WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapid metabolic imaging

  1. Metabolic Imaging of Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawal, Ismaheel; Zeevaart, JanRijn; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ankrah, Alfred; Vorster, Mariza; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Govender, Thavendran; Sathekge, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic imaging has come to occupy a prominent place in the diagnosis and management of microbial infection. Molecular probes available for infection imaging have undergone a rapid evolution starting with nonspecific agents that accumulate similarly in infection, sterile inflammation, and

  2. Metabolic imaging using PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Takashi [University of Fukui, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Eiheiji-cho, Fukui (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    There is growing evidence that myocardial metabolism plays a key role not only in ischaemic heart disease but also in a variety of diseases which involve myocardium globally, such as heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Understanding myocardial metabolism in such diseases helps to elucidate the pathophysiology and assists in making therapeutic decisions. As well as providing information on regional changes, PET can deliver quantitative information about both regional and global changes in metabolism. This capability of quantitative measurement is one of the major advantages of PET along with physiological positron tracers, especially relevant in evaluating diseases which involve the whole myocardium. This review discusses major PET tracers for metabolic imaging and their clinical applications and contributions to research regarding ischaemic heart disease and other diseases such as heart failure and diabetic heart disease. Future applications of positron metabolic tracers for the detection of vulnerable plaque are also highlighted briefly. (orig.)

  3. Pediatric imaging. Rapid fire questions and answers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quattromani, F.; Lampe, R. (eds.) [Texas Tech Univ. Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, Lubbock, TX (United States); Handal, G.A. [Texas Tech Univ. Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The book contains the following contributions: Airway, head, neck; allergy, immunology rheumatology; pediatric cardiac imaging; child abuse; chromosomal abnormalities; conscious sedation; contrast agents and radiation protection; pediatric gastrointestinal imaging; genetic disorders in infants and children; pediatric genitourinary imaging; pediatric hematology, oncology imaging; pediatric intenrventional radiology; metabolic and vitamin disorders; muscoskeletal disorders (osteoradiology); neonatology imaging; pediatric neuroimaging; imaging of the respiratory tract in infants and children; vascular anomalies.

  4. Metabolic Imaging in Parkinson Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meles, Sanne K.; Teune, Laura K.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    This review focuses on recent human 18F-FDG PET studies in Parkinson disease. First, an overview is given of the current analytic approaches to metabolic brain imaging data. Next, we discuss how 18F-FDG PET studies have advanced understanding of the relation between distinct brain regions and

  5. Single-Shot-RARE for rapid 3D hyperpolarized metabolic ex vivo tissue imaging: RF-pulse design for semi-dense spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, P.O.; Jensen, Pernille Rose; Dyrby, Tim Bjørn

    they require narrow excitation transition-bands. We have designed a 3D-MRSI pulse sequence for hyperpolarized ex vivo sample imaging for semi-dense compound spectra (few components, relatively small separations), ultimately aimed to be used for metastasis detection in excised lymph nodes.......MRS of hyperpolarized (HP) 13C-enriched compounds is a promising method for in vivo cancer diagnosis . Sentinel lymph node ex vivo tissue sample histology used in clinical routine for breast cancer metastasis diagnosis requires time consuming sample analysis. 3D-HP-MRSI can potentially speed up...... the diagnosis given a sensitive marker that can be efficiently imaged in tissue after homogenous injection. The entire sample can be confined within the imaged volume giving the possibility of complete spatial non-selectivity of the radio frequency (RF) pulses in the RF pulse design with no chemical shift...

  6. Imaging myocardial metabolism and ischemic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2008-08-01

    The advent of myocardial metabolic imaging more than 30 years ago ushered in a paradigm shift in the clinical management of patients with ischemic and nonischemic heart disease. A classic example is the so-called metabolic memory of altered glucose and fatty acid metabolism in regions of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. At the cellular level, metabolic memory is driven by changes in the activities and expression of a host of metabolic enzymes, including reactivation of the fetal gene program. The future of metabolic imaging will require a more-refined understanding of the pathways of metabolic adaptation and maladaptation of the heart. Recent evidence suggests that metabolic signals alter metabolic fluxes and give rise to specific metabolic patterns that, in turn, lead to changes in translational and/or transcriptional activities in the cardiac myocyte. In other words, metabolism provides a link between environmental stimuli and a host of intracellular signaling pathways. This concept has not yet been fully explored in vivo, although metabolic adaptation represents the earliest response to myocardial ischemia and left ventricular remodeling.

  7. Metabolic imaging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma detects altered choline metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Shah, Tariq; Bharti, Santosh; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Artemov, Dmitri; Mironchik, Yelena; Wildes, Flonné; Maitra, Anirban; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2015-01-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive and lethal disease that develops relatively symptom-free and is therefore advanced at the time of diagnosis. The absence of early symptoms and effective treatments has created a critical need for identifying and developing new noninvasive biomarkers and therapeutic targets. We investigated the metabolism of a panel of PDAC cell lines in culture and noninvasively in vivo with (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to identify noninvasive biomarkers and uncover potential metabolic targets. We observed elevated choline-containing compounds in the PDAC cell lines and tumors. These elevated choline-containing compounds were easily detected by increased total choline (tCho) in vivo, in spectroscopic images obtained from tumors. Principal component analysis of the spectral data identified additional differences in metabolites between immortalized human pancreatic cells and neoplastic PDAC cells. Molecular characterization revealed overexpression of choline kinase (Chk)-α, choline transporter 1 (CHT1), and choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) in the PDAC cell lines and tumors. Collectively, these data identify new metabolic characteristics of PDAC and reveal potential metabolic targets. Total choline detected with (1)H MRSI may provide an intrinsic, imaging probe-independent biomarker to complement existing techniques in detecting PDAC. The expression of Chk-α, CHT1, and CTL1 may provide additional molecular markers in aspirated cytological samples. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Metabolic imaging in multiple time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2014-03-15

    We report here a novel combination of time-resolved imaging methods for probing mitochondrial metabolism in multiple time scales at the level of single cells. By exploiting a mitochondrial membrane potential reporter fluorescence we demonstrate the single cell metabolic dynamics in time scales ranging from microseconds to seconds to minutes in response to glucose metabolism and mitochondrial perturbations in real time. Our results show that in comparison with normal human mammary epithelial cells, the breast cancer cells display significant alterations in metabolic responses at all measured time scales by single cell kinetics, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and by scaling analysis of time-series data obtained from mitochondrial fluorescence fluctuations. Furthermore scaling analysis of time-series data in living cells with distinct mitochondrial dysfunction also revealed significant metabolic differences thereby suggesting the broader applicability (e.g. in mitochondrial myopathies and other metabolic disorders) of the proposed strategies beyond the scope of cancer metabolism. We discuss the scope of these findings in the context of developing portable, real-time metabolic measurement systems that can find applications in preclinical and clinical diagnostics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid MR spectroscopic imaging of lactate using compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidya Shankar, Rohini; Agarwal, Shubhangi; Geethanath, Sairam; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.

    2015-03-01

    Imaging lactate metabolism in vivo may improve cancer targeting and therapeutics due to its key role in the development, maintenance, and metastasis of cancer. The long acquisition times associated with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), which is a useful technique for assessing metabolic concentrations, are a deterrent to its routine clinical use. The objective of this study was to combine spectral editing and prospective compressed sensing (CS) acquisitions to enable precise and high-speed imaging of the lactate resonance. A MRSI pulse sequence with two key modifications was developed: (1) spectral editing components for selective detection of lactate, and (2) a variable density sampling mask for pseudo-random under-sampling of the k-space `on the fly'. The developed sequence was tested on phantoms and in vivo in rodent models of cancer. Datasets corresponding to the 1X (fully-sampled), 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X, and 10X accelerations were acquired. The under-sampled datasets were reconstructed using a custom-built algorithm in MatlabTM, and the fidelity of the CS reconstructions was assessed in terms of the peak amplitudes, SNR, and total acquisition time. The accelerated reconstructions demonstrate a reduction in the scan time by up to 90% in vitro and up to 80% in vivo, with negligible loss of information when compared with the fully-sampled dataset. The proposed unique combination of spectral editing and CS facilitated rapid mapping of the spatial distribution of lactate at high temporal resolution. This technique could potentially be translated to the clinic for the routine assessment of lactate changes in solid tumors.

  10. A rapid mitochondrial toxicity assay utilizing rapidly changing cell energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanuki, Yosuke; Araki, Tetsuro; Nakazono, Osamu; Tsurui, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a major cause of safety-related drug-marketing withdrawals. Several drugs have been reported to disrupt mitochondrial function, resulting in hepatotoxicity. The development of a simple and effective in vitro assay to identify the potential for mitochondrial toxicity is thus desired to minimize the risk of causing hepatotoxicity and subsequent drug withdrawal. An in vitro test method called the "glucose-galactose" assay is often used in drug development but requires prior-culture of cells over several passages for mitochondrial adaptation, thereby restricting use of the assay. Here, we report a rapid version of this method with the same predictability as the original method. We found that replacing the glucose in the medium with galactose resulted in HepG2 cells immediately shifting their energy metabolism from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation due to drastic energy starvation; in addition, the intracellular concentration of ATP was reduced by mitotoxicants when glucose in the medium was replaced with galactose. Using our proposed rapid method, mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells can be evaluated by drug exposure for one hour without a pre-culture step. This rapid assay for mitochondrial toxicity may be more suitable for high-throughput screening than the original method at an early stage of drug development.

  11. Hyaluronic Acid-Serum Hydrogels Rapidly Restore Metabolism of Encapsulated Stem Cells and Promote Engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Angel T.; Karakas, Mehmet F.; Vakrou, Styliani; Afzal, Junaid; Rittenbach, Andrew; Lin, Xiaoping; Wahl, Richard L.; Pomper, Martin G.; Steenbergen, Charles J.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2015-01-01

    Background Cell death due to anoikis, necrosis and cell egress from transplantation sites limits functional benefits of cellular cardiomyoplasty. Cell dissociation and suspension, which are a pre-requisite for most cell transplantation studies, lead to depression of cellular metabolism and anoikis, which contribute to low engraftment. Objective We tissue engineered scaffolds with the goal of rapidly restoring metabolism, promoting viability, proliferation and engraftment of encapsulated stem cells. Methods The carboxyl groups of HA were functionalized with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) to yield HA succinimidyl succinate (HA-NHS) groups that react with free amine groups to form amide bonds. HA-NHS was cross-linked by serum to generate HA:Serum (HA:Ser) hydrogels. Physical properties of HA:Ser hydrogels were measured. Effect of encapsulating cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) in HA:Ser hydrogels on viability, proliferation, glucose uptake and metabolism was assessed in vitro. In vivo acute intra-myocardial cell retention of 18FDG-labeled CDCs encapsulated in HA:Ser hydrogels was quantified. Effect of CDC encapsulation in HA:Ser hydrogels on in vivo metabolism and engraftment at 7 days was assessed by serial, dual isotope SPECT-CT and bioluminescence imaging of CDCs expressing the Na-iodide symporter and firefly luciferase genes respectively. Effect of HA:Ser hydrogels +/− CDCs on cardiac function was assessed at 7 days & 28 days post-infarct. Results HA:Ser hydrogels are highly bio-adhesive, biodegradable, promote rapid cell adhesion, glucose uptake and restore bioenergetics of encapsulated cells within 1 h of encapsulation, both in vitro and in vivo. These metabolic scaffolds can be applied epicardially as a patch to beating hearts or injected intramyocardially. HA:Ser hydrogels markedly increase acute intramyocardial retention (~6 fold), promote in vivo viability, proliferation, engraftment of encapsulated stem cells and angiogenesis. Conclusion HA:Ser hydrogels

  12. Research Progress of Amino Acid Metabolism PET Imaging in Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIE Da-hong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid metabolism PET imaging plays a very important role in metabolism molecular imaging. Amino acid PET tracers include [1-11C]amino acid, labeling α-C amino acid, labeling side-chain amino acid, and N-substituted labeling amino acid. Uptake mechanism of these amino acids in tumor mainly involves in amino acid transport and amino acid metabolism PET imaging has an advantage of differential diagnosis of neuropsychiatric diseases, brain cancer, neuroendocrine tumor, and other tumors. The research progress of amino acid metabolism PET imaging in tumor were summarized.

  13. Metabolic Imaging of Glutamine in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Ploessl, Karl; Zhou, Rong; Mankoff, David

    2017-01-01

    Glucose and glutamine are the most abundant nutrients for producing energy and building blocks in normal and tumor cells. Increased glycolysis in tumors, the Warburg Effect, is the basis for 18F-FDG PET imaging. Cancer cells can also be genetically reprogrammed to use glutamine. 5-11C-(2S)-glutamine and 18F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine may be useful complementary tools to measure changes in tumor metabolism. In glioma patients, the tracer 18F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine showed tumor-to-background contrast different from that of 18F-FDG and differences in uptake in glioma patients with clinical progression of disease versus stable disease (tumor-to-brain ratio > 3.7 in clinically active glioma tumors, minimal or no specific uptake in clinically stable tumors). These preliminary results suggest that 18F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine PET may be a new tool for probing in vivo metabolism of glutamine in cancer patients and for guiding glutamine-targeted therapeutics. Further studies of uptake mechanism, and comparison of kinetics for 18F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine versus the 11C-labeled native glutamine, will be important and enlightening. PMID:28232608

  14. Pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis: insights from molecular and metabolic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciccarelli, O.; Barkhof, F.; Bodini, B.; De Stefano, N.; Golay, X.; Nicolay, K; Pelletier, D.; Pouwels, P.J.W.; Smith, S.A.; Wheeler-Kingshott, C.A.M.; Stankoff, B.; Yousry, T.; Miller, D. H.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis induce the changes that underpin relapse-associated and progressive disability. Disease mechanisms can be investigated in preclinical models and patients with multiple sclerosis by molecular and metabolic imaging techniques. Many

  15. Functional Imaging of Dolphin Brain Metabolism and Blood Flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ridgway, Sam; Finneran, James; Carder, Don; Keogh, Mandy; Van Bonn, William; Smith, Cynthia; Scadeng, Miriam; Dubowitz, David; Mattrey, Robert; Hoh, Carl

    2006-01-01

    .... Diazepam has been shown to induce unihemispheric slow waves (USW), therefore we used functional imaging of dolphins with and without diazepam to observe hemispheric differences in brain metabolism and blood flow...

  16. Shuffled magnetization-prepared multicontrast rapid gradient-echo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Peng; Zhu, Xucheng; Tang, Shuyu; Leynes, Andrew; Jakary, Angela; Larson, Peder E Z

    2018-01-01

    To develop a novel acquisition and reconstruction method for magnetization-prepared 3-dimensional multicontrast rapid gradient-echo imaging, using Hankel matrix completion in combination with compressed sensing and parallel imaging. A random k-space shuffling strategy was implemented in simulation and in vivo human experiments at 7 T for 3-dimensional inversion recovery, T2 /diffusion preparation, and magnetization transfer imaging. We combined compressed sensing, based on total variation and spatial-temporal low-rank regularizations, and parallel imaging with pixel-wise Hankel matrix completion, allowing the reconstruction of tens of multicontrast 3-dimensional images from 3- or 6-min scans. The simulation result showed that the proposed method can reconstruct signal-recovery curves in each voxel and was robust for typical in vivo signal-to-noise ratio with 16-times acceleration. In vivo studies achieved 4 to 24 times accelerations for inversion recovery, T2 /diffusion preparation, and magnetization transfer imaging. Furthermore, the contrast was improved by resolving pixel-wise signal-recovery curves after magnetization preparation. The proposed method can improve acquisition efficiencies for magnetization-prepared MRI and tens of multicontrast 3-dimensional images could be recovered from a single scan. Furthermore, it was robust against noise, applicable for recovering multi-exponential signals, and did not require any previous knowledge of model parameters. Magn Reson Med 79:62-70, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Rapid prototyping of biomimetic vascular phantoms for hyperspectral reflectance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Jianting; Melchiorri, Anthony J; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Mathews, Scott A; Coburn, James C; Sorg, Brian S; Chen, Yu; Pfefer, T Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The emerging technique of rapid prototyping with three-dimensional (3-D) printers provides a simple yet revolutionary method for fabricating objects with arbitrary geometry. The use of 3-D printing for generating morphologically biomimetic tissue phantoms based on medical images represents a potentially major advance over existing phantom approaches. Toward the goal of image-defined phantoms, we converted a segmented fundus image of the human retina into a matrix format and edited it to achieve a geometry suitable for printing. Phantoms with vessel-simulating channels were then printed using a photoreactive resin providing biologically relevant turbidity, as determined by spectrophotometry. The morphology of printed vessels was validated by x-ray microcomputed tomography. Channels were filled with hemoglobin (Hb) solutions undergoing desaturation, and phantoms were imaged with a near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging system. Additionally, a phantom was printed incorporating two disjoint vascular networks at different depths, each filled with Hb solutions at different saturation levels. Light propagation effects noted during these measurements—including the influence of vessel density and depth on Hb concentration and saturation estimates, and the effect of wavelength on vessel visualization depth—were evaluated. Overall, our findings indicated that 3-D-printed biomimetic phantoms hold significant potential as realistic and practical tools for elucidating light–tissue interactions and characterizing biophotonic system performance.

  18. Adaptive Robotic Welding Using A Rapid Image Pre-Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, M.; Begin, G.

    1984-02-01

    The rapid pre-processor initially developed by NRCC and Leigh Instruments Inc. as part of the visual aid system of the space shuttle arm 1 has been adapted to perform real time seam tracking of multipass butt weld and other adaptive welding functions. The weld preparation profile is first enhanced by a projected laser target formed by a line and dots. A standard TV camera is used to observe the target image at an angle. Displacement and distorsion of the target image on a monitor are simple functions of the preparation surface distance and shape respectively. Using the video signal, the pre-processor computes in real time the area and first moments of the white level figure contained within four independent rectangular windows in the field of view of the camera. The shape, size, and position of each window can be changed dynamically for each successive image at the standard 30 images/sec rate, in order to track some target image singularities. Visual sensing and welding are done simultaneously. As an example, it is shown that thin sheet metal welding can be automated using a single window for seam tracking, gap width measurement and torch height estimation. Using a second window, measurement of sheet misalignment and their orientation in space were also achieved. The system can be used at welding speed of up to 1 m/min. Simplicity, speed and effectiveness are the main advantages of this system.

  19. A Cellular Perspective on Brain Energy Metabolism and Functional Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy demands of the brain are high: they account for at least 20% of the body\\'s energy consumption. Evolutionary studies indicate that the emergence of higher cognitive functions in humans is associated with an increased glucose utilization and expression of energy metabolism genes. Functional brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and PET, which are widely used in human neuroscience studies, detect signals that monitor energy delivery and use in register with neuronal activity. Recent technological advances in metabolic studies with cellular resolution have afforded decisive insights into the understanding of the cellular and molecular bases of the coupling between neuronal activity and energy metabolism and pointat a key role of neuron-astrocyte metabolic interactions. This article reviews some of the most salient features emerging from recent studies and aims at providing an integration of brain energy metabolism across resolution scales. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  20. The oncogene c-Myc coordinates regulation of metabolic networks to enable rapid cell cycle entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M; Hockenbery, David M

    2008-04-15

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is rapidly activated by serum and regulates genes involved in metabolism and cell cycle progression. This gene is thereby uniquely poised to coordinate both the metabolic and cell cycle regulatory events required for cell cycle entry. However, this function of Myc has not been evaluated. Using a rat fibroblast model of isogenic cell lines, myc(-/-), myc(+/-), myc(+/+) and myc(-/-) cells with an inducible c-myc transgene (mycER), we show that the Myc protein programs cells to utilize both oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis to drive cell cycle progression. We demonstrate this coordinate regulation of metabolic networks is essential, as specific inhibitors of these pathways block Myc-induced proliferation. Metabolic events temporally correlated with cell cycle entry include increased oxygen consumption, mitochondrial function, pyruvate and lactate production, and ATP generation. Treatment of normal cells with inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation recapitulates the myc(-/-) phenotype, resulting in impaired cell cycle entry and reduced metabolism. Combined with a kinetic expression profiling analysis of genes linked to mitochondrial function, our study indicates that Myc's ability to coordinately regulate the mitochondrial metabolic network transcriptome is required for rapid cell cycle entry. This function of Myc may underlie the pervasive presence of Myc in many human cancers.

  1. Molecular imaging based on metabolic glycoengineering and bioorthogonal click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hong Yeol; Koo, Heebeom; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2017-07-01

    Metabolic glycoengineering is a powerful technique that can introduce various chemical groups to cellular glycan by treatment of unnatural monosaccharide. Particularly, this technique has enabled many challenging trials for molecular imaging in combination with click chemistry, which provides fast and specific chemical conjugation reaction of imaging probes to metabolically-modified live cells. This review introduces recent progress in molecular imaging based on the combination of these two cutting-edge techniques. First, these techniques showed promising results in specific tumor cell imaging for cancer diagnosis and therapy. The related researches showed the surface of tumor cells could be labeled with bioorthogonal chemical groups by metabolic glycoengineering, which can be further conjugated with fluorescence dyes or nanoparticles with imaging probes by click chemistry, in vitro and in vivo. This method can be applied to heterogeneous tumor cells regardless of genetic properties of different tumor cells. Furthermore, the amount of targeting moieties on tumor cells can be freely controlled externally by treatment of unnatural monosaccharide. Second, this sequential use of metabolic glycoengineering and click chemistry is also useful in cell tracking to monitor the localization of the inoculated therapeutic cells including chondrocytes and stem cells. This therapeutic cell-labeling technique provided excellent viability of chondrocytes and stem cells during the whole process in vitro and in vivo. It can provide long-term and safe therapeutic cell imaging compared to traditional methods. These overall studies demonstrate the great potential of metabolic glycoengineering and click chemistry in live cell imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Scheduling algorithms for rapid imaging using agile Cubesat constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Sreeja; Li, Alan S.; Merrick, James H.

    2018-02-01

    Distributed Space Missions such as formation flight and constellations, are being recognized as important Earth Observation solutions to increase measurement samples over space and time. Cubesats are increasing in size (27U, ∼40 kg in development) with increasing capabilities to host imager payloads. Given the precise attitude control systems emerging in the commercial market, Cubesats now have the ability to slew and capture images within short notice. We propose a modular framework that combines orbital mechanics, attitude control and scheduling optimization to plan the time-varying, full-body orientation of agile Cubesats in a constellation such that they maximize the number of observed images and observation time, within the constraints of Cubesat hardware specifications. The attitude control strategy combines bang-bang and PD control, with constraints such as power consumption, response time, and stability factored into the optimality computations and a possible extension to PID control to account for disturbances. Schedule optimization is performed using dynamic programming with two levels of heuristics, verified and improved upon using mixed integer linear programming. The automated scheduler is expected to run on ground station resources and the resultant schedules uplinked to the satellites for execution, however it can be adapted for onboard scheduling, contingent on Cubesat hardware and software upgrades. The framework is generalizable over small steerable spacecraft, sensor specifications, imaging objectives and regions of interest, and is demonstrated using multiple 20 kg satellites in Low Earth Orbit for two case studies - rapid imaging of Landsat's land and coastal images and extended imaging of global, warm water coral reefs. The proposed algorithm captures up to 161% more Landsat images than nadir-pointing sensors with the same field of view, on a 2-satellite constellation over a 12-h simulation. Integer programming was able to verify that

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of tumor oxygenation and metabolic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishna, Murali C.; Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita

    2013-01-01

    which can characterize such features non-invasively and repeatedly will be of significant value in planning treatment as well as monitoring response to treatment. The three techniques based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are reviewed here. Tumor pO2 can be measured by two MRI methods requiring...... an exogenous contrast agent: electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI). Tumor metabolic profile can be assessed by a third method, hyperpolarized metabolic MR, based on injection of hyperpolarized biological molecules labeled with 13C or 15N and MR......The tumor microenvironment is distinct from normal tissue as a result of abnormal vascular network characterized by hypoxia, low pH, high interstitial fluid pressure and elevated glycolytic activity. This poses a barrier to treatments including radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Imaging methods...

  4. Click-EM for imaging metabolically tagged nonprotein biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, John T; Adams, Stephen R; Deerinck, Thomas J; Boassa, Daniela; Rodriguez-Rivera, Frances; Palida, Sakina F; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Ellisman, Mark H; Tsien, Roger Y

    2016-06-01

    EM has long been the main technique for imaging cell structures with nanometer resolution but has lagged behind light microscopy in the crucial ability to make specific molecules stand out. Here we introduce click-EM, a labeling technique for correlative light microscopy and EM imaging of nonprotein biomolecules. In this approach, metabolic labeling substrates containing bioorthogonal functional groups are provided to cells for incorporation into biopolymers by endogenous biosynthetic machinery. The unique chemical functionality of these analogs is exploited for selective attachment of singlet oxygen-generating fluorescent dyes via bioorthogonal 'click chemistry' ligations. Illumination of dye-labeled structures generates singlet oxygen to locally catalyze the polymerization of diaminobenzidine into an osmiophilic reaction product that is readily imaged by EM. We describe the application of click-EM in imaging metabolically tagged DNA, RNA and lipids in cultured cells and neurons and highlight its use in tracking peptidoglycan synthesis in the Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes.

  5. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC.

  6. Molecular Imaging Of Metabolic Reprogramming In Mutant IDH Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra eViswanath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70-90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG. Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG. In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an oncometabolite, inhibits key α-KG- dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprogramming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprogramming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprogramming of mutant IDH cells and how this reprogramming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo.

  7. Molecular Imaging of Metabolic Reprograming in Mutant IDH Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Pavithra; Chaumeil, Myriam M; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70-90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an "oncometabolite," inhibits key α-KG-dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprograming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprograming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review, we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprograming of mutant IDH cells, and how this reprograming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells, and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo.

  8. Mapping soil heterogeneity using RapidEye satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccard, Isabelle; Eerens, Herman; Dong, Qinghan; Gobin, Anne; Goffart, Jean-Pierre; Curnel, Yannick; Planchon, Viviane

    2016-04-01

    In the frame of BELCAM, a project funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office (BELSPO), researchers from UCL, ULg, CRA-W and VITO aim to set up a collaborative system to develop and deliver relevant information for agricultural monitoring in Belgium. The main objective is to develop remote sensing methods and processing chains able to ingest crowd sourcing data, provided by farmers or associated partners, and to deliver in return relevant and up-to-date information for crop monitoring at the field and district level based on Sentinel-1 and -2 satellite imagery. One of the developments within BELCAM concerns an automatic procedure to detect soil heterogeneity within a parcel using optical high resolution images. Such heterogeneity maps can be used to adjust farming practices according to the detected heterogeneity. This heterogeneity may for instance be caused by differences in mineral composition of the soil, organic matter content, soil moisture or soil texture. Local differences in plant growth may be indicative for differences in soil characteristics. As such remote sensing derived vegetation indices may be used to reveal soil heterogeneity. VITO started to delineate homogeneous zones within parcels by analyzing a series of RapidEye images acquired in 2015 (as a precursor for Sentinel-2). Both unsupervised classification (ISODATA, K-means) and segmentation techniques were tested. Heterogeneity maps were generated from images acquired at different moments during the season (13 May, 30 June, 17 July, 31 August, 11 September and 1 November 2015). Tests were performed using blue, green, red, red edge and NIR reflectances separately and using derived indices such as NDVI, fAPAR, CIrededge, NDRE2. The results for selected winter wheat, maize and potato fields were evaluated together with experts from the collaborating agricultural research centers. For a few fields UAV images and/or yield measurements were available for comparison.

  9. Perfusion and metabolism imaging studies in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are important tools in the evaluation of brain blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, conflicting results are reported in the literature depending on the type of imaging data...

  10. Muscle perfusion and metabolic heterogeneity: insights from noninvasive imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Kjaer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments in noninvasive imaging techniques have enabled the study of local changes in perfusion and metabolism in skeletal muscle as well as patterns of heterogeneity in these variables in humans. In this review, the principles of these techniques along with some recent findings...

  11. Rapid seismic reflection imaging in an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberty, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    Subsurface characterization in urban areas is important for city planners, municipalities, and engineers to estimate groundwater resources, track contaminants, assess earthquake or landslide hazards, and many other similar objectives. Improving geophysical imaging methods and results, while minimizing costs, provides greater opportunities for city/project planners and geophysicists alike to take advantage of the improved characterization afforded by the particular method. Seismic reflection results can provide hydrogeologic constraints for groundwater models, provide slip rate estimates for active faults, or simply map stratigraphy to provide target depth estimates. While many traditional urban seismic transects have included the use of vibroseis sources to improve reflection signals and attenuate cultural noise, low cost and high quality near-surface seismic reflection data can be obtained within an urban environment using impulsive sources at a variety of scales and at production rates that can significantly exceed those of swept sources. Sledgehammers and hydraulically powered accelerated weight drops allow rapid acquisition rates through dense urban corridors where the objective is to image targets in the upper one km depth range. In addition permit and land access issues; culturally noisy urban environments can provide additional challenges to producing high quality seismic reflection results. Acquisition methods designed to address both coherent and random noises include recording redundant, unstacked, unfiltered field records. Processing steps that improve data quality in this setting include diversity stacking to attenuate large-amplitude coherent (non-repeatable) vehicle noise and subtraction of power line signals via match filters to retain reflection signals near alternating current frequencies. These acquisition and processing approaches allow for rapid and low cost data acquisition at the expense of moderately increased computing time and disk space. I

  12. Metabolic Imaging Biomarkers of Postradiotherapy Xerostomia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, Blake [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, New York (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Xerostomia is a major complication of head and neck radiotherapy (RT). Available xerostomia measures remain flawed. [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET-CT) is routinely used for staging and response assessment of head and neck cancer. We investigated quantitative measurement of parotid gland FDG uptake as a potential biomarker for post-RT xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight locally advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving definitive RT underwent baseline and post-RT FDG-PET-CT on a prospective imaging trial. A separate validation cohort of 14 patients underwent identical imaging while prospectively enrolled in a second trial collecting sialometry and patient-reported outcomes. Radiation dose and pre- and post-RT standard uptake values (SUVs) for all voxels contained within parotid gland ROI were deformably registered. Results: Average whole-gland or voxel-by-voxel models incorporating parotid D{sub Met} (defined as the pretreatment parotid SUV weighted by dose) accurately predicted posttreatment changes in parotid FDG uptake (e.g., fractional parotid SUV). Fractional loss of parotid FDG uptake closely paralleled early parotid toxicity defined by posttreatment salivary output (p < 0.01) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia scores (p < 0.01). Conclusions: In this pilot series, loss of parotid FDG uptake was strongly associated with acute clinical post-RT parotid toxicity. D{sub Met} may potentially be used to guide function-sparing treatment planning. Prospective validation of FDG-PET-CT as a convenient, quantifiable imaging biomarker of parotid function is warranted and ongoing.

  13. In-Situ Imaging of Particles during Rapid Thermite Deflagrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapes, Michael; Reeves, Robert; Densmore, John; Fezzaa, Kamel; van Buuren, Tony; Willey, Trevor; Sullivan, Kyle

    2017-06-01

    The dynamic behavior of rapidly deflagrating thermites is a highly complex process involving rapid decomposition, melting, and outgassing of intermediate and/or product gases. Few experimental techniques are capable of probing these phenomena in situ due to the small length and time scales associated with the reaction. Here we use a recently developed extended burn tube test, where we initiate a small pile of thermite on the closed end of a clear acrylic tube. The length of the tube is sufficient to fully contain the reaction as it proceeds and flows entrained particles down the tube. This experiment was brought to the Advanced Photon Source, and the particle formation was X-ray imaged at various positions down the tube. Several formulations, as well as formulation parameters were varied to investigate the size and morphology of the particles, as well as to look for dynamic behavior attributed to the reaction. In all cases, we see evidence of particle coalescence and condensed-phase interfacial reactions. The results improve our understanding of the procession of reactants to products in these systems. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-691140.

  14. Digital image capture and rapid prototyping of the maxillofacial defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, Jennifer V; Grant, Gerald T; Liacouras, Peter; Rouse, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    In order to restore an extraoral maxillofacial defect, a moulage impression is commonly made with traditional impression materials. This technique has some disadvantages, including distortion of the site due to the weight of the impression material, changes in tissue location with modifications of the patient position, and the length of time and discomfort for the patient due to the impression procedure and materials used. The use of the commercially available 3dMDface™ System creates 3D images of soft tissues to form an anatomically accurate 3D surface image. Rapid prototyping converts the virtual designs from the 3dMDface™ System into a physical model by converting the data to a ZPrint (ZPR) CAD format file and a stereolithography (STL) file. The data, in conjunction with a Zprinter(®) 450 or a Stereolithography Apparatus (SLA), can be used to fabricate a model for prosthesis fabrication, without the disadvantages of the standard moulage technique. This article reviews this technique and how it can be applied to maxillofacial prosthetics. © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Analysis of Cancer Metabolism by Imaging Hyperpolarized Nuclei: Prospects for Translation to Clinical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kurhanewicz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in cancer biology is to monitor and understand cancer metabolism in vivo with the goal of improved diagnosis and perhaps therapy. Because of the complexity of biochemical pathways, tracer methods are required for detecting specific enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Stable isotopes such as 13C or 15N with detection by nuclear magnetic resonance provide the necessary information about tissue biochemistry, but the crucial metabolites are present in low concentration and therefore are beyond the detection threshold of traditional magnetic resonance methods. A solution is to improve sensitivity by a factor of 10,000 or more by temporarily redistributing the populations of nuclear spins in a magnetic field, a process termed hyperpolarization. Although this effect is short-lived, hyperpolarized molecules can be generated in an aqueous solution and infused in vivo where metabolism generates products that can be imaged. This discovery lifts the primary constraint on magnetic resonance imaging for monitoring metabolism—poor sensitivity—while preserving the advantage of biochemical information. The purpose of this report was to briefly summarize the known abnormalities in cancer metabolism, the value and limitations of current imaging methods for metabolism, and the principles of hyperpolarization. Recent preclinical applications are described. Hyperpolarization technology is still in its infancy, and current polarizer equipment and methods are suboptimal. Nevertheless, there are no fundamental barriers to rapid translation of this exciting technology to clinical research and perhaps clinical care.

  16. Gentamicin rapidly inhibits mitochondrial metabolism in high-frequency cochlear outer hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather C Jensen-Smith

    Full Text Available Aminoglycosides (AG, including gentamicin (GM, are the most frequently used antibiotics in the world and are proposed to cause irreversible cochlear damage and hearing loss (HL in 1/4 of the patients receiving these life-saving drugs. Akin to the results of AG ototoxicity studies, high-frequency, basal turn outer hair cells (OHCs preferentially succumb to multiple HL pathologies while inner hair cells (IHCs are much more resilient. To determine if endogenous differences in IHC and OHC mitochondrial metabolism dictate differential sensitivities to AG-induced HL, IHC- and OHC-specific changes in mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH fluorescence during acute (1 h GM treatment were compared. GM-mediated decreases in NADH fluorescence and succinate dehydrogenase activity were observed shortly after GM application. High-frequency basal turn OHCs were found to be metabolically biased to rapidly respond to alterations in their microenvironment including GM and elevated glucose exposures. These metabolic biases may predispose high-frequency OHCs to preferentially produce cell-damaging reactive oxygen species during traumatic challenge. Noise-induced and age-related HL pathologies share key characteristics with AG ototoxicity, including preferential OHC loss and reactive oxygen species production. Data from this report highlight the need to address the role of mitochondrial metabolism in regulating AG ototoxicity and the need to illuminate how fundamental differences in IHC and OHC metabolism may dictate differences in HC fate during multiple HL pathologies.

  17. Jacaric acid is rapidly metabolized to conjugated linoleic acid in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijima, Ryo; Honma, Taro; Ito, Junya; Yamasaki, Masao; Ikezaki, Aya; Motonaga, Chihiro; Nishiyama, Kazuo; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have shown previously that jacaric acid (JA; 8c,10t,12c-18:3), which has a conjugated triene system, has a strong anti-tumor effect. However, the characteristics of absorption and metabolism of JA have yet to be determined in vivo, and the details of absorption and metabolism of JA in the small intestine are particularly unclear. This information is required for effective use of JA in humans. Therefore, in this study we examined absorption and metabolism of JA using cannulation of the thoracic duct in rats. Emulsions of two test oils, jacaranda seed oil and tung oil, which contain JA and α-eleostearic acid (α-ESA; 9c,11t,13t-18:3), respectively, were administered to rats and lymph from the thoracic duct was collected over 24 h. We examined the rate of absorption of JA and possible conversion to a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)containing a conjugated diene system. The positional isomerism of the CLA produced by JA metabolism was determined using gas chromatography-electron impact/mass spectrometry. The rate of absorption and percentage conversion of JA were compared with those of α-ESA. We found that JA is rapidly absorbed and converted to a CLA in rats and that the percentage conversion of JA was lower than that of α-ESA. This is the first report on the absorption and metabolism of JA and this information may be important for application of JA as a functional food.

  18. Rapid diagnosis and intraoperative margin assessment of human lung cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyan Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A method of rapidly differentiating lung tumor from healthy tissue is extraordinarily needed for both the diagnosis and the intraoperative margin assessment. We assessed the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues with the autofluorescence, and also elucidated the mechanism in tissue studies and cell studies. A 15-patient testing group was used to compare FLIM results with traditional histopathology diagnosis. Based on the endogenous fluorescence lifetimes of the testing group, a criterion line was proposed to distinguish normal and cancerous tissues. Then by blinded examined 41 sections from the validation group of other 16 patients, the sensitivity and specificity of FLIM were determined. The cellular metabolism was studied with specific perturbations of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in cell studies. The fluorescence lifetime of cancerous lung tissues is consistently lower than normal tissues, and this is due to the both decrease of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD lifetimes. A criterion line of lifetime at 1920 ps can be given for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues.The sensitivity and specificity of FLIM for lung cancer diagnosis were determined as 92.9% and 92.3%. These findings suggest that NADH and FAD can be used to rapidly diagnose lung cancer. FLIM is a rapid, accurate and highly sensitive technique in the judgment during lung cancer surgery and it can be potential in earlier cancer detection.

  19. Rapid diagnosis and intraoperative margin assessment of human lung cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyan; Tang, Feng; Pan, Xiaobo; Yao, Longfang; Wang, Xinyi; Jing, Yueyue; Ma, Jiong; Wang, Guifang; Mi, Lan

    2017-12-01

    A method of rapidly differentiating lung tumor from healthy tissue is extraordinarily needed for both the diagnosis and the intraoperative margin assessment. We assessed the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues with the autofluorescence, and also elucidated the mechanism in tissue studies and cell studies. A 15-patient testing group was used to compare FLIM results with traditional histopathology diagnosis. Based on the endogenous fluorescence lifetimes of the testing group, a criterion line was proposed to distinguish normal and cancerous tissues. Then by blinded examined 41 sections from the validation group of other 16 patients, the sensitivity and specificity of FLIM were determined. The cellular metabolism was studied with specific perturbations of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in cell studies. The fluorescence lifetime of cancerous lung tissues is consistently lower than normal tissues, and this is due to the both decrease of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) lifetimes. A criterion line of lifetime at 1920 ps can be given for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues.The sensitivity and specificity of FLIM for lung cancer diagnosis were determined as 92.9% and 92.3%. These findings suggest that NADH and FAD can be used to rapidly diagnose lung cancer. FLIM is a rapid, accurate and highly sensitive technique in the judgment during lung cancer surgery and it can be potential in earlier cancer detection.

  20. Highly Rapid Amplification-Free and Quantitative DNA Imaging Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamp, Tobias; Camps, Marta; Nieto, Benjamin; Guasch, Francesc; Ranasinghe, Rohan T.; Wiedemann, Jens; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra; Klenerman, David; Sauer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent need for rapid and highly sensitive detection of pathogen-derived DNA in a point-of-care (POC) device for diagnostics in hospitals and clinics. This device needs to work in a ‘sample-in-result-out’ mode with minimum number of steps so that it can be completely integrated into a cheap and simple instrument. We have developed a method that directly detects unamplified DNA, and demonstrate its sensitivity on realistically sized 5 kbp target DNA fragments of Micrococcus luteus in small sample volumes of 20 μL. The assay consists of capturing and accumulating of target DNA on magnetic beads with specific capture oligonucleotides, hybridization of complementary fluorescently labeled detection oligonucleotides, and fluorescence imaging on a miniaturized wide-field fluorescence microscope. Our simple method delivers results in less than 20 minutes with a limit of detection (LOD) of ~5 pM and a linear detection range spanning three orders of magnitude. PMID:23677392

  1. Characterizing Tumors Using Metabolic Imaging: PET Imaging of Cellular Proliferation and Steroid Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Mankoff

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment decisions in oncology are increasingly guided by information on the biologic characteristics of tumors. Currently, patient-specific information on tumor biology is obtained from the analysis of biopsy material. Positron emission tomography (PET provides quantitative estimates of regional biochemistry and receptor status and can overcome the sampling error and difficulty in performing serial studies inherent with biopsy. Imaging using the glucose metabolism tracer, 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG, has demonstrated PET's ability to guide therapy in clinical oncology. In this review, we highlight PET approaches to imaging two other aspects of tumor biology: cellular proliferation and tumor steroid receptors. We review the biochemical and biologic processes underlying the imaging, positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals that have been developed, quantitative image-analysis considerations, and clinical studies to date. This provides a basis for evaluating future developments in these promising applications of PET metabolic imaging.

  2. Time-gated FLIM microscope for corneal metabolic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana F.; Batista, Ana; Domingues, José Paulo; Quadrado, Maria João.; Morgado, António Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Detecting corneal cells metabolic alterations may prove a valuable tool in the early diagnosis of corneal diseases. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are autofluorescent metabolic co-factors that allow the assessment of metabolic changes through non-invasive optical methods. These co-factors exhibit double-exponential fluorescence decays, with well-separated short and lifetime components, which are related to their protein-bound and free-states. Corneal metabolism can be assessed by measuring the relative contributions of these two components. For that purpose, we have developed a wide-field time-gated fluorescence lifetime microscope based on structured illumination and one-photon excitation to record FAD lifetime images from corneas. NADH imaging was not considered as its UV excitation peak is regarded as not safe for in vivo measurements. The microscope relies on a pulsed blue diode laser (λ=443 nm) as excitation source, an ultra-high speed gated image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera to acquire fluorescence signals and a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) to implement the Structured Illumination technique. The system has a lateral resolution better than 2.4 μm, a field of view of 160 per 120 μm and an optical sectioning of 6.91 +/- 0.45 μm when used with a 40x, 0.75 NA, Water Immersion Objective. With this setup we were able to measure FAD contributions from ex-vivo chicken corneas collected from a local slaughterhouse..

  3. Dopamine transporter imaging in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Kyeong; Yoon, In Young; Kim, Jong Min; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Byung Chul; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The pathogenesis of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is still unknown. However, involvement of dopaminergic system in RBD has been hypothesized because of frequent association with degenerative movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent and pattern of loss of dopamine transporter in RBD using FP-CIT SPECT. Fourteen patient with idiopathic RBD (mean age:665 yrs, M:F=10:3) participated in this study. Polysonmography confirmed loss of REM atonia and determined RBD severities by amount of tonic/phasic muscle activity during REM sleep in all cases. To compare with RBD, 14 early idiopathic Parkinson's disease rated as Hoehn and Yahr stage 1 (IPD) and 12 healthy controls were also selected. All participants performed single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging 3 hours after injection of [123I]FP-CIT. Regions of interest were drawn on bilateral caudate and putamen, whole striatum and occipital cortex. Specific binding for dopamine transporters (DAT) were calculated using region to occipital uptake ratio based on the transient equilibrium method. Overall mean of DAT density in the striatum was lower in RBD group than controls, and higher than IPD group, However, DAT density in most individual RBD was still within normal range, and total striatal DAT density was not correlated with severity of RBD. Meanwhile, the caudate to putamen uptake ratio (C/P ratio) in RBD group was insignificantly higher than those in healthy controls. Nevertheless, C/P ratio within RBD group was reversely correlated with the RBD severity. Our study suggested that nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration could be a part of the pathogenesis of RBD, but not essential for the development of RBD. Further longitudinal evaluation of presynaptic dopaminergic system in idiopathic RBD may guarantee the more understanding for RBD and associated neurodegenerative disease.

  4. Perfusion and metabolism imaging studies in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are important tools in the evaluation of brain blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, conflicting results are reported in the literature depending on the type of imaging data...... analysis employed. The present review gives a comprehensive summary of the perfusion and metabolism literature in the field of PD research, including quantitative PET studies, normalized PET and SPECT studies, autoradiography studies in animal models of PD, and simulation studies of PD data....... It is concluded that PD most likely is characterized by widespread cortical hypometabolism, probably even at early disease stages. Widespread subcortical hypermetabolism is probably not a feature of PD, although certain small basal ganglia structures, such as the external pallidum, may display true...

  5. Optical metabolic imaging measures early drug response in an allograft murine breast cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has shown that cellular-level Optical Metabolic Imaging (OMI) of organoids derived from human breast cancer cell-line xenografts accurately and rapidly predicts in vivo response to therapy. To validate OMI as a predictive measure of treatment response in an immune-competent model, we used the polyomavirus middle-T (PyVmT) transgenic mouse breast cancer model. The PyVmT model includes intra-tumoral heterogeneity and a complex tumor microenvironment that can influence treatment responses. Three-dimensional organoids generated from primary PyVmT tumor tissue were treated with a chemotherapy (paclitaxel) and a PI3K inhibitor (XL147), each alone or in combination. Cellular subpopulations of response were measured using the OMI Index, a composite endpoint of metabolic response comprised of the optical redox ratio (ratio of the fluorescence intensities of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H to FAD) as well as the fluorescence lifetimes of NAD(P)H and FAD. Combination treatment significantly decreased the OMI Index of PyVmT tumor organoids (padaptive immunity. Thus, this method is promising for use in humans to predict long-term treatment responses accurately and rapidly, and could aid in clinical treatment planning.

  6. Cancer Metabolism and Tumor Heterogeneity: Imaging Perspectives Using MR Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigin Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to maintain viability via genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations, expressing overall dynamic heterogeneity. The complex relaxation mechanisms of nuclear spins provide unique and convertible tissue contrasts, making magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS pertinent imaging tools in both clinics and research. In this review, we summarized MR methods that visualize tumor characteristics and its metabolic phenotypes on an anatomical, microvascular, microstructural, microenvironmental, and metabolomics scale. The review will progress from the utilities of basic spin-relaxation contrasts in cancer imaging to more advanced imaging methods that measure tumor-distinctive parameters such as perfusion, water diffusion, magnetic susceptibility, oxygenation, acidosis, redox state, and cell death. Analytical methods to assess tumor heterogeneity are also reviewed in brief. Although the clinical utility of tumor heterogeneity from imaging is debatable, the quantification of tumor heterogeneity using functional and metabolic MR images with development of robust analytical methods and improved MR methods may offer more critical roles of tumor heterogeneity data in clinics. MRI/MRS can also provide insightful information on pharmacometabolomics, biomarker discovery, disease diagnosis and prognosis, and treatment response. With these future directions in mind, we anticipate the widespread utilization of these MR-based techniques in studying in vivo cancer biology to better address significant clinical needs.

  7. Imaging in Chronic Kidney Disease-Metabolic Bone Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Anup J; Jahangir, David; Lazarus, Martin; Sprague, Stuart M

    2017-07-01

    Musculoskeletal manifestations in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are the result of a series of complex alterations in mineral metabolism, which has been defined as chronic kidney disease - mineral and bone-related disorder (CKD-MBD). Biochemical assessment and, at times, bone biopsy remains the mainstay of disease assessment, however, radiological imaging is an important adjunct in evaluating disease severity. This review aims to illustrate the radiological features of CKD-MBD, such as secondary hyperparathyroidism, osteomalacia, adynamic bone disease, osteopenia, and extra-skeletal calcifications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Images from the Mind: BCI image reconstruction based on Rapid Serial Visual Presentations of polygon primitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís F Seoane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We provide a proof of concept for an EEG-based reconstruction of a visual image which is on a user's mind. Our approach is based on the Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP of polygon primitives and Brain-Computer Interface (BCI technology. In an experimental setup, subjects were presented bursts of polygons: some of them contributed to building a target image (because they matched the shape and/or color of the target while some of them did not. The presentation of the contributing polygons triggered attention-related EEG patterns. These Event Related Potentials (ERPs could be determined using BCI classification and could be matched to the stimuli that elicited them. These stimuli (i.e. the ERP-correlated polygons were accumulated in the display until a satisfactory reconstruction of the target image was reached. As more polygons were accumulated, finer visual details were attained resulting in more challenging classification tasks. In our experiments, we observe an average classification accuracy of around 75%. An in-depth investigation suggests that many of the misclassifications were not misinterpretations of the BCI concerning the users' intent, but rather caused by ambiguous polygons that could contribute to reconstruct several different images. When we put our BCI-image reconstruction in perspective with other RSVP BCI paradigms, there is large room for improvement both in speed and accuracy. These results invite us to be optimistic. They open a plethora of possibilities to explore non-invasive BCIs for image reconstruction both in healthy and impaired subjects and, accordingly, suggest interesting recreational and clinical applications.

  9. Automated measurements of metabolic tumor volume and metabolic parameters in lung PET/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orologas, F.; Saitis, P.; Kallergi, M.

    2017-11-01

    Patients with lung tumors or inflammatory lung disease could greatly benefit in terms of treatment and follow-up by PET/CT quantitative imaging, namely measurements of metabolic tumor volume (MTV), standardized uptake values (SUVs) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). The purpose of this study was the development of an unsupervised or partially supervised algorithm using standard image processing tools for measuring MTV, SUV, and TLG from lung PET/CT scans. Automated metabolic lesion volume and metabolic parameter measurements were achieved through a 5 step algorithm: (i) The segmentation of the lung areas on the CT slices, (ii) the registration of the CT segmented lung regions on the PET images to define the anatomical boundaries of the lungs on the functional data, (iii) the segmentation of the regions of interest (ROIs) on the PET images based on adaptive thresholding and clinical criteria, (iv) the estimation of the number of pixels and pixel intensities in the PET slices of the segmented ROIs, (v) the estimation of MTV, SUVs, and TLG from the previous step and DICOM header data. Whole body PET/CT scans of patients with sarcoidosis were used for training and testing the algorithm. Lung area segmentation on the CT slices was better achieved with semi-supervised techniques that reduced false positive detections significantly. Lung segmentation results agreed with the lung volumes published in the literature while the agreement between experts and algorithm in the segmentation of the lesions was around 88%. Segmentation results depended on the image resolution selected for processing. The clinical parameters, SUV (either mean or max or peak) and TLG estimated by the segmented ROIs and DICOM header data provided a way to correlate imaging data to clinical and demographic data. In conclusion, automated MTV, SUV, and TLG measurements offer powerful analysis tools in PET/CT imaging of the lungs. Custom-made algorithms are often a better approach than the manufacturer

  10. Rapid metabolism of exogenous angiotensin II by catecholaminergic neuronal cells in culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Urmi; Seravalli, Javier; Madayiputhiya, Nandakumar; Adamec, Jiri; Case, Adam J; Zimmerman, Matthew C

    2015-02-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) acts on central neurons to increase neuronal firing and induce sympathoexcitation, which contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension and heart failure. Numerous studies have examined the precise AngII-induced intraneuronal signaling mechanism in an attempt to identify new therapeutic targets for these diseases. Considering the technical challenges in studying specific intraneuronal signaling pathways in vivo, especially in the cardiovascular control brain regions, most studies have relied on neuronal cell culture models. However, there are numerous limitations in using cell culture models to study AngII intraneuronal signaling, including the lack of evidence indicating the stability of AngII in culture media. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous AngII is rapidly metabolized in neuronal cell culture media. Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we measured levels of AngII and its metabolites, Ang III, Ang IV, and Ang-1-7, in neuronal cell culture media after administration of exogenous AngII (100 nmol/L) to a neuronal cell culture model (CATH.a neurons). AngII levels rapidly declined in the media, returning to near baseline levels within 3 h of administration. Additionally, levels of Ang III and Ang-1-7 acutely increased, while levels of Ang IV remained unchanged. Replenishing the media with exogenous AngII every 3 h for 24 h resulted in a consistent and significant increase in AngII levels for the duration of the treatment period. These data indicate that AngII is rapidly metabolized in neuronal cell culture media, and replenishing the media at least every 3 h is needed to sustain chronically elevated levels. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  11. Imaging cerebral tryptophan metabolism in brain tumor-associated depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Behen, Michael E; Barger, Geoffrey R; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2015-12-01

    Depression in patients with brain tumors is associated with impaired quality of life and shorter survival. Altered metabolism of tryptophan to serotonin and kynurenine metabolites may play a role in tumor-associated depression. Our recent studies with alpha[(11)C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT)-PET in brain tumor patients indicated abnormal tryptophan metabolism not only in the tumor mass but also in normal-appearing contralateral brain. In the present study, we explored if tryptophan metabolism in such brain regions is associated with depression. Twenty-one patients (mean age: 57 years) with a brain tumor (10 meningiomas, 8 gliomas, and 3 brain metastases) underwent AMT-PET scanning. MRI and AMT-PET images were co-registered, and AMT kinetic parameters, including volume of distribution (VD', an estimate of net tryptophan transport) and K (unidirectional uptake, related to tryptophan metabolism), were measured in the tumor mass and in unaffected cortical and subcortical regions contralateral to the tumor. Depression scores (based on the Beck Depression Inventory-II [BDI-II]) were correlated with tumor size, grade, type, and AMT-PET variables. The mean BDI-II score was 12 ± 10 (range: 2-33); clinical levels of depression were identified in seven patients (33 %). High BDI-II scores were most strongly associated with high thalamic AMT K values both in the whole group (Spearman's rho = 0.63, p = 0.004) and in the subgroup of 18 primary brain tumors (r = 0.68, p = 0.004). Frontal and striatal VD' values were higher in the depressed subgroup than in non-depressed patients (p Tumor size, grade, and tumor type were not related to depression scores. Abnormalities of tryptophan transport and metabolism in the thalamus, striatum, and frontal cortex, measured by PET, are associated with depression in patients with brain tumor. These changes may indicate an imbalance between the serotonin and kynurenine pathways and serve as a molecular imaging marker of

  12. Imaging liver and brain glycogen metabolism at the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takado, Yuhei; Knott, Graham; Humbel, Bruno M; Escrig, Stéphane; Masoodi, Mojgan; Meibom, Anders; Comment, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, glycogen synthesis and degradation are dynamic processes regulating blood and cerebral glucose-levels within a well-defined physiological range. Despite the essential role of glycogen in hepatic and cerebral metabolism, its spatiotemporal distribution at the molecular and cellular level is unclear. By correlating electron microscopy and ultra-high resolution ion microprobe (NanoSIMS) imaging of tissue from fasted mice injected with (13)C-labeled glucose, we demonstrate that liver glycogenesis initiates in the hepatocyte perinuclear region before spreading toward the cell membrane. In the mouse brain, we observe that (13)C is inhomogeneously incorporated into astrocytic glycogen at a rate ~25 times slower than in the liver, in agreement with prior bulk studies. This experiment, using temporally resolved, nanometer-scale imaging of glycogen synthesis and degradation, provides greater insight into glucose metabolism in mammalian organs and shows how this technique can be used to explore biochemical pathways in healthy and diseased states. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolic signatures imaged in cancer-induced cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Gadiya, Mayur M; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pomper, Martin G; Artemov, Dmitri; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2011-11-15

    Cancer-induced cachexia is a complex and poorly understood life-threatening syndrome that is characterized by progressive weight loss due to metabolic alterations, depletion of lipid stores, and severe loss of skeletal muscle protein. Gaining the ability to noninvasively image the presence or onset of cachexia is important to better treat this condition, to improve the design and optimization of therapeutic strategies, and to detect the responses to such treatments. In this study, we employed noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to identify metabolic signatures typical of cachectic tumors, using this information to analyze the types and extents of metabolic changes induced by the onset of cachexia in normal tissues. Cachexia was confirmed by weight loss as well as analyses of muscle tissue and serum. In vivo, cachexia-inducing murine adenocarcinoma (MAC)16 tumors were characterized by higher total choline (tCho) and higher (18)FDG uptake than histologically similar noncachectic MAC13 tumors. A profound depletion of the lipid signal was observed in normal tissue of MAC16 tumor-bearing mice but not within the tumor tissue itself. High-resolution (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) confirmed the high tCho level observed in cachectic tumors that occurred because of an increase of free choline and phosphocholine. Higher succinate and lower creatine levels were also detected in cachectic tumors. Taken together, these findings enhance our understanding of the effect of cancer on host organs and tissues as well as promote the development of noninvasive biomarkers for the presence of cachexia and identification of new therapeutic targets. ©2011 AACR

  14. Intraoperative Molecular Imaging for Rapid Assessment of Tumor Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    approach in animal models using a the MRI- FMT imaging system (Task 5). A description of the primary accomplishments and ongoing efforts follows...guided fluorescence molecular tomography ( FMT ) of ( ) ( ) ( ) tBP k NTNTT etCBP kRktCRtC + − ∗    + ++= 12121 2 1 9 two fluorescent probes in...administration, mice were imaged for an hour at approximately two minutes per frame using an MR-coupled FMT system. The imaging system is a spectrometer

  15. Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph (RAISE) Renewal Proposal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The optical design of RAISE is based on a new class of UV/EUV imaging spectrometers that use  only two reflections to provide quasi-stigmatic performance...

  16. Tumor image signatures and habitats: a processing pipeline of multimodality metabolic and physiological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Daekeun; Kim, Michelle M; Aryal, Madhava P; Parmar, Hemant; Piert, Morand; Lawrence, Theodore S; Cao, Yue

    2018-01-01

    To create tumor "habitats" from the "signatures" discovered from multimodality metabolic and physiological images, we developed a framework of a processing pipeline. The processing pipeline consists of six major steps: (1) creating superpixels as a spatial unit in a tumor volume; (2) forming a data matrix [Formula: see text] containing all multimodality image parameters at superpixels; (3) forming and clustering a covariance or correlation matrix [Formula: see text] of the image parameters to discover major image "signatures;" (4) clustering the superpixels and organizing the parameter order of the [Formula: see text] matrix according to the one found in step 3; (5) creating "habitats" in the image space from the superpixels associated with the "signatures;" and (6) pooling and clustering a matrix consisting of correlation coefficients of each pair of image parameters from all patients to discover subgroup patterns of the tumors. The pipeline was applied to a dataset of multimodality images in glioblastoma (GBM) first, which consisted of 10 image parameters. Three major image "signatures" were identified. The three major "habitats" plus their overlaps were created. To test generalizability of the processing pipeline, a second image dataset from GBM, acquired on the scanners different from the first one, was processed. Also, to demonstrate the clinical association of image-defined "signatures" and "habitats," the patterns of recurrence of the patients were analyzed together with image parameters acquired prechemoradiation therapy. An association of the recurrence patterns with image-defined "signatures" and "habitats" was revealed. These image-defined "signatures" and "habitats" can be used to guide stereotactic tissue biopsy for genetic and mutation status analysis and to analyze for prediction of treatment outcomes, e.g., patterns of failure.

  17. Rapid and accurate tumor-target bio-imaging through specific in vivo biosynthesis of a fluorescent europium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Wang, Jianling; Li, Qiwei; Dong, Xiawei; Ge, Wei; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Xuerui; Liu, Hongde; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Xuemei

    2016-04-01

    A new and facile method for rapidly and accurately achieving tumor targeting fluorescent images has been explored using a specifically biosynthesized europium (Eu) complex in vivo and in vitro. It demonstrated that a fluorescent Eu complex could be bio-synthesized through a spontaneous molecular process in cancerous cells and tumors, but not prepared in normal cells and tissues. In addition, the proteomics analyses show that some biological pathways of metabolism, especially for NADPH production and glutamine metabolism, are remarkably affected during the relevant biosynthesis process, where molecular precursors of europium ions are reduced to fluorescent europium complexes inside cancerous cells or tumor tissues. These results proved that the specific self-biosynthesis of a fluorescent Eu complex by cancer cells or tumor tissues can provide a new strategy for accurate diagnosis and treatment strategies in the early stages of cancers and thus is beneficial for realizing precise surgical intervention based on the relevant cheap and readily available agents.

  18. Intraoperative Molecular Imaging for Rapid Assessment of Tumor Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    determine the depth of embedded tumor fragments in the excise tissue or surgical cavity. Pilot animal data with the Licor IRDye800CW-2DG imaging agent in...and the tumor immediately removed with adjacent normal tissue. All tissue were soaked for 5 – 20 minutes in a solution of Licor IRDye800CW-2DG and... Licor IRDye800CW-2DG, showing a cross section of the tumor mass. These images show a significant amount of non-specific uptake of the probe in

  19. Monitoring of rapid sand filters using an acoustic imaging technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allouche, N.; Simons, D.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2012-01-01

    A novel instrument is developed to acoustically image sand filters used for water treatment and monitor their performance. The instrument consists of an omnidirectional transmitter that generates a chirp with a frequency range between 10 and 110 kHz, and an array of hydrophones. The instrument was

  20. [Rapid total body fat measurement by magnetic resonance imaging: quantification and topography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, F M; Ruehm, S; Hunold, P; de Greiff, A; Nuefer, M; Barkhausen, J; Ladd, S C

    2007-05-01

    To evaluate a rapid and comprehensive MR protocol based on a T1-weighted sequence in conjunction with a rolling table platform for the quantification of total body fat. 11 healthy volunteers and 50 patients were included in the study. MR data was acquired on a 1.5-T system (Siemens Magnetom Sonata). An axial T1-weighted flash 2D sequence (TR 101, TE 4.7, FA 70, FOV 50 cm, 205 x 256 matrix, slice thickness: 10 mm, 10 mm interslice gap) was used for data acquisition. Patients were placed in a supine position on a rolling table platform capable of acquiring multiple consecutive data sets by pulling the patient through the isocenter of the magnet. Data sets extending from the upper to lower extremities were collected. The images were analyzed with respect to the amount of intraabdominal, subcutaneous and total abdominal fat by semi-automated image segmentation software that employs a contour-following algorithm. The obtained MR images were able to be evaluated for all volunteers and patients. Excellent correlation was found between whole body MRI results in volunteers with DEXA (r (2) = 0.95) and bioimpedance (r (2) = 0.89) measurements, while the correlation coefficient was 0.66 between MRI and BMI, indicating only moderate reliability of the BMI method. Variations in patients with respect to the amount of total, subcutaneous, and intraabdominal adipose tissue was not related to standard anthropometric measurements and metabolic lipid profiles (r (2) = 0,001 to 0.48). The results showed that there was a significant variation in intraabdominal adipose tissue which could not be predicted from the total body fat (r (2) = 0.14) or subcutaneous adipose tissue (r (2) = 0.04). Although no significant differences in BMI could be found between females and males (p = 0.26), females showed significantly higher total and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (p < 0.05). This MR protocol can be used for the rapid and non-invasive quantification of body fat. The missing

  1. Myocardial metabolic and receptor imaging in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neglia, Danilo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Iozzo, Patricia; L' Abbate, Antonio [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy); Strauss, William H. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) is a distinct disease of the myocardium, of unknown etiology. The disease can occur acutely, or evolve in a subacute fashion. IDC is often associated with a substantial impairment of ventricular function, which may recover over time. Although spontaneous recovery of LV function occurs in 20%-45% of newly diagnosed patients, the majority of patients do not do well. IDC has an average 5-year mortality of 20%. Abnormalities of energetics, perfusion, and adrenergic control of the myocardium are markers of the status of LV dysfunction. As the heart fails, changes occur in the production and catabolism of high-energy substrates, the efficiency of mitochondrial oxidative processes, the distribution of resting perfusion and coronary vasodilating capacity and the adrenergic receptor density and function. This article reviews the information provided by metabolic and receptor imaging in patients with IDC, and the role the data may play in patient management. (orig.)

  2. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Warren

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset. This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis

  3. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean C; Margineanu, Anca; Alibhai, Dominic; Kelly, Douglas J; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Katan, Matilda; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M W

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset). This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis of live cell

  4. Direct Parametric Image Reconstruction in Reduced Parameter Space for Rapid Multi-Tracer PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoyin; Li, Zhoulei; Liu, Zhen; Navab, Nassir; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Keller, Ulrich; Ziegler, Sibylle; Shi, Kuangyu

    2015-02-12

    The separation of multiple PET tracers within an overlapping scan based on intrinsic differences of tracer pharmacokinetics is challenging, due to limited signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PET measurements and high complexity of fitting models. In this study, we developed a direct parametric image reconstruction (DPIR) method for estimating kinetic parameters and recovering single tracer information from rapid multi-tracer PET measurements. This is achieved by integrating a multi-tracer model in a reduced parameter space (RPS) into dynamic image reconstruction. This new RPS model is reformulated from an existing multi-tracer model and contains fewer parameters for kinetic fitting. Ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) was employed to approximate log-likelihood function with respect to kinetic parameters. To incorporate the multi-tracer model, an iterative weighted nonlinear least square (WNLS) method was employed. The proposed multi-tracer DPIR (MTDPIR) algorithm was evaluated on dual-tracer PET simulations ([18F]FDG and [11C]MET) as well as on preclinical PET measurements ([18F]FLT and [18F]FDG). The performance of the proposed algorithm was compared to the indirect parameter estimation method with the original dual-tracer model. The respective contributions of the RPS technique and the DPIR method to the performance of the new algorithm were analyzed in detail. For the preclinical evaluation, the tracer separation results were compared with single [18F]FDG scans of the same subjects measured 2 days before the dual-tracer scan. The results of the simulation and preclinical studies demonstrate that the proposed MT-DPIR method can improve the separation of multiple tracers for PET image quantification and kinetic parameter estimations.

  5. Simultaneous QSM and metabolic imaging of the brain using SPICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xi; Lam, Fan; Li, Yudu; Clifford, Bryan; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2018-01-01

    To map brain metabolites and tissue magnetic susceptibility simultaneously using a single three-dimensional 1 H-MRSI acquisition without water suppression. The proposed technique builds on a subspace imaging method called spectroscopic imaging by exploiting spatiospectral correlation (SPICE), which enables ultrashort echo time (TE)/short pulse repetition time (TR) acquisitions for 1 H-MRSI without water suppression. This data acquisition scheme simultaneously captures both the spectral information of brain metabolites and the phase information of the water signals that is directly related to tissue magnetic susceptibility variations. In extending this scheme for simultaneous QSM and metabolic imaging, we increase k-space coverage by using dual density sparse sampling and ramp sampling to achieve spatial resolution often required by QSM, while maintaining a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the spatiospectral data used for metabolite mapping. In data processing, we obtain high-quality QSM from the unsuppressed water signals by taking advantage of the larger number of echoes acquired and any available anatomical priors; metabolite spatiospectral distributions are reconstructed using a union-of-subspaces model. In vivo experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can produce susceptibility maps at a resolution higher than 1.8 × 1.8 × 2.4 mm3 along with metabolite spatiospectral distributions at a nominal spatial resolution of 2.4 × 2.4 × 2.4 mm3 from a single 7-min MRSI scan. The estimated susceptibility values are consistent with those obtained using the conventional QSM method with 3D multi-echo gradient echo acquisitions. This article reports a new capability for simultaneous susceptibility mapping and metabolic imaging of the brain from a single 1 H-MRSI scan, which has potential for a wide range of applications. Magn Reson Med 79:13-21, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017

  6. Featured Image: Making a Rapidly Rotating Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    These stills from a simulation show the evolution (from left to right and top to bottom) of a high-mass X-ray binary over 1.1 days, starting after the star on the right fails to explode as a supernova and then collapses into a black hole. Many high-mass X-ray binaries like the well-known Cygnus X-1, the first source widely accepted to be a black hole host rapidly spinning black holes. Despite our observations of these systems, however, were still not sure how these objects end up with such high rotation speeds. Using simulations like that shown above, a team of scientists led by Aldo Batta (UC Santa Cruz) has demonstrated how a failed supernova explosion can result in such a rapidly spinning black hole. The authors work shows that in a binary where one star attempts to explode as a supernova and fails it doesnt succeed in unbinding the star the large amount of fallback material can interact with the companion star and then accrete onto the black hole, spinning it up in the process. You can read more about the authors simulations and conclusions in the paper below.CitationAldo Batta et al 2017 ApJL 846 L15. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa8506

  7. Rapid HIFU autofocusing using the entire MR-ARFI image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grissom, William A.; Kaye, Elena; Pauly, Kim Butts; Zur, Yuval; Yeo, Desmond; Medan, Yoav; Davis, Cynthia [Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); GE Healthcare, Haifa (Israel); GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Biomedical Engineering, Technion IIT, Haifa (Israel); GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States)

    2012-11-28

    Phase aberrations and attenuations caused by bone can defocus HIFU in the brain and organs behind the ribcage. To refocus the beam, MR-ARFI can be used to measure tissue displacements created by each element in the transducer, and optimize driving signal delays and amplitudes. We introduce a new MR-ARFI-based autofocusing method that requires many fewer image acquisitions than current methods. The method is validated in simulations of bone and brain HIFU transducers, and compared to a conventional method.

  8. Assessment of oxidative metabolism in Brown Fat using PET imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto eMuzik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although it has been believed that brown adipose tissue (BAT depots disappear shortly after the perinatal period in humans, PET imaging using the glucose analog FDG has shown unequivocally the existence of functional BAT in humans. The objective of this study was to determine, using dynamic oxygen-15 (15O PET imaging, to what extent BAT thermogenesis is activated in adults during cold stress and to establish the relationship between BAT oxidative metabolism and FDG tracer uptake.Methods: Fourteen adult normal subjects (9F/5M, 30+7 years underwent triple oxygen scans (H215O, C15O, 15O2 as well as indirect calorimetric measurements at rest and following exposure to mild cold (60F. Subjects were divided into two groups (BAT+ and BAT- based on the presence or absence of FDG tracer uptake (SUV > 2 in supraclavicular BAT. Blood flow (BF and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF was calculated from dynamic PET scans at the location of BAT, muscle and white adipose tissue (WAT. The metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2 in BAT was determined and used to calculate the contribution of activated BAT to daily energy expenditure (DEE.Results: The median mass of activated BAT in the BAT+ group (5F, 31+8yrs was 52.4 g (14-68g and was 1.7 g (0-6.3g in the BAT- group (5M/4F, 29+6yrs. SUV values were significantly higher in the BAT+ as compared to the BAT- group (7.4+3.7 vs 1.9+0.9; p=0.03. BF values in BAT were significantly higher in the BAT+ as compared to the BAT- group (13.1+4.4 vs 5.7+1.1 ml/100g/min, p=0.03, but were similar in WAT (4.1+1.6 vs 4.2+1.8 ml/100g/min and muscle (3.7+0.8 vs 3.3+1.2 ml/100g/min. Calculated MRO2 values in BAT increased from 0.95+0.74 to 1.62+0.82 ml/100g/min in the BAT+ group and were significantly higher than those determined in the BAT- group (0.43+0.27 vs 0.56+0.24; p=0.67. The DEE associated with BAT oxidative metabolism was highly variable in the BAT+ group, with an average of 5.5+6.4 kcal/day (range 0.57–15.3 kcal/day.

  9. MR imaging evaluation of cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, R.W. van der; Lamb, H.J.; Smit, J.W.A.; Roos, A. de

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has become an important public health problem and has reached epidemic proportions globally. Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a cluster of metabolic abnormalities in an individual, with insulin resistance as the main characteristic. The major adverse consequence of metabolic

  10. Rapid countermeasure discovery against Francisella tularensis based on a metabolic network reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhartha Chaudhury

    Full Text Available In the future, we may be faced with the need to provide treatment for an emergent biological threat against which existing vaccines and drugs have limited efficacy or availability. To prepare for this eventuality, our objective was to use a metabolic network-based approach to rapidly identify potential drug targets and prospectively screen and validate novel small-molecule antimicrobials. Our target organism was the fully virulent Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis Schu S4 strain, a highly infectious intracellular pathogen that is the causative agent of tularemia and is classified as a category A biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We proceeded with a staggered computational and experimental workflow that used a strain-specific metabolic network model, homology modeling and X-ray crystallography of protein targets, and ligand- and structure-based drug design. Selected compounds were subsequently filtered based on physiological-based pharmacokinetic modeling, and we selected a final set of 40 compounds for experimental validation of antimicrobial activity. We began screening these compounds in whole bacterial cell-based assays in biosafety level 3 facilities in the 20th week of the study and completed the screens within 12 weeks. Six compounds showed significant growth inhibition of F. tularensis, and we determined their respective minimum inhibitory concentrations and mammalian cell cytotoxicities. The most promising compound had a low molecular weight, was non-toxic, and abolished bacterial growth at 13 µM, with putative activity against pantetheine-phosphate adenylyltransferase, an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of coenzyme A, encoded by gene coaD. The novel antimicrobial compounds identified in this study serve as starting points for lead optimization, animal testing, and drug development against tularemia. Our integrated in silico/in vitro approach had an overall 15% success rate in terms of

  11. Rapid interferometric imaging of printed drug laden multilayer structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandler, Niklas; Kassamakov, Ivan; Ehlers, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    /and active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) adhere to each other. This is crucial in order to have predetermined drug release profiles. We also demonstrate non-invasive measurement of a polymer structure in a microfluidic channel. It shown that traceable interferometric 3D microscopy is a viable technique......The developments in printing technologies allow fabrication of micron-size nano-layered delivery systems to personal specifications. In this study we fabricated layered polymer structures for drug-delivery into a microfluidic channel and aimed to interferometrically assure their topography...... and adherence to each other. We present a scanning white light interferometer (SWLI) method for quantitative assurance of the topography of the embedded structure. We determined rapidly in non-destructive manner the thickness and roughness of the structures and whether the printed layers containing polymers or...

  12. Rapid identification of heterogeneous mixture components with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbacik, E.T.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Otto, Cornelis; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2012-01-01

    For the rapid analysis of complicated heterogeneous mixtures, we have developed a method to acquire and intuitively display hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) images. The imaging is performed with a conventional optical setup based around an optical parametric oscillator.

  13. Rapid uptake, metabolism, and elimination of inhaled sulfuryl fluoride fumigant by rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendrala, A L; Markham, D A; Eisenbrandt, D L

    2005-08-01

    Sulfuryl fluoride (SO(2)F(2)) is a structural fumigant gas used to control drywood termites and wood-boring beetles. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of inhaled SO(2)F(2) were evaluated in male Fischer-344 rats exposed to 30 or 300 ppm (35)S-labeled SO(2)F(2) for 4 h. Blood, urine and feces were collected during and after the exposures and analyzed for radioactivity, (35)S-labeled fluorosulfate and sulfate, and fluoride (urine and feces only). Selected tissues were collected 7 days post-exposure and analyzed for radioactivity. During and after unlabeled SO(2)F(2) exposures, blood, brain, and kidney were collected and analyzed for fluoride ion. SO(2)F(2) was rapidly absorbed, achieving maximum concentrations of radioactivity in both plasma and red blood cells (RBC) near the end of the 4-h exposure period. Radioactivity was rapidly excreted, mostly via the urine. Seven days post-exposure, small amounts of radioactivity were distributed among several tissues, with the highest concentration detected in respiratory tissues. Radioactivity associated with the RBC remained elevated 7 days post-exposure, and highly perfused tissues had higher levels of radioactivity than other non-respiratory tissues. Radioactivity cleared from plasma and RBC with initial half-lives of 2.5 h after 30 ppm and 1-2.5 h after 300 ppm exposures. The terminal half-life of radioactivity was 2.5-fold longer in RBC than plasma. Based on the radiochemical profiles, there was no evidence of parent (35)SO(2)F(2) in blood. Identification of fluorosulfate and sulfate in blood and urine suggests that SO(2)F(2) is hydrolyzed to fluorosulfate, with release of fluoride, followed by further hydrolysis to sulfate and release of the remaining fluoride.

  14. Rapid MR imaging of cryoprotectant permeation in an engineered dermal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidault, N P; Hammer, B E; Hubel, A

    2000-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a powerful technique for monitoring the permeation of cryoprotective agents (CPAs) inside tissues. However, the techniques published until now suffer from inherently long imaging times, limiting the application of these techniques to slow diffusion processes and large CPA concentrations. In this study, we present a rapid MR imaging technique based on a CHESS-FLASH scheme combined with Keyhole image acquisition. This technique can image the fast permeation of Me(2)SO solutions into freeze-dried artificial dermal replacements for concentrations down to 10% v/v. Special attention is given to evaluating the technique for quantitative analysis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  15. Invasive Aspergillus infection requiring lobectomy in a CYP2C19 rapid metabolizer with subtherapeutic voriconazole concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, J Kevin; Gonzalez, Blanca E; Zembillas, Anthony S; Kusick, Karissa; Murthy, Sudish; Raja, Siva; Gordon, Steven M; Hanna, Rabi

    2016-05-01

    Individuals who carry the CYP2C19*17 gain-of-function allele have lower voriconazole exposure and are therefore at risk of failing therapy. Utilizing CYP2C19 genotype to optimize voriconazole dosage may be a cost-effective method of improving treatment outcomes. However, there are limited data describing what initial voriconazole dosage should be used in those with increased CYP2C19 metabolic capacity. Herein, we present a case report of a pediatric CYP2C19 rapid metabolizer (i.e., CYP2C19*1/*17) requiring a voriconazole dosage of 14 mg/kg twice daily (usual pediatric dosage ranges from 7 to 9 mg/kg twice daily). This case report supports the clinical utility of using CYP2C19 genotype to guide voriconazole dosing, and provides data for establishing an initial voriconazole dose in pediatric CYP2C19 rapid metabolizers.

  16. Development of rapid methods for relaxation time mapping and motion estimation using magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Gilani, Syed Irtiza Ali

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological developments in the field of magnetic resonance imaging have resulted in advanced techniques that can reduce the total time to acquire images. For applications such as relaxation time mapping, which enables improved visualisation of in vivo structures, rapid imaging techniques are highly desirable. TAPIR is a Look- Locker-based sequence for high-resolution, multislice T1 relaxation time mapping. Despite the high accuracy and precision of TAPIR, an improveme...

  17. Rapid imaging of free radicals in vivo using field cycled PEDRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puwanich, P; Lurie, D J; Foster, M A

    1999-12-01

    Imaging of free radicals in vivo using an interleaved field-cycled proton-electron double-resonance imaging (FC-PEDRI) pulse sequence has recently been investigated. In this work, in order to reduce the EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) irradiation power required and the imaging time, a centric reordered snapshot FC-PEDRI pulse sequence has been implemented. This is based on the FLASH pulse sequence with a very short repetition time and the use of centric reordering of the phase-encoding gradient, allowing the most significant free induction decay (FID) signals to be collected before the signal enhancement decays significantly. A new technique of signal phaseshift correction was required to eliminate ghost artefacts caused by the instability of the main magnetic field after field cycling. An FID amplitude correction scheme has also been implemented to reduce edge enhancement artefacts caused by the rapid change of magnetization population before reaching the steady state. Using the rapid pulse sequence, the time required for acquisition of a 64 x 64 pixel FC-PEDRI image was reduced to 6 s per image compared with about 2.5 min with the conventional pulse sequence. The EPR irradiation power applied to the sample was reduced by a factor of approximately 64. Although the resulting images obtained by the rapid pulse sequence have a lower signal to noise than those obtained by a normal interleaved FC-PEDRI pulse sequence, the results show that rapid imaging of free radicals in vivo using snapshot FC-PEDRI is possible.

  18. Optical metabolic imaging of colorectal adenocarcinoma derived organoids: assessing cellular-level resistance to therapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Haley M.; Prieto, Sandra P.; Greening, Gage J.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2017-02-01

    Locally advanced adenocarcinomas located in the distal rectum are commonly treated via 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). The occurrence of pre-operative pathological complete response, or the absence of any histological evidence of residual cancer, is seen in 15-27% of rectal cancer cases. Response to chemotherapeutic agents varies between patients, introducing the need for a system to predict optimal drug combinations. We propose a method of utilizing optical metabolic imaging of in vitro, primary tumor-derived, three-dimensional organoid culture to create specific drug sensitivity profiles, and to rapidly assess a patient's potential response to drugs. Murine xenografts were developed in Swiss athymic nude mice, using human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines, implanted in the flank (RKO, ATCC). Tumors were excised upon reaching a volume of 500mm3 and processed for organoid culture. Organoids were subjected to longitudinal metabolic imaging of metabolic cofactors FAD and NADH for seven days. The resulting images were used to yield an optical redox value on a cell-by-cell basis, determined by the fluorescence intensity ratio of FAD/(FAD+NADH). This data infers proliferative index of the organoids. Beginning on day three, a control vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide, or the cytotoxic agent 5-FU, was added to the organoid growth media in wells, with metabolic imaging performed the same as previously stated. The optical redox values decreased due to the addition of 5-FU, which targets rapidly dividing cells and induces apoptosis. The changes in the optical redox histograms were correlated to markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67) and apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3).

  19. Low Birthweight, Rapid Weight Gain and Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescence: An Illustrative Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyiriuka Alphonsus N.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old boy whose diabetes mellitus was diagnosed 3 months previously in a private hospital but was not placed on medication. The presenting complaints were fast breathing for 24 hours, weakness for 2 hours, and unresponsiveness to calls for 0.5 hours. His father was obese with type 2 diabetes mellitus and died 8 months earlier from cardiac arrest. His birthweight was low, 2.2kg. At first presentation, his weight, BMI and blood pressure were 60kg (25th-50th percentile, 19.4kg/m2 (25thpercentile and 110/70mmHg (systolic BP 50th percentile, diastolic BP 50th-90th percentile, respectively. He was managed for diabetic ketoacidosis and was discharged on subcutaneous premixed insulin, 1 Unit/kg/day. At point of discharge, weight and BP were 60.5 kg and 120/70 mmHg, respectively. The patient defaulted but presented again 6 months later at the age of 17 years. At second presentation, his weight, BMI and BP were 89 kg (95th percentile, 27.5 kg/m2 (90th-95th percentile and 180/80 mmHg (systolic 99th percentile; diastolic 90th percentile, respectively. His waist circumference was 98.7cm (> 90th percentile. We had no record of previous waist circumference. His lipid profile showed low HDL-cholesterol 0.7252 mmol/L [(28mg/dl; <5thpercentile]. His fasting blood glucose and HbA1C were 6.5 mmol/L (117mg/dl and 34 mol/mol (5.3%, respectively. A diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in a patient with ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes was made. He was referred to the pediatric cardiologist for management of his hypertension. He defaulted again and was lost to follow up. Conclusion: This report illustrates the association of low birth weight and rapid weight gain with metabolic syndrome in adolescence.

  20. Rapid biocompatibility analysis of materials via in vivo fluorescence imaging of mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M Bratlie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many materials are unsuitable for medical use because of poor biocompatibility. Recently, advances in the high throughput synthesis of biomaterials has significantly increased the number of potential biomaterials, however current biocompatibility analysis methods are slow and require histological analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we develop rapid, non-invasive methods for in vivo quantification of the inflammatory response to implanted biomaterials. Materials were placed subcutaneously in an array format and monitored for host responses as per ISO 10993-6: 2001. Host cell activity in response to these materials was imaged kinetically, in vivo using fluorescent whole animal imaging. Data captured using whole animal imaging displayed similar temporal trends in cellular recruitment of phagocytes to the biomaterials compared to histological analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Histological analysis similarity validates this technique as a novel, rapid approach for screening biocompatibility of implanted materials. Through this technique there exists the possibility to rapidly screen large libraries of polymers in vivo.

  1. Carboxylesterase 1A2 encoding gene with increased transcription and potential rapid drug metabolism in Asian populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Madsen, Majbritt Busk; Lyauk, Yassine Kamal

    2017-01-01

    The carboxylesterase 1 gene (CES1) encodes a hydrolase implicated in the metabolism of commonly used drugs. CES1A2, a hybrid of CES1 and a CES1-like pseudogene, has a promoter that is weak in most individuals. However, some individuals harbor a promoter haplotype of this gene with two overlapping...... Sp1 sites that confer significantly increased transcription potentially leading to rapid drug metabolism. This CES1A2 haplotype has previously been reported to be common among Asians. Using polymerase chain reaction followed by sequencing, the present study examined variation in the promoter and 5...

  2. Single-Trial Event-Related Potential Based Rapid Image Triage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Yu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Searching for points of interest (POI in large-volume imagery is a challenging problem with few good solutions. In this work, a neural engineering approach called rapid image triage (RIT which could offer about a ten-fold speed up in POI searching is developed. It is essentially a cortically-coupled computer vision technique, whereby the user is presented bursts of images at a speed of 6–15 images per second and then neural signals called event-related potential (ERP is used as the ‘cue’ for user seeing images of high relevance likelihood. Compared to past efforts, the implemented system has several unique features: (1 it applies overlapping frames in image chip preparation, to ensure rapid image triage performance; (2 a novel common spatial-temporal pattern (CSTP algorithm that makes use of both spatial and temporal patterns of ERP topography is proposed for high-accuracy single-trial ERP detection; (3 a weighted version of probabilistic support-vector-machine (SVM is used to address the inherent unbalanced nature of single-trial ERP detection for RIT. High accuracy, fast learning, and real-time capability of the developed system shown on 20 subjects demonstrate the feasibility of a brainmachine integrated rapid image triage system for fast detection of POI from large-volume imagery.

  3. Alterations in regional cerebral glucose metabolism across waking and non-rapid eye movement sleep in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J; Germain, Anne; Price, Julie C; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Miewald, Jean M; Kupfer, David J

    2005-04-01

    Depression is associated with sleep disturbances, including alterations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Non-rapid eye movement sleep is associated with decreases in frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex metabolic activity compared with wakefulness. To show that depressed patients would have less of a decrease than controls in frontal metabolism between waking and NREM sleep and to show that during NREM sleep, they would have increased activity in structures that promote arousal. Subjects completed electroencephalographic sleep and regional cerebral glucose metabolism assessments during both waking and NREM sleep using [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography. General clinical research center. The study included 29 unmedicated patients who met the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV criteria for current major depression and who had a score of 15 or greater on a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and 28 medically healthy subjects of comparable age and sex who were free of mental disorders. Electroencephalographic sleep and regional cerebral metabolism during waking and NREM sleep. Depressed patients showed smaller decreases than healthy subjects in relative metabolism in broad regions of the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex from waking to NREM sleep. Depressed patients showed larger decreases than healthy subjects in relative metabolism in the left amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, cerebellum, parahippocampal cortex, fusiform gyrus, and occipital cortex. However, in post hoc analyses, depressed patients showed hypermetabolism in these areas during both waking and NREM sleep. The smaller decrease in frontal metabolism from waking to NREM sleep in depressed patients is further evidence for a dynamic sleep-wake alteration in prefrontal cortex function in depression. Hypermetabolism in a ventral emotional neural system during waking in depressed patients persists into NREM sleep.

  4. Rapid, low dose X-ray diffractive imaging of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Michael W.M., E-mail: michael.jones@latrobe.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Dearnley, Megan K. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Riessen, Grant A. van [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Abbey, Brian [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Putkunz, Corey T. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Junker, Mark D. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Vine, David J. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); McNulty, Ian [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Centre for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nugent, Keith A. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Peele, Andrew G. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton 3168 (Australia); Tilley, Leann [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2014-08-01

    Phase-diverse X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) provides a route to high sensitivity and spatial resolution with moderate radiation dose. It also provides a robust solution to the well-known phase-problem, making on-line image reconstruction feasible. Here we apply phase-diverse CDI to a cellular sample, obtaining images of an erythrocyte infected by the sexual stage of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, with a radiation dose significantly lower than the lowest dose previously reported for cellular imaging using CDI. The high sensitivity and resolution allow key biological features to be identified within intact cells, providing complementary information to optical and electron microscopy. This high throughput method could be used for fast tomographic imaging, or to generate multiple replicates in two-dimensions of hydrated biological systems without freezing or fixing. This work demonstrates that phase-diverse CDI is a valuable complementary imaging method for the biological sciences and ready for immediate application. - Highlights: • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy provides high-resolution and high-contrast images of intact biological samples. • Rapid nanoscale resolution imaging is demonstrated at orders of magnitude lower dose than previously possible. • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a robust technique for rapid, quantitative, and correlative X-ray phase imaging.

  5. Rapid 3D Reconstruction for Image Sequence Acquired from UAV Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufu Qu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D structures from an image sequence captured by unmanned aerial vehicles’ camera (UAVs and improve the processing speed, we propose a rapid 3D reconstruction method that is based on an image queue, considering the continuity and relevance of UAV camera images. The proposed approach first compresses the feature points of each image into three principal component points by using the principal component analysis method. In order to select the key images suitable for 3D reconstruction, the principal component points are used to estimate the interrelationships between images. Second, these key images are inserted into a fixed-length image queue. The positions and orientations of the images are calculated, and the 3D coordinates of the feature points are estimated using weighted bundle adjustment. With this structural information, the depth maps of these images can be calculated. Next, we update the image queue by deleting some of the old images and inserting some new images into the queue, and a structural calculation of all the images can be performed by repeating the previous steps. Finally, a dense 3D point cloud can be obtained using the depth–map fusion method. The experimental results indicate that when the texture of the images is complex and the number of images exceeds 100, the proposed method can improve the calculation speed by more than a factor of four with almost no loss of precision. Furthermore, as the number of images increases, the improvement in the calculation speed will become more noticeable.

  6. Rapid 3D Reconstruction for Image Sequence Acquired from UAV Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yufu; Huang, Jianyu; Zhang, Xuan

    2018-01-14

    In order to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) structures from an image sequence captured by unmanned aerial vehicles' camera (UAVs) and improve the processing speed, we propose a rapid 3D reconstruction method that is based on an image queue, considering the continuity and relevance of UAV camera images. The proposed approach first compresses the feature points of each image into three principal component points by using the principal component analysis method. In order to select the key images suitable for 3D reconstruction, the principal component points are used to estimate the interrelationships between images. Second, these key images are inserted into a fixed-length image queue. The positions and orientations of the images are calculated, and the 3D coordinates of the feature points are estimated using weighted bundle adjustment. With this structural information, the depth maps of these images can be calculated. Next, we update the image queue by deleting some of the old images and inserting some new images into the queue, and a structural calculation of all the images can be performed by repeating the previous steps. Finally, a dense 3D point cloud can be obtained using the depth-map fusion method. The experimental results indicate that when the texture of the images is complex and the number of images exceeds 100, the proposed method can improve the calculation speed by more than a factor of four with almost no loss of precision. Furthermore, as the number of images increases, the improvement in the calculation speed will become more noticeable.

  7. Do the eyes scan dream images during rapid eye movement sleep? Evidence from the rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair-Visonneau, Laurène; Oudiette, Delphine; Gaymard, Bertrand; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2010-06-01

    Rapid eye movements and complex visual dreams are salient features of human rapid eye movement sleep. However, it remains to be elucidated whether the eyes scan dream images, despite studies that have retrospectively compared the direction of rapid eye movements to the dream recall recorded after having awakened the sleeper. We used the model of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (when patients enact their dreams by persistence of muscle tone) to determine directly whether the eyes move in the same directions as the head and limbs. In 56 patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and 17 healthy matched controls, the eye movements were monitored by electrooculography in four (right, left, up and down) directions, calibrated with a target and synchronized with video and sleep monitoring. The rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder-associated behaviours occurred 2.1 times more frequently during rapid eye movement sleep with than without rapid eye movements, and more often during or after rapid eye movements than before. Rapid eye movement density, index and complexity were similar in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and controls. When rapid eye movements accompanied goal-oriented motor behaviour during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (e.g. grabbing a fictive object, hand greetings, climbing a ladder), which happened in 19 sequences, 82% were directed towards the action of the patient (same plane and direction). When restricted to the determinant rapid eye movements, the concordance increased to 90%. Rapid eye movements were absent in 38-42% of behaviours. This directional coherence between limbs, head and eye movements during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder suggests that, when present, rapid eye movements imitate the scanning of the dream scene. Since the rapid eye movements are similar in subjects with and without rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, this concordance can be extended

  8. Evidence of co-metabolic bentazone transformation by methanotrophic enrichment from a groundwater-fed rapid sand filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Deliniere, Hélène; Prasse, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    and bentazone at concentrations below 2 mg/L showed methanotrophic co-metabolic bentazone transformation: The culture removed 53% of the bentazone in 21 days in presence of 5 mg/L of methane, while only 31% was removed in absence of methane. Addition of acetylene inhibited methane oxidation and stopped...... from 58 to 158, well within the range for methanotrophic co-metabolic degradation of trace contaminants calculated from the literature, with normalized substrate preferences varying from 3 to 400. High-resolution mass spectrometry revealed formation of the transformation products (TPs) 6-OH, 8-OH......, isopropyl-OH and di-OH-bentazone, with higher abundances of all TPs in the presence of methane. Overall, we found a suite of evidence all showing that bentazone was co-metabolically transformed to hydroxy-bentazone by a methanotrophic culture enriched from a rapid sand filter at a waterworks....

  9. Characterizing Urban Household Waste Generation and Metabolism Considering Community Stratification in a Rapid Urbanizing Area of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishan Xiao

    Full Text Available The relationship between social stratification and municipal solid waste generation remains uncertain under current rapid urbanization. Based on a multi-object spatial sampling technique, we selected 191 households in a rapidly urbanizing area of Xiamen, China. The selected communities were classified into three types: work-unit, transitional, and commercial communities in the context of housing policy reform in China. Field survey data were used to characterize household waste generation patterns considering community stratification. Our results revealed a disparity in waste generation profiles among different households. The three community types differed with respect to family income, living area, religious affiliation, and homeowner occupation. Income, family structure, and lifestyle caused significant differences in waste generation among work-unit, transitional, and commercial communities, respectively. Urban waste generation patterns are expected to evolve due to accelerating urbanization and associated community transition. A multi-scale integrated analysis of societal and ecosystem metabolism approach was applied to waste metabolism linking it to particular socioeconomic conditions that influence material flows and their evolution. Waste metabolism, both pace and density, was highest for family structure driven patterns, followed by lifestyle and income driven. The results will guide community-specific management policies in rapidly urbanizing areas.

  10. Characterizing Urban Household Waste Generation and Metabolism Considering Community Stratification in a Rapid Urbanizing Area of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lishan; Lin, Tao; Chen, Shaohua; Zhang, Guoqin; Ye, Zhilong; Yu, Zhaowu

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between social stratification and municipal solid waste generation remains uncertain under current rapid urbanization. Based on a multi-object spatial sampling technique, we selected 191 households in a rapidly urbanizing area of Xiamen, China. The selected communities were classified into three types: work-unit, transitional, and commercial communities in the context of housing policy reform in China. Field survey data were used to characterize household waste generation patterns considering community stratification. Our results revealed a disparity in waste generation profiles among different households. The three community types differed with respect to family income, living area, religious affiliation, and homeowner occupation. Income, family structure, and lifestyle caused significant differences in waste generation among work-unit, transitional, and commercial communities, respectively. Urban waste generation patterns are expected to evolve due to accelerating urbanization and associated community transition. A multi-scale integrated analysis of societal and ecosystem metabolism approach was applied to waste metabolism linking it to particular socioeconomic conditions that influence material flows and their evolution. Waste metabolism, both pace and density, was highest for family structure driven patterns, followed by lifestyle and income driven. The results will guide community-specific management policies in rapidly urbanizing areas.

  11. Metabolic Imaging of Breast Cancer and the Normal Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar Butt, Sadia

    Cellular metabolism is a set of biochemical reactions that happen in living organisms to maintain life. Enzymes act as catalysts and allow these reactions to proceed quickly and efficiently in order to maintain the cellular function and reproduction. Metabolic Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS...

  12. Rapid identification of salmonella serotypes with stereo and hyperspectral microscope imaging Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method can reduce detection time within 8 hours including incubation process. The early and rapid detection with this method in conjunction with the high throughput capabilities makes HMI method a prime candidate for implementation for the food industry. Th...

  13. Click-Chemistry-Mediated Rapid Microbubble Capture for Acute Thrombus Ultrasound Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tuantuan; Yuan, Chuxiao; Dai, Bingyang; Liu, Yang; Li, Mingxi; Feng, Zhenqiang; Jiang, Qing; Xu, Zhihong; Zhao, Ningwei; Gu, Ning; Yang, Fang

    2017-07-18

    Bioorthogonal coupling chemistry has been studied as a potentially advantageous approach for molecular imaging because it offers rapid, efficient, and strong binding, which might also benefit stability, production, and chemical conjugation. The inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction between a 1,2,4,5-tetrazine and trans-cyclooctene (TCO) is an example of a highly selective and rapid bioorthogonal coupling reaction that has been used successfully to prepare targeted molecular imaging probes. Here we report a fast, reliable, and highly sensitive approach, based on a two-step pretargeting bioorthogonal approach, to achieving activated-platelet-specific CD62p-targeted thrombus ultrasound molecular imaging. Tetrazine-modified microbubbles (tetra-MBs) could be uniquely and rapidly captured by subsequent click chemistry of thrombus tagged with a trans-cyclooctene-pretreated CD62p antibody. Moreover, such tetra-MBs showed great long-term stability under physiological conditions, thus offering the ability to monitor thrombus changes in real time. We demonstrated for the first time that a bioorthogonal targeting molecular ultrasound imaging strategy based on tetra-MBs could be a simple but powerful tool for rapid diagnosis of acute thrombosis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Technological Development of High-Performance MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Study of Metabolic Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feenstra, Adam D. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    This thesis represents efforts made in technological developments for the study of metabolic biology in plants, specifically maize, using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization-mass spectrometry imaging.

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease: magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Andrew H; Duncan, Gordon W; Firbank, Michael J; Yarnall, Alison J; Khoo, Tien K; Burn, David J; O'Brien, John T

    2013-06-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder has poor prognostic implications for Parkinson's disease. The authors recruited 124 patients with early Parkinson's disease to compare clinical and neuroimaging findings based on the presence of this sleep disorder. The presence of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder was assessed with the Mayo Sleep Questionnaire. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences were obtained for voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging. Patients with sleep disorder had more advanced disease, but groups had similar clinical characteristics and cognitive performance. Those with sleep disorder had areas of reduced cortical grey matter volume and white matter changes compared with those who did not have sleep disorder. However, differences were slight and were not significant when the analyses were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder was associated with subtle changes in white matter integrity and grey matter volume in patients with early Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Rapid Multi-Tracer PET Tumor Imaging With 18F-FDG and Secondary Shorter-Lived Tracers

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Noel F.; McJames, Scott; Kadrmas, Dan J

    2009-01-01

    Rapid multi-tracer PET, where two to three PET tracers are rapidly scanned with staggered injections, can recover certain imaging measures for each tracer based on differences in tracer kinetics and decay. We previously showed that single-tracer imaging measures can be recovered to a certain extent from rapid dual-tracer 62Cu – PTSM (blood flow) + 62Cu — ATSM (hypoxia) tumor imaging. In this work, the feasibility of rapidly imaging 18F-FDG plus one or two of these shorter-lived secondary trac...

  17. Development of New Contrast Agents for Imaging Function and Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Carvalho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are interesting nanosystems with a wide range of medical application. One particular application is their ability to enhance contrast in magnetic resonance images; when properly loaded with magnetic/superparamagnetic nanoparticles, this means to act as contrast agents. The design of liposomes loaded with magnetic particles, magnetoliposomes, presents a large number of possibilities depending on the application from image function to metabolism. More interesting is its double function application as theranostics (diagnostics and therapy. The synthesis, characterization, and possible medical applications of two types of magnetoliposomes are reviewed. Their performance will be compared, in particular, their efficiency as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, measured by their relaxivities r 1 and r 2 relating to their particular composition. One of the magnetoliposomes had 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (soy as the main phospholipid component, with and without cholesterol, varying its phospholipid to cholesterol molar ratios. The other formulation is a long-circulating liposome composed of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (egg, cholesterol, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoethanolamine- N -[methoxy(polyethylene glycol-2000]. Both nanosystems were loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different sizes and coatings.

  18. Imaging thiol redox status in murine tumors in vivo with rapid-scan electron paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Boris; Sundramoorthy, Subramanian V.; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Maggio, Matthew C.; Tseytlin, Mark; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Halpern, Howard J.

    2017-03-01

    Thiol redox status is an important physiologic parameter that affects the success or failure of cancer treatment. Rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance (RS EPR) is a novel technique that has shown higher signal-to-noise ratio than conventional continuous-wave EPR in in vitro studies. Here we used RS EPR to acquire rapid three-dimensional images of the thiol redox status of tumors in living mice. This work presents, for the first time, in vivo RS EPR images of the kinetics of the reaction of 2H,15N-substituted disulfide-linked dinitroxide (PxSSPx) spin probe with intracellular glutathione. The cleavage rate is proportional to the intracellular glutathione concentration. Feasibility was demonstrated in a FSa fibrosarcoma tumor model in C3H mice. Similar to other in vivo and cell model studies, decreasing intracellular glutathione concentration by treating mice with L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) markedly altered the kinetic images.

  19. Easy Leaf Area: Automated Digital Image Analysis for Rapid and Accurate Measurement of Leaf Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien Ming Easlon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Measurement of leaf areas from digital photographs has traditionally required significant user input unless backgrounds are carefully masked. Easy Leaf Area was developed to batch process hundreds of Arabidopsis rosette images in minutes, removing background artifacts and saving results to a spreadsheet-ready CSV file. Methods and Results: Easy Leaf Area uses the color ratios of each pixel to distinguish leaves and calibration areas from their background and compares leaf pixel counts to a red calibration area to eliminate the need for camera distance calculations or manual ruler scale measurement that other software methods typically require. Leaf areas estimated by this software from images taken with a camera phone were more accurate than ImageJ estimates from flatbed scanner images. Conclusions: Easy Leaf Area provides an easy-to-use method for rapid measurement of leaf area and nondestructive estimation of canopy area from digital images.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Tumor Metabolic Markers for Cancer Diagnosis, Metabolic Phenotyping, and Characterization of Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhong He

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display heterogeneous genetic characteristics, depending on the tumor dynamic microenvironment. Abnormal tumor vasculature and poor tissue oxygenation generate a fraction of hypoxic tumor cells that have selective advantages in metastasis and invasion and often resist chemo- and radiation therapies. The genetic alterations acquired by tumors modify their biochemical pathways, which results in abnormal tumor metabolism. An elevation in glycolysis known as the “Warburg effect” and changes in lipid synthesis and oxidation occur. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS has been used to study tumor metabolism in preclinical animal models and in clinical research on human breast, brain, and prostate cancers. This technique can identify specific genetic and metabolic changes that occur in malignant tumors. Therefore, the metabolic markers, detectable by MRS, not only provide information on biochemical changes but also define different metabolic tumor phenotypes. When combined with the contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, which has a high sensitivity for cancer diagnosis, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI improves the diagnostic specificity of malignant human cancers and is becoming an important clinical tool for cancer management and care. This article reviews the MRSI techniques as molecular imaging methods to detect and quantify metabolic changes in various tumor tissue types, especially in extracranial tumor tissues that contain high concentrations of fat. MRI/MRSI methods have been used to characterize tumor microenvironments in terms of blood volume and vessel permeability. Measurements of tissue oxygenation and glycolytic rates by MRS also are described to illustrate the capability of the MR technology in probing molecular information non-invasively in tumor tissues and its important potential for studying molecular mechanisms of human cancers in physiological conditions.

  1. Development of a symmetric echo planar imaging framework for clinical translation of rapid dynamic hyperpolarized 13 C imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jeremy W; Vigneron, Daniel B; Larson, Peder E Z

    2017-02-01

    To develop symmetric echo planar imaging (EPI) and a reference scan framework for hyperpolarized 13 C metabolic imaging. Symmetric, ramp-sampled EPI with partial Fourier reconstruction was implemented on a 3T scanner. The framework for acquiring a reference scan on the 1 H channel and applied to 13 C data was described and validated in both phantoms and in vivo metabolism of [1-13 C]pyruvate. Ramp-sampled, symmetric EPI provided a substantial increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the phantom experiments. The reference scan acquired on the 1 H channel yielded 13 C phantom images that varied in mean signal intensity Ramp-sampled, symmetric EPI with spectral-spatial excitation of a single metabolite provides a fast, robust, and clinically efficacious approach to acquire hyperpolarized 13 C dynamic molecular imaging data. The gains of this efficient sampling, combined with partial Fourier methods, enables large matrix sizes required for human studies. Magn Reson Med 77:826-832, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Hepatic adenomatosis: rapid sequence MR imaging following gadolinium enhancement: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brummett, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States); Burton, E.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States)]|[Dept. of Pediatrics, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States); Sabio, H. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Hepatic adenomas are primary liver tumors usually associated with underlying metabolic disease or with anabolic steroid or oral contraceptive use. Hepatic adenomatosis (HA) is defined as the presence of more than four adenomas. Only 13 cases of HA have been reported in patients without glycogen storage disease or steroid use. We report a case of HA imaged by postcontrast T1-weighted images obtained during a breath-holding series. The lesions were most conspicuous 3-4 min after contrast administration; 4 of the 5 tumors were not identified on T2-weighted images. Unlike previous reports of HA in which the lesions remained hyperintense during sequential postcontrast imaging, the smaller lesions in this case demonstrated contrast washout, thereby distinguishing them from hemangiomata. (orig.) With 3 figs., 10 refs.

  3. In situ 3D magnetic resonance metabolic imaging of microwave-irradiated rodent brain: a new tool for metabolomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Robin A; Chowdhury, Golam M I; Brown, Peter B; Rothman, Douglas L; Behar, Kevin L

    2009-04-01

    The rapid elevation in rat brain temperature achieveable with focused beam microwave irradiation (FBMI) leads to a permanent inactivation of enzymes, thereby minimizing enzyme-dependent post-mortem metabolic changes. An additional characteristic of FBMI is that the NMR properties of the tissue are close to those of the in vivo condition and remain so for at least 12 h. These features create an opportunity to develop magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging on microwave-irradiated samples into a technique with a resolution, coverage and sensitivity superior to any experiment performed directly in vivo. Furthermore, when combined with pre-FBMI infusion of (13)C-labeled substrates, like [1-(13)C]-glucose, the technique can generate maps of metabolic fluxes, like the tricarboxylic acid and glutamate-glutamine neurotransmitter cycle fluxes at an unprecedented spatial resolution.

  4. Large area super-resolution chemical imaging via rapid dithering of a nanoprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Languirand, Eric R.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2015-05-01

    Super-resolution chemical imaging via Raman spectroscopy provides a significant ability to simultaneously or pseudosimultaneously monitor numerous label-free analytes while elucidating their spatial distribution on the surface of the sample. However, spontaneous Raman is an inherently weak phenomenon making trace detection and thus superresolution imaging extremely difficult, if not impossible. To circumvent this and allow for trace detection of the few chemical species present in any sub-diffraction limited resolution element of an image, we have developed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coherent fiber-optic imaging bundle probe consisting of 30,000 individual fiber elements. When the probes are tapered, etched and coated with metal, they provide circular Raman chemical images of a sample with a field of view of approximately 20μm (i.e. diameter) via the array of 30,000 individual 50 nm fiber elements. An acousto-optic tunable filter is used to rapidly scan or select discrete frequencies for multi- or hyperspectral analysis. Although the 50nm fiber element dimensions of this probe inherently provide spatial resolutions of approximately 100nm, further increases in the spatial resolution can be achieved by using a rapid dithering process. Using this process, additional images are obtained one-half fiber diameter translations in the x- and y- planes. A piezostage drives the movement, providing the accurate and reproducible shifts required for dithering. Optimal probability algorithms are then used to deconvolute the related images producing a final image with a three-fold increase in spatial resolution. This paper describes super-resolution chemical imaging using these probes and the dithering method as well as its potential applications in label-free imaging of lipid rafts and other applications within biology and forensics.

  5. After Nearly A Decade Of Rapid Growth, Use And Complexity Of Imaging Declined, 2008-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David C; Parker, Laurence; Palit, Charles D; Rao, Vijay M

    2017-04-01

    Imaging is an important cost driver in health care, and its use grew rapidly in the early 2000s. Several studies toward the end of the decade suggested that a leveling off was beginning to occur. In this study we examined more recent data to determine whether the slowdown had continued. Our data sources were the nationwide Medicare Part B databases for the period 2001-14. We calculated utilization rates per 1,000 enrollees for all advanced imaging modalities. We also calculated professional component relative value unit (RVU) rates per 1,000 beneficiaries for all imaging modalities, as RVU values provide a measure of complexity of imaging services and may in some ways be a better reflection of the amount of work involved in imaging. We found that utilization rates and RVU rates grew substantially until 2008 and 2009, respectively, and then began to drop. The downward trend in both rates persisted through 2014. Federal policies appear to have achieved the desired effect of ending the rapid growth of imaging that had been seen in earlier years. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  6. MR diffusion imaging and MR spectroscopy of maple syrup urine disease during acute metabolic decompensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, Wajanat; Wang, Zhiyue J. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Zimmerman, Robert A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, Gerard T.; Kaplan, Paige B.; Kaye, Edward M. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism, which affects the brain tissue resulting in impairment or death if untreated. Imaging studies have shown reversible brain edema during acute metabolic decompensation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and spectroscopy findings during metabolic decompensation and to assess the value of these findings in the prediction of patient outcome. Six patients with the diagnosis of MSUD underwent conventional MR imaging with DWI during acute presentation with metabolic decompensation. Spectroscopy with long TE was performed in four of the six patients. Follow-up examinations were performed after clinical and metabolic recovery. DWI demonstrated marked restriction of proton diffusion compatible with cytotoxic or intramyelinic sheath edema in the brainstem, basal ganglia, thalami, cerebellar and periventricular white matter and the cerebral cortex. This was accompanied by the presence of an abnormal branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and branched-chain alpha-keto acids (BCKA) peak at 0.9 ppm as well as elevated lactate on proton spectroscopy in all four patients. The changes in all six patients were reversed with treatment without evidence of volume loss or persistent tissue damage. The presence of cytotoxic or intramyelinic edema as evidenced by restricted water diffusion on DWI, with the presence of lactate on spectroscopy, could imply imminent cell death. However, in the context of metabolic decompensation in MSUD, it appears that changes in cell osmolarity and metabolism can reverse completely after metabolic correction. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of rapid volume changes of substrate-adherent cells by conventional microscopy 3D imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, F; Grygorczyk, R

    2004-09-01

    Precise measurement of rapid volume changes of substrate-adherent cells is essential to understand many aspects of cell physiology, yet techniques to evaluate volume changes with sufficient precision and high temporal resolution are limited. Here, we describe a novel imaging method that surveys the rapid morphology modifications of living, substrate-adherent cells based on phase-contrast, digital video microscopy. Cells grown on a glass substrate are mounted in a custom-designed, side-viewing chamber and subjected to hypotonic swelling. Side-view images of the rapidly swelling cell, and at the end of the assay, an image of the same cell viewed from a perpendicular direction through the substrate, are acquired. Based on these images, off-line reconstruction of 3D cell morphology is performed, which precisely measures cell volume, height and surface at different points during cell volume changes. Volume evaluations are comparable to those obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (DeltaVolume microscopy without the need for cell staining or intense illumination to monitor cell volume make this system a promising new tool to investigate the fundamentals of cell volume physiology.

  8. Rapid Sequential in Situ Multiplexing with DNA Exchange Imaging in Neuronal Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Donoghue, Noah; Dai, Mingjie; Avendaño, Maier S; Schackmann, Ron C J; Zoeller, Jason J; Wang, Shan Shan H; Tillberg, Paul W; Park, Demian; Lapan, Sylvain W; Boyden, Edward S; Brugge, Joan S; Kaeser, Pascal S; Church, George M; Agasti, Sarit S; Jungmann, Ralf; Yin, Peng

    2017-10-11

    To decipher the molecular mechanisms of biological function, it is critical to map the molecular composition of individual cells or even more importantly tissue samples in the context of their biological environment in situ. Immunofluorescence (IF) provides specific labeling for molecular profiling. However, conventional IF methods have finite multiplexing capabilities due to spectral overlap of the fluorophores. Various sequential imaging methods have been developed to circumvent this spectral limit but are not widely adopted due to the common limitation of requiring multirounds of slow (typically over 2 h at room temperature to overnight at 4 °C in practice) immunostaining. We present here a practical and robust method, which we call DNA Exchange Imaging (DEI), for rapid in situ spectrally unlimited multiplexing. This technique overcomes speed restrictions by allowing for single-round immunostaining with DNA-barcoded antibodies, followed by rapid (less than 10 min) buffer exchange of fluorophore-bearing DNA imager strands. The programmability of DEI allows us to apply it to diverse microscopy platforms (with Exchange Confocal, Exchange-SIM, Exchange-STED, and Exchange-PAINT demonstrated here) at multiple desired resolution scales (from ∼300 nm down to sub-20 nm). We optimized and validated the use of DEI in complex biological samples, including primary neuron cultures and tissue sections. These results collectively suggest DNA exchange as a versatile, practical platform for rapid, highly multiplexed in situ imaging, potentially enabling new applications ranging from basic science, to drug discovery, and to clinical pathology.

  9. The Impact of Rapid Weight Loss on Oxidative Stress Markers and the Expression of the Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Tumova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obesity is linked with a state of increased oxidative stress, which plays an important role in the etiology of atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of rapid weight loss on oxidative stress markers in obese individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS. Design and Methods. We measured oxidative stress markers in 40 obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS+, 40 obese subjects without metabolic syndrome (MetS−, and 20 lean controls (LC at baseline and after three months of very low caloric diet. Results. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL levels decreased by 12% in MetS+ subjects, associated with a reduction in total cholesterol (TC, even after adjustment for age and sex. Lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2 activity decreased by 4.7% in MetS+ subjects, associated with a drop in LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C, TC, and insulin levels. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that a model including ox-LDL, LpPLA2 activity, and myeloperoxidase (MPO improved prediction of MetS status among obese individuals compared to each oxidative stress marker alone. Conclusions. Oxidative stress markers were predictive of MetS in obese subjects, suggesting a higher oxidative stress. Rapid weight loss resulted in a decline in oxidative stress markers, especially in MetS+ patients.

  10. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic activities in live mammalian hippocampal tissues with stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fanghao; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Wei, Lu; Morrison, Barclay; Min, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Brain is an immensely complex system displaying dynamic and heterogeneous metabolic activities. Visualizing cellular metabolism of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids in brain with chemical specificity has been a long-standing challenge. Recent development in metabolic labeling of small biomolecules allows the study of these metabolisms at the global level. However, these techniques generally require nonphysiological sample preparation for either destructive mass spectrometry imaging or secondary labeling with relatively bulky fluorescent labels. In this study, we have demonstrated bioorthogonal chemical imaging of DNA, RNA, protein and lipid metabolism in live rat brain hippocampal tissues by coupling stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with integrated deuterium and alkyne labeling. Heterogeneous metabolic incorporations for different molecular species and neurogenesis with newly-incorporated DNA were observed in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus at the single cell level. We further applied this platform to study metabolic responses to traumatic brain injury in hippocampal slice cultures, and observed marked upregulation of protein and lipid metabolism particularly in the hilus region of the hippocampus within days of mechanical injury. Thus, our method paves the way for the study of complex metabolic profiles in live brain tissue under both physiological and pathological conditions with single-cell resolution and minimal perturbation.

  11. Imaging inflammation in mouse colon using a rapid stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldua, Meagan A; Olsovsky, Cory A; Callaway, Evelyn S; Chapkin, Robert S; Maitland, Kristen C

    2012-01-01

    Large area confocal microscopy may provide fast, high-resolution image acquisition for evaluation of tissue in pre-clinical studies with reduced tissue processing in comparison to histology. We present a rapid beam and stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope to image cellular and tissue features along the length of the entire excised mouse colon. The beam is scanned at 8,333 lines/sec by a polygon scanning mirror while the specimen is scanned in the orthogonal axis by a motorized translation stage with a maximum speed of 7 mm/sec. A single 1 × 60 mm(2) field of view image spanning the length of the mouse colon is acquired in 10 s. Z-projection images generated from axial image stacks allow high resolution imaging of the surface of non-flat specimens. In contrast to the uniform size, shape, and distribution of colon crypts in confocal images of normal colon, confocal images of chronic bowel inflammation exhibit heterogeneous tissue structure with localized severe crypt distortion.

  12. Rapid visuomotor processing of phobic images in spider- and snake-fearful participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkamp, Anke; Schmidt, Filipp; Schmidt, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates enhanced visuomotor processing of phobic compared to fear-relevant and neutral stimuli. We used a response priming design to measure rapid, automatic motor activation by natural images (spiders, snakes, mushrooms, and flowers) in spider-fearful, snake-fearful, and control participants. We found strong priming effects in all tasks and conditions; however, results showed marked differences between groups. Most importantly, in the group of spider-fearful individuals, spider pictures had a strong and specific influence on even the fastest motor responses: Phobic primes entailed the largest priming effects, and phobic targets accelerated responses, both effects indicating speeded response activation by phobic images. In snake-fearful participants, this processing enhancement for phobic material was less pronounced and extended to both snake and spider images. We conclude that spider phobia leads to enhanced processing capacity for phobic images. We argue that this is enabled by long-term perceptual learning processes. © 2013.

  13. Rapid mapping of digital integrated circuit logic gates via multi-spectral backside imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Adato, Ronen; Zangeneh, Mahmoud; Zhou, Boyou; Joshi, Ajay; Goldberg, Bennett; Unlu, M Selim

    2016-01-01

    Modern semiconductor integrated circuits are increasingly fabricated at untrusted third party foundries. There now exist myriad security threats of malicious tampering at the hardware level and hence a clear and pressing need for new tools that enable rapid, robust and low-cost validation of circuit layouts. Optical backside imaging offers an attractive platform, but its limited resolution and throughput cannot cope with the nanoscale sizes of modern circuitry and the need to image over a large area. We propose and demonstrate a multi-spectral imaging approach to overcome these obstacles by identifying key circuit elements on the basis of their spectral response. This obviates the need to directly image the nanoscale components that define them, thereby relaxing resolution and spatial sampling requirements by 1 and 2 - 4 orders of magnitude respectively. Our results directly address critical security needs in the integrated circuit supply chain and highlight the potential of spectroscopic techniques to addres...

  14. In vivo metabolic imaging of mouse tumor models in response to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, Maria M.; Dudenkova, Varvara; Shumilova, Anastasia V.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate energy metabolism in human cervical cancer cells HeLa Kyoto after chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo using two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM). Cellular metabolism was examined by monitoring of the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD. Cancer metabolism was analyzed in dynamics after treatment with cisplatin. Two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopies as well as standard histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin were used to characterize cancer tissue structure. We showed an increase of the optical redox ratio FAD/NAD(P)H in cancer cells in vitro and decrease of the relative contribution of free NAD(P)H (ɑ1) in vitro and in vivo, which presumably indicate a shift to more oxidative metabolism after chemotherapy. These data demonstrate the possibility to detect response of cancer cells to chemotherapy using optical metabolic imaging.

  15. On-site Rapid Diagnosis of Intracranial Hematoma using Portable Multi-slice Microwave Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobashsher, Ahmed Toaha; Abbosh, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Rapid, on-the-spot diagnostic and monitoring systems are vital for the survival of patients with intracranial hematoma, as their conditions drastically deteriorate with time. To address the limited accessibility, high costs and static structure of currently used MRI and CT scanners, a portable non-invasive multi-slice microwave imaging system is presented for accurate 3D localization of hematoma inside human head. This diagnostic system provides fast data acquisition and imaging compared to the existing systems by means of a compact array of low-profile, unidirectional antennas with wideband operation. The 3D printed low-cost and portable system can be installed in an ambulance for rapid on-site diagnosis by paramedics. In this paper, the multi-slice head imaging system’s operating principle is numerically analysed and experimentally validated on realistic head phantoms. Quantitative analyses demonstrate that the multi-slice head imaging system is able to generate better quality reconstructed images providing 70% higher average signal to clutter ratio, 25% enhanced maximum signal to clutter ratio and with around 60% hematoma target localization compared to the previous head imaging systems. Nevertheless, numerical and experimental results demonstrate that previous reported 2D imaging systems are vulnerable to localization error, which is overcome in the presented multi-slice 3D imaging system. The non-ionizing system, which uses safe levels of very low microwave power, is also tested on human subjects. Results of realistic phantom and subjects demonstrate the feasibility of the system in future preclinical trials.

  16. A rapid method for creating qualitative images indicative of thick oil emulsion on the ocean's surface from imaging spectrometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, K. Eric; Swayze, Gregg A.; Leifer, Ira; McCubbin, Ian B.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Green, Robert O.; Lundeen, Sarah R.; Sarture, Charles M.; Steele, Denis; Ryan, Thomas; Bradley, Eliza S.; Roberts, Dar A.; ,

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a method to create color-composite images indicative of thick oil:water emulsions on the surface of clear, deep ocean water by using normalized difference ratios derived from remotely sensed data collected by an imaging spectrometer. The spectral bands used in the normalized difference ratios are located in wavelength regions where the spectra of thick oil:water emulsions on the ocean's surface have a distinct shape compared to clear water and clouds. In contrast to quantitative analyses, which require rigorous conversion to reflectance, the method described is easily computed and can be applied rapidly to radiance data or data that have been atmospherically corrected or ground-calibrated to reflectance. Examples are shown of the method applied to Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer data collected May 17 and May 19, 2010, over the oil spill from the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil drilling platform in the Gulf of Mexico.

  17. Rapid imaging of free radicals in vivo using hybrid FISP field-cycled PEDRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngdee, Wiwat; Lurie, David J.; Foster, Margaret A.

    2002-04-01

    A new pulse sequence for rapid imaging of free radicals is presented which combines snapshot imaging methods and conventional field-cycled proton electron double resonance imaging (FC-PEDRI). The new sequence allows the number of EPR irradiation periods to be optimized to obtain an acceptable SNR and spatial resolution of free radical distribution in the final image while reducing the RF power deposition and increasing the temporal resolution. Centric reordered phase encoding has been employed to counter the problem of rapid decay of the Overhauser-enhanced signal. A phase-correction scheme has also been used to correct problems arising from instability of the magnetic field following field-cycling. In vivo experiments were carried out using triaryl methyl free radical contrast agent, injected at a dose of 0.214 mmol kg-1 body weight in anaesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Transaxial images through the abdomen were collected using 1, 2, 4 and 8 EPR irradiation periods. Using 4 EPR irradiation periods it was possible to generate free radical distributions of acceptable SNR and resolution. The EPR power deposition is reduced by a factor of 16 and the acquisition time is reduced by a factor of 4 compared to an acquisition using the conventional FC-PEDRI pulse sequence.

  18. Novel Applications of Rapid Prototyping in Gamma-ray and X-ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian W.; Moore, Jared W.; Gehm, Michael E.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in 3D rapid-prototyping printers, 3D modeling software, and casting techniques allow for the fabrication of cost-effective, custom components in gamma-ray and x-ray imaging systems. Applications extend to new fabrication methods for custom collimators, pinholes, calibration and resolution phantoms, mounting and shielding components, and imaging apertures. Details of the fabrication process for these components are presented, specifically the 3D printing process, cold casting with a tungsten epoxy, and lost-wax casting in platinum. PMID:22984341

  19. A rapid method for counting nucleated erythrocytes on stained blood smears by digital image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, E.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    Measures of parasitemia by intraerythrocytic hematozoan parasites are normally expressed as the number of infected erythrocytes per n erythrocytes and are notoriously tedious and time consuming to measure. We describe a protocol for generating rapid counts of nucleated erythrocytes from digital micrographs of thin blood smears that can be used to estimate intensity of hematozoan infections in nonmammalian vertebrate hosts. This method takes advantage of the bold contrast and relatively uniform size and morphology of erythrocyte nuclei on Giemsa-stained blood smears and uses ImageJ, a java-based image analysis program developed at the U.S. National Institutes of Health and available on the internet, to recognize and count these nuclei. This technique makes feasible rapid and accurate counts of total erythrocytes in large numbers of microscope fields, which can be used in the calculation of peripheral parasitemias in low-intensity infections.

  20. "Slave" metabolites and enzymes. A rapid way of delineating metabolic control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teusink, B.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2000-01-01

    Although control of fluxes and concentrations tends to be distributed rather than confined to a single rate-limiting enzyme, the extent of control can differ widely between enzymes in a metabolic network. In some cases, there are enzymes that lack control completely. This paper identifies one

  1. Cerebral O2 metabolism and cerebral blood flow in humans during deep and rapid-eye-movement sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Wildschiødtz, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    It could be expected that the various stages of sleep were reflected in variation of the overall level of cerebral activity and thereby in the magnitude of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The elusive nature of sleep imposes major methodological restrictions...... on examination of this question. We have now measured CBF and CMRO2 in young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness, deep sleep (stage 3/4), and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep as verified by standard polysomnography...

  2. A rapid and robust gradient measurement technique using dynamic single-point imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyungseok; McMillan, Alan B

    2017-09-01

    We propose a new gradient measurement technique based on dynamic single-point imaging (SPI), which allows simple, rapid, and robust measurement of k-space trajectory. To enable gradient measurement, we utilize the variable field-of-view (FOV) property of dynamic SPI, which is dependent on gradient shape. First, one-dimensional (1D) dynamic SPI data are acquired from a targeted gradient axis, and then relative FOV scaling factors between 1D images or k-spaces at varying encoding times are found. These relative scaling factors are the relative k-space position that can be used for image reconstruction. The gradient measurement technique also can be used to estimate the gradient impulse response function for reproducible gradient estimation as a linear time invariant system. The proposed measurement technique was used to improve reconstructed image quality in 3D ultrashort echo, 2D spiral, and multi-echo bipolar gradient-echo imaging. In multi-echo bipolar gradient-echo imaging, measurement of the k-space trajectory allowed the use of a ramp-sampled trajectory for improved acquisition speed (approximately 30%) and more accurate quantitative fat and water separation in a phantom. The proposed dynamic SPI-based method allows fast k-space trajectory measurement with a simple implementation and no additional hardware for improved image quality. Magn Reson Med 78:950-962, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Effects of Rapid Weight Loss on Systemic and Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Metabolism in Obese Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, José O; Iyengar, Neil M; Walker, Jeanne M; Milne, Ginger L; Da Rosa, Joel Correa; Liang, Yupu; Giri, Dilip D; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Pollak, Michael N; Hudis, Clifford A; Breslow, Jan L; Holt, Peter R; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is associated with subclinical white adipose tissue inflammation, as defined by the presence of crown-like structures (CLSs) consisting of dead or dying adipocytes encircled by macrophages. In humans, bariatric surgery-induced weight loss leads to a decrease in CLSs, but the effects of rapid diet-induced weight loss on CLSs and metabolism are unclear. To determine the effects of rapid very-low-calorie diet-induced weight loss on CLS density, systemic biomarkers of inflammation, and metabolism in obese postmenopausal women. Prospective cohort study. Rockefeller University Hospital, New York, NY. Ten obese, postmenopausal women with a mean age of 60.6 years (standard deviation, ±3.6 years). Effects on CLS density and gene expression in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, cardiometabolic risk factors, white blood count, circulating metabolites, and oxidative stress (urinary isoprostane-M) were measured. Obese subjects lost approximately 10% body weight over a mean of 46 days. CLS density increased in subcutaneous adipose tissue without an associated increase in proinflammatory gene expression. Weight loss was accompanied by decreased fasting blood levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, glucose, lactate, and kynurenine, and increased circulating levels of free fatty acids, glycerol, β-hydroxybutyrate, and 25 hydroxyvitamin D. Levels of urinary isoprostane-M declined. Rapid weight loss stimulated lipolysis and an increase in CLS density in subcutaneous adipose tissue in association with changes in levels of circulating metabolites, and improved systemic biomarkers of inflammation and insulin resistance. The observed change in levels of metabolites (i.e., lactate, β-hydroxybutyrate, 25 hydroxyvitamin D) may contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect of rapid weight loss.

  4. Development of a Rapid Microbore Metabolic Profiling Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Approach for High-Throughput Phenotyping Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Nicola; Adesina-Georgiadis, Kyrillos; Chekmeneva, Elena; Plumb, Robert S; Wilson, Ian D; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2016-06-07

    A rapid gradient microbore ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) method has been developed to provide a high-throughput analytical platform for the metabolic phenotyping of urine from large sample cohorts. The rapid microbore metabolic profiling (RAMMP) approach was based on scaling a conventional reversed-phase UPLC-MS method for urinary profiling from 2.1 mm × 100 mm columns to 1 mm × 50 mm columns, increasing the linear velocity of the solvent, and decreasing the gradient time to provide an analysis time of 2.5 min/sample. Comparison showed that conventional UPLC-MS and rapid gradient approaches provided peak capacities of 150 and 50, respectively, with the conventional method detecting approximately 19 000 features compared to the ∼6 000 found using the rapid gradient method. Similar levels of repeatability were seen for both methods. Despite the reduced peak capacity and the reduction in ions detected, the RAMMP method was able to achieve similar levels of group discrimination as conventional UPLC-MS when applied to rat urine samples obtained from investigative studies on the effects of acute 2-bromophenol and chronic acetaminophen administration. When compared to a direct infusion MS method of similar analysis time the RAMMP method provided superior selectivity. The RAMMP approach provides a robust and sensitive method that is well suited to high-throughput metabonomic analysis of complex mixtures such as urine combined with a 5-fold reduction in analysis time compared with the conventional UPLC-MS method.

  5. Investigating the Feasibility of Rapid MRI for Image-Guided Motion Management in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sawant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner. A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter, tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter, tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  6. Hyperspectral Imaging as a Rapid Quality Control Method for Herbal Tea Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majolie Djokam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa, indigenous herbal teas are enjoyed due to their distinct taste and aroma. The acclaimed health benefits of herbal teas include the management of chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Quality control of herbal teas has become important due to the availability of different brands of varying quality and the production of tea blends. The potential of hyperspectral imaging as a rapid quality control method for herbal tea blends from rooibos (Aspalathus linearis, honeybush (Cyclopia intermedia, buchu (Agathosma Betulina and cancerbush (Sutherlandia frutescens was investigated. Hyperspectral images of raw materials and intact tea bags were acquired using a sisuChema shortwave infrared (SWIR hyperspectral pushbroom imaging system (920–2514 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA plots showed clear discrimination between raw materials. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA models correctly predicted the raw material constituents of each blend and accurately determined the relative proportions. The results were corroborated independently using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS. This study demonstrated the application of hyperspectral imaging coupled with chemometric modelling as a reliable, rapid and non-destructive quality control method for authenticating herbal tea blends and to determine relative proportions in a tea bag.

  7. Rapid transcriptional and metabolic regulation of the deacclimation process in cold acclimated Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagter, Majken; Alpers, Jessica; Erban, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During low temperature exposure, temperate plant species increase their freezing tolerance in a process termed cold acclimation. This is accompanied by dampened oscillations of circadian clock genes and disrupted oscillations of output genes and metabolites. During deacclimation...... in response to warm temperatures, cold acclimated plants lose freezing tolerance and resume growth and development. While considerable effort has been directed toward understanding the molecular and metabolic basis of cold acclimation, much less information is available about the regulation of deacclimation....... RESULTS: We report metabolic (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) and transcriptional (microarrays, quantitative RT-PCR) responses underlying deacclimation during the first 24 h after a shift of Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia-0) plants cold acclimated at 4 °C back to warm temperature (20 °C). The data...

  8. Rapid Revival of a Patient after very Severe Metabolic Acidosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Ahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic acidosis is a fatal finding in trauma patients thatcomplicates the process of resuscitation.Case: The case was a 37-year-old man with open fracture in both legs and fracturein second lumbar vertebral (L2. The serial arterial blood gas (ABG test resultsshowed a pH value of 6.7 indicating a very severe and special case of metabolicacidosis. The rate of mortality for such a case was very high. The patient wastreated with sodium bicarbonate and successfully revived after four hours posttreatment and metabolic acidosis was resolved.Conclusion: This indicated that bicarbonate administration is useful for verysevere cases. The good condition of the patient after survival from the severeacademia allowed for extubation.

  9. Functional Imaging of Dolphin Brain Metabolism and Blood Flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ridgway, Sam; Finneran, James; Carder, Don; Keogh, Mandy; Van Bonn, William; Smith, Cynthia; Scadeng, Miriam; Dubowitz, David; Mattrey, Robert; Hoh, Carl

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the first use of magnetic resonance images (MRls) of living dolphins to register functional brain scans, allowing for the exploration of potential mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep...

  10. The method of parallel-hierarchical transformation for rapid recognition of dynamic images using GPGPU technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timchenko, Leonid; Yarovyi, Andrii; Kokriatskaya, Nataliya; Nakonechna, Svitlana; Abramenko, Ludmila; Ławicki, Tomasz; Popiel, Piotr; Yesmakhanova, Laura

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents a method of parallel-hierarchical transformations for rapid recognition of dynamic images using GPU technology. Direct parallel-hierarchical transformations based on cluster CPU-and GPU-oriented hardware platform. Mathematic models of training of the parallel hierarchical (PH) network for the transformation are developed, as well as a training method of the PH network for recognition of dynamic images. This research is most topical for problems on organizing high-performance computations of super large arrays of information designed to implement multi-stage sensing and processing as well as compaction and recognition of data in the informational structures and computer devices. This method has such advantages as high performance through the use of recent advances in parallelization, possibility to work with images of ultra dimension, ease of scaling in case of changing the number of nodes in the cluster, auto scan of local network to detect compute nodes.

  11. Hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurd, Ralph E.; Yen, Yi‐Fen; Chen, Albert

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the basic physics of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution‐DNP), and the impact of the resulting highly nonequilibrium spin states, on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection. The hardware requirements for clinical translation of this techn......This article describes the basic physics of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution‐DNP), and the impact of the resulting highly nonequilibrium spin states, on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection. The hardware requirements for clinical translation...

  12. ReagentTF: a rapid and versatile optical clearing method for biological imaging(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tingting; Zhu, Jingtan; Li, Yusha; Qi, Yisong; Xu, Jianyi; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan

    2017-02-01

    The emergence of various optical clearing methods provides a great potential for imaging deep inside tissues by combining with multiple-labelling and microscopic imaging techniques. They were generally developed for specific imaging demand thus presented some non-negligible limitations such as long incubation time, tissue deformation, fluorescence quenching, incompatibility with immunostaining or lipophilic tracers. In this study, we developed a rapid and versatile clearing method, termed ReagentTF, for deep imaging of various fluorescent samples. This method can not only efficiently clear embryos, neonatal whole-brains and adult thick brain sections by simple immersion in aqueous mixtures with minimal volume change, but also can preserve fluorescence of various fluorescent proteins and simultaneously be compatible with immunostaining and lipophilic neuronal dyes. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in reconstructing the cell distributions of mouse hippocampus, visualizing the neural projection from CA1 (Cornu Ammonis 1) to HDB (nucleus of the horizontal limb of the diagonal band), and observing the growth of forelimb plexus in whole-mount embryos. These results suggest that ReagentTF is useful for large-volume imaging and will be an option for the deep imaging of biological tissues.

  13. A rapid automatic analyzer and its methodology for effective bentonite content based on image recognition technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Long

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fast and accurate determination of effective bentonite content in used clay bonded sand is very important for selecting the correct mixing ratio and mixing process to obtain high-performance molding sand. Currently, the effective bentonite content is determined by testing the ethylene blue absorbed in used clay bonded sand, which is usually a manual operation with some disadvantages including complicated process, long testing time and low accuracy. A rapid automatic analyzer of the effective bentonite content in used clay bonded sand was developed based on image recognition technology. The instrument consists of auto stirring, auto liquid removal, auto titration, step-rotation and image acquisition components, and processor. The principle of the image recognition method is first to decompose the color images into three-channel gray images based on the photosensitive degree difference of the light blue and dark blue in the three channels of red, green and blue, then to make the gray values subtraction calculation and gray level transformation of the gray images, and finally, to extract the outer circle light blue halo and the inner circle blue spot and calculate their area ratio. The titration process can be judged to reach the end-point while the area ratio is higher than the setting value.

  14. Rapid Texture Optimization of Three-Dimensional Urban Model Based on Oblique Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weilong; Li, Ming; Guo, Bingxuan; Li, Deren; Guo, Ge

    2017-04-20

    Seamless texture mapping is one of the key technologies for photorealistic 3D texture reconstruction. In this paper, a method of rapid texture optimization of 3D urban reconstruction based on oblique images is proposed aiming at the existence of texture fragments, seams, and inconsistency of color in urban 3D texture mapping based on low-altitude oblique images. First, we explore implementing radiation correction on the experimental images with a radiation procession algorithm. Then, an efficient occlusion detection algorithm based on OpenGL is proposed according to the mapping relation between the terrain triangular mesh surface and the images to implement the occlusion detection of the visible texture on the triangular facets as well as create a list of visible images. Finally, a texture clustering algorithm is put forward based on Markov Random Field utilizing the inherent attributes of the images and solve the energy function minimization by Graph-Cuts. The experimental results display that the method is capable of decreasing the existence of texture fragments, seams, and inconsistency of color in the 3D texture model reconstruction.

  15. Evidence of co-metabolic bentazone transformation by methanotrophic enrichment from a groundwater-fed rapid sand filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde J; Deliniere, Hélène; Prasse, Carsten; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2018-02-01

    The herbicide bentazone is recalcitrant in aquifers and is therefore frequently detected in wells used for drinking water production. However, bentazone degradation has been observed in filter sand from a rapid sand filter at a waterworks with methane-rich groundwater. Here, the association between methane oxidation and removal of bentazone was investigated with a methanotrophic enrichment culture derived from methane-fed column reactors inoculated with that filter sand. Several independent lines of evidence obtained from microcosm experiments with the methanotrophic enrichment culture, tap water and bentazone at concentrations below 2 mg/L showed methanotrophic co-metabolic bentazone transformation: The culture removed 53% of the bentazone in 21 days in presence of 5 mg/L of methane, while only 31% was removed in absence of methane. Addition of acetylene inhibited methane oxidation and stopped bentazone removal. The presence of bentazone partly inhibited methane oxidation since the methane consumption rate was significantly lower at high (1 mg/L) than at low (1 μg/L) bentazone concentrations. The transformation yield of methane relative to bentazone normalized by their concentration ratio ranged from 58 to 158, well within the range for methanotrophic co-metabolic degradation of trace contaminants calculated from the literature, with normalized substrate preferences varying from 3 to 400. High-resolution mass spectrometry revealed formation of the transformation products (TPs) 6-OH, 8-OH, isopropyl-OH and di-OH-bentazone, with higher abundances of all TPs in the presence of methane. Overall, we found a suite of evidence all showing that bentazone was co-metabolically transformed to hydroxy-bentazone by a methanotrophic culture enriched from a rapid sand filter at a waterworks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid Countermeasure Discovery against Francisella tularensis Based on a Metabolic Network Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    a given drug target. First, the selection of a subset of genes deemed to be essential for bacterial survival overlooks non-essential genes that may... Salmonella typhimurium during host-pathogen interaction. BMC Syst Biol 3: 38. 19. Shen Y, Liu J, Estiu G, Isin B, Ahn YY, et al. (2010) Blueprint for...and Medicine 48: 330–333. 69. Mosmann T (1983) Rapid colorimetric assay for cellular growth and survival : application to proliferation and

  17. Simultaneous water activation and glucose metabolic rate imaging with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Reader, Andrew J

    2013-02-07

    A novel imaging and signal separation strategy is proposed to be able to separate [(18)F]FDG and multiple [(15)O]H(2)O signals from a simultaneously acquired dynamic PET acquisition of the two tracers. The technique is based on the fact that the dynamics of the two tracers are very distinct. By adopting an appropriate bolus injection strategy and by defining tailored sets of basis functions that model either the FDG or water component, it is possible to separate the FDG and water signal. The basis functions are inspired from the spectral analysis description of dynamic PET studies and are defined as the convolution of estimated generating functions (GFs) with a set of decaying exponential functions. The GFs are estimated from the overall measured head curve, while the decaying exponential functions are pre-determined. In this work, the time activity curves (TACs) are modelled post-reconstruction but the model can be incorporated in a global 4D reconstruction strategy. Extensive PET simulation studies are performed considering single [(18)F]FDG and 6 [(15)O]H(2)O bolus injections for a total acquisition time of 75 min. The proposed method is evaluated at multiple noise levels and different parameters were estimated such as [(18)F]FDG uptake and blood flow estimated from the [(15)O]H(2)O component, requiring a full dynamic analysis of the two components, static images of [(18)F]FDG and the water components as well as [(15)O]H(2)O activation. It is shown that the resulting images and parametric values in ROIs are comparable to images obtained from separate imaging, illustrating the feasibility of simultaneous imaging of [(18)F]FDG and [(15)O]H(2)O components.

  18. Potential of fermentation profiling via rapid measurement of amino acid metabolism by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalluge, Joseph J; Smith, Sean; Sanchez-Riera, Fernando; McGuire, Chris; Hobson, Russell

    2004-07-16

    Monitoring amino acid metabolism during fermentation has significant potential from the standpoint of strain selection, optimizing growth and production in host strains, and profiling microbial metabolism and growth state. A method has been developed based on rapid quantification of underivatized amino acids using liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to monitor the metabolism of 20 amino acids during microbial fermentation. The use of a teicoplanin-based chiral stationary phase coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry allows complete amino acid analyses in less than 4 min. Quantification is accomplished using five isotopically labeled amino acids as internal standards. Because comprehensive chromatographic separation and derivatization are not required, analysis time is significantly less than traditional reversed- or normal-phase LC-based amino acid assays. Intra-sample precisions for amino acid measurements in fermentation supernatants using this method average 4.9% (R.S.D.). Inter-day (inter-fermentation) precisions for individual amino acid measurements range from 4.2 to 129% (R.S.D.). Calibration curves are linear over the range 0-300 microg/ml, and detection limits are estimated at 50-450 ng/ml. Data visualization techniques for constructing semi-quantitative fermentation profiles of nitrogen source utilization have also been developed and implemented, and demonstrate that amino acid profiles generally correlate with observed growth profiles. Further, cellular growth events, such as lag-time and cell lysis can be detected using this methodology. Correlation coefficients for the time profiles of each amino acid measured illustrate that while several amino acids are differentially metabolized in similar fermentations, a select group of amino acids display strong correlations in these samples, indicating a sub-population of analytes that may be most useful for fermentation profiling.

  19. Multimodal imaging documentation of rapid evolution of retinal changes in handheld laser-induced maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhrami-Gavazi, Elona; Lee, Winston; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Kayserman, Larisa; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Freund, K Bailey

    2015-01-01

    To use multimodal imaging to document the relatively rapid clinical evolution of handheld laser-induced maculopathy (HLIM). To demonstrate that inadvertent ocular injury can result from devices mislabeled with respect to their power specifications. The clinical course of a 17-year-old male who sustained self-inflicted, central macular damage from a 20-25 s direct stare at a red-spectrum, handheld laser pointer ordered from an internet retailer is provided. Retrospective review of multimodal imaging that includes fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, MultiColor reflectance, eye-tracked spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), fundus autofluorescence, and microperimetry is used to describe the evolving clinical manifestations of HLIM in the first 3 months. Curvilinear bands of dense hyperreflectivity extending from the outer retina and following the Henle fibers were seen on SD-OCT immediately after injury. This characteristic appearance had largely resolved by 2 weeks. There was significant non-uniformity in the morphological characteristics of HLIM lesions between autofluorescence and reflectance images. The pattern of lesion evolution was also significantly different between imaging modalities. Analysis of the laser device showed its wavelength to be correctly listed, but the power was found to be 102.5-105 mW, as opposed to the laser -induced maculopathy, this finding can undergo rapid resolution in the span of several days. In the absence of this finding, other multimodal imaging clues and a careful history may aid in recognizing this diagnosis. A greater awareness regarding inaccurate labeling on some of these devices could help reduce the frequency of this preventable entity.

  20. Brain activity-based image classification from rapid serial visual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdely-Shamlo, Nima; Vankov, Andrey; Ramirez, Rey R; Makeig, Scott

    2008-10-01

    We report the design and performance of a brain-computer interface (BCI) system for real-time single-trial binary classification of viewed images based on participant-specific dynamic brain response signatures in high-density (128-channel) electroencephalographic (EEG) data acquired during a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task. Image clips were selected from a broad area image and presented in rapid succession (12/s) in 4.1-s bursts. Participants indicated by subsequent button press whether or not each burst of images included a target airplane feature. Image clip creation and search path selection were designed to maximize user comfort and maintain user awareness of spatial context. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to extract a set of independent source time-courses and their minimally-redundant low-dimensional informative features in the time and time-frequency amplitude domains from 128-channel EEG data recorded during clip burst presentations in a training session. The naive Bayes fusion of two Fisher discriminant classifiers, computed from the 100 most discriminative time and time-frequency features, respectively, was used to estimate the likelihood that each clip contained a target feature. This estimator was applied online in a subsequent test session. Across eight training/test session pairs from seven participants, median area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, by tenfold cross validation, was 0.97 for within-session and 0.87 for between-session estimates, and was nearly as high (0.83) for targets presented in bursts that participants mistakenly reported to include no target features.

  1. Rapid intracerebroventricular delivery of Cu-DOTA-etanercept after peripheral administration demonstrated by PET imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoyuan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytokines interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF, and the cytokine blocker interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, all have been demonstrated to enter the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF following peripheral administration. Recent reports of rapid clinical improvement in patients with Alzheimer's disease and related forms of dementia following perispinal administration of etanercept, a TNF antagonist, suggest that etanercept also has the ability to reach the brain CSF. To investigate, etanercept was labeled with a positron emitter to enable visualization of its intracranial distribution following peripheral administration by PET in an animal model. Findings Radiolabeling of etanercept with the PET emitter 64Cu was performed by DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N",N"'-tetraacetic acid conjugation of etanercept, followed by column purification and 64Cu labeling. MicroPET imaging revealed accumulation of 64Cu-DOTA-etanercept within the lateral and third cerebral ventricles within minutes of peripheral perispinal administration in a normal rat anesthesized with isoflurane anesthesia, with concentration within the choroid plexus and into the CSF. Conclusion Synthesis of 64Cu-DOTA-etanercept enabled visualization of its intracranial distribution by microPET imaging. MicroPET imaging documented rapid accumulation of 64Cu-DOTA-etanercept within the choroid plexus and the cerebrospinal fluid within the cerebral ventricles of a living rat after peripheral administration. Further study of the effects of etanercept and TNF at the level of the choroid plexus may yield valuable insights into the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. The Java Image Science Toolkit (JIST) for Rapid Prototyping and Publishing of Neuroimaging Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Blake C.; Bogovic, John A.; Carass, Aaron; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Prince, Jerry L.; Pham, Dzung

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive neuroimaging techniques enable extraordinarily sensitive and specific in vivo study of the structure, functional response and connectivity of biological mechanisms. With these advanced methods comes a heavy reliance on computer-based processing, analysis and interpretation. While the neuroimaging community has produced many excellent academic and commercial tool packages, new tools are often required to interpret new modalities and paradigms. Developing custom tools and ensuring interoperability with existing tools is a significant hurdle. To address these limitations, we present a new framework for algorithm development that implicitly ensures tool interoperability, generates graphical user interfaces, provides advanced batch processing tools, and, most importantly, requires minimal additional programming or computational overhead. Java-based rapid prototyping with this system is an efficient and practical approach to evaluate new algorithms since the proposed system ensures that rapidly constructed prototypes are actually fully-functional processing modules with support for multiple GUI's, a broad range of file formats, and distributed computation. Herein, we demonstrate MRI image processing with the proposed system for cortical surface extraction in large cross-sectional cohorts, provide a system for fully automated diffusion tensor image analysis, and illustrate how the system can be used as a simulation framework for the development of a new image analysis method. The system is released as open source under the Lesser GNU Public License (LGPL) through the Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC). PMID:20077162

  3. Rapid and Quantitative Assessment of Cancer Treatment Response Using In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Current assessment of orthotopic tumor models in animals utilizes survival as the primary therapeutic end point. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating antineoplastic therapies [1 ]. Using human tumor cell lines constitutively expressing luciferase, the kinetics of tumor growth and response to therapy have been assessed in intraperitoneal [2], subcutaneous, and intravascular [3] cancer models. However, use of this approach for evaluating orthotopic tumor models has not been demonstrated. In this report, the ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth and therapeuticinduced cell kill of orthotopic rat brain tumors derived from 9L gliosarcoma cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase (9LLuc was investigated. Intracerebral tumor burden was monitored over time by quantitation of photon emission and tumor volume using a cryogenically cooled CCD camera and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, respectively. There was excellent correlation (r=0.91 between detected photons and tumor volume. A quantitative comparison of tumor cell kill determined from serial MRI volume measurements and BLI photon counts following 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU treatment revealed that both imaging modalities yielded statistically similar cell kill values (P=.951. These results provide direct validation of BLI imaging as a powerful and quantitative tool for the assessment of antineoplastic therapies in living animals.

  4. Computationally rapid method of estimating signal-to-noise ratio for phased array image reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Curtis N; Kisch, Shawn J; Willig-Onwuachi, Jacob D; McKenzie, Charles A

    2011-10-01

    Measuring signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for parallel MRI reconstructions is difficult due to spatially dependent noise amplification. Existing approaches for measuring parallel MRI SNR are limited because they are not applicable to all reconstructions, require significant computation time, or rely on repeated image acquisitions. A new SNR estimation approach is proposed, a hybrid of the repeated image acquisitions method detailed in the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) standard and the Monte Carlo based pseudo-multiple replica method, in which the difference between images reconstructed from the unaltered acquired data and that same data reconstructed after the addition of calibrated pseudo-noise is used to estimate the noise in the parallel MRI image reconstruction. This new noise estimation method can be used to rapidly compute the pixel-wise SNR of the image generated from any parallel MRI reconstruction of a single acquisition. SNR maps calculated with the new method are validated against existing SNR calculation techniques. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Development of a time-gated fluorescence lifetime microscope for in vivo corneal metabolic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana F.; Batista, Ana; Castejón, Olga C.; Quadrado, Maria João.; Domingues, José Paulo; Morgado, Miguel

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic imaging can be a valuable tool in the early diagnosis of corneal diseases. Cell metabolic changes can be assessed through non-invasive optical methods due to the autofluorescence of metabolic co-factors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Both molecules exhibit double exponential fluorescence decays, with well-separated short and long lifetime components, which are related to their protein-bound and free states. Corneal metabolism can be monitored by measuring the relative contribution of these two components. Here we report on the development of a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope for in vivo measurement of FAD fluorescence lifetimes in corneal cells. The microscope is based on one-photon fluorescence excitation, through a pulsed blue diode laser. Fluorescence lifetime imaging is achieved using the Time-Gated technique. Structured illumination is used to improve the low axial resolution of wide-field time-gated FLIM. A Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is used to produce the sinusoidal patterns required by structural illumination. The DMD control is integrated with the acquisition software of the imaging system which is based on an ultra-high speed gated image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera. We present preliminary results concerning optical and timing performance of the fluorescence lifetime microscope. Preliminary tests with ex-vivo bovine corneas are also described.

  6. Hyperspectral imaging of endogenous fluorescent metabolic molecules to identify pain states in central nervous system tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staikopoulos, Vasiliki; Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Mustafa, Sanam; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescence-based bio-imaging methods have been extensively used to identify molecular changes occurring in biological samples in various pathological adaptations. Auto-fluorescence generated by endogenous fluorescent molecules within these samples can interfere with signal to background noise making positive antibody based fluorescent staining difficult to resolve. Hyperspectral imaging uses spectral and spatial imaging information for target detection and classification, and can be used to resolve changes in endogenous fluorescent molecules such as flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids that are involved in cell metabolism. Hyperspectral auto-fluorescence imaging of spinal cord slices was used in this study to detect metabolic differences within pain processing regions of non-pain versus sciatic chronic constriction injury (CCI) animals, an established animal model of peripheral neuropathy. By using an endogenous source of contrast, subtle metabolic variations were detected between tissue samples, making it possible to distinguish between animals from non-injured and injured groups. Tissue maps of native fluorophores, flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids unveiled subtle metabolic signatures and helped uncover significant tissue regions with compromised mitochondrial function. Taken together, our results demonstrate that hyperspectral imaging provides a new non-invasive method to investigate central changes of peripheral neuropathic injury and other neurodegenerative disease models, and paves the way for novel cellular characterisation in health, disease and during treatment, with proper account of intrinsic cellular heterogeneity.

  7. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose.

  8. Rapid susceptibility testing and microcolony analysis of Candida spp. cultured and imaged on porous aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Colin J; Boonstra, Sjoukje; Levels, Suzanne; de Lange, Marit; Meis, Jacques F; Schneeberger, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    Acquired resistance to antifungal agents now supports the introduction of susceptibility testing for species-drug combinations for which this was previously thought unnecessary. For pathogenic yeasts, conventional phenotypic testing needs at least 24 h. Culture on a porous aluminum oxide (PAO) support combined with microscopy offers a route to more rapid results. Microcolonies of Candida species grown on PAO were stained with the fluorogenic dyes Fun-1 and Calcofluor White and then imaged by fluorescence microscopy. Images were captured by a charge-coupled device camera and processed by publicly available software. By this method, the growth of yeasts could be detected and quantified within 2 h. Microcolony imaging was then used to assess the susceptibility of the yeasts to amphotericin B, anidulafungin and caspofungin (3.5 h culture), and voriconazole and itraconazole (7 h culture). Overall, the results showed good agreement with EUCAST (86.5% agreement; n = 170) and E-test (85.9% agreement; n = 170). The closest agreement to standard tests was found when testing susceptibility to amphotericin B and echinocandins (88.2 to 91.2%) and the least good for the triazoles (79.4 to 82.4%). Furthermore, large datasets on population variation could be rapidly obtained. An analysis of microcolonies revealed subtle effects of antimycotics on resistant strains and below the MIC of sensitive strains, particularly an increase in population heterogeneity and cell density-dependent effects of triazoles. Additionally, the method could be adapted to strain identification via germ tube extension. We suggest PAO culture is a rapid and versatile method that may be usefully adapted to clinical mycology and has research applications.

  9. Rapid susceptibility testing and microcolony analysis of Candida spp. cultured and imaged on porous aluminum oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J Ingham

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquired resistance to antifungal agents now supports the introduction of susceptibility testing for species-drug combinations for which this was previously thought unnecessary. For pathogenic yeasts, conventional phenotypic testing needs at least 24 h. Culture on a porous aluminum oxide (PAO support combined with microscopy offers a route to more rapid results. METHODS: Microcolonies of Candida species grown on PAO were stained with the fluorogenic dyes Fun-1 and Calcofluor White and then imaged by fluorescence microscopy. Images were captured by a charge-coupled device camera and processed by publicly available software. By this method, the growth of yeasts could be detected and quantified within 2 h. Microcolony imaging was then used to assess the susceptibility of the yeasts to amphotericin B, anidulafungin and caspofungin (3.5 h culture, and voriconazole and itraconazole (7 h culture. SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, the results showed good agreement with EUCAST (86.5% agreement; n = 170 and E-test (85.9% agreement; n = 170. The closest agreement to standard tests was found when testing susceptibility to amphotericin B and echinocandins (88.2 to 91.2% and the least good for the triazoles (79.4 to 82.4%. Furthermore, large datasets on population variation could be rapidly obtained. An analysis of microcolonies revealed subtle effects of antimycotics on resistant strains and below the MIC of sensitive strains, particularly an increase in population heterogeneity and cell density-dependent effects of triazoles. Additionally, the method could be adapted to strain identification via germ tube extension. We suggest PAO culture is a rapid and versatile method that may be usefully adapted to clinical mycology and has research applications.

  10. Increases in myocardial workload induced by rapid atrial pacing trigger alterations in global metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan T Turer

    Full Text Available To determine whether increases in cardiac work lead to alterations in the plasma metabolome and whether such changes arise from the heart or peripheral organs.There is growing evidence that the heart influences systemic metabolism through endocrine effects and affecting pathways involved in energy homeostasis.Nineteen patients referred for cardiac catheterization were enrolled. Peripheral and selective coronary sinus (CS blood sampling was performed at serial timepoints following the initiation of pacing, and metabolite profiling was performed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS.Pacing-stress resulted in a 225% increase in the median rate·pressure product from baseline. Increased myocardial work induced significant changes in the peripheral concentration of 43 of 125 metabolites assayed, including large changes in purine [adenosine (+99%, p = 0.006, ADP (+42%, p = 0.01, AMP (+79%, p = 0.004, GDP (+69%, p = 0.003, GMP (+58%, p = 0.01, IMP (+50%, p = 0.03, xanthine (+61%, p = 0.0006], and several bile acid metabolites. The CS changes in metabolites qualitatively mirrored those in the peripheral blood in both timing and magnitude, suggesting the heart was not the major source of the metabolite release.Isolated increases in myocardial work can induce changes in the plasma metabolome, but these changes do not appear to be directly cardiac in origin. A number of these dynamic metabolites have known signaling functions. Our study provides additional evidence to a growing body of literature on metabolic 'cross-talk' between the heart and other organs.

  11. Scar imaging using multislice computed tomography versus metabolic imaging by F-18 FDG positron emission tomography: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Girish; Al-Shehri, Halia; deKemp, Robert A; Ali, Iftikhar; Alghamdi, Abdul Aziz; Klein, Ran; Scullion, Andrew; Ruddy, Terrence D; Beanlands, Rob S; Chow, Benjamin J W

    2013-09-30

    F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) FDG PET is an established metabolic imaging technique to assess myocardial viability. Delayed iodinated contrast enhancement (DE) of myocardium on computed tomography (CT) has also been shown to be an anatomical marker of nonviable myocardium. A pilot study was undertaken to determine quantitative and qualitative agreement between metabolic viability imaging and scar imaging using FDG PET and multislice CT respectively. Fifteen patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction were recruited in the study. All patients underwent same day FDG PET and DECT to evaluate myocardial viability. The images were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively using a 17 segment model. DECT diagnosed viability in 57% (146/255) whilst PET in 51% (129/255) of segments. The per-segment agreement between DECT and FDG PET on qualitative analysis was 70% (Kappa: 0.40). The agreement in quantitative measurements between the two techniques for viability showed modest correlation [Pearson ρ: 0.63; Pcorrelate modestly with metabolic FDG PET, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Although in our study quantitative analysis offered superior agreement compared to qualitative with DECT, further studies are needed to determine its incremental value. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimization of an on-board imaging system for extremely rapid radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry Kemmerling, Erica M.; Wu, Meng; Yang, He; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Next-generation extremely rapid radiation therapy systems could mitigate the need for motion management, improve patient comfort during the treatment, and increase patient throughput for cost effectiveness. Such systems require an on-board imaging system that is competitively priced, fast, and of sufficiently high quality to allow good registration between the image taken on the day of treatment and the image taken the day of treatment planning. In this study, three different detectors for a custom on-board CT system were investigated to select the best design for integration with an extremely rapid radiation therapy system. Methods: Three different CT detectors are proposed: low-resolution (all 4 × 4 mm pixels), medium-resolution (a combination of 4 × 4 mm pixels and 2 × 2 mm pixels), and high-resolution (all 1 × 1 mm pixels). An in-house program was used to generate projection images of a numerical anthropomorphic phantom and to reconstruct the projections into CT datasets, henceforth called “realistic” images. Scatter was calculated using a separate Monte Carlo simulation, and the model included an antiscatter grid and bowtie filter. Diagnostic-quality images of the phantom were generated to represent the patient scan at the time of treatment planning. Commercial deformable registration software was used to register the diagnostic-quality scan to images produced by the various on-board detector configurations. The deformation fields were compared against a “gold standard” deformation field generated by registering initial and deformed images of the numerical phantoms that were used to make the diagnostic and treatment-day images. Registrations of on-board imaging system data were judged by the amount their deformation fields differed from the corresponding gold standard deformation fields—the smaller the difference, the better the system. To evaluate the registrations, the pointwise distance between gold standard and realistic registration

  13. Imaging cerebral 2-ketoisocaproate metabolism with hyperpolarized (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butt, Sadia Asghar; Søgaard, Lise Vejby-Christensen; Magnusson, Peter O.

    2012-01-01

    The branched chain amino acid transaminase (BCAT) has an important role in nitrogen shuttling and glutamate metabolism in the brain. The purpose of this study was to describe the cerebral distribution and metabolism of hyperpolarized 2-keto[1-(13)C]isocaproate (KIC) in the normal rat using magnetic...

  14. How Lovebirds Maneuver Rapidly Using Super-Fast Head Saccades and Image Feature Stabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kress

    Full Text Available Diurnal flying animals such as birds depend primarily on vision to coordinate their flight path during goal-directed flight tasks. To extract the spatial structure of the surrounding environment, birds are thought to use retinal image motion (optical flow that is primarily induced by motion of their head. It is unclear what gaze behaviors birds perform to support visuomotor control during rapid maneuvering flight in which they continuously switch between flight modes. To analyze this, we measured the gaze behavior of rapidly turning lovebirds in a goal-directed task: take-off and fly away from a perch, turn on a dime, and fly back and land on the same perch. High-speed flight recordings revealed that rapidly turning lovebirds perform a remarkable stereotypical gaze behavior with peak saccadic head turns up to 2700 degrees per second, as fast as insects, enabled by fast neck muscles. In between saccades, gaze orientation is held constant. By comparing saccade and wingbeat phase, we find that these super-fast saccades are coordinated with the downstroke when the lateral visual field is occluded by the wings. Lovebirds thus maximize visual perception by overlying behaviors that impair vision, which helps coordinate maneuvers. Before the turn, lovebirds keep a high contrast edge in their visual midline. Similarly, before landing, the lovebirds stabilize the center of the perch in their visual midline. The perch on which the birds land swings, like a branch in the wind, and we find that retinal size of the perch is the most parsimonious visual cue to initiate landing. Our observations show that rapidly maneuvering birds use precisely timed stereotypic gaze behaviors consisting of rapid head turns and frontal feature stabilization, which facilitates optical flow based flight control. Similar gaze behaviors have been reported for visually navigating humans. This finding can inspire more effective vision-based autopilots for drones.

  15. How Lovebirds Maneuver Rapidly Using Super-Fast Head Saccades and Image Feature Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Daniel; van Bokhorst, Evelien; Lentink, David

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal flying animals such as birds depend primarily on vision to coordinate their flight path during goal-directed flight tasks. To extract the spatial structure of the surrounding environment, birds are thought to use retinal image motion (optical flow) that is primarily induced by motion of their head. It is unclear what gaze behaviors birds perform to support visuomotor control during rapid maneuvering flight in which they continuously switch between flight modes. To analyze this, we measured the gaze behavior of rapidly turning lovebirds in a goal-directed task: take-off and fly away from a perch, turn on a dime, and fly back and land on the same perch. High-speed flight recordings revealed that rapidly turning lovebirds perform a remarkable stereotypical gaze behavior with peak saccadic head turns up to 2700 degrees per second, as fast as insects, enabled by fast neck muscles. In between saccades, gaze orientation is held constant. By comparing saccade and wingbeat phase, we find that these super-fast saccades are coordinated with the downstroke when the lateral visual field is occluded by the wings. Lovebirds thus maximize visual perception by overlying behaviors that impair vision, which helps coordinate maneuvers. Before the turn, lovebirds keep a high contrast edge in their visual midline. Similarly, before landing, the lovebirds stabilize the center of the perch in their visual midline. The perch on which the birds land swings, like a branch in the wind, and we find that retinal size of the perch is the most parsimonious visual cue to initiate landing. Our observations show that rapidly maneuvering birds use precisely timed stereotypic gaze behaviors consisting of rapid head turns and frontal feature stabilization, which facilitates optical flow based flight control. Similar gaze behaviors have been reported for visually navigating humans. This finding can inspire more effective vision-based autopilots for drones. PMID:26107413

  16. How Lovebirds Maneuver Rapidly Using Super-Fast Head Saccades and Image Feature Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Daniel; van Bokhorst, Evelien; Lentink, David

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal flying animals such as birds depend primarily on vision to coordinate their flight path during goal-directed flight tasks. To extract the spatial structure of the surrounding environment, birds are thought to use retinal image motion (optical flow) that is primarily induced by motion of their head. It is unclear what gaze behaviors birds perform to support visuomotor control during rapid maneuvering flight in which they continuously switch between flight modes. To analyze this, we measured the gaze behavior of rapidly turning lovebirds in a goal-directed task: take-off and fly away from a perch, turn on a dime, and fly back and land on the same perch. High-speed flight recordings revealed that rapidly turning lovebirds perform a remarkable stereotypical gaze behavior with peak saccadic head turns up to 2700 degrees per second, as fast as insects, enabled by fast neck muscles. In between saccades, gaze orientation is held constant. By comparing saccade and wingbeat phase, we find that these super-fast saccades are coordinated with the downstroke when the lateral visual field is occluded by the wings. Lovebirds thus maximize visual perception by overlying behaviors that impair vision, which helps coordinate maneuvers. Before the turn, lovebirds keep a high contrast edge in their visual midline. Similarly, before landing, the lovebirds stabilize the center of the perch in their visual midline. The perch on which the birds land swings, like a branch in the wind, and we find that retinal size of the perch is the most parsimonious visual cue to initiate landing. Our observations show that rapidly maneuvering birds use precisely timed stereotypic gaze behaviors consisting of rapid head turns and frontal feature stabilization, which facilitates optical flow based flight control. Similar gaze behaviors have been reported for visually navigating humans. This finding can inspire more effective vision-based autopilots for drones.

  17. Rapid determination of biogenic amines in cooked beef using hyperspectral imaging with sparse representation algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Lu, Anxiang; Ren, Dong; Wang, Jihua

    2017-11-01

    This study explored the feasibility of rapid detection of biogenic amines (BAs) in cooked beef during the storage process using hyperspectral imaging technique combined with sparse representation (SR) algorithm. The hyperspectral images of samples were collected in the two spectral ranges of 400-1000 nm and 1000-1800 nm, separately. The spectral data were reduced dimensionality by SR and principal component analysis (PCA) algorithms, and then integrated the least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) to build the SR-LS-SVM and PC-LS-SVM models for the prediction of BAs values in cooked beef. The results showed that the SR-LS-SVM model exhibited the best predictive ability with determination coefficients (RP2) of 0.943 and root mean square errors (RMSEP) of 1.206 in the range of 400-1000 nm of prediction set. The SR and PCA algorithms were further combined to establish the best SR-PC-LS-SVM model for BAs prediction, which had high RP2of 0.969 and low RMSEP of 1.039 in the region of 400-1000 nm. The visual map of the BAs was generated using the best SR-PC-LS-SVM model with imaging process algorithms, which could be used to observe the changes of BAs in cooked beef more intuitively. The study demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging technique combined with sparse representation were able to detect effectively the BAs values in cooked beef during storage and the built SR-PC-LS-SVM model had a potential for rapid and accurate determination of freshness indexes in other meat and meat products.

  18. Rapid non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for post appendectomy intra-abdominal abscess in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Megan H. [Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Eutsler, Eric P.; Khanna, Geetika [Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Pediatric Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Sheybani, Elizabeth F. [Mercy Hospital St. Louis, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Acute appendicitis, especially if perforated at presentation, is often complicated by postoperative abscess formation. The detection of a postoperative abscess relies primarily on imaging. This has traditionally been done with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to accurately detect intra-abdominal abscesses, especially with the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). To evaluate our single-center experience with a rapid non-contrast MRI protocol evaluating post-appendectomy abscesses in children with persistent postsurgical symptoms. In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved study, all patients underwent a clinically indicated non-contrast 1.5- or 3-Tesla abdomen/pelvis MRI consisting of single-shot fast spin echo, inversion recovery and DWI sequences. All MRI studies were reviewed by two blinded pediatric radiologists to identify the presence of a drainable fluid collection. Each fluid collection was further characterized as accessible or not accessible for percutaneous or transrectal drainage. Imaging findings were compared to clinical outcome. Seven of the 15 patients had a clinically significant fluid collection, and 5 of these patients were treated with percutaneous drain placement or exploratory laparotomy. The other patients had a phlegmon or a clinically insignificant fluid collection and were discharged home within 48 h. Rapid non-contrast MRI utilizing fluid-sensitive and DWI sequences can be used to identify drainable fluid collections in post-appendectomy patients. This protocol can be used to triage patients between conservative management vs. abscess drainage without oral/intravenous contrast or exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  19. JMorph: Software for performing rapid morphometric measurements on digital images of fossil assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelièvre, Peter G.; Grey, Melissa

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative morphometric analyses of form are widely used in palaeontology, especially for taxonomic and evolutionary research. These analyses can involve several measurements performed on hundreds or even thousands of samples. Performing measurements of size and shape on large assemblages of macro- or microfossil samples is generally infeasible or impossible with traditional instruments such as vernier calipers. Instead, digital image processing software is required to perform measurements via suitable digital images of samples. Many software packages exist for morphometric analyses but there is not much available for the integral stage of data collection, particularly for the measurement of the outlines of samples. Some software exists to automatically detect the outline of a fossil sample from a digital image. However, automatic outline detection methods may perform inadequately when samples have incomplete outlines or images contain poor contrast between the sample and staging background. Hence, a manual digitization approach may be the only option. We are not aware of any software packages that are designed specifically for efficient digital measurement of fossil assemblages with numerous samples, especially for the purposes of manual outline analysis. Throughout several previous studies, we have developed a new software tool, JMorph, that is custom-built for that task. JMorph provides the means to perform many different types of measurements, which we describe in this manuscript. We focus on JMorph's ability to rapidly and accurately digitize the outlines of fossils. JMorph is freely available from the authors.

  20. End organ damage in the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus : biochemical and magnetic resonance imaging studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjeerdema, Nathanja

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this thesis was to evaluate biomarkers of cardiovascular end organ damage in the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus. We performed cross-sectional studies with biochemical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. We have demonstrated that insulin resistance is a strong

  1. Ischaemic memory imaging using metabolic radiopharmaceuticals: overview of clinical settings and ongoing investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Naya, Masanao [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Sapporo (Japan); Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Eriko; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    ''Ischaemic memory'' is defined as a prolonged functional and/or biochemical alteration remaining after a particular episode of severe myocardial ischaemia. The biochemical alteration has been reported as metabolic stunning. Metabolic imaging has been used to detect the footprint left by previous ischaemic episodes evident due to delayed recovery of myocardial metabolism (persistent dominant glucose utilization with suppression of fatty acid oxidation). β-Methyl-p-[{sup 123}I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracer widely used for metabolic imaging in clinical settings in Japan. In patients with suspected coronary artery disease but no previous myocardial infarction, BMIPP has shown acceptable diagnostic accuracy. In particular, BMIPP plays an important role in the identification of prior ischaemic insult in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute chest pain syndrome. Recent data also show the usefulness of {sup 123}I-BMIPP SPECT for predicting cardiovascular events in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Similarly, SPECT or PET imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG injected during peak exercise or after exercise under fasting conditions shows an increase in FDG uptake in postischaemic areas. This article will overview the roles of ischaemic memory imaging both under established indications and in ongoing investigations. (orig.)

  2. The rapid internationalization of Annals of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism as evidenced by journal metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Sun

    2017-06-01

    Using journal metrics, this paper explores whether Annals of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism has internationalized 4 years after changing its language to English only. From the journal's website and the Web of Science Core Collection, the following metrics were counted or calculated: Number of citable articles, countries of authors and editorial board members, total citations, impact factor, countries of citing authors, citing journal titles, and Hirsch index. From 2012 to 2017, 208 articles were citable. The authors had affiliations in 7 countries and the editorial board members in 14 countries. From 2014 to 2017, the total citations each year were 8, 81, 141, and 61; and the impact factors from 2014 to 2016 were calculated as 0.05, 0.987, and 1.165. The citing authors were from 60 countries, among which the United States, China, South Korea, Italy, and Germany were most common. The journal was cited by 215 journal titles. The Hirsch index was 7. These journal metrics showed that the journal achieved international status 4 years after changing the journals' language into English only. The journal's language policy successfully enabled the journal to rebrand as an international journal.

  3. Educational disparities in the metabolic syndrome in a rapidly changing society--the case of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung-Hee; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Bo Youl; Shin, Young-Jeon

    2005-12-01

    Most of the evidence about socioeconomic inequalities in the metabolic syndrome comes from Western industrialized societies. The aim of this study is to examine how the inequalities appear and what could explain them in Korea, a rapidly changing society. We analysed the nationwide survey data of 1998 and 2001 with a sample of 4630 men and 5896 women (> or = 25 years). The subjects were grouped into four birth cohorts based on the historical context: born before 1946, 1946-53, 1954-62, and since 1963. Socioeconomic position was defined by education level: high school graduation or above as the more educated group, and below that as the less educated one. The syndrome was defined according to ATP III criteria using abdominal obesity for Asians. The covariates included family history of diabetes, smoking, drinking, daily physical activity, regular exercise, suicidal ideation, weight change, and carbohydrates intake. The associations were examined by stratified logistic regression models across cohorts and gender. Less-educated women had higher prevalence with widening gaps across successive cohorts; the age-adjusted odds ratios of the less-educated group were 1.22 (0.86-1.71), 1.41 (1.01-1.97), 2.50 (1.87-3.35), and 2.64 (1.69-4.14). They hardly changed after covariate adjustment, and remained significant with considerable attenuation after controlling body mass index. However, educational disparities were not observed in men. We could observe the complex pattern of disparities in the metabolic syndrome across cohorts and gender. An equity-sensitive health promotion programme to prevent further spread of social inequalities may have beneficial effects on the metabolic syndrome and its components in Korea.

  4. Development of rapid methods for relaxation time mapping and motion estimation using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilani, Syed Irtiza Ali

    2008-09-15

    Recent technological developments in the field of magnetic resonance imaging have resulted in advanced techniques that can reduce the total time to acquire images. For applications such as relaxation time mapping, which enables improved visualisation of in vivo structures, rapid imaging techniques are highly desirable. TAPIR is a Look- Locker-based sequence for high-resolution, multislice T{sub 1} relaxation time mapping. Despite the high accuracy and precision of TAPIR, an improvement in the k-space sampling trajectory is desired to acquire data in clinically acceptable times. In this thesis, a new trajectory, termed line-sharing, is introduced for TAPIR that can potentially reduce the acquisition time by 40 %. Additionally, the line-sharing method was compared with the GRAPPA parallel imaging method. These methods were employed to reconstruct time-point images from the data acquired on a 4T high-field MR research scanner. Multislice, multipoint in vivo results obtained using these methods are presented. Despite improvement in acquisition speed, through line-sharing, for example, motion remains a problem and artefact-free data cannot always be obtained. Therefore, in this thesis, a rapid technique is introduced to estimate in-plane motion. The presented technique is based on calculating the in-plane motion parameters, i.e., translation and rotation, by registering the low-resolution MR images. The rotation estimation method is based on the pseudo-polar FFT, where the Fourier domain is composed of frequencies that reside in an oversampled set of non-angularly, equispaced points. The essence of the method is that unlike other Fourier-based registration schemes, the employed approach does not require any interpolation to calculate the pseudo-polar FFT grid coordinates. Translation parameters are estimated by the phase correlation method. However, instead of two-dimensional analysis of the phase correlation matrix, a low complexity subspace identification of the phase

  5. The Role of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Slow-Wave Activity in Prefrontal Metabolism across Young and Middle Age Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wilckens, K.A.; Aizenstein, H J; Nofzinger, E.A.; James, J. A.; Hasler, B.P.; Rosario-Rivera, B.L.; Franzen, P; Germain, A.; Hall, M. H.; Kupfer, D.J.; Price, J C.; Siegle, G.J.; Buysse, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (0.5���4 Hz) during non rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep is a marker for cortical reorganization, particularly within the prefrontal cortex. Greater slow-wave activity during sleep may promote greater waking prefrontal metabolic rate, and in turn, executive function. However, this process may be affected by age. Here we examined whether greater NREM slow-wave activity was associated with higher prefrontal metabolism during wakefulness and whether this...

  6. Optical scatter imaging: a microscopic modality for the rapid morphological assay of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boustany, Nada N.

    2007-02-01

    Tumors derived from epithelial cells comprise the majority of human tumors and their growth results from the accumulation of multiple mutations affecting cellular processes critical for tissue homeostasis, including cell proliferation and cell death. To understand these processes and address the complexity of cancer cell function, multiple cellular responses to different experimental conditions and specific genetic mutations must be analyzed. Fundamental to this endeavor is the development of rapid cellular assays in genetically defined cells, and in particular, the development of optical imaging methods that allow dynamic observation and real-time monitoring of cellular processes. In this context, we are developing an optical scatter imaging technology that is intended to bridge the gap between light and electron microscopy by rapidly providing morphometric information about the relative size and shape of non-spherical organelles, with sub-wavelength resolution. Our goal is to complement current microscopy techniques used to study cells in-vitro, especially in long-term time-lapse studies of living cells, where exogenous labels can be toxic, and electron microscopy will destroy the sample. The optical measurements are based on Fourier spatial filtering in a standard microscope, and could ultimately be incorporated into existing high-throughput diagnostic platforms for cancer cell research and histopathology of neoplastic tissue arrays. Using an engineered epithelial cell model of tumor formation, we are currently studying how organelle structure and function are altered by defined genetic mutations affecting the propensity for cell death and oncogenic potential, and by environmental conditions promoting tumor growth. This talk will describe our optical scatter imaging technology and present results from our studies on apoptosis, and the function of BCL-2 family proteins.

  7. Technical Note: Rapid prototyping of 3D grid arrays for image guided therapy quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittle, David; Holshouser, Barbara; Slater, James M.; Guenther, Bob D.; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Pearlstein, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Epilepsy Radiosurgery Research Program, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Department of Radiology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Computer Science, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Epilepsy Radiosurgery Research Program, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California 92354 and Department of Surgery-Neurosurgery, Duke University and Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Three dimensional grid phantoms offer a number of advantages for measuring imaging related spatial inaccuracies for image guided surgery and radiotherapy. The authors examined the use of rapid prototyping technology for directly fabricating 3D grid phantoms from CAD drawings. We tested three different fabrication process materials, photopolymer jet with acrylic resin (PJ/AR), selective laser sintering with polyamide (SLS/P), and fused deposition modeling with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (FDM/ABS). The test objects consisted of rectangular arrays of control points formed by the intersections of posts and struts (2 mm rectangular cross section) and spaced 8 mm apart in the x, y, and z directions. The PJ/AR phantom expanded after immersion in water which resulted in permanent warping of the structure. The surface of the FDM/ABS grid exhibited a regular pattern of depressions and ridges from the extrusion process. SLS/P showed the best combination of build accuracy, surface finish, and stability. Based on these findings, a grid phantom for assessing machine-dependent and frame-induced MR spatial distortions was fabricated to be used for quality assurance in stereotactic neurosurgical and radiotherapy procedures. The spatial uniformity of the SLS/P grid control point array was determined by CT imaging (0.6x0.6x0.625 mm{sup 3} resolution) and found suitable for the application, with over 97.5% of the control points located within 0.3 mm of the position specified in CAD drawing and none of the points off by more than 0.4 mm. Rapid prototyping is a flexible and cost effective alternative for development of customized grid phantoms for medical physics quality assurance.

  8. Hyperpolarized [2-13C]-fructose: a hemiketal DNP substrate for in vivo metabolic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshari, Kayvan R; Wilson, David M; Chen, Albert P; Bok, Robert; Larson, Peder E Z; Hu, Simon; Van Criekinge, Mark; Macdonald, Jeffrey M; Vigneron, Daniel B; Kurhanewicz, John

    2009-12-09

    Hyperpolarized (13)C labeled molecular probes have been used to investigate metabolic pathways of interest as well as facilitate in vivo spectroscopic imaging by taking advantage of the dramatic signal enhancement provided by DNP. Due to the limited lifetime of the hyperpolarized nucleus, with signal decay dependent on T(1) relaxation, carboxylate carbons have been the primary targets for development of hyperpolarized metabolic probes. The use of these carbon nuclei makes it difficult to investigate upstream glycolytic processes, which have been related to both cancer metabolism as well as other metabolic abnormalities, such as fatty liver disease and diabetes. Glucose carbons have very short T(1)s (glycolysis. However, the pentose analogue fructose can also enter glycolysis through its phosphorylation by hexokinase and yield complementary information. The C(2) of fructose is a hemiketal that has a relatively longer relaxation time (approximately 16 s at 37 degrees C) and high solution state polarization (approximately 12%). Hyperpolarized [2-(13)C]-fructose was also injected into a transgenic model of prostate cancer (TRAMP) and demonstrated difference in uptake and metabolism in regions of tumor relative to surrounding tissue. Thus, this study demonstrates the first hyperpolarization of a carbohydrate carbon with a sufficient T(1) and solution state polarization for ex vivo spectroscopy and in vivo spectroscopic imaging studies.

  9. Imaging Spectroscopy Techniques for Rapid Assessment of Geologic and Cryospheric Science Data from future Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, W. M.; Hill, R.

    2016-12-01

    Several efforts are currently underway to develop and launch the next generation of imaging spectrometer systems on satellite platforms for a wide range of Earth Observation goals. Systems that include the reflected solar wavelength range up to 2.5 μm will be capable of detailed mapping of the composition of the Earth's surface. Sensors under development include EnMAP, HISUI, PRISMA, HERO, and HyspIRI. These systems are expected to be able to provide global data for insights and constraints on fundamental geological processes, natural and anthropogenic hazards, water, energy and mineral resource assessments. Coupled with the development of these sensors is the challenge of bringing a multi-channel user community (from Landsat, MODIS, and ASTER) into the rich science return available from imaging spectrometer systems. Most data end users will never be spectroscopy experts so that making the derived science products accessible to a wide user community is imperative. Simple band parameterizations have been developed for the CRISM instrument at Mars, including mafic and alteration minerals, frost and volatile ice indices. These products enhance and augment the use of that data set by broader group of scientists. Summary products for terrestrial geologic and water resource applications would help build a wider user base for future satellite systems, and rapidly key spectral experts to important regions for detailed spectral mapping. Summary products take advantage of imaging spectroscopy's narrow spectral channels with band depth calculations in addition to band ratios that are commonly used by multi-channel systems (e.g. NDVI, NDWI, NDSI). We are testing summary products for Earth geologic and snow scenes over California using AVIRIS data at 18m/pixel. This has resulted in several algorithms for rapid mineral discrimination and mapping and data collects over the melting Sierra snowpack in spring 2016 are expected to generate algorithms for snow grain size and surface

  10. White matter microstructure and cognitive decline in metabolic syndrome: a review of diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Freddy J; Gavrieli, Anna; Saade-Lemus, Patricia; Lioutas, Vasileios-Arsenios; Upadhyay, Jagriti; Novak, Vera

    2018-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors defined by the presence of abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertension and/or dyslipidemia. It is a major public health epidemic worldwide, and a known risk factor for the development of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Several studies have demonstrated a positive association between the presence of metabolic syndrome and worse cognitive outcomes, however, evidence of brain structure pathology is limited. Diffusion tensor imaging has offered new opportunities to detect microstructural white matter changes in metabolic syndrome, and a possibility to detect associations between functional and structural abnormalities. This review analyzes the impact of metabolic syndrome on white matter microstructural integrity, brain structure abnormalities and their relationship to cognitive function. Each of the metabolic syndrome components exerts a specific signature of white matter microstructural abnormalities. Metabolic syndrome and its components exert both additive/synergistic, as well as, independent effects on brain microstructure thus accelerating brain aging and cognitive decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of non-rapid eye movement slow-wave activity in prefrontal metabolism across young and middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilckens, Kristine A; Aizenstein, Howard J; Nofzinger, Eric A; James, Jeffrey A; Hasler, Brant P; Rosario-Rivera, Bedda L; Franzen, Peter L; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H; Kupfer, David J; Price, Julie C; Siegle, Greg J; Buysse, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (0.5-4 Hz) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is a marker for cortical reorganization, particularly within the prefrontal cortex. Greater slow wave activity during sleep may promote greater waking prefrontal metabolic rate and, in turn, executive function. However, this process may be affected by age. Here we examined whether greater NREM slow wave activity was associated with higher prefrontal metabolism during wakefulness and whether this relationship interacted with age. Fifty-two participants aged 25-61 years were enrolled into studies that included polysomnography and a (18) [F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography scan during wakefulness. Absolute and relative measures of NREM slow wave activity were assessed. Semiquantitative and relative measures of cerebral metabolism were collected to assess whole brain and regional metabolism, focusing on two regions of interest: the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. Greater relative slow wave activity was associated with greater dorsolateral prefrontal metabolism. Age and slow wave activity interacted significantly in predicting semiquantitative whole brain metabolism and outside regions of interest in the posterior cingulate, middle temporal gyrus and the medial frontal gyrus, such that greater slow-wave activity was associated with lower metabolism in the younger participants and greater metabolism in the older participants. These results suggest that slow-wave activity is associated with cerebral metabolism during wakefulness across the adult lifespan within regions important for executive function. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Quantitative optical imaging of paracetamol-induced metabolism changes in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaowen; Wang, Haolu; Liu, Xin; Roberts, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Paracetamol is the most readily available and widely used painkiller. However, its toxicity remains the most common cause of liver injury. The toxicity of paracetamol has been attributing to its toxic metabolite, which depletes cellular glutathione (GSH) stores and reacts within cells to increase oxidative stress, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell necrosis. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) can provide quantitative imaging of biological tissues and organs in vivo and allow direct visualization of cellular events, which were used to monitor cellular metabolism in paracetamol-induced toxicity in this study. To better understand mechanisms of paracetamol induced liver injury, the redox ratio of NADH/FAD in liver cells were detected and quantified by MPM imaging to represent the relative rates of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation within cells. Compared to normal liver, average fluorescence lifetime of NADH and redox ratio of NADH/FAD in hepatocytes was significantly decreased after paracetamol overdose for 12 and 24 hrs, reflecting impaired metabolic activity. GSH levels of treatment groups were significantly lower than those of normal livers, with gradually decreasing from periportal to centrilobular zonation. This imaging technique has significant implications for investigating metabolic mechanisms of paracetamol toxicity.

  13. A rapid Look-Locker imaging sequence for quantitative tissue oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidya Shankar, Rohini; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.

    2015-03-01

    Tissue oximetry studies using magnetic resonance imaging are increasingly contributing to advances in the imaging and treatment of cancer. The non-invasive measurement of tissue oxygenation (pO2) may facilitate a better understanding of the pathophysiology and prognosis of diseases, particularly in the assessment of the extensive hypoxic regions associated with cancerous lesions. The availability of tumor hypoxia maps could help quantify and predict tumor response to intervention and therapy. The PISTOL (Proton Imaging of Siloxanes to map Tissue Oxygenation Levels) oximetry technique maps the T1 of administered hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), an 1H NMR pO2 reporter molecule in about 3 ½ min. This allows us to subsequently monitor static and dynamic changes in the tissue pO2 (in response to intervention) at various locations due to the linear relationship between 1/T1 and pO2. In this work, an HMDSO-selective Look-Locker imaging sequence with EPI readout has been developed to enable faster PISTOL acquisitions. The new sequence incorporates the fast Look-Locker measurement method to enable T1, and hence, pO2 mapping of HMDSO in under one minute. To demonstrate the application of this pulse sequence in vivo, 50 μL of neat HMDSO was administered to the thigh muscle of a healthy rat (Fischer F344, n=4). Dynamic changes in the mean pO2 of the thigh muscle were measured using both PISTOL and the developed LL oximetry sequence in response to oxygen challenge and compared. Results demonstrate the efficacy of the new sequence in rapidly mapping the pO2 changes, leading to advances in fast quantitative 1H MR oximetry.

  14. Visual processing in rapid-chase systems: Image processing, attention, and awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eSchmidt

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Visual stimuli can be classified so rapidly that their analysis may be based on a single sweep of feedforward processing through the visuomotor system. Behavioral criteria for feedforward processing can be evaluated in response priming tasks where speeded pointing or keypress responses are performed towards target stimuli which are preceded by prime stimuli. We apply this method to several classes of complex stimuli. 1 When participants classify natural images into animals or non-animals, the time course of their pointing responses indicates that prime and target signals remain strictly sequential throughout all processing stages, meeting stringent behavioral criteria for feedforward processing (rapid-chase criteria. 2 Such priming effects are boosted by selective visual attention for positions, shapes, and colors, in a way consistent with bottom-up enhancement of visuomotor processing, even when primes cannot be consciously identified. 3 Speeded processing of phobic images is observed in participants specifically fearful of spiders or snakes, suggesting enhancement of feedforward processing by long-term perceptual learning. 4 When the perceived brightness of primes in complex displays is altered by means of illumination or transparency illusions, priming effects in speeded keypress responses can systematically contradict subjective brightness judgments, such that one prime appears brighter than the other but activates motor responses as if it was darker. We propose that response priming captures the output of the first feedforward pass of visual signals through the visuomotor system, and that this output lacks some characteristic features of more elaborate, recurrent processing. This way, visuomotor measures may become dissociated from several aspects of conscious vision. We argue that "fast" visuomotor measures predominantly driven by feedforward processing should supplement "slow" psychophysical measures predominantly based on visual

  15. Rapid quantification of metabolic intermediates in blood by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to investigate congenital lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Minzhi; Cai, Yanna; Fang, Xiefan; Liu, Li

    2016-10-26

    A novel liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been established to quantify metabolic intermediates, including lactate (Lac), pyruvate (Pyr), acetoacetate (ACAC) and 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) in blood. Samples were deproteinized with methanol-acetonitrile solution, and analytes were separated on an adamantyl group-bonded reverse phase column and detected in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Total analysis time was 4 min per sample. Method validation results displayed that limits of quantification were 10.0 μmol L(-1) for Lac and Pyr, and 5.0 μmol L(-1)for ACAC and 3-HB. The within- and between-run coefficients of variation were in the range of 1.2-6.4% for all analytes. The recoveries were ranged from 95.6 to 111.5%. The reference values of analytes were determined for the pediatric population. Duo to instability of Lac, Pyr and ACAC in vitro, a comprehensive stability assay was performed to determine optimal conditions for sample collection, pretreatment and storage. Results showed that precipitation of protein in blood at bedside combined with low storage temperature could effectively preserve the integrity of Lac, Pyr and 3-HB, but the precipitated protein accelerated degradation of ACAC. Isolation of supernatant fluid slowed degradation of ACAC. Supernatant samples could store at -20 °C for 10 days. The use of plasma or serum to determine these intermediates was not recommended. In this study, 450 samples from patients were analyzed, and 7 patients were diagnosed as congenital lactic acidosis. With the advantages of rapid, accurate and reliable, this method is very suitable for congenital lactic acidosis screening and researches related to energy metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapidly destructive arthrosis of the shoulder joints: radiographic, magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathologic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekatpure, Aashay L; Sun, Ji-Ho; Sim, Gyeong-Bo; Chun, Jae-Myeung; Jeon, In-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Rapidly destructive arthrosis of the humeral head is a rare condition with an elusive pathophysiologic mechanism. In this study, radiographic and histopathologic findings were analyzed to determine the clinical characteristics of this rare condition. We retrospectively analyzed 189 patients who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty from January 2001 to August 2012. Among them, 9 patients showed a particular pattern of rapid collapse of the humeral head on plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 12 months from symptom onset. Patients with trauma, rheumatoid arthritis, steroid intake, neurologic osteoarthropathy, osteonecrosis, renal osteoarthropathy, or gout were excluded. All patients were women, with a mean age of 72.0 years (range, 63-85 years). The right side was involved in 7 cases and the left in 2 cases. The mean duration of humeral head collapse was 5.6 months (range, 2-11 months) from the onset of shoulder pain. Plain radiographs of all patients showed a unique pattern of humeral head flattening, which appeared like a clean surgical cut with bone debris around the humeral head. MRI findings revealed significant joint effusion and bone marrow edema in the humeral head, without involvement of the glenoid. Pathologic findings showed both fragmentation and regeneration of bone matrix, representing fracture healing. The important features of rapidly destructive shoulder arthrosis are unique flattened humeral head collapse with MRI showing massive joint effusion and bone marrow edema in the remnant humeral head. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of elderly women with insidious shoulder pain. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Elizabeth A.; Atkins, Tonya M.; Gilbert, Dustin A.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.; Liu, Kai; Louie, Angelique Y.

    2012-06-01

    Currently, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are the only nanosized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents approved for clinical use, yet commercial manufacturing of these agents has been limited or discontinued. Though there is still widespread demand for these particles both for clinical use and research, they are difficult to obtain commercially, and complicated syntheses make in-house preparation unfeasible for most biological research labs or clinics. To make commercial production viable and increase accessibility of these products, it is crucial to develop simple, rapid and reproducible preparations of biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we report a rapid, straightforward microwave-assisted synthesis of superparamagnetic dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were produced in two hydrodynamic sizes with differing core morphologies by varying the synthetic method as either a two-step or single-step process. A striking benefit of these methods is the ability to obtain swift and consistent results without the necessity for air-, pH- or temperature-sensitive techniques; therefore, reaction times and complex manufacturing processes are greatly reduced as compared to conventional synthetic methods. This is a great benefit for cost-effective translation to commercial production. The nanoparticles are found to be superparamagnetic and exhibit properties consistent for use in MRI. In addition, the dextran coating imparts the water solubility and biocompatibility necessary for in vivo utilization.

  18. Rapid and noncontact photoacoustic tomography imaging system using an interferometer with high-speed phase modulation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jun [School of Physics and Telecom Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, Zhilie; Wu, Yongbo [School of Physics and Telecom Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); GuangDong Province Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Normal University, IMOT, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Yi [School of Control Engineering, Northeastern University at Qinhuangdao, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2015-04-15

    We designed, fabricated, and tested a rapid and noncontact photoacoustic tomography (PAT) imaging system using a low-coherence interferometer with high-speed phase modulation technique. Such a rapid and noncontact probing system can greatly decrease the time of imaging. The proposed PAT imaging system is experimentally verified by capturing images of a simulated tissue sample and the blood vessels within the ear flap of a mouse (pinna) in vivo. The axial and lateral resolutions of the system are evaluated at 45 and ∼15 μm, respectively. The imaging depth of the system is 1 mm in a special phantom. Our results show that the proposed system opens a promising way to realize noncontact, real-time PAT.

  19. Rapid total body fat measurement by magnetic resonance imaging: quantification and topography; Schnelle Ganzkoerperfettmessung mittels MRT: Quantifizierung und Topografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, F.M.; Hunold, P.; Greiff, A. de; Nuefer, M.; Barkhausen, J.; Ladd, S.C. [Uniklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Ruehm, S. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a rapid and comprehensive MR protocol based on a T1-weighted sequence in conjunction with a rolling table platform for the quantification of total body fat. Materials and Methods: 11 healthy volunteers and 50 patients were included in the study. MR data was acquired on a 1.5-T system (Siemens Magnetom Sonata). An axial T1-weighted flash 2D sequence (TR 101, TE 4.7, FA 70, FOV 50 cm, 205 x 256 matrix, slice thickness: 10 mm, 10 mm interslice gap) was used for data acquisition. Patients were placed in a supine position on a rolling table platform capable of acquiring multiple consecutive data sets by pulling the patient through the isocenter of the magnet. Data sets extending from the upper to lower extremities were collected. The images were analyzed with respect to the amount of intraabdominal, subcutaneous and total abdominal fat by semi-automated image segmentation software that employs a contour-following algorithm. Results: The obtained MR images were able to be evaluated for all volunteers and patients. Excellent correlation was found between whole body MRI results in volunteers with DEXA (r{sup 2} = 0.95) and bioimpedance (r{sup 2} = 0.89) measurements, while the correlation coefficient was 0.66 between MRI and BMI, indicating only moderate reliability of the BMI method. Variations in patients with respect to the amount of total, subcutaneous, and intraabdominal adipose tissue was not related to standard anthropometric measurements and metabolic lipid profiles (r{sup 2} = 0,001 to 0.48). The results showed that there was a significant variation in intraabdominal adipose tissue which could not be predicted from the total body fat (r{sup 2} = 0.14) or subcutaneous adipose tissue (r{sup 2} = 0.04). Although no significant differences in BMI could be found between females and males (p = 0.26), females showed significantly higher total and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (p < 0.05). Conclusion. (orig.)

  20. Dual-scanning optical coherence elastography for rapid imaging of two tissue volumes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qi; Frewer, Luke; Wijesinghe, Philip; Hamzah, Juliana; Ganss, Ruth; Allen, Wes M.; Sampson, David D.; Curatolo, Andrea; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2017-02-01

    In many applications of optical coherence elastography (OCE), it is necessary to rapidly acquire images in vivo, or within intraoperative timeframes, over fields-of-view far greater than can be achieved in one OCT image acquisition. For example, tumour margin assessment in breast cancer requires acquisition over linear dimensions of 4-5 centimetres in under 20 minutes. However, the majority of existing techniques are not compatible with these requirements, which may present a hurdle to the effective translation of OCE. To increase throughput, we have designed and developed an OCE system that simultaneously captures two 3D elastograms from opposite sides of a sample. The optical system comprises two interferometers: a common-path interferometer on one side of the sample and a dual-arm interferometer on the other side. This optical system is combined with scanning mechanisms and compression loading techniques to realize dual-scanning OCE. The optical signals scattered from two volumes are simultaneously detected on a single spectrometer by depth-encoding the interference signal from each interferometer. To demonstrate dual-scanning OCE, we performed measurements on tissue-mimicking phantoms containing rigid inclusions and freshly isolated samples of murine hepatocellular carcinoma, highlighting the use of this technique to visualise 3D tumour stiffness. These findings indicate that our technique holds promise for in vivo and intraoperative applications.

  1. Rapid implementation of image processing onto FPGA using modular DSP C6201 VHDL model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brost, V.; Yang, F.; Paindavoine, M.; Liu, X. J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent FPGA chips, with their large capacity memory and reconfigurability potential, have opened new frontiers for rapid prototyping of embedded systems. With the advent of high density FPGAs it is now feasible to implement a high-performance VLIW processor core in an FPGA. We describe research results of enabling the DSP TMS320 C6201 model for real-time image processing applications, by exploiting FPGA technology. The goals are, firstly, to keep the flexibility of DSP in order to shorten the development cycle, and secondly, to use powerful available resources on FPGA to a maximum in order to increase real-time performance. We present a modular DSP C6201 VHDL model which contains only the bare minimum number of instruction sets, or modules, necessary for each target application. This allows an optimal implementation on the FPGA. Some common algorithms of image processing were created and validated on an FPGA VirtexII-2000 multimedia board using the proposed application development cycle. Our results demonstrate that an algorithm can easily be, in an optimal manner, specified and then automatically converted to VHDL language and implemented on an FPGA device with system level software.

  2. Rapid in situ biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in living platelets for multimodal biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Juan; Liu, Taotao; Li, Mingxi; Yuan, Chuxiao; Liu, Yang; Tang, Jian; Feng, Zhenqiang; Zhou, Yue; Yang, Fang; Gu, Ning

    2018-01-10

    Inspired by the nature, the biomimetic nanomaterial design strategies have attracted great interest because the bioinspired nanoplatforms may enhance the functionality of current nanoparticles. Especially, the cell membrane-derived nanoparticles can more effectively navigate and interact with the complex biological microenvironment. In this study, we have explored a novel strategy to rapidly in situ biosynthesize gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in living platelets with the help of ultrasound energy. Firstly, under the ultrasound exposure, the biocompatible chloroauric acid salts (HAuCl 4 ) can be enhanced to permeate into the platelet cytoplasm. Then, by the assist of reducing agent (NaBH 4 and sodium citrate) and platelet enzyme, GNPs were fast in situ synthesized in intra-platelets. The biosynthesized GNPs had a size of about 5 nm and were uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) showed the synthesized amount of Au is (12.7 ± 2.4) × 10 -3  pg per one platelet. The GNPs in platelets can produce Raman enhancement effect and further be probed for both dark-field microscopy (DFM)-based imaging and computed tomography (CT) imaging. Moreover, the platelets were not activated and remained aggregation bioactivity when intra-platelet GNPs synthesis. Therefore, such mimicking GNPs-platelets with in situ GNPs components remain inherent platelet bioactivity will find potential theranostic implications with unique GNPs properties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial infections following laparoscopic surgery: CT imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpato, Richard [Cassiano Antonio de Moraes University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Campi de Castro, Claudio [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Department of Radiology, Cerqueira Cesar, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hadad, David Jamil [Cassiano Antonio de Moraes University Hospital, Nucleo de Doencas Infecciosas, Department of Internal Medicine, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Silva Souza Ribeiro, Flavya da [Laboratorio de Patologia PAT, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Unit 1473, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Filho, Ezequiel Leal [UNIMED Diagnostico, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Unit 1473, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Marcal, Leonardo P. [The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Unit 1473, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To identify the distribution and frequency of computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial (RGM) infection after laparoscopic surgery. A descriptive retrospective study in patients with RGM infection after laparoscopic surgery who underwent CT imaging prior to initiation of therapy. The images were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus, who evaluated the skin/subcutaneous tissues, the abdominal wall, and intraperitoneal region separately. The patterns of involvement were tabulated as: densification, collections, nodules (≥1.0 cm), small nodules (<1.0 cm), pseudocavitated nodules, and small pseudocavitated nodules. Twenty-six patients met the established criteria. The subcutaneous findings were: densification (88.5 %), small nodules (61.5 %), small pseudocavitated nodules (23.1 %), nodules (38.5 %), pseudocavitated nodules (15.4 %), and collections (26.9 %). The findings in the abdominal wall were: densification (61.5 %), pseudocavitated nodules (3.8 %), and collections (15.4 %). The intraperitoneal findings were: densification (46.1 %), small nodules (42.3 %), nodules (15.4 %), and collections (11.5 %). Subcutaneous CT findings in descending order of frequency were: densification, small nodules, nodules, small pseudocavitated nodules, pseudocavitated nodules, and collections. The musculo-fascial plane CT findings were: densification, collections, and pseudocavitated nodules. The intraperitoneal CT findings were: densification, small nodules, nodules, and collections. (orig.)

  4. SERS imaging of cell-surface biomolecules metabolically labeled with bioorthogonal Raman reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Lin, Liang; Li, Zefan; Liu, Jie; Hong, Senlian; Li, Yaya; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Chen, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Live imaging of biomolecules with high specificity and sensitivity as well as minimal perturbation is essential for studying cellular processes. Here, we report the development of a bioorthogonal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging approach that exploits small Raman reporters for visualizing cell-surface biomolecules. The cells were cultured and imaged by SERS microscopy on arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles coated on silicon wafers or glass slides. The Raman reporters including azides, alkynes, and carbondeuterium bonds are small in size and spectroscopically bioorthogonal (background-free). We demonstrated that various cell-surface biomolecules including proteins, glycans, and lipids were metabolically incorporated with the corresponding precursors bearing a Raman reporter and visualized by SERS microscopy. The coupling of SERS microscopy with bioorthogonal Raman reporters expands the capabilities of live-cell microscopy beyond the modalities of fluorescence and label-free imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Codeine Ultra-rapid Metabolizers: Age Appears to be a Key Factor in Adverse Effects of Codeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, K; Fuchs, W

    2015-12-01

    Codeine is widely used as an analgesic drug. Taking into account the high consumption of codeine, only few fatal adverse events have been published. A number of reports, where neonates and children showed serious or fatal adverse reactions, led to a restriction of the use of codeine in this patient group. Therefore, we reviewed the safety of codeine in adults. PubMed was systematically searched for clinical studies and case reports, with a special focus on CYP2D6, the enzyme that converts codeine to morphine and exhibits genetic polymorphism.181 cases were identified in adults in conjunction with serious or lethal effects of codeine. In the vast majority of cases, codeine was used in combination with other drugs by drug-dependent individuals or with a suicidal intent. Only 2 cases were found where ultra-rapid metabolizers experienced severe non-lethal adverse events. This is far less than would be predicted from the number of cases reported in children. The discrepancy may be explained by developmental changes in the disposition of codeine.The strategy of regulatory authorities to restrict access to codeine for infants and young children, the apparent highest risk group, has a factual and pharmacological rationale. By the same standards, there is no need for restrictions for adult use of codeine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Physiological and metabolic adaptations of Potamogeton pectinatus L. tubers support rapid elongation of stem tissue in the absence of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, M H; Hill, S A; Jackson, M B; Ratcliffe, R G; Sweetlove, L J

    2006-01-01

    Tubers of Potamogeton pectinatus L., an aquatic pondweed, over-winter in the anoxic sediments of rivers, lakes and marshes. Growth of the pre-formed shoot that emerges from the tuber is remarkably tolerant to anoxia, with elongation of the stem occurring faster when oxygen is absent. This response, which allows the shoot to reach oxygenated waters, occurs despite a 69-81% reduction in the rate of ATP production, and it is underpinned by several physiological and metabolic adaptations that contribute to efficient energy usage. First, extension of the pre-formed shoot is the result of cell expansion, without the accumulation of new cellular material. Secondly, after over-wintering, the tuber and pre-formed shoot have the enzymes necessary for a rapid fermentative response at the onset of growth under anoxia. Thirdly, the incorporation of [(35)S]methionine into protein is greatly reduced under anoxia. The majority of the anoxically synthesized proteins differ from those in aerobically grown tissue, implying an extensive redirection of protein synthesis under anoxia. Finally, anoxia-induced cytoplasmic acidosis is prevented to an unprecedented degree. The adaptations of this anoxia-tolerant plant tissue emphasize the importance of the mechanisms that balance ATP production and consumption in the absence of oxygen.

  7. Peripheral metabolic responses to prolonged weight reduction that promote rapid, efficient regain in obesity-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Paul S; Higgins, Janine A; Jackman, Matthew R; Johnson, Ginger C; Fleming-Elder, Brooke K; Wyatt, Holly R; Melanson, Edward L; Hill, James O

    2006-06-01

    Weight regain after weight loss is the most significant impediment to long-term weight reduction. We have developed a rodent paradigm that models the process of regain after weight loss, and we have employed both prospective and cross-sectional analyses to characterize the compensatory adaptations to weight reduction that may contribute to the propensity to regain lost weight. Obese rats were fed an energy-restricted (50-60% kcal) low-fat diet that reduced body weight by 14%. This reduced weight was maintained for up to 16 wk with limited provisions of the low-fat diet. Intake restriction was then removed, and the rats were followed for 56 days as they relapsed to the obese state. Prolonged weight reduction was accompanied by 1) a persistent energy gap resulting from an increased drive to eat and a reduced expenditure of energy, 2) a higher caloric efficiency of regain that may be linked with suppressed lipid utilization early in the relapse process, 3) preferential lipid accumulation in adipose tissue accompanied by adipocyte hyperplasia, and 4) humoral adiposity signals that underestimate the level of peripheral adiposity and likely influence the neural pathways controlling energy balance. Taken together, long-term weight reduction in this rodent paradigm is accompanied by a number of interrelated compensatory adjustments in the periphery that work together to promote rapid and efficient weight regain. These metabolic adjustments to weight reduction are discussed in the context of a homeostatic feedback system that controls body weight.

  8. Metabolic Imaging to Assess Treatment Response to Cytotoxic and Cytostatic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Julie Serkova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available For several decades, cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents were considered the basis of anti-cancer treatment for patients with metastatic tumors. A decrease in tumor burden, assessed by volumetric computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST, was considered as a radiological response to cytotoxic chemotherapies. In addition to RECIST-based dimensional measurements, a metabolic response to cytotoxic drugs can be assessed by positron emission tomography (PET using 18F-fluoro-thymidine (FLT as a radioactive tracer for drug-disrupted DNA synthesis. The decreased 18FLT-PET uptake is often seen concurrently with increased apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI due to chemotherapy-induced changes in tumor cellularity. Recently, the discovery of molecular origins of tumorogenesis led to the introduction of novel signal transduction inhibitors (STIs. STIs are targeted cytostatic agents; their effect is based on a specific biological inhibition with no immediate cell death. As such, tumor size is not anymore a sensitive end-point for a treatment response to STIs; novel physiological imaging end-points are desirable. For receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as modulators of the downstream signaling pathways, an almost immediate inhibition in glycolytic activity (the Warburg effect and phospholipid turnover (the Kennedy pathway has been seen by metabolic imaging in the first 24 hours of treatment. The quantitative imaging end-points by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and metabolic PET (including 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose, FDG, and total choline provide an early treatment response to targeted STIs, before a reduction in tumor burden can be seen.

  9. Quantitative Functional Imaging Using Dynamic Positron Computed Tomography and Rapid Parameter Estimation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppe, Robert Allen

    Positron computed tomography (PCT) is a diagnostic imaging technique that provides both three dimensional imaging capability and quantitative measurements of local tissue radioactivity concentrations in vivo. This allows the development of non-invasive methods that employ the principles of tracer kinetics for determining physiological properties such as mass specific blood flow, tissue pH, and rates of substrate transport or utilization. A physiologically based, two-compartment tracer kinetic model was derived to mathematically describe the exchange of a radioindicator between blood and tissue. The model was adapted for use with dynamic sequences of data acquired with a positron tomograph. Rapid estimation techniques were implemented to produce functional images of the model parameters by analyzing each individual pixel sequence of the image data. A detailed analysis of the performance characteristics of three different parameter estimation schemes was performed. The analysis included examination of errors caused by statistical uncertainties in the measured data, errors in the timing of the data, and errors caused by violation of various assumptions of the tracer kinetic model. Two specific radioindicators were investigated. ('18)F -fluoromethane, an inert freely diffusible gas, was used for local quantitative determinations of both cerebral blood flow and tissue:blood partition coefficient. A method was developed that did not require direct sampling of arterial blood for the absolute scaling of flow values. The arterial input concentration time course was obtained by assuming that the alveolar or end-tidal expired breath radioactivity concentration is proportional to the arterial blood concentration. The scale of the input function was obtained from a series of venous blood concentration measurements. The method of absolute scaling using venous samples was validated in four studies, performed on normal volunteers, in which directly measured arterial concentrations

  10. Molecular imaging correlates of tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway in human meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Guastella, Anthony R; Varadarajan, Kaushik; Robinette, Natasha L; Kupsky, William J; Muzik, Otto; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2015-09-01

    Increased tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway (KP) is a key mechanism of tumoral immune suppression in gliomas. However, details of tryptophan metabolism in meningiomas have not been elucidated. In this study, we evaluated in vivo tryptophan metabolism in meningiomas and compared it with gliomas using α-[(11)C]-methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT)-PET. We also explored expression patterns of KP enzymes in resected meningiomas. Forty-seven patients with MRI-detected meningioma (n = 16) and glioma (n = 31) underwent presurgical AMT-PET scanning. Tumoral AMT uptake and tracer kinetic parameters (including K and k3' evaluating unidirectional uptake and trapping, respectively) were measured, correlated with meningioma grade, and compared between meningiomas and gliomas. Patterns of KP enzyme expression were assessed by immunohistochemistry in all meningiomas. Meningioma grade showed a positive correlation with AMT k3' tumor/cortex ratio (r = 0.75, P = .003), and this PET parameter distinguished grade I from grade II/III meningiomas with 92% accuracy. Kinetic AMT parameters could differentiate meningiomas from both low-grade gliomas (97% accuracy by k3' ratios) and high-grade gliomas (83% accuracy by K ratios). Among 3 initial KP enzymes (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1/2, and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase 2 [TDO2]), TDO2 showed the strongest immunostaining, particularly in grade I meningiomas. TDO2 also showed a strong negative correlation with AMT k3' ratios (P = .001). PET imaging of tryptophan metabolism can provide quantitative imaging markers for differentiating grade I from grade II/III meningiomas. TDO2 may be an important driver of in vivo tryptophan metabolism in these tumors. These results can have implications for pharmacological targeting of the KP in meningiomas. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Interannual Change Detection of Mediterranean Seagrasses Using RapidEye Image Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimosthenis Traganos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent research studies have highlighted the decrease in the coverage of Mediterranean seagrasses due to mainly anthropogenic activities. The lack of data on the distribution of these significant aquatic plants complicates the quantification of their decreasing tendency. While Mediterranean seagrasses are declining, satellite remote sensing technology is growing at an unprecedented pace, resulting in a wealth of spaceborne image time series. Here, we exploit recent advances in high spatial resolution sensors and machine learning to study Mediterranean seagrasses. We process a multispectral RapidEye time series between 2011 and 2016 to detect interannual seagrass dynamics in 888 submerged hectares of the Thermaikos Gulf, NW Aegean Sea, Greece (eastern Mediterranean Sea. We assess the extent change of two Mediterranean seagrass species, the dominant Posidonia oceanica and Cymodocea nodosa, following atmospheric and analytical water column correction, as well as machine learning classification, using Random Forests, of the RapidEye time series. Prior corrections are necessary to untangle the initially weak signal of the submerged seagrass habitats from satellite imagery. The central results of this study show that P. oceanica seagrass area has declined by 4.1%, with a trend of −11.2 ha/yr, while C. nodosa seagrass area has increased by 17.7% with a trend of +18 ha/yr throughout the 5-year study period. Trends of change in spatial distribution of seagrasses in the Thermaikos Gulf site are in line with reported trends in the Mediterranean. Our presented methodology could be a time- and cost-effective method toward the quantitative ecological assessment of seagrass dynamics elsewhere in the future. From small meadows to whole coastlines, knowledge of aquatic plant dynamics could resolve decline or growth trends and accurately highlight key units for future restoration, management, and conservation.

  12. Correlation of PET Images of Metabolism, Proliferation and Hypoxia to Characterize Tumor Phenotype in Patients with Cancer of the Oropharynx

    OpenAIRE

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Harari, Paul M.; Yip, Stephen; Perlman, Scott B; Jeraj, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Spatial organization of tumor phenotype is of great interest to radiotherapy target definition and outcome prediction. We characterized tumor phenotype in patients with cancers of the oropharynx through voxel-based correlation of PET images of metabolism, proliferation, and hypoxia.

  13. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca eLizarbe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI, Blood oxygenation level dependent contrast (BOLD and Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI have revealed Mn2+accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks, becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable.

  14. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  15. Development and validation of a novel dementia of Alzheimer's type (DAT) score based on metabolism FDG-PET imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Popuri, Karteek; Balachandar, Rakesh; Alpert, Kathryn; Lu, Donghuan; Bhalla, Mahadev; Mackenzie, Ian; Hsiung, Robin Ging-Yuek; Wang, Lei; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Initiative, the Alzhemier's Disease Neuroimaging

    2017-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging based 3D topographic brain glucose metabolism patterns from normal controls (NC) and individuals with dementia of Alzheimer's type (DAT) are used to train a novel multi-scale ensemble classification model. This ensemble model outputs a FDG-PET DAT score (FPDS) between 0 and 1 denoting the probability of a subject to be clinically diagnosed with DAT based on their metabolism profile. A novel 7 group image stratification scheme i...

  16. Design of deep convolutional networks for prediction of image rapid serial visual presentation events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijing Mao; Wan Xiang Yao; Yufe Huang

    2017-07-01

    We report in this paper an investigation of convolutional neural network (CNN) models for target prediction in time-locked image rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) experiment. We investigated CNN models with 11 different designs of convolution filters in capturing spatial and temporal correlations in EEG data. We showed that for both within-subject and cross-subject predictions, the CNN models outperform the state-of-the-art algorithms: Bayesian linear discriminant analysis (BLDA) and xDAWN spatial filtering and achieved >6% improvement. Among the 11 different CNN models, the global spatial filter and our proposed region of interest (ROI) achieved best performance. We also implemented the deconvolution network to show how we can visualize from activated hidden units for target/nontarget events learned by the ROI-CNN. Our study suggests that deep learning is a powerful tool for RSVP target prediction and the proposed model is applicable for general EEG-based classifications in brain computer interaction research. The code of this project is available at https://github.com/ZijingMao/ROICNN.

  17. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  18. Chemiluminescent imaging of transpired ethanol from the palm for evaluation of alcohol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Takahiro; Kita, Kazutaka; Wang, Xin; Miyajima, Kumiko; Toma, Koji; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-05-15

    A 2-dimensional imaging system was constructed and applied in measurements of gaseous ethanol emissions from the human palm. This imaging system measures gaseous ethanol concentrations as intensities of chemiluminescence by luminol reaction induced by alcohol oxidase and luminol-hydrogen peroxide-horseradish peroxidase system. Conversions of ethanol distributions and concentrations to 2-dimensional chemiluminescence were conducted on an enzyme-immobilized mesh substrate in a dark box, which contained a luminol solution. In order to visualize ethanol emissions from human palm skin, we developed highly sensitive and selective imaging system for transpired gaseous ethanol at sub ppm-levels. Thus, a mixture of a high-purity luminol solution of luminol sodium salt HG solution instead of standard luminol solution and an enhancer of eosin Y solution was adapted to refine the chemiluminescent intensity of the imaging system, and improved the detection limit to 3 ppm gaseous ethanol. The highly sensitive imaging allows us to successfully visualize the emissions dynamics of transdermal gaseous ethanol. The intensity of each site on the palm shows the reflection of ethanol concentrations distributions corresponding to the amount of alcohol metabolized upon consumption. This imaging system is significant and useful for the assessment of ethanol measurement of the palmar skin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. TransRapid TR-07 maglev-spectrum magnetic field effects on daily pineal indoleamine metabolic rhythms in rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the effects on pineal function of magnetic field (MF) exposures (ac and dc components) similar to those produced by the TransRapid TR-07 and other electromagnetic maglev systems (EMS). Rats were entrained to a light-dark cycle and then exposed to a continuous, or to an inverted, intermittent (on = 45 s, off = 15 s, induced current = 267 G/s) simulated multifrequency ac and dc magnetic field (MF) at 1 or 7 times the TR-07 maglev vehicle MF intensity for 2 hr. Other groups of rats were exposed to only the ac or the dc-component of the maglev MF. For comparison, one group was exposed to an inverted, intermittent 60-Hz MF. Each group was compared to an unexposed group of rats for changes in pineal melatonin and serotonin-N-acetyltransferase (NAT). MF exposures at an intensity equivalent to that produced by the TR-07 vehicle had no effect on melatonin or NAT compared with sham-exposed animals under any of the conditions examined. However, 7X TR-07-level continuous 2-h MF exposures significantly depressed pineal NAT by 45%. Pineal melatonin was also depressed 33--43% by a continuous 7X TR-07 MF exposure and 28% by an intermittent 60-Hz 850-mG MF, but the results were not statically significant. This study demonstrates that intermittent, combined ac and dc MFs similar to those produced by the TR-07 EMS maglev vehicle alter the normal circadian rhythm of pineal indoleamine metabolism. The pineal regulatory enzyme NAT was more sensitive to MF exposure than melatonin and may be a more desirable measure of the biological effects of MF exposure.

  20. TransRapid TR-07 maglev-spectrum magnetic field effects on daily pineal indoleamine metabolic rhythms in rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, K.R.

    1993-06-01

    This study examined the effects on pineal function of magnetic field (MF) exposures (ac and dc components) similar to those produced by the TransRapid TR-07 and other electromagnetic maglev systems (EMS). Rats were entrained to a light-dark cycle and then exposed to a continuous, or to an inverted, intermittent (on = 45 s, off = 15 s, induced current = 267 G/s) simulated multifrequency ac and dc magnetic field (MF) at 1 or 7 times the TR-07 maglev vehicle MF intensity for 2 hr. Other groups of rats were exposed to only the ac or the dc-component of the maglev MF. For comparison, one group was exposed to an inverted, intermittent 60-Hz MF. Each group was compared to an unexposed group of rats for changes in pineal melatonin and serotonin-N-acetyltransferase (NAT). MF exposures at an intensity equivalent to that produced by the TR-07 vehicle had no effect on melatonin or NAT compared with sham-exposed animals under any of the conditions examined. However, 7X TR-07-level continuous 2-h MF exposures significantly depressed pineal NAT by 45%. Pineal melatonin was also depressed 33--43% by a continuous 7X TR-07 MF exposure and 28% by an intermittent 60-Hz 850-mG MF, but the results were not statically significant. This study demonstrates that intermittent, combined ac and dc MFs similar to those produced by the TR-07 EMS maglev vehicle alter the normal circadian rhythm of pineal indoleamine metabolism. The pineal regulatory enzyme NAT was more sensitive to MF exposure than melatonin and may be a more desirable measure of the biological effects of MF exposure.

  1. Electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy without echocardiographic abnormalities evaluated by myocardial perfusion and fatty acid metabolic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi [Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    The pathophysiologic process in patients with electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy with ST, T changes but without echocardiographic abnormalities was investigated by myocardial perfusion imaging and fatty acid metabolic imaging. Exercise stress {sup 99m}Tc-methoxy-isobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) imaging and rest {sup 123}I-beta-methyl-p-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) imaging were performed in 59 patients with electrocardiographic hypertrophy including 29 without apparent cause including hypertension and echocardiographic hypertrophy, and 30 with essential hypertension. Coronary angiography was performed in 6 patients without hypertension and 4 with hypertension and biopsy specimens were obtained from the left ventricular apex from 6 patients without hypertension. Myocardial perfusion and {sup 123}I-BMIPP images were classified into 3 types: normal, increased accumulation of the isotope at the left ventricular apex (high uptake) and defect. Transient perfusion abnormality and apical defect observed by {sup 123}I-BMIPP imaging were more frequent in patients without hypertension than in patients with hypertension (32% vs. 17%, p=0.04671 in perfusion; 62% vs. 30%, p=0.0236 in {sup 123}I-BMIPP). Eighteen normotensive patients with apical defect by {sup 123}I-BMIPP imaging included 3 of 10 patients with normal perfusion at exercise, 6 of 10 patients with high uptake and 9 of 9 patients with perfusion defect. The defect size revealed by {sup 123}I-BMIPP imaging was greater than that of the perfusion abnormality. Coronary stenoses were not observed and myocardial specimens showed myocardial disarray with hypertrophy. Moreover, 9 patients with hypertension and apical defects by {sup 123}I-BMIPP showed 3 different types of perfusion. Many patients without hypertension show a pathologic process similar to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Perfusion and {sup 123}I-BMIPP imaging are useful for the identification of these patients. (author)

  2. Rapid wide-field Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging based on four photoelastic modulators with no moving parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Sanaz; Gribble, Adam; Vitkin, I Alex

    2016-03-01

    A new polarimetry method is demonstrated to image the entire Mueller matrix of a turbid sample using four photoelastic modulators (PEMs) and a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, with no moving parts. Accurate wide-field imaging is enabled with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) optical gating technique and an evolutionary algorithm (EA) that optimizes imaging times. This technique accurately and rapidly measured the Mueller matrices of air, polarization elements, and turbid phantoms. The system should prove advantageous for Mueller matrix analysis of turbid samples (e.g., biological tissues) over large fields of view, in less than a second.

  3. Metabolic imaging of patients with intracranial tumors: H-1 MR spectroscopic imaging and PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, P R; Marien, A J; Heindel, W; van Gerwen, P H; Herholz, K; den Hollander, J A; Friedmann, G; Heiss, W D

    1990-09-01

    Hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic images of patients with intracranial tumors were obtained. Metabolite maps of N-acetyl aspartate, choline, lactate, and creatine concentrations were reconstructed with a nominal spatial resolution of 7 mm and a section thickness of 25 mm. The metabolite maps showed variations in metabolite concentrations across the tumor. In one patient, it was observed that choline concentration was increased in one part of the tumor but decreased in another part. In another patient, the concentration of N-acetyl aspartate was extremely low in one part of the tumor but only slightly increased in another part of the tumor. Lactate was observed in all patients. In one patient, a combined measurement made with positron emission tomography (PET) and MR spectroscopic imaging was performed. This demonstrated that increased lactate concentration measured with H-1 MR spectroscopic imaging corresponded topographically with increased glucose uptake measured with fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose PET. Combined MR spectroscopic and PET measurements provide an opportunity to investigate, in greater detail than before, glucose uptake and catabolism by intracranial tumors.

  4. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benitez, Ania; Peláez Brioso, Gerardo A.; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main MRI and MRS strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), Blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast (BOLD), and Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) have revealed Mn2+ accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions, and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable. PMID:23781199

  5. IMAGING BRAIN SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION AND METABOLISM VIA ARACHIDONIC AND DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID IN ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), important second messengers in brain, are released from membrane phospholipid following receptor-mediated activation of specific phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes. We developed an in vivo method in rodents using quantitative autoradiography to image PUFA incorporation into brain from plasma, and showed that their incorporation rates equal their rates of metabolic consumption by brain. Thus, quantitative imaging of unesterified plasma AA or DHA incorporation into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain PUFA metabolism and neurotransmission. We have employed our method to image and quantify effects of mood stabilizers on brain AA/DHA incorporation during neurotransmission by muscarinic M1,3,5, serotonergic 5-HT2A/2C, dopaminergic D2-like (D2, D3, D4) or glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, and effects of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, of selective serotonin and dopamine reuptake transporter inhibitors, of neuroinflammation (HIV-1 and lipopolysaccharide) and excitotoxicity, and in genetically modified rodents. The method has been extended for the use with positron emission tomography (PET), and can be employed to determine how human brain AA/DHA signaling and consumption are influenced by diet, aging, disease and genetics. PMID:22178644

  6. Optical imaging of radiation-induced metabolic changes in radiation-sensitive and resistant cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhallak, Kinan; Jenkins, Samir V.; Lee, David E.; Greene, Nicholas P.; Quinn, Kyle P.; Griffin, Robert J.; Dings, Ruud P. M.; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2017-06-01

    Radiation resistance remains a significant problem for cancer patients, especially due to the time required to definitively determine treatment outcome. For fractionated radiation therapy, nearly 7 to 8 weeks can elapse before a tumor is deemed to be radiation-resistant. We used the optical redox ratio of FAD/(FAD+NADH) to identify early metabolic changes in radiation-resistant lung cancer cells. These radiation-resistant human A549 lung cancer cells were developed by exposing the parental A549 cells to repeated doses of radiation (2 Gy). Although there were no significant differences in the optical redox ratio between the parental and resistant cell lines prior to radiation, there was a significant decrease in the optical redox ratio of the radiation-resistant cells 24 h after a single radiation exposure (p=0.01). This change in the redox ratio was indicative of increased catabolism of glucose in the resistant cells after radiation and was associated with significantly greater protein content of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α), a key promoter of glycolytic metabolism. Our results demonstrate that the optical redox ratio could provide a rapid method of determining radiation resistance status based on early metabolic changes in cancer cells.

  7. Characterizing the metabolic heterogeneity in human breast cancer xenografts by 3D high resolution fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N; Zheng, Gang; Tchou, Julia; Nioka, Shoko; Li, Lin Z

    2013-12-01

    We previously reported that tumor mitochondrial redox state and its heterogeneity distinguished between the aggressive and the indolent breast cancer xenografts, suggesting novel metabolic indices as biomarkers for predicting tumor metastatic potential. Additionally, we reported that the identified redox biomarkers successfully differentiated between the normal breast tissue and the cancerous breast tissue from breast cancer patients. The aim of the present study was to further characterize intratumor heterogeneity by its distribution of mitochondrial redox state and glucose uptake pattern in tumor xenografts and to further investigate the metabolic heterogeneity of the clinical biopsy samples. We employed the Chance redox scanner, a multi-section cryogenic fluorescence imager to simultaneously image the intratumor heterogeneity in the mitochondrial redox state and glucose uptake at a high spatial resolution (down to 50 × 50 × 20 μm(3)). The mitochondrial redox state was determined by the ratio of the intrinsic fluorescence signals from reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide), and the glucose uptake was measured using a near-infrared fluorescent glucose-analogue, pyropheophorbide 2-deoxyglucosamide (Pyro-2DG). Significant inter- and intratumor metabolic heterogeneity were observed from our imaging data on various types of breast cancer xenografts. The patterns and degrees of heterogeneity of mitochondrial redox state appeared to relate to tumor size and metastatic potential. The glucose uptake was also heterogeneous and generally higher in tumor peripheries. The oxidized and reduced regions mostly corresponded with the lower and the higher pyro-2DG uptake, respectively. However, there were some regions where the glucose uptake did not correlate with the redox indices. Pronounced glucose uptake and high NADH were observed in certain localized areas within the tumor

  8. Rapid Assessment of Earthquakes with Radar and Optical Geodetic Imaging and Finite Fault Models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, E. J.; Sladen, A.; Simons, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Yun, S.; Li, Z.; Avouac, J.; Leprince, S.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake responders need to know where the earthquake has caused damage and what is the likely intensity of damage. The earliest information comes from global and regional seismic networks, which provide the magnitude and locations of the main earthquake hypocenter and moment tensor centroid and also the locations of aftershocks. Location accuracy depends on the availability of seismic data close to the earthquake source. Finite fault models of the earthquake slip can be derived from analysis of seismic waveforms alone, but the results can have large errors in the location of the fault ruptures and spatial distribution of slip, which are critical for estimating the distribution of shaking and damage. Geodetic measurements of ground displacements with GPS, LiDAR, or radar and optical imagery provide key spatial constraints on the location of the fault ruptures and distribution of slip. Here we describe the analysis of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and sub-pixel correlation (or pixel offset tracking) of radar and optical imagery to measure ground coseismic displacements for recent large earthquakes, and lessons learned for rapid assessment of future events. These geodetic imaging techniques have been applied to the 2010 Leogane, Haiti; 2010 Maule, Chile; 2010 Baja California, Mexico; 2008 Wenchuan, China; 2007 Tocopilla, Chile; 2007 Pisco, Peru; 2005 Kashmir; and 2003 Bam, Iran earthquakes, using data from ESA Envisat ASAR, JAXA ALOS PALSAR, NASA Terra ASTER and CNES SPOT5 satellite instruments and the NASA/JPL UAVSAR airborne system. For these events, the geodetic data provided unique information on the location of the fault or faults that ruptured and the distribution of slip that was not available from the seismic data and allowed the creation of accurate finite fault source models. In many of these cases, the fault ruptures were on previously unknown faults or faults not believed to be at high risk of earthquakes, so the area and degree of

  9. Using multimodal imaging techniques to monitor limb ischemia: a rapid noninvasive method for assessing extremity wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Rajiv; Caruso, Joseph D.; Radowsky, Jason S.; Rodriguez, Maricela; Forsberg, Jonathan; Elster, Eric A.; Crane, Nicole J.

    2013-03-01

    Over 70% of military casualties resulting from the current conflicts sustain major extremity injuries. Of these the majority are caused by blasts from improvised explosive devices. The resulting injuries include traumatic amputations, open fractures, crush injuries, and acute vascular disruption. Critical tissue ischemia—the point at which ischemic tissues lose the capacity to recover—is therefore a major concern, as lack of blood flow to tissues rapidly leads to tissue deoxygenation and necrosis. If left undetected or unaddressed, a potentially salvageable limb may require more extensive debridement or, more commonly, amputation. Predicting wound outcome during the initial management of blast wounds remains a significant challenge, as wounds continue to "evolve" during the debridement process and our ability to assess wound viability remains subjectively based. Better means of identifying critical ischemia are needed. We developed a swine limb ischemia model in which two imaging modalities were combined to produce an objective and quantitative assessment of wound perfusion and tissue viability. By using 3 Charge-Coupled Device (3CCD) and Infrared (IR) cameras, both surface tissue oxygenation as well as overall limb perfusion could be depicted. We observed a change in mean 3CCD and IR values at peak ischemia and during reperfusion correlate well with clinically observed indicators for limb function and vitality. After correcting for baseline mean R-B values, the 3CCD values correlate with surface tissue oxygenation and the IR values with changes in perfusion. This study aims to not only increase fundamental understanding of the processes involved with limb ischemia and reperfusion, but also to develop tools to monitor overall limb perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a clinical setting. A rapid and objective diagnostic for extent of ischemic damage and overall limb viability could provide surgeons with a more accurate indication of tissue viability. This may

  10. Construction and evaluation of a switch-tuned (13) C - (1) H birdcage radiofrequency coil for imaging the metabolism of hyperpolarized (13) C-enriched compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Heeseung; Thind, Kundan; Martinez-Santiesteban, Francisco M; Scholl, Timothy James

    2014-11-01

    To construct a switch-tuned (13) C - (1) H birdcage radiofrequency (RF) coil system capable of metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized (13) C-enriched metabolic probes for co-registration with MRI morphology using protons. The switch-tuned coil was constructed using PIN diodes for rapid switching of the resonant frequency of the coil. Identical, single-tuned, (1) H and (13) C birdcage RF coils have also been constructed for comparison of imaging performance. A (13) C receive-only surface RF coil has been integrated with the switch-tuned coil for transmit-only, receive-only operation (TORO) to increase local (13) C signal for improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The SNR achieved with the switch-tuned coil in transmit/receive mode was 87% that of the single-tuned (1) H coil. For (13) C imaging, the SNR for the switch-tuned coil was 55% that of the single-tuned (13) C coil. TORO operation of the switch-tuned coil with the surface coil increased SNR for by a factor of 4.2 over transmit/receive operation of the switch-tuned coil alone. A surface coil can be integrated with a switch-tuned (13) C - (1) H coil for (13) C TORO operation producing improved SNR. In vivo metabolic imaging of [1-(13) C]pyruvate in a rat model of glioma is demonstrated using TORO operation, which is co-registered with (1) H-imaged anatomy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebral Oxygen Metabolism During Resection of Brain Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas; Merkel, Andreas; Zimmermann, Max; Sommer, Björn; Buchfelder, Michael; Meyer-Bäse, Anke; Rössler, Karl

    2017-04-01

    Tissue oxygen tension is an important parameter for brain tissue viability and its noninvasive intraoperative monitoring in the whole brain is of highly clinical relevance. The purpose of this study was the introduction of a multiparametric quantitative blood oxygenation dependent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach for intraoperative examination of oxygen metabolism during the resection of brain lesions. Sixteen patients suffering from brain lesions were examined intraoperatively twice (before craniotomy and after gross-total resection) via the quantitative blood oxygenation dependent technique and a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner, which is installed in an operating room. The MRI protocol included T2*- and T2 mapping and dynamic susceptibility weighted perfusion. Data analysis was performed with a custom-made, in-house MatLab software for calculation of maps of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) as well as of cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow. Perilesional edema showed a significant increase in both perfusion (cerebral blood volume +21%, cerebral blood flow +13%) and oxygen metabolism (OEF +32%, CMRO 2  +16%) after resection of the lesions. In perilesional nonedematous tissue only, however, oxygen metabolism (OEF +19%, CMRO 2  +11%) was significantly increased, but not perfusion. No changes were found in normal brain. Fortunately, no neurovascular adverse events were observed. This approach for intraoperative examination of oxygen metabolism in the whole brain is a new application of intraoperative MRI additionally to resection control (residual tumor detection) and updating of neuronavigation (brain shift detection). It may help to detect neurovascular adverse events early during surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Beta-hydroxybutyrate and pyroglutamate can be included in a rapid GC-MS screening method for differential diagnosis of metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Føreid, Siri; Gadeholt, Gaut

    2017-04-01

    A rapid gas chromatographic mass spectrometric method for measuring anions associated with acute anion gap metabolic acidosis is described. The method is an extension of a previous method. The method quantifies glycolic acid, beta-hydroxybutyric acid with good linearity and pyroglutamic acid with a reproducible curvature relation between 1 and 20 mmol/L and can help the clinician distinguish effectively between ethylene glycol poisoning, alcoholic and diabetic ketoacidosis and cysteine deficiency so early that it will have clinical consequences.

  13. Cranial ultrasound in metabolic disorders presenting in the neonatal period : characteristic features and comparison with MR imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijser, L M; de Vries, L S; Rutherford, M A; Manzur, A Y; Groenendaal, F; de Koning, T J; van der Heide-Jalving, M; Cowan, F M

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brain imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic work-up for metabolic disorders, and the bedside availability of cranial ultrasonography (cUS) allows very early brain imaging in symptomatic neonates. Our aim was to investigate the role and range of abnormalities seen on

  14. Imaging regional metabolic changes in the ischemic rat heart in vivo using hyperpolarized(1-13C)Pyruvate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Mette Hauge; Magnusson, Peter; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the use of hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an open-chest rat model of myocardial infarction to image regional changes in myocardial metabolism. In total, 10 rats were examined before and after 30 minutes of occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary art...

  15. Linear terrestrial laser scanning using array avalanche photodiodes as detectors for rapid three-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yinqiao; Tong, Xiaohua; Tong, Peng; Bu, Hongyi; Shu, Rong

    2010-12-01

    As an active remote sensor technology, the terrestrial laser scanner is widely used for direct generation of a three-dimensional (3D) image of an object in the fields of geodesy, surveying, and photogrammetry. In this article, a new laser scanner using array avalanche photodiodes, as designed by the Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is introduced for rapid collection of 3D data. The system structure of the new laser scanner is first presented, and a mathematical model is further derived to transform the original data to the 3D coordinates of the object in a user-defined coordinate system. The performance of the new laser scanner is tested through a comprehensive experiment. The result shows that the new laser scanner can scan a scene with a field view of 30° × 30° in 0.2 s and that, with respect to the point clouds obtained on the wall and ground floor surfaces, the root mean square errors for fitting the two planes are 0.21 and 0.01 cm, respectively. The primary advantages of the developed laser scanner include: (i) with a line scanning mode, the new scanner achieves simultaneously the 3D coordinates of 24 points per single laser pulse, which enables it to scan faster than traditional scanners with a point scanning mode and (ii) the new scanner makes use of two galvanometric mirrors to deflect the laser beam in both the horizontal and the vertical directions. This capability makes the instrument smaller and lighter, which is more acceptable for users.

  16. The protease inhibitors ritonavir and saquinavir influence lipid metabolism: a pig model for the rapid evaluation of new drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E.; Mu, Huiling; Porsgaard, Trine

    2010-01-01

    Background: Studies of the effects of antiretroviral drugs on lipid metabolism are limited by the availability of suitable models. We have thus developed an animal model utilising Gottingen mini-pigs. The normal lipid metabolism of mini-pigs closely reflects that of humans and they are expected t...

  17. Analysis of Metabolic Changes in Plant Pathosystems by Imprint Imaging DESI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Alessandra; Perez, Consuelo J.; Hamid, Tanam S.; Bayfield, Mark A.; Ifa, Demian R.

    2015-04-01

    The response of plants to microbial pathogens is based on the production of secondary metabolites. The complexity of plant-pathogen interactions makes their understanding a challenging task for metabolomic studies requiring powerful analytical approaches. In this paper, the ability of ambient mass spectrometry to provide a snapshot of plant metabolic response to pathogen invasion was tested. The fluctuations of glycoalkaloids present in sprouted potatoes infected by the phytopathogen Pythium ultimum were monitored by imprint imaging desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). After 8 d from the inoculation, a decrease of the relative abundance of potato glycoalkaloids α-solanine ( m/z 706) and α-chaconine ( m/z 722) was observed, whereas the relative intensity of solanidine ( m/z 398), solasodenone ( m/z 412), solanaviol ( m/z 430), solasodiene ( m/z 396), solaspiralidine ( m/z 428), γ-solanine/γ-chaconine ( m/z 560) , β-solanine ( m/z 706), and β-chaconine ( m/z 722) increased. The progression of the disease, expressed by the development of brown necrotic lesions on the potato, led to the further decrease of all the glycoalkaloid metabolites. Therefore, the applicability of imprint imaging DESI-MS in studying the plant metabolic changes in a simple pathosystem was demonstrated with minimal sample preparation.

  18. Exchange-linked dissolution agents in dissolution-DNP (13)C metabolic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Ralph E; Spielman, Daniel; Josan, Sonal; Yen, Yi-Fen; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Mayer, Dirk

    2013-10-01

    The use of unlabeled exchange-linked dissolution agents in hyperpolarized metabolic imaging was studied to examine pool size limits and saturation relative to the availability of NADH. Three-dimensional dynamic metabolic images were obtained, and compared following injection of a bolus of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate, prepared with and without unlabeled sodium lactate in the dissolution buffer. Comparisons were made on the basis of apparent rate constants and [1-(13)C]lactate signal-to-noise ratio. Range finding data were obtained for different bolus compositions. Isotope exchange was also probed in the reverse direction, following injection of a bolus of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]lactate, with and without unlabeled sodium pyruvate in the dissolution buffer. Liver, kidney, and vascular regions of interest all showed an increase in [1-(13)C]lactate signal with addition of unlabeled sodium lactate in the dissolution buffer. Injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]lactate with unlabeled sodium pyruvate in the dissolution buffer, provided exchange rate constants Klp for kidney and vascular regions of interest. These results are consistent with a high level of (13)C-exchange, and with labeling rates that are limited by steady-state pool sizes in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Anatomical and metabolic small-animal whole-body imaging using ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Due to the wide use of animals for human disease studies, small animal whole-body imaging plays an increasingly important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose metabolic information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image coregistration, the spatial resolution of the metabolic imaging modality is not improved. We present a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT) system that can provide both assessments in a single modality. Utilizing the novel design of confocal full-ring light delivery and ultrasound transducer array detection, RC-PACT provides full-view cross-sectional imaging with high spatial resolution. Scanning along the orthogonal direction provides three-dimensional imaging. While the mouse anatomy was imaged with endogenous hemoglobin contrast, the glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose. Through mouse tumor models, we demonstrate that RC-PACT may be a paradigm shifting imaging method for preclinical research.

  20. Rapid detection of parasite in muscle fibers of fishes using a portable microscope imaging technique (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jayoung; Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S.; Cho, Byoungkwan

    2017-05-01

    Fishes are a widely used food material in the world. Recently about 4% of the fishes are infected with Kudoa thyrsites in Asian ocean. Kudoa thyrsites is a parasite that is found within the muscle fibers of fishes. The infected fishes can be a reason of food poisoning, which should be sorted out before distribution and consumption. Although Kudoa thyrsites is visible to the naked eye, it could be easily overlooked due to the micro-scale size and similar color with fish tissue. In addition, the visual inspection is labor intensive works resulting in loss of money and time. In this study, a portable microscopic camera was utilized to obtain images of raw fish slices. The optimized image processing techniques with polarized transmittance images provided reliable performance. The result shows that the portable microscopic imaging method can be used to detect parasites rapidly and non-destructively, which could be an alternative to manual inspections.

  1. Spectral phasor analysis allows rapid and reliable unmixing of fluorescence microscopy spectral images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fereidouni, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372641431; Bader, A.N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/291137334; Gerritsen, H.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071548777

    2012-01-01

    A new global analysis algorithm to analyse (hyper-) spectral images is presented. It is based on the phasor representation that has been demonstrated to be very powerful for the analysis of lifetime imaging data. In spectral phasor analysis the fluorescence spectrum of each pixel in the image is

  2. Refining prognosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma through incorporation of metabolic imaging biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Satoshi [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology, Sapporo (Japan); The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Rohren, Eric M. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Abdel-Wahab, Reham [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Assiut University Hospital, Clinical Oncology Department, Assiut (Egypt); Xiao, Lianchun; Morris, Jeffrey S. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Houston, TX (United States); Macapinlac, Homer A. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Hassan, Manal M. [Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Kaseb, Ahmed O. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-06-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomopraphy/computed tomography (FDGPET/CT) has been proven to be useful for imaging many types of cancer; however, its role is not well defined in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We assessed the prognostic value of metabolic imaging biomarkers as established by baseline pretreatment FDG PET/CT in patients with HCC. We retrospectively analyzed the records of patients with HCC who underwent FDG PET/CT before initial treatment from May 2013 through May 2014. Four PET/CT parameters were measured: maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and tumor-to-normal-liver SUV ratio (TNR). Optimal cut-off values for the PET/CT parameters to stratify patients in terms of overall survival (OS) were determined. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine whether the PET/CT parameters could add to the prognostic value of the Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) scoring system and the Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system. The analysis included 56 patients. Univariate analysis of the association between OS and continuous variables, including the PET/CT parameters SUV{sub max}, TLG, tumor size, total bilirubin level, and alkaline phosphatase level were significant predictors of OS. SUV{sub max} ≥ 11.7, TLG ≥ 1,341, MTV ≥ 230 mL, and TNR ≥ 4.8 were identified as cut-off values. Multivariate analysis revealed that SUV{sub max} ≥ 11.7 and TNR ≥ 4.8 were independent factors predicting a poor prognosis in both the CLIP scoring system and the BCLC staging system, as was TLG in the BCLC staging system. Pretreatment FDG PET/CT in patients with HCC can add to the prognostic value of standard clinical measures. Incorporation of imaging biomarkers derived from FDG PET/CT into HCC staging systems should be considered. (orig.)

  3. In vivo application of sub-second spiral chemical shift imaging (CSI) to hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging: comparison with phase-encoded CSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dirk; Yen, Yi-Fen; Levin, Yakir S; Tropp, James; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Hurd, Ralph E; Spielman, Daniel M

    2010-06-01

    A fast spiral chemical shift imaging (CSI) has been developed to address the challenge of the limited acquisition window in hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic imaging. The sequence exploits the sparsity of the spectra and prior knowledge of resonance frequencies to reduce the measurement time by undersampling the data in the spectral domain. As a consequence, multiple reconstructions are necessary for any given data set as only frequency components within a selected bandwidth are reconstructed "in-focus" while components outside that band are severely blurred ("spectral tomosynthesis"). A variable-flip-angle scheme was used for optimal use of the longitudinal magnetization. The sequence was applied to sub-second metabolic imaging of the rat in vivo after injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]-pyruvate on a clinical 3T MR scanner. The comparison with conventional CSI based on phase encoding showed similar signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution in metabolic maps for the substrate and its metabolic products lactate, alanine, and bicarbonate, despite a 50-fold reduction in scan time for the spiral CSI acquisition. The presented results demonstrate that dramatic reductions in scan time are feasible in hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic imaging without a penalty in SNR or spatial resolution. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementing an Accurate and Rapid Sparse Sampling Approach for Low-Dose Atomic Resolution STEM Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovarik, Libor; Stevens, Andrew J.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-10-17

    Aberration correction for scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM) has dramatically increased spatial image resolution for beam-stable materials, but it is the sample stability rather than the microscope that often limits the practical resolution of STEM images. To extract physical information from images of beam sensitive materials it is becoming clear that there is a critical dose/dose-rate below which the images can be interpreted as representative of the pristine material, while above it the observation is dominated by beam effects. Here we describe an experimental approach for sparse sampling in the STEM and in-painting image reconstruction in order to reduce the electron dose/dose-rate to the sample during imaging. By characterizing the induction limited rise-time and hysteresis in scan coils, we show that sparse line-hopping approach to scan randomization can be implemented that optimizes both the speed of the scan and the amount of the sample that needs to be illuminated by the beam. The dose and acquisition time for the sparse sampling is shown to be effectively decreased by factor of 5x relative to conventional acquisition, permitting imaging of beam sensitive materials to be obtained without changing the microscope operating parameters. The use of sparse line-hopping scan to acquire STEM images is demonstrated with atomic resolution aberration corrected Z-contrast images of CaCO3, a material that is traditionally difficult to image by TEM/STEM because of dose issues.

  5. The rapid imaging renaissance: sparser samples, denser dimensions, and glimmerings of a grand unified tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodickson, Daniel K.; Feng, Li; Knoll, Florian; Cloos, Martijn; Ben-Eliezer, Noam; Axel, Leon; Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Tobias; Otazo, Ricardo

    2015-03-01

    The task of imaging is to gather spatiotemporal information which can be organized into a coherent map. Tomographic imaging in particular involves the use of multiple projections, or other interactions of a probe (light, sound, etc.) with a body, in order to determine cross-sectional information. Though the probes and the corresponding imaging modalities may vary, and though the methodology of particular imaging approaches is in constant ferment, the conceptual underpinnings of tomographic imaging have in many ways remained fixed for many decades. Recent advances in applied mathematics, however, have begun to roil this intellectual landscape. The advent of compressed sensing, anticipated in various algorithms dating back many years but unleashed in full theoretical force in the last decade, has changed the way imagers have begun to think about data acquisition and image reconstruction. The power of incoherent sampling and sparsity-enforcing reconstruction has been demonstrated in various contexts and, when combined with other modern fast imaging techniques, has enabled unprecedented increases in imaging efficiency. Perhaps more importantly, however, such approaches have spurred a shift in perspective, prompting us to focus less on nominal data sufficiency than on information content. Beginning with examples from MRI, then proceeding through selected other modalities such as CT and PET, as well as multimodality combinations, this paper explores the potential of newly evolving acquisition and reconstruction paradigms to change the way we do imaging in the lab and in the clinic.

  6. NDER: A novel web application using annotated whole slide images for rapid improvements in human pattern recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P Reder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Whole-slide images (WSIs present a rich source of information for education, training, and quality assurance. However, they are often used in a fashion similar to glass slides rather than in novel ways that leverage the advantages of WSI. We have created a pipeline to transform annotated WSI into pattern recognition training, and quality assurance web application called novel diagnostic electronic resource (NDER. Aims: Create an efficient workflow for extracting annotated WSI for use by NDER, an attractive web application that provides high-throughput training. Materials and Methods: WSI were annotated by a resident and classified into five categories. Two methods of extracting images and creating image databases were compared. Extraction Method 1: Manual extraction of still images and validation of each image by four breast pathologists. Extraction Method 2: Validation of annotated regions on the WSI by a single experienced breast pathologist and automated extraction of still images tagged by diagnosis. The extracted still images were used by NDER. NDER briefly displays an image, requires users to classify the image after time has expired, then gives users immediate feedback. Results: The NDER workflow is efficient: annotation of a WSI requires 5 min and validation by an expert pathologist requires An additional one to 2 min. The pipeline is highly automated, with only annotation and validation requiring human input. NDER effectively displays hundreds of high-quality, high-resolution images and provides immediate feedback to users during a 30 min session. Conclusions: NDER efficiently uses annotated WSI to rapidly increase pattern recognition and evaluate for diagnostic proficiency.

  7. Direct, rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test from positive blood cultures based on microscopic imaging analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jungil; Jeong, Hyun Yong; Lee, Gi Yoon; Han, Sangkwon; Han, Shinhun; Jin, Bonghwan; Lim, Taegeun; Kim, Shin; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Hee Chan; Kim, Eui-Chong; Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Taek Soo; Kwon, Sunghoon

    2017-01-01

    For the timely treatment of patients with infections in bloodstream and cerebrospinal fluid, a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) is urgently needed. Here, we describe a direct and rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (dRAST) system, which can determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria from a positive blood culture bottle (PBCB) in six hours. The positive blood culture sample is directly mixed with agarose and inoculated into a micropatterned plastic microchip wit...

  8. Shadow and feature recognition aids for rapid image geo-registration in UAV vision system architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Wolfgang; Kölsch, Mathias

    2009-05-01

    The problem of real-time image geo-referencing is encountered in all vision based cognitive systems. In this paper we present a model-image feedback approach to this problem and show how it can be applied to image exploitation from Unmanned Arial Vehicle (UAV) vision systems. By calculating reference images from a known terrain database, using a novel ray trace algorithm, we are able to eliminate foreshortening, elevation, and lighting distortions, introduce registration aids and reduce the geo-referencing problem to a linear transformation search over the two dimensional image space. A method for shadow calculation that maintains real-time performance is also presented. The paper then discusses the implementation of our model-image feedback approach in the Perspective View Nascent Technology (PVNT) software package and provides sample results from UAV mission control and target mensuration experiments conducted at China Lake and Camp Roberts, California.

  9. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teune, Laura K; Renken, Remco J; de Jong, Bauke M; Willemsen, Antoon T; van Osch, Matthias J; Roerdink, Jos B T M; Dierckx, Rudi A; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, the spatial distribution of resting cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose are closely related. A relatively new magnetic resonance (MR) technique, pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL), can be used to measure regional brain perfusion. We identified a Parkinson's disease (PD)-related perfusion and metabolic covariance pattern in the same patients using PCASL and FDG-PET imaging and assessed (dis)similarities in the disease-related pattern between perfusion and metabolism in PD patients. Nineteen PD patients and seventeen healthy controls underwent [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Of 14 PD patients and all healthy controls PCASL-MRI could be obtained. Data were analyzed using scaled subprofile model/principal component analysis (SSM/PCA). Unique Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and metabolic covariance patterns were identified using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients. The PD-related metabolic covariance brain pattern is in high accordance with previously reports. Also our disease-related perfusion pattern is comparable to the earlier described perfusion pattern. The most marked difference between our perfusion and metabolic patterns is the larger perfusion decrease in cortical regions including the insula. We identified PD-related perfusion and metabolic brain patterns using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients which were comparable with results of existing research. In this respect, PCASL appears to be a promising addition in the early diagnosis of individual parkinsonian patients.

  10. Neo-angiogenesis metabolic biomarker of tumor-genesis tracking by infrared joystick contact imaging in personalized homecare system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Hoekstra, Philip; Landa, Joseph; Vydelingum, Nadarajen A.

    2014-05-01

    We describe an affordable, harmless, and administrative (AHA) metabolic biomarker (MBM) for homecare cancer screening. It may save hundreds of thousands of women's and thousands of men's lives every year from breast cancer and melanoma. The goal is to increase the specificity of infrared (IR) imagery to reduce the false alarm rate (FAR). The patient's hands are immersed in icy cold water, about 11oC, for 30 seconds. We then compare two IR images, taken before and after the cold stimulus, and the difference reveals an enhanced signal and noise ratio (SNR) at tumorigenesis sites since the contraction of capillaries under cold challenge is natural to healthy capillaries, except those newly built capillaries during angiogenesis (Folkman, Nature 1995). Concomitant with the genome and the phenome (molecular signaling by phosphor-mediate protein causing inflammation by platelet activating factor (PAF) that transform cells from benign to malignant is the amplification of nitric oxide (NO) syntheses, a short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) that dilates regional blood vessels; superseding normal autonomic nervous system regulation. A rapidly growing tumor site might implicate accumulation of ROS, for which NO can rapidly stretch the capillary bed system usually having thinning muscular lining known as Neo-Angiogenesis (NA) that could behave like Leaky In-situ Faucet Effect (LIFE) in response to cold challenge. To emphasize the state of art knowledge of NA, we mentioned in passing the first generation of an anticapillary growth drug, Avastin by Genetech; it is an antibody protein that is injected for metastasis, while the second generation drug; Sorafenib by Bayers (2001) and Sutent by Pfizer (2000) both target molecular signaling loci to block receptor associated tyrosine kinase induced protein phosphorylation in order to reverse the angiogenesis. Differentiating benign from malignant in a straightforward manner is required to achieve the wellness protocol, yet would

  11. Rapid Measurements of Intensities for Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2014-01-01

    FDA requires that intensity and safety parameters are measured for all imaging schemes for clinical imaging. This is often cumbersome, since the scan sequence has to broken apart, measurements conducted for the individually emitted beams, and the nal intensity levels calculated by combining the i...

  12. Rapid Retrieval of Lung Nodule CT Images Based on Hashing and Pruning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Pan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The similarity-based retrieval of lung nodule computed tomography (CT images is an important task in the computer-aided diagnosis of lung lesions. It can provide similar clinical cases for physicians and help them make reliable clinical diagnostic decisions. However, when handling large-scale lung images with a general-purpose computer, traditional image retrieval methods may not be efficient. In this paper, a new retrieval framework based on a hashing method for lung nodule CT images is proposed. This method can translate high-dimensional image features into a compact hash code, so the retrieval time and required memory space can be reduced greatly. Moreover, a pruning algorithm is presented to further improve the retrieval speed, and a pruning-based decision rule is presented to improve the retrieval precision. Finally, the proposed retrieval method is validated on 2,450 lung nodule CT images selected from the public Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC database. The experimental results show that the proposed pruning algorithm effectively reduces the retrieval time of lung nodule CT images and improves the retrieval precision. In addition, the retrieval framework is evaluated by differentiating benign and malignant nodules, and the classification accuracy can reach 86.62%, outperforming other commonly used classification methods.

  13. Rapid Retrieval of Lung Nodule CT Images Based on Hashing and Pruning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ling; Qiang, Yan; Yuan, Jie; Wu, Lidong

    2016-01-01

    The similarity-based retrieval of lung nodule computed tomography (CT) images is an important task in the computer-aided diagnosis of lung lesions. It can provide similar clinical cases for physicians and help them make reliable clinical diagnostic decisions. However, when handling large-scale lung images with a general-purpose computer, traditional image retrieval methods may not be efficient. In this paper, a new retrieval framework based on a hashing method for lung nodule CT images is proposed. This method can translate high-dimensional image features into a compact hash code, so the retrieval time and required memory space can be reduced greatly. Moreover, a pruning algorithm is presented to further improve the retrieval speed, and a pruning-based decision rule is presented to improve the retrieval precision. Finally, the proposed retrieval method is validated on 2,450 lung nodule CT images selected from the public Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) database. The experimental results show that the proposed pruning algorithm effectively reduces the retrieval time of lung nodule CT images and improves the retrieval precision. In addition, the retrieval framework is evaluated by differentiating benign and malignant nodules, and the classification accuracy can reach 86.62%, outperforming other commonly used classification methods.

  14. Rapid Assessment of Tablet Film Coating Quality by Multispectral UV Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klukkert, Marten; Wu, Jian X.; Rantanen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    and coated with a polyvinyl alcohol-polyethylene glycol graft copolymer using a pan coater. It was demonstrated that the coating intactness can be assessed accurately and fast by UV imaging. The different types of coating defects could be differentiated and localized based on multivariate image analysis...

  15. Investigation of Fat Metabolism during Antiobesity Interventions by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunima Pola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of current treatments for obesity is to reduce the body weight or visceral fat, which requires longer duration to show effect. In this study, we investigated the short-term changes in fat metabolism in liver, abdomen, and skeletal muscle during antiobesity interventions including Sibutramine treatment and diet restriction in obese rats using magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and blood chemistry. Sibutramine is an antiobesity drug that results in weight loss by increasing satiety and energy expenditure. The Sibutramine-treated rats showed reduction of liver fat and intramyocellular lipids on day 3. The triglycerides (TG decreased on day 1 and 3 compared to baseline (day 0. The early response/nonresponse in different fat depots will permit optimization of treatment for better clinical outcome rather than staying with a drug for longer periods.

  16. Implementing an accurate and rapid sparse sampling approach for low-dose atomic resolution STEM imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, L.; Stevens, A.; Liyu, A.; Browning, N. D.

    2016-10-01

    While aberration correction for scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) dramatically increased the spatial resolution obtainable in the images of materials that are stable under the electron beam, the practical resolution of many STEM images is now limited by the sample stability rather than the microscope. To extract physical information from the images of beam sensitive materials, it is becoming clear that there is a critical dose/dose-rate below which the images can be interpreted as representative of the pristine material, while above it the observation is dominated by beam effects. Here, we describe an experimental approach for sparse sampling in the STEM and in-painting image reconstruction in order to reduce the electron dose/dose-rate to the sample during imaging. By characterizing the induction limited rise-time and hysteresis in the scan coils, we show that a sparse line-hopping approach to scan randomization can be implemented that optimizes both the speed of the scan and the amount of the sample that needs to be illuminated by the beam. The dose and acquisition time for the sparse sampling is shown to be effectively decreased by at least a factor of 5× relative to conventional acquisition, permitting imaging of beam sensitive materials to be obtained without changing the microscope operating parameters. The use of sparse line-hopping scan to acquire STEM images is demonstrated with atomic resolution aberration corrected the Z-contrast images of CaCO3, a material that is traditionally difficult to image by TEM/STEM because of dosage issues.

  17. Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Patterns in Metabolic and Toxic Brain Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R.N. [Ege Univ. Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate metabolic and toxic brain disorders that manifest with restricted, elevated, or both restricted and elevated diffusion patterns on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: Echo-planar diffusion MRI examinations were obtained in 34 pediatric patients with metabolic and toxic brain disorders proved by appropriate laboratory studies. The MRI unit operated at 1.5T with a gradient strength of 30 mT/meter, and a rise time of 600 s. b=1000 s/mm{sup 2} images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps with ADC values were studied. Results: Three patterns were observed: 1. A restricted diffusion pattern (high signal on b=1000 s/mm{sup 2} images and low ADC values); 2. an elevated diffusion pattern (normal signal on b=1000 s/mm2 images and high ADC values); and 3. a mixed pattern (coexistent restricted and increased diffusion patterns in the same patient). Disorders manifesting with a restricted diffusion pattern included metachromatic leukodystrophy (n=2), phenylketonuria (n=3), maple syrup urine disease (intermediate form) (n=1), infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (n=1), Leigh (n=2), Wilson (n=3), and Canavan disease (n=1). Disorders with an elevated diffusion pattern included phenylketonuria (n=1), adrenoleukodystrophy (n=1), merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (n=2), mucopolysaccharidosis (n=2), Lowe syndrome (n=1), Leigh (n=2), Alexander (n=1), Pelizaeus-Merzbacher (n=1), and Wilson (n=3) disease. Disorders with a mixed pattern included L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria (n=2), non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (n=1), infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (n=2), maple syrup urine disease (n=1), and Leigh (n=1) disease. Conclusion: The findings suggested that the three different diffusion patterns reflect the histopathological changes associated with the disorders and different stages of a particular disorder. It is likely that the restricted diffusion pattern corresponds to abnormalities related to myelin, and the elevated

  18. Metabolic imaging of human kidney triglyceride content: reproducibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan Hammer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for quantification of triglyceride content and to compare spectral quality and reproducibility without and with respiratory motion compensation in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Institutional Review Board of our institution approved the study protocol, and written informed consent was obtained. After technical optimization, a total of 20 healthy volunteers underwent renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the renal cortex both without and with respiratory motion compensation and volume tracking. After the first session the subjects were repositioned and the protocol was repeated to assess reproducibility. Spectral quality (linewidth of the water signal and triglyceride content were quantified. Bland-Altman analyses and a test by Pitman were performed. RESULTS: Linewidth changed from 11.5±0.4 Hz to 10.7±0.4 Hz (all data pooled, p<0.05, without and with respiratory motion compensation respectively. Mean % triglyceride content in the first and second session without respiratory motion compensation were respectively 0.58±0.12% and 0.51±0.14% (P = NS. Mean % triglyceride content in the first and second session with respiratory motion compensation were respectively 0.44±0.10% and 0.43±0.10% (P = NS between sessions and P = NS compared to measurements with respiratory motion compensation. Bland-Altman analyses showed narrower limits of agreement and a significant difference in the correlated variances (correlation of -0.59, P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Metabolic imaging of the human kidney using renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a feasible tool to assess cortical triglyceride content in humans in vivo and the use of respiratory motion compensation significantly improves spectral quality and reproducibility. Therefore, respiratory motion compensation seems a necessity for metabolic imaging of renal triglyceride content in vivo.

  19. Television, disordered eating, and young women in Fiji: negotiating body image and identity during rapid social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anne E

    2004-12-01

    Although the relationship between media exposure and risk behavior among youth is established at a population level, the specific psychological and social mechanisms mediating the adverse effects of media on youth remain poorly understood. This study reports on an investigation of the impact of the introduction of television to a rural community in Western Fiji on adolescent ethnic Fijian girls in a setting of rapid social and economic change. Narrative data were collected from 30 purposively selected ethnic Fijian secondary school girls via semi-structured, open-ended interviews. Interviews were conducted in 1998, 3 years after television was first broadcast to this region of Fiji. Narrative data were analyzed for content relating to response to television and mechanisms that mediate self and body image in Fijian adolescents. Data in this sample suggest that media imagery is used in both creative and destructive ways by adolescent Fijian girls to navigate opportunities and conflicts posed by the rapidly changing social environment. Study respondents indicated their explicit modeling of the perceived positive attributes of characters presented in television dramas, but also the beginnings of weight and body shape preoccupation, purging behavior to control weight, and body disparagement. Response to television appeared to be shaped by a desire for competitive social positioning during a period of rapid social transition. Understanding vulnerability to images and values imported with media will be critical to preventing disordered eating and, potentially, other youth risk behaviors in this population, as well as other populations at risk.

  20. PET imaging of blood flow and glucose metabolism in localized musculoskeletal tumors of the extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, Paula, E-mail: paula.lindholm@tyks.f [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku University Hospital, Turku FI-20521 (Finland); Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Sutinen, Eija [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku University Hospital, Turku FI-20521 (Finland); Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Oikonen, Vesa [Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Mattila, Kimmo [Department of Radiology, Turku University Hospital, Turku FI-20521 (Finland); Tarkkanen, Maija [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Kallajoki, Markku [Department of Pathology, Turku University Hospital, Turku FI-20521 (Finland); Aro, Hannu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku FI-20521 (Finland); Boehling, Tom [Department of Pathology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Kivioja, Aarne [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, FI-00029 (Finland); Elomaa, Inkeri [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Minn, Heikki [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku University Hospital, Turku FI-20521 (Finland); Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland)

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: Little is known about blood flow in sarcomas. Our purpose was to study glucose metabolism and blood flow in untreated localized musculoskeletal tumors of the extremities using [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), oxygen-15 labeled water ([15O]H{sub 2}O) and positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Six patients with high-grade osteosarcoma (OS), two with soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) and one with aneurysmal bone cyst had PET studies with [15O]H{sub 2}O and FDG. Arterial blood sampling and autoradiography calculation method were used to define blood flow as milliliters per 100 g times minutes. Tumor FDG uptake was measured as standardized uptake values (SUVs) and regional metabolic rates for FDG (rMRFDG). Two patients also had FDG PET studies during (one patient) and after (two patients) preoperative chemotherapy. All patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The PET findings were compared with the clinical follow-up data and results of DCE-MRI. Results: Blood flow in bone tumors was 31.7-75.2 ml/(100 gxmin) and in STS 9.0-45.9 ml/(100 gxmin). [{sup 18}F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and rMRFDG in untreated bone tumors were 5.4-18.4 and 10.9-57.4 {mu}mol/100 g/min, respectively. [{sup 18}F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and rMRFDG in STS were 2.6-11.5 and 5.6-32.2 {mu}mol/100 g/min, respectively. Four of five sarcomas with SUV>9.0 have already relapsed. High blood flow in untreated OS was related to long overall survival, while the predictive power of glucose metabolism was less apparent. Good histopathological response to therapy was not associated with long survival. Conclusions: Measurement of blood flow in musculoskeletal tumors appears to be feasible by PET and [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O. The influence of tumor blood flow and glucose metabolism on the final outcome in sarcoma is variable and needs further research.

  1. Process for rapid detection of fratricidal defects on optics using Linescan Phase Differential Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravizza, F L; Nostrand, M C; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hawley, R A; Johnson, M A

    2009-11-05

    Phase-defects on optics used in high-power lasers can cause light intensification leading to laser-induced damage of downstream optics. We introduce Linescan Phase Differential Imaging (LPDI), a large-area dark-field imaging technique able to identify phase-defects in the bulk or surface of large-aperture optics with a 67 second scan-time. Potential phase-defects in the LPDI images are indentified by an image analysis code and measured with a Phase Shifting Diffraction Interferometer (PSDI). The PSDI data is used to calculate the defects potential for downstream damage using an empirical laser-damage model that incorporates a laser propagation code. A ray tracing model of LPDI was developed to enhance our understanding of its phase-defect detection mechanism and reveal limitations.

  2. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic changes during epithelial-mesenchymal transition of cancer cells by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyuan; Min, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Study of metabolic changes during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells is important for basic understanding and therapeutic management of cancer progression. We here used metabolic labeling and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a strategy of bioorthogonal chemical imaging, to directly visualize changes in anabolic metabolism during cancer EMT at a single-cell level. MCF-7 breast cancer cell is employed as a model system. Four types of metabolites (amino acids, glucose, fatty acids, and choline) are labeled with either deuterium or alkyne (C≡C) tag. Their intracellular incorporations into MCF-7 cells before or after EMT are visualized by SRS imaging targeted at the signature vibration frequency of C-D or C≡C bonds. Overall, after EMT, anabolism of amino acids, glucose, and choline is less active, reflecting slower protein and membrane synthesis in mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, we also observed less incorporation of glucose and palmitate acids into membrane lipids, but more of them into lipid droplets in mesenchymal cells. This result indicates that, although mesenchymal cells synthesize fewer membrane lipids, they are actively storing energy into lipid droplets, either through de novo lipogenesis from glucose or direct scavenging of exogenous free fatty acids. Hence, metabolic labeling coupled with SRS can be a straightforward method in imaging cancer metabolism.

  3. Lobster-eye x-ray optics: a rapid evaluation of the image distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peele, A G; Nugent, K A

    1998-02-01

    A method for calculating the image distribution for one-dimensional lobster-eye optics is presented. This method gives the image distribution exactly for certain cases and offers improved speed over the method of ray tracing. Examples of the use of the algorithm are given. We show that the algorithm gives the same results as detailed ray-tracing codes. Extension of the method to the two-dimensional case is discussed.

  4. [Rapid 2D-3D medical image registration based on CUDA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingzhi; Zou, Beiji

    2014-08-01

    The medical image registration between preoperative three-dimensional (3D) scan data and intraoperative two-dimensional (2D) image is a key technology in the surgical navigation. Most previous methods need to generate 2D digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) images from the 3D scan volume data, then use conventional image similarity function for comparison. This procedure includes a large amount of calculation and is difficult to archive real-time processing. In this paper, with using geometric feature and image density mixed characteristics, we proposed a new similarity measure function for fast 2D-3D registration of preoperative CT and intraoperative X-ray images. This algorithm is easy to implement, and the calculation process is very short, while the resulting registration accuracy can meet the clinical use. In addition, the entire calculation process is very suitable for highly parallel numerical calculation by using the algorithm based on CUDA hardware acceleration to satisfy the requirement of real-time application in surgery.

  5. Automated Formosat Image Processing System for Rapid Response to International Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, M. C.; Chou, S. C.; Chen, Y. C.; Chen, B.; Liu, C.; Yu, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    FORMOSAT-2, Taiwan's first remote sensing satellite, was successfully launched in May of 2004 into the Sun-synchronous orbit at 891 kilometers of altitude. With the daily revisit feature, the 2-m panchromatic, 8-m multi-spectral resolution images captured have been used for researches and operations in various societal benefit areas. This paper details the orchestration of various tasks conducted in different institutions in Taiwan in the efforts responding to international disasters. The institutes involved including its space agency-National Space Organization (NSPO), Center for Satellite Remote Sensing Research of National Central University, GIS Center of Feng-Chia University, and the National Center for High-performance Computing. Since each institution has its own mandate, the coordinated tasks ranged from receiving emergency observation requests, scheduling and tasking of satellite operation, downlink to ground stations, images processing including data injection, ortho-rectification, to delivery of image products. With the lessons learned from working with international partners, the FORMOSAT Image Processing System has been extensively automated and streamlined with a goal to shorten the time between request and delivery in an efficient manner. The integrated team has developed an Application Interface to its system platform that provides functions of search in archive catalogue, request of data services, mission planning, inquiry of services status, and image download. This automated system enables timely image acquisition and substantially increases the value of data product. Example outcome of these efforts in recent response to support Sentinel Asia in Nepal Earthquake is demonstrated herein.

  6. 3D noninvasive, high-resolution imaging using a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system and rapid wavelength-cycling lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Gross, Daniel; Klosner, Marc; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-05-01

    Globally, cancer is a major health issue as advances in modern medicine continue to extend the human life span. Breast cancer ranks second as a cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) provides high molecular contrast at greater depths in tissue without the use of ionizing radiation. In this work, we describe the development of a PA tomography (PAT) system and a rapid wavelength-cycling Alexandrite laser designed for clinical PAI applications. The laser produces 450 mJ/pulse at 25 Hz to illuminate the entire breast, which eliminates the need to scan the laser source. Wavelength cycling provides a pulse sequence in which the output wavelength repeatedly alternates between 755 nm and 797 nm rapidly within milliseconds. We present imaging results of breast phantoms with inclusions of different sizes at varying depths, obtained with this laser source, a 5-MHz 128-element transducer and a 128-channel Verasonics system. Results include PA images and 3D reconstruction of the breast phantom at 755 and 797 nm, delineating the inclusions that mimic tumors in the breast.

  7. Rapid Automatic Lighting Control of a Mixed Light Source for Image Acquisition using Derivative Optimum Search Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim HyungTae

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic lighting (auto-lighting is a function that maximizes the image quality of a vision inspection system by adjusting the light intensity and color.In most inspection systems, a single color light source is used, and an equal step search is employed to determine the maximum image quality. However, when a mixed light source is used, the number of iterations becomes large, and therefore, a rapid search method must be applied to reduce their number. Derivative optimum search methods follow the tangential direction of a function and are usually faster than other methods. In this study, multi-dimensional forms of derivative optimum search methods are applied to obtain the maximum image quality considering a mixed-light source. The auto-lighting algorithms were derived from the steepest descent and conjugate gradient methods, which have N-size inputs of driving voltage and one output of image quality. Experiments in which the proposed algorithm was applied to semiconductor patterns showed that a reduced number of iterations is required to determine the locally maximized image quality.

  8. AOTF-based near-infrared imaging spectrometer for rapid identification of camouflaged target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhifan; Zeng, Libo; Wu, Qiongshui

    2014-11-01

    Acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is a novel device for spectrometer. The electronic tunability qualifies it with the most compelling advantages of higher wavelength scan rate over the conventional spectrometers that are mechanically tuned, and the feature of large angular aperture makes the AOTF particularly suitable in imaging applications. In this research, an AOTF-based near-infrared imaging spectrometer was developed. The spectrometer consists of a TeO2 AOTF module, a near-infrared imaging lens assembly, an AOTF controller, an InGaAs array detector, an image acquisition card, and a PC. A precisely designed optical wedge is placed at the emergent surface of the AOTF to deal with the inherent dispersion of the TeO2 that may degrade the spatial resolution. The direct digital synthesizer (DDS) techniques and the phase locked loop (PLL) techniques are combined for radio frequency (RF) signal synthesis. The PLL is driven by the DDS to take advantage of both their merits of high frequency resolution, high frequency scan rate and strong spurious signals resistance capability. All the functions relating to wavelength scan, image acquisition, processing, storge and display are controlled by the PC. Calibration results indicate that the spectral range is 898~1670 nm, the spectral resolution is 6.8 nm(@1064 nm), the wavelength separation between frames in the spectral image assembly is 1.0 nm, and the processing time of a single image is less than 1 ms if a TV camera with 640×512 detector is incorporated. A prototype device was assembled to test the capability of differentiating samples with similar appearances, and satisfactory results were achieved. By this device, the chemical compositions and the distribution information can be obtained simultaneously. This system has the most advantages of no moving parts, fast wavelength scan and strong vibration resistance. The proposed imaging spectrometer has a significant application prospect in the area of identification of

  9. Foraminiferal Metabolism Under Hypoxia: Sub-Cellular NanoSIMS Imaging of Intertidal Ammonia tepida Feeding Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeKieffre, C.; Spangenberg, J.; Geslin, E.; Meibom, A.

    2016-02-01

    Hypoxic events particularly affect benthic ecosystems on continental shelves and in coastal areas where renewal of bottom waters slow. Foraminifera living in such environments are among the most tolerant to hypoxia in the meiofauna. Some foraminifera species are able to survive hypoxia, and even anoxia, for weeks to months. Different species must have developed different mechanisms for survival - hypotheses include reduction of the metabolism, symbiosis with bacteria, or denitrification. NanoSIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) imaging is a powerful analytical technique to visualize and quantify the incorporation and transfer of isotopically labeled compounds in organisms with subcellular resolution. We used NanoSIMS imaging, correlated with TEM ultrastructural observations of individual foraminifera, to study the metabolism of intertidal Ammonia tepida, which has shown strongly reduced metabolism under anoxia. Individuals were fed with a 13C-labeled microalgal biofilm and incubated for 4 weeks in oxic and anoxic conditions, respectively. NanoSIMS imaging reveal strongly contrasting cellular-level dynamics of integration and transfer of the ingested biofilm components under the two conditions. In oxic conditions, ingested biofilm components are internalized, metabolized, and used for biosynthesis of different cellular components on a time scale of 24 hours: Lipid droplets are formed, then consumed through respiration. In contrast, upon the onset of anoxia, individual internalized biofilm components remain visible within the cytoplasm after 4 weeks. Lipids of different compositions are initially formed but then not respired. These observations indicate that foraminifera do initially have an active heterotrophic metabolism in the absence of oxygen, but this it is strongly reduced when oxygen is no longer available. Isotopic labeling experiments, NanoSIMS and TEM imaging, and GC-MS will be key to study metabolic mechanisms under anoxic conditions in marine

  10. Targeting Amino Acid Metabolism for Molecular Imaging of Inflammation Early After Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James T; Bankstahl, Jens P; Wang, Yong; Wollert, Kai C; Bengel, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    Acute tissue inflammation after myocardial infarction influences healing and remodeling and has been identified as a target for novel therapies. Molecular imaging holds promise for guidance of such therapies. The amino acid (11)C-methionine is a clinically approved agent which is thought to accumulate in macrophages, but not in healthy myocytes. We assessed the suitability of positron emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-methionine for imaging post-MI inflammation, from cell to mouse to man. Uptake assays demonstrated 7-fold higher (11)C-methionine uptake by polarized pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages over anti-inflammatory M2 subtypes (p<0.001). C57Bl/6 mice (n=27) underwent coronary artery ligation or no surgery. Serial (11)C-methionine PET was performed 3, 5 and 7d later. MI mice exhibited a perfusion defect in 32-50% of the left ventricle (LV). PET detected increased (11)C-methionine accumulation in the infarct territory at 3d (5.9±0.9%ID/g vs 4.7±0.9 in remote myocardium, and 2.6±0.5 in healthy mice; p<0.05 and <0.01 respectively), which declined by d7 post-MI (4.3±0.6 in infarct, 3.4±0.8 in remote; p=0.03 vs 3d, p=0.08 vs healthy). Increased (11)C-methionine uptake was associated with macrophage infiltration of damaged myocardium. Treatment with anti-integrin antibodies (anti-CD11a, -CD11b, -CD49d; 100µg) lowered macrophage content by 56% and (11)C-methionine uptake by 46% at 3d post-MI. A patient study at 3d after ST-elevation MI and early reperfusion confirmed elevated (11)C-methionine uptake in the hypoperfused myocardial region. Targeting of elevated amino acid metabolism in pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages enables PET imaging-derived demarcation of tissue inflammation after MI. (11)C-methionine-based molecular imaging may assist in the translation of novel image-guided, inflammation-targeted regenerative therapies.

  11. Tissue viability (TiVi) imaging: utility in assessment of rapid changes in the cutaneous microvasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Paul M.; O'Doherty, Jim; O'Connell, Marie-Louise; Fitzgerald, Barry W.; Anderson, Chris D.; Nilsson, Gert E.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2010-02-01

    This report outlines results from an independent study assessing the clinical potential of an emerging, contemporary imaging technology. Tissue Viability (TiVi) imaging is an easily implemented, non-invasive, and portable technique which maps the blood circulation in the surface dermal layer. However, its routine clinical implementation awaits the development of the necessary standardised protocols. Thus the pilot study examines the efficacy of a novel TiVi imaging device within a localised skin blood flow occlusion protocol. The test was administered to the upper volar forearm of 19 healthy subjects (10:9 Female:Male) for 5 different time periods ranging from 5 to 25 seconds. Dermal areas corresponding to 100 × 100 pixels (2.89 cm2) were monitored for 60 seconds prior to, during and after each occlusal test. Our results support the relevance of a TiVi occlusion protocol for physiological assessment of the skin microcirculation.

  12. AUTOMATED FORMOSAT IMAGE PROCESSING SYSTEM FOR RAPID RESPONSE TO INTERNATIONAL DISASTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available FORMOSAT-2, Taiwan’s first remote sensing satellite, was successfully launched in May of 2004 into the Sun-synchronous orbit at 891 kilometers of altitude. With the daily revisit feature, the 2-m panchromatic, 8-m multi-spectral resolution images captured have been used for researches and operations in various societal benefit areas. This paper details the orchestration of various tasks conducted in different institutions in Taiwan in the efforts responding to international disasters. The institutes involved including its space agency-National Space Organization (NSPO, Center for Satellite Remote Sensing Research of National Central University, GIS Center of Feng-Chia University, and the National Center for High-performance Computing. Since each institution has its own mandate, the coordinated tasks ranged from receiving emergency observation requests, scheduling and tasking of satellite operation, downlink to ground stations, images processing including data injection, ortho-rectification, to delivery of image products. With the lessons learned from working with international partners, the FORMOSAT Image Processing System has been extensively automated and streamlined with a goal to shorten the time between request and delivery in an efficient manner. The integrated team has developed an Application Interface to its system platform that provides functions of search in archive catalogue, request of data services, mission planning, inquiry of services status, and image download. This automated system enables timely image acquisition and substantially increases the value of data product. Example outcome of these efforts in recent response to support Sentinel Asia in Nepal Earthquake is demonstrated herein.

  13. Rapid Cancer Fluorescence Imaging Using A γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase-Specific Probe For Primary Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruaki Hino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We set out to examine the activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT in lung cancer and the validity of γ-glutamyl hydroxymethyl rhodamine green (gGlu-HMRG for intraoperative imaging of primary lung cancer. METHODS: GGT activities and mRNA expression levels of GGT1 (one of the GGT subtypes in five human lung cancer cell lines were examined by fluorescence imaging and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In vivo imaging of an orthotopic A549 xenograft model in nude mice was performed to confirm its applicability to intraoperative imaging. Furthermore, ex vivo imaging of 73 specimens from lung cancer patients were performed and analyzed to calculate the sensitivity/specificity of gGlu-HMRG for lung cancer diagnosis. RESULTS: GGT activities and mRNA expression levels of GGT1 are diverse depending on cell type; A549, H441, and H460 showed relatively high GGT activities and expression levels, whereas H82 and H226 showed lower values. In the in vivo mouse model study, tiny pleural dissemination and hilar/mediastinal lymph node metastasis (less than 1 mm in diameter were clearly detected 15 minutes after topical application of gGlu-HMRG. In the ex vivo study of specimens from patients, the sensitivity and specificity of gGlu-HMRG were calculated to be 43.8% (32/73 and 84.9% (62/73, respectively. When limited to female patients, never smokers, and adenocarcinomas, these values were 78.9% (15/19 and 73.7% (14/19, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Although GGT activity of lung cancer cells vary, gGlu-HMRG can serve as an intraoperative imaging tool to detect small foci of lung cancer when such cells have sufficient GGT activity.

  14. Metabolic implications when employing heavy pre- and post-exercise rapid-acting insulin reductions to prevent hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes patients: a randomised clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Campbell

    Full Text Available To examine the metabolic, gluco-regulatory-hormonal and inflammatory cytokine responses to large reductions in rapid-acting insulin dose administered prandially before and after intensive running exercise in male type 1 diabetes patients.This was a single centre, randomised, controlled open label study. Following preliminary testing, 8 male patients (24±2 years, HbA1c 7.7±0.4%/61±4 mmol.l-1 treated with insulin's glargine and aspart, or lispro attended the laboratory on two mornings at ∼08:00 h and consumed a standardised breakfast carbohydrate bolus (1 g carbohydrate.kg-1BM; 380±10 kcal and self-administered a 75% reduced rapid-acting insulin dose 60 minutes before 45 minutes of intensive treadmill running at 73.1±0.9% VO2peak. At 60 minutes post-exercise, patients ingested a meal (1 g carbohydrate.kg-1BM; 660±21 kcal and administered either a Full or 50% reduced rapid-acting insulin dose. Blood glucose and lactate, serum insulin, cortisol, non-esterified-fatty-acids, β-Hydroxybutyrate, and plasma glucagon, adrenaline, noradrenaline, IL-6, and TNF-α concentrations were measured for 180 minutes post-meal.All participants were analysed. All glycaemic, metabolic, hormonal, and cytokine responses were similar between conditions up to 60 minutes following exercise. Following the post-exercise meal, serum insulin concentrations were lower under 50% (p<0.05 resulting in 75% of patients experiencing hyperglycaemia (blood glucose ≥8.0 mmol.l-1; 50% n = 6, Full n = 3. β-Hydroxybutyrate concentrations decreased similarly, such that at 180 minutes post-meal concentrations were lower than rest under Full and 50%. IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations remained similar to fasting levels under 50% but declined under Full. Under 50% IL-6 concentrations were inversely related with serum insulin concentrations (r = -0.484, p = 0.017.Heavily reducing rapid-acting insulin dose with a carbohydrate bolus before, and a meal after intensive

  15. [Rapid Identification of Epicarpium Citri Grandis via Infrared Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Spectrum Imaging Technology Combined with Neural Network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sha-sha; Huang, Fu-rong; Xiao, Chi; Xian, Rui-yi; Ma, Zhi-guo

    2015-10-01

    To explore rapid reliable methods for detection of Epicarpium citri grandis (ECG), the experiment using Fourier Transform Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR/ATR) and Fluorescence Spectrum Imaging Technology combined with Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) Neural Network pattern recognition, for the identification of ECG, and the two methods are compared. Infrared spectra and fluorescence spectral images of 118 samples, 81 ECG and 37 other kinds of ECG, are collected. According to the differences in tspectrum, the spectra data in the 550-1 800 cm(-1) wavenumber range and 400-720 nm wavelength are regarded as the study objects of discriminant analysis. Then principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to reduce the dimension of spectroscopic data of ECG and MLP Neural Network is used in combination to classify them. During the experiment were compared the effects of different methods of data preprocessing on the model: multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), standard normal variable correction (SNV), first-order derivative(FD), second-order derivative(SD) and Savitzky-Golay (SG). The results showed that: after the infrared spectra data via the Savitzky-Golay (SG) pretreatment through the MLP Neural Network with the hidden layer function as sigmoid, we can get the best discrimination of ECG, the correct percent of training set and testing set are both 100%. Using fluorescence spectral imaging technology, corrected by the multiple scattering (MSC) results in the pretreatment is the most ideal. After data preprocessing, the three layers of the MLP Neural Network of the hidden layer function as sigmoid function can get 100% correct percent of training set and 96.7% correct percent of testing set. It was shown that the FTIR/ATR and fluorescent spectral imaging technology combined with MLP Neural Network can be used for the identification study of ECG and has the advantages of rapid, reliable effect.

  16. A rapid ex vivo tissue model for optimising drug detection and ionisation in MALDI imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, K; Aichler, M; Sun, N; Buck, A; Li, Z; Fernandez, I E; Hauck, S M; Zitzelsberger, H; Eickelberg, O; Janssen, K P; Keller, U; Walch, A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish an ex vivo model for a faster optimisation of sample preparation procedures, for example matrix choice, in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) drug imaging studies. The ionisation properties of four drugs, afatinib, erlotinib, irinotecan and pirfenidone, were determined in an ex vivo tissue experiment by spotting decreasing dilution series onto liver sections. Hereby, the drug signals were distinctly detectable using different matrix compounds, which allowed the selection of the optimal matrix for each drug. The analysis of afatinib and erlotinib yielded high drug signals with α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid matrix, whereas 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid was identified as optimal matrix for irinotecan and pirfenidone detection. Our method was validated by a MALDI drug imaging approach of in vivo treated mouse tissue resulting in corresponding findings, indicating the spotting method as an appropriate approach to determine the matrix of choice. The present study shows the accordance between the detection of ex vivo spotted drugs and in vivo administered drugs by MALDI-TOF and MALDI-FT-ICR imaging, which has not been demonstrated so far. Our data suggest the ex vivo tissue spotting method as an easy and reliable model to optimise MALDI imaging measurements and to predict drug detection in tissue sections derived from treated mice prior to the recruitment of laboratory animals, which helps to save animals, time and costs.

  17. How lovebirds maneuver rapidly using super-fast head saccades and image feature stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kress, Daniel; Bokhorst, Van Evelien; Lentink, David

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal flying animals such as birds depend primarily on vision to coordinate their flight path during goal-directed flight tasks. To extract the spatial structure of the surrounding environment, birds are thought to use retinal image motion (optical flow) that is primarily induced by motion of

  18. Restriction of rapid eye movement sleep during adolescence increases energy gain and metabolic efficiency in young adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Silva, Neila; Nejm, Mariana Bocca; da Silva, Sylvia Maria Affonso; Suchecki, Deborah; Luz, Jacqueline

    2016-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Sleep curtailment in infancy and adolescence may lead to long-term risk for obesity, but the mechanisms involved have not yet been determined. This study examined the immediate and long-term metabolic effects produced by sleep restriction in young rats. What is the main finding and its importance? Prolonged sleep restriction reduced weight gain (body fat stores) in young animals. After prolonged recovery, sleep-restricted rats tended to save more energy and to store more fat, possibly owing to increased gross food efficiency. This could be the first step to understand this association. Sleep curtailment is associated with obesity and metabolic changes in adults and children. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term metabolic alterations produced by sleep restriction in pubertal male rats. Male Wistar rats (28 days old) were allocated to a control (CTL) group or a sleep-restricted (SR) group. This was accomplished by the single platform technique for 18 h per day for 21 days. These groups were subdivided into the following four time points for assessment: sleep restriction and 1, 2 and 4 months of recovery. Body weight and food intake were monitored throughout the experiment. At the end of each time period, blood was collected for metabolic profiling, and the carcasses were processed for measurement of body composition and energy balance. During the period of sleep restriction, SR animals consumed less food in the home cages. This group also displayed lower body weight, body fat, triglycerides and glucose levels than CTL rats. At the end of the first month of recovery, despite eating as much as CTL rats, SR animals showed greater energy and body weight gain, increased gross food efficiency and decreased energy expenditure. At the end of the second and fourth months of recovery, the groups were no longer different, except for energy gain and gross food efficiency, which remained higher in SR

  19. Rapid metabolic profiling of Nicotiana tabacum defence responses against Phytophthora nicotianae using direct infrared laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Alfredo J; Scharte, Judith; Bones, Philipp; Pirkl, Alexander; Meldau, Stefan; Baldwin, Ian T; Hillenkamp, Franz; Weis, Engelbert; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2010-06-09

    Successful defence of tobacco plants against attack from the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae includes a type of local programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response. Complex and not completely understood signaling processes are required to mediate the development of this defence in the infected tissue. Here, we demonstrate that different families of metabolites can be monitored in small pieces of infected, mechanically-stressed, and healthy tobacco leaves using direct infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The defence response was monitored for 1 - 9 hours post infection. Infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows rapid and simultaneous detection in both negative and positive ion mode of a wide range of naturally occurring primary and secondary metabolites. An unsupervised principal component analysis was employed to identify correlations between changes in metabolite expression (obtained at different times and sample treatment conditions) and the overall defence response.A one-dimensional projection of the principal components 1 and 2 obtained from positive ion mode spectra was used to generate a Biological Response Index (BRI). The BRI obtained for each sample treatment was compared with the number of dead cells found in the respective tissue. The high correlation between these two values suggested that the BRI provides a rapid assessment of the plant response against the pathogen infection. Evaluation of the loading plots of the principal components (1 and 2) reveals a correlation among three metabolic cascades and the defence response generated in infected leaves. Analysis of selected phytohormones by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry verified our findings. The described methodology allows for rapid assessment of infection-specific changes in the plant metabolism, in particular of phenolics, alkaloids, oxylipins, and carbohydrates

  20. Rapid metabolic profiling of Nicotiana tabacum defence responses against Phytophthora nicotianae using direct infrared laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weis Engelbert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful defence of tobacco plants against attack from the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae includes a type of local programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response. Complex and not completely understood signaling processes are required to mediate the development of this defence in the infected tissue. Here, we demonstrate that different families of metabolites can be monitored in small pieces of infected, mechanically-stressed, and healthy tobacco leaves using direct infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The defence response was monitored for 1 - 9 hours post infection. Results Infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows rapid and simultaneous detection in both negative and positive ion mode of a wide range of naturally occurring primary and secondary metabolites. An unsupervised principal component analysis was employed to identify correlations between changes in metabolite expression (obtained at different times and sample treatment conditions and the overall defence response. A one-dimensional projection of the principal components 1 and 2 obtained from positive ion mode spectra was used to generate a Biological Response Index (BRI. The BRI obtained for each sample treatment was compared with the number of dead cells found in the respective tissue. The high correlation between these two values suggested that the BRI provides a rapid assessment of the plant response against the pathogen infection. Evaluation of the loading plots of the principal components (1 and 2 reveals a correlation among three metabolic cascades and the defence response generated in infected leaves. Analysis of selected phytohormones by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry verified our findings. Conclusion The described methodology allows for rapid assessment of infection-specific changes in the plant metabolism, in particular

  1. Calcium ionophore (A-23187 induced peritoneal eicosanoid biosynthesis: a rapid method to evaluate inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Rao

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation characterizes calcium ionophore (A-23187 induced peritoneal eicosanoid biosynthesis in the rat. Intraperitoneal injection of A-23187 (20 μg/rat stimulated marked biosynthesis of 6-keto-PGF1α (6-KPA, TxB2, LTC4 and LTB4, with no detectable changes on levels of PGE2. Levels of all eicosanoids decreased rapidly after a peak which was seen as early as 5 min. Enzyme markers of cellular contents of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, MPO and NAG respectively, decreased rapidly after ionophore injection; this was followed by increases after 60 min. Indomethacin, a selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, and zileuton and ICI D-2138, two selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors attenuated prostaglandin and leukotriene pathways respectively. Oral administration of zileuton (20 mg/kg, p.o. inhibited LTB4 biosynthesis for up to 6 h suggesting a long duration of pharmacological activity in the rats consistent with its longer half-life. The rapid onset and the magnitude of increases in levels of eicosanoids render the ionophore induced peritoneal eicosanoid biosynthesis a useful model to evaluate pharmacological profiles of inhibitors of eicosanoid pathways in vivo.

  2. Active machine learning for rapid landslide inventory mapping with VHR satellite images (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, A.; Lachiche, N.; Malet, J.; Kerle, N.; Puissant, A.

    2013-12-01

    VHR satellite images have become a primary source for landslide inventory mapping after major triggering events such as earthquakes and heavy rainfalls. Visual image interpretation is still the prevailing standard method for operational purposes but is time-consuming and not well suited to fully exploit the increasingly better supply of remote sensing data. Recent studies have addressed the development of more automated image analysis workflows for landslide inventory mapping. In particular object-oriented approaches that account for spatial and textural image information have been demonstrated to be more adequate than pixel-based classification but manually elaborated rule-based classifiers are difficult to adapt under changing scene characteristics. Machine learning algorithm allow learning classification rules for complex image patterns from labelled examples and can be adapted straightforwardly with available training data. In order to reduce the amount of costly training data active learning (AL) has evolved as a key concept to guide the sampling for many applications. The underlying idea of AL is to initialize a machine learning model with a small training set, and to subsequently exploit the model state and data structure to iteratively select the most valuable samples that should be labelled by the user. With relatively few queries and labelled samples, an AL strategy yields higher accuracies than an equivalent classifier trained with many randomly selected samples. This study addressed the development of an AL method for landslide mapping from VHR remote sensing images with special consideration of the spatial distribution of the samples. Our approach [1] is based on the Random Forest algorithm and considers the classifier uncertainty as well as the variance of potential sampling regions to guide the user towards the most valuable sampling areas. The algorithm explicitly searches for compact regions and thereby avoids a spatially disperse sampling pattern

  3. Quantitative redox imaging biomarkers for studying tissue metabolic state and its heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He N. Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available NAD+/NADH redox state has been implicated in many diseases such as cancer and diabetes as well as in the regulation of embryonic development and aging. To fluorimetrically assess the mitochondrial redox state, Dr. Chance and co-workers measured the fluorescence of NADH and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp including flavin–adenine–dinucleotide (FAD and demonstrated their ratio (i.e. the redox ratio is a sensitive indicator of the mitochondrial redox states. The Chance redox scanner was built to simultaneously measure NADH and Fp in tissue at submillimeter scale in 3D using the freeze-trap protocol. This paper summarizes our recent research experience, development and new applications of the redox scanning technique in collaboration with Dr. Chance beginning in 2005. Dr. Chance initiated or actively involved in many of the projects during the last several years of his life. We advanced the redox scanning technique by measuring the nominal concentrations (in reference to the frozen solution standards of the endogenous fluorescent analytes, i.e., [NADH] and [Fp] to quantify the redox ratios in various biological tissues. The advancement has enabled us to identify an array of the redox indices as quantitative imaging biomarkers (including [NADH], [Fp], [Fp]/([NADH]+[Fp], [NADH]/[Fp], and their standard deviations for studying some important biological questions on cancer and normal tissue metabolism. We found that the redox indices were associated or changed with (1 tumorigenesis (cancer versus non-cancer of human breast tissue biopsies; (2 tumor metastatic potential; (3 tumor glucose uptake; (4 tumor p53 status; (5 PI3K pathway activation in pre-malignant tissue; (6 therapeutic effects on tumors; (7 embryonic stem cell differentiation; (8 the heart under fasting. Together, our work demonstrated that the tissue redox indices obtained from the redox scanning technique may provide useful information about tissue metabolism and physiology status in normal

  4. PET/MR - a rapidly growing technique of imaging in oncology and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sałyga, Alicja; Guzikowska-Ruszkowska, Izabela; Czepczyński, Rafał; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) has become a subject of interest for researchers in the recent several years. Positron emission tomography in combination with magnetic resonance (PET/MR) is the most recent imaging technique classified in the so called hybrid systems category. This review briefly discusses the development history of PET/MR scanners, the principle of their operation, of tandem systems, as well as fully integrated devices. Further, it summarizes recent reports on the application of PET/MR scans and their possible future role in oncological and non-oncological diagnostics. Recent reports regarding the application of PET/MR scanners show huge potential of simultaneously received images, which exceed the advantages of either of those scans used separately. However, the results so far remain uncertain and require further investigations, especially in terms of clinical studies, not only for scientific purposes.

  5. Multi-Frequency Encoding for Rapid Color Flow and Quadroplex Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasonic color flow maps are made by estimating the velocities line by line over the region of interest. For each velocity estimate, multiple repetitions are needed. This sets a limit on the frame rate, which becomes increasingly severe when imaging deeper lying structures or when simultaneously...... acquiring spectrogram data for triplex imaging. This paper proposes a method for decreasing the data acquisition time by simultaneously sampling multiple lines at different spatial positions for the color flow map using narrow band signals with disjoint spectral support. The signals are separated...... in the receiver by filters matched to the emitted waveforms and the autocorrelation estimator is applied. Alternatively, one spectral band can be used for creating a color flow map, while data for a number of spectrograms are acquired simultaneously. Using three disjoint spectral bands, this will result...

  6. Rapid reconstruction of 3D neuronal morphology from light microscopy images with augmented rayburst sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Ming

    Full Text Available Digital reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D neuronal morphology from light microscopy images provides a powerful technique for analysis of neural circuits. It is time-consuming to manually perform this process. Thus, efficient computer-assisted approaches are preferable. In this paper, we present an innovative method for the tracing and reconstruction of 3D neuronal morphology from light microscopy images. The method uses a prediction and refinement strategy that is based on exploration of local neuron structural features. We extended the rayburst sampling algorithm to a marching fashion, which starts from a single or a few seed points and marches recursively forward along neurite branches to trace and reconstruct the whole tree-like structure. A local radius-related but size-independent hemispherical sampling was used to predict the neurite centerline and detect branches. Iterative rayburst sampling was performed in the orthogonal plane, to refine the centerline location and to estimate the local radius. We implemented the method in a cooperative 3D interactive visualization-assisted system named flNeuronTool. The source code in C++ and the binaries are freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/flneurontool/. We validated and evaluated the proposed method using synthetic data and real datasets from the Digital Reconstruction of Axonal and Dendritic Morphology (DIADEM challenge. Then, flNeuronTool was applied to mouse brain images acquired with the Micro-Optical Sectioning Tomography (MOST system, to reconstruct single neurons and local neural circuits. The results showed that the system achieves a reasonable balance between fast speed and acceptable accuracy, which is promising for interactive applications in neuronal image analysis.

  7. Recent advances in rapid and non-destructive assessment of meat quality using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feifei; Ngadi, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Meat is an important food item in human diet. Its production and consumption has greatly increased in the last decades with the development of economies and improvement of peoples' living standards. However, most of the traditional methods for evaluation of meat quality are time-consuming, laborious, inconsistent and destructive to samples, which make them not appropriate for a fast-paced production and processing environment. Development of innovative and non-destructive optical sensing techniques to facilitate simple, fast, and accurate evaluation of quality are attracting increasing attention in the food industry. Hyperspectral imaging is one of the promising techniques. It integrates the combined merits of imaging and spectroscopic techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review on recent advances in evaluation of the important quality attributes of meat including color, marbling, tenderness, pH, water holding capacity, and also chemical composition attributes such as moisture content, protein content and fat content in pork, beef and lamb. In addition, the future potential applications and trends of hyperspectral imaging are also discussed in this paper.

  8. Rapid image recognition of body parts scanned in computed tomography datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicken, Volker; Lindow, B; Bornemann, L; Drexl, J; Nikoubashman, A; Peitgen, H-O

    2010-09-01

    Automatic CT dataset classification is important to efficiently create reliable database annotations, especially when large collections of scans must be analyzed. An automated segmentation and labeling algorithm was developed based on a fast patient segmentation and extraction of statistical density class features from the CT data. The method also delivers classifications of image noise level and patient size. The approach is based on image information only and uses an approximate patient contour detection and statistical features of the density distribution. These are obtained from a slice-wise analysis of the areas filled by various materials related to certain density classes and the spatial spread of each class. The resulting families of curves are subsequently classified using rules derived from knowledge about features of the human anatomy. The method was successfully applied to more than 5,000 CT datasets. Evaluation was performed via expert visual inspection of screenshots showing classification results and detected characteristic positions along the main body axis. Accuracy per body region was very satisfactory in the trunk (lung/liver >99.5% detection rate, presence of abdomen >97% or pelvis >95.8%) improvements are required for zoomed scans. The method performed very reliably. A test on 1,860 CT datasets collected from an oncological trial showed that the method is feasible, efficient, and is promising as an automated tool for image post-processing.

  9. Time-gated FRET nanoassemblies for rapid and sensitive intra- and extracellular fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari, Hamid Samareh; Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Lindén, Stina; Chen, Ting; Qiu, Xue; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Jennings, Travis L; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L; Hildebrandt, Niko; Miller, Lawrence W

    2016-06-01

    Time-gated Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using the unique material combination of long-lifetime terbium complexes (Tb) and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) provides many advantages for highly sensitive and multiplexed biosensing. Although time-gated detection can efficiently suppress sample autofluorescence and background fluorescence from directly excited FRET acceptors, Tb-to-QD FRET has rarely been exploited for biomolecular imaging. We demonstrate Tb-to-QD time-gated FRET nanoassemblies that can be applied for intra- and extracellular imaging. Immunostaining of different epitopes of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with Tb- and QD-conjugated antibodies and nanobodies allowed for efficient Tb-to-QD FRET on A431 cell membranes. The broad usability of Tb-to-QD FRET was further demonstrated by intracellular Tb-to-QD FRET and Tb-to-QD-to-dye FRET using microinjection as well as cell-penetrating peptide-mediated endocytosis with HeLa cells. Effective brightness enhancement by FRET from several Tb to the same QD, the use of low nanomolar concentrations, and the quick and sensitive detection void of FRET acceptor background fluorescence are important advantages for advanced intra- and extracellular imaging of biomolecular interactions.

  10. Sparse-SEMAC: rapid and improved SEMAC metal implant imaging using SPARSE-SENSE acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otazo, Ricardo; Nittka, Mathias; Bruno, Mary; Raithel, Esther; Geppert, Christian; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Recht, Michael; Rybak, Leon

    2017-07-01

    To develop an accelerated SEMAC metal implant MRI technique (Sparse-SEMAC) with reduced scan time and improved metal distortion correction. Sparse-SEMAC jointly exploits the inherent sparsity along the additional phase-encoding dimension and multicoil encoding capabilities to significantly accelerate data acquisition. A prototype pulse sequence with pseudorandom ky -kz undersampling and an inline image reconstruction was developed for integration in clinical studies. Three patients with hip implants were imaged using the proposed Sparse-SEMAC with eight-fold acceleration and compared with the standard-SEMAC technique used in clinical studies (three-fold GRAPPA acceleration). Measurements were performed with SEMAC-encoding steps (SES) = 15 for Sparse-SEMAC and SES = 9 for Standard-SEMAC using high spatial resolution Proton Density (PD) and lower-resolution STIR acquisitions. Two expert musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists performed a consensus reading to score image-quality parameters. Sparse-SEMAC enables up to eight-fold acceleration of data acquisition that results in two-fold scan time reductions, compared with Standard-SEMAC, with improved metal artifact correction for patients with hip implants without degrading spatial resolution. The high acceleration enabled by Sparse-SEMAC would enable clinically feasible examination times with improved correction of metal distortion. Magn Reson Med 78:79-87, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging Detects Rapid Microstructural Changes in Amygdala and Hippocampus Following Fear Conditioning in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Abby Y.; Li, Qi; Zhou, Iris Y.; Ma, Samantha J.; Tong, Gehua; McAlonan, Grainne M.; Wu, Ed X.

    2013-01-01

    Background Following fear conditioning (FC), ex vivo evidence suggests that early dynamics of cellular and molecular plasticity in amygdala and hippocampal circuits mediate responses to fear. Such altered dynamics in fear circuits are thought to be etiologically related to anxiety disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Consistent with this, neuroimaging studies of individuals with established PTSD in the months after trauma have revealed changes in brain regions responsible for processing fear. However, whether early changes in fear circuits can be captured in vivo is not known. Methods We hypothesized that in vivo magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) would be sensitive to rapid microstructural changes elicited by FC in an experimental mouse PTSD model. We employed a repeated measures paired design to compare in vivo DTI measurements before, one hour after, and one day after FC-exposed mice (n = 18). Results Using voxel-wise repeated measures analysis, fractional anisotropy (FA) significantly increased then decreased in amygdala, decreased then increased in hippocampus, and was increasing in cingulum and adjacent gray matter one hour and one day post-FC respectively. These findings demonstrate that DTI is sensitive to early changes in brain microstructure following FC, and that FC elicits distinct, rapid in vivo responses in amygdala and hippocampus. Conclusions Our results indicate that DTI can detect rapid microstructural changes in brain regions known to mediate fear conditioning in vivo. DTI indices could be explored as a translational tool to capture potential early biological changes in individuals at risk for developing PTSD. PMID:23382811

  12. Rapid Stereomicroscopic Imaging of HER2 Overexpression in Ex Vivo Breast Tissue Using Topically Applied Silica-Based Gold Nanoshells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissett R. Bickford

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor margin detection for patients undergoing breast conservation surgery primarily occurs postoperatively. Previously, we demonstrated that gold nanoshells rapidly enhance contrast of HER2 overexpression in ex vivo tissue sections. Our ultimate objective, however, is to discern HER2 overexpressing tissue from normal tissue in whole, nonsectioned, specimens to facilitate rapid diagnoses. Here, we use targeted nanoshells to quickly and effectively visualize HER2 receptor expression in intact ex vivo human breast tissue specimens. Punch biopsies of human breast tissue were analyzed after a brief 5-minute incubation with and without HER2-targeted silica-gold nanoshells using two-photon microscopy and stereomicroscopy. Labeling was subsequently verified using reflectance confocal microscopy, darkfield hyperspectral imaging, and immunohistochemistry to confirm levels of HER2 expression. Our results suggest that anti-HER2 nanoshells used in tandem with a near-infrared reflectance confocal microscope and a standard stereomicroscope may potentially be used to discern HER2-overexpressing cancerous tissue from normal tissue in near real time and offer a rapid supplement to current diagnostic techniques.

  13. Three-dimensional brain metabolic imaging in patients with toxic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callender, T.J.; Duhon, D.; Ristovv, M. (Med-Health, Ltd. Clinic, Lafayette, LA (United States)); Morrow, L. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Subramanian, K. (Lafayette General Hospital, LA (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Thirty-three workers, ages 24 to 63, developed clinical toxic encephalopathy after exposure to neurotoxins and were studied by SPECT brain scans. Five were exposed to pesticides, 13 were acutely exposed to mixtures of solvents, 8 were chronically exposed to mixtures of hazardous wastes that contained organic solvents, 2 were acutely exposed to phosgene and other toxins, and 5 had exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Twenty-nine had neuropsychological testing and all had a medical history and physical. Of the workers who had a clinical diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy, 31 (93.9%) had abnormal SPECT brain scans with the most frequent areas of abnormality being temporal lobes (67.7%), frontal lobes (61.3%), basal ganglia (45.2%), thalamus (29.0%), parietal lobes (12.9%), motorstrip (9.68%), cerebral hemisphere (6.45%), occipital lobes (3.23%), and caudate nucleus (3.23%). Twenty-three out of 29 (79.3%) neuropsychological evaluations were abnormal. Other modalities when performed included the following percentages of abnormals: NCV, 33.3%; CPT sensory nerve testing, 91.3%, vestibular function testing, 71.4%; olfactory testing, 89.2%; sleep EEG analysis, 85.7%; EEG, 8.33%; CT, 7.14%; and MRI brain scans, 28.6%. The complex of symptoms seen in toxic encephalopathy implies dysfunction involving several CNS regions. This series of patients adds to the previous experience of brain metabolic imaging and demonstrates that certain areas of the brain are typically affected despite differences in toxin structure, that these lesions can be globally defined by SPECT/PET brain scans, that these lesions correlate well with clinical and neuropsychological testing, and that such testing is a useful adjunct to previous methods. EEG and structural brain imaging such as CT and MRI are observed to have poor sensitivity in this type of patient. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  14. Rapidly updated hyperspectral sounding and imaging data for severe storm prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Gail; Jensen, Scott; Elwell, John; Cardon, Joel; Crain, David; Huang, Hung-Lung (Allen); Smith, William L.; Revercomb, Hank E.; Huppi, Ronald J.

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have shown that a geostationary hyperspectral imager/sounder can provide the most significant value increase in short term, regional numerical prediction weather models over a range of other options. In 1998, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) proposal was selected by NASA as the New Millennium Earth Observation 3 program over several other geostationary instrument development proposals. After the EO3 GIFTS flight demonstration program was changed to an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) due to funding limitations by one of the partners, the EDU was subjected to flight-like thermal vacuum calibration and testing and successfully validated the breakthrough technologies needed to make a successful observatory. After several government stops and starts, only EUMETSAT's Meteosat Third Generation (MTG-S) sounder is in operational development. Recently, a commercial partnership has been formed to fill the significant data gap. AsiaSat has partnered with GeoMetWatch (GMW)1 to fund the development and launch of the Sounding and Tracking Observatory for Regional Meteorology (STORMTM) sensor, a derivative of the Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) EDU that was designed, built, and tested by Utah State University (USU). STORMTM combines advanced technologies to observe surface thermal properties, atmospheric weather, and chemistry variables in four dimensions to provide high vertical resolution temperature and moisture sounding information, with the fourth dimension (time) provided by the geosynchronous satellite platform ability to measure a location as often as desired. STORMTM will enhance the polar orbiting imaging and sounding measurements by providing: (1) a direct measure of moisture flux and altitude-resolved water vapor and cloud tracer winds throughout the troposphere, (2) an observation of the time varying atmospheric thermodynamics associated with storm system development, and (3) the

  15. Rapid nanoparticle-mediated monitoring of bacterial metabolic activity and assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility in blood with magnetic relaxation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos Kaittanis

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the increased incidence of bacterial infections and the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria at the global level, we designed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nanosensors for the assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility through magnetic relaxation. In this report, we demonstrate that iron oxide nanosensors, either dextran-coated supplemented with Con A or silica-coated conjugated directly to Con A, can be used for the fast (1 quantification of polysaccharides, (2 assessment of metabolic activity and (3 determination of antimicrobial susceptibility in blood. The use of these polysaccharide nanosensors in the determination of antimicrobial susceptibility in the clinic or the field, and the utilization of these nanoprobes in pharmaceutical R&D are anticipated.

  16. Metabolic Profiling Directly from the Petri Dish Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Roach, Patrick J.; Heath, Brandi S.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-11-05

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here, we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin.

  17. Priming from distractors in rapid serial visual presentation is modulated by image properties and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Irina M; Benito, Claire T; Dux, Paul E

    2010-12-01

    We investigated distractor processing in a dual-target rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task containing familiar objects, by measuring repetition priming from a priming distractor (PD) to Target 2 (T2). Priming from a visually identical PD was contrasted with priming from a PD in a different orientation from T2. We also tested the effect of attention on distractor processing, by placing the PD either within or outside the attentional blink (AB). PDs outside the AB induced positive priming when they were in a different orientation to T2 and no priming, or negative priming, when they were perceptually identical to T2. PDs within the AB induced positive priming regardless of orientation. These findings demonstrate (1) that distractors are processed at multiple levels of representation; (2) that the view-specific representations of distractors are actively suppressed during RSVP; and (3) that this suppression fails in the absence of attention.

  18. Imaging of acute pulmonary embolism using a dual energy CT system with rapid kVp switching: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyer, Lucas L., E-mail: Lucas.Geyer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Scherr, Michael, E-mail: michael.scherr@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Körner, Markus, E-mail: markus.koerner@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Wirth, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.wirth@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Deak, Paul, E-mail: paul.deak@ge.com [GE Healthcare, Oskar-Schlemmer-Straße 11, 80807 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F., E-mail: maximilian.reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Linsenmaier, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.linsenmaier@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is considered as clinical gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism (PE). Whereas conventional CTPA only offers anatomic information, dual energy CT (DECT) provides functional information on blood volume as surrogate of perfusion by assessing the pulmonary iodine distribution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of lung perfusion imaging using a single-tube DECT scanner with rapid kVp switching. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with suspicion of acute PE underwent DECT. Two experienced radiologists assessed the CTPA images and lung perfusion maps regarding the presence of PE. The image quality was rated using a semi-quantitative 5-point scale: 1 (=excellent) to 5 (=non-diagnostic). Iodine concentrations were quantified by a ROI analysis. Results: Seventy perfusion defects were identified in 266 lung segments: 13 (19%) were rated as consistent with PE. Five patients had signs of PE at CTPA. All patients with occlusive clots were correctly identified by DECT perfusion maps. On a per patient basis the sensitivity and specificity were 80.0% and 88.9%, respectively, while on a per segment basis it was 40.0% and 97.6%, respectively. None of the patients with a homogeneous perfusion map had an abnormal CTPA. The overall image quality of the perfusion maps was rated with a mean score of 2.6 ± 0.6. There was a significant ventrodorsal gradient of the median iodine concentrations (1.1 mg/cm{sup 3} vs. 1.7 mg/cm{sup 3}). Conclusion: Lung perfusion imaging on a DE CT-system with fast kVp-switching is feasible. DECT might be a helpful adjunct to assess the clinical severity of PE.

  19. Wavelength optimization for rapid chromophore mapping using spatial frequency domain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhar, Amaan; Dell, Steven; Cuccia, David J.; Gioux, Sylvain; Durkin, Anthony J.; Frangioni, John V.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2010-11-01

    Spatial frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) utilizes multiple-frequency structured illumination and model-based computation to generate two-dimensional maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties. SFDI absorption data are measured at multiple wavelengths and used to fit for the tissue concentration of intrinsic chromophores in each pixel. This is done with a priori knowledge of the basis spectra of common tissue chromophores, such as oxyhemoglobin (ctO2Hb), deoxyhemoglobin (ctHHb), water (ctH2O), and bulk lipid. The quality of in vivo SFDI fits for the hemoglobin parameters ctO2Hb and ctHHb is dependent on wavelength selection, fitting parameters, and acquisition rate. The latter is critical because SFDI acquisition time is up to six times longer than planar two-wavelength multispectral imaging due to projection of multiple-frequency spatial patterns. Thus, motion artifact during in vivo measurements compromises the quality of the reconstruction. Optimal wavelength selection is examined through matrix decomposition of basis spectra, simulation of data, and dynamic in vivo measurements of a human forearm during cuff occlusion. Fitting parameters that minimize cross-talk from additional tissue chromophores, such as water and lipid, are determined. On the basis of this work, a wavelength pair of 670 nm/850 nm is determined to be the optimal two-wavelength combination for in vivo hemodynamic tissue measurements provided that assumptions for water and lipid fractions are made in the fitting process. In our SFDI case study, wavelength optimization reduces acquisition time over 30-fold to 1.5s compared to 50s for a full 34-wavelength acquisition. The wavelength optimization enables dynamic imaging of arterial occlusions with improved spatial resolution due to reduction of motion artifacts.

  20. Multichannel microfluidic chip for rapid and reliable trapping and imaging plant-parasitic nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Ratthasart; Sripumkhai, Witsaroot; Porntheeraphat, Supanit; Jeamsaksiri, Wutthinan; Tangchitsomkid, Nuchanart; Sutapun, Boonsong

    2013-05-01

    Faster and reliable testing technique to count and identify nematode species resided in plant roots is therefore essential for export control and certification. This work proposes utilizing a multichannel microfluidic chip with an integrated flow-through microfilter to retain the nematodes in a trapping chamber. When trapped, it is rather simple and convenient to capture images of the nematodes and later identify their species by a trained technician. Multiple samples can be tested in parallel using the proposed microfluidic chip therefore increasing number of samples tested per day.

  1. A method for rapid quantitative assessment of biofilms with biomolecular staining and image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, Curtis; Winder, Eric; Jeters, Robert; Prowant, Matthew; Nettleship, Ian; Addleman, Raymond Shane; Bonheyo, George T

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of bacteria in surface-attached biofilms can be detrimental to human health, dental hygiene, and many industrial processes. Natural biofilms are soft and often transparent, and they have heterogeneous biological composition and structure over micro- and macroscales. As a result, it is challenging to quantify the spatial distribution and overall intensity of biofilms. In this work, a new method was developed to enhance the visibility and quantification of bacterial biofilms. First, broad-spectrum biomolecular staining was used to enhance the visibility of the cells, nucleic acids, and proteins that make up biofilms. Then, an image analysis algorithm was developed to objectively and quantitatively measure biofilm accumulation from digital photographs and results were compared to independent measurements of cell density. This new method was used to quantify the growth intensity of Pseudomonas putida biofilms as they grew over time. This method is simple and fast, and can quantify biofilm growth over a large area with approximately the same precision as the more laborious cell counting method. Stained and processed images facilitate assessment of spatial heterogeneity of a biofilm across a surface. This new approach to biofilm analysis could be applied in studies of natural, industrial, and environmental biofilms.

  2. Prospector: A web-based tool for rapid acquisition of gold standard data for pathology research and image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Wright

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obtaining ground truth for pathological images is essential for various experiments, especially for training and testing image analysis algorithms. However, obtaining pathologist input is often difficult, time consuming and expensive. This leads to algorithms being over-fitted to small datasets, and inappropriate validation, which causes poor performance on real world data. There is a great need to gather data from pathologists in a simple and efficient manner, in order to maximise the amount of data obtained. Methods: We present a lightweight, web-based HTML5 system for administering and participating in data collection experiments. The system is designed for rapid input with minimal effort, and can be accessed from anywhere in the world with a reliable internet connection. Results: We present two case studies that use the system to assess how limitations on fields of view affect pathologist agreement, and to what extent poorly stained slides affect judgement. In both cases, the system collects pathologist scores at a rate of less than two seconds per image. Conclusions: The system has multiple potential applications in pathology and other domains.

  3. Rapid simulation of X-ray transmission imaging for baggage inspection via GPU-based ray-tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qian; Stoian, Razvan-Ionut; Coccarelli, David S.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Vera, Esteban; Gehm, Michael E.

    2018-01-01

    We present a pipeline that rapidly simulates X-ray transmission imaging for arbitrary system architectures using GPU-based ray-tracing techniques. The purpose of the pipeline is to enable statistical analysis of threat detection in the context of airline baggage inspection. As a faster alternative to Monte Carlo methods, we adopt a deterministic approach for simulating photoelectric absorption-based imaging. The highly-optimized NVIDIA OptiX API is used to implement ray-tracing, greatly speeding code execution. In addition, we implement the first hierarchical representation structure to determine the interaction path length of rays traversing heterogeneous media described by layered polygons. The accuracy of the pipeline has been validated by comparing simulated data with experimental data collected using a heterogenous phantom and a laboratory X-ray imaging system. On a single computer, our approach allows us to generate over 400 2D transmission projections (125 × 125 pixels per frame) per hour for a bag packed with hundreds of everyday objects. By implementing our approach on cloud-based GPU computing platforms, we find that the same 2D projections of approximately 3.9 million bags can be obtained in a single day using 400 GPU instances, at a cost of only 0.001 per bag.

  4. Cardiac Light-Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy for Multi-Scale and Rapid Imaging of Architecture and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Peng; Lee, Juhyun; Packard, René R. Sevag; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Xu, Hao; Ma, Jianguo; Ding, Yichen; Kang, Hanul; Chen, Harrison; Sung, Kevin; Kulkarni, Rajan; Ardehali, Reza; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Xu, Xiaolei; Ho, Chih-Ming; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2016-03-01

    Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) enables multi-dimensional and multi-scale imaging via illuminating specimens with a separate thin sheet of laser. It allows rapid plane illumination for reduced photo-damage and superior axial resolution and contrast. We hereby demonstrate cardiac LSFM (c-LSFM) imaging to assess the functional architecture of zebrafish embryos with a retrospective cardiac synchronization algorithm for four-dimensional reconstruction (3-D space + time). By combining our approach with tissue clearing techniques, we reveal the entire cardiac structures and hypertrabeculation of adult zebrafish hearts in response to doxorubicin treatment. By integrating the resolution enhancement technique with c-LSFM to increase the resolving power under a large field-of-view, we demonstrate the use of low power objective to resolve the entire architecture of large-scale neonatal mouse hearts, revealing the helical orientation of individual myocardial fibers. Therefore, our c-LSFM imaging approach provides multi-scale visualization of architecture and function to drive cardiovascular research with translational implication in congenital heart diseases.

  5. Rapid estimation of cartilage T2 with reduced T1 sensitivity using double echo steady state imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heule, Rahel; Ganter, Carl; Bieri, Oliver

    2014-03-01

    In principle, double echo steady state (DESS) offers morphological and quantitative T2 imaging of cartilage within one single scan. However, accurate T2 estimation is hampered by its prominent T1 dependency in the limit of low flip angles, generally used to image cartilage morphology, as for the osteoarthritis initiative. A new postprocessing approach is introduced to overcome this T1-related bias for rapid DESS-based T2 quantification in the low flip angle regime. Based on a rough global T1 estimator and a golden section search, T2 is extracted from the ratio of the two echoes acquired with DESS. The new relaxometry method is evaluated from simulations and in vivo 3D measurements of the knee joint at 3T. A pronounced reduction in the T1-related bias of DESS-T2 estimation and increased zonal variation in T2 between deep and superficial cartilage layers are observed. The improvement becomes particularly evident in the range of low flip angles (α estimate, the reliability of DESS-T2 quantification can be considerably increased. The results emphasize the potential of DESS to fuse accurate quantitative T2 and morphological imaging of the musculoskeletal system within one single scan. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Optimizing the Attitude Control of Small Satellite Constellations for Rapid Response Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, S.; Li, A.

    2016-12-01

    Distributed Space Missions (DSMs) such as formation flight and constellations, are being recognized as important solutions to increase measurement samples over space and time. Given the increasingly accurate attitude control systems emerging in the commercial market, small spacecraft now have the ability to slew and point within few minutes of notice. In spite of hardware development in CubeSats at the payload (e.g. NASA InVEST) and subsystems (e.g. Blue Canyon Technologies), software development for tradespace analysis in constellation design (e.g. Goddard's TAT-C), planning and scheduling development in single spacecraft (e.g. GEO-CAPE) and aerial flight path optimizations for UAVs (e.g. NASA Sensor Web), there is a gap in open-source, open-access software tools for planning and scheduling distributed satellite operations in terms of pointing and observing targets. This paper will demonstrate results from a tool being developed for scheduling pointing operations of narrow field-of-view (FOV) sensors over mission lifetime to maximize metrics such as global coverage and revisit statistics. Past research has shown the need for at least fourteen satellites to cover the Earth globally everyday using a LandSat-like sensor. Increasing the FOV three times reduces the need to four satellites, however adds image distortion and BRDF complexities to the observed reflectance. If narrow FOV sensors on a small satellite constellation were commanded using robust algorithms to slew their sensor dynamically, they would be able to coordinately cover the global landmass much faster without compensating for spatial resolution or BRDF effects. Our algorithm to optimize constellation satellite pointing is based on a dynamic programming approach under the constraints of orbital mechanics and existing attitude control systems for small satellites. As a case study for our algorithm, we minimize the time required to cover the 17000 Landsat images with maximum signal to noise ratio fall

  7. Determination of rice canopy growth based on high resolution satellite images: a case study using RapidEye imagery in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijeong Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Processing to correct atmospheric effects and classify all constituent pixels in a remote sensing image is required before the image is used to monitor plant growth. The raw image contains artifacts due to atmospheric conditions at the time of acquisition. This study sought to distinguish the canopy growth of paddy rice using RapidEye (BlackBridge, Berlin, Germany satellite data and investigate practical image correction and classification methods. The RapidEye images were taken over experimental fields of paddy rice at Chonnam National University (CNU, Gwangju, and at TaeAn, Choongcheongnam-do, Korea. The CNU RapidEye images were used to evaluate the atmospheric correction methods. Atmospheric correction of the RapidEye images was performed using three different methods, QUick Atmospheric Correction (QUAC, Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH, and Atmospheric and Topographic Correction (ATCOR. To minimize errors in utilizing observed growth and yield estimation of paddy rice, the paddy fields were classified using a supervised classification method and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI thresholds, using the NDVI time-series features of the paddy fields. The results of the atmospheric correction using ATCOR on the satellite images were favorable, which correspond to those from reference UAV images. Meanwhile, the classification method using the NDVI threshold accurately classified the same pixels from each of the time-series images. We have demonstrated that the image correction and classification methods investigated here should be applicable to high resolution satellite images used in monitoring other crop growth conditions.

  8. Rapid imaging, detection and quantification of Giardia lamblia cysts using mobile-phone based fluorescent microscopy and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koydemir, Hatice Ceylan; Gorocs, Zoltan; Tseng, Derek; Cortazar, Bingen; Feng, Steve; Chan, Raymond Yan Lok; Burbano, Jordi; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-07

    Rapid and sensitive detection of waterborne pathogens in drinkable and recreational water sources is crucial for treating and preventing the spread of water related diseases, especially in resource-limited settings. Here we present a field-portable and cost-effective platform for detection and quantification of Giardia lamblia cysts, one of the most common waterborne parasites, which has a thick cell wall that makes it resistant to most water disinfection techniques including chlorination. The platform consists of a smartphone coupled with an opto-mechanical attachment weighing ~205 g, which utilizes a hand-held fluorescence microscope design aligned with the camera unit of the smartphone to image custom-designed disposable water sample cassettes. Each sample cassette is composed of absorbent pads and mechanical filter membranes; a membrane with 8 μm pore size is used as a porous spacing layer to prevent the backflow of particles to the upper membrane, while the top membrane with 5 μm pore size is used to capture the individual Giardia cysts that are fluorescently labeled. A fluorescence image of the filter surface (field-of-view: ~0.8 cm(2)) is captured and wirelessly transmitted via the mobile-phone to our servers for rapid processing using a machine learning algorithm that is trained on statistical features of Giardia cysts to automatically detect and count the cysts captured on the membrane. The results are then transmitted back to the mobile-phone in less than 2 minutes and are displayed through a smart application running on the phone. This mobile platform, along with our custom-developed sample preparation protocol, enables analysis of large volumes of water (e.g., 10-20 mL) for automated detection and enumeration of Giardia cysts in ~1 hour, including all the steps of sample preparation and analysis. We evaluated the performance of this approach using flow-cytometer-enumerated Giardia-contaminated water samples, demonstrating an average cyst capture

  9. Rapid, semi-automatic fracture and contact mapping for point clouds, images and geophysical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Samuel T.; Grose, Lachlan; Samsu, Anindita; Micklethwaite, Steven; Vollgger, Stefan A.; Cruden, Alexander R.

    2017-12-01

    The advent of large digital datasets from unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and satellite platforms now challenges our ability to extract information across multiple scales in a timely manner, often meaning that the full value of the data is not realised. Here we adapt a least-cost-path solver and specially tailored cost functions to rapidly interpolate structural features between manually defined control points in point cloud and raster datasets. We implement the method in the geographic information system QGIS and the point cloud and mesh processing software CloudCompare. Using these implementations, the method can be applied to a variety of three-dimensional (3-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) datasets, including high-resolution aerial imagery, digital outcrop models, digital elevation models (DEMs) and geophysical grids. We demonstrate the algorithm with four diverse applications in which we extract (1) joint and contact patterns in high-resolution orthophotographs, (2) fracture patterns in a dense 3-D point cloud, (3) earthquake surface ruptures of the Greendale Fault associated with the Mw7.1 Darfield earthquake (New Zealand) from high-resolution light detection and ranging (lidar) data, and (4) oceanic fracture zones from bathymetric data of the North Atlantic. The approach improves the consistency of the interpretation process while retaining expert guidance and achieves significant improvements (35-65 %) in digitisation time compared to traditional methods. Furthermore, it opens up new possibilities for data synthesis and can quantify the agreement between datasets and an interpretation.

  10. A game-based crowdsourcing platform for rapidly training middle and high school students to perform biomedical image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Steve; Woo, Min-jae; Kim, Hannah; Kim, Eunso; Ki, Sojung; Shao, Lei; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    We developed an easy-to-use and widely accessible crowd-sourcing tool for rapidly training humans to perform biomedical image diagnostic tasks and demonstrated this platform's ability on middle and high school students in South Korea to diagnose malaria infected red-blood-cells (RBCs) using Giemsa-stained thin blood smears imaged under light microscopes. We previously used the same platform (i.e., BioGames) to crowd-source diagnostics of individual RBC images, marking them as malaria positive (infected), negative (uninfected), or questionable (insufficient information for a reliable diagnosis). Using a custom-developed statistical framework, we combined the diagnoses from both expert diagnosticians and the minimally trained human crowd to generate a gold standard library of malaria-infection labels for RBCs. Using this library of labels, we developed a web-based training and educational toolset that provides a quantified score for diagnosticians/users to compare their performance against their peers and view misdiagnosed cells. We have since demonstrated the ability of this platform to quickly train humans without prior training to reach high diagnostic accuracy as compared to expert diagnosticians. Our initial trial group of 55 middle and high school students has collectively played more than 170 hours, each demonstrating significant improvements after only 3 hours of training games, with diagnostic scores that match expert diagnosticians'. Next, through a national-scale educational outreach program in South Korea we recruited >1660 students who demonstrated a similar performance level after 5 hours of training. We plan to further demonstrate this tool's effectiveness for other diagnostic tasks involving image labeling and aim to provide an easily-accessible and quickly adaptable framework for online training of new diagnosticians.

  11. Correction of hemifacial microsomia with the help of mirror imaging and a rapid prototyping technique: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Libin; He, Lisheng; Shang, Hongtao; Liu, Guicai; Zhao, Jinlong; Liu, Yanpu

    2009-09-01

    A 23-year-old man presented with an 8-year history of unilateral hemifacial microsomia. A three-dimensional model of the maxillofacial bones was generated after acquisition of helical computed tomographic data. A customised implant model was designed by projecting a mirror image of the healthy mandible on to the three-dimensional model. A resin model of the implant was then made using a rapid prototyping machine. A polymeric biomaterial was sculpted according to the model and implanted into the affected side of the mandible to restore his facial symmetry. The hemifacial microsomia was corrected and a symmetrical facial contour obtained. No complications developed during the 6-year follow-up.

  12. Rapid Follow-Up Observations of Tidal Disruption Events Discovered in the GALEX Ultra-Deep Imaging Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezari, Suvi

    2005-09-01

    Luminous UV/X-ray flares are predicted to occur in the nuclei of inactive galaxies when a star is tidally disrupted by the galaxy's central supermassive black hole (SMBH), and the bound fraction of the tidal debris is accreted. The GALEX Ultra-Deep Imaging Survey (UDIS) has the ideal depth, wavelength coverage, and temporal sampling for detecting flares from TDEs in the nuclei of galaxies over a large range of redshifts. We propose to catch the decay of candidate tidal disruption flares discovered in the UDIS with rapid follow-up TOO Chandra observations, and measure for the first time, the early phase of the decay of a tidal disruption flare in detail in the soft and hard X-rays.

  13. Rapid increase in fibroblast growth factor 21 in protein malnutrition and its impact on growth and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Yori; Saito, Kenji; Nakazawa, Kyoko; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Kato, Hisanori; Takenaka, Asako

    2015-11-14

    Protein malnutrition promotes hepatic steatosis, decreases insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I production and retards growth. To identify new molecules involved in such changes, we conducted DNA microarray analysis on liver samples from rats fed an isoenergetic low-protein diet for 8 h. We identified the fibroblast growth factor 21 gene (Fgf21) as one of the most strongly up-regulated genes under conditions of acute protein malnutrition (P<0·05, false-discovery rate<0·001). In addition, amino acid deprivation increased Fgf21 mRNA levels in rat liver-derived RL-34 cells (P<0·01). These results suggested that amino acid limitation directly increases Fgf21 expression. FGF21 is a polypeptide hormone that regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. FGF21 also promotes a growth hormone-resistance state and suppresses IGF-I in transgenic mice. Therefore, to determine further whether Fgf21 up-regulation causes hepatic steatosis and growth retardation after IGF-I decrease in protein malnutrition, we fed an isoenergetic low-protein diet to Fgf21-knockout (KO) mice. Fgf21-KO did not rescue growth retardation and reduced plasma IGF-I concentration in these mice. Fgf21-KO mice showed greater epididymal white adipose tissue weight and increased hepatic TAG and cholesterol levels under protein malnutrition conditions (P<0·05). Overall, the results showed that protein deprivation directly increased Fgf21 expression. However, growth retardation and decreased IGF-I were not mediated by increased FGF21 expression in protein malnutrition. Furthermore, FGF21 up-regulation rather appears to have a protective effect against obesity and hepatic steatosis in protein-malnourished animals.

  14. Calibrated imaging reveals altered grey matter metabolism related to white matter microstructure and symptom severity in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Nicholas A; Turner, Monroe P; Ouyang, Minhui; Himes, Lyndahl; Thomas, Binu P; Hutchison, Joanna L; Faghihahmadabadi, Shawheen; Davis, Scott L; Strain, Jeremy F; Spence, Jeffrey; Krawczyk, Daniel C; Huang, Hao; Lu, Hanzhang; Hart, John; Frohman, Teresa C; Frohman, Elliot M; Okuda, Darin T; Rypma, Bart

    2017-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) involves damage to white matter microstructures. This damage has been related to grey matter function as measured by standard, physiologically-nonspecific neuroimaging indices (i.e., blood-oxygen-level dependent signal [BOLD]). Here, we used calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine the extent to which specific, evoked grey matter physiological processes were associated with white matter diffusion in MS. Evoked changes in BOLD, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen metabolism (CMRO2 ) were measured in visual cortex. Individual differences in the diffusion tensor measure, radial diffusivity, within occipital tracts were strongly associated with MS patients' BOLD and CMRO2 . However, these relationships were in opposite directions, complicating the interpretation of the relationship between BOLD and white matter microstructural damage in MS. CMRO2 was strongly associated with individual differences in patients' fatigue and neurological disability, suggesting that alterations to evoked oxygen metabolic processes may be taken as a marker for primary symptoms of MS. This work demonstrates the first application of calibrated and diffusion imaging together and details the first application of calibrated functional MRI in a neurological population. Results lend support for neuroenergetic hypotheses of MS pathophysiology and provide an initial demonstration of the utility of evoked oxygen metabolism signals for neurology research. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5375-5390, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Advanced CLARITY for rapid and high-resolution imaging of intact tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Raju; Ye, Li; Hsueh, Brian; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-07-01

    CLARITY is a method for chemical transformation of intact biological tissues into a hydrogel-tissue hybrid, which becomes amenable to interrogation with light and macromolecular labels while retaining fine structure and native biological molecules. This emerging accessibility of information from large intact samples has created both new opportunities and new challenges. Here we describe protocols spanning multiple dimensions of the CLARITY workflow, ranging from simple, reliable and efficient lipid removal without electrophoretic instrumentation (passive CLARITY) to optimized objectives and integration with light-sheet optics (CLARITY-optimized light-sheet microscopy (COLM)) for accelerating data collection from clarified samples by several orders of magnitude while maintaining or increasing quality and resolution. The entire protocol takes from 7-28 d to complete for an adult mouse brain, including hydrogel embedding, full lipid removal, whole-brain antibody staining (which, if needed, accounts for 7-10 of the days), and whole-brain high-resolution imaging; timing within this window depends on the choice of lipid removal options, on the size of the tissue, and on the number and type of immunostaining rounds performed. This protocol has been successfully applied to the study of adult mouse, adult zebrafish and adult human brains, and it may find many other applications in the structural and molecular analysis of large assembled biological systems.

  16. Rapid and non-destructive assessment of polyunsaturated fatty acids contents in Salmon using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feifei; Mba, Ogan; Liu, Li; Ngadi, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important nutrients present in Salmon. However, current methods for quantifying the fatty acids (FAs) contents in foods are generally based on gas chromatography (GC) technique, which is time-consuming, laborious and destructive to the tested samples. Therefore, the capability of near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging to predict the PUFAs contents of C20:2 n-6, C20:3 n-6, C20:5 n-3, C22:5 n-3 and C22:6 n-3 in Salmon fillets in a rapid and non-destructive way was investigated in this work. Mean reflectance spectra were first extracted from the region of interests (ROIs), and then the spectral pre-processing methods of 2nd derivative and Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing were performed on the original spectra. Based on the original and the pre-processed spectra, PLSR technique was employed to develop the quantitative models for predicting each PUFA content in Salmon fillets. The results showed that for all the studied PUFAs, the quantitative models developed using the pre-processed reflectance spectra by "2nd derivative + SG smoothing" could improve their modeling results. Good prediction results were achieved with RP and RMSEP of 0.91 and 0.75 mg/g dry weight, 0.86 and 1.44 mg/g dry weight, 0.82 and 3.01 mg/g dry weight for C20:3 n-6, C22:5 n-3 and C20:5 n-3, respectively after pre-processing by "2nd derivative + SG smoothing". The work demonstrated that NIR hyperspectral imaging could be a useful tool for rapid and non-destructive determination of the PUFA contents in fish fillets.

  17. Rapid fabrication of carbon quantum dots as multifunctional nanovehicles for dual-modal targeted imaging and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Sheng-Hui; Gedda, Gangaraju; Girma, Wubshet Mekonnen; Chen, Jem-Kun; Ling, Yong-Chien; Ghule, Anil V; Ou, Keng-Liang; Chang, Jia-Yaw

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we synthesized an S, N, and Gd tri-element doped magnetofluorescent carbon quantum dots (GdNS@CQDs) within 10min by using a one-pot microwave method. Our results showed that these magnetofluorescent GdNS@CQDs have excellent fluorescent and magnetic properties. Moreover, GdNS@CQDs exhibited high stability at physiological conditions and ionic strength. These magnetofluorescent GdNS@CQDs were conjugated with a folic acid, denoted as FA-GdNS@CQDs, for targeting dual modal fluorescence/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of FA-GdNS@CQDs. FA-GdNS@CQDs enhanced the MR response as compared to that for commercial Gd-DTPA. The targeting capabilities of FA-GdNS@CQDs were confirmed in HeLa and HepG2 cells using in vitro fluorescence and MR dual modality imaging. Additionally, an anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was incorporated into the FA-GdNS@CQDs forming FA-GdNS@CQDs-DOX, which enables targeted drug delivery. Importantly, the prepared FA-GdNS@CQDs-DOX showed a high quantity of doxorubicin loading capacity (about 80%) and pH-sensitive drug release. The uptake into cancer cells and the intracellular location of the FA-GdNS@CQDs were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. We also successfully demonstrated in vivo fluorescence bio imaging of the FA-GdNS@CQDs, using zebrafish as an animal model. In this manuscript, we reported a facial, rapid, and environmental friendly method to fabricate hetero atoms including gadolinium, nitrogen, and sulfur doped multi-functional magnetofluorescent carbon quantum dots (GdNS@CQDs) nanocomposite. These multifunctional GdNS@CQDs were conjugated with a folic acid for targeting dual modal fluorescence/magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, an anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was incorporated into the nanocomposite forming FA-GdNS@CQDs-DOX, which enables targeted drug delivery. We have developed GdNS@CQDs with integrated functions for simultaneous in

  18. Fluorescence imaging of bombesin and transferrin receptor expression is comparable to 18F-FDG PET in early detection of sorafenib-induced changes in tumor metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Chieh Tseng

    Full Text Available Physical measurement of tumor volume reduction is the most commonly used approach to assess tumor progression and treatment efficacy in mouse tumor models. However, it is relatively insensitive, and often requires long treatment courses to achieve gross physical tumor destruction. As alternatives, several non-invasive imaging methods such as bioluminescence imaging (BLI, fluorescence imaging (FLI and positron emission tomography (PET have been developed for more accurate measurement. As tumors have elevated glucose metabolism, 18F-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG has become a sensitive PET imaging tracer for cancer detection, diagnosis, and efficacy assessment by measuring alterations in glucose metabolism. In particular, the ability of 18F-FDG imaging to detect drug-induced effects on tumor metabolism at a very early phase has dramatically improved the speed of decision-making regarding treatment efficacy. Here we demonstrated an approach with FLI that offers not only comparable performance to PET imaging, but also provides additional benefits, including ease of use, imaging throughput, probe stability, and the potential for multiplex imaging. In this report, we used sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor clinically approved for cancer therapy, for treatment of a mouse tumor xenograft model. The drug is known to block several key signaling pathways involved in tumor metabolism. We first identified an appropriate sorafenib dose, 40 mg/kg (daily on days 0-4 and 7-10, that retained ultimate therapeutic efficacy yet provided a 2-3 day window post-treatment for imaging early, subtle metabolic changes prior to gross tumor regression. We then used 18F-FDG PET as the gold standard for assessing the effects of sorafenib treatment on tumor metabolism and compared this to results obtained by measurement of tumor size, tumor BLI, and tumor FLI changes. PET imaging showed ~55-60% inhibition of tumor uptake of 18F-FDG as early as days 2 and 3 post-treatment, without

  19. Rapid sphere sizing using a Bayesian analysis of reciprocal space imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziovas, K; Sederman, A J; Gehin-Delval, C; Gunes, D Z; Hughes, E; Mantle, M D

    2016-01-15

    Dispersed systems are important in many applications in a wide range of industries such as the petroleum, pharmaceutical and food industries. Therefore the ability to control and non-invasively measure the physical properties of these systems, such as the dispersed phase size distribution, is of significant interest, in particular for concentrated systems, where microscopy or scattering techniques may not apply or with very limited output quality. In this paper we show how reciprocal space data acquired using both 1D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 2D X-ray micro-tomographic (X-ray μCT) data can be analysed, using a Bayesian statistical model, to extract the sphere size distribution (SSD) from model sphere systems and dispersed food foam samples. Glass spheres-in-xanthan gels were used as model samples with sphere diameters (D) in the range of 45μm⩽D⩽850μm. The results show that the SSD was successfully estimated from both the NMR and X-ray μCT with a good degree of accuracy for the entire range of glass spheres in times as short as two seconds. After validating the technique using model samples, the Bayesian sphere sizing method was successfully applied to air/water foam samples generated using a microfluidics apparatus with 160μm⩽D⩽400μm. The effect of different experimental parameters such as the standard deviation of the bubble size distribution and the volume fraction of the dispersed phase is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Towards the automated localisation of targets in rapid image-sifting by collaborative brain-computer interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Matran-Fernandez

    Full Text Available The N2pc is a lateralised Event-Related Potential (ERP that signals a shift of attention towards the location of a potential object of interest. We propose a single-trial target-localisation collaborative Brain-Computer Interface (cBCI that exploits this ERP to automatically approximate the horizontal position of targets in aerial images. Images were presented by means of the rapid serial visual presentation technique at rates of 5, 6 and 10 Hz. We created three different cBCIs and tested a participant selection method in which groups are formed according to the similarity of participants' performance. The N2pc that is elicited in our experiments contains information about the position of the target along the horizontal axis. Moreover, combining information from multiple participants provides absolute median improvements in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of up to 21% (for groups of size 3 with respect to single-user BCIs. These improvements are bigger when groups are formed by participants with similar individual performance, and much of this effect can be explained using simple theoretical models. Our results suggest that BCIs for automated triaging can be improved by integrating two classification systems: one devoted to target detection and another to detect the attentional shifts associated with lateral targets.

  1. Rapid detection of Clostridium difficile via magnetic bead aggregation in cost-effective polyester microdevices with cell phone image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Cabaniss, Scott T; Angotti, Morgan L; Moore, John H; Abhyankar, Mayuresh; Shukla, Nishant; Mills, Daniel L; Kessel, Bryan G; Garner, Gavin T; Swami, Nathan S; Landers, James P

    2016-10-07

    Pathogen detection has traditionally been accomplished by utilizing methods such as cell culture, immunoassays, and nucleic acid amplification tests; however, these methods are not easily implemented in resource-limited settings because special equipment for detection and thermal cycling is often required. In this study, we present a magnetic bead aggregation assay coupled to an inexpensive microfluidic fabrication technique that allows for cell phone detection and analysis of a notable pathogen in less than one hour. Detection is achieved through the use of a custom-built system that allows for fluid flow control via centrifugal force, as well as manipulation of magnetic beads with an adjustable rotating magnetic field. Cell phone image capture and analysis is housed in a 3D-printed case with LED backlighting and a lid-mounted Android phone. A custom-written application (app.) is employed to interrogate images for the extent of aggregation present following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) coupled to product-inhibited bead aggregation (PiBA) for detection of target sequences. Clostridium difficile is a pathogen of increasing interest due to its causative role in intestinal infections following antibiotic treatment, and was therefore chosen as the pathogen of interest in the present study to demonstrate the rapid, cost-effective, and sequence-specific detection capabilities of the microfluidic platform described herein.

  2. Characterization of Diesel and Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion in a Rapid Compression-Expansion Machine using OH* Chemiluminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Sundar Rajan; Srinivasan, Kalyan Kumar; Stegmeir, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Direct-injection compression ignition combustion of diesel and gasoline were studied in a rapid compression-expansion machine (RCEM) using high-speed OH* chemiluminescence imaging. The RCEM (bore = 84 mm, stroke = 110-250 mm) was used to simulate engine-like operating conditions at the start of fuel injection. The fuels were supplied by a high-pressure fuel cart with an air-over-fuel pressure amplification system capable of providing fuel injection pressures up to 2000 bar. A production diesel fuel injector was modified to provide a single fuel spray for both diesel and gasoline operation. Time-resolved combustion pressure in the RCEM was measured using a Kistler piezoelectric pressure transducer mounted on the cylinder head and the instantaneous piston displacement was measured using an inductive linear displacement sensor (0.05 mm resolution). Time-resolved, line-of-sight OH* chemiluminescence images were obtained using a Phantom V611 CMOS camera (20.9 kHz @ 512 x 512 pixel resolution, ~ 48 μs time resolution) coupled with a short wave pass filter (cut-off ~ 348 nm). The instantaneous OH* distributions, which indicate high temperature flame regions within the combustion chamber, were used to discern the characteristic differences between diesel and gasoline compression ignition combustion. The authors gratefully acknowledge facilities support for the present work from the Energy Institute at Mississippi State University.

  3. Acute renal metabolic effect of metformin treatment assessed with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qi, Haiyun; Nielsen, Per Mose; Schroeder, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Metformin is the primary anti-diabetic drug in type-2 diabetes patients. However, controversy exists on its use in patients with renal impairment. Here we investigated the acute metabolic effects of metformin treatment in rat kidneys, with hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate and Clark......-electrodes. A significantly altered metabolic phenotype was observed 30 min post metformin treatment. Anaerobic metabolism was elevated in the cytosol, indicated by increased lactate/pyruvate ratio, and mitochondrial aerobic metabolism was reduced, indicated by decreased bicarbonate/pyruvate ratio. Acute metformin treatment...... increased renal blood flow with higher O2 saturation and did not change tubular O2 consumption. These results indicate that metformin reduces mitochondrial respiration and enhances anaerobic metabolism, even with enough oxygen supply, within only 30 min of treatment....

  4. High altitude may alter oxygen availability and renal metabolism in diabetics as measured by hyperpolarized [1-1C]pyruvate magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer; Lycke, Sara; Palm, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    . The importance of deranged oxygen metabolism is further supported by deterioration of kidney function in patients with diabetes living at high altitude. Thus, we argue that reduced oxygen availability alters renal energy metabolism. Here, we introduce a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to monitor...... of nephropathy in patients with diabetes at high altitudes may originate from the increased sensitivity toward inspired oxygen. This increased lactate production shifts the metabolic routs toward hypoxic pathways....

  5. Rapid FLIM: The new and innovative method for ultra-fast imaging of biological processes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthaus-Mueller, Sandra; Kraemer, Benedikt; Tannert, Astrid; Roehlicke, Tino; Wahl, Michael; Rahn, Hans-Juergen; Koberling, Felix; Erdmann, Rainer

    2017-02-01

    Over the last two decades, time-resolved fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool in Life Sciences thanks to measurement procedures such as Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM), lifetime based Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), and Fluorescence (Lifetime) Correlation Spectroscopy (F(L)CS) down to the single molecule level. Today, complete turn-key systems are available either as stand-alone units or as upgrades for confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). Data acquisition on such systems is typically based on Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) electronics along with picosecond pulsed diode lasers as excitation sources and highly sensitive, single photon counting detectors. Up to now, TCSPC data acquisition is considered a somewhat slow process as a large number of photons per pixel is required for reliable data analysis, making it difficult to use FLIM for following fast FRET processes, such as signal transduction pathways in cells or fast moving sub-cellular structures. We present here a novel and elegant solution to tackle this challenge. Our approach, named rapidFLIM, exploits recent hardware developments such as TCSPC modules with ultra short dead times and hybrid photomultiplier detector assemblies enabling significantly higher detection count rates. Thanks to these improved components, it is possible to achieve much better photon statistics in significantly shorter time spans while being able to perform FLIM imaging for fast processes in a qualitative manner and with high optical resolution. FLIM imaging can now be performed with up to several frames per second making it possible to study fast processes such as protein interactions involved in endosome trafficking.

  6. Imaging of Cellular Oxidoreductase Activity Suggests Mixotrophic Metabolisms in Thiomargarita spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jake V; Flood, Beverly E; Ricci, Elizabeth; Delherbe, Nathalie

    2017-11-07

    The largest known bacteria, Thiomargarita spp., have yet to be isolated in pure culture, but their large size allows for individual cells to be monitored in time course experiments or to be individually sorted for omics-based investigations. Here we investigated the metabolism of individual cells of Thiomargarita spp. by using a novel application of a tetrazolium-based dye that measures oxidoreductase activity. When coupled with microscopy, staining of the cells with a tetrazolium-formazan dye allows metabolic responses in Thiomargarita spp. to be to be tracked in the absence of observable cell division. Additionally, the metabolic activity of Thiomargarita sp. cells can be differentiated from the metabolism of other microbes in specimens that contain adherent bacteria. The results of our redox dye-based assay suggest that Thiomargarita is the most metabolically versatile under anoxic conditions, where it appears to express cellular oxidoreductase activity in response to the electron donors succinate, acetate, citrate, formate, thiosulfate, H2, and H2S. Under hypoxic conditions, formazan staining results suggest the metabolism of succinate and likely acetate, citrate, and H2S. Cells incubated under oxic conditions showed the weakest formazan staining response, and then only to H2S, citrate, and perhaps succinate. These results provide experimental validation of recent genomic studies of Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii that suggest metabolic plasticity and mixotrophic metabolism. The cellular oxidoreductase response of bacteria attached to the exterior of Thiomargarita also supports the possibility of trophic interactions between these largest of known bacteria and attached epibionts.IMPORTANCE The metabolic potential of many microorganisms that cannot be grown in the laboratory is known only from genomic data. Genomes of Thiomargarita spp. suggest that these largest of known bacteria are mixotrophs, combining lithotrophic metabolism with organic carbon

  7. Eight-Week Training Cessation Suppresses Physiological Stress but Rapidly Impairs Health Metabolic Profiles and Aerobic Capacity in Elite Taekwondo Athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hung Liao

    Full Text Available Changes in an athlete's physiological and health metabolic profiles after detraining have not been studied in elite Taekwondo (TKD athletes. To enable a better understanding of these physiological changes to training cessation, this study examined the effects of 8-weeks detraining on the aerobic capacity, body composition, inflammatory status and health metabolic profile in elite TKD athletes. Sixteen elite TKD athletes (age: 21.0 ± 0.8 yrs, BMI: 22.4 ± 3.9 kg/m2; Mean ± SD; 11 males and 5 females participated in this study. Physical activity level assessment using computerized physical activity logs was performed during the competitive preparation season (i.e. one-week before national competition and at two week intervals throughout the detraining period. Participant aerobic capacity, body fat, and blood biomarkers were measured before and after detraining, and the blood biomarker analyses included leukocyte subpopulations, blood glucose, insulin, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S, and cortisol. Eight-week detraining increased DHEA-S/cortisol ratio (+57.3%, p = 0.004, increased insulin/cortisol ratio (+59.9%, p = 0.004, reduced aerobic power (-2.43%, p = 0.043, increased body fat accumulation (body fat%: +21.3%, p < 0.001, decreased muscle mass (muscle mass%: -4.04%, p < 0.001, and elevated HOMA-IR (the biomarker of systemic insulin resistance; +34.2%, p = 0.006. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR, a systemic inflammatory index, increased by 48.2% (p = 0.005. The change in aerobic capacity was correlated with the increased fat mass (r = -0.429, p = 0.049 but not with muscle loss. An increase in the NLR was correlated to the changes in HOMA-IR (r = 0.44, p = 0.044 and aerobic capacity (r = -0.439, p = 0.045. We demonstrate that 8-week detraining suppresses physiological stress but rapidly results in declines in athletic performance and health metabolic profiles, including reduced aerobic capacity, increased body fat, muscle loss

  8. Plasmonic Thermal Decomposition/Digestion of Proteins: A Rapid On-Surface Protein Digestion Technique for Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rong; Basile, Franco

    2017-09-05

    A method based on plasmon surface resonance absorption and heating was developed to perform a rapid on-surface protein thermal decomposition and digestion suitable for imaging mass spectrometry (MS) and/or profiling. This photothermal process or plasmonic thermal decomposition/digestion (plasmonic-TDD) method incorporates a continuous wave (CW) laser excitation and gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) to induce known thermal decomposition reactions that cleave peptides and proteins specifically at the C-terminus of aspartic acid and at the N-terminus of cysteine. These thermal decomposition reactions are induced by heating a solid protein sample to temperatures between 200 and 270 °C for a short period of time (10-50 s per 200 μm segment) and are reagentless and solventless, and thus are devoid of sample product delocalization. In the plasmonic-TDD setup the sample is coated with Au-NPs and irradiated with 532 nm laser radiation to induce thermoplasmonic heating and bring about site-specific thermal decomposition on solid peptide/protein samples. In this manner the Au-NPs act as nanoheaters that result in a highly localized thermal decomposition and digestion of the protein sample that is independent of the absorption properties of the protein, making the method universally applicable to all types of proteinaceous samples (e.g., tissues or protein arrays). Several experimental variables were optimized to maximize product yield, and they include heating time, laser intensity, size of Au-NPs, and surface coverage of Au-NPs. Using optimized parameters, proof-of-principle experiments confirmed the ability of the plasmonic-TDD method to induce both C-cleavage and D-cleavage on several peptide standards and the protein lysozyme by detecting their thermal decomposition products with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The high spatial specificity of the plasmonic-TDD method was demonstrated by using a mask to digest designated sections of

  9. Imaging plasma docosahexaenoic acid (dha incorporation into the brain in vivo, as a biomarker of brain DHA: Metabolism and neurotransmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapoport Stanley I.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA is critical for normal brain structure and function, and its brain concentration depends on dietary DHA content and hepatic conversion from its dietary derived n-3 precursor, a-linolenic acid (α-LNA. We developed an in vivo method in rats using quantitative autoradiography to image incorporation into brain of unesterified plasma DHA, and showed that the incorporation rate equals the rate of brain metabolic DHA consumption. Thus, quantitative imaging of DHA incorporation from plasma into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain DHA metabolism and neurotransmission. The method has been extended to humans with the use of positron emission tomography (PET. Furthermore, imaging in unanesthetized rats using DHA incorporation as a biomarker in response to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA administration confirms that regional DHA signaling is independent of extracellular calcium, and likely mediated by a calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2. Studies in mice in which iPLA2-VIA (β was knocked out confirmed that this enzyme is critical for baseline and muscarinic cholinergic signaling involving DHA.

  10. The Relation of Rapid Changes in Obesity Measures to Lipid Profile - Insights from a Nationwide Metabolic Health Survey in 444 Polish Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, Bernhard M.; Jóźwiak, Jacek; Nelson, Christopher P.; Lukas, Witold; Mastej, Mirosław; Windak, Adam; Tomasik, Tomasz; Grzeszczak, Władysław; Tykarski, Andrzej; Gąsowski, Jerzy; Ślęzak-Prochazka, Izabella; Ślęzak, Andrzej; Charchar, Fadi J.; Sattar, Naveed; Thompson, John R.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Tomaszewski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Objective The impact of fast changes in obesity indices on other measures of metabolic health is poorly defined in the general population. Using the Polish accession to the European Union as a model of political and social transformation we examined how an expected rapid increase in body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference relates to changes in lipid profile, both at the population and personal level. Methods Through primary care centres in 444 Polish cities, two cross-sectional nationwide population-based surveys (LIPIDOGRAM 2004 and LIPIDOGRAM 2006) examined 15,404 and 15,453 adult individuals in 2004 and 2006, respectively. A separate prospective sample of 1,840 individuals recruited in 2004 had a follow-up in 2006 (LIPIDOGRAM PLUS). Results Two years after Polish accession to European Union, mean population BMI and waist circumference increased by 0.6% and 0.9%, respectively. This tracked with a 7.6% drop in HDL-cholesterol and a 2.1% increase in triglycerides (all prelation of BMI to the magnitude of change in both lipid fractions was comparable to that of waist circumference. Conclusions Moderate changes in obesity measures tracked with a significant deterioration in measures of pro-atherogenic dyslipidaemia at both personal and population level. These associations were predominantly driven by factors not measureable directly through either BMI or waist circumference. PMID:24497983

  11. Imaging characterization of the rapid adiabatic passage in a source-rotatable, crossed-beam scattering experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huilin; Mondal, Sohidul; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Liu, Kopin

    2017-07-01

    In order to achieve a more efficient preparation of a specific ro-vibrationally excited reactant state for reactive scattering experiments, we implemented the rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) scheme to our pulsed crossed-beam machine, using a single-mode, continuous-wave mid-infrared laser. The challenge for this source-rotatable apparatus lies in the non-orthogonal geometry between the molecular beam and the laser propagation directions. As such, the velocity spread of the supersonic beam results in a significantly broader Doppler distribution that needs to be activated for RAP to occur than the conventional orthogonal configuration. In this report, we detail our approach to shifting, locking, and stabilizing the absolute mid-infrared frequency. We exploited the imaging detection technique to characterize the RAP process and to quantify the excitation efficiency. We showed that with appropriate focusing of the IR laser, a nearly complete population transfer can still be achieved in favorable cases. Compared to our previous setup—a pulsed optical parametric oscillator/amplifier in combination with a multipass ring reflector for saturated absorption, the present RAP scheme with a single-pass, continuous-wave laser yields noticeably higher population-transfer efficiency.

  12. Reduced medial prefrontal-subcortical connectivity in dysphoria: Granger causality analyses of rapid functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatinelli, Dean; McTeague, Lisa M; Dhamala, Mukesh; Frank, David W; Wanger, Timothy J; Adhikari, Bhim M

    2015-02-01

    A cortico-limbic network consisting of the amygdala, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and ventral striatum (vSTR) has been associated with altered function in emotional disorders. Here we used rapidly sampled functional magnetic resonance imaging and Granger causality analyses to assess the directional connectivity between these brain structures in a sample of healthy and age-matched participants endorsing moderate to severe depressive symptomatology as they viewed a series of natural scene stimuli varying systematically in pleasantness and arousal. Specifically during pleasant scene perception, dysphoric participants showed reduced activity in mPFC and vSTR, relative to healthy participants. In contrast, amygdala activity was enhanced to pleasant as well as unpleasant arousing scenes in both participant groups. Granger causality estimates of influence between mPFC and vSTR were significantly reduced in dysphoric relative to control participants during all picture contents. These findings provide direct evidence that during visual perception of evocative emotional stimuli, reduced reward-related activity in dysphoria is associated with dysfunctional causal connectivity between mPFC, amygdala, and vSTR.

  13. Technique for diamond machining large ZnSe grisms for the Rapid Infrared/Imager Spectrograph (RIMAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Little, Steve L.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Capone, John I.

    2016-07-01

    The Rapid Infrared Imager/Spectrograph (RIMAS) is an instrument designed to observe gamma ray burst afterglows following initial detection by the SWIFT satellite. Operating in the near infrared between 0.9 and 2.4 μm, it has capabilities for both low resolution (R 25) and moderate resolution (R 4000) spectroscopy. Two zinc selenide (ZnSe) grisms provide dispersion in the moderate resolution mode: one covers the Y and J bands and the other covers the H and K. Each has a clear aperture of 44 mm. The YJ grism has a blaze angle of 49.9° with a 40 μm groove spacing. The HK grism is blazed at 43.1° with a 50 μm grooves spacing. Previous fabrication of ZnSe grisms on the Precision Engineering Research Lathe (PERL II) at LLNL has demonstrated the importance of surface preparation, tool and fixture design, tight thermal control, and backup power sources for the machine. The biggest challenges in machining the RIMAS grisms are the large grooved area, which indicates long machining time, and the relatively steep blaze angle, which means that the grism wavefront error is much more sensitive to lathe metrology errors. Mitigating techniques are described.

  14. The Emerging Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Evaluation of Metabolic Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, S; Markousis-Mavrogenis, G; Markussis, V; Kolovou, G

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in the diagnosis, risk stratification, and follow-up of metabolic cardiomyopathies. The classification of myocardial diseases, proposed by WHO/ISFC task force, distinguished specific cardiomyopathies, caused by metabolic disorders, into 4 types: 1) endocrine disorders, 2) storage or infiltration disorders (amyloidosis, hemochromatosis and familial storage disorders), 3) nutritional disorders (Kwashiorkor, beri-beri, obesity, and alcohol), and 4) diabetic heart. Thyroid disease, pheochromocytoma, and growth hormone excess or deficiency may contribute to usually reversible dilated cardiomyopathy. Glucogen storage diseases can be presented with myopathy, liver, and heart failure. Lysosomal storage diseases can provoke cardiac hypertrophy, mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias. Hereditary hemochromatosis, an inherited disorder of iron metabolism, leads to tissue iron overload in different organs, including the heart. Cardiac amyloidosis is the result of amyloid deposition in the heart, formed from breakdown of normal or abnormal proteins that leads to increased heart stiffness, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. Finally, nutritional disturbances and metabolic diseases, such as Kwashiorkor, beri-beri, obesity, alcohol consumption, and diabetes mellitus may also lead to severe cardiac dysfunction. CMR, through its capability to reliably assess anatomy, function, inflammation, rest-stress myocardial perfusion, myocardial fibrosis, aortic distensibility, iron and/or fat deposition can serve as an excellent tool for early diagnosis of heart involvement, risk stratification, treatment evaluation, and long term follow-up of patients with metabolic cardiomyopathies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Positron emission tomography imaging of tumor cell metabolism and application to therapy response monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarnath eChallapalli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells do reprogramme their energy metabolism to enable several functions such as generation of biomass including membrane biosynthesis, and overcoming bioenergetic and redox stress. In this article we review both established and evolving radioprobes developed in association with positron emission tomography (PET to detect tumor cell metabolism and effect of treatment. Measurement of enhanced tumor cell glycolysis using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose is well established in the clinic. Analogues of choline including [11C]-choline and various fluorinated derivatives are being tested in several cancer types clinically with PET. In addition to these, there is an evolving array of metabolic tracers for measuring intracellular transport of glutamine and other amino acids or for measuring glycogenesis, as well as probes used as surrogates for fatty acid synthesis or precursors for fatty acid oxidation. In addition to providing us with opportunities for examining the complex regulation of reprogrammed energy metabolism in living subjects, the PET methods open up opportunities for monitoring pharmacological activity of new therapies that directly or indirectly inhibit tumor cell metabolism.

  16. MR Imaging-derived Oxygen Metabolism and Neovascularization Characterization for Grading and IDH Gene Mutation Detection of Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas; Zimmermann, Max; Kitzwögerer, Melitta; Oberndorfer, Stefan; Rössler, Karl; Dörfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Heinz, Gertraud

    2017-06-01

    Purpose To explore the diagnostic performance of physiological magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of oxygen metabolism and neovascularization activity for grading and characterization of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation status of gliomas. Materials and Methods This retrospective study had institutional review board approval; written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Eighty-three patients with histopathologically proven glioma (World Health Organization [WHO] grade II-IV) were examined with quantitative blood oxygen level-dependent imaging and vascular architecture mapping. Biomarker maps of neovascularization activity (microvessel radius, microvessel density, and microvessel type indicator [MTI]) and oxygen metabolism (oxygen extraction fraction [OEF] and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen [CMRO 2 ]) were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine diagnostic performance for grading and detection of IDH gene mutation status. Results Low-grade (WHO grade II) glioma showed areas with increased OEF (+18%, P < .001, n = 20), whereas anaplastic glioma (WHO grade III) and glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) showed decreased OEF when compared with normal brain tissue (-54% [P < .001, n = 21] and -49% [P < .001, n = 41], respectively). This allowed clear differentiation between low- and high-grade glioma (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC], 1) for the patient cohort. MTI had the highest diagnostic performance (AUC, 0.782) for differentiation between gliomas of grades III and IV among all biomarkers. CMRO 2 was decreased (P = .037) in low-grade glioma with a mutated IDH gene, and MTI was significantly increased in glioma grade III with IDH mutation (P = .013) when compared with the IDH wild-type counterparts. CMRO 2 showed the highest diagnostic performance for IDH gene mutation detection in low-grade glioma (AUC, 0.818) and MTI in high-grade glioma (AUC, 0.854) and for all WHO grades (AUC, 0

  17. Detection of follicular transport of lidocaine and metabolism in adipose tissue in pig ear skin by DESI mass spectrometry imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Alvise, Janina; Mortensen, Rasmus; Hansen, Steen H

    2014-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry imaging is demonstrated as a detection technique for penetration experiments of drugs in skin. Lidocaine ointment was used as the model compound in ex vivo experiments with whole pig ears as the skin model. Follicular transport of lidoca......Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry imaging is demonstrated as a detection technique for penetration experiments of drugs in skin. Lidocaine ointment was used as the model compound in ex vivo experiments with whole pig ears as the skin model. Follicular transport...... of lidocaine into the deeper skin layers is demonstrated for the first time. Furthermore, metabolism of lidocaine to 3-OH-lidocaine was observed in subcutaneous tissue as well as in lobules of white adipose tissue surrounding the hair follicles. These results suggest that it is advantageous to use full...

  18. Analysis of Metabolic Changes in Plant Pathosystems by Imprint Imaging DESI-MS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tata, Alessandra; Perez, Consuelo J; Hamid, Tanam S; Bayfield, Mark A; Ifa, Demian R

    2015-01-01

    .... The fluctuations of glycoalkaloids present in sprouted potatoes infected by the phytopathogen Pythium ultimum were monitored by imprint imaging desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS...

  19. Facile synthesis [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine for hyperpolarized MRS imaging of cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wenchao; Zha, Zhihao; Lieberman, Brian P; Mancuso, Anthony; Stetz, Mathew; Rizzi, Rahim; Ploessl, Karl; Wise, David; Thompson, Craig; Kung, Hank F

    2011-08-01

    Recent reports suggest that cancer cells may use glutamine, instead of glucose, as an alternative source of metabolic energy. This suggests that hyperpolarized (13)C glutamine may be useful as a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) imaging agent for detecting changes in glutamine metabolism in cancerous cells or tissues. Synthesis of [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine was accomplished through a seven-step synthetic pathway with a 44% overall yield. The introduction of two stable isotopes was performed by a NaB(2)H(4)-mixed anhydride reduction and K(13)CN-nuclophilic substitution, respectively. The desired [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine was successfully obtained by a one-pot reaction of deprotection and controlled cyanide hydrolysis. Hyperpolarized [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine samples were tested in human glioma cells (myc upregulated glia cells, SF188-Bcl-x(L)). MRS signals were obtained with a 9.4 Tesla 89-mm bore nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and a direct-detection multi-nuclear probe. The initial degree of polarization for [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine was ~5% and the initial (13)C signal to noise ratio was ~100:1. Glutamate was detected within seconds after the injection of hyperpolarized glutamine into the cells. The ratio of glutamate to glutamine was very high, indicating rapid conversion to glutamate. Similar cell uptake studies using [(3)H]-L-glutamine also demonstrated cell uptakes higher than that of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose. We are reporting the first example of using specifically deuterated [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine in conjunction with hyperpolarized MRS for studying "glutaminolysis" in proliferating tumor cells. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Digital still images from Coral Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (CRAMP) Rapid Assessment Transect surveys from 2006 in the coastal waters of Hawaii, 22 June - 12 December 2006 (NODC Accession 0039627)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of digital still images taken during CRAMP Rapid Assessment Transect surveys taken in 2006 and includes images of substrate type and species....

  1. Hyperpolarized 1-13C Pyruvate Imaging of Porcine Cardiac Metabolism shift by GIK Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Tougaard, Rasmus Stilling; Mikkelsen, Emmeli

    Cardiac metabolism has gained considerable attention worldwide lately, both as a diagnostic and prognostication tool, as well as a novel target for treatment. As human trials involving hyperpolarized MR in the heart are imminent, we employed a clinically relevant, large animal model, and sought...

  2. Multiple genetic imaging study of the association between cholesterol metabolism and brain functional alterations in individuals with risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Feng; Yuan, Yonggui; Shi, Yongmei; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-03-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease. Genes involved in cholesterol metabolism may play a role in the pathological changes of AD. However, the imaging genetics-based endophenotypes derived from polymorphisms in multiple functionally related genes are unclear in individuals with risk factors for AD. Forty-three amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects and 30 healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements of brain topological organization. Thirty-three previously suggested tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 12 candidate genes in the cholesterol metabolism pathway were further investigated. A cholesterol metabolism pathway gene-based imaging genetics approach was then utilized to investigate disease-related differences between the groups based on genotype-by-aMCI interactions. The cholesterol metabolism pathway genes exerted widespread effects on the cortico-subcortical-cerebellar spontaneous brain activity. Meanwhile, left lateralization of global brain connectivity was associated with cholesterol metabolism pathway genes. The APOE rs429358 variation significantly influenced the brain network characteristics, affecting the activation of nodes as well as the connectivity of edges in aMCI subjects.The cholesterol metabolism pathway gene-based imaging genetics approach may provide new opportunities to understand the mechanisms underlying AD and suggested that APOE rs429358 is a core genetic variation that is associated with disease-related differences in brain function.

  3. Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    have been using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) (7) to examine Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and Flavin adenine...an optical imaging window into the skin of these mice above the tumor. We will then collect SHG from collagen and FLIM data for NADH using an MPM

  4. The value of metabolic imaging by using PET-CT for making therapeutic plan in patients with diffuse large b cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Suk; Lim, Seok Tae; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation after systemic chemotherapy with R-CHOP regimen can improve disease free survival in patients with stage III or IV. Recently, accurate staging is very important to make a plan for management of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We evaluated if metabolic imaging by using PET-CT can play more additive role to manage DLBCL than anatomic imaging. Twenty three patients (age 58.3{+-}15.3 years, M: F=17: 6) who had pathologically diagnosed DLBCL according to WHO classification were enrolled in this study. All of them underwent diagnostic work up for anatomic staging along the NCCN practice guideline version 2001 and also got metabolic staging using PET-CT before therapy. After 3 and/or 6 cycles of R-CHOP, PET-CT was repeated for the determination of further management. We compared diagnostic performance of anatomic and metabolic staging with pathologic findings and result of bone marrow biopsy. The primary biopsies were done in head and neck (13/23), chest (1/23), and abdomen (9/23). Metabolic imaging had more accurate to find biopsy site than anatomic imaging (100% vs 81.8%, respectively). The concordant rate between anatomic and metabolic staging was 39.1% (9/23) of patients. Metabolic imaging leaded upstaging in 60.8% (14/23) of patients. After adding metabolic staging, therapeutic plan were changed in 64.2% of patients having upstaging. PET-CT had 73.9% of concordance and 26.1% of dis-concordance in bone marrow biopsies. Although metabolic assessment by using PET-CT will be unable to replace bone marrow biopsy, it should be needed to make therapeutic plans in patients with DLBCL.

  5. Interrogating tumor metabolism and tumor microenvironments using molecular positron emission tomography imaging. Theranostic approaches to improve therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Orit; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive molecular imaging technology that is becoming increasingly important for the measurement of physiologic, biochemical, and pharmacological functions at cellular and molecular levels in patients with cancer. Formation, development, and aggressiveness of tumor involve a number of molecular pathways, including intrinsic tumor cell mutations and extrinsic interaction between tumor cells and the microenvironment. Currently, evaluation of these processes is mainly through biopsy, which is invasive and limited to the site of biopsy. Ongoing research on specific target molecules of the tumor and its microenvironment for PET imaging is showing great potential. To date, the use of PET for diagnosing local recurrence and metastatic sites of various cancers and evaluation of treatment response is mainly based on [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG), which measures glucose metabolism. However, [(18)F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer and does not give enough insight into tumor biology and/or its vulnerability to potential treatments. Hence, there is an increasing need for the development of selective biologic radiotracers that will yield specific biochemical information and allow for noninvasive molecular imaging. The possibility of cancer-associated targets for imaging will provide the opportunity to use PET for diagnosis and therapy response monitoring (theranostics) and thus personalized medicine. This article will focus on the review of non-[(18)F]FDG PET tracers for specific tumor biology processes and their preclinical and clinical applications.

  6. Typical cerebral metabolic patterns in various types of dementia: an SPM analysis of 18F-FDG PET images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-xue CUI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To delineate the cerebral metabolic patterns presented in 18F-FDG PET images in various types of dementia with SPM analysis.  Methods Patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET scanning with a retrospectively confirmed diagnosis according to strictly defined clinical research criteria were studied. Clinical follow-up enabled appropriate patient inclusion. A total of 62 patients were included, of which 20 patients were diagnosed as Alzheimer's disease (AD, 20 frontotemporal dementia (FTD, 10 dementia with Lewy body (DLB, 7 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, 3 primary progressive aphasia (PPA, 1 corticobasal ganglionic degeneration (CBD, 1 multiple system atrophy (MSA. 18F-FDG PET images of each group were analyzed and compared to 20 healthy controls using SPM5. Results Disease-specific patterns of relatively decreased metabolic activity were found in AD (bilateral parietotemporal regions and frontal regions sparing sensorimotor cortex, FTD (asymmetric frontotemporal regions, DLB (occipital lobe, visual cortex and bilateral superior temporal gyrus, PSP (bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterolateral temporal regions, caudate nucleus and mesencephalon, PPA (Broca's area in left frontal lobe, left temporal cortex excepting posterior superior temporal gyrus, CBD (asymmetricly involved cortical regions, prodominately on right side, around bilateral central sulcus and right basal ganglia, MSA (bilateral cerebellum dorsolateral cortex and left putamen, and right medial temporal cortex.  Conclusions Specific dementia related cerebral metabolic patterns in 18F-FDG PET might assist in early differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.04.008

  7. Rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of PVP-coated ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahdatkhah, Parisa [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Madaah Hosseini, Hamid Reza, E-mail: Madaah@sharif.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodaei, Azin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Montazerabadi, Ali Reza [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Irajirad, Rasoul [Biomolecular Image Analysis Group, Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Oghabian, Mohamad Ali [Biomolecular Image Analysis Group, Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Delavari, Hamid H., E-mail: Hamid.delavari@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, PO Box 14115-143 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-12

    Highlights: • A rapid microwave-assisted polyol process used to synthesize Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. • In situ surface modification of ultrasmall Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs with PVP has been performed. • Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs shows considerable increasing of relaxivity in comparison to Gd-chelates. • PVP-covered Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs show appropriate stability for approximately 15 days. • Spectrophotometric indicates the leaching of free Gd ions not occurred versus time. - Abstract: Synthesis of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) coated ultrasmall Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (NPs) with enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted signal intensity and r{sub 2}/r{sub 1} ratio close to unity is performed by a microwave-assisted polyol process. PVP coated Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs with spherical shape and uniform size of 2.5 ± 0.5 nm have been synthesized below 5 min and structure and morphology confirmed by HRTEM, XRD and FTIR. The longitudinal (r{sub 1}) and transversal relaxation (r{sub 2}) of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs is measured by a 3 T MRI scanner. The results showed considerable increasing of relaxivity for Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs in comparison to gadolinium chelates which are commonly used for clinical magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, a mechanism for Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs formation and in situ surface modification of PVP-grafted Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs is proposed.

  8. New layer-based imaging and rapid prototyping techniques for computer-aided design and manufacture of custom dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M-Y; Chang, C-C; Ku, Y C

    2008-01-01

    Fixed dental restoration by conventional methods greatly relies on the skill and experience of the dental technician. The quality and accuracy of the final product depends mostly on the technician's subjective judgment. In addition, the traditional manual operation involves many complex procedures, and is a time-consuming and labour-intensive job. Most importantly, no quantitative design and manufacturing information is preserved for future retrieval. In this paper, a new device for scanning the dental profile and reconstructing 3D digital information of a dental model based on a layer-based imaging technique, called abrasive computer tomography (ACT) was designed in-house and proposed for the design of custom dental restoration. The fixed partial dental restoration was then produced by rapid prototyping (RP) and computer numerical control (CNC) machining methods based on the ACT scanned digital information. A force feedback sculptor (FreeForm system, Sensible Technologies, Inc., Cambridge MA, USA), which comprises 3D Touch technology, was applied to modify the morphology and design of the fixed dental restoration. In addition, a comparison of conventional manual operation and digital manufacture using both RP and CNC machining technologies for fixed dental restoration production is presented. Finally, a digital custom fixed restoration manufacturing protocol integrating proposed layer-based dental profile scanning, computer-aided design, 3D force feedback feature modification and advanced fixed restoration manufacturing techniques is illustrated. The proposed method provides solid evidence that computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies may become a new avenue for custom-made fixed restoration design, analysis, and production in the 21st century.

  9. Study on microstructure of corpus striatum in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder using magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-meng ZHANG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the structure of corpus striatum and the integrity of white matter fiber in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD and idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD.  Methods Twelve patients with iRBD, 12 patients with PD and 10 healthy subjects that were well matched in gender, age and education were enrolled in this study. Head MRI examination was performed to all subjects to observe the changes of corpus striatum structure (the gray matter volume and the integrity of white matter fiber [fractional anisotropy (FA] by combining voxel?based morphometry (VBM and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI.  Results Compared with healthy subjects, the gray matter volume of left caudate nucleus was significantly decreased (P < 0.005, and FA values of left caudate nucleus (P < 0.005, right caudate nucleus (P < 0.001 and right putamen (P < 0.05 were all significantly reduced in iRBD patients; FA value of right putamen was significantly decreased in PD patients (P < 0.05. Compared with PD patients, the gray matter volume of left caudate nucleus of iRBD patients was significantly reduced (P < 0.001, FA values of left caudate nucleus (P < 0.01 and right caudate nucleus (P < 0.005 of iRBD patients were significantly reduced.  Conclusions There is atrophy of gray matter volume and extensive white matter fiber impairment in corpus striatum of patients with iRBD, and the white matter fiber impairment was similar to PD, which provides an anatomical evidence for iRBD being presymptom of PD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.05.008

  10. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of alterations to cellular metabolism by domain 2 of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Mazumder

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV co-opts hepatic lipid pathways to facilitate its pathogenesis. The virus alters cellular lipid biosynthesis and trafficking, and causes an accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs that gives rise to hepatic steatosis. Little is known about how these changes are controlled at the molecular level, and how they are related to the underlying metabolic states of the infected cell. The HCV core protein has previously been shown to independently induce alterations in hepatic lipid homeostasis. Herein, we demonstrate, using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy, that expression of domain 2 of the HCV core protein (D2 fused to GFP is sufficient to induce an accumulation of larger lipid droplets (LDs in the perinuclear region. Additionally, we performed fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides [NAD(PH], a key coenzyme in cellular metabolic processes, to monitor changes in the cofactor's abundance and conformational state in D2-GFP transfected cells. When expressed in Huh-7 human hepatoma cells, we observed that the D2-GFP induced accumulation of LDs correlated with an increase in total NAD(PH fluorescence and an increase in the ratio of free to bound NAD(PH. This is consistent with an approximate 10 fold increase in cellular NAD(PH levels. Furthermore, the lifetimes of bound and free NAD(PH were both significantly reduced--indicating viral protein-induced alterations in the cofactors' binding and microenvironment. Interestingly, the D2-expressing cells showed a more diffuse localization of NAD(PH fluorescence signal, consistent with an accumulation of the co-factor outside the mitochondria. These observations suggest that HCV causes a shift of metabolic control away from the use of the coenzyme in mitochondrial electron transport and towards glycolysis, lipid biosynthesis, and building of new biomass. Overall, our findings demonstrate that HCV induced alterations in hepatic

  11. Use of imaging biomarkers to assess perfusion and glucose metabolism in the skeletal muscle of dystrophic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadway Jennifer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a severe neuromuscular disease that affects 1 in 3500 boys. The disease is characterized by progressive muscle degeneration that results from mutations in or loss of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin, from the glycoprotein membrane complex, thus increasing the susceptibility of contractile muscle to injury. To date, disease progression is typically assessed using invasive techniques such as muscle biopsies, and while there are recent reports of the use of magnetic resonance, ultrasound and optical imaging technologies to address the issue of disease progression and monitoring therapeutic intervention in dystrophic mice, our study aims to validate the use of imaging biomarkers (muscle perfusion and metabolism in a longitudinal assessment of skeletal muscle degeneration/regeneration in two murine models of muscular dystrophy. Methods Wild-type (w.t. and dystrophic mice (weakly-affected mdx mice that are characterized by a point mutation in dystrophin; severely-affected mdx:utrn-/- (udx mice that lack functional dystrophin and are null for utrophin were exercised three times a week for 30 minutes. To follow the progression of DMD, accumulation of 18 F-FDG, a measure of glucose metabolism, in both wild-type and affected mice was measured with a small animal PET scanner (GE eXplore Vista. To assess changes in blood flow and blood volume in the hind limb skeletal muscle, mice were injected intravenously with a CT contrast agent, and imaged with a small animal CT scanner (GE eXplore Ultra. Results In hind limb skeletal muscle of both weakly-affected mdx mice and in severely-affected udx mice, we demonstrate an early, transient increase in both 18F-FDG uptake, and in blood flow and blood volume. Histological analysis of H&E-stained tissue collected from parallel littermates demonstrates the presence of both inflammatory infiltrate and centrally-located nuclei, a classic hallmark of myofibrillar

  12. Comparison of the effects of slowly and rapidly absorbed carbohydrates on postprandial glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Meidjie; Linn, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Isomaltulose attenuates postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations compared with sucrose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the mechanism by which isomaltulose limits postprandial hyperglycemia has not been clarified. The objective was therefore to assess the effects of bolus administration of isomaltulose on glucose metabolism compared with sucrose in T2DM. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover design, 11 participants with T2DM initially underwent a 3-h euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic (0.8 mU · kg(-1) · min(-1)) clamp that was subsequently combined with 1 g/kg body wt of an oral (13)C-enriched isomaltulose or sucrose load. Hormonal responses and glucose kinetics were analyzed during a 4-h postprandial period. Compared with sucrose, absorption of isomaltulose was prolonged by ∼50 min (P = 0.004). Mean plasma concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide were ∼10-23% lower (P insulin-to-glucagon ratio (P Insulin action was enhanced after isomaltulose compared with sucrose (P = 0.013). Ingestion of slowly absorbed isomaltulose attenuates postprandial hyperglycemia by reducing oral glucose appearance, inhibiting endogenous glucose production (EGP), and increasing SGU compared with ingestion of rapidly absorbed sucrose in patients with T2DM. In addition, GLP-1 secretion contributes to a beneficial shift in the insulin-to-glucagon ratio, suppression of EGP, and enhancement of SGU after isomaltulose consumption. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01070238. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Diagnostic value of 123I-phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) metabolic and thallium 201 perfusion imaging in stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walamies, M; Turjanmaa, V; Koskinen, M; Uusitalo, A

    1993-08-01

    The diagnostic value of 123I-phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) metabolic cardiac imaging was studied in a group (n = 29) of patients with angiographically confirmed CAD using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A symptom-limited exercise test was first done with IPPA, and 2 days later with thallium. Medications were not withheld during testing. Fourteen healthy control subjects participated in parallel IPPA and 15 in thallium tests. Data acquisition and output were comparable in the two imaging modalities. By testing various relatively simple criteria for abnormality we found that the semiquantitative interpretation was more accurate than the visual readings. The best compromise of accuracy with the scored criteria consisted of a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 86%, obtained with IPPA polar tomograms (mild exercise defect) and a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 80% obtained with thallium (regionally decreased washout). With visual interpretation alone, a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 71% was detected with IPPA (mild exercise defect) and 72% and 73%, respectively, with thallium (partial reversibility). The sensitivity of the exercise ECG alone was 62%. The results of this study imply that IPPA imaging could be a rational, uncomplicated clinical method for non-invasive diagnosis of CAD. The diagnostic ability of IPPA is at least as good as that of thallium, and it is possible to use them in succession.

  14. Profiling the metabolic signals involved in chemical communication between microbes using imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasulli, Nikolas M; Shank, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-01

    The ability of microbes to secrete bioactive chemical signals into their environment has been known for over a century. However, it is only in the last decade that imaging mass spectrometry has provided us with the ability to directly visualize the spatial distributions of these microbial metabolites. This technology involves collecting mass spectra from multiple discrete locations across a biological sample, yielding chemical ‘maps’ that simultaneously reveal the distributions of hundreds of metabolites in two dimensions. Advances in microbial imaging mass spectrometry summarized here have included the identification of novel strain- or coculture-specific compounds, the visualization of biotransformation events (where one metabolite is converted into another by a neighboring microbe), and the implementation of a method to reconstruct the 3D subsurface distributions of metabolites, among others. Here we review the recent literature and discuss how imaging mass spectrometry has spurred novel insights regarding the chemical consequences of microbial interactions.

  15. Amyloid and metabolic positron emission tomography imaging of cognitively normal adults with Alzheimer's parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosconi, Lisa; Rinne, Juha O; Tsui, Wai H

    2013-01-01

    , voxel-wise intermodality correlations, and logistic regressions were used to examine cerebral-to-cerebellar PiB and FDG standardized uptake value ratios across groups. The MH group showed higher PiB retention and lower metabolism in AD regions compared with NH and PH, which were negatively correlated...... emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG). These included 19 NL with a maternal history (MH), 12 NL with a paternal history (PH), and 16 NL with negative family history of AD (NH). Automated regions of interest, statistical parametric mapping...... in posterior cingulate, frontal, and parieto-temporal regions (Pearson r ≤ -0.57, p ≤ 0.05). No correlations were observed in NH and PH. The combination of Aβ deposition and metabolism yielded accuracy ≥ 69% for MH vs. NH and ≥ 71% for MH vs. PH, with relative risk = 1.9-5.1 (p values

  16. Direct imaging of glycans in Arabidopsis roots via click labeling of metabolically incorporated azido-monosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, Jorin; Berghuis, Nathalja; Cramer, Dario; Geurts, Rene; Zuilhof, Han; Wennekes, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carbohydrates, also called glycans, play a crucial but not fully understood role in plant health and development. The non-template driven formation of glycans makes it impossible to image them in vivo with genetically encoded fluorescent tags and related molecular biology approaches. A

  17. Direct imaging of glycans in Arabidopsis roots via click labeling of metabolically incorporated azido-monosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, J.; Berghuis, N.; Cramer, Dario; Geurts, R.; Zuilhof, H.; Wennekes, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background

    Carbohydrates, also called glycans, play a crucial but not fully understood role in plant health and development. The non-template driven formation of glycans makes it impossible to image them in vivo with genetically encoded fluorescent tags and related molecular biology

  18. PET imaging of glucose metabolism, neuroinflammation and demyelination in the lysolecithin rat model for multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria, Daniele de Paula; de Vries, Erik F. J.; Sijbesma, Jurgen W. A.; Buchpiguel, Carlos A.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Copray, Sjef C. V. M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Injection of lysolecithin in the central nervous system results in demyelination accompanied by local activation of microglia and recruitment of monocytes. Positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging, using specific tracers, may be an adequate technique to monitor these events in vivo and

  19. Fouille d'images géoréférencées avec RapidMiner

    OpenAIRE

    Guyet, Thomas; Nicolas, Hervé; Ghedamsi, Boussad; Athane, Elise

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This article presents the integration of spatial data in the data mining software RapidMiner. RapidMiner is a data mining tool to design data processing chains. In this work, we implemented an extension of RapidMiner to process spatial data. It benefits from the wide range of data mining methods already available and it enables spatial data users to answer to their analysis questions. The paper illustrates the extension by a comparison of classification methods on a pr...

  20. Rapid 'on-line' image processing as a tool in the evaluation of kinetic and morphological aspects of receptor-induced cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theler, J M; Wollheim, C B; Schlegel, W

    1991-01-01

    Transmembrane signalling involves rapid and spatially well defined changes in cytosolic free Ca2+, [Ca2+]i. Specific technologies involving image processing permit the analysis of kinetic and morphological aspects of [Ca2+]i at the subcellular level with the fluorescent Ca2+ probe fura-2. Fluorescence excitation wavelengths (340 nm or 380 nm) are alternated in synchrony with the acquisition at video rate of images captured with an intensified CCD camera. Images are digitized, recursively filtered, divided, and displayed after calibration of the 'ratio' image into a numerical [Ca2+]i scale. The image processor IMAGINE (Synoptics Ltd., UK) permits these operations at video rate. This produces 'on-line' [Ca2+]i images in real time which are stored on video tapes for subsequent analysis. The present communication summarizes the rationale for the selection of our current technologies. A comparison with alternative solutions should highlight the particular advantages and drawbacks of our approach. The present text thus should serve as a help for investigators who try to assemble image processing tools for work in the receptor and cellular signalling field.

  1. Rapid acquisition of helium-3 and proton three-dimensional image sets of the human lung in a single breath-hold using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Kun; Altes, Talissa A; Tustison, Nicholas J; Feng, Xue; Chen, Xiao; Mata, Jaime F; Miller, G Wilson; de Lange, Eduard E; Tobias, William A; Cates, Gordon D; Brookeman, James R; Mugler, John P

    2015-10-01

    To develop and validate a method for acquiring helium-3 ((3) He) and proton ((1) H) three-dimensional (3D) image sets of the human lung with isotropic spatial resolution within a 10-s breath-hold by using compressed sensing (CS) acceleration, and to assess the fidelity of undersampled images compared with fully sampled images. The undersampling scheme for CS acceleration was optimized and tested using (3) He ventilation data. Rapid 3D acquisition of both (3) He and (1) H data during one breath-hold was then implemented, based on a balanced steady-state free-precession pulse sequence, by random undersampling of k-space with reconstruction by means of minimizing the L1 norm and total variance. CS-reconstruction fidelity was evaluated quantitatively by comparing fully sampled and retrospectively undersampled image sets. Helium-3 and (1) H 3D image sets of the lung with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution were acquired during a single breath-hold in 12 s and 8 s using acceleration factors of 2 and 3, respectively. Comparison of fully sampled and retrospectively undersampled (3) He and (1) H images yielded mean absolute errors 0.9. By randomly undersampling k-space and using CS reconstruction, high-quality (3) He and (1) H 3D image sets with isotropic 3.9-mm resolution can be acquired within an 8-s breath-hold. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Metabolic autofluorescence imaging of head and neck cancer organoids quantifies cellular heterogeneity and treatment response (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amy T.; Heaster, Tiffany M.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    Treatment options for head and neck cancer are limited, and can cause an impaired ability to eat, talk, and breathe. Therefore, optimized and personalized therapies could reduce unnecessary toxicities from ineffective treatments. Organoids are generated from primary tumor tissue and provide a physiologically-relevant in vitro model to measure drug response. Additionally, multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of the metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD can resolve dynamic cellular response to anti-cancer treatment. This study applies FLIM of NAD(P)H and FAD to head and neck cancer organoids. Head and neck cancer tissue was digested and grown in culture as three-dimensional organoids. Gold standard measures of therapeutic response in vivo indicate stable disease after treatment with cetuximab (antibody therapy) or cisplatin (chemotherapy), and treatment response after combination treatment. In parallel, organoids were treated with cetuximab, cisplatin, or combination therapy for 24 hours. Treated organoids exhibit decreased NAD(P)H lifetime (p<0.05) and increased FAD lifetime (p<0.05) compared with control organoids. Additionally, analysis of cellular heterogeneity identifies distinct subpopulations of cells in response to treatment. A quantitative heterogeneity index predicts in vivo treatment response and demonstrates increased cellular heterogeneity in organoids treated with cetuximab or cisplatin compared with combination treatment. Mapping of cell subpopulations enables characterization of spatial relationships between cell subpopulations. Ultimately, an organoid model combined with metabolic fluorescence imaging could provide a high-throughput platform for drug discovery. Organoids grown from patient tissue could enable individualized treatment planning. These achievements could optimize quality of life and treatment outcomes for head and neck cancer patients.

  3. Simultaneous Rapid Determination of the Solubility and Diffusion Coefficients of a Poorly Water-Soluble Drug Based on a Novel UV Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Li, Mingzhong

    2016-01-01

    The solubility and diffusion coefficient are two of the most important physicochemical properties of a drug compound. In practice, both have been measured separately, which is time consuming. This work utilizes a novel technique of UV imaging to determine the solubility and diffusion coefficients of poorly water-soluble drugs simultaneously. A 2-step optimal method is proposed to determine the solubility and diffusion coefficients of a poorly water-soluble pharmaceutical substance based on the Fick's second law of diffusion and UV imaging measurements. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can be used to determine the solubility and diffusion coefficients of a drug with reasonable accuracy, indicating that UV imaging may provide a new opportunity to accurately measure the solubility and diffusion coefficients of a poorly water-soluble drug simultaneously and rapidly. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Automated method for the rapid and precise estimation of adherent cell culture characteristics from phase contrast microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Coil concepts for rapid and motion-compensated MR-Imaging of small animals; Spulenkonzepte zur schnellen und bewegungskompensierten MR-Bildgebung von Kleintieren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korn, Matthias

    2009-05-06

    In this work radiofrequency-coils for the imaging of small animals in clinical whole-body MRI-systems were developed. Therefore in a first step single-channel solenoids were designed and characterized. The solenoids had two and three windings respectively, which were implemented as double wires to increase the homogeneity of the receive profile. These coils allow the acquisition of whole-body images of mice with high signal-to-noise ratio and homogeneity over a distance of at least 6.3 cm. Since many imaging experiments require rapid image acquisition, in the next step a novel coil concept was developed, which, due to its geometry, enables parallel imaging in arbitrary directions. A prototype was assembled and tested on phantom and small-animal experiments. With an accelerating factor of R=2, the difference of the SNR in all directions from the theoretical maximum, was less than 1%. In order to compensate physiological motion by the self-gating technique, in this work a coil is presented for the first time, which selectively amplifies the self-gating signal, while - due to a optical detuning technique - preserving the homogeneous illumination of the image. In vivo experiments on a small animal show an amplification of the self-gating signal by at least 40%. (orig.)

  6. Glutamine/Glutamate Metabolism Studied with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging for the Characterization of Adrenal Nodules and Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan M. Goldman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess glutamine/glutamate (Glx and lactate (Lac metabolism using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRS in order to differentiate between adrenal gland nodules and masses (adenomas, pheochromocytomas, carcinomas, and metastases. Materials and Methods. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. A total of 130 patients (47 men with 132 adrenal nodules/masses were prospectively assessed ( years. A multivoxel system was used with a two-dimensional point-resolved spectroscopy/chemical-shift imaging sequence. Spectroscopic data were interpreted by visual inspection and peak amplitudes of lipids (Lip, choline (Cho, creatine (Cr, Lac, and Glx. Lac/Cr and Glx/Cr were calculated. Glx/Cr was assessed in relation to lesion size. Results. Statistically significant differences were observed in Glx/Cr results between adenomas and pheochromocytomas (, however, with a low positive predictive value (PPV. Glx levels were directly proportional to lesion size in carcinomas. A cutoff point of 1.44 was established for the differentiation between carcinomas larger versus smaller than 4 cm, with 75% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% PPV, and 80% accuracy. Lac/Cr results showed no differences across lesions. A cutoff point of −6.5 for Lac/Cr was established for carcinoma diagnosis. Conclusion. Glx levels are directly proportional to lesion size in carcinomas. A cutoff point of −6.5 Lac/Cr differentiates carcinomas from noncarcinomas.

  7. Glutamine/glutamate metabolism studied with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging for the characterization of adrenal nodules and masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Suzan M; Nunes, Thiago F; Melo, Homero J F; Dalavia, Claudio; Szejnfeld, Denis; Kater, Claudio; Andreoni, Cassio; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Ajzen, Sergio A

    2013-01-01

    To assess glutamine/glutamate (Glx) and lactate (Lac) metabolism using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRS) in order to differentiate between adrenal gland nodules and masses (adenomas, pheochromocytomas, carcinomas, and metastases). Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. A total of 130 patients (47 men) with 132 adrenal nodules/masses were prospectively assessed (54 ± 14.8 years). A multivoxel system was used with a two-dimensional point-resolved spectroscopy/chemical-shift imaging sequence. Spectroscopic data were interpreted by visual inspection and peak amplitudes of lipids (Lip), choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), Lac, and Glx. Lac/Cr and Glx/Cr were calculated. Glx/Cr was assessed in relation to lesion size. Statistically significant differences were observed in Glx/Cr results between adenomas and pheochromocytomas (P < 0.05), however, with a low positive predictive value (PPV). Glx levels were directly proportional to lesion size in carcinomas. A cutoff point of 1.44 was established for the differentiation between carcinomas larger versus smaller than 4 cm, with 75% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% PPV, and 80% accuracy. Lac/Cr results showed no differences across lesions. A cutoff point of -6.5 for Lac/Cr was established for carcinoma diagnosis. Glx levels are directly proportional to lesion size in carcinomas. A cutoff point of -6.5 Lac/Cr differentiates carcinomas from noncarcinomas.

  8. Pre-treatment verification of RapidArc® using Electronic Portal Imaging Device; Verificacao pre-tratamento de RapidArc® utilizando Dispositivo Eletronico de Imagem Porta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Marilia B.; Ferreira, Anne Caroline M.; Bittencourt, Guilherme R.; Pirani, Luis F.; Silveira, Thiago B., E-mail: mbeckerlima@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    The RapidArc® is a novel but widespread technique to achieve intensity modulated beams. One of the major challenges concerning this technique is the pretreatment verification process. The aim of this paper was to analyze the viability of the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) used to perform the verification of RapidArc® using the Sun Nuclear SNC Patient software enable to EPID dose conversion (EPIDose license) and compare its results with punctual dose measurements against a low volume ion chamber. There were analyze five RapidArc® planning, evaluating, separately, planar and punctual doses for each arc. For punctual measurements was used a 0,15 cm³ volume ion chamber and the planar distributions, in Calibration Units (CU), were acquired using the EPID and then converted to absolute dose in centigray through EPIDose. The predicted doses were calculated using the AAA algorithm in Eclipse treatment planning system, version 8.6. The planar comparisons, performed in SNC Patient, employed the Gamma Index tool with a 4% dose difference, 4 mm distance to agreement and 20% threshold. The evaluation of punctual dose was defined by calculating deviations between predicted and measured doses. The mean approval percentage in planar distributions was 94.8% and the average deviation in punctual dose was -1.2%. The use of EPID for RapidArc® pre-treatment verification proved to be feasible and showed good sensibility, because of its high spatial resolution. However one must consider the uncertainty of the method. (author)

  9. Calibrated image-derived input functions for the determination of the metabolic uptake rate of glucose with [18F]-FDG PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Nymark; Reichkendler, Michala H.; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the use of a simple calibration method to remove bias in previously proposed approaches to image-derived input functions (IDIFs) when used to calculate the metabolic uptake rate of glucose (Km) from dynamic [18F]-FDG PET scans of the thigh. Our objective was to obtain nonbiased, low...

  10. Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Licences ……………………………………………………… 7 8. Reportable Outcomes…………………………………………………………….. 7 9. Other outcomes……………………………………………………………………. 7 10. References...Microanalysis 2013. (in preparation) 7. Inventions/Patents/ Licences : None 8. Reportable Outcomes: My findings demonstrate that fluorescence lifetime imaging

  11. Biodistribution, dosimetry, metabolism and monkey PET studies of [18F]GBR 13119. Imaging the dopamine uptake system in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourn, M R; Carey, J E; Koeppe, R A; Haka, M S; Hutchins, G D; Sherman, P S; Kuhl, D E

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo characteristics of a new radiotracer, [18F]GBR 13119, have been examined. Full body biodistribution in rats has been determined and the expected human dosimetry calculated. Pharmacological specificity of in vivo regional brain distribution in rats was examined. Blockage of specific binding was accomplished by dopamine reuptake inhibitors but no effect was observed for pretreatment with serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Preliminary examination of rat blood shows the presence of radiolabeled metabolites, which can be rapidly identified using bonded-phase (Sep-Pak) chromatography. Finally, the striatum of living primates has been imaged using PET and i.v. administration of [18F]GBR 13119. These results represent the intermediate steps in the development of [18F]GBR 13119 as a radiotracer for the study of the dopamine uptake system in man.

  12. Live Cell Imaging Reveals pH Oscillations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae During Metabolic Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Benjamin J T; Kralj, Joel M

    2017-10-24

    Addition of glucose to starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae initiates collective NADH dynamics termed glycolytic oscillations. Numerous questions remain about the extent to which single cells can oscillate, if oscillations occur in natural conditions, and potential physiological consequences of oscillations. In this paper, we report sustained glycolytic oscillations in single cells without the need for cyanide. Glucose addition to immobilized cells induced pH oscillations that could be imaged with fluorescent sensors. A population of cells had oscillations that were heterogeneous in frequency, start time, stop time, duration and amplitude. These changes in cytoplasmic pH were necessary and sufficient to drive changes in NADH. Oscillators had lower mitochondrial membrane potentials and budded more slowly than non-oscillators. We also uncovered a new type of oscillation during recovery from H2O2 challenge. Our data show that pH in S. cerevisiae changes over several time scales, and that imaging pH offers a new way to measure glycolytic oscillations on individual cells.

  13. A model of lysosomal metabolism of dextran coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles: implications for cellular magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, Ali S; Wilson, Lindsey B; Ashari, Parwana; Jordan, Elaine K; Lewis, Bobbi K; Frank, Joseph A

    2005-10-01

    Ferumoxides, dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles, form ferumoxide-transfection agent (FE-TA) complexes that are internalized into endosomes/lysosomes and have been used to label cells for in vivo MRI tracking and localization studies. A better understanding of the physical state of the FE-TA complexes during endocytosis could improve their use. The purpose of this study was to measure the rate of the degradation of iron particles under varying physiological conditions. FE-TA complexes were incubated in seven different buffers containing different chelates with different pH. Reducible iron concentrations, T2 relaxation rates and gradient echo (GRE) magnetic resonance images (MRI) were obtained from each condition immediately after incubation and at 6, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h and days 7, 14 and 21. The dynamics of FE-TA in the endosome/lysosomes within the cells were visualized with electron microscopy. Sodium citrate buffer at pH 4.5 rapidly dissolved FE-TA complexes. However, FE-TA complexes were less soluble in the same buffer at pH 5.5. Similarly, FE-TA complexes were not readily soluble in any of the other buffers with or without chelates, regardless of pH. Electron microscopic images showed degraded FE-TA in some intracellular endosome/lysosomes between days 3 and 5. In the cellular environment, some of the FE-TA-containing endosomes were found to fuse with lysosomes, causing rapid dissociation at low pH and exposing the iron core to chelates that resulted in soluble Fe(III) within the lysosomes. The studies presented represent a first step in identifying the important cellular environmental parameters affecting the integrity of FE-TA complexes.

  14. Uncertainty of soil reflectance retrieval from SPOT and RapidEye multispectral satellite images using a per-pixel bootstrapped empirical line atmospheric correction over an agricultural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudour, E.; Gilliot, J. M.; Bel, L.; Bréchet, L.; Hamiache, J.; Hadjar, D.; Lemonnier, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Many authors have reported the use of empirical line regression between field target sites and image pixels in order to perform atmospheric correction of multispectral images. However few studies were dedicated to the specific reflectance retrieval for cultivated bare soils from multispectral satellite images, from a large number (≥15) of bare field targets spread over a region. Even fewer were oriented towards additional field targets for validation and uncertainty assessment of reflectance error. This study aimed at assessing ELM validation accuracy and uncertainty for predicting topsoil reflectance over a wide area (221 km2) with contrasting soils and tillage practices using a set of six multispectral images at very high (supermode SPOT5, 2.5 m), high (RapidEye, 6.5 m) and medium (SPOT4, 20 m) spatial resolutions. For each image and each spectral band, linear regression (LR) models were constructed through a series of 1000 bootstrap datasets of training/validation samples generated amongst a total of about 30 field sites used as targets, the reflectance measurements of which were made between -6 days/+7 days around acquisition date. The achieved models had an average coefficient of variation of validation errors of ∼14%, which indicates that the composition of training field sites does influence performance results of ELM. However, according to median LR-models, our approach mostly resulted in accurate predictions with low standard errors of estimation around 1-2% reflectance, validation errors of 2-3% reflectance, low validation bias (March: in agricultural areas, images programmed during periods when most field tillage operations have resulted in smooth seedbed conditions (April in this study) are in favour of better performances of soil reflectance prediction. Nevertheless, directional effects appear to mainly and moderately affect the global performance of near-infrared and SWIR bands-models except for oblique viewing images (viewing angle > |20°|). The

  15. Rapid assessment of different oxygenic phototrophs and single-cell photosynthesis with multicolour variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trampe, Erik Christian Løvbjerg; Kolbowski, J.; Schreiber, U.

    2011-01-01

    , red or white light. Automated sequential exposure of microscopic samples to the three excitation colours enables subsequent deconvolution of the resulting fluorescence signals and colour marking of cells with different photopigmentation, i.e., cyanobacteria, green algae, red algae and diatoms......We present a new system for microscopic multicolour variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of aquatic phototrophs. The system is compact and portable and enables microscopic imaging of photosynthetic performance of individual cells and chloroplasts using different combinations of blue, green...

  16. Imaging of Metabolic Status in 3D Cultures with an Improved AMPK FRET Biosensor for FLIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Chennell

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe an approach to non-invasively map spatiotemporal biochemical and physiological changes in 3D cell culture using Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET biosensors expressed in tumour spheroids. In particular, we present an improved Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK FRET biosensor, mTurquoise2 AMPK Activity Reporter (T2AMPKAR, for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM readouts that we have evaluated in 2D and 3D cultures. Our results in 2D cell culture indicate that replacing the FRET donor, enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP, in the original FRET biosensor, AMPK activity reporter (AMPKAR, with mTurquoise2 (mTq2FP, increases the dynamic range of the response to activation of AMPK, as demonstrated using the direct AMPK activator, 991. We demonstrated 3D FLIM of this T2AMPKAR FRET biosensor expressed in tumour spheroids using two-photon excitation.

  17. Imaging of Metabolic Status in 3D Cultures with an Improved AMPK FRET Biosensor for FLIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennell, George; Willows, Robin J W; Warren, Sean C; Carling, David; French, Paul M W; Dunsby, Chris; Sardini, Alessandro

    2016-08-19

    We describe an approach to non-invasively map spatiotemporal biochemical and physiological changes in 3D cell culture using Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) biosensors expressed in tumour spheroids. In particular, we present an improved Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP) Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) FRET biosensor, mTurquoise2 AMPK Activity Reporter (T2AMPKAR), for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) readouts that we have evaluated in 2D and 3D cultures. Our results in 2D cell culture indicate that replacing the FRET donor, enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), in the original FRET biosensor, AMPK activity reporter (AMPKAR), with mTurquoise2 (mTq2FP), increases the dynamic range of the response to activation of AMPK, as demonstrated using the direct AMPK activator, 991. We demonstrated 3D FLIM of this T2AMPKAR FRET biosensor expressed in tumour spheroids using two-photon excitation.

  18. Multiparametric PET imaging in thyroid malignancy characterizing tumour heterogeneity: somatostatin receptors and glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Putzer, Daniel; Bale, Reto [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Dobrozemsky, Georg; Nilica, Bernhard; Kendler, Dorota; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    Radiolabelled somatostatin (SST) analogues have proven useful in diagnosing tumours positive for SST receptor (SSTR). As different subtypes of SSTR are expressed on the tumour cell surface, the choice of appropriate therapeutic SST analogue is crucial. We evaluated the SSTR status of thyroid cancer patients who had signs of progressive disease comparing different SSTR ligands for PET imaging to evaluate possible further therapeutic options. PET with {sup 68}Ga-radiolabelled SSTR ligands DOTA lanreotide (DOTA-LAN), DOTA-Tyr{sup 3} octreotide (DOTA-TOC) and {sup 18}F-FDG was performed in 31 patients with thyroid cancer (TC). These 31 patients comprised 18 with radioiodine non-avid differentiated TC (DTC) including 6 papillary TC (PTC), 8 follicular TC (FTC) and 4 oxyphilic TC (oxyTC), 5 with anaplastic TC (ATC), and 8 with medullary TC (MTC). The PET results were compared in a region-based evaluation. All patients underwent a PET study with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN, 28 patients with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC and 28 patients with {sup 18}F-FDG. A lack of SSTR expression was found in 13 of the 31 patients (42 %) with negative results with both SSTR tracers in 12 patients. Ambiguous results with both SSTR tracers were observed in one patient. High tracer uptake in SSTR PET images was seen in seven DTC patients (39 %; two PTC, three FTC, two oxyTC), in four ATC patients (80 %) and in six MTC patients (75 %). Lesions showing aerobic glycolysis on {sup 18}F-FDG PET were found in 24 of 28 patients (86 %) with corresponding positive results with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN in 35 % and with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC in 29 %. The heterogeneous SSTR profile of TC tumour lesions needs to be evaluated using different SSTR PET tracers to characterize more closely the SSTR subtype affinities in patients with progressive TC in order to further stratify therapy with SSTR therapeutics. (orig.)

  19. Non-contact rapid optical coherence elastography by high-speed 4D imaging of elastic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Ambroziński, Łukasz; Pelivanov, Ivan; Li, David; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2017-02-01

    Shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) uses an OCT system to track propagating mechanical waves, providing the information needed to map the elasticity of the target sample. In this study we demonstrate high speed, 4D imaging to capture transient mechanical wave propagation. Using a high-speed Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system operating at 1.62 MHz A-line rate, the equivalent volume rate of mechanical wave imaging is 16 kvps (kilo-volumes per second), and total imaging time for a 6 x 6 x 3 mm volume is only 0.32 s. With a displacement sensitivity of 10 nanometers, the proposed 4D imaging technique provides sufficient temporal and spatial resolution for real-time optical coherence elastography (OCE). Combined with a new air-coupled, high-frequency focused ultrasound stimulator requiring no contact or coupling media, this near real-time system can provide quantitative information on localized viscoelastic properties. SW-OCE measurements are demonstrated on tissue-mimicking phantoms and porcine cornea under various intra-ocular pressures. In addition, elasticity anisotropy in the cornea is observed. Images of the mechanical wave group velocity, which correlates with tissue elasticity, show velocities ranging from 4-20 m/s depending on pressure and propagation direction. These initial results strong suggest that 4D imaging for real-time OCE may enable high-resolution quantitative mapping of tissue biomechanical properties in clinical applications.

  20. Inborn errors of metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolism. A few of them are: Fructose intolerance Galactosemia Maple sugar urine disease (MSUD) Phenylketonuria (PKU) Newborn ... disorder. Alternative Names Metabolism - inborn errors of Images Galactosemia Phenylketonuria test References Bodamer OA. Approach to inborn ...

  1. Clinical validation and assessment of a modular fluorescent imaging system and algorithm for rapid detection and quantification of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelino, Keith; Shah, Pratik; Edlund, David A; Mohit, Mrinal; Yauney, Gregory

    2017-12-28

    Significant numbers of adults and children have untreated plaque due to poor oral hygiene and consequently suffer from associate dental and systemic diseases. A handheld device equipped with 405 nm light-emitting diodes was constructed to examine the prevalence of red fluorescence signatures associated with dental plaque. This device was used for in vivo imaging of all four incisors and all four canines of twenty-eight consenting human subjects. The same areas were further imaged under white light illumination with a commercial image-processing based plaque-imaging device, and evaluated by a hygienist and dentist. A custom computer vision algorithm using pixel information was developed to calculate plaque coverage ratios ranging from 0 (no plaque) to 1 (complete plaque coverage) for images captured by both devices. The algorithm calculated red fluorescence-based plaque coverage ratios ranging from 0.011 to 0.211 for the subjects imaged. Clinical assessment and statistical analyses of associated plaque ratios of the 405 nm device images indicated high sensitivity and specificity in detecting dental plaque by the experimental device compared to the commercial reference device. The low-cost and open source 405 nm device and the associated computer vision algorithm successfully captured red fluorescence signatures associated with dental plaque and demonstrated comparable performance to a commercially available device. Therefore, a proof of concept validation was provided for the construction and application of a sensitive cost-effective plaque-detecting device. A miniaturized mobile adaptable version of the device was also provided, together with and a step-by-step guide for device assembly and webhost the associated software, to facilitate open-source access to a cost-effective at-home, in-clinic oral care technology. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03379337, December 19 2017. Retrospectively registered.

  2. (Tissue PET) Vascular metabolic imaging and peripheral plasma biomarkers in the evolution of chronic aortic dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakalihasan, Natzi; Nienaber, Christoph A; Hustinx, Roland; Lovinfosse, Pierre; El Hachemi, Mounia; Cheramy-Bien, Jean-Paul; Seidel, Laurence; Lavigne, Jean-Paul; Quaniers, Janine; Kerstenne, Marie-Ange; Courtois, Audrey; Ooms, Annie; Albert, Adelin; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-06-01

    Despite adequate medical management, dissection of the descending aorta (type B) may develop complications, including aneurysmal progression and eventually rupture. Partial false lumen thrombosis has been identified as a marker of adverse evolution in chronic dissection. The aim of this study was to test the ability of complementary information, provided by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and peripheral biomarkers, to add pathophysiological significance and a prognostic value to morphological data. We explored serial aortic (18)F-FDG uptake by PET/CT imaging and plasma biomarkers in a series of 23 patients with type B dissection to predict complications from initial data and to investigate potential associations with aneurysmal expansion during follow-up. Complications occurred in 17 patients. Acute initial characteristics associated with complications were male gender (P = 0.021), arterial hypertension (P = 0.040), aortic dissection diameter (P = 0.0086), partial thrombosis of the false channel (P = 0.0046), and enhanced focal (18)F-FDG uptake (P = 0.045). During follow-up (mean 16.7 ± 8.0 months), aneurysmal expansion was associated with false lumen morphology (P< 0.0001), quantitative (18)F-FDG uptake, (P = 0.0029), elevated plasma concentrations of biomarkers of platelets (P-selectin, P = 0.0009) and thrombin activation (TAT complexes, P = 0.0075), and fibrinolysis (PAP complexes, P < 0.0001; D-dimers, P = 0.0006). Plasma markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis were related to false channel morphology, suggesting that thrombus biological dynamics may drive progressive expansion of type B dissections. Enhanced FDG uptake may be considered as a complementary imaging marker associated with secondary complications in type B dissections. During follow-up, aneurysmal progression is related to PET/CT and biomarkers of thrombus renewal and lysis. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology

  3. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Lipids and Gene Expression Reveals Differences in Fatty Acid Metabolism between Follicular Compartments in Porcine Ovaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Uzbekova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, oocytes develop inside the ovarian follicles; this process is strongly supported by the surrounding follicular environment consisting of cumulus, granulosa and theca cells, and follicular fluid. In the antral follicle, the final stages of oogenesis require large amounts of energy that is produced by follicular cells from substrates including glucose, amino acids and fatty acids (FAs. Since lipid metabolism plays an important role in acquiring oocyte developmental competence, the aim of this study was to investigate site-specificity of lipid metabolism in ovaries by comparing lipid profiles and expression of FA metabolism-related genes in different ovarian compartments. Using MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging, images of porcine ovary sections were reconstructed from lipid ion signals for the first time. Cluster analysis of ion spectra revealed differences in spatial distribution of lipid species among ovarian compartments, notably between the follicles and interstitial tissue. Inside the follicles analysis differentiated follicular fluid, granulosa, theca and the oocyte-cumulus complex. Moreover, by transcript quantification using real time PCR, we showed that expression of five key genes in FA metabolism significantly varied between somatic follicular cells (theca, granulosa and cumulus and the oocyte. In conclusion, lipid metabolism differs between ovarian and follicular compartments.

  4. Accurate, rapid identification of dislocation lines in coherent diffractive imaging via a min-max optimization formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, A.; Menickelly, M.; Wild, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    Defects such as dislocations impact materials properties and their response during external stimuli. Imaging these defects in their native operating conditions to establish the structure-function relationship and, ultimately, to improve performance via defect engineering has remained a considerable challenge for both electron-based and x-ray-based imaging techniques. While Bragg coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (BCDI) is successful in many cases, nuances in identifying the dislocations has left manual identification as the preferred method. Derivative-based methods are also used, but they can be inaccurate and are computationally inefficient. Here we demonstrate a derivative-free method that is both more accurate and more computationally efficient than either derivative- or human-based methods for identifying 3D dislocation lines in nanocrystal images produced by BCDI. We formulate the problem as a min-max optimization problem and show exceptional accuracy for experimental images. We demonstrate a 227x speedup for a typical experimental dataset with higher accuracy over current methods. We discuss the possibility of using this algorithm as part of a sparsity-based phase retrieval process. We also provide MATLAB code for use by other researchers.

  5. Exploiting machine learning algorithms for tree species classification in a semiarid woodland using RapidEye image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelabu, Samuel; Mutanga, Onisimo; Adam, Elhadi; Cho, Moses Azong

    2013-01-01

    Classification of different tree species in semiarid areas can be challenging as a result of the change in leaf structure and orientation due to soil moisture constraints. Tree species mapping is, however, a key parameter for forest management in semiarid environments. In this study, we examined the suitability of 5-band RapidEye satellite data for the classification of five tree species in mopane woodland of Botswana using machine leaning algorithms with limited training samples.We performed classification using random forest (RF) and support vector machines (SVM) based on EnMap box. The overall accuracies for classifying the five tree species was 88.75 and 85% for both SVM and RF, respectively. We also demonstrated that the new red-edge band in the RapidEye sensor has the potential for classifying tree species in semiarid environments when integrated with other standard bands. Similarly, we observed that where there are limited training samples, SVM is preferred over RF. Finally, we demonstrated that the two accuracy measures of quantity and allocation disagreement are simpler and more helpful for the vast majority of remote sensing classification process than the kappa coefficient. Overall, high species classification can be achieved using strategically located RapidEye bands integrated with advanced processing algorithms.

  6. Apparent brain temperature imaging with multi-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy compared with cerebral blood flow and metabolism imaging on positron emission tomography in patients with unilateral chronic major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanba, Takamasa; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Murakami, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Ogasawara, Kuniaki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate (Japan); Yoshioka, Yoshichika [Osaka University, Open and Transdisciplinary Research Initiatives, Osaka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Uwano, Ikuko [Iwate Medical University, Institute for Biomedical Science, Iwate (Japan); Terasaki, Kazunori [Iwate Medical University, Cyclotron Research Center, Iwate (Japan)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether apparent brain temperature imaging using multi-voxel proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy correlates with cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism imaging in the deep white matter of patients with unilateral chronic major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease. Apparent brain temperature and CBF and metabolism imaging were measured using proton MR spectroscopy and {sup 15}O-positron emission tomography (PET), respectively, in 35 patients. A set of regions of interest (ROIs) of 5 x 5 voxels was placed on an MR image so that the voxel row at each edge was located in the deep white matter of the centrum semiovale in each cerebral hemisphere. PET images were co-registered with MR images with these ROIs and were re-sliced automatically using image analysis software. In 175 voxel pairs located in the deep white matter, the brain temperature difference (affected hemisphere - contralateral hemisphere: ΔBT) was correlated with cerebral blood volume (CBV) (r = 0.570) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) ratios (affected hemisphere/contralateral hemisphere) (r = 0.641). We excluded voxels that contained ischemic lesions or cerebrospinal fluid and calculated the mean values of voxel pairs in each patient. The mean ΔBT was correlated with the mean CBF (r = - 0.376), mean CBV (r = 0.702), and mean OEF ratio (r = 0.774). Apparent brain temperature imaging using multi-voxel proton MR spectroscopy was correlated with CBF and metabolism imaging in the deep white matter of patients with unilateral major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease. (orig.)

  7. Label-free in vivo in situ diagnostic imaging by cellular metabolism quantification with a flexible multiphoton endomicroscope (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Pierre; Hage, Charles-Henri; Fabert, Marc; Brevier, Julien; O'Connor, Rodney P.; Bardet-Coste, Sylvia M.; Habert, Rémi; Braud, Flavie; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Louradour, Frederic

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a cutting edge imaging modality leading to increasing advances in biology and also in the clinical field. To use it at its full potential and at the very heart of clinical practice, there have been several developments of fiber-based multiphoton microendoscopes. The application for those probes is now limited by few major restrictions, such as the difficulty to collect autofluorescence signals from tissues and cells theses being inherently weak (e.g. the ones from intracellular NADH or FAD metabolites). This limitation reduces the usefulness of microendoscopy in general, effectively restraining it to morphological imaging modality requiring staining of the tissues. Our aim is to go beyond this limitation, showing for the first time label-free cellular metabolism monitoring, in vivo in situ in real time. The experimental setup is an upgrade of a recently published one (Ducourthial et.al, Scientific Reports, 2016) where femtosecond pulse fiber delivery is further optimized thank's to a new transmissive-GRISM-based pulse stretcher permitting high energy throughput and wide bandwidth. This device allows fast sequential operation with two different excitation wavelengths for efficient two-photon excited NADH and FAD autofluorescence endoscopic detection (i.e. 860 nm for FAD and 760 nm for NADH), enabling cellular optical redox ratio quantification at 8 frames/s. The obtained results on cell models in vitro and also on animal models in vivo (e.g. neurons of a living mouse) prove that we accurately assess the level of NADH and FAD at subcellular resolution through a 3-meters-long fiber with our miniaturized probe (O.D. =2.2 mm).

  8. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Highly Specific Interactions between Actinomycetes To Activate Specialized Metabolic Gene Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, David A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genomes of actinomycetes contain numerous gene clusters potentially able to encode the production of many antibiotics and other specialized metabolites that are not expressed during growth under typical laboratory conditions. Undoubtedly, this reflects the soil habitat of these organisms, which is highly complex physically, chemically, and biotically; the majority of the compounds that make up the specialized metabolome are therefore adaptive only under specific conditions. While there have been numerous previous reports of “waking up” the “sleeping” gene clusters, many involving genetic interventions or nutritional challenges, the role of competing microorganisms has been comparatively little studied. Now, Traxler et al. [M. F. Traxler, J. D. Watrous, T. Alexandrov, P. C. Dorrestein, and R. Kolter, mBio 4(4):e00459-13, 2013, doi:10.1128/mBio.00459-13] have used the recently described technique of microscale imaging mass spectrometry to analyze in detail the stimulation of specialized metabolite production by the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) by growth in proximity to other actinomycetes. The striking finding from these experiments was that growth of S. coelicolor close to each of the five other actinomycetes studied caused it to produce many specialized metabolites that were not made when it was grown in isolation and that the majority of the compounds were interaction specific, i.e., they occurred only in one of the five pairwise combinations, emphasizing the highly specific nature of the interactions. These observations contribute substantially to the increasing awareness of communication between microorganisms in complex natural communities, as well as auguring well for the discovery of useful specialized metabolites based on microbial interactions. PMID:24003180

  9. RAPID automated patient selection for reperfusion therapy: a pooled analysis of the Echoplanar Imaging Thrombolytic Evaluation Trial (EPITHET) and the Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution (DEFUSE) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansberg, Maarten G; Lee, Jun; Christensen, Soren; Straka, Matus; De Silva, Deidre A; Mlynash, Michael; Campbell, Bruce C; Bammer, Roland; Olivot, Jean-Marc; Desmond, Patricia; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Albers, Gregory W

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if automated MRI analysis software (RAPID) can be used to identify patients with stroke in whom reperfusion is associated with an increased chance of good outcome. Baseline diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MRI scans from the Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution study (DEFUSE; n=74) and the Echoplanar Imaging Thrombolytic Evaluation Trial (EPITHET; n=100) were reprocessed with RAPID. Based on RAPID-generated diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging lesion volumes, patients were categorized according to 3 prespecified MRI profiles that were hypothesized to predict benefit (Target Mismatch), harm (Malignant), and no effect (No Mismatch) from reperfusion. Favorable clinical response was defined as a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 0 to 1 or a ≥ 8-point improvement on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at Day 90. In Target Mismatch patients, reperfusion was strongly associated with a favorable clinical response (OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 2.1 to 15.3) and attenuation of infarct growth (10 ± 23 mL with reperfusion versus 40 ± 44 mL without reperfusion; P<0.001). In Malignant profile patients, reperfusion was not associated with a favorable clinical response (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.1 to 5.8) or attenuation of infarct growth (85 ± 74 mL with reperfusion versus 95 ± 79 mL without reperfusion; P=0.7). Reperfusion was also not associated with a favorable clinical response (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.1 to 9.4) or attenuation of lesion growth (10 ± 15 mL with reperfusion versus 17 ± 30 mL without reperfusion; P=0.9) in No Mismatch patients. MRI profiles that are associated with a differential response to reperfusion can be identified with RAPID. This supports the use of automated image analysis software such as RAPID for patient selection in acute stroke trials.

  10. Serotonin mediates rapid changes of striatal glucose and lactate metabolism after systemic 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") administration in awake rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Cumming, Paul

    2007-01-01

     The pathway for selective serotonergic toxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") is poorly understood, but has been linked to hyperthermia and disturbed energy metabolism. We investigated the dose-dependency and time-course of MDMA-induced perturbations of cerebral glucose...

  11. Monitoring of the Spatial Distribution and Temporal Dynamics of the Green Vegetation Fraction of Croplands in Southwest Germany Using High-Resolution RapidEye Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imukova, Kristina; Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2014-05-01

    The green vegetation fraction (GVF) is a key input variable to the evapotranspiration scheme applied in the widely used NOAH land surface model (LSM). In standard applications of the NOAH LSM, the GVF is taken from a global map with a 15 km×15 km resolution. The central objective of the present study was (a) to derive gridded GVF data in a high spatial and temporal resolution from RapidEye images for a region in Southwest Germany, and (b) to improve the representation of the GVF dynamics of croplands in the NOAH LSM for a better simulation of water and energy exchange between land surface and atmosphere. For the region under study we obtained monthly RapidEye satellite images with a resolution 5 m×5 m by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The images hold five spectral bands: blue, green, red, red-edge and near infrared (NIR). The GVF dynamics were determined based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) calculated from the red and near-infrared bands of the satellite images. The satellite GVF data were calibrated and validated against ground truth measurements. Digital colour photographs above the canopy were taken with a boom-mounted digital camera at fifteen permanently marked plots (1 m×1 m). Crops under study were winter wheat, winter rape and silage maize. The GVF was computed based on the red and the green band of the photographs according to Rundquist's method (2002). Based on the obtained calibration scheme GVF maps were derived in a monthly resolution for the region. Our results confirm a linear relationship between GVF and NDVI and demonstrate that it is possible to determine the GVF of croplands from RapidEye images based on a simple two end-member mixing model. Our data highlight the high variability of the GVF in time and space. At the field scale, the GVF was normally distributed with a coefficient of variation of about 32%. Variability was mainly caused by soil heterogeneities and management differences. At the regional scale the GVF

  12. Exploiting machine learning algorithms for tree species classification in a semiarid woodland using RapidEye image

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adelabu, S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ,” IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 48(11), 4133–4142 (2010). 12. A. Lobo, “Image segmentation and discriminant analysis for the identification of land cover units in ecology,” IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 35(5), 1136–1145 (1997), http://dx.doi .org/10...

  13. Metabolic cardiac imaging in severe coronary disease: assessment of viability with iodine-123-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid and multicrystal gamma camera, and correlation with biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, G; Schad, N; Ladd, W; Allie, D; vander Zwagg, R; Avet, P; Rockett, J

    1992-07-01

    Fifteen patients with coronary disease and resting left ventricular ejection fractions of less than or equal to 0.35 underwent resting metabolic cardiac imaging utilizing 1 mCi [123I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) intravenously and a multicrystal gamma camera. Parametric images of regional rates of IPPA clearance and accumulation were generated. Forty-two vascular territories (22 infarcted) were evaluated by metabolic imaging as well as transmural myocardial biopsy. Despite resting akinesis or dyskinesis in 20/22 (91%) infarcted territories, 16/22 (73%) of these territories were metabolically viable. Transmural myocardial biopsies in all patients (43 sites, 42 vascular territories) during coronary bypass surgery confirmed IPPA results in 39/43 patients (91%). When compared to biopsy, scan sensitivity for viability was 33/36 (92%) with a specificity of 6/7 (86%). Eighty percent of bypassed, infarcted but IPPA viable segments demonstrated improved regional systolic wall motion postoperatively as assessed by exercise radionuclide angiography. We conclude resting IPPA imaging identifies viable myocardium, thereby providing a safe, cost-effective technique for myocardial viability assessment.

  14. Optimization of Sample Preparation and Instrumental Parameters for the Rapid Analysis of Drugs of Abuse in Hair samples by MALDI-MS/MS Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinders, Bryn; Beasley, Emma; Verlaan, Ricky M.; Cuypers, Eva; Francese, Simona; Bassindale, Tom; Clench, Malcolm R.; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2017-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has been employed to rapidly screen longitudinally sectioned drug user hair samples for cocaine and its metabolites using continuous raster imaging. Optimization of the spatial resolution and raster speed were performed on intact cocaine contaminated hair samples. The optimized settings (100 × 150 μm at 0.24 mm/s) were subsequently used to examine longitudinally sectioned drug user hair samples. The MALDI-MS/MS images showed the distribution of the most abundant cocaine product ion at m/z 182. Using the optimized settings, multiple hair samples obtained from two users were analyzed in approximately 3 h: six times faster than the standard spot-to-spot acquisition method. Quantitation was achieved using longitudinally sectioned control hair samples sprayed with a cocaine dilution series. A multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) experiment was also performed using the `dynamic pixel' imaging method to screen for cocaine and a range of its metabolites, in order to differentiate between contaminated hairs and drug users. Cocaine, benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene were detectable, in agreement with analyses carried out using the standard LC-MS/MS method. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Benefits of Red-Edge Spectral Band and Texture Features for the Object-based Classification using RapidEye sSatellite Image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. O.; Yeom, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Space-based remote sensing in agriculture is particularly relevant to issues such as global climate change, food security, and precision agriculture. Recent satellite missions have opened up new perspectives by offering high spatial resolution, various spectral properties, and fast revisit rates to the same regions. Here, we examine the utility of broadband red-edge spectral information in multispectral satellite image data for classifying paddy rice crops in South Korea. Additionally, we examine how object-based spectral features affect the classification of paddy rice growth stages. For the analysis, two seasons of RapidEye satellite image data were used. The results showed that the broadband red-edge information slightly improved the classification accuracy of the crop condition in heterogeneous paddy rice crop environments, particularly when single-season image data were used. This positive effect appeared to be offset by the multi-temporal image data. Additional texture information brought only a minor improvement or a slight decline, although it is well known to be advantageous for object-based classification in general. We conclude that broadband red-edge information derived from conventional multispectral satellite data has the potential to improve space-based crop monitoring. Because the positive or negative effects of texture features for object-based crop classification could barely be interpreted, the relationships between the textual properties and paddy rice crop parameters at the field scale should be further examined in depth.

  16. Rapid and simultaneous in situ assessment of aflatoxins and stilbenes using silica plate imprinting mass spectrometry imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo N de Oliveira

    Full Text Available A fast and direct combination of techniques for simultaneous mycotoxin and phytoalexin identification in peanut skin and kernel is described. Silica Plate Imprinting Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (SPILDI-MSI is a powerful technique that exhibits great advantages, such as solvent-free and matrix-free characteristics, as well as no sample preparation or separation steps. It also permits accurate identification of mycotoxins and phytoalexins with unique fingerprint profiles in just a few seconds. Results are expressed as chemical images of the 4 identified types of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2 and a stilbenoid (resveratrol. Also, SPILDI-MSI allows the comparison between the spatial distribution of aflatoxins and resveratrol found in kernel and skin. This novel application has proven to be useful for instantaneous qualitative assessment of aflatoxins and stilbenoids both in the peanut skin and kernel and offers precise tracking of fungal contamination in nuts and other foodstuffs.

  17. Rapid and simultaneous in situ assessment of aflatoxins and stilbenes using silica plate imprinting mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Diogo N; Ferreira, Mônica S; Catharino, Rodrigo R

    2014-01-01

    A fast and direct combination of techniques for simultaneous mycotoxin and phytoalexin identification in peanut skin and kernel is described. Silica Plate Imprinting Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (SPILDI-MSI) is a powerful technique that exhibits great advantages, such as solvent-free and matrix-free characteristics, as well as no sample preparation or separation steps. It also permits accurate identification of mycotoxins and phytoalexins with unique fingerprint profiles in just a few seconds. Results are expressed as chemical images of the 4 identified types of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2) and a stilbenoid (resveratrol). Also, SPILDI-MSI allows the comparison between the spatial distribution of aflatoxins and resveratrol found in kernel and skin. This novel application has proven to be useful for instantaneous qualitative assessment of aflatoxins and stilbenoids both in the peanut skin and kernel and offers precise tracking of fungal contamination in nuts and other foodstuffs.

  18. Rapid comprehensive evaluation of luminography and hemodynamic function with 3D radially undersampled phase contrast imaging MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin M; Francois, Chris; Lum, Darren; Bley, Thorsten A; Nett, Elisabeth; Landgraf, Benjamin; Reeder, Scott B; Grist, Thomas M; Wieben, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative flow measurements with volumetric coverage and three directional flow encoding are technically feasible with magnetic resonance imaging yet prohibitively long in clinical settings. Data reconstruction from three dimensional angular undersampled MR acquisitions allows for dramatic reductions in scan time with tolerable imaging artifacts in many clinical applications. This approach provides high spatial resolution suitable for hemodynamic analysis in smaller vessels such as the renal artery, thereby providing additional crucial diagnostic information in a non invasive fashion. In an animal model, transstenotic pressure gradient measurements obtained with the novel acquisition scheme compared favorably with invasive intra arterial measurements (r=0.977; 95% CI: 0.931-0.998; p<0.001). In addition, human studies demonstrate the suitability of the technique for lumen measurements as an alternative for contrast enhanced MR Angiography and the associated risks with the use of an external contrast agent in certain patient populations.

  19. Rapid in-focus corrections on quantitative amplitude and phase imaging using transport of intensity equation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, X; Tian, X; Kong, Y; Sun, A; Yu, W; Qian, W; Song, X; Cui, H; Xue, L; Liu, C; Wang, S

    2017-06-01

    Transport of intensity equation (TIE) method can acquire sample phase distributions with high speed and accuracy, offering another perspective for cellular observations and measurements. However, caused by incorrect focal plane determination, blurs and halos are induced, decreasing resolution and accuracy in both retrieved amplitude and phase information. In order to obtain high-accurate sample details, we propose TIE based in-focus correction technique for quantitative amplitude and phase imaging, which can locate focal plane and then retrieve both in-focus intensity and phase distributions combining with numerical wavefront extraction and propagation as well as physical image recorder translation. Certified by both numerical simulations and practical measurements, it is believed the proposed method not only captures high-accurate in-focus sample information, but also provides a potential way for fast autofocusing in microscopic system. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. A Novel Procedure for Rapid Imaging of Adult Mouse Brains with MicroCT Using Iodine-Based Contrast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Anderson

    Full Text Available High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has been the primary modality for obtaining 3D cross-sectional anatomical information in animals for soft tissue, particularly brain. However, costs associated with MRI can be considerably high for large phenotypic screens for gross differences in the structure of the brain due to pathology and/or experimental manipulations. MicroCT (mCT, especially benchtop mCT, is becoming a common laboratory equipment with throughput rates equal or faster than any form of high-resolution MRI at lower costs. Here we explore adapting previously developed contrast based mCT to image adult mouse brains in-situ. We show that 2% weight per volume (w/v iodine-potassium iodide solution can be successfully used to image adult mouse brains within 48 hours post-mortem when a structural support matrix is used. We demonstrate that hydrogel can be effectively used as a perfusant which limits the tissue shrinkage due to iodine.

  1. Early life stress induces attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-like behavioral and brain metabolic dysfunctions: functional imaging of methylphenidate treatment in a novel rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, J; Breuer, S; Poeggel, G; Braun, K

    2017-03-01

    In a novel animal model Octodon degus we tested the hypothesis that, in addition to genetic predisposition, early life stress (ELS) contributes to the etiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder-like behavioral symptoms and the associated brain functional deficits. Since previous neurochemical observations revealed that early life stress impairs dopaminergic functions, we predicted that these symptoms can be normalized by treatment with methylphenidate. In line with our hypothesis, the behavioral analysis revealed that repeated ELS induced locomotor hyperactivity and reduced attention towards an emotionally relevant acoustic stimulus. Functional imaging using ( 14 C)-2-fluoro-deoxyglucose-autoradiography revealed that the behavioral symptoms are paralleled by metabolic hypoactivity of prefrontal, mesolimbic and subcortical brain areas. Finally, the pharmacological intervention provided further evidence that the behavioral and metabolic dysfunctions are due to impaired dopaminergic neurotransmission. Elevating dopamine in ELS animals by methylphenidate normalized locomotor hyperactivity and attention-deficit and ameliorated brain metabolic hypoactivity in a dose-dependent manner.

  2. Rapid computation of single PET scan rest-stress myocardial blood flow parametric images by table look up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guehl, Nicolas J; Normandin, Marc D; Wooten, Dustin W; Rozen, Guy; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Shoup, Timothy M; Woo, Jonghye; Ptaszek, Leon M; Fakhri, Georges El; Alpert, Nathaniel M

    2017-09-01

    We have recently reported a method for measuring rest-stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) using a single, relatively short, PET scan session. The method requires two IV tracer injections, one to initiate rest imaging and one at peak stress. We previously validated absolute flow quantitation in ml/min/cc for standard bull's eye, segmental analysis. In this work, we extend the method for fast computation of rest-stress MBF parametric images. We provide an analytic solution to the single-scan rest-stress flow model which is then solved using a two-dimensional table lookup method (LM). Simulations were performed to compare the accuracy and precision of the lookup method with the original nonlinear method (NLM). Then the method was applied to 16 single scan rest/stress measurements made in 12 pigs: seven studied after infarction of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) territory, and nine imaged in the native state. Parametric maps of rest and stress MBF as well as maps of left (f LV ) and right (f RV ) ventricular spill-over fractions were generated. Regions of interest (ROIs) for 17 myocardial segments were defined in bull's eye fashion on the parametric maps. The mean of each ROI was then compared to the rest (K 1r ) and stress (K 1s ) MBF estimates obtained from fitting the 17 regional TACs with the NLM. In simulation, the LM performed as well as the NLM in terms of precision and accuracy. The simulation did not show that bias was introduced by the use of a predefined two-dimensional lookup table. In experimental data, parametric maps demonstrated good statistical quality and the LM was computationally much more efficient than the original NLM. Very good agreement was obtained between the mean MBF calculated on the parametric maps for each of the 17 ROIs and the regional MBF values estimated by the NLM (K 1map LM  = 1.019 × K 1 ROI NLM  + 0.019, R 2  = 0.986; mean difference = 0.034 ± 0.036 mL/min/cc). We developed a table lookup method for fast

  3. A simple, rapid method to isolate salt glands for three-dimensional visualization, fluorescence imaging and cytological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Tit-Meng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some plants inhabiting saline environment remove salts via the salt glands embedded in the epidermal tissues. Cytological studies of salt glands will provide valuable information to our understanding of the secretory process. Previous studies on salt gland histology relied mainly on two-dimensional microscopic observations of microtome sections. Optical sectioning properties of confocal laser scanning microscope offer alternative approach for obtaining three-dimensional structural information of salt glands. Difficulty in light penetration through intact leaves and interference from neighbouring leaf cells, however, impede the acquiring of good optical salt gland sections and limit its applications in salt gland imaging. Freeing the glands from adjacent leaf tissues will allow better manipulations for three-dimensional imaging through confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Here, we present a simple and fast method for the isolation of individual salt glands released from the interference of neighbouring cells. About 100-200 salt glands could be isolated from just one cm2 of Avicennia officinalis leaf within hours and microscopic visualization of isolated salt glands was made possible within a day. Using these isolated glands, confocal laser scanning microscopic techniques could be applied and better resolution salt gland images could be achieved. By making use of their intrinsic fluorescent properties, optical sections of the gland cells could be acquired without the use of fluorescent probes and the corresponding three-dimensional images constructed. Useful cytological information of the salt gland cells could also be obtained through the applications of fluorescent dyes (e.g., LysoTracker® Red, FM®4-64, Texas Red®. Conclusions The study of salt glands directly at the glandular level are made possible with the successful isolation of these specialized structures. Preparation of materials for subsequent microscopic

  4. Temporal Changes in Phosphatidylserine Expression and Glucose Metabolism after Myocardial Infarction: An in Vivo Imaging Study in Mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lehner, Sebastian; Todica, Andrei; Brunner, Stefan; Uebleis, Christopher; Wang, Hao; Wängler, Carmen; Herbach, Nadja; Herrler, Tanja; Böning, Guido; Laubender, Rüdiger Paul; Cumming, Paul; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Franz, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) for in vivo monitoring of phosphatidylserine externalization and glucose metabolism can potentially provide early predictors of outcome of cardioprotective therapies after myocardial infarction...

  5. Rapid and non-destructive determination of rancidity levels in butter cookies by multi-spectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qing; Liu, Changhong; Liu, Jinxia; Pan, Wenjuan; Lu, Xuzhong; Yang, Jianbo; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Lei

    2016-03-30

    Rancidity is an important attribute for quality assessment of butter cookies, while traditional methods for rancidity measurement are usually laborious, destructive and prone to operational error. In the present paper, the potential of applying multi-spectral imaging (MSI) technology with 19 wavelengths in the range of 405-970 nm to evaluate the rancidity in butter cookies was investigated. Moisture content, acid value and peroxide value were determined by traditional methods and then related with the spectral information by partial least squares regression (PLSR) and back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN). The optimal models for predicting moisture content, acid value and peroxide value were obtained by PLSR. The correlation coefficient (r) obtained by PLSR models revealed that MSI had a perfect ability to predict moisture content (r = 0.909), acid value (r = 0.944) and peroxide value (r = 0.971). The study demonstrated that the rancidity level of butter cookies can be continuously monitored and evaluated in real-time by the multi-spectral imaging, which is of great significance for developing online food safety monitoring solutions. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. First results in rapid MR imaging of focal liver and spleen lesions using field echos and small angle excitation (gradient echo sequences)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griebel, J.; Hess, C.F.; Kurtz, B.; Klose, U.; Kueper, K.

    1987-01-01

    15 healthy subjects and 39 patients with focal liver and spleen lesions were examined via MR tomography at 1.5 tesla. Gradient field echos at small angle excitation (< 90/sup 0/) were employed. The imaging time per layer was 10 seconds so that rapid imaging could be carried out at respiratory standstill. This enabled visualisation of liver and spleen without interference by breathing artifacts and with accurate localisation. Focal lesions can be imaged best at low flip-angle pulses (liver) or low to medium-angle pulses (spleen). The primary liver cell carcinoma is visualised as an inhomogeneous structure with similar signal intensity as the surrounding tissue. All other examined liver lesions (metastases, haemangiomas, lymphatic infiltrates, echinococcus cysts, FNH, gummae) showed greater signal intensity than the remaining organ at small angle excitation. Furthermore, contrast reversals were seen at medium-angle pulses. Contrariwise, with the exception of the light-coloured spleen infarcts, spleen lesions (lymphatic infiltrate, Boeck's disease or sarcoidosis) appeared darker at all excitation angles than the surrounding tissue.

  7. Pulsed Doppler tissue imaging of the velocity of tricuspid annular systolic motion; a new, rapid, and non-invasive method of evaluating right ventricular systolic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meluzín, J; Spinarová, L; Bakala, J; Toman, J; Krejcí, J; Hude, P; Kára, T; Soucek, M

    2001-02-01

    Rapid, accurate, and widely available non-invasive evaluation of right ventricular function still presents a problem. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the parameters derived from Doppler tissue imaging of tricuspid annular motion could be used as indexes of right ventricular function in patients with heart failure. Standard and pulsed Doppler tissue echocardiography were obtained in 44 patients with heart failure (mean left ventricular ejection fraction 24 +/- 7%) and in 30 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. The tricuspid annular systolic and diastolic velocities were acquired in apical four-chamber views at the junction of the right ventricular free wall and the anterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve using Doppler tissue imaging. Within 2 h of Doppler tissue imaging, the first-pass radionuclide ventriculogram, determining right ventricular ejection fraction and equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography single photon emission computed tomography, were performed in all patients. In patients with heart failure, the peak systolic annular velocity was significantly lower and the time from the onset of the electrocardiographic QRS complex to the peak of systolic annular velocity was significantly greater than the corresponding values in healthy subjects (10.3 +/- 2.6 cm. s(-1) vs 15.5 +/- 2.6 cm.s(-1), P heart failure. Copyright 2001 The European Society of Cardiology.

  8. Rapid development of systemic insulin resistance with overeating is not accompanied by robust changes in skeletal muscle glucose and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornford, Andrea S; Hinko, Alexander; Nelson, Rachael K; Barkan, Ariel L; Horowitz, Jeffrey F

    2013-05-01

    Prolonged overeating and the resultant weight gain are clearly linked with the development of insulin resistance and other cardiometabolic abnormalities, but adaptations that occur after relatively short periods of overeating are not completely understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize metabolic adaptations that may accompany the development of insulin resistance after 2 weeks of overeating. Healthy, nonobese subjects (n = 9) were admitted to the hospital for 2 weeks, during which time they ate ∼4000 kcals·day(-1) (70 kcal·kg(-1) fat free mass·day(-1)). Insulin sensitivity was estimated during a meal tolerance test, and a muscle biopsy was obtained to assess muscle lipid accumulation and protein markers associated with insulin resistance, inflammation, and the regulation of lipid metabolism. Whole-body insulin sensitivity declined markedly after 2 weeks of overeating (Matsuda composite index: 8.3 ± 1.3 vs. 4.6 ± 0.7, p insulin resistance and inflammation (i.e., phosphorylation of IRS-1-Ser(312), Akt-Ser(473), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase) were not altered by overeating. Intramyocellular lipids tended to increase after 2 weeks of overeating (triacylglyceride: 7.6 ± 1.6 vs. 10.0 ± 1.8 nmol·mg(-1) wet weight; diacylglyceride: 104 ± 10 vs. 142 ± 23 pmol·mg(-1) wet weight) but these changes did not reach statistical significance. Overeating induced a 2-fold increase in 24-h insulin response (area under the curve (AUC); p increase in muscle lipid accumulation. In summary, our findings suggest alterations in skeletal muscle metabolism may not contribute meaningfully to the marked whole-body insulin resistance observed after 2 weeks of overeating.

  9. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  10. In vivo imaging reveals rapid astrocyte depletion and axon damage in a model of neuromyelitis optica-related pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herwerth, Marina; Kalluri, Sudhakar Reddy; Srivastava, Rajneesh

    2016-01-01

    of astrocyte injury in NMO and the mechanisms by which toxicity spreads to axons are not understood. METHODS: Here, we establish in vivo imaging of the spinal cord, one of the main sites of NMO pathology, as a powerful tool to study the formation of experimental NMO-related lesions caused by human AQP4...... antibodies in mice. RESULTS: We found that human AQP4 antibodies caused acute astrocyte depletion with initial oligodendrocyte survival. Within two hours of antibody application, we observed secondary axon injury in the form of progressive swellings. Astrocyte toxicity and axon damage were dependent on AQP4...... of NMO pathology beyond astrocytes, as well as in evaluating potential neuroprotective interventions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  11. Rapid palatal expansion effects on mandibular transverse dimensions in unilateral posterior crossbite patients: a three-dimensional digital imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ugolini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this controlled study was to investigate indirect effects on mandibular arch dimensions, 1 year after rapid palatal expansion (RPE therapy. Methods Thirty-three patients in mixed dentition (mean age 8.8 years showing unilateral posterior crossbite and maxillary deficiency were treated with a RPE (Haas type cemented on the first permanent molars. Treatment protocol consisted of two turns per day until slight overcorrection of the molar transverse relationship occurred. The Haas expander was kept on the teeth as a passive retainer for an average of 6 months. Study models were taken prior (T1 and 15 months on average (T2 after expansion. A control group of 15 untreated subjects with maxillary deficiency (mean age 8.3 years was also recorded with a 12-month interval. Stone casts were digitized with a 3D scanner (3Shape, DK. Results In the treated group, both mandibular intermolar distance (+1.9 mm and mandibular molar angulation (+9° increased. Mandibular incisor angulation showed an increase of 1.9°. There was little effect on intercanine distance and canine angulation. Controls showed a reduction in transverse arch dimension and a decrease in molar and canine angulation values. Conclusions RPE protocol has indirect widening effects on the mandibular incisors and first molars.

  12. Rapid prototyping of SoC-based real-time vision system: application to image preprocessing and face detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jridi, Maher; Alfalou, Ayman

    2017-05-01

    By this paper, the major goal is to investigate the Multi-CPU/FPGA SoC (System on Chip) design flow and to transfer a know-how and skills to rapidly design embedded real-time vision system. Our aim is to show how the use of these devices can be benefit for system level integration since they make possible simultaneous hardware and software development. We take the facial detection and pretreatments as case study since they have a great potential to be used in several applications such as video surveillance, building access control and criminal identification. The designed system use the Xilinx Zedboard platform. The last is the central element of the developed vision system. The video acquisition is performed using either standard webcam connected to the Zedboard via USB interface or several camera IP devices. The visualization of video content and intermediate results are possible with HDMI interface connected to HD display. The treatments embedded in the system are as follow: (i) pre-processing such as edge detection implemented in the ARM and in the reconfigurable logic, (ii) software implementation of motion detection and face detection using either ViolaJones or LBP (Local Binary Pattern), and (iii) application layer to select processing application and to display results in a web page. One uniquely interesting feature of the proposed system is that two functions have been developed to transmit data from and to the VDMA port. With the proposed optimization, the hardware implementation of the Sobel filter takes 27 ms and 76 ms for 640x480, and 720p resolutions, respectively. Hence, with the FPGA implementation, an acceleration of 5 times is obtained which allow the processing of 37 fps and 13 fps for 640x480, and 720p resolutions, respectively.

  13. Myocardial viability assessment with dynamic low-dose iodine-123-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid metabolic imaging: comparison with myocardial biopsy and reinjection SPECT thallium after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, G L; Schad, N C; Magill, H L; Vander Zwaag, R

    1994-04-01

    Aggressive cardiac revascularization requires recognition of stunned and hibernating myocardium, and cost considerations may well govern the technique used. Dynamic low-dose (1 mCi) [123I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) metabolic imaging is a potential alternative to PET using either 18FDG or 15O-water. Resting IPPA images were obtained from patients with severe ischemic cardiomyopathy, and transmural myocardial biopsies were obtained during coronary bypass surgery to confirm viability. Thirty-nine of 43 (91%) biopsies confirmed the results of the IPPA images with a sensitivity for viability of 33/36 (92%) and a specificity of 6/7 (86%). Postoperatively, wall motion improved in 80% of IPPA-viable, dysfunctional segments. Furthermore, when compared to reinjection thallium (SPECT-TI) scans after myocardial infarction, IPPA-SPECT-TI concordance occurred in 27/35 (77%) (K = 0.536, p = 0.0003). Similar to PET, IPPA demonstrated more viability than SPECT-TI, 26/35 (74%) versus 18/35 (51%) (p = 0.047). Metabolic IPPA cardiac viability imaging is a safe, inexpensive technique that may be a useful alternative to PET.

  14. Rapid synthesis of highly luminescent and stable Au20 nanoclusters for active tumor-targeted imaging in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pu; Yang, Xiao Xi; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Ning Wei; Xiong, Zu Hong; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Rapid synthesis of protein-stabilized Au20 nanoclusters (Au20NCs) with high fluorescence quantum yield (QY) up to ~15% is successfully achieved by manipulating the reaction kinetics. The as-obtained Au20NCs, identified by mass spectrometry, have an average size of 2.6 nm, with strong fluorescence emission at 620 nm (2.00 eV) upon excitation at either 370 nm (3.35 eV) or 470 nm (2.64 eV). The advantages of the as-obtained Au20NCs, including small sizes, high fluorescence QY, excellent photostability, non-toxicity, and good stability in biological media, make them ideal candidates as good luminescent probes for optical imaging in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the uptake of Au20NCs by both cancer cells and tumor-bearing nude mice can be improved by receptor-mediated internalization, compared with that by passive targeting. Because of their selective accumulation at the tumor sites, the Au20NC probes can be used as potential indicators for cancer diagnosis. This work not only provides a new understanding of the rapid synthesis of highly luminescent Au20NCs but also demonstrates that the functionalized-Au20NCs are excellent probes for active tumor-targeted imaging in vitro and in vivo.Rapid synthesis of protein-stabilized Au20 nanoclusters (Au20NCs) with high fluorescence quantum yield (QY) up to ~15% is successfully achieved by manipulating the reaction kinetics. The as-obtained Au20NCs, identified by mass spectrometry, have an average size of 2.6 nm, with strong fluorescence emission at 620 nm (2.00 eV) upon excitation at either 370 nm (3.35 eV) or 470 nm (2.64 eV). The advantages of the as-obtained Au20NCs, including small sizes, high fluorescence QY, excellent photostability, non-toxicity, and good stability in biological media, make them ideal candidates as good luminescent probes for optical imaging in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the uptake of Au20NCs by both cancer cells and tumor-bearing nude mice can be improved by receptor

  15. Live cell imaging of mitochondria following targeted irradiation in situ reveals rapid and highly localized loss of membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Dietrich W M; Siebenwirth, Christian; Greubel, Christoph; Ilicic, Katarina; Reindl, Judith; Girst, Stefanie; Muggiolu, Giovanna; Simon, Marina; Barberet, Philippe; Seznec, Hervé; Zischka, Hans; Multhoff, Gabriele; Schmid, Thomas E; Dollinger, Guenther

    2017-04-25

    The reliance of all cell types on the mitochondrial function for survival makes mitochondria an interesting target when trying to understand their role in the cellular response to ionizing radiation. By harnessing highly focused carbon ions and protons using microbeams, we have performed in situ live cell imaging of the targeted irradiation of individual mitochondria stained with Tetramethyl rhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE), a cationic fluorophore which accumulates electrophoretically in polarized mitochondria. Targeted irradiation with both carbon ions and protons down to beam spots of <1 μm induced a near instant loss of mitochondrial TMRE fluorescence signal in the targeted area. The loss of TMRE after targeted irradiation represents a radiation induced change in mitochondrial membrane potential. This is the first time such mitochondrial responses have been documented in situ after targeted microbeam irradiation. The methods developed and the results obtained have the ability to shed new light on not just mitochondria's response to radiation but to further elucidate a putative mechanism of radiation induced depolarization and mitochondrial response.

  16. A pilot study of the prognostic significance of metabolic tumor size measurements in PET/CT imaging of lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallergi, Maria; Botsivali, Maria; Politis, Nikolaos; Menychtas, Dimitrios; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Chatziioannou, Sofia

    2015-03-01

    This study explores changes in metabolic tumor volume, metabolic tumor diameter, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), for earlier and more accurate identification of lymphomas' response to treatment using 18F- FDG PET/CT. Pre- and post-treatment PET/CT studies of 20 patients with Hodgkin disease (HL) and 7 patients with non- Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) were retrospectively selected for this study. The diameter and volume of the metabolic tumor was determined by an in-house developed adaptive local thresholding technique based on a 50% threshold of the maximum pixel value within a region. Statistical analysis aimed at exploring associations between metabolic size measurements and SUVmax and the ability of the three biomarkers to predict the patients' response to treatment as defined by the four classes in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) guidelines. Results indicated moderate correlations between % change in metabolic tumor volume and % change in metabolic tumor maximum diameter (R=0.51) and between % change in maximum diameter and % change in SUVmax (R=0.52). The correlation between % change in tumor volume and % change in SUVmax was weak (R=0.24). The % change in metabolic tumor size, either volume or diameter, was a "very strong" predictor of response to treatment (R=0.89), stronger than SUVmax (R=0.63). In conclusion, metabolic tumor volume could have important prognostic value, possibly higher than maximum metabolic diameter or SUVmax that are currently the standard of practice. Volume measurements, however, should be based on robust and standardized segmentation methodologies to avoid variability. In addition, SUV-peak or lean body mass corrected SUV-peak may be a better PET biomarker than SUVmax when SUV-volume combinations are considered.

  17. Multiparametric imaging of patient and tumour heterogeneity in non-small-cell lung cancer: quantification of tumour hypoxia, metabolism and perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmpt, Wouter van; Zegers, Catharina M.L.; Reymen, Bart; Even, Aniek J.G.; Oellers, Michel; Troost, Esther G.C.; Lambin, Philippe [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Pulmonology, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wildberger, Joachim E.; Das, Marco [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix M. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital RWTH Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Multiple imaging techniques are nowadays available for clinical in-vivo visualization of tumour biology. FDG PET/CT identifies increased tumour metabolism, hypoxia PET visualizes tumour oxygenation and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT characterizes vasculature and morphology. We explored the relationships among these biological features in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at both the patient level and the tumour subvolume level. A group of 14 NSCLC patients from two ongoing clinical trials (NCT01024829 and NCT01210378) were scanned using FDG PET/CT, HX4 PET/CT and DCE CT prior to chemoradiotherapy. Standardized uptake values (SUV) in the primary tumour were calculated for the FDG and hypoxia HX4 PET/CT scans. For hypoxia imaging, the hypoxic volume, fraction and tumour-to-blood ratio (TBR) were also defined. Blood flow and blood volume were obtained from DCE CT imaging. A tumour subvolume analysis was used to quantify the spatial overlap between subvolumes. At the patient level, negative correlations were observed between blood flow and the hypoxia parameters (TBR >1.2): hypoxic volume (-0.65, p = 0.014), hypoxic fraction (-0.60, p = 0.025) and TBR (-0.56, p = 0.042). At the tumour subvolume level, hypoxic and metabolically active subvolumes showed an overlap of 53 ± 36 %. Overlap between hypoxic sub-volumes and those with high blood flow and blood volume was smaller: 15 ± 17 % and 28 ± 28 %, respectively. Half of the patients showed a spatial mismatch (overlap <5 %) between increased blood flow and hypoxia. The biological imaging features defined in NSCLC tumours showed large interpatient and intratumour variability. There was overlap between hypoxic and metabolically active subvolumes in the majority of tumours, there was spatial mismatch between regions with high blood flow and those with increased hypoxia. (orig.)

  18. Wideband arrhythmia-Insensitive-rapid (AIR) pulse sequence for cardiac T1 mapping without image artifacts induced by an implantable-cardioverter-defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, KyungPyo; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Wall, T Scott; Drakos, Stavros G; Kim, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    To develop and evaluate a wideband arrhythmia-insensitive-rapid (AIR) pulse sequence for cardiac T1 mapping without image artifacts induced by implantable-cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). We developed a wideband AIR pulse sequence by incorporating a saturation pulse with wide frequency bandwidth (8.9 kHz) to achieve uniform T1 weighting in the heart with ICD. We tested the performance of original and "wideband" AIR cardiac T1 mapping pulse sequences in phantom and human experiments at 1.5 Tesla. In five phantoms representing native myocardium and blood and postcontrast blood/tissue T1 values, compared with the control T1 values measured with an inversion-recovery pulse sequence without ICD, T1 values measured with original AIR with ICD were considerably lower (absolute percent error > 29%), whereas T1 values measured with wideband AIR with ICD were similar (absolute percent error T1 values measured with original AIR without ICD, T1 measured with original AIR with ICD was significantly lower (absolute percent error > 10.1%), whereas T1 measured with wideband AIR with ICD was similar (absolute percent error T1 mapping without significant image artifacts induced by ICD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. SynPAnal: software for rapid quantification of the density and intensity of protein puncta from fluorescence microscopy images of neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Danielson

    Full Text Available Continuous modification of the protein composition at synapses is a driving force for the plastic changes of synaptic strength, and provides the fundamental molecular mechanism of synaptic plasticity and information storage in the brain. Studying synaptic protein turnover is not only important for understanding learning and memory, but also has direct implication for understanding pathological conditions like aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and psychiatric disorders. Proteins involved in synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity are typically concentrated at synapses of neurons and thus appear as puncta (clusters in immunofluorescence microscopy images. Quantitative measurement of the changes in puncta density, intensity, and sizes of specific proteins provide valuable information on their function in synaptic transmission, circuit development, synaptic plasticity, and synaptopathy. Unfortunately, puncta quantification is very labor intensive and time consuming. In this article, we describe a software tool designed for the rapid semi-automatic detection and quantification of synaptic protein puncta from 2D immunofluorescence images generated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The software, dubbed as SynPAnal (for Synaptic Puncta Analysis, streamlines data quantification for puncta density and average intensity, thereby increases data analysis throughput compared to a manual method. SynPAnal is stand-alone software written using the JAVA programming language, and thus is portable and platform-free.

  20. Rapid imaging of misfit dislocations in SiGe/Si in cross-section and through oxide layers using electron channeling contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Kunal; Wacaser, Brent A.; Bedell, Stephen W.; Sadana, Devendra K.

    2017-06-01

    Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is emerging as a technique for rapid and high-resolution characterization of individual crystalline defects in a scanning electron microscope. However, the application of ECCI to semiconductor materials has been limited to bare samples in plan-view geometry. In this paper, two modalities of this technique are demonstrated with relevance to semiconductor manufacturing and failure analysis: (1) The use of ECCI to reveal misfit dislocation defects along a cleaved cross-section of a SiGe compositionally graded buffer grown on Si and (2) plan-view imaging of misfit dislocations in metamorphic SiGe/Si layers covered by amorphous oxide layers, where the partial loss of contrast due to the oxide layers is quantified and the effect of the beam accelerating voltage is studied. These results demonstrate the power of ECCI in inspecting crystallographic defects non-destructively over large areas, which is highly desirable for substrate quality control in manufacturing of products based on crystalline materials.

  1. Monitoring the change of mitochondrial morphology and its metabolism of the breast cancer cells with the treatment of Hsp70 inhibitor during heat shock by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Biying; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Xiaoman; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Heat shock (HS) is one of the best-studied exogenous cellular stresses, and all cellular compartments and metabolic processes are involved in HS response. The heat shock proteins (Hsps) expression enhanced during HS mainly localized in subcellular compartments, such as cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochandria. The major inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) modulate cellular homeostasis and promote cellular survival by blocking a caspase independent cell death through its association with apoptosis inducing factor. Mitochondria as the critical elements of HS response that participate in key metabolic reactions, and the changes in mitochonrial morphology may impact on mitochondrial metabolism. In this paper, the changes of mitorchondrial morphology in breast cancer cell have been monitored in real time after heat shock (43 °) by the fluorescence imaging, and the influence of Hsp70 inhibitor on mitochandrial structures have also been investigated. Then the information of mitochondrial metabolism which can be characterized by the level of the mitochondrial membrane potential has also been obtained wihout/with the treatment of Hsp70 inhibitor. Our data indicated that the mitochandrial morphology were related with the mitochandrial membrane potential, and the mitochandrial membrane potential was influenced significantly with the treatment of Hsp70 inhibitor during HS.

  2. The use of fluorescence microscopy and image analysis for rapid detection of non-producing revertant cells of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Katja; Lang, Imke; Enke, Heike; Grohme, Diana; Frohme, Marcus

    2015-04-17

    Ethanol production via genetically engineered cyanobacteria is a promising solution for the production of biofuels. Through the introduction of a pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase direct ethanol production becomes possible within the cells. However, during cultivation genetic instability can lead to mutations and thus loss of ethanol production. Cells then revert back to the wild type phenotype. A method for a rapid and simple detection of these non-producing revertant cells in an ethanol producing cell population is an important quality control measure in order to predict genetic stability and the longevity of a producing culture. Several comparable cultivation experiments revealed a difference in the pigmentation for non-producing and producing cells: the accessory pigment phycocyanin (PC) is reduced in case of the ethanol producer, resulting in a yellowish appearance of the culture. Microarray and western blot studies of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 confirmed this PC reduction on the level of RNA and protein. Based on these findings we developed a method for fluorescence microscopy in order to distinguish producing and non-producing cells with respect to their pigmentation phenotype. By applying a specific filter set the emitted fluorescence of a producer cell with a reduced PC content appeared orange. The emitted fluorescence of a non-producing cell with a wt pigmentation phenotype was detected in red, and dead cells in green. In an automated process multiple images of each sample were taken and analyzed with a plugin for the image analysis software ImageJ to identify dead (green), non-producing (red) and producing (orange) cells. The results of the presented validation experiments revealed a good identification with 98 % red cells in the wt sample and 90 % orange cells in the producer sample. The detected wt pigmentation phenotype (red cells) in the producer sample were either not fully induced yet (in 48 h induced

  3. Using SAR and GPS for Hazard Management and Response: Progress and Examples from the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. E.; Simons, M.; Hua, H.; Yun, S. H.; Agram, P. S.; Milillo, P.; Sacco, G. F.; Webb, F.; Rosen, P. A.; Lundgren, P.; Milillo, G.; Manipon, G. J. M.; Moore, A. W.; Liu, Z.; Polet, J.; Cruz, J.

    2014-12-01

    ARIA is a joint JPL/Caltech project to automate synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and GPS imaging capabilities for scientific understanding, hazard response, and societal benefit. We have built a prototype SAR and GPS data system that forms the foundation for hazard monitoring and response capability, as well as providing imaging capabilities important for science studies. Together, InSAR and GPS have the ability to capture surface deformation in high spatial and temporal resolution. For earthquakes, this deformation provides information that is complementary to seismic data on location, geometry and magnitude of earthquakes. Accurate location information is critical for understanding the regions affected by damaging shaking. Regular surface deformation measurements from SAR and GPS are useful for monitoring changes related to many processes that are important for hazard and resource management such as volcanic deformation, groundwater withdrawal, and landsliding. Observations of SAR coherence change have a demonstrated use for damage assessment for hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, and volcanic eruptions. These damage assessment maps can be made from imagery taken day or night and are not affected by clouds, making them valuable complements to optical imagery. The coherence change caused by the damage from hazards (building collapse, flooding, ash fall) is also detectable with intelligent algorithms, allowing for rapid generation of damage assessment maps over large areas at fine resolution, down to the spatial scale of single family homes. We will present the progress and results we have made on automating the analysis of SAR data for hazard monitoring and response using data from the Italian Space Agency's (ASI) COSMO-SkyMed constellation of X-band SAR satellites. Since the beginning of our project with ASI, our team has imaged deformation and coherence change caused by many natural hazard events around the world. We will present progress on our

  4. Differential Nongenetic Impact of Birth Weight Versus Third-Trimester Growth Velocity on Glucose Metabolism and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abdominal Obesity in Young Healthy Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilgaard, Kasper; Mosbech, Thomas Hammershaimb; Grunnet, Louise

    2011-01-01

    monozygotic twins are instrumental in determining nongenetic associations between early environment and adult metabolic phenotype.Objective: Our objective was to investigate the relationship between size at birth and third-trimester growth velocity on adult body composition and glucose metabolism using intra......-pair differences in young healthy twins.Methods: Fifty-eight healthy twins (42 monozygotic/16 dizygotic) aged 18-24 yr participated. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. Whole-body fat was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan, whereas abdominal visceral and sc fat...... (L1-L4) were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Third-trimester growth velocity was determined by repeated ultrasound examinations.Results: Size at birth was nongenetically inversely associated with adult visceral and sc fat accumulation but unrelated to adult insulin action. In contrast, fetal...

  5. Dynamic low dose I-123-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid metabolic cardiac imaging; Comparison to myocardial biopsy and reinjection SPECT thallium in ischemic cardiomyopathy and cardiac transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, G.L.; Magill, H.L. [Baptist Memorial Hospital (United States); Schad, N.C.

    1993-12-01

    Recognition of stunned and hibernating myocardium is essential in this era of cardiac revascularization. Positron emission tomography (PET) accurately identifies viability but is costly and unavailable to most patients. Dynamic low dose I-123-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) metabolic cardiac imaging is a potentially cost-effective alternative to PET. Using transmural myocardial biopsies obtained during coronary bypass surgery as the viability gold standard, resting IPPA imaging agreed with 39/43 (91%) biopsies, with a sensitivity for viability of 33/36(92%) and a specificity of 6/7 (86%) in patients with severe ischemic cardiomyopathy. Eighty percent of IPPA viable, infarcted segments improved wall motion postoperatively. Furthermore, when compared to reinjection thallium (SPECT-Tl) scans after myocardial infarction, there was IPPA-Tl concordance in 27/35 (77%)(Kappa=0.536, p=0.0003). Similar to PET, IPPA demonstrated more viability than SPECT-Tl, 26/35 (74%) vs. 18/35 (51%)(p=0.047). Finally, when compared to transvenous endomyocardial biopsy for detecting rejection following cardiac transplantation, IPPA sensitivity for {>=}Grade II rejection was 100%, and IPPA screening assessment for the necessity of biopsy could result in a 31% cost-savings. Therefore, IPPA metabolic cardiac imaging is a safe, inexpensive technique with a promising future. (author).

  6. LIVER ULTRASONOGRAPHY IN DOLPHINS: USE OF ULTRASONOGRAPHY TO ESTABLISH A TECHNIQUE FOR HEPATOBILIARY IMAGING AND TO EVALUATE METABOLIC DISEASE-ASSOCIATED LIVER CHANGES IN BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS (TURSIOPS TRUNCATUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Kelsey E; Smith, Cynthia R; Marks, Stanley L; Venn-Watson, Stephanie K; Ivančić, Marina

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a comprehensive technique for ultrasound examination of the dolphin hepatobiliary system and apply this technique to 30 dolphins to determine what, if any, sonographic changes are associated with blood-based indicators of metabolic syndrome (insulin greater than 14 μIU/ml or glucose greater than 112 mg/dl) and iron overload (transferrin saturation greater than 65%). A prospective study of individuals in a cross-sectional population with and without elevated postprandial insulin levels was performed. Twenty-nine bottlenose dolphins ( Tursiops truncatus ) in a managed collection were included in the final data analysis. An in-water ultrasound technique was developed that included detailed analysis of the liver and pancreas. Dolphins with hyperinsulinemia concentrations had larger livers compared with dolphins with nonelevated concentrations. Using stepwise, multivariate regression including blood-based indicators of metabolic syndrome in dolphins, glucose was the best predictor of and had a positive linear association with liver size (P = 0.007, R 2 = 0.24). Bottlenose dolphins are susceptible to metabolic syndrome and associated complications that affect the liver, including fatty liver disease and iron overload. This study facilitated the establishment of a technique for a rapid, diagnostic, and noninvasive ultrasonographic evaluation of the dolphin liver. In addition, the study identified ultrasound-detectable hepatic changes associated primarily with elevated glucose concentration in dolphins. Future investigations will strive to detail the pathophysiological mechanisms for these changes.

  7. Genotypic Variation under Fe Deficiency Results in Rapid Changes in Protein Expressions and Genes Involved in Fe Metabolism and Antioxidant Mechanisms in Tomato Seedlings (Solanum lycopersicum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate Fe deficiency tolerance in tomato cultivars, quantification of proteins and genes involved in Fe metabolism and antioxidant mechanisms were performed in “Roggusanmaru” and “Super Doterang”. Fe deficiency (Moderate, low and –Fe) significantly decreased the biomass, total, and apoplastic Fe concentration of “Roggusanmaru”, while a slight variation was observed in “Super Doterang” cultivar. The quantity of important photosynthetic pigments such as total chlorophyll and carotenoid contents significantly decreased in “Roggusanmaru” than “Super Doterang” cultivar. The total protein profile in leaves and roots determines that “Super Doterang” exhibited an optimal tolerance to Fe deficiency compared to “Roggusanmaru” cultivar. A reduction in expression of PSI (photosystem I), PSII (photosystem II) super-complexes and related thylakoid protein contents were detected in “Roggusanmaru” than “Super Doterang” cultivar. Moreover, the relative gene expression of SlPSI and SlPSII were well maintained in “Super Doterang” than “Roggusanmaru” cultivar. The relative expression of genes involved in Fe-transport (SlIRT1 and SlIRT2) and Fe(III) chelates reductase oxidase (SlFRO1) were relatively reduced in “Roggusanmaru”, while increased in “Super Doterang” cultivar under Fe deficient conditions. The H+-ATPase relative gene expression (SlAHA1) in roots were maintained in “Super Doterang” compared to “Roggusanmaru”. Furthermore, the gene expressions involved in antioxidant defense mechanisms (SlSOD, SlAPX and SlCAT) in leaves and roots showed that these genes were highly increased in “Super Doterang”, whereas decreased in “Roggusanmaru” cultivar under Fe deficiency. The present study suggested that “Super Doterang” is better tomato cultivar than “Roggusanmaru” for calcareous soils. PMID:26602920

  8. Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Detects Early Metabolic Remodeling in a Mouse Model of Pressure Overload Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Min; Alonso, Clayton E.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Kundu, Bijoy K.

    2013-01-01

    We proposed that metabolic remodeling in the form of increased myocardial glucose analogue 2-[18F] fluoro-2deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake precedes and triggers the onset of severe contractile dysfunction in pressure overload left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in vivo. To test this hypothesis we used a mouse model of transverse aortic constriction (TAC) together with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and assessed serial changes in cardiac metabolism and function over 7 days. Methods PET scans of 16 C57BL/6 male mice were performed using a microPET scanner under sevofluorane anesthesia. A 10-minute transmission scan was followed by a 60-minute dynamic FDG-PET scan with cardiac and respiratory gating. Blood glucose levels were measured before and after the emission scan. Transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and sham surgeries were performed after baseline imaging. Osmotic mini-pumps containing either propranolol (5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle alone were implanted subcutaneously at the end of surgery. Subsequent scans were taken at days 1 and 7 after surgery. A compartment model, in which the blood input function with spill-over and partial volume corrections and the metabolic rate constants in a 3-compartment model are simultaneously estimated, was used to determine the net myocardial FDG influx constant, Ki. The rate of myocardial glucose use, rMGU, was also computed. Estimations of the ejection fractions (EF) were based on the high resolution gated PET images Results Mice undergoing TAC surgery exhibited an increase in the Ki (580%) and glucose usage the day after surgery indicating early adaptive response. On day 7 the EF had decreased by 24% indicating a maladaptive response. Average Ki increases were not linearly associated with increases in rMGU. Ki exceeded rMGU by 29% in the TAC mice. TAC Mice treated with propranolol attenuated rate of FDG uptake, diminished mismatch between Ki and rMGU (9%) and rescued cardiac function. Conclusions Metabolic maladaptation precedes

  9. Mapping breast cancer blood flow index, composition, and metabolism in a human subject using combined diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging and diffuse correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Hossein S.; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Leproux, Anais; Hill, Brian; Durkin, Amanda; Telep, Seraphim; Lam, Jesse; Yazdi, Siavash S.; Police, Alice M.; Carroll, Robert M.; Combs, Freddie J.; Strömberg, Tomas; Yodh, Arjun G.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) are model-based near-infrared (NIR) methods that measure tissue optical properties (broadband absorption, μa, and reduced scattering, μs‧) and blood flow (blood flow index, BFI), respectively. DOSI-derived μa values are used to determine composition by calculating the tissue concentration of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin (HbO2, HbR), water, and lipid. We developed and evaluated a combined, coregistered DOSI/DCS handheld probe for mapping and imaging these parameters. We show that uncertainties of 0.3 mm-1 (37%) in μs‧ and 0.003 mm-1 (33%) in μa lead to ˜53% and 9% errors in BFI, respectively. DOSI/DCS imaging of a solid tissue-simulating flow phantom and a breast cancer patient reveals well-defined spatial distributions of BFI and composition that clearly delineates both the flow channel and the tumor. BFI reconstructed with DOSI-corrected μa and μs‧ values had a tumor/normal contrast of 2.7, 50% higher than the contrast using commonly assumed fixed optical properties. In conclusion, spatially coregistered imaging of DOSI and DCS enhances intrinsic tumor contrast and information content. This is particularly important for imaging diseased tissues where there are significant spatial variations in μa and μs‧ as well as potential uncoupling between flow and metabolism.

  10. Calibrated image-derived input functions for the determination of the metabolic uptake rate of glucose with [18F]-FDG PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders N; Reichkendler, Michala H; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated the use of a simple calibration method to remove bias in previously proposed approaches to image-derived input functions (IDIFs) when used to calculate the metabolic uptake rate of glucose (K(m)) from dynamic [(18)F]-FDG PET scans of the thigh. Our objective was to obtain...... nonbiased, low-variance K(m) values without blood sampling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We evaluated eight previously proposed IDIF methods. K(m) values derived from these IDIFs were compared with Km values calculated from the arterial blood samples (gold standard). We used linear regression to extract...

  11. 3D Rapid Prototyping for Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery: Applications in Image-Guidance, Surgical Simulation and Patient-Specific Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Harley H. L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Vescan, Allan; Daly, Michael J.; Prisman, Eitan; Irish, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of advanced fabrication technology across a broad spectrum of head and neck surgical procedures, including applications in endoscopic sinus surgery, skull base surgery, and maxillofacial reconstruction. The initial case studies demonstrated three applications of rapid prototyping technology are in head and neck surgery: i) a mono-material paranasal sinus phantom for endoscopy training ii) a multi-material skull base simulator and iii) 3D patient-specific mandible templates. Digital processing of these phantoms is based on real patient or cadaveric 3D images such as CT or MRI data. Three endoscopic sinus surgeons examined the realism of the endoscopist training phantom. One experienced endoscopic skull base surgeon conducted advanced sinus procedures on the high-fidelity multi-material skull base simulator. Ten patients participated in a prospective clinical study examining patient-specific modeling for mandibular reconstructive surgery. Qualitative feedback to assess the realism of the endoscopy training phantom and high-fidelity multi-material phantom was acquired. Conformance comparisons using assessments from the blinded reconstructive surgeons measured the geometric performance between intra-operative and pre-operative reconstruction mandible plates. Both the endoscopy training phantom and the high-fidelity multi-material phantom received positive feedback on the realistic structure of the phantom models. Results suggested further improvement on the soft tissue structure of the phantom models is necessary. In the patient-specific mandible template study, the pre-operative plates were judged by two blinded surgeons as providing optimal conformance in 7 out of 10 cases. No statistical differences were found in plate fabrication time and conformance, with pre-operative plating providing the advantage of reducing time spent in the operation room. The applicability of common model design and fabrication techniques

  12. 3D Rapid Prototyping for Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery: Applications in Image-Guidance, Surgical Simulation and Patient-Specific Modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harley H L Chan

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of advanced fabrication technology across a broad spectrum of head and neck surgical procedures, including applications in endoscopic sinus surgery, skull base surgery, and maxillofacial reconstruction. The initial case studies demonstrated three applications of rapid prototyping technology are in head and neck surgery: i a mono-material paranasal sinus phantom for endoscopy training ii a multi-material skull base simulator and iii 3D patient-specific mandible templates. Digital processing of these phantoms is based on real patient or cadaveric 3D images such as CT or MRI data. Three endoscopic sinus surgeons examined the realism of the endoscopist training phantom. One experienced endoscopic skull base surgeon conducted advanced sinus procedures on the high-fidelity multi-material skull base simulator. Ten patients participated in a prospective clinical study examining patient-specific modeling for mandibular reconstructive surgery. Qualitative feedback to assess the realism of the endoscopy training phantom and high-fidelity multi-material phantom was acquired. Conformance comparisons using assessments from the blinded reconstructive surgeons measured the geometric performance between intra-operative and pre-operative reconstruction mandible plates. Both the endoscopy training phantom and the high-fidelity multi-material phantom received positive feedback on the realistic structure of the phantom models. Results suggested further improvement on the soft tissue structure of the phantom models is necessary. In the patient-specific mandible template study, the pre-operative plates were judged by two blinded surgeons as providing optimal conformance in 7 out of 10 cases. No statistical differences were found in plate fabrication time and conformance, with pre-operative plating providing the advantage of reducing time spent in the operation room. The applicability of common model design and

  13. Rapid synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of folic acid derivatives labeled with fluorine-18 for PET imaging of folate receptor-positive tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammaz, I. Al, E-mail: jammaz@kfshrc.edu.sa; Al-Otaibi, B.; Amer, S.; Okarvi, S.M.

    2011-10-15

    In an attempt to visualize folate receptors that overexpress on many cancers, [{sup 18}F]-fluorobenzene and pyridinecarbohydrazide-folate/methotrexate conjugates ([{sup 18}F]-1, [{sup 18}F]-2-folates and [{sup 18}F]-8, [{sup 18}F]-9-MTXs) were synthesized by the nucleophilic displacement reactions using ethyl-trimethylammonium-benzoate and pyridinecarboxylate precursors. The intermediates ethyl [{sup 18}F]-fluorinated benzene and pyridine esters were reacted with hydrazine to produce the [{sup 18}F]-fluorobenzene and pyridinecarbohydrazides, followed by coupling with N-hydroxysuccinimide-folate/MTX. Radiochemical yields were greater than 80% (decay corrected), with total synthesis time of less than 45 min. Radiochemical purities were always greater than 97% without high-performance liquid chromatography purification. These synthetic approaches hold considerable promise as rapid and simple method for the radiofluorination of folate derivatives with high radiochemical yield in short synthesis time. In vitro tests on KB cell line showed that significant amount of the radioconjugates were associated with cell fractions, and in vivo characterization in normal Balb/c mice revealed rapid blood clearance of these radioconjugates with excretion predominantly by the urinary and partially by the hepatobiliary systems. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing human KB cell line xenografts demonstrated significant tumor uptake and favorable biodistribution profile for [{sup 18}F]-2-folate over the other conjugates. The uptake in the tumors was blocked by excess coinjection of folic acid, suggesting a receptor-mediated process. Micro-positron emission tomography images of nude mice bearing human KB cell line xenografts confirmed these observations. These results demonstrate that [{sup 18}F]-2-folate may be useful as molecular probe for detecting and staging of folate receptor-positive cancers, such as ovarian cancer and their metastasis as well as monitoring tumor response

  14. Rapid shut-off and burial of slope channel-levee systems: new imaging and analysis of the Rio Grande submarine fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, J. M.; Mohrig, D. C.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Stockli, D. F.; Daniller-Varghese, M. S.; Fernandez, R.

    2016-12-01

    The continental slope of the western Gulf of Mexico is host to a major depositional system, the Rio Grande Fan. Unlike many submarine fans, the surface of the Rio Grande Fan lacks large submarine channels and associated levees. Prior analysis of continental shelf stratigraphy has identified the presence of past extensive shelf-edge delta systems, when the Rio Grande River system flowed across the modern shelf and delivered high volumes of sediment to the shelf/slope break. A major gap in understanding this system is how large volumes of sediment, particularly sands, are transported from the shelf edge systems down the slope and onto the basin-floor fan without constructional channel-levee systems. Over 500km of new high-resolution 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) and CHIRP echosounder data were collected over the shelf edge and upper slope of the Rio Grande fan. These new data provide unprecedented imaging of the shelf-edge delta systems and associated slope deposits. Our preliminary observations indicate that while the modern seafloor morphology of the fan is dominated by mass-transport deposits, slumps and minor inactive channels, buried below thick mud deposits are very large aggradational channels-levee systems. These systems have channel belts almost 1km wide, with confining levees that approach 10km in width. The main body of the fan is built from these channel complexes, which appear to have then rapidly buried in mud. We document the evolution, from initial channelization to burial, of these massive slope systems. Regional correlation suggests that this most recent episode of channel-levee growth and shutoff occurred very rapidly, and could indicate drastically higher sediment flux through the paleo-Rio Grande River than that of the modern. Our results highlight an example of a slope-channel system that is subject to significant variations in sediment supply. Such systems can apparently build large late Pleistocene submarine fan deposits that can be difficult

  15. Rapid synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of folic acid derivatives labeled with fluorine-18 for PET imaging of folate receptor-positive tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jammaz, I; Al-Otaibi, B; Amer, S; Okarvi, S M

    2011-10-01

    In an attempt to visualize folate receptors that overexpress on many cancers, [(18)F]-fluorobenzene and pyridinecarbohydrazide-folate/methotrexate conjugates ([(18)F]-1, [(18)F]-2-folates and [(18)F]-8, [(18)F]-9-MTXs) were synthesized by the nucleophilic displacement reactions using ethyl-trimethylammonium-benzoate and pyridinecarboxylate precursors. The intermediates ethyl [(18)F]-fluorinated benzene and pyridine esters were reacted with hydrazine to produce the [(18)F]-fluorobenzene and pyridinecarbohydrazides, followed by coupling with N-hydroxysuccinimide-folate/MTX. Radiochemical yields were greater than 80% (decay corrected), with total synthesis time of less than 45 min. Radiochemical purities were always greater than 97% without high-performance liquid chromatography purification. These synthetic approaches hold considerable promise as rapid and simple method for the radiofluorination of folate derivatives with high radiochemical yield in short synthesis time. In vitro tests on KB cell line showed that significant amount of the radioconjugates were associated with cell fractions, and in vivo characterization in normal Balb/c mice revealed rapid blood clearance of these radioconjugates with excretion predominantly by the urinary and partially by the hepatobiliary systems. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing human KB cell line xenografts demonstrated significant tumor uptake and favorable biodistribution profile for [(18)F]-2-folate over the other conjugates. The uptake in the tumors was blocked by excess coinjection of folic acid, suggesting a receptor-mediated process. Micro-positron emission tomography images of nude mice bearing human KB cell line xenografts confirmed these observations. These results demonstrate that [(18)F]-2-folate may be useful as molecular probe for detecting and staging of folate receptor-positive cancers, such as ovarian cancer and their metastasis as well as monitoring tumor response to treatment. Copyright © 2011

  16. 3D Rapid Prototyping for Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery: Applications in Image-Guidance, Surgical Simulation and Patient-Specific Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Harley H L; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Vescan, Allan; Daly, Michael J; Prisman, Eitan; Irish, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of advanced fabrication technology across a broad spectrum of head and neck surgical procedures, including applications in endoscopic sinus surgery, skull base surgery, and maxillofacial reconstruction. The initial case studies demonstrated three applications of rapid prototyping technology are in head and neck surgery: i) a mono-material paranasal sinus phantom for endoscopy training ii) a multi-material skull base simulator and iii) 3D patient-specific mandible templates. Digital processing of these phantoms is based on real patient or cadaveric 3D images such as CT or MRI data. Three endoscopic sinus surgeons examined the realism of the endoscopist training phantom. One experienced endoscopic skull base surgeon conducted advanced sinus procedures on the high-fidelity multi-material skull base simulator. Ten patients participated in a prospective clinical study examining patient-specific modeling for mandibular reconstructive surgery. Qualitative feedback to assess the realism of the endoscopy training phantom and high-fidelity multi-material phantom was acquired. Conformance comparisons using assessments from the blinded reconstructive surgeons measured the geometric performance between intra-operative and pre-operative reconstruction mandible plates. Both the endoscopy training phantom and the high-fidelity multi-material phantom received positive feedback on the realistic structure of the phantom models. Results suggested further improvement on the soft tissue structure of the phantom models is necessary. In the patient-specific mandible template study, the pre-operative plates were judged by two blinded surgeons as providing optimal conformance in 7 out of 10 cases. No statistical differences were found in plate fabrication time and conformance, with pre-operative plating providing the advantage of reducing time spent in the operation room. The applicability of common model design and fabrication techniques

  17. Metabolic Myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Am A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Metabolic Myopathies Metabolic Myopathies Fast Facts Metabolic myopathies are rare genetic ... no family history of the condition. What are metabolic myopathies? Metabolic myopathies are genetic defects that interfere ...

  18. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K. Teune, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We identified PD-related perfusion and metabolic brain patterns using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients which were comparable with results of existing research. In this respect, PCASL appears to be a promising addition in the early diagnosis of individual parkinsonian patients.

  19. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, Laura K.; Renken, Remco J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Willemsen, Antoon T.; van Osch, Matthias J.; Roerdink, Jos B. T. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Under normal conditions, the spatial distribution of resting cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose are closely related. A relatively new magnetic resonance (MR) technique, pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL), can be used to measure regional brain

  20. Acute afterload-imposed change in porcine cardiac metabolism imaged by hyperpolarized [1-13C]Pyruvate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tougaard, Rasmus Stilling; Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Laustsen, Christoffer

    Deranged metabolism is now considered a key causal factor in heart failure and has therefore gained considerable scientific interest. The novel technique hyperpolarized MR has emerged as a leading methodological candidate to study these derangements. We employed a clinically relevant, large animal...

  1. A Real Time Quality Monitoring System for the Lighting Industry: A Practical and Rapid Approach Using Computer Vision and Image Processing (CVIP Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.K. Ng

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In China, the manufacturing of lighting products is very labour intensive. The approach used to check quality and control production relies on operators who test using various types of fixtures. In order to increase the competitiveness of the manufacturer and the efficiency of production, the authors propose an integrated system. This system has two major elements: a computer vision system (CVS and a real‐time monitoring system (RTMS. This model focuses not only on the rapid and practical application of modern technology to a traditional industry, but also represents a process innovation in the lighting industry. This paper describes the design and development of the prototyped lighting inspection system based on a practical and fast approach using computer vision and imaging processing (CVIP tools. LabVIEW with IMAQ Vision Builder is the chosen tool for building the CVS. Experimental results show that this system produces a lower error rate than humans produce in the quality checking process. The whole integrated manufacturing strategy, aimed at achieving a better performance, is most suitable for a China and other labour intensive environments such as India.

  2. Single-cell pH imaging and detection for pH profiling and label-free rapid identification of cancer-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hui; Zhao, Yangyang; Li, Chuanping; Wang, Minmin; Xu, Xiaolong; Jin, Yongdong

    2017-05-11

    Single-cell pH-sensing and accurate detection and label-free fast identification of cancer-cells are two long-standing pursuits in cell and life science, as intracellular pH plays a crucial role in many cellular events and fates, while the latter is vital for early cancer theranostics. Numerous methods based on functionalized nanoparticles and fluorescence probes have been developed for cell pH-sensing, but are often hindered for single-cell studies by their main drawbacks of complicated probe preparation and labeling, low sensitivity and poor reproducibility. Here we report a simple and reliable method for single-cell pH imaging and sensing by innovative combined use of UV-Vis microspectroscopy and common pH indicators. Accurate and sensitive pH detection on single-cell or sub-cell level with good reproducibility is achieved by the method, which enables facile single-cell pH profiling and label-free rapid identification of cancer-cells (due to distinguishable intracellular pH levels) for early cancer diagnosis, and may open a new avenue for pH-related single-cell studies.

  3. In-office rapid volumetric ablation of uterine fibroids under ultrasound imaging guidance: Preclinical and early clinical experience with the Mirabilis transabdominal HIFU treatment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, José G. Garza; León, Ivan Hernandez; Sáenz, Lorena Castillo; Aguirre, Juan M. Aguilar; Lagos, Joel J. Islas; Parsons, Jessica E.; Darlington, Gregory P.; Lau, Michael P. H.

    2017-03-01

    Mirabilis Medica, Inc. (Bothell, WA, USA) has developed a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) system for producing rapid transabdominal volumetric ablation of uterine fibroids in an office-based setting. The Mirabilis HIFU Treatment System utilizes integrated ultrasound imaging guidance and short treatment times under 15 minutes. Treatment with the Mirabilis system is generally well tolerated using only oral analgesia without anesthesia or sedation. This paper summarizes certain technical aspects of the Mirabilis HIFU technology, the preclinical development process, and the results of the first in-human clinical study using the Mirabilis system. During preclinical studies, an in vivo transcutaneous porcine lower extremity model was used in a total of 180 adult swine to develop the HIFU treatment regimen parameters. Additionally, 108 excised human uteri with fibroids obtained from scheduled hysterectomies were treated in an ex vivo experimental setup and evaluated. These preclinical activities resulted in a HIFU treatment technique referred to as Mirabilis Shell Ablation, which enables rapid volumetric fibroid ablation by directing the HIFU energy to the outer perimeter of the target volume (the `shell') without insonating its core. This method results in efficient fibroid treatment through a synergistic combination of direct tissue ablation, cooperative heating effects, and indirect ischemic necrosis in the interior of the volume. After refining this technique and performing safety testing in the in vivo porcine model, a clinical pilot study was conducted to assess the initial safety and performance of the Mirabilis HIFU Treatment System for transabdominal treatment of uterine fibroids in eligible women who were scheduled to undergo hysterectomy following treatment with the device. A total of 37 women meeting certain eligibility criteria were treated at two clinical sites in Mexico. Twenty-nine (29) of these 37 women received only prophylactic sublingual

  4. Simple anthropometric measures correlate with metabolic risk indicators as strongly as magnetic resonance imaging-measured adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Bacchetti, Peter; Kotler, Donald; Lewis, Cora E; Shlipak, Michael G; Heymsfield, Steven B; Grunfeld, Carl

    2008-06-01

    Studies in persons without HIV infection have compared percentage body fat (%BF) and waist circumference as markers of risk for the complications of excess adiposity, but only limited study has been conducted in HIV-infected subjects. We compared anthropometric and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based adiposity measures as correlates of metabolic complications of adiposity in HIV-infected and control subjects. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 666 HIV-positive and 242 control subjects in the Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) study assessing body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumferences, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), %BF, and MRI-measured regional adipose tissue. Study outcomes were 3 metabolic risk variables [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol]. Analyses were stratified by sex and HIV status and adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and HIV-related factors. In HIV-infected and control subjects, univariate associations with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL were strongest for WC, MRI-measured visceral adipose tissue, and WHR; in all cases, differences in correlation between the strongest measures for each outcome were small (r metabolic complications, whereas, for triglycerides, the best was WHR. Relations of simple anthropometric measures with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol are approximately as strong as MRI-measured whole-body adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

  5. Correlating metabolic and anatomic responses of primary lung cancers to radiotherapy by combined F-18 FDG PET-CT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grills Inga

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To correlate the metabolic changes with size changes for tumor response by concomitant PET-CT evaluation of lung cancers after radiotherapy. Methods 36 patients were studied pre- and post-radiotherapy with18FDG PET-CT scans at a median interval of 71 days. All of the patients were followed clinically and radiographically after a mean period of 342 days for assessment of local control or failure rates. Change in size (sum of maximum orthogonal diameters was correlated with that of maximum standard uptake value (SUV of the primary lung cancer before and after conventional radiotherapy. Results There was a significant reduction in both SUV and size of the primary cancer after radiotherapy (p Conclusion Correlating and incorporating metabolic change by PET into size change by concomitant CT is more sensitive in assessing therapeutic response than CT alone.

  6. Rest myocardial perfusion/metabolism imaging using simultaneous dual-isotope acquisition SPECT with technetium-99m-MIBI/fluorine-18-FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbeke, D; Videlefsky, S; Patton, J A; Campbell, M G; Martin, W H; Ohana, I; Sandler, M P

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA) protocol using a multihead SPECT camera equipped with an ultrahigh-energy (UHE) collimator to evaluate simultaneously rest cardiac perfusion and metabolism with 99mTc-MIBI/18FDG. Physical measurements were first performed with phantoms to develop the acquisition protocol. Fifteen patients underwent DISA-SPECT with 99mTc-MIBI/18FDG to validate the protocol. To evaluate the quality of the 99mTc-MIBI images acquired with the UHE collimator, four patients underwent a resting 99mTc-MIBI scan acquired with a high-resolution, low-energy collimator prior to DISA-SPECT. With a window of 20% for both photopeaks and a 99mTc/18F concentration ratio of 3.2:1, the spillover from 18F into the 99mTc window is 6% of the counts in the window for normal subjects. Phantom images clearly demonstrated defects measuring 2 x 1 and 2 x 0.5 cm. Technetium-99m-MIBI images obtained with the UHE and high-resolution collimators provided similar diagnostic information. Using a stenosis of > 70% as criteria to diagnose coronary artery disease, DISA-SPECT had a sensitivity of 100% and a positive predictive value of 93%. Simultaneous evaluation of rest myocardial perfusion/metabolism with a multihead SPECT camera equipped with an UHE collimator is possible using 99mTc-MIBI/18FDG with a dual-isotope simultaneous acquisition protocol.

  7. An Object-Based Image Analysis Method for Monitoring Land Conversion by Artificial Sprawl Use of RapidEye and IRS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Balestrat

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In France, in the peri-urban context, urban sprawl dynamics are particularly strong with huge population growth as well as a land crisis. The increase and spreading of built-up areas from the city centre towards the periphery takes place to the detriment of natural and agricultural spaces. The conversion of land with agricultural potential is all the more worrying as it is usually irreversible. The French Ministry of Agriculture therefore needs reliable and repeatable spatial-temporal methods to locate and quantify loss of land at both local and national scales. The main objective of this study was to design a repeatable method to monitor land conversion characterized by artificial sprawl: (i We used an object-based image analysis to extract artificial areas from satellite images; (ii We built an artificial patch that consists of aggregating all the peripheral areas that characterize artificial areas. The “artificialized” patch concept is an innovative extension of the urban patch concept, but differs in the nature of its components and in the continuity distance applied; (iii The diachronic analysis of artificial patch maps enables characterization of artificial sprawl. The method was applied at the scale of four departments (similar to provinces along the coast of Languedoc-Roussillon, in the South of France, based on two satellite datasets, one acquired in 1996–1997 (Indian Remote Sensing and the other in 2009 (RapidEye. In the four departments, we measured an increase in artificial areas of from 113,000 ha in 1997 to 133,000 ha in 2009, i.e., an 18% increase in 12 years. The package comes in the form of a 1/15,000 valid cartography, usable at the scale of a commune (the smallest territorial division used for administrative purposes in France that can be adapted to departmental and regional scales. The method is reproducible in homogenous spatial-temporal terms, so that it could be used periodically to assess changes in land conversion

  8. Rapid 3D in vivo 1H human lung respiratory imaging at 1.5 T using ultra-fast balanced steady-state free precession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusterla, Orso; Bauman, Grzegorz; Wielpütz, Mark O; Nyilas, Sylvia; Latzin, Philipp; Heussel, Claus P; Bieri, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    To introduce a reproducible, nonenhanced 1H MRI method for rapid in vivo functional assessment of the whole lung at 1.5 Tesla (T). At different respiratory volumes, the pulmonary signal of ultra-fast steady-state free precession (ufSSFP) follows an adapted sponge model, characterized by a respiratory index α. From the model, α reflects local ventilation-related information, is virtually independent from the lung density and thus from the inspiratory phase and breathing amplitude. Respiratory α-mapping is evaluated for healthy volunteers and patients with obstructive lung disease from a set of five consecutive 3D ultra-fast steady-state free precession (ufSSFP) scans performed in breath-hold and at different inspiratory volumes. For the patients, α-maps were compared with CT, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and Fourier decomposition (FD). In healthy volunteers, respiratory α-maps showed good reproducibility and were homogeneous on iso-gravitational planes, but showed a gravity-dependent respiratory gradient. In patients with obstructive pulmonary disease, the functional impairment observed in respiratory α-maps was associated with emphysematous regions present on CT images, perfusion defects observable on DCE-MRI, and impairments visualized on FD ventilation and perfusion maps. Respiratory α-mapping derived from multivolumetric ufSSFP provides insights into functional lung impairment and may serve as a reproducible and normative measure for clinical studies. Magn Reson Med 78:1059-1069, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Temporal Changes in Phosphatidylserine Expression and Glucose Metabolism after Myocardial Infarction: An in Vivo Imaging Study in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Lehner

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET for in vivo monitoring of phosphatidylserine externalization and glucose metabolism can potentially provide early predictors of outcome of cardioprotective therapies after myocardial infarction. We performed serial [68Ga]annexin A5 PET (annexin-PET and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET after myocardial infarction to determine the time of peak phosphatidylserine externalization in relation to impaired glucose metabolism in infracted tissue. Annexin- and FDG-PET recordings were obtained in female (C57BL6/N mice on days 1 to 4 after ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD artery. [68Ga]annexin A5 uptake (%ID/g in the LAD artery territory increased from 1.7 ± 1.1 on day 1 to 5.0 ± 3.3 on day 2 and then declined to 2.0 ± 1.4 on day 3 (p = .047 vs day 2 and 1.6 ± 1.4 on day 4 (p = .014 vs day 2. These results matched apoptosis rates as estimated by autoradiography and fluorescein staining. FDG uptake (%ID/g declined from 28 ± 14 on day 1 to 14 ± 3.5 on day 4 (p < .0001 vs day 1. Whereas FDG-PET revealed continuous loss of cell viability after permanent LAD artery occlusion, annexin-PET indicated peak phosphatidylserine expression at day 2, which might be the optimal time point for therapy monitoring.

  10. Metabolic Patterns in Chronic Multiple Sclerosis Lesions and Normal-appearing White Matter: Intraindividual Comparison by Using 2D MR Spectroscopic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Vinzenz; Kolb, Rupert; Groppa, Sergiu; Zipp, Frauke; Klose, Uwe; Gröger, Adriane

    2016-11-01

    Purpose To perform a direct metabolic comparison of chronic lesions and diffusely injured normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and Methods In this institutional review board-approved study, with the written informed consent of all patients, two-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging data in 46 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (median disease duration, 0.8 year) were analyzed by using the spectral quantification tool LCModel. Metabolic patterns were evaluated for non-gadolinium-enhancing chronic lesions and the corresponding contralateral NAWM. The sensitivity of the method was assessed by reproducing the known metabolic differences between cortical gray matter (GM) and NAWM. In addition to individual spectra, averaged spectra were calculated by accumulating free induction decays over all subjects to yield an increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and in turn, to allow improved curve fitting as demonstrated by lower error bounds for low-concentration metabolites. Metabolite concentrations were statistically tested for intraindividual differences (paired t tests) to avoid effects resulting from variations in disease severity or treatment. Results Differences between the metabolite concentrations in the NAWM and the cortical GM were highly significant (P concentrations showed only slight differences (P > .07). Owing to increased SNRs in the averaged spectra compared with individual spectra (eg, for chronic lesions, 63 vs 28.4 ± 4.1), it was possible to reliably (Cramér-Rao lower bound [CRLB], white matter lesions, even very early in the disease course, further supporting the view that such lesions may not be as relevant as widely assumed. © RSNA, 2016.

  11. Multimodal metabolic imaging of cerebral gliomas: positron emission tomography with [18F]fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floeth, Frank Willi; Pauleit, Dirk; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg; Langen, Karl Josef; Reifenberger, Guido; Hamacher, Kurt; Messing-Jünger, Martina; Zilles, Karl; Weber, Friedrich; Stummer, Walter; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Woebker, Gabriele; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm; Coenen, Heinz; Sabel, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive value of [18F]fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (FET)-positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy for tumor diagnosis in patients with suspected gliomas. Both FET-PET and MR spectroscopy analyses were performed in 50 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed intracerebral lesions supposed to be diffuse gliomas on contrast-enhanced MR imaging. Lesion/brain ratios of FET uptake greater than 1.6 were considered positive, that is, indicative of tumor. Results of MR spectroscopy were considered positive when N-acetylaspartate (NAA) was decreased in conjunction with an absolute increase of choline (Cho) and an NAA/Cho ratio of 0.7 or less. An FET lesion/brain ratio, an NAA/Cho ratio, and signal abnormalities on MR images were compared with histological findings in neuronavigated biopsy specimens. The FET lesion/brain ratio and the NAA/Cho ratio were identified as significant independent predictors for the histological identification of tumor tissue. The accuracy in distinguishing neoplastic from nonneoplastic tissue could be increased from 68% with the use of MR imaging alone to 97% with MR imaging in conjunction with FET-PET and MR spectroscopy. Sensitivity and specificity for tumor detection were 100 and 81% for MR spectroscopy and 88 and 88% for FET-PET, respectively. Results of histological studies did not reveal tumor tissue in any of the lesions that were negative on FET-PET and MR spectroscopy. In contrast, a tumor diagnosis was made in 97% of the lesions that were positive with both methods. In patients with intracerebral lesions supposed to be diffuse gliomas on MR imaging, FET-PET and MR spectroscopy analyses markedly improved the diagnostic efficacy of targeted biopsies.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy in Cancer Theranostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Jin, Jiefu; Chen, Zhihang; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-10-01

    With its exquisite anatomical resolution and wide-ranging functional imaging capabilities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has found multiple applications in detection, staging, and monitoring treatment response in cancer. The metabolic information provided by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is being actively investigated to complement MRI parameters, as well as existing biomarkers, in cancer detection and in monitoring response to treatment. Located at the interface of detection and therapy, theranostic imaging is a rapidly expanding new field that is showing significant promise for precision medicine of cancer. Innovations in the development of novel nanoparticles decorated with imaging reporters that can be used to deliver therapeutic cargo to specific cells and environments have provided new roles for MRI and MRS in theranostic imaging.

  13. JOURNAL CLUB: Evaluation of Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging of Stroke Lesion With Hemodynamic and Metabolic MRI in a Rodent Model of Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dongshuang; Jiang, Yinghua; Ji, Yang; Zhou, Iris Yuwen; Mandeville, Emiri; Lo, Eng H; Wang, Xiaoying; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2018-02-22

    Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) has emerged as a new acute stroke imaging approach, augmenting routine DWI. Although it has been shown that a diffusion lesion without kurtosis abnormality is more likely to recover after reperfusion, whereas a kurtosis lesion shows poor response, little is known about the underlying pathophysiologic profile of the kurtosis lesion versus the kurtosis lesion-diffusion lesion mismatch. We performed multiparametric MRI, including arterial spin labeling, pH-sensitive amide proton transfer, and DKI, in a rodent model of acute stroke caused by embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion. Diffusion and kurtosis lesions were semiautomatically segmented, and multiparametric MRI indexes were compared among the kurtosis lesion, diffusion lesion, kurtosis lesion-diffusion lesion mismatch, and the contralateral normal tissue area. We confirmed a significant difference between diffusion lesion and kurtosis lesion volumes (mean [± SD] volume, 151 ± 65 vs 125 ± 47 mm 3 ; p 0.05). Of importance, the pH of the kurtosis lesion was significantly lower than that of the lesion mismatch (mean pH, 6.81 ± 0.08 vs 6.89 ± 0.09; p < 0.01). The present study confirms that DKI provides an expedient approach for refining the heterogeneous DWI lesion that is associated with graded metabolic derangement, which is promising for improving the infarction core definition and ultimately helping to guide stroke treatment.

  14. A Phytochemical-Sensing Strategy Based on Mass Spectrometry Imaging and Metabolic Profiling for Understanding the Functionality of the Medicinal Herb Green Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Fujimura

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Low-molecular-weight phytochemicals have health benefits and reduce the risk of diseases, but the mechanisms underlying their activities have remained elusive because of the lack of a methodology that can easily visualize the exact behavior of such small molecules. Recently, we developed an in situ label-free imaging technique, called mass spectrometry imaging, for visualizing spatially-resolved biotransformations based on simultaneous mapping of the major bioactive green tea polyphenol and its phase II metabolites. In addition, we established a mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling technique capable of evaluating the bioactivities of diverse green tea extracts, which contain multiple phytochemicals, by focusing on their compositional balances. This methodology allowed us to simultaneously evaluate the relative contributions of the multiple compounds present in a multicomponent system to its bioactivity. This review highlights small molecule-sensing techniques for visualizing the complex behaviors of herbal components and linking such information to an enhanced understanding of the functionalities of multicomponent medicinal herbs.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging response as an early biomarker of cognitive decline in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaeff, Nadia; Amaro, Edson; Franco, Fabio G M; Jacinto, Alessandro F; Chiochetta, Gabriela; Cendoroglo, Maysa S; Citero, Vanessa A

    2017-11-01

    We assessed whether potential changes in brain activation patterns of elderly individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) who were cognitively healthy (without mild cognitive impairment or dementia) were associated with cognitive decline in executive function in the short-term. We analyzed 43 individuals (23 MetS, 20 controls) using a global geriatric evaluation, a neuropsychological battery, and task-related (attention) fMRI exam. Correlation analysis between the fMRI signal at baseline and cognitive impairment after 1year was based on the voxel-based Pearson coefficient, corrected for multiple comparisons. At baseline, MetS patients showed reduced brain response in frontal and parietal regions compared to controls. After one year, the MetS group also showed a decline in verbal fluency performance. fMRI response in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and bilateral parietal lobes was negatively correlated with verbal fluency decline in the MetS group. Our results provide an early biomarker of the possible development of cognitive impairment, particularly in the executive function, of elderly individuals suffering from MetS. These findings also point to an up or down regulation which could be interpreted as compensatory mechanism for possible brain tissue burden caused by MetS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: david.schwartz@utsw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern School of Medicine, Dallas, Texas (United States); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yao, Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Opanowski, Adam; Levering, Anthony [American College of Radiology Imaging Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Trotti, Andy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Sutter Medical Group, Sacramento, California (United States); Harari, Paul [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Foote, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baseline SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials.

  17. A fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of the Metabolic Tumor Volume from PET images: validation on 3D printed anthropomorphic oncological lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivanone, F.; Interlenghi, M.; Canervari, C.; Castiglioni, I.

    2016-01-01

    18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a standard functional diagnostic technique to in vivo image cancer. Different quantitative paramters can be extracted from PET images and used as in vivo cancer biomarkers. Between PET biomarkers Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) has gained an important role in particular considering the development of patient-personalized radiotherapy treatment for non-homogeneous dose delivery. Different imaging processing methods have been developed to define MTV. The different proposed PET segmentation strategies were validated in ideal condition (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration), while the majority of cancer lesions doesn't fulfill these requirements. In this context, this work has a twofold objective: 1) to implement and optimize a fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of MTV, feasible in clinical practice 2) to develop a strategy to obtain anthropomorphic phantoms, including non-spherical and non-uniform objects, miming realistic oncological patient conditions. The developed PET segmentation algorithm combines an automatic threshold-based algorithm for the definition of MTV and a k-means clustering algorithm for the estimation of the background. The method is based on parameters always available in clinical studies and was calibrated using NEMA IQ Phantom. Validation of the method was performed both in ideal (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration) and non-ideal (e.g. in non-spherical objects with a non-uniform radioactivity concentration) conditions. The strategy to obtain a phantom with synthetic realistic lesions (e.g. with irregular shape and a non-homogeneous uptake) consisted into the combined use of standard anthropomorphic phantoms commercially and irregular molds generated using 3D printer technology and filled with a radioactive chromatic alginate. The proposed segmentation algorithm was feasible in a

  18. RAPID3? Aptly named!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, J-M

    2014-01-01

    The RAPID3 score is the sum of three 0-10 patient self-report scores: pain, functional impairment on MDHAQ, and patient global estimate. It requires 5 seconds for scoring and can be used in all rheumatologic conditions, although it has mostly been used in rheumatoid arthritis where cutoffs for low disease activity (12/30) have been set. A RAPID3 score of ≤ 3/30 with 1 or 0 swollen joints (RAPID3 ≤ 3 + ≤ SJ1) provides remission criteria comparable to Boolean, SDAI, CDAI, and DAS28 remission criteria, in far less time than a formal joint count. RAPID3 performs as well as the DAS28 in separating active drugs from placebos in clinical trials. RAPID3 also predicts subsequent structural disease progression. RAPID3 can be determined at short intervals at home, allowing the determination of the area under the curve of disease activity between two visits and flare detection. However, RAPID3 should not be seen as a substitute for DAS28 and face to face visits in routine care. Monitoring patient status with only self-report information without a rheumatologist's advice (including joints and physical examination, and consideration of imaging and laboratory tests) may indeed be as undesirable for most patients than joint examination without a patient questionnaire. Conversely, combining the RAPID3 and the DAS28 may consist in faster or more sensitive confirmation that a medication is effective. Similarly, better enquiring of most important concerns of patients (pain, functional status and overall opinion on their disorder) should reinforces patients' confidence in their rheumatologist and treatments.

  19. Comparison of different phosphorus-containing ligands complexing {sup 68}Ga for PET-imaging of bone metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellner, M.; Riss, P.; Loktionova, N.; Zhernosekov, K.; Roesch, F. [Univ. of Mainz, Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Thews, O. [Univ. of Mainz, Inst. of Pathophysiology, Mainz (Germany); Geraldes, C.F.G.C. [Univ. of Coimbra, Faculty of Science and Technology, and Center of Neurosciences and Cell Biology, Dept. of Life Science, Coimbra (Portugal); Kovacs, Z. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Advanced Imaging Research Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Lukes, I. [Charles Univ., Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    {sup 99m}Tc-phosphonate structures are well established tracers for bone tumour imaging. Our objective was to investigate different {sup 68}Ga-labelled phosphonate ligands concerning labelling kinetics, binding to hydroxyapatite and bone imaging using {mu}-PET. Seven macrocyclic phosphorus-containing ligands and EDTMP were labelled in nanomolar scale with n.c.a. {sup 68}Ga in Na-HEPES buffer at pH{proportional_to}4. Except for DOTP, all ligands were labelled with >92% yield. Binding of the {sup 68}Ga-ligand complexes on hydroxyapatite was analysed to evaluate the effect of the number of the phosphorus acid groups on adsorption parameters. Adsorption of {sup 68}Ga-EDTMP and 68Ga-DOTP was >83%. For the {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-phosphonates an increasing binding with increasing number of phosphonate groups was observed but was still lower than {sup 68}Ga-DOTP and {sup 68}Ga-EDTMP. {mu}-PET studies in vivo were performed with {sup 68}Ga-EDTMP and {sup 68}Ga-DOTP with Wistar rats. While {sup 68}Ga-EDTMP-PET showed uptake on bone structures, an excess amount of the ligand (>1.5 mg EDTMP/kg body weight) had to be used, otherwise the {sup 68}Ga{sup 3+} is released from the complex and forms gallium hydroxide or it is transchelated to {sup 68}Ga-transferrin. As a result, the main focus of further phosphonate structures has to be on complex formation in high radiochemical yields with macrocyclic ligands with phosphonate groups that are not required for complexing {sup 68}Ga. (orig.)

  20. Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Catherine, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme of this month's issue is "Images"--from early paintings and statuary to computer-generated design. Resources on the theme include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and others. A page of reproducible activities is also provided. Features include photojournalism, inspirational Web sites, art history, pop art, and myths. (AEF)

  1. A Rapid and Efficient 2D/3D Nuclear Segmentation Method for Analysis of Early Mouse Embryo and Stem Cell Image Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghua Lou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation is a fundamental problem that dominates the success of microscopic image analysis. In almost 25 years of cell detection software development, there is still no single piece of commercial software that works well in practice when applied to early mouse embryo or stem cell image data. To address this need, we developed MINS (modular interactive nuclear segmentation as a MATLAB/C++-based segmentation tool tailored for counting cells and fluorescent intensity measurements of 2D and 3D image data. Our aim was to develop a tool that is accurate and efficient yet straightforward and user friendly. The MINS pipeline comprises three major cascaded modules: detection, segmentation, and cell position classification. An extensive evaluation of MINS on both 2D and 3D images, and comparison to related tools, reveals improvements in segmentation accuracy and usability. Thus, its accuracy and ease of use will allow MINS to be implemented for routine single-cell-level image analyses.

  2. Metabolic syndrome predicts vascular changes in whole body magnetic resonance imaging in patients with long standing diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Findeisen Hannes M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although diabetic patients have an increased rate of cardio-vascular events, there is considerable heterogeneity with respect to cardiovascular risk, requiring new approaches to individual cardiovascular risk factor assessment. In this study we used whole body-MR-angiography (WB-MRA to assess the degree of atherosclerosis in patients with long-standing diabetes and to determine the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS and atherosclerotic burden. Methods Long standing (≥10 years type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients (n = 59; 31 males; 63.3 ± 1.7 years were examined by WB-MRA. Based on the findings in each vessel, we developed an overall score representing the patient's vascular atherosclerotic burden (MRI-score. The score's association with components of the MetS was assessed. Results The median MRI-score was 1.18 [range: 1.00-2.41] and MetS was present in 58% of the cohort (type 2 diabetics: 73%; type 1 diabetics: 26%. Age (p = 0.0002, HDL-cholesterol (p = 0.016, hypertension (p = 0.0008, nephropathy (p = 0.0093, CHD (p = 0.001 and MetS (p = 0.0011 were significantly associated with the score. Adjusted for age and sex, the score was significantly (p = 0.02 higher in diabetics with MetS (1.450 [1.328-1.572] compared to those without MetS (1.108 [0.966-1.50]. The number of MetS components was associated with a linear increase in the MRI-score (increase in score: 0.09/MetS component; r2 = 0.24, p = 0.038. Finally, using an established risk algorithm, we found a significant association between MRI-score and 10-year risk for CHD, fatal CHD and stroke. Conclusion In this high-risk diabetic population, WB-MRA revealed large heterogeneity in the degree of systemic atherosclerosis. Presence and number of traits of the MetS are associated with the extent of atherosclerotic burden. These results support the perspective that diabetic patients are a heterogeneous population with increased but varying prevalence of atherosclerosis

  3. Metabolic Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    A metabolic panel is a group of tests that measures different chemicals in the blood. These tests are usually ... kidneys and liver. There are two types: basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The ...

  4. Metabolic acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acidosis - metabolic ... Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys ... from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known ...

  5. Metabolic neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... damage can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with ... is one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk ...

  6. Metabolic flexibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Storlien, Len; Oakes, Nick D; Kelley, David E

    2004-01-01

    ...). Such capacities characterize the healthy state and can be termed 'metabolic flexibility'. However, increasing evidence points to metabolic inflexibility as a key dysfunction of the cluster of disease states encompassed by the term 'metabolic syndrome...

  7. An enzyme-activatable probe with a self-immolative linker for rapid and sensitive alkaline phosphatase detection and cell imaging through a cascade reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Xu, Chenglong; Liu, Jie; Li, Xiaohong; Guo, Lin; Li, Xinming

    2015-04-25

    We report the design and synthesis of a novel probe (1) for ALP assay by incorporating a self-immolative linker between a phosphate moiety and resorufin. Because of its good biocompatibility and rapid cell internalization, this probe also exhibited great potential for real-time monitoring of endogenous phosphatase activity in living cells.

  8. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  9. Rapid volumetric photoacoustic tomographic imaging with a Fabry-Perot ultrasound sensor depicts peripheral arteries and microvascular vasomotor responses to thermal stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, Andrew A; Huynh, Nam Trung; Guggenheim, Jamie; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul

    2017-10-10

    To determine if a new photoacoustic imaging (PAI) system successfully depicts (1) peripheral arteries and (2) microvascular circulatory changes in response to thermal stimuli. Following ethical permission, 8 consenting subjects underwent PAI of the dorsalis pedis (DP) artery, and 13 completed PAI of the index fingertip. Finger images were obtained after immersion in warm (30-35 °C) or cold (10-15 °C) water to promote vasodilation or vasoconstriction. The PAI instrument used a Fabry-Perot interferometeric ultrasound sensor and a 30-Hz 750-nm pulsed excitation laser. Volumetric images were acquired through a 14 × 14 × 14-mm volume over 90 s. Images were evaluated subjectively and quantitatively to determine if PAI could depict cold-induced vasoconstriction. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of resolvable vessels was measured. Fingertip vessels were visible in all participants, with mean FWHM of 125 μm. Two radiologists used PAI to correctly identify vasoconstricted fingertip capillary beds with 100% accuracy (95% CI 77.2-100.0%, p thermal stimuli. • Fabry-Perot interferometer-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) generates volumetric, high-resolution images of the peripheral vasculature. • The system reliably detects thermally induced peripheral vasoconstriction (100% correct identification rate, p < 0.001). • Vessels measuring less than 100 μm in diameter can be depicted in vivo.

  10. Global gray and white matter metabolic changes after simian immunodeficiency virus infection in CD8-depleted rhesus macaques: proton MRS imaging at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, William E; Tal, Assaf; Kirov, Ivan I; Rusinek, Henry; Charytonowicz, Daniel; Babb, James S; Ratai, Eva-Maria; Gilberto Gonzalez, R; Gonen, Oded

    2013-04-01

    To test the hypotheses that global decreased neuro-axonal integrity reflected by decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and increased glial activation reflected by an elevation in its marker, the myo-inositol (mI), present in a CD8-depleted rhesus macaque model of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. To this end, we performed quantitative MRI and 16 × 16 × 4 multivoxel proton MRS imaging (TE/TR = 33/1400 ms) in five macaques pre- and 4-6 weeks post-simian immunodeficiency virus infection. Absolute NAA, creatine, choline (Cho), and mI concentrations, gray and white matter (GM and WM) and cerebrospinal fluid fractions were obtained. Global GM and WM concentrations were estimated from 224 voxels (at 0.125 cm(3) spatial resolution over ~35% of the brain) using linear regression. Pre- to post-infection global WM NAA declined 8%: 6.6 ± 0.4 to 6.0 ± 0.5 mM (p = 0.05); GM Cho declined 20%: 1.3 ± 0.2 to 1.0 ± 0.1 mM (p changes were statistically insignificant. These metabolic changes are consistent with global WM (axonal) injury and glial activation, and suggest a possible GM host immune response. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Nuclear medicine for treatment of thyroid diseases. Diagnostic evaluation and imaging of the intrathyroid metabolism; Einsatz der Nuklearmedizin bei Schilddruesenerkrankungen. Diagnostik und bildliche Darstellung des intrathyreoidalen Stoffwechsels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maul, F.D. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Staedtisches Klinikum, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1996-05-01

    The diagnostic interest of nuclear medicine is focussed on the imaging and quantification of intrathyroidal iodine metabolism. Most frequently the various forms of autonomy will be investigated by functional scintigraphy. Cold nodules and the differential diagnosis of Graves disease are further indications. In the case of a sufficient iodine uptake hyperthyroidism can be treated by 1311. Severe hyperthyroidism requires a medical pretreatment before radioiodine therapy. A rigid age limit for radioiodine therapy is not necessary. Pregnancy and the suspicion of malignancy are contraindications of a radioiodine therapy. The after-treatment depends on the nature of the treated hyperthyroidism and the posttreatment result. If a focal autonomy could be eliminated a sufficient amount of iodine should be supplied. To prevent the development of hypothyroidism clinical and thyroid hormon controls, and if necessary a substitution with thyroxin is necessary. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei der Diagnostik und Therapie von Schilddruesenerkrankungen steht die Diagnostik und bildliche Darstellung der intrathyreoidalen Stoffwechselstoerung im Zentrum. Am haeufigsten wird die Schilddruesenfunktionsszintigraphie bei den verschiedenen Formen der autonomen Schilddruesenerkrankungen eingesetzt. Sie dient aber auch der Diagnostik kalter Knoten und der Differenzierung von Autoimmunthyreopathien. Ausreichende Iodspeicherung vorausgesetzt, koennen hyperthyreote Erkrankungen der Schilddruese mit {sup 131}I behandelt werden. (orig./MG)

  12. Fluoroacetylcarnitine: metabolism and metabolic effects in mitochondria<