6.9% (interday). This method was applied successfully to the analysis of dynamic FFA formation in four types of edible oils subjected to an accelerated storage test. The simple, rapid, and cost-effective method developed in the current study offers a potential application for the extraction and

  10. Rapid profiling of polymeric phenolic acids in Salvia miltiorrhiza by hybrid data-dependent/targeted multistage mass spectrometry acquisition based on expected compounds prediction and fragment ion searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yao; Feng, Zijin; Yang, Min; Zhou, Zhe; Han, Sumei; Hou, Jinjun; Li, Zhenwei; Wu, Wanying; Guo, De-An

    2018-01-15

    Phenolic acids are the major water-soluble components in Salvia miltiorrhiza (> 5%). According to previous studies, many of them contribute to the cardiovascular effects and antioxidant effects of S. miltiorrhiza. Polymeric phenolic acids can be considered as the tanshinol derived metabolites, e.g., dimmers, trimers and tetramers. A strategy combined with tanshinol-based expected compounds prediction, total ion chromatogram filtering, Fragment Ion Searching and parent list-based multistage mass spectrometry acquisition by Linear Trap Quadropole-orbitrap Velos Mass Spectrometry was proposed to rapid profile polymeric phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza. More than 480 potential polymeric phenolic acids could be screened out by this strategy. Based on the fragment information obtained by parent list-activated data dependent multistage mass spectrometry acquisition, 190 polymeric phenolic acids were characterized by comparing their mass information with literature data, and 18 of them were firstly detected from S. miltiorrhiza. Seven potential compounds were tentatively characterized as new polymeric phenolic acids from S. miltiorrhiza. This strategy facilitates identification of polymeric phenolic acids in complex matrix with both selectivity and sensitivity, which could be expanded for rapid discovery and identification of compounds from complex matrix. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Transuranic decontamination of nitric acid solutions by the TRUEX solvent extraction process: preliminary development studies. [Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Leonard, R.A.; Steindler, M.J.; Horwitz, E.P.; Basile, L.J.; Diamond, H.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

    1984-07-01

    This report summarizes the work that has been performed to date at Argonne National Laboratory on the development of the TRUEX process, a solvent extraction process employing a bifunctional organophosphorous reagent in a PUREX process solvent (tributyl phosphate-normal paraffinic hydrocarbons). The purpose of this extraction process is to separate and concentrate transuranic (TRU) elements from nuclear waste. Assessments were made of the use of two TRUEX solvents: one incorporating the well-studied dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP) and a second incorporating an extractant with superior properties for a 1M HNO/sub 3/ acid feed, octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (O/sub phi/D(IB)CMPO). In this report, conceptual flowsheets for the removal of soluble TRUs from high-level nuclear wastes using these two TRUEX proces solvents are presented, and flowsheet features are discussed in detail. The conceptual flowsheet for TRU-element removal from a PUREX waste by the O/sub phi/D(IB)CMPO-TRUEX process solvent was tested in a bench-scale countercurrent experiment, and results of that experiment are presented and discussed. The conclusion of this study is that the TRUEX process is able to separate TRUs from high-level wastes so that the major portion of the solid waste (approx. 99%) can be classified as non-TRU. Areas where more experimentation is needed are listed at the end of the report. 45 references, 17 figures, 56 tables.

  12. Saw palmetto extract enhances erectile responses by inhibition of phosphodiesterase 5 activity and increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger ribonucleic acid expression in rat and rabbit corpus cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Surong; Chen, Changrui; Li, Yiying; Ren, Zhenghua; Zhang, Yungang; Wu, Gantong; Wang, Hao; Hu, Zhenzhen; Yao, Minghui

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate whether saw palmetto extract (SPE) relaxes corpus cavernosum and explore the underlying mechanisms. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats and 30 New Zealand rabbits were randomly allocated into 3 SPE-treated groups (low-, middle-, and high-dose) and 1 saline-treated control group. SPE was administered intragastrically for 7 consecutive days. Another 23 rats treated with sildenafil were used to appraise the erectile response to electrical stimulation of nerves in the corpus cavernosum. The erectile functions of rats and rabbits were evaluated 24 hours after the last SPE administration or 15 minutes after intragastric sildenafil. Outcome measures included corpus cavernosum electrical activity recording, phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) activity detected by the colorimetric quantitative method, and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression level for PDE5 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the SPE-treated animals, the relaxant response to electrical stimulation of nerves in the corpus cavernosum, reflected by the amplitude of the electrical activity within the cavernosum, was significantly and dose-dependently augmented. Similar effects were observed in the sildenafil-treated rats. PDE5 activity in rat and rabbit corpus cavernosum tissues was significantly and dose-dependently inhibited in SPE-treated animals, whereas the iNOS mRNA level increased compared with the saline group. PDE5 mRNA, however, was only significantly enhanced in the rats treated with the middle dose of SPE. The results suggest that SPE may have potential application value for the prevention or treatment of erectile dysfunction through an increase in iNOS mRNA expression and inhibition of PDE5 activity in corpus cavernosum smooth muscles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Overview of the LADCO winter nitrate study: hourly ammonia, nitric acid and PM2.5 composition at an urban and rural site pair during PM2.5 episodes in the US Great Lakes region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shaw

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An overview of the LADCO (Lake Michigan Air Directors Consortium Winter Nitrate Study (WNS is presented. Sampling was conducted at ground level at an urban-rural pair of sites during January–March 2009 in eastern Wisconsin, toward the western edge of the US Great Lakes region. Areas surrounding these sites experience multiday episodes of wintertime PM2.5 pollution characterized by high fractions of ammonium nitrate in PM, low wind speeds, and air mass stagnation. Hourly surface monitoring of inorganic gases and aerosols supplemented long-term 24-h aerosol chemistry monitoring at these locations. The urban site (Milwaukee, WI experienced 13 PM2.5 episodes, defined as periods where the seven-hour moving average PM2.5 concentration exceeded 27 μg m−3 for at least four consecutive hours. The rural site experienced seven episodes by the same metric, and all rural episodes coincided with urban episodes. Episodes were characterized by low pressure systems, shallow/stable boundary layer, light winds, and increased temperature and relative humidity relative to climatological mean conditions. They often occurred in the presence of regional snow cover at temperatures near freezing, when snow melt and sublimation could generate fog and strengthen the boundary layer inversion. Substantial contribution to nitrate production from nighttime chemistry of ozone and NO2 to N2O5 and nitric acid is likely and requires further investigation. Pollutant-specific urban excess during episode and non-episode conditions is presented. The largest remaining uncertainties in the conceptual model of the wintertime episodes are the variability from episode-to-episode in ammonia emissions, the balance of daytime and nighttime nitrate production, the relationship between ammonia controls, NOx controls and ammonium nitrate reductions, and the extent to which snow and fog are causal (either through meteorological or chemical processes rather than just correlated with episodes

  14. Humic acid induces the endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation at Ser1177 and Thr495 Via Hsp90α and Hsp90β upregulation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masato; Miyajima, Miki; Hishioka, Naoko; Nishimura, Ryo; Kihara, Yusuke; Hosokawa, Toshiyuki; Kurasaki, Masaaki; Tanaka, Shunitz; Saito, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as a contributory factor for blackfoot disease, which is an endemic peripheral vascular disease. We investigated the effect of HA on the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to evaluate the involvement of eNOS and related factors in peripheral vascular impairment with HA exposure. Treatment of HUVECs with HA induced upregulation of eNOS. This result coincides with those of previous studies. Furthermore this is the first study to report that HA induces upregulation of heat shock protein (Hsp)90α, Hsp90β, eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177, and eNOS phosphorylation at Thr495, as compared to that in the control. In contrast, treatment with BAPTA, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, inhibited upregulation of these proteins induced by HA. This study demonstrates that HA treatment leads to increases in both Hsp90α and Hsp90β proteins and indicates that Hsp90α leads to eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 and that Hsp90β leads to eNOS phosphorylation at Thr495, respectively. Upregulation of eNOS, Hsp90α, and Hsp90β in HUVECs is regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation induced by HA. These results suggest that upregulation of eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 and eNOS phosphorylation at Thr495 produce NO and superoxide anions, respectively, resulting in generation of peroxynitrite, which causes impairment of vascular endothelial cells. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Abscisic acid, H2O2 and nitric oxide interactions mediated cold-induced S-adenosylmethionine synthetase in Medicago sativa subsp. falcata that confers cold tolerance through up-regulating polyamine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenfei; Tan, Jiali; Zhuo, Chunliu; Wang, Congying; Xiang, Bin; Wang, Zengyu

    2014-06-01

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) is the key enzyme catalysing the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a precursor of polyamines and ethylene. To investigate the potential role of SAMS in cold tolerance, we isolated MfSAMS1 from the cold-tolerant germplasm Medicago sativa subsp. falcata and analysed the association of SAM-derived polyamines with cold tolerance. The expression of MfSAMS1 in leaves was greatly induced by cold, abscisic acid (ABA), H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). Our data revealed that ABA, H2O2 and NO interactions mediated the cold-induced MfSAMS1 expression and cold acclimation in falcata. SAM, putrescine, spermidine and spermine levels, ethylene production and polyamine oxidation were sequentially altered in response to cold, indicating that SAMS-derived SAM is preferentially used in polyamine synthesis and homeostasis during cold acclimation. Antioxidant enzyme activities were also induced in response to cold and showed correlation with polyamine oxidation. Overexpression of MfSAMS1 in tobacco resulted in elevated SAM levels, but polyamine levels and ethylene production in the transgenic plants were not significantly changed. Compared to the wild type, transgenic plants had increased levels of apoplastic H2O2, higher transcript levels of genes involved in polyamine synthesis and oxidation, and higher activities of polyamine oxidation and antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that overexpression of MfSAMS1 promoted polyamine synthesis and oxidation, which in turn improved H2 O2 -induced antioxidant protection, as a result enhanced tolerance to freezing and chilling stress in transgenic plants. This is the first report demonstrating that SAMS plays an important role in plant tolerance to cold via up-regulating polyamine oxidation. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Extremely rapid increase in fatty acid transport and intramyocellular lipid accumulation but markedly delayed insulin resistance after high fat feeding in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonen, Arend; Jain, Swati S; Snook, Laelie A; Han, Xiao-Xia; Yoshida, Yuko; Buddo, Kathryn H; Lally, James S; Pask, Elizabeth D; Paglialunga, Sabina; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Harasim, Ewa; Wright, David C; Chabowski, Adrian; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms for diet-induced intramyocellular lipid accumulation and its association with insulin resistance remain contentious. In a detailed time-course study in rats, we examined whether a high-fat diet increased intramyocellular lipid accumulation via alterations in fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36)-mediated fatty acid transport, selected enzymes and/or fatty acid oxidation, and whether intramyocellular lipid accretion coincided with the onset of insulin resistance. We measured, daily (on days 1-7) and/or weekly (for 6 weeks), the diet-induced changes in circulating substrates, insulin, sarcolemmal substrate transporters and transport, selected enzymes, intramyocellular lipids, mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and basal and insulin-stimulated sarcolemmal GLUT4 and glucose transport. We also examined whether upregulating fatty acid oxidation improved glucose transport in insulin-resistant muscles. Finally, in Cd36-knockout mice, we examined the role of FAT/CD36 in intramyocellular lipid accumulation, insulin sensitivity and diet-induced glucose intolerance. Within 2-3 days, diet-induced increases occurred in insulin, sarcolemmal FAT/CD36 (but not fatty acid binding protein [FABPpm] or fatty acid transporter [FATP]1 or 4), fatty acid transport and intramyocellular triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol and ceramide, independent of enzymatic changes or muscle fatty acid oxidation. Diet-induced increases in mitochondria and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and impairments in insulin-stimulated glucose transport and GLUT4 translocation occurred much later (≥21 days). FAT/CD36 ablation impaired insulin-stimulated fatty acid transport and lipid accumulation, improved insulin sensitivity and prevented diet-induced glucose intolerance. Increasing fatty acid oxidation in insulin-resistant muscles improved glucose transport. High-fat feeding rapidly increases intramyocellular lipids (in 2-3 days) via insulin-mediated upregulation of sarcolemmal FAT/CD36 and fatty acid

  17. Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (heart attack) and hypertension. Nitric oxide (NO), an inorganic molecule formed by vascular endothelial cells is now thought to be a messenger molecule that is believed to playa crucial role in various biological processes of both physiological and pathological importance. Nitric oxide is a simple heterodiatomic molecule ...

  18. Valproate protein binding following rapid intravenous administration of high doses of valproic acid in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S; Faught, E; Limdi, N A

    2007-08-01

    To characterize protein binding in patients with epilepsy who achieve transient high (>150 mg/L) total plasma concentrations following rapid valproate infusion at very high doses. Patients with epilepsy (n = 40) were administered 20 or 30 mg/kg loading doses (6 or 10 mg/kg/min) of undiluted valproate sodium injection. Total and unbound valproic acid (VPA) concentrations were used to assess VPA binding to plasma albumin. One- and two-binding site models were explored in a nonlinear mixed effects population analysis framework. The relative importance of weight, age, sex, race and enzyme-inducing comedications on the binding site association constant (K) was examined using the likelihood ratio test. Intersubject and intrasubject variabilities were characterized using exponential or proportional error models. Optimal characterization of the data was achieved using the one-binding site model. Population binding parameter estimates (standard error) for number of binding sites (N) and K were 1.98 (0.0865) and 15.5 [2.28 (1/mM)], respectively. No significant covariates were identified for VPA protein binding. The intersubject and intrasubject coefficients of variation were 32% and 14%, respectively. A one-binding site model without any significant covariates for binding constants optimally described VPA protein binding. As the estimated dissociation constant (1/K, 64.5 microm or 9.3 mg/L) was within the therapeutic range (5-15 mg/L) for unbound VPA concentrations, protein binding was nonlinear. Although the range of unbound fraction and VPA concentrations were much higher than previous studies, the dissociation constant was consistent with historical data in normal healthy adults and epilepsy patients receiving lower doses.

  19. Polyacrylamide-phytic acid-polydopamine conducting porous hydrogel for rapid detection and removal of copper (II) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen; Chen, Hongda; Zhang, Hua; Ma, Lina; Wang, Zhenxin

    2017-05-15

    In this work, a conducting porous polymer hydrogel-based electrochemical sensor has been developed for rapid detection of copper (II) ions (Cu2+). The polymer (termed as PAAM/PA/PDA) hydrogel is prepared through multi-interactions of the monomers dopamine (DA), acrylamide (AAM) and phytic acid (PA) under mild ambient conditions: the AAM polymerizes through free-radical polymerization, DA occurs poly coupling reaction, and PA crosslinks polydopamine (PDA) and polyacrylamide (PAAM) by hydrogen bonds. The three dimensional (3D) network nanostructured PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel not only provides a large surface area for increasing the amount of immobilized molecules/ions, but also exhibits a good conductivity. The PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel-based electrochemical sensor exhibits a low detection limit (1nmolL-1, S/N=3) and wide linear range (from 1nmolL-1 to 1µmolL-1) for Cu2+ detection in aqueous samples. Furthermore, the Cu2+ can be sensitively detected by the electrochemical sensor in different sample matrices, indicating that the electrochemical sensor could be used to monitor Cu2+ with reasonable assay performance in practical samples. The PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel also exhibits a good capacity to remove Cu2+(231.36±4.70mgg-1), which is superior to those of other adsorption materials reported in the literature. The facile synthesized PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel provides a novel and regenerable platform for monitoring and removing Cu2+ in real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid Phosphoproteomic Effects of Abscisic Acid (ABA) on Wild-Type and ABA Receptor-Deficient A. thaliana Mutants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkoff, Benjamin B.; Stecker, Kelly E.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)1 is a plant hormone that controls many aspects of plant growth, including seed germination, stomatal aperture size, and cellular drought response. ABA interacts with a unique family of 14 receptor proteins. This interaction leads to the activation of a family of protein kinases, SnRK2s, which in turn phosphorylate substrates involved in many cellular processes. The family of receptors appears functionally redundant. To observe a measurable phenotype, four of the fourteen receptors have to be mutated to create a multilocus loss-of-function quadruple receptor (QR) mutant, which is much less sensitive to ABA than wild-type (WT) plants. Given these phenotypes, we asked whether or not a difference in ABA response between the WT and QR backgrounds would manifest on a phosphorylation level as well. We tested WT and QR mutant ABA response using isotope-assisted quantitative phosphoproteomics to determine what ABA-induced phosphorylation changes occur in WT plants within 5 min of ABA treatment and how that phosphorylation pattern is altered in the QR mutant. We found multiple ABA-induced phosphorylation changes that occur within 5 min of treatment, including three SnRK2 autophosphorylation events and phosphorylation on SnRK2 substrates. The majority of robust ABA-dependent phosphorylation changes observed were partially diminished in the QR mutant, whereas many smaller ABA-dependent phosphorylation changes observed in the WT were not responsive to ABA in the mutant. A single phosphorylation event was increased in response to ABA treatment in both the WT and QR mutant. A portion of the discovery data was validated using selected reaction monitoring-based targeted measurements on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. These data suggest that different subsets of phosphorylation events depend upon different subsets of the ABA receptor family to occur. Altogether, these data expand our understanding of the model by which the family of ABA receptors directs

  1. RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN EMERGENCY MILK SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-07-17

    A new rapid separation method for radiostrontium in emergency milk samples was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that will allow rapid separation and measurement of Sr-90 within 8 hours. The new method uses calcium phosphate precipitation, nitric acid dissolution of the precipitate to coagulate residual fat/proteins and a rapid strontium separation using Sr Resin (Eichrom Technologies, Darien, IL, USA) with vacuum-assisted flow rates. The method is much faster than previous method that use calcination or cation exchange pretreatment, has excellent chemical recovery, and effectively removes beta interferences. When a 100 ml sample aliquot is used, the method has a detection limit of 0.5 Bq/L, well below generic emergency action levels.

  2. Thermodynamic modelling of the extraction of nitrates of lanthanides by CMPO and by CMPO-like calixarene in concentrated nitric acid medium. Application in the optimization of the separation of lanthanides and actinides/lanthanides; Modelisation thermodynamique de l'extraction de nitrates de lanthanides par le CMPO et par un calixarene-CMPO en milieu acide nitrique concentre. Application a l'optimisation de la separation des lanthanides et des actinides/lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belair, S

    2003-07-01

    The separation minor actinides / lanthanides in nitric acid medium is as one of problems of separative chemistry the most delicate within the framework of the processes allowing the recovery of long life radioelements present in the solutions of fission products. Previous studies showed that CMPO-substituted calix[4]arenes presents a better affinity for actinides than for lanthanides. To optimize the operating conditions of separation and to take into account the degree of non-ideality for the concentrated nitric solutions, we adopted a thermodynamic approach. The methodology taken to determine the number and the stoichiometry of the complexes formed in organic phase base on MIKULIN-SERGIEVSKII's model used through a software of data processing of experimental extraction isotherms. These tools are exploited at first on an extraction system engaging the CMPO, extractant reagent of actinides and lanthanides in concentrated nitric medium. The modelling of the system Ln(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}-HNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O/CMPO comes to confirm the results of several studies. At the same time, they allow to establish working hypotheses aiming at limiting the investigations of our researches towards the most stable complexes formed between lanthanides and CMPO-like calixarene to which the same method is then applied. An analytical expression of the selectivity of separation by the calixarene is established to determine the parameters and physico-chemical variables on which it depends. So, the ratio of the constants of extraction and the value of the activity of water of the system fixes the selectivity of separation of 2 elements. The exploitation of this relation allows to preview the influence of a variation of the concentration of nitric acid. Experiments of extraction confirm these forecasts and inform about the affinity of the calixarene with respect to lanthanides elements and to the americium. (author)

  3. Nitric oxide, S-nitrosation, and endothelial permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Walter N; Beuve, Annie V; Sánchez, Fabiola A

    2013-10-01

    S-Nitrosation is rapidly emerging as a regulatory mechanism in vascular biology, with particular importance in the onset of hyperpermeability induced by pro-inflammatory agents. This review focuses on the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO) in regulating S-Nitrosation of adherens junction proteins. We discuss evidence for translocation of eNOS, via caveolae, to the cytosol and analyze the significance of eNOS location for S-Nitrosation and onset of endothelial hyperpermeability to macromolecules. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Nitric oxide: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeberg, D A; Chaet, M S; Bass, R C; Arkovitz, M S; Garcia, V F

    1995-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a paracrine-acting gas enzymatically synthesized from L-arginine, is a unique biologic mediator that has been implicated in a myriad of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. It is an important regulator of vascular tone and may be the mediator of the hemodynamic changes involved in sepsis and cirrhosis. In addition, there is increasing evidence that NO is involved in coagulation, immune function, inhibitory innervation of the gastrointestinal tract, protection of gastrointestinal mucosa, and the hepatotoxicity of cirrhosis. It has already been speculated that NO may represent a point of control or intervention in a number of disease states. The purpose of this paper is to provide the surgeon with a broad overview of the scientific and clinical aspects of this important molecule.

  5. Restoration Of Glutamine Synthetase Activity, Nitric Oxide Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Propolis has been proposed to be protective on neurodegenerative disorders. To understand the neuroprotective effects of honeybee propolis, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, nitric oxide (NO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were studied in different brain ...

  6. Effects of nitric oxide treatment on the cell wall softening related enzymes and several hormones of papaya fruit during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qin; Wu, Bin; Chen, Weixin; Zhang, Yuli; Wang, Jide; Li, Xueping

    2014-06-01

    Papaya fruits (Carica papaya L. cv 'Sui you 2') harvested with papaya fruits treated with nitric oxide had a significantly lower rate of ethylene production and a lesser loss of firmness during storage. A decrease in polygalacturonase, pectin methyl esterase, pectate lyase and cellulase activities was observed in nitric oxide treated fruit. In addition, the contents of indole acetic acid, abscisic acid and zeatin riboside were reduced in nitric oxide treated fruit, but no significant reduction in the level of gibberellin was found. These results indicate that nitric oxide treatment can effectively delay the softening and ripening of papaya fruit, likely via the regulation of cell wall softening related enzymes and certain hormones.

  7. A rapid high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantitation of aspirin, salicylic acid, and caffeine in effervescent tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, MaryJean; Kumar, Vimal

    2003-09-01

    A rapid reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure is developed and validated for the simultaneous quantitation of aspirin, salicylic acid, and caffeine extracted from an effervescent tablet. The method uses a Hypersil C18 column (5 micro m, 15 cm x 4.6 mm) for an isocratic elution in a water-methanol-acetic acid mobile phase at a wavelength of 275 nm. The tablets' buffering effects and acid neutralizing capacity require an extraction solvent of methanol-formic acid. The range of linearity for aspirin is 0.5-1.25 mg/mL, caffeine 0.065-0.195 mg/mL, and salicylic acid 0.4-6.0% of aspirin. The overall recovery is 100.2%, 100.7%, and 99.2% for aspirin, caffeine, and salicylic acid, respectively. Under the conditions of the method, aspirin, caffeine, and salicylic acid are adequately resolved with proper peak symmetry in less than 7 min.

  8. Uranium carbide dissolution in nitric solution: Sonication vs. silent conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virot, Matthieu; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Chave, Tony; Dacheux, Nicolas; Moisy, Philippe; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2013-10-01

    The dissolution of uranium carbide (UC) in nitric acid media is considered by means of power ultrasound (sonication) or magnetic stirring. The induction period required to initiate UC dissolution was found to be dramatically shortened when sonicating a 3 M nitric solution (Ar, 20 kHz, 18 W cm-2, 20 °C). At higher acidity, magnetic stirring offers faster dissolution kinetics compared to sonication. Ultrasound-assisted UC dissolution is found to be passivated after ∼60% dissolution and remains incomplete whatever the acidity which is confirmed by ICP-AES, LECO and SEM-EDX analyses. In general, the kinetics of UC dissolution is linked to the in situ generation of nitrous acid in agreement with the general mechanism of UC dissolution; the nitrous acid formation is reported to be faster under ultrasound at low acidity due to the nitric acid sonolysis. The carbon balance shared between the gaseous, liquid, and solid phases is strongly influenced by the applied dissolution procedure and HNO3 concentration.

  9. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  10. Mass concentration and ion composition of coarse and fine particles in an urban area in Beirut: effect of calcium carbonate on the absorption of nitric and sulfuric acids and the depletion of chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kouyoumdjian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Levels of coarse (PM10-2.5 and fine (PM2.5 particles were determined between February 2004 and January 2005 in the city of Beirut, Lebanon. While low PM mass concentrations were measured in the rainy season, elevated levels were detected during sand storms originating from Arabian desert and/or Africa. Using ATR-FTIR and IC, it was shown that nitrate, sulfate, carbonate and chloride were the main anionic constituents of the coarse particles, whereas sulfate was mostly predominant in the fine particles in the form of (NH42SO4. Ammonium nitrate was not expected to be important because the medium was defined as ammonium poor. In parallel, the cations Ca2+ and Na+ dominated in the coarse, and NH4+, Ca2+ and Na+ in the fine particles. Coarse nitrate and sulfate ions resulted from the respective reactions of nitric and sulfuric acid with a relatively high amount of calcium carbonate. Both CaCO3 and Ca(NO32 crystals identified by ATR-FTIR in the coarse particles were found to be resistant to soaking in water for 24 h but became water soluble when they were formed in the fine particles suggesting, thereby, different growth and adsorption phenomena. The seasonal variational study showed that nitrate and sulfate ion concentrations increased in the summer due to the enhancement of photochemical reactions which facilitated the conversion of NO2 and SO2 gases into NO3- and SO42-, respectively. While nitrate was mainly due to local heavy traffic, sulfates were due to local and long-range transport phenomena. Using the air mass trajectory HYSPLIT model, it was found that the increase in the sulfate concentration correlated with wind vectors coming from Eastern and Central Europe. Chloride levels, on the other hand, were high when wind originated from the sea and low during sand storms. In addition to sea salt, elevated levels of chloride were also attributed to waste mass burning in proximity to the site. In comparison to other neighboring Mediterranean

  11. Rapid microwave-assisted acid extraction of southern pine waste wood to remove metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe; Bin Yu

    2013-01-01

    Recovery of metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood particles was investigated by extraction in a microwave reactor with binary combinations of acetic acid (AA), oxalic acid (OxA), and phosphoric acid (PhA). Use of OxA was not successful, as insoluble copper oxalate complexes impeded copper removal. The combination of OxA and AA also had...

  12. Efficacy of peracetic acid in rapid disinfection of Resilon and gutta-percha cones compared with sodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine, and povidone-iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subha, N; Prabhakar, V; Koshy, Minu; Abinaya, K; Prabu, M; Thangavelu, Lavanya

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the effectiveness of 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 2% chlorhexidine, 1% peracetic acid, and 10% povidone-iodine in the rapid disinfection of Resilon (Pentron Clinical Technologies, LLC, Wallingford, CT) and gutta-percha cones contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis and Bacillus subtilis. Two hundred fifty-six samples consisting of 128 gutta-percha cones and 128 Resilon cones were used in this study. The materials were tested for disinfection according to the type of solution (3% NaOCl, 2% chlorhexidine, 1% peracetic acid, or 10% povidone-iodine), the time of exposure to each solution (1 or 5 minutes), and the type of microorganisms (E. faecalis or B. subtilis). Subsequent to the disinfection, samples were placed in test tubes containing 10 mL Mueller-Hinton broth and incubated at 37°C for 7 days. All test tubes were observed at 24-hour intervals and visually checked for turbidity, signifying microbial growth. In this study, 1% peracetic acid showed the best results for both 1 minute and 5 minutes of disinfection, 2% chlorhexidine showed the second best results although it was statistically at par with peracetic acid, and 3% hypochlorite ranked third in disinfection; this was statistically significant when compared with peracetic acid and chlorhexidine. Disinfection by povidone-iodine was the least within all the groups for both contact times although disinfection for 5 minutes showed better results than disinfection for 1 minute for gutta-percha. The outcome of this study confirmed the efficacy of 1% peracetic acid and 2% chlorhexidine in the rapid disinfection of both Resilon and gutta-percha. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitric-glycolic flowsheet testing for maximum hydrogen generation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site is developing for implementation a flowsheet with a new reductant to replace formic acid. Glycolic acid has been tested over the past several years and found to effectively replace the function of formic acid in the DWPF chemical process. The nitric-glycolic flowsheet reduces mercury, significantly lowers the chemical generation of hydrogen and ammonia, allows purge reduction in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), stabilizes the pH and chemistry in the SRAT and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), allows for effective adjustment of the SRAT/SME rheology, and is favorable with respect to melter flammability. The objective of this work was to perform DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) testing at conditions that would bound the catalytic hydrogen production for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet.

  14. Carbachol induces a rapid and sustained hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositide in bovine tracheal smooth muscle measurements of the mass of polyphosphoinositides, 1,2-diacylglycerol, and phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takuwa, Y; Takuwa, N; Rasmussen, H

    1986-11-05

    The effects of carbachol on polyphosphoinositides and 1,2-diacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in bovine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring both lipid mass and the turnover of [3H]inositol-labeled phosphoinositides. Carbachol induces a rapid reduction in the mass of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate and a rapid increase in the mass of 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. These changes in lipid mass are sustained for at least 60 min. The level of phosphatidylinositol shows a delayed and progressive decrease during a 60-min period of carbachol stimulation. The addition of atropine reverses these responses completely. Carbachol stimulates a rapid loss in [3H]inositol radioactivity from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate associated with production of [3H]inositol trisphosphate. The carbachol-induced change in the mass of phosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid is not affected by removal of extracellular Ca2+ and does not appear to be secondary to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. These results indicate that carbachol causes phospholipase C-mediated polyphosphoinositide breakdown, resulting in the production of inositol trisphosphate and a sustained increase in the actual content of 1,2-diacylglycerol. These results strongly suggest that carbachol-induced contraction is mediated by the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides with the resulting generation of two messengers: inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and 1,2-diacylglycerol.

  15. Carbachol induces a rapid and sustained hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositide in bovine tracheal smooth muscle measurements of the mass of polyphosphoinositides, 1,2-diacylglycerol, and phosphatidic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takuwa, Y.; Takuwa, N.; Rasmussen, H.

    1986-11-05

    The effects of carbachol on polyphosphoinositides and 1,2-diacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in bovine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring both lipid mass and the turnover of (/sup 3/H)inositol-labeled phosphoinositides. Carbachol induces a rapid reduction in the mass of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate and a rapid increase in the mass of 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. These changes in lipid mass are sustained for at least 60 min. The level of phosphatidylinositol shows a delayed and progressive decrease during a 60-min period of carbachol stimulation. The addition of atropine reverses these responses completely. Carbachol stimulates a rapid loss in (/sup 3/H)inositol radioactivity from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate associated with production of (/sup 3/H)inositol trisphosphate. The carbachol-induced change in the mass of phosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid is not affected by removal of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and does not appear to be secondary to an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. These results indicate that carbachol causes phospholipase C-mediated polyphosphoinositide breakdown, resulting in the production of inositol trisphosphate and a sustained increase in the actual content of 1,2-diacylglycerol. These results strongly suggest that carbachol-induced contraction is mediated by the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides with the resulting generation of two messengers: inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and 1,2-diacylglycerol.

  16. Rapid determination of amino acids in fruits of Ziziphus jujuba by hydrophilic interaction ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sheng; Duan, Jin-ao; Qian, Dawei; Tang, Yuping; Qian, Yefei; Wu, Dawei; Su, Shulan; Shang, Erxin

    2013-03-20

    In this study, a sensitive and rapid method for the simultaneous determination of free amino acids without derivatization using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) was developed. The method was performed on an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation system coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (TQ-MS) instrument. Sufficient separation of 23 underivatized amino acids was achieved on an Acquity BEH Amide column (2.1 mm × 100 mm, 1.7 μm) in a single run of 12 min. Then the method was applied for the analysis of the free amino acids in 46 batches of Ziziphus jujuba fruits which comprised 39 cultivars from 26 cultivation regions. Multivariate statistical analysis was also used to investigate the differences in free amino acid profiles among the samples. This study showed that HILIC-UHPLC-TQ-MS is an effective technique to analyze underivatized amino acids in the food samples.

  17. Rapid and precise measurement of serum branched-chain and aromatic amino acids by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyue Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serum branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (BCAAs and AAAs have emerged as predictors for the future development of diabetes and may aid in diabetes risk assessment. However, the current methods for the analysis of such amino acids in biological samples are time consuming. METHODS: An isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC/MS/MS method for serum BCAAs and AAAs was developed. The serum was mixed with isotope-labeled BCAA and AAA internal standards and the amino acids were extracted with acetonitrile, followed by analysis using LC/MS/MS. The LC separation was performed on a reversed-phase C18 column, and the MS/MS detection was performed via the positive electronic spray ionization in multiple reaction monitoring mode. RESULTS: Specific analysis of the amino acids was achieved within 2 min. Intra-run and total CVs for the amino acids were less than 2% and 4%, respectively, and the analytical recoveries ranged from 99.6 to 103.6%. CONCLUSION: A rapid and precise method for the measurement of serum BCAAs and AAAs was developed and may serve as a quick tool for screening serum BCAAs and AAAs in studies assessing diabetes risk.

  18. 3,5-Diiodo-L-thyronine administration to hypothyroid rats rapidly enhances fatty acid oxidation rate and bioenergetic parameters in liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Cavallo

    Full Text Available Growing evidence shows that, among triiodothyronine derivatives, 3,5 diiodo-L-thyronine (T(2 plays an important role in energy metabolism and fat storage. In the present study, short-term effects of T(2 administration to hypothyroid rats on fatty acid oxidation rate and bioenergetic parameters were investigated. Within 1 h following T(2 injection, state 3 and state 4 respiration rates, which were reduced in hypothyroid mitochondria, were noticeably increased particularly in succinate- with respect to glutamate/malate-energized mitochondria. Maximal respiratory activity, observed when glutamate/malate/succinate were simultaneously present in the respiratory medium, was significantly stimulated by T(2 treatment. A T(2-induced increase in respiratory rates was also observed when palmitoyl-CoA or L-palmitoylcarnitine were used as substrates. No significant change in respiratory control index and ADP/O ratio was observed. The activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, especially Complex II, were increased in T(2-treated rats. In the latter, Complex V activities, assayed in both ATP synthesis and hydrolysis direction, were enhanced. The rate of fatty acid oxidation, followed by conversion of [(14C]palmitate to CO(2 and ketone bodies, was higher in hepatocytes isolated from T(2-treated rats. This increase occurs in parallel with the raise in the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I, the rate limiting enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation, assayed in situ in digitonin-permeabilized hepatocytes. Overall, these results indicate that T(2 rapidly increases the ability of mitochondria to import and oxidize fatty acids. An emerging idea in the literature is the ability of T(2 to reduce adiposity and dyslipidemia and to prevent the development in liver steatosis. The results of the present study, showing a rapid T(2-induced increase in the ability of mitochondria to import and oxidize fatty acids, may contribute to understand the

  19. Rapid regulation of sialidase activity in response to neural activity and sialic acid removal during memory processing in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Akira; Meguro, Yuko; Ishibashi, Sayaka; Ishii, Ami; Shiratori, Mako; Sai, Saki; Horii, Yuuki; Shimizu, Hirotaka; Fukumoto, Hokuto; Shimba, Sumika; Taguchi, Risa; Takahashi, Tadanobu; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi

    2017-04-07

    Sialidase cleaves sialic acids on the extracellular cell surface as well as inside the cell and is necessary for normal long-term potentiation (LTP) at mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses and for hippocampus-dependent spatial memory. Here, we investigated in detail the role of sialidase in memory processing. Sialidase activity measured with 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (4MU-Neu5Ac) or 5-bromo-4-chloroindol-3-yl-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (X-Neu5Ac) and Fast Red Violet LB was increased by high-K+-induced membrane depolarization. Sialidase activity was also increased by chemical LTP induction with forskolin and activation of BDNF signaling, non-NMDA receptors, or NMDA receptors. The increase in sialidase activity with neural excitation appears to be caused not by secreted sialidase or by an increase in sialidase expression but by a change in the subcellular localization of sialidase. Astrocytes as well as neurons are also involved in the neural activity-dependent increase in sialidase activity. Sialidase activity visualized with a benzothiazolylphenol-based sialic acid derivative (BTP3-Neu5Ac), a highly sensitive histochemical imaging probe for sialidase activity, at the CA3 stratum lucidum of rat acute hippocampal slices was immediately increased in response to LTP-inducible high-frequency stimulation on a time scale of seconds. To obtain direct evidence for sialic acid removal on the extracellular cell surface during neural excitation, the extracellular free sialic acid level in the hippocampus was monitored using in vivo microdialysis. The free sialic acid level was increased by high-K+-induced membrane depolarization. Desialylation also occurred during hippocampus-dependent memory formation in a contextual fear-conditioning paradigm. Our results show that neural activity-dependent desialylation by sialidase may be involved in hippocampal memory processing. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Rapid comprehensive amino acid analysis by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry: comparison to cation exchange with post-column ninhydrin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzen, Dennis J; Weindel, Annette L; Carayannopoulos, Mary O; Landt, Michael; Normansell, Ellen T; Reimschisel, Tyler E; Smith, Carl H

    2008-11-01

    Ion-exchange chromatography with ninhydrin detection remains the gold standard for detecting inborn errors of amino acid catabolism and transport. Disadvantages of such analysis include long chromatography times and interference from other ninhydrin-positive compounds. The aim of this project was to develop a more rapid and specific technique using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Optimal fragmentation patterns for 32 amino acids were determined on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer following butylation. Chromatographic characteristics of each of the amino acids were determined using C8 reversed-phase chromatography with 20% acetonitrile/0.1% formic acid as isocratic mobile phase. Quantitation using eleven deuterated internal standards was compared to cation exchange and ninhydrin detection on a Beckman 7300 system. Following methanol extraction and butylation, determination of 32 amino acids required 20 min. The dynamic range of each amino acid was generally 1-1000 micromol/L. Imprecision ranged from 7 to 23% (CV) over 6 months and recovery ranged from 88-125%. Deming regression with the Beckman 7300 yielded slopes from 0.4-1.2, intercepts from -21 to 65 micromol/L, correlation coefficients from 0.84-0.99 and Syx from 2-125 micromol/L. Isobaric amino acids were separated by chromatography (e.g. leucine, isoleucine) or by unique fragmentation (e.g., alanine, beta-alanine). LC/MS/MS is comparable to traditional LC-ninhydrin detection. Mass spectral detection shortens analysis times and reduces potential for interference in detecting inborn metabolic errors.

  1. NITRIC OXIDE INTERFERES WITH HYPOXIA SIGNALING DURING COLONIC INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Rabelo e Paiva CARIA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Methods Colitis was induced by single (acute or repeated (reactivated colitis trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administration in rats. In addition, one group of rats with reactivated colitis was also treated with Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride to block nitric oxide synthase. Colitis was assessed by macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity in the colon samples. Hypoxia was determined using the oxygen-dependent probe, pimonidazole. The expression of HIF-1α and HIF-induced factors (vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGF and apelin was assessed using Western blotting. Results The single or repeated administration of trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid to rats induced colitis which was characterized by a high macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity. Hypoxia was observed with both protocols. During acute colitis, HIF-1α expression was not increased, but VEGF and apelin were increased. HIF-1α expression was inhibited during reactivated colitis, and VEGF and apelin were not increased. Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride blockade during reactivated colitis restored HIF-1α, VEGF and apelin expression. Conclusions Nitric oxide could interfere with hypoxia signaling during reactivated colitis inflammation modifying the expression of proteins regulated by HIF-1α.

  2. Nitric oxide interferes with hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caria, Cintia Rabelo e Paiva; Moscato, Camila Henrique; Tomé, Renata Bortolin Guerra; Pedrazzoli, José; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Gambero, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Colitis was induced by single (acute) or repeated (reactivated colitis) trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administration in rats. In addition, one group of rats with reactivated colitis was also treated with Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride to block nitric oxide synthase. Colitis was assessed by macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity in the colon samples. Hypoxia was determined using the oxygen-dependent probe, pimonidazole. The expression of HIF-1α and HIF-induced factors (vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGF and apelin) was assessed using Western blotting. The single or repeated administration of trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid to rats induced colitis which was characterized by a high macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity. Hypoxia was observed with both protocols. During acute colitis, HIF-1α expression was not increased, but VEGF and apelin were increased. HIF-1α expression was inhibited during reactivated colitis, and VEGF and apelin were not increased. Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride blockade during reactivated colitis restored HIF-1α, VEGF and apelin expression. Nitric oxide could interfere with hypoxia signaling during reactivated colitis inflammation modifying the expression of proteins regulated by HIF-1α.

  3. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in tumor biology: the two sides of the same coin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lechner, Matthias; Lirk, Philipp; Rieder, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is one of three key enzymes generating nitric oxide (NO) from the amino acid l-arginine. iNOS-derived NO plays an important role in numerous physiological (e.g. blood pressure regulation, wound repair and host defence mechanisms) and pathophysiological

  4. Rapid quantification of underivatized amino acids in plasma by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled with tandem mass-spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, Hubertus C M T|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/250628228; Schiebergen-Bronkhorst, B. G M; Roeleveld, M. W.; Jans, J. J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/256345732; de Sain-van der Velden, M. G M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817910; Visser, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229317057; van Hasselt, P. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304814423; Verhoeven-Duif, N. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/310926556

    Background: Amino acidopathies are a class of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) that can be diagnosed by analysis of amino acids (AA) in plasma. Current strategies for AA analysis include cation exchange HPLC with post-column ninhydrin derivatization, GC-MS, and LC-MS/MS-related methods. Major

  5. The rapid identification of lactic acid bacteria present in Chilean winemaking processes using culture-independent analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilabaca, Carolina; Jara, Carla; Romero, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes was developed to identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that are commonly present in winemaking processes (Oenococcus, Pediococcus, Lactobacillus, and Leuconostoc). This culture-independent approach revealed the presence of Oenococcus in the spontaneous malolactic fermentation in industrial Chilean wines.

  6. Rapid charging of lead-acid batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion and solar-electric storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longrigg, P.

    1981-06-01

    A survey of the various charging techniques that are available and that have been used extensively for lead acid batteries is presented. Descriptions of newer techniques involving gas evolution controlled charging are also included. An evaluation of fast charge approaches, with an analysis of battery state equations, is presented.

  7. Calcium ionophore (A-23187 induced peritoneal eicosanoid biosynthesis: a rapid method to evaluate inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Rao

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation characterizes calcium ionophore (A-23187 induced peritoneal eicosanoid biosynthesis in the rat. Intraperitoneal injection of A-23187 (20 μg/rat stimulated marked biosynthesis of 6-keto-PGF1α (6-KPA, TxB2, LTC4 and LTB4, with no detectable changes on levels of PGE2. Levels of all eicosanoids decreased rapidly after a peak which was seen as early as 5 min. Enzyme markers of cellular contents of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, MPO and NAG respectively, decreased rapidly after ionophore injection; this was followed by increases after 60 min. Indomethacin, a selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, and zileuton and ICI D-2138, two selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors attenuated prostaglandin and leukotriene pathways respectively. Oral administration of zileuton (20 mg/kg, p.o. inhibited LTB4 biosynthesis for up to 6 h suggesting a long duration of pharmacological activity in the rats consistent with its longer half-life. The rapid onset and the magnitude of increases in levels of eicosanoids render the ionophore induced peritoneal eicosanoid biosynthesis a useful model to evaluate pharmacological profiles of inhibitors of eicosanoid pathways in vivo.

  8. Specific ionic effect for simple and rapid colorimetric sensing assays of amino acids using gold nanoparticles modified with task-specific ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Datong; Cai, Pengfei; Tao, Zhihao; Pan, Yuanjiang, E-mail: panyuanjiang@zju.edu.cn

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel task-specific ionic liquid functionalized gold nanoparticle (TSIL-GNP) was successfully prepared and applied in the recognition of amino acids. Particularly, the surface of GNP was modified with the ionic liquid containing carbamido and ester group via thiol, which was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The stability of this material in aqueous solution improves apparently and can remain unchanged for more than three months. The effect of pH was also discussed in this study. Attractive ionic interaction would effectively weaken intensity of the covalent coupling between the metal ion and the functional groups of amino acids. Thus, TSIL-GNP was successfully applied to recognizing serine, aspartic acid, lysine, arginine, and histidine in the presence of Cu{sup 2+} through distinctive color changes. Suspension would be generated once a spot of cysteine was added into the GNPs solution. Results indicated that it had a good linear relationship between extinction coefficients and concentration of amino acids in a wide range of 10{sup −3}–10{sup −6} M. Moreover, the proposed strategy was successfully used to analyze the histidine in urinary samples. In brief, TSIL-GNP is a suitable substrate for discrimination of five amino acids in a rapid and simple way without sophisticated instruments. - Highlights: • A novel task-specific ionic liquid functionalized gold nanoparticle was successfully prepared. • This material was successfully applied to recognizing five amino acids with Cu(II) through distinctive color changes. • The proposed strategy was successfully used to analyze the histidine in real samples.

  9. Preparation of hybrid molecularly imprinted polymer with double-templates for rapid simultaneous purification of theophylline and chlorogenic acid in green tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weiyang; Li, Guizhen; Row, Kyung Ho; Zhu, Tao

    2016-05-15

    A novel double-templates technique was adopted for solid-phase extraction packing agent, and the obtained hybrid molecularly imprinted polymers with double-templates (theophylline and chlorogenic acid) were characterized by fourier transform infrared and field emission scanning electron microscope. The molecular recognition ability and binding capability for theophylline and chlorogenic acid of polymers was evaluated by static absorption and dynamic adsorption curves. A rapid and accurate approach was established for simultaneous purification of theophylline and chlorogenic acid in green tea by coupling hybrid molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction with high performance liquid chromatography. With optimization of SPE procedure, a reliable analytical method was developed for highly recognition towards theophylline and chlorogenic acid in green tea with satisfactory extraction recoveries (theophylline: 96.7% and chlorogenic acid: 95.8%). The limit of detection and limit of quantity of the method were 0.01 μg/mL and 0.03 μg/mL for theophylline, 0.05 μg/mL and 0.17 μg/mL for chlorogenic acid, respectively. The recoveries of proposed method at three spiked levels analysis were 98.7-100.8% and 98.3-100.2%, respectively, with the relative standard deviation less than 1.9%. Hybrid molecularly imprinted polymers with double-templates showed good performance for two kinds of targets, and the proposed approach with high affinity of hybrid molecularly imprinted polymers might offer a novel method for the purification of complex samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid One-Step Selection Method for Generating Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Development of a DNA Aptamer against alpha-Bungarotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Lasse Holm; Shamaileh, Hadi A.; Edwards, Stacey L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nucleic acids based therapeutic approaches have gained significant interest in recent years towards the development of therapeutics against many diseases. Recently, research on aptamers led to the marketing of Macugen (R), an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF......) for the treatment of age related macular degeneration (AMD). Aptamer technology may prove useful as a therapeutic alternative against an array of human maladies. Considering the increased interest in aptamer technology globally that rival antibody mediated therapeutic approaches, a simplified selection, possibly...... in one-step, technique is required for developing aptamers in limited time period. Principal Findings: Herein, we present a simple one-step selection of DNA aptamers against alpha-bungarotoxin. A toxin immobilized glass coverslip was subjected to nucleic acid pool binding and extensive washing followed...

  11. Trichloroacetic acid treatment as a tricky way for rapid purification of 1N/4R tau protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi, Kazem; Rafiee, Saharnaz; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Pooyan, Shahriar; Afrasiabi, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Tau protein consists of six different isoforms and each one has particular physiological roles. In order to analyze the specific function of each single isoforms, large quantity of highly purified tau isoforms is essential. Many studies have been done to purify tau isoforms by heat treatment, followed by perchloric acid and glycerol precipitation. We found out that 1N/4R tau is soluble in glycerol, that is why mentioned methods do not work for purifying this isoform. In this study, large amounts of active and highly purified (97%) 1N/4R tau protein has been prepared by utilization of trichloroacetic acid as precipitating agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Protective role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, Ester W J A; Stegeman, Coen A; Heeringa, Peter; Henning, Robert; van Goor, Harry

    Nitric oxide is a versatile molecule, with its actions ranging from haemodynamic regulation to anti-proliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. Nitric oxide is produced by the nitric oxide synthases, endothelial NOS (eNOS), neural NOS (nNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS). Constitutively

  13. The rapid identification of lactic acid bacteria present in Chilean winemaking processes using culture-independent analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ilabaca, Carolina; Jara, Carla; Romero, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes was developed to identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that are commonly present in winemaking processes (Oenococcus, Pediococcus, Lactobacillus, and Leuconostoc). This culture-independent approach revealed the presence of Oenococcus in the spontaneous malolactic fermentation in industrial Chilean wines. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (...

  14. The random co-polymer glatiramer acetate rapidly kills primary human leukocytes through sialic-acid-dependent cell membrane damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stig Hill; Zhang, Xianwei; Juul-Madsen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    in innate immunity. It shares the positive charge and amphipathic character of GA, and, as shown here, also the ability to kill human leukocyte. The cytotoxicity of both compounds depends on sialic acid in the cell membrane. The killing was associated with the generation of CD45 + debris, derived from cell...... of certain oligomeric and chemical properties to support cytotoxic effects of cationic polymers targeting human leukocytes....

  15. A rapid method for the simultaneous determination of L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin C effervescent tablet by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Khan, Mohammad Rizwan

    2013-05-01

    In present study, a rapid and sensitive method using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin C effervescent tablet. The optimum chromatographic separation was carried out on a reversed phase Waters® Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column (1.7 μm particle size, 100 mm × 2.1 mm ID) with an isocratic elution profile and mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile (75:25, v/v, pH 3.5) at flow rate of 0.5 mL min-1. The influences of mobile phase composition, flow rate and pH on chromatographic resolution were investigated. The total chromatographic analysis time was as short as 2 min with excellent resolution. Detection and quantification of the target compounds were carried out with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer using negative electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) modes. The performance of the method was evaluated and very low limits of detection less than 0.09 μg g-1, excellent coefficient correlation (r2 > 0.999) with liner range over a concentration range of 0.1-1.0 μg g-1 for both L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid, and good intraday and interday precisions (relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) effervescent tablet.

  16. Reactivity of the uranium (U(IV)/U(VI)) and the plutonium (Pu(III)/Pu(IV)) in nitric aqueous solution under ultrasound; De l'influence des ultrasons sur la reactivite de l'uranium (U(IV)/U(VI)) et du plutonium (PU(III)/PU(IV)) en solution aqueuse nitrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venault, L

    1998-07-01

    To minimize the volumes of solid waste and industrial effluents generated at the end of cycle, particularly in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing industry, research is currently under way on so-called innovative processes, designed to induce chemical reactions without adding reagent to the media. Among these processes, the use of ultrasound can prove advantageous, and the purpose of this study is to assess accurately the potential for its application. In the present context, this work shows that the transmission of an ultrasonic wave in aqueous nitric acid solution leads to: the accumulation of nitrous acid in solution, until a steady-sate concentration is reached; the removal of nitrogen monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in the gas stream. The initial kinetics of the formation of HNO{sub 2} in solution was quantified as a function of the nitric acid concentration and the ultrasound intensity. It was also shown than an excess of nitrous acid in nitric solution decomposes under the effect of ultrasound. It is also possible to accumulate hydrogen peroxide in solution during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions in the presence of a chemical species (N{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup +}, NH{sub 2}SO{sub 3}H...) which reacts rapidly with HNO{sub 2}, preventing the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by HNO{sub 2}. The mechanisms of HNO{sub 2} formation and decomposition, and the mechanism of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions, are presented. Control of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or HNO{sub 2} in a nitric acid medium under the effect of an ultrasonic wave can be exploited to control redox reactions of uranium and plutonium ions, particularly with respect to the oxidation of U and Pu (U(IV){yields} U(IV) or Pu(III) {yields} Pu(IV)) and the reduction of Pu (Pu(IV){yields} Pu(III). The redox behavior of uranium and plutonium ions in aqueous nitric solution subject to an ultrasonic flux is interpreted in term of effects

  17. An Alternative and Rapid Method for the Extraction of Nucleic Acids from Ixodid Ticks by Potassium Acetate Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islay Rodríguez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Four variants of the potassium acetate procedure for DNA extraction from ixodid ticks at different stage of their life cycles were evaluated and compared with phenol-chloroform and ammonium hydroxide methods. The most rapid and most efficient variant was validated in the DNA extraction procedure from the engorged ticks collected from bovine, canine as well as from house ticks for the screening of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma spp. and Babesia spp. The ammonium hydroxide procedure was used for non-engorged ticks. All the variants were efficient and allowed obtaining PCR-quality material according to the specific amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragment of the original tick. DNA extracted from the ticks under the study was tested by multiplex PCR for the screening of tick-borne pathogens. Anaplasma spp. and Babesia spp. amplification products were obtained from 29/48 extracts. Ammonium hydroxide protocol was not efficient for two extracts. Detection of amplification products from the PCR indicated that DNA had been successfully extracted. The potassium acetate procedure could be an alternative, rapid, and reliable method for DNA extraction from the ixodid ticks, mainly for poorly-resourced laboratories.

  18. Real-time PCR-based method for the rapid detection of extended RAS mutations using bridged nucleic acids in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Takao; Mizuno, Yukie; Kaizaki, Yasuharu

    2017-10-27

    Mutations in RAS and BRAF are predictors of the efficacy of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Therefore, simple, rapid, cost-effective methods to detect these mutations in the clinical setting are greatly needed. In the present study, we evaluated BNA Real-time PCR Mutation Detection Kit Extended RAS (BNA Real-time PCR), a real-time PCR method that uses bridged nucleic acid clamping technology to rapidly detect mutations in RAS exons 2-4 and BRAF exon 15. Genomic DNA was extracted from 54 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples obtained from mCRC patients. Among the 54 FFPE samples, BNA Real-time PCR detected 21 RAS mutations (38.9%) and 5 BRAF mutations (9.3%), and the reference assay (KRAS Mutation Detection Kit and MEBGEN™ RASKET KIT) detected 22 RAS mutations (40.7%). The concordance rate of detected RAS mutations between the BNA Real-time PCR assay and the reference assays was 98.2% (53/54). The BNA Real-time PCR assay proved to be a more simple, rapid, and cost-effective method for detecting KRAS and RAS mutations compared with existing assays. These findings suggest that BNA Real-time PCR is a valuable tool for predicting the efficacy of early anti-EGFR therapy in mCRC patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Microwave-assisted extraction and rapid isolation of ursolic acid from the leaves of Eucalyptus × hybrida Maiden and its quantification using HPLC-diode array technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Subash C; Jain, Chhoten L; Kumari, Amita; Padhi, Madan M; Devalla, Ramesh B

    2013-04-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is the most important bioactive phytoconstituent of Eucalyptus × hybrida Maiden leaves and exhibits anticancer, antimutagenic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiprotozoal activities. In this study, microwave-assisted extraction technique was employed for rapid isolation of UA from the leaves of Eucalyptus × hybrida and simultaneously HPLC-diode array method was developed for the quantification of UA. Effects of several experimental parameters on the extraction efficiencies of UA, such as type and volume of extraction solvents, microwave power and extraction time, were evaluated. The optimal extraction conditions were found to be 20 mL of a mixture of chloroform/methanol, 60:40; liquid-to-material ratio, 4:1; preleaching time, 10 min; microwave power, 600 W; temperature, 50°C; and microwave irradiation time, 5 min. Under the optimum conditions, the yield of UA was found to be 1.95 ± 0.08% in the dry leaves of Eucalyptus × hybrida. The results showed that microwave-assisted extraction is a more rapid extraction method with higher yield and lower solvent consumptions than the conventional method. It is a faster, convenient, and appropriate method and it may be used for rapid isolation and quantification of UA and other important phytoconstituents present in the leaves of Eucalyptus × hybrida. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Determination of iodine at ppt level in a nitric acid medium by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry: influence of the chemical forms; Etude de la determination de traces d'iode en solution par spectrometrie de masse a secteur magnetique utilisant un plasma a couplage inductif comme source d'ionisation: influence de la forme chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, B

    2001-07-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP/SFMS) was used to determine several chemical forms of iodine, at ppt level, in a nitric acid media. Ascorbic acid was added as a reducing agent in order to maintain iodine as iodide. In a preliminary approach, the influence of the chemical form was studied by comparing inorganic iodine (NaI) and organic iodine (CH3I). Different signal responses were observed. With a conventional sample introduction system, sensitivities obtained for iodo-methane could differ by a factor of 5. This was not caused by a problem of atomization or by a change in the ionization efficiency of the iodo-compound into the plasma. The low volatilization temperature of iodo-methane (315.5 K) seemed to be the main explanation of this phenomena. Actually, nebulization resulted in the volatilization of a 2% nitric acid solution containing iodo-methane. As a result, the transport efficiency of iodo-methane between the nebulizer and the torch was approaching 100%. A Direct Injection High Efficiency Nebulizer (DIHEN) allowed us to minimize the behavior difference between the two iodine species, but the sensitivity ratio was inverted and still differed by 20 - 40%. Moreover, the association of a guard electrode and the direct injection system was studied in order to apply these equipments to the determination of iodine. This association allowed us to improve the sensitivity by a factor of 10 and to minimize memory effects, when compared with a conventional system. Further studies indicated that signal responses obtained with different iodine-containing species, except for iodo-methane, were found to be similar. (author)

  1. Role of amino acids and vitamins in prevention of and rapid recovery from fatigue in the officers and soldiers at high altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen HUANG

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the role of amino acids and vitamins in the prevention of and recovery from the fatigue related to military operation in the officers and soldiers at high altitude. Methods  The participants were 100 officers and soldiers, whose Modified Fatigue Rating Scale (MFIS scores were >21 points. The participants were randomly divided into three groups: capsule, placebo, and granules. Amino acids capsule (8 kinds of essential amino acids and 11 kinds of vitamins were contained, placebo, or amino acid-fructose beverage was given to respective group for 14 days continuously. The 3000-m running performance of the officers and soldiers stationed on a plateau was measured on the first and 14th days. The maximal grip strength of the right hand, fist-making times per minute, and the height reaching by the hand after three-step run-up for the same candidate were observed before and after fatigue loading (3000-m running. The blood levels of lactic acid and urea nitrogen of the candidates were measured after fatigue loading on the first and the 14th days. Results  The 3000-m running performance of officers and soldiers in the capsule and granules groups on the 14th day were better than that of the first day (PP>0.05. The difference between the capsule and the granules groups in grip strength, fist-making times per minute, and hand reaching height on the 14th day were obviously lower than that on the first day (PP>0.05. The blood levels of lactic acid and urea nitrogen in the capsule and granules groups on the 14th day were lower than that on the first day (PP>0.05. Conclusions  Amino acids and vitamins preparations can obviously improve the military performance capacity of officers and soldiers stationed on the plateau. Similarly, they can effectively prevent the lowering of jumping ability and grip strength caused by military fatigue. Therefore, amino acids and vitamins preparations play an important role in the prevention of and rapid

  2. Rapid isolation procedure for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA) from Cannabis sativa using two flash chromatography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Mahler, Hellmut; Auwärter, Volker

    2011-10-15

    Two isolation procedures for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA), the biogenetic precursor in the biosynthesis of the psychoactive Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the cannabis plant, are presented. Two flash chromatography systems that can be used independently from each other were developed to separate THCA from other compounds of a crude cannabis extract. In both systems UV absorption at 209 and 270 nm was monitored. Purity was finally determined by HPLC-DAD, NMR and GC-MS analysis with a focus on the impurity THC. System 1 consisted of a normal phase silica column (120 g) as well as cyclohexane and acetone--both spiked with the modifier pyridine--as mobile phases. Gradient elution was performed over 15 min. After the chromatographic run the fractions containing THCA fractions were pooled, extracted with hydrochloric acid to eliminate pyridine and evaporated to dryness. Loading 1800 mg cannabis extract yielded 623 mg THCA with a purity of 99.8% and a THC concentration of 0.09%. System 2 was based on a reversed-phase C18 column (150 g) combined with 0.55% formic acid and methanol as mobile phases. A very flat gradient was set over 20 minutes. After pooling the THCA-containing fractions methanol was removed in a rotary evaporator. THCA was re-extracted from the remaining aqueous phase with methyl tert-butyl ether. The organic phase was finally evaporated under high vacuum conditions. Loading 300 mg cannabis extract yielded 51 mg THCA with a purity of 98.8% and a THC concentration of 0.67%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The random co-polymer glatiramer acetate rapidly kills primary human leukocytes through sialic-acid-dependent cell membrane damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stig Hill; Zhang, Xianwei; Juul-Madsen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    in innate immunity. It shares the positive charge and amphipathic character of GA, and, as shown here, also the ability to kill human leukocyte. The cytotoxicity of both compounds depends on sialic acid in the cell membrane. The killing was associated with the generation of CD45 + debris, derived from cell...... membrane deformation. Nanoparticle tracking analysis confirmed the formation of such debris, even at low GA concentrations. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing measurements also recorded stable alterations in T lymphocytes following such treatment. LL-37 forms oligomers through weak hydrophobic...

  4. A rapid method for the quantification of fatty acids in fats and oils with emphasis on trans fatty acids using Fourier Transform near infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Hormoz; Kramer, John K G

    2005-08-01

    A rapid method was developed for classifying and quantifying the FA composition of edible oils and fats using Fourier Transform near infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIR). The FT-NIR spectra showed unique fingerprints for saturated FA, cis and trans monounsaturated FA, and all n-6 and n-3 PUFA within TAG to permit qualitative and quantitative comparisons of fats and oils. The quantitative models were based on incorporating accurate GC data of the different fats and oils and FT-NIR spectral information into the calibration model using chemometric analysis. FT-NIR classification models were developed based on chemometric analyses of 55 fats, oils, and fat/oil mixtures that were used in the identification of similar materials. This database was used to prepare three calibration models-one suitable for the analysis of common fats and oils with low levels of trans FA, and the other two for fats and oils with intermediate and high levels of trans FA. The FT-NIR method showed great potential to provide the complete FA composition of unknown fats and oils in minutes. Compared with the official GC method, the FT-NIR method analyzed fats and oils directly in their neat form and required no derivatization of the fats to volatile FAME, followed by time-consuming GC separations and analyses. The FT-NIR method also compared well with the official FTIR method using an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) cell; the latter provided only quantification of specific functional groups, such as the total trans FA content, whereas FT-NIR provided the complete FA profile. The FT-NIR method has the potential to be used for rapid screening and/or monitoring of fat products, trans FA determinations for regulatory labeling purposes, and detection of contaminants. The quantitative FT-NIR results for various edible oils and fats and their mixtures are presented based on the FT-NIR models developed.

  5. Rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pork using a nucleic acid-based lateral flow immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongwei; Ma, Luyao; Ma, Lina; Hua, Marti Z; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Xiaonan

    2017-02-21

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is considered as one of the leading causes of food poisonings worldwide. Due to the high prevalence and extensive challenges in clinical treatment, a rapid and accurate detection method is required to differentiate MRSA from other S. aureus isolated from foods. Since the methicillin resistance of S. aureus is due to the acquisition of the mecA gene from staphylococcal chromosome cassette, the presence of the mecA gene is interpreted as a marker for the identification of MRSA. In this study, a low-cost lateral flow immunoassay (LFI) strip was used to detect the mecA amplicons subsequent to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The specificity of this PCR-LFI assay was tested between MRSA and methicillin-susceptive S. aureus. Both the test line and control line were shown up on the LFI strip for MRSA, whereas only the control line developed for methicillin-susceptive S. aureus. The detection limit of PCR-LFI assay was 20fg for genomic DNA (100 times more sensitive than gel electrophoresis) and 2×10 0 CFU per 100g of pork products after enrichment at 37°C for 48h. The total detection time of using LFI was 3min, which was faster than the conventional electrophoresis (~45min). With the performance of PCR-LFI, 7 out of 42 S. aureus isolates were identified to be MRSA from imported pork products, which was consistent to the standardized minimum inhibitory concentration assay. This mecA-based PCR-LFI strip can be used for rapid and accurate detection of MRSA isolated from commercial pork products. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Simple, rapid and cost-effective method for high quality nucleic acids extraction from different strains of Botryococcus braunii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Hyuk Kim

    Full Text Available This study deals with an effective nucleic acids extraction method from various strains of Botryococcus braunii which possesses an extensive extracellular matrix. A method combining freeze/thaw and bead-beating with heterogeneous diameter of silica/zirconia beads was optimized to isolate DNA and RNA from microalgae, especially from B. braunii. Eukaryotic Microalgal Nucleic Acids Extraction (EMNE method developed in this study showed at least 300 times higher DNA yield in all strains of B. braunii with high integrity and 50 times reduced working volume compared to commercially available DNA extraction kits. High quality RNA was also extracted using this method and more than two times the yield compared to existing methods. Real-time experiments confirmed the quality and quantity of the input DNA and RNA extracted using EMNE method. The method was also applied to other eukaryotic microalgae, such as diatoms, Chlamydomonas sp., Chlorella sp., and Scenedesmus sp. resulting in higher efficiencies. Cost-effectiveness analysis of DNA extraction by various methods revealed that EMNE method was superior to commercial kits and other reported methods by >15%. This method would immensely contribute to area of microalgal genomics.

  7. A rapid quantitative analysis of bile acids, lysophosphatidylcholines and polyunsaturated fatty acids in biofluids based on ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole tandem massspectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhangxiao; Zhang, Qian; Mao, Ziming; Wang, Jie; Liu, Chunying; Lin, Xuejing; Li, Xin; Ji, Weidan; Fan, Jianhui; Wang, Maorong; Su, Changqing

    2017-11-15

    Much evidence suggested that quantitative analysis of bile acids (BAs), lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs), and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in biofluids may be very useful for diagnosis and prevention of hepatobiliary disease with a non-invasive manner. However, simultaneously fast analysis of these metabolites has been challenging for their huge differences of physicochemical properties and concentration levels in biofluids. In this study, we present a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method with a high throughput analytical cycle (10min) to fast and accurately quantify fifteen potential biomarkers (eight BAs, four LPCs and three PUFAs) of hepatobiliary disease. The accuracy for the fifteen analytes in plasma and urine matrices was 80.45%-118.99% and 84.55%-112.66%, respectively. The intra- and inter- precisions for the fifteen analytes in plasma and urine matrices were all less than 20% and the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of analytes is up to 0.0283-8.2172nmol/L. Therefore, this method is fast, sensitive and accurate for the quantitative analysis of BAs, LPCs and PUFAs in biofluids. Moreover, the stability and concentration differences of the analytes in plasma and serum were evaluated, and the results demonstrated that LPCs is stable, but PUFAs is very unstable in freeze and thaw cycles, and the concentrations of the analytes in serum were slightly higher than those in plasma. We suggested plasma may be a kind of better bio-sample than serum using for quantitative analysis of metabolites in blood, due to the characteristics of plasma are more close to blood than those of serum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Carglumic acid enhances rapid ammonia detoxification in classical organic acidurias with a favourable risk-benefit profile: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Baruteau, Julien; Delgado, Maria Bueno; Cano, Aline; Couce, Maria L; Del Toro, Mireia; Donati, Maria Alice; Garcia-Cazorla, Angeles; Gil-Ortega, David; Gomez-de Quero, Pedro; Guffon, Nathalie; Hofstede, Floris C; Kalkan-Ucar, Sema; Coker, Mahmut; Lama-More, Rosa; Martinez-Pardo Casanova, Mercedes; Molina, Agustin; Pichard, Samia; Papadia, Francesco; Rosello, Patricia; Plisson, Celine; Le Mouhaer, Jeannie; Chakrapani, Anupam

    2016-03-31

    Isovaleric aciduria (IVA), propionic aciduria (PA) and methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) are inherited organic acidurias (OAs) in which impaired organic acid metabolism induces hyperammonaemia arising partly from secondary deficiency of N-acetylglutamate (NAG) synthase. Rapid reduction in plasma ammonia is required to prevent neurological complications. This retrospective, multicentre, open-label, uncontrolled, phase IIIb study evaluated the efficacy and safety of carglumic acid, a synthetic structural analogue of NAG, for treating hyperammonaemia during OA decompensation. Eligible patients had confirmed OA and hyperammonaemia (plasma NH3 > 60 μmol/L) in ≥1 decompensation episode treated with carglumic acid (dose discretionary, mean (SD) first dose 96.3 (73.8) mg/kg). The primary outcome was change in plasma ammonia from baseline to endpoint (last available ammonia measurement at ≤18 hours after the last carglumic acid administration, or on Day 15) for each episode. Secondary outcomes included clinical response and safety. The efficacy population (received ≥1 dose of study drug and had post-baseline measurements) comprised 41 patients (MMA: 21, PA: 16, IVA: 4) with 48 decompensation episodes (MMA: 25, PA: 19, IVA: 4). Mean baseline plasma ammonia concentration was 468.3 (±365.3) μmol/L in neonates (29 episodes) and 171.3 (±75.7) μmol/L in non-neonates (19 episodes). At endpoint the mean plasma NH3 concentration was 60.7 (±36.5) μmol/L in neonates and 55.2 (±21.8) μmol/L in non-neonates. Median time to normalise ammonaemia was 38.4 hours in neonates vs 28.3 hours in non-neonates and was similar between OA subgroups (MMA: 37.5 hours, PA: 36.0 hours, IVA: 40.5 hours). Median time to ammonia normalisation was 1.5 and 1.6 days in patients receiving and not receiving concomitant scavenger therapy, respectively. Although patients receiving carglumic acid with scavengers had a greater reduction in plasma ammonia, the endpoint ammonia levels were

  9. Nitric oxide influences auxin signaling through S‐nitrosylation of the Arabidopsis TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1 auxin receptor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Terrile, María C; París, Ramiro; Calderón‐Villalobos, Luz I. A; Iglesias, María J; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Estelle, Mark; Casalongué, Claudia A

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that auxin (indole‐3‐acetic acid) and nitric oxide (NO) are plant growth regulators that coordinate several plant physiological responses determining root architecture...

  10. A rapid spectrophotometric determination of imidacloprid in selected commercial formulations in the presence of 6-chloronicotinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BILJANA F. ABRAMOVIĆ