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Sample records for rapid karyotypic evolution

  1. Holokinetic centromeres and efficient telomere healing enable rapid karyotype evolution.

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    Jankowska, Maja; Fuchs, Jörg; Klocke, Evelyn; Fojtová, Miloslava; Polanská, Pavla; Fajkus, Jiří; Schubert, Veit; Houben, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Species with holocentric chromosomes are often characterized by a rapid karyotype evolution. In contrast to species with monocentric chromosomes where acentric fragments are lost during cell division, breakage of holocentric chromosomes creates fragments with normal centromere activity. To decipher the mechanism that allows holocentric species an accelerated karyotype evolution via chromosome breakage, we analyzed the chromosome complements of irradiated Luzula elegans plants. The resulting chromosomal fragments and rearranged chromosomes revealed holocentromere-typical CENH3 and histone H2AThr120ph signals as well as the same mitotic mobility like unfragmented chromosomes. Newly synthesized telomeres at break points become detectable 3 weeks after irradiation. The presence of active telomerase suggests a telomerase-based mechanism of chromosome healing. A successful transmission of holocentric chromosome fragments across different generations was found for most offspring of irradiated plants. Hence, a combination of holokinetic centromere activity and the fast formation of new telomeres at break points enables holocentric species a rapid karyotype evolution involving chromosome fissions and rearrangements.

  2. Chromothripsis: A New Mechanism for Rapid Karyotype Evolution.

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    Leibowitz, Mitchell L; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Pellman, David

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are generally thought to accumulate gradually over many generations. However, DNA sequencing of cancer and congenital disorders uncovered a new pattern in which multiple rearrangements arise all at once. The most striking example, chromothripsis, is characterized by tens or hundreds of rearrangements confined to a single chromosome or to local regions over a few chromosomes. Genomic analysis of chromothripsis and the search for its biological mechanism have led to new insights on how chromosome segregation errors can generate mutagenesis and changes to the karyotype. Here, we review the genomic features of chromothripsis and summarize recent progress on understanding its mechanism. This includes reviewing new work indicating that one mechanism to generate chromothripsis is through the physical isolation of chromosomes in abnormal nuclear structures (micronuclei). We also discuss connections revealed by recent genomic analysis of cancers between chromothripsis, chromosome bridges, and ring chromosomes.

  3. Rapid Karyotype Evolution in Lasiopodomys Involved at Least Two Autosome – Sex Chromosome Translocations

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    Lemskaya, Natalya A.; Serdyukova, Natalya A.; O’Brien, Patricia C. M.; Kovalskaya, Julia M.; Smorkatcheva, Antonina V.; Golenishchev, Feodor N.; Perelman, Polina L.; Trifonov, Vladimir A.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.; Yang, Fengtang; Graphodatsky, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The generic status of Lasiopodomys and its division into subgenera Lasiopodomys (L. mandarinus, L. brandtii) and Stenocranius (L. gregalis, L. raddei) are not generally accepted because of contradictions between the morphological and molecular data. To obtain cytogenetic evidence for the Lasiopodomys genus and its subgenera and to test the autosome to sex chromosome translocation hypothesis of sex chromosome complex origin in L. mandarinus proposed previously, we hybridized chromosome painting probes from the field vole (Microtus agrestis, MAG) and the Arctic lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus, DTO) onto the metaphases of a female Mandarin vole (L. mandarinus, 2n = 47) and a male Brandt's vole (L. brandtii, 2n = 34). In addition, we hybridized Arctic lemming painting probes onto chromosomes of a female narrow-headed vole (L. gregalis, 2n = 36). Cross-species painting revealed three cytogenetic signatures (MAG12/18, 17a/19, and 22/24) that could validate the genus Lasiopodomys and indicate the evolutionary affinity of L. gregalis to the genus. Moreover, all three species retained the associations MAG1bc/17b and 2/8a detected previously in karyotypes of all arvicolins studied. The associations MAG2a/8a/19b, 8b/21, 9b/23, 11/13b, 12b/18, 17a/19a, and 5 fissions of ancestral segments appear to be characteristic for the subgenus Lasiopodomys. We also validated the autosome to sex chromosome translocation hypothesis on the origin of complex sex chromosomes in L. mandarinus. Two translocations of autosomes onto the ancestral X chromosome in L. mandarinus led to a complex of neo-X1, neo-X2, and neo-X3 elements. Our results demonstrate that genus Lasiopodomys represents a striking example of rapid chromosome evolution involving both autosomes and sex chromosomes. Multiple reshuffling events including Robertsonian fusions, chromosomal fissions, inversions and heterochromatin expansion have led to the formation of modern species karyotypes in a very short time, about 2.4 MY. PMID

  4. Rapid Karyotype Evolution in Lasiopodomys Involved at Least Two Autosome - Sex Chromosome Translocations.

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    Olga L Gladkikh

    Full Text Available The generic status of Lasiopodomys and its division into subgenera Lasiopodomys (L. mandarinus, L. brandtii and Stenocranius (L. gregalis, L. raddei are not generally accepted because of contradictions between the morphological and molecular data. To obtain cytogenetic evidence for the Lasiopodomys genus and its subgenera and to test the autosome to sex chromosome translocation hypothesis of sex chromosome complex origin in L. mandarinus proposed previously, we hybridized chromosome painting probes from the field vole (Microtus agrestis, MAG and the Arctic lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus, DTO onto the metaphases of a female Mandarin vole (L. mandarinus, 2n = 47 and a male Brandt's vole (L. brandtii, 2n = 34. In addition, we hybridized Arctic lemming painting probes onto chromosomes of a female narrow-headed vole (L. gregalis, 2n = 36. Cross-species painting revealed three cytogenetic signatures (MAG12/18, 17a/19, and 22/24 that could validate the genus Lasiopodomys and indicate the evolutionary affinity of L. gregalis to the genus. Moreover, all three species retained the associations MAG1bc/17b and 2/8a detected previously in karyotypes of all arvicolins studied. The associations MAG2a/8a/19b, 8b/21, 9b/23, 11/13b, 12b/18, 17a/19a, and 5 fissions of ancestral segments appear to be characteristic for the subgenus Lasiopodomys. We also validated the autosome to sex chromosome translocation hypothesis on the origin of complex sex chromosomes in L. mandarinus. Two translocations of autosomes onto the ancestral X chromosome in L. mandarinus led to a complex of neo-X1, neo-X2, and neo-X3 elements. Our results demonstrate that genus Lasiopodomys represents a striking example of rapid chromosome evolution involving both autosomes and sex chromosomes. Multiple reshuffling events including Robertsonian fusions, chromosomal fissions, inversions and heterochromatin expansion have led to the formation of modern species karyotypes in a very short time, about

  5. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Relatives.

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    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Radke, Brittany; Findley, Seth; Abernathy, Brian; Vallejos, C Eduardo; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-04-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2-4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species. Copyright © 2016 Iwata-Otsubo et al.

  6. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris and Relatives

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    Aiko Iwata-Otsubo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus. Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2–4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species.

  7. Evolution of Karyotypes in Chameleons

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    Michail Rovatsos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of the evolutionary dynamics of karyotypes and sex determining systems in squamate reptiles is precluded by the lack of data in many groups including most chameleons (Squamata: Acrodonta: Chamaeleonidae. We performed cytogenetic analysis in 16 species of chameleons from 8 genera covering the phylogenetic diversity of the family and also phylogenetic reconstruction of karyotype evolution in this group. In comparison to other squamates, chameleons demonstrate rather variable karyotypes, differing in chromosome number, morphology and presence of interstitial telomeric signal (ITS. On the other hand, the location of rDNA is quite conserved among chameleon species. Phylogenetic analysis combining our new results and previously published data tentatively suggests that the ancestral chromosome number for chameleons is 2n = 36, which is the same as assumed for other lineages of the clade Iguania, i.e., agamids and iguanas. In general, we observed a tendency for the reduction of chromosome number during the evolution of chameleons, however, in Rieppeleon brevicaudatus, we uncovered a chromosome number of 2n = 62, very unusual among squamates, originating from a number of chromosome splits. Despite the presence of the highly differentiated ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in the genus Furcifer, we did not detect any unequivocal sexual differences in the karyotypes of any other studied species of chameleons tested using differential staining and comparative genomic hybridization, suggesting that sex chromosomes in most chameleons are only poorly differentiated.

  8. The genome diversity and karyotype evolution of mammals

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    Trifonov Vladimir A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The past decade has witnessed an explosion of genome sequencing and mapping in evolutionary diverse species. While full genome sequencing of mammals is rapidly progressing, the ability to assemble and align orthologous whole chromosome regions from more than a few species is still not possible. The intense focus on building of comparative maps for companion (dog and cat, laboratory (mice and rat and agricultural (cattle, pig, and horse animals has traditionally been used as a means to understand the underlying basis of disease-related or economically important phenotypes. However, these maps also provide an unprecedented opportunity to use multispecies analysis as a tool for inferring karyotype evolution. Comparative chromosome painting and related techniques are now considered to be the most powerful approaches in comparative genome studies. Homologies can be identified with high accuracy using molecularly defined DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH on chromosomes of different species. Chromosome painting data are now available for members of nearly all mammalian orders. In most orders, there are species with rates of chromosome evolution that can be considered as 'default' rates. The number of rearrangements that have become fixed in evolutionary history seems comparatively low, bearing in mind the 180 million years of the mammalian radiation. Comparative chromosome maps record the history of karyotype changes that have occurred during evolution. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of these recent advances in our endeavor to decipher the karyotype evolution of mammals by integrating the published results together with some of our latest unpublished results.

  9. The impact of rapid aneuploidy detection (RAD) in addition to karyotyping versus karyotyping on maternal quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boormans, E. M. A.; Birnie, E.; Oepkes, D.; Bilardo, C. M.; Wildschut, H. I. J.; Creemers, J.; Bonsel, G. J.; van Lith, J. M. M.

    Objective To assess the impact of rapid aneuploidy detection (RAD) combined with fetal karyotyping versus karyotyping only on maternal anxiety and health-related quality of life. Methods Women choosing to undergo amniocentesis were selected into group 1, i.e. receiving a karyotype result only (n =

  10. Karyotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arrangement of the chromosomes. This is called a karyotype. Certain problems can be identified through the number ... order other tests that go together with a karyotype: Microarray: Looks at small changes in the chromosomes ...

  11. Karyotype Evolution in Harvestmen of the Suborder Cyphophthalmi (Opiliones).

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    Svojanovská, Hana; Nguyen, Petr; Hiřman, Matyáš; Tuf, Ivan H; Wahab, Rodzay Abdul; Haddad, Charles R; Šťáhlavský, František

    2016-01-01

    The morphologically uniform suborder Cyphophthalmi represents a basal group of harvestmen (Opiliones). As such, it plays an important role in the reconstruction of the karyotype evolution within this arachnid order. The cytogenetic analysis of 6 representatives of the suborder Cyphophthalmi, namely Miopsalis sp. (2n = 30; Stylocellidae), Austropurcellia arcticosa (Cantrell, 1980) (2n = 30; Pettalidae), Parapurcellia amatola de Bivort & Giribet, 2010 (2n = 32; Pettalidae), Paramiopsalis aff. ramulosus Juberthie, 1962 (2n = 28; Sironidae), Cyphophthalmus duricorius Joseph, 1868 (2n = 24; Sironidae), and Siro carpaticus Rafalski, 1956 (2n = 52; Sironidae) was performed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with 18S rDNA probe was used to analyze the distribution of major ribosomal RNA genes in harvestmen. We confront the obtained cytogenetic data with current hypotheses on cyphophthalmid phylogeny to reconstruct their karyotype evolution. We conclude that the ancestral karyotype of harvestmen consisted of 2n = 30 elements with 1 chromosome pair bearing terminal rDNA clusters. The rDNA locus was multiplicated in the evolution of Cyphophthalmi. However, decreases as well as increases in the number of chromosomes have been detected in the karyotype evolution of Cyphophthalmi. Our data thus reveal unexpected diversity in cyphophthalmid karyotypes. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Centromere strength provides the cell biological basis for meiotic drive and karyotype evolution in mice.

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    Chmátal, Lukáš; Gabriel, Sofia I; Mitsainas, George P; Martínez-Vargas, Jessica; Ventura, Jacint; Searle, Jeremy B; Schultz, Richard M; Lampson, Michael A

    2014-10-06

    Mammalian karyotypes (number and structure of chromosomes) can vary dramatically over short evolutionary time frames. There are examples of massive karyotype conversion, from mostly telocentric (centromere terminal) to mostly metacentric (centromere internal), in 10(2)-10(5) years. These changes typically reflect rapid fixation of Robertsonian (Rb) fusions, a common chromosomal rearrangement that joins two telocentric chromosomes at their centromeres to create one metacentric. Fixation of Rb fusions can be explained by meiotic drive: biased chromosome segregation during female meiosis in violation of Mendel's first law. However, there is no mechanistic explanation of why fusions would preferentially segregate to the egg in some populations, leading to fixation and karyotype change, while other populations preferentially eliminate the fusions and maintain a telocentric karyotype. Here we show, using both laboratory models and wild mice, that differences in centromere strength predict the direction of drive. Stronger centromeres, manifested by increased kinetochore protein levels and altered interactions with spindle microtubules, are preferentially retained in the egg. We find that fusions preferentially segregate to the polar body in laboratory mouse strains when the fusion centromeres are weaker than those of telocentrics. Conversely, fusion centromeres are stronger relative to telocentrics in natural house mouse populations that have changed karyotype by accumulating metacentric fusions. Our findings suggest that natural variation in centromere strength explains how the direction of drive can switch between populations. They also provide a cell biological basis of centromere drive and karyotype evolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Detecting Mechanisms of Karyotype Evolution in Heterotaxis (Orchidaceae).

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    Moraes, Ana Paula; Olmos Simões, André; Ojeda Alayon, Dario Isidro; de Barros, Fábio; Forni-Martins, Eliana Regina

    2016-01-01

    The karyotype is shaped by different chromosome rearrangements during species evolution. However, determining which rearrangements are responsible for karyotype changes is a challenging task and the combination of a robust phylogeny with refined karyotype characterization, GS measurements and bioinformatic modelling is necessary. Here, this approach was applied in Heterotaxis to determine what chromosome rearrangements were responsible for the dysploidy variation. We used two datasets (nrDNA and cpDNA, both under MP and BI) to infer the phylogenetic relationships among Heterotaxis species and the closely related genera Nitidobulbon and Ornithidium. Such phylogenies were used as framework to infer how karyotype evolution occurred using statistical methods. The nrDNA recovered Ornithidium, Nitidobulbon and Heterotaxis as monophyletic under both MP and BI; while cpDNA could not completely separate the three genera under both methods. Based on the GS, we recovered two groups within Heterotaxis: (1) "small GS", corresponding to the Sessilis grade, composed of plants with smaller genomes and smaller morphological structure, and (2) "large GS", corresponding to the Discolor clade, composed of plants with large genomes and robust morphological structures. The robust karyotype modeling, using both nrDNA phylogenies, allowed us to infer that the ancestral Heterotaxis karyotype presented 2n = 40, probably with a proximal 45S rDNA on a metacentric chromosome pair. The chromosome number variation was caused by ascending dysploidy (chromosome fission involving the proximal 45S rDNA site resulting in two acrocentric chromosome pairs holding a terminal 45S rDNA), with subsequent descending dysploidy (fusion) in two species, H. maleolens and H. sessilis. However, besides dysploidy, our analysis detected another important chromosome rearrangement in the Orchidaceae: chromosome inversion, that promoted 5S rDNA site duplication and relocation.

  14. Amphibian and Avian Karyotype Evolution: Insights from Lampbrush Chromosome Studies.

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    Zlotina, Anna; Dedukh, Dmitry; Krasikova, Alla

    2017-11-08

    Amphibian and bird karyotypes typically have a complex organization, which makes them difficult for standard cytogenetic analysis. That is, amphibian chromosomes are generally large, enriched with repetitive elements, and characterized by the absence of informative banding patterns. The majority of avian karyotypes comprise a small number of relatively large macrochromosomes and numerous tiny morphologically undistinguishable microchromosomes. A good progress in investigation of amphibian and avian chromosome evolution became possible with the usage of giant lampbrush chromosomes typical for growing oocytes. Due to the giant size, peculiarities of organization and enrichment with cytological markers, lampbrush chromosomes can serve as an opportune model for comprehensive high-resolution cytogenetic and cytological investigations. Here, we review the main findings on chromosome evolution in amphibians and birds that were obtained using lampbrush chromosomes. In particular, we discuss the data on evolutionary chromosomal rearrangements, accumulation of polymorphisms, evolution of sex chromosomes as well as chromosomal changes during clonal reproduction of interspecies hybrids.

  15. Rates of karyotypic evolution in Estrildid finches differ between island and continental clades.

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    Hooper, Daniel M; Price, Trevor D

    2015-04-01

    Reasons why chromosomal rearrangements spread to fixation and frequently distinguish related taxa remain poorly understood. We used cytological descriptions of karyotype to identify large pericentric inversions between species of Estrildid finches (family Estrildidae) and a time-dated phylogeny to assess the genomic, geographic, and phylogenetic context of karyotype evolution in this group. Inversions between finch species fixed at an average rate of one every 2.26 My. Inversions were twice as likely to fix on the sex chromosomes compared to the autosomes. A high repeat density on the sex chromosomes may increase mutation rates, but other explanations via mutagenic input are not supported, as the number of inversions on a chromosome does not correlate with its length or map size. Inversions have fixed 3.3× faster in three continental clades than in two island chain clades, and fixation rate correlates with both range size and the number of sympatric species pairs. These results point to adaptation as the dominant mechanism driving fixation and suggest a role for gene flow in karyotype divergence. A review shows that the rapid karyotype evolution observed in the Estrildid finches appears to be more general across birds, and by implication other understudied taxa. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Centromere strength provides the cell biological basis for meiotic drive and karyotype evolution in mice

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    Chmátal, Lukáš; Gabriel, Sofia I.; Mitsainas, George P.; Martínez-Vargas, Jessica; Ventura, Jacint; Searle, Jeremy B.; Schultz, Richard M.; Lampson, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian karyotypes (number and structure of chromosomes) can vary dramatically over short evolutionary time frames [1–3]. There are examples of massive karyotype conversion, from mostly telocentric (centromere terminal) to mostly metacentric (centromere internal), in 102–105 years [4, 5]. These changes typically reflect rapid fixation of Robertsonian (Rb) fusions, a common chromosomal rearrangement that joins two telocentric chromosomes at their centromeres to create one metacentric [5]. Fi...

  17. Sex Determination, Sex Chromosomes, and Karyotype Evolution in Insects.

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    Blackmon, Heath; Ross, Laura; Bachtrog, Doris

    2017-01-01

    Insects harbor a tremendous diversity of sex determining mechanisms both within and between groups. For example, in some orders such as Hymenoptera, all members are haplodiploid, whereas Diptera contain species with homomorphic as well as male and female heterogametic sex chromosome systems or paternal genome elimination. We have established a large database on karyotypes and sex chromosomes in insects, containing information on over 13000 species covering 29 orders of insects. This database constitutes a unique starting point to report phylogenetic patterns on the distribution of sex determination mechanisms, sex chromosomes, and karyotypes among insects and allows us to test general theories on the evolutionary dynamics of karyotypes, sex chromosomes, and sex determination systems in a comparative framework. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that male heterogamety is the ancestral mode of sex determination in insects, and transitions to female heterogamety are extremely rare. Many insect orders harbor species with complex sex chromosomes, and gains and losses of the sex-limited chromosome are frequent in some groups. Haplodiploidy originated several times within insects, and parthenogenesis is rare but evolves frequently. Providing a single source to electronically access data previously distributed among more than 500 articles and books will not only accelerate analyses of the assembled data, but also provide a unique resource to guide research on which taxa are likely to be informative to address specific questions, for example, for genome sequencing projects or large-scale comparative studies. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Evolution of the karyotype and sex chromosome systems in basal clades of araneomorph spiders (Araneae: Araneomorphae).

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    Král, Jirí; Musilová, Jana; St'áhlavský, Frantisek; Rezác, Milan; Akan, Zübeyde; Edwards, Robert L; Coyle, Frederick A; Almerje, Carles Ribera

    2006-01-01

    Concepts of spider karyotype evolution are based mostly on advanced and most diversified clade, the entelegyne lineage of araneomorph spiders. Hence the typical spider karyotype is supposed to consist exclusively of acrocentric chromosomes including the multiple X chromosomes. However, our data show considerable diversity of chromosome morphology and sex chromosome systems in basal clades of araneomorphs. Karyotypes of basal araneomorphs consist of holocentric (superfamily Dysderoidea) or normal chromosomes with localized centromere. In males of basal araneomorphs the prophase of first meiotic division includes a long diffuse stage. Multiple X chromosomes are less common in basal clades. The sex chromosome system of many families includes a Y chromosome or nucleolus organizer region that occurs rarely in the entelegyne spiders. A derived X(1)X(2)Y system with an achiasmatic sex-chromosome pairing during meiosis was found in the families Drymusidae, Hypochilidae, Filistatidae, Sicariidae, and Pholcidae. This suggests a monophyletic origin of the families. In some lineages the X(1)X(2)Y system converted into an X0 system, as found in some pholcids, or into an XY system, which is typical for the family Diguetidae. The remarkable karyotype and sex chromosome system diversity allows us to distinguish four evolutionary lineages of basal araneomorphs and hypothesize about the ancestral karyotype of araneomorphs.

  19. A novel indicator of karyotype evolution in the tribe Leucocoryneae (Allioideae, Amaryllidaceae).

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    Sassone, Agostina B; López, Alicia; Hojsgaard, Diego H; Giussani, Liliana M

    2017-10-26

    The tribe Leucocoryneae is taxonomically and cytogenetically complex, mainly due to its extraordinary morphological and karyological variation. Robertsonian translocations had long been recognized as a central factor contributing to karyotype diversity within the Leucocoryneae, but so far no major tendency prevailing on the observed complexity of karyotype formula among species has been identified. The assessment of nuclear DNA contents by flow cytometry using propidium iodide in 23 species, representing all genera within the tribe, showed a monoploid genome size variation of 1Cx = 9.07-30.46 pg denoting a threefolds fluctuation. A highly significant linear association between the average DNA content per chromosome arm (2C/FN) and the monoploid genome size (1Cx) is reported for the first time and identified as a novel indicator of a trend governing karyotype diversity within Leucocoryneae. This trend shows that a reduction in DNA content per chromosome arm is influencing and has shaped karyotype evolution of different monophyletic groups within the tribe despite the complex karyotype diversity and apparently contrasting patterns of genome sizes.

  20. The amphioxus genome and the evolution of the chordate karyotype

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    Putnam, Nicholas H.; Butts, Thomas; Ferrier, David E.K.; Furlong, Rebecca F.; Hellsten, Uffe; Kawashima, Takeshi; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Terry, Astrid; Yu, Jr-Kai; Benito-Gutierrez, Elia; Dubchak, Inna; Garcia-Fernandez, Jordi; Gibson-Brown, Jeremy J.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Horton, Amy C.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Jurka, Jerzy; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Kohara, Yuji; Kuroki, Yoko; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Pennacchio, Len A.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Satou, Yutaka; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Schmutz[, Jeremy; Shin-I, Tadasu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne; Fujiyama, Asao; Holland, Linda Z.; Holland, Peter W. H.; Satoh, Nori; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2008-04-01

    Lancelets ('amphioxus') are the modern survivors of an ancient chordate lineage with a fossil record dating back to the Cambrian. We describe the structure and gene content of the highly polymorphic {approx}520 million base pair genome of the Florida lancelet Branchiostoma floridae, and analyze it in the context of chordate evolution. Whole genome comparisons illuminate the murky relationships among the three chordate groups (tunicates, lancelets, and vertebrates), and allow reconstruction of not only the gene complement of the last common chordate ancestor, but also a partial reconstruction of its genomic organization, as well as a description of two genome-wide duplications and subsequent reorganizations in the vertebrate lineage. These genome-scale events shaped the vertebrate genome and provided additional genetic variation for exploitation during vertebrate evolution.

  1. Chromosomal Diversity and Karyotype Evolution in South American Macaws (Psittaciformes, Psittacidae)

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    de Oliveira Furo, Ivanete; Kretschmer, Rafael; O’Brien, Patrícia C.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa

    2015-01-01

    Most species of macaws, which represent the largest species of Neotropical Psittacidae, characterized by their long tails and exuberant colours, are endangered, mainly because of hunting, illegal trade and habitat destruction. Long tailed species seem to represent a monophyletic group within Psittacidae, supported by cytogenetic data. Hence, these species show karyotypes with predominance of biarmed macrochromosomes, in contrast to short tailed species, with a predominance of acro/telocentric macrochromosomes. Because of their similar karyotypes, it has been proposed that inversions and translocations may be the main types of rearrangements occurring during the evolution of this group. However, only one species of macaw, Ara macao, that has had its genome sequenced was analyzed by means of molecular cytogenetics. Hence, in order to verify the rearrangements, we analyzed the karyotype of two species of macaws, Ara chloropterus and Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus, using cross-species chromosome painting with two different sets of probes from chicken and white hawk. Both intra- and interchromosomal rearrangements were observed. Chicken probes revealed the occurrence of fusions, fissions and inversions in both species, while the probes from white hawk determined the correct breakpoints or chromosome segments involved in the rearrangements. Some of these rearrangements were common for both species of macaws (fission of GGA1 and fusions of GGA1p/GGA4q, GGA6/GGA7 and GGA8/GGA9), while the fissions of GGA 2 and 4p were found only in A. chloropterus. These results confirm that despite apparent chromosomal similarity, macaws have very diverse karyotypes, which differ from each other not only by inversions and translocations as postulated before, but also by fissions and fusions. PMID:26087053

  2. Dynamic karyotype evolution and unique sex determination systems in Leptidea wood white butterflies.

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    Šíchová, Jindra; Voleníková, Anna; Dincă, Vlad; Nguyen, Petr; Vila, Roger; Sahara, Ken; Marec, František

    2015-05-19

    Chromosomal rearrangements have the potential to limit the rate and pattern of gene flow within and between species and thus play a direct role in promoting and maintaining speciation. Wood white butterflies of the genus Leptidea are excellent models to study the role of chromosome rearrangements in speciation because they show karyotype variability not only among but also within species. In this work, we investigated genome architecture of three cryptic Leptidea species (L. juvernica, L. sinapis and L. reali) by standard and molecular cytogenetic techniques in order to reveal causes of the karyotype variability. Chromosome numbers ranged from 2n = 85 to 91 in L. juvernica and 2n = 69 to 73 in L. sinapis (both from Czech populations) to 2n = 51 to 55 in L. reali (Spanish population). We observed significant differences in chromosome numbers and localization of cytogenetic markers (rDNA and H3 histone genes) within the offspring of individual females. Using FISH with the (TTAGG) n telomeric probe we also documented the presence of multiple chromosome fusions and/or fissions and other complex rearrangements. Thus, the intraspecific karyotype variability is likely due to irregular chromosome segregation of multivalent meiotic configurations. The analysis of female meiotic chromosomes by GISH and CGH revealed multiple sex chromosomes: W1W2W3Z1Z2Z3Z4 in L. juvernica, W1W2W3Z1Z2Z3 in L. sinapis and W1W2W3W4Z1Z2Z3Z4 in L. reali. Our results suggest a dynamic karyotype evolution and point to the role of chromosomal rearrangements in the speciation of Leptidea butterflies. Moreover, our study revealed a curious sex determination system with 3-4 W and 3-4 Z chromosomes, which is unique in the Lepidoptera and which could also have played a role in the speciation process of the three Leptidea species.

  3. Insight into the Karyotype Evolution of Brachypodium Species Using Comparative Chromosome Barcoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idziak, Dominika; Hazuka, Iwona; Poliwczak, Beata; Wiszynska, Anna; Wolny, Elzbieta; Hasterok, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Paleogenomic studies based on bioinformatic analyses of DNA sequences have enabled unprecedented insight into the evolution of grass genomes. They have revealed that nested chromosome fusions played an important role in the divergence of modern grasses. Nowadays, studies on karyotype evolution based on the sequence analysis can also be effectively complemented by the fine-scale cytomolecular approach. In this work, we studied the karyotype evolution of small genome grasses using BAC-FISH based comparative chromosome barcoding in four Brachypodium species: diploid B. distachyon (2n = 10) and B. sylvaticum (2n = 18), diploid (2n = 18) and allopolyploid (2n = 28) B. pinnatum as well as B. phoenicoides (2n = 28). Using BAC clones derived from the B. distachyon genomic libraries for the chromosomes Bd2 and Bd3, we identified the descending dysploidy events that were common for diploids with x = 9 and B. distachyon as well as two nested chromosome fusions that were specific only for B. distachyon. We suggest that dysploidy events that are shared by different lineages of the genus had already appeared in their common ancestor. We also show that additional structural rearrangements, such as translocations and duplications, contributed to increasing genome diversification in the species analysed. No chromosomes structured exactly like Bd2 and Bd3 were found in B. pinnatum (2n = 28) and B. phoenicoides. The structure of Bd2 and Bd3 homeologues belonging to the two genomes in the allopolyploids resembled the structure of their counterparts in the 2n = 18 diploids. These findings reinforce the hypothesis which excludes B. distachyon as a potential parent for Eurasian perennial Brachypodium allopolyploids. Our cytomolecular data elucidate some mechanisms of the descending dysploidy in monocots and enable reconstructions of the evolutionary events which shaped the extant karyotypes in both the genus Brachypodium and in grasses as a whole. PMID

  4. Insight into the karyotype evolution of brachypodium species using comparative chromosome barcoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Idziak

    Full Text Available Paleogenomic studies based on bioinformatic analyses of DNA sequences have enabled unprecedented insight into the evolution of grass genomes. They have revealed that nested chromosome fusions played an important role in the divergence of modern grasses. Nowadays, studies on karyotype evolution based on the sequence analysis can also be effectively complemented by the fine-scale cytomolecular approach. In this work, we studied the karyotype evolution of small genome grasses using BAC-FISH based comparative chromosome barcoding in four Brachypodium species: diploid B. distachyon (2n = 10 and B. sylvaticum (2n = 18, diploid (2n = 18 and allopolyploid (2n = 28 B. pinnatum as well as B. phoenicoides (2n = 28. Using BAC clones derived from the B. distachyon genomic libraries for the chromosomes Bd2 and Bd3, we identified the descending dysploidy events that were common for diploids with x = 9 and B. distachyon as well as two nested chromosome fusions that were specific only for B. distachyon. We suggest that dysploidy events that are shared by different lineages of the genus had already appeared in their common ancestor. We also show that additional structural rearrangements, such as translocations and duplications, contributed to increasing genome diversification in the species analysed. No chromosomes structured exactly like Bd2 and Bd3 were found in B. pinnatum (2n = 28 and B. phoenicoides. The structure of Bd2 and Bd3 homeologues belonging to the two genomes in the allopolyploids resembled the structure of their counterparts in the 2n = 18 diploids. These findings reinforce the hypothesis which excludes B. distachyon as a potential parent for Eurasian perennial Brachypodium allopolyploids. Our cytomolecular data elucidate some mechanisms of the descending dysploidy in monocots and enable reconstructions of the evolutionary events which shaped the extant karyotypes in both the genus Brachypodium and in grasses as a whole.

  5. Insight into the karyotype evolution of brachypodium species using comparative chromosome barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idziak, Dominika; Hazuka, Iwona; Poliwczak, Beata; Wiszynska, Anna; Wolny, Elzbieta; Hasterok, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Paleogenomic studies based on bioinformatic analyses of DNA sequences have enabled unprecedented insight into the evolution of grass genomes. They have revealed that nested chromosome fusions played an important role in the divergence of modern grasses. Nowadays, studies on karyotype evolution based on the sequence analysis can also be effectively complemented by the fine-scale cytomolecular approach. In this work, we studied the karyotype evolution of small genome grasses using BAC-FISH based comparative chromosome barcoding in four Brachypodium species: diploid B. distachyon (2n = 10) and B. sylvaticum (2n = 18), diploid (2n = 18) and allopolyploid (2n = 28) B. pinnatum as well as B. phoenicoides (2n = 28). Using BAC clones derived from the B. distachyon genomic libraries for the chromosomes Bd2 and Bd3, we identified the descending dysploidy events that were common for diploids with x = 9 and B. distachyon as well as two nested chromosome fusions that were specific only for B. distachyon. We suggest that dysploidy events that are shared by different lineages of the genus had already appeared in their common ancestor. We also show that additional structural rearrangements, such as translocations and duplications, contributed to increasing genome diversification in the species analysed. No chromosomes structured exactly like Bd2 and Bd3 were found in B. pinnatum (2n = 28) and B. phoenicoides. The structure of Bd2 and Bd3 homeologues belonging to the two genomes in the allopolyploids resembled the structure of their counterparts in the 2n = 18 diploids. These findings reinforce the hypothesis which excludes B. distachyon as a potential parent for Eurasian perennial Brachypodium allopolyploids. Our cytomolecular data elucidate some mechanisms of the descending dysploidy in monocots and enable reconstructions of the evolutionary events which shaped the extant karyotypes in both the genus Brachypodium and in grasses as a whole.

  6. Individualized choice in prenatal diagnosis : the impact of karyotyping and standalone rapid aneuploidy detection on quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boormans, E. M. A.; Birnie, E.; Oepkes, D.; Boekkooi, P. F.; Bonsel, G. J.; van Lith, J. M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the reasons and perceptions of women who are offered a choice between karyotyping and standalone rapid aneuploidy detection (RAD) and to compare the impact of both tests on anxiety and health-related quality of life Methods In this prospective comparative study, women undergoing

  7. Chromosome evolution in kangaroos (Marsupialia: Macropodidae): cross species chromosome painting between the tammar wallaby and rock wallaby spp. with the 2n = 22 ancestral macropodid karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, R J; Eldridge, M D; Toder, R; Ferguson-Smith, M A; O'Brien, P C; Graves, J A

    1999-06-01

    Marsupial mammals show extraordinary karyotype stability, with 2n = 14 considered ancestral. However, macropodid marsupials (kangaroos and wallabies) exhibit a considerable variety of karyotypes, with a hypothesised ancestral karyotype of 2n = 22. Speciation and karyotypic diversity in rock wallabies (Petrogale) is exceptional. We used cross species chromosome painting to examine the chromosome evolution between the tammar wallaby (2n = 16) and three 2n = 22 rock wallaby species groups with the putative ancestral karyotype. Hybridization of chromosome paints prepared from flow sorted chromosomes of the tammar wallaby to Petrogale spp., showed that this ancestral karyotype is largely conserved among 2n = 22 rock wallaby species, and confirmed the identity of ancestral chromosomes which fused to produce the bi-armed chromosomes of the 2n = 16 tammar wallaby. These results illustrate the fission-fusion process of karyotype evolution characteristic of the kangaroo group.

  8. Chromosomal rearrangements and karyotype evolution in carnivores revealed by chromosome painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, W; Wang, J; Su, W; Wang, D; Tanomtong, A; Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Yang, F

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal evolution in carnivores has been revisited extensively using cross-species chromosome painting. Painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the domestic dog, which has one of the most rearranged karyotypes in mammals and the highest dipoid number (2n=78) in carnivores, are a powerful tool in detecting both evolutionary intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. However, only a few comparative maps have been established between dog and other non-Canidae species. Here, we extended cross-species painting with dog probes to seven more species representing six carnivore families: Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), the stone marten (Martes foina), the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica), the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphrodites), Javan mongoose (Hepestes javanicas), the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The numbers and positions of intra-chromosomal rearrangements were found to differ among these carnivore species. A comparative map between human and stone marten, and a map among the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), stone marten and human were also established to facilitate outgroup comparison and to integrate comparative maps between stone marten and other carnivores with such maps between human and other species. These comparative maps give further insight into genome evolution and karyotype phylogenetic relationships among carnivores, and will facilitate the transfer of gene mapping data from human, domestic dog and cat to other species. PMID:22086079

  9. Developmental evolution facilitates rapid adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Travisano, Michael

    2017-11-21

    Developmental evolution has frequently been identified as a mode for rapid adaptation, but direct observations of the selective benefits and associated mechanisms of developmental evolution are necessarily challenging to obtain. Here we show rapid evolution of greatly increased rates of dispersal by developmental changes when populations experience stringent selection. Replicate populations of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma citrinoviride underwent 85 serial transfers, under conditions initially favoring growth but not dispersal. T. citrinoviride populations shifted away from multicellular growth toward increased dispersal by producing one thousand times more single-celled asexual conidial spores, three times sooner than the ancestral genotype. Conidia of selected lines also germinated fifty percent faster. Gene expression changed substantially between the ancestral and selected fungi, especially for spore production and growth, demonstrating rapid evolution of tight regulatory control for down-regulation of growth and up-regulation of conidia production between 18 and 24 hours of growth. These changes involved both developmentally fixed and plastic changes in gene expression, showing that complex developmental changes can serve as a mechanism for rapid adaptation.

  10. Chromosome numbers and karyotype evolution in holoparasitic Orobanche (Orobanchaceae) and related genera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeweiss, G.M.; Palomeque, T.; Colwell, A.E.; Weiss-Schneeweiss, H.

    2004-01-01

    Chromosome numbers and karyotypes of species of Orobanche, Cistanche, and Diphelypaea (Orobanchaceae) were investigated, and 108 chromosome counts of 53 taxa, 19 counted for the first time, are presented with a thorough compilation of previously published data. Additionally, karyotypes of representatives of these genera, including Orobanche sects. Orobanche and Trionychon, are reported. Cistanche (x = 20) has large meta- to submetacentric chromosomes, while those of Diphelypaea (x = 19) are medium-sized submeta-to acrocentrics. Within three analyzed sections of Orobanche, sects. Myzorrhiza (x = 24) and Trionychon (x = 12) possess medium-sized submeta- to acrocentrics, while sect. Orobanche (x = 19) has small, mostly meta- to submetacentric, chromosomes. Polyploidy is unevenly distributed in Orobanche and restricted to a few lineages, e.g., O. sect. Myzorrhiza or Orobanche gracilis and its relatives (sect. Orobanche). The distribution of basic chromosome numbers supports the groups found by molecular phylogenetic analyses: Cistanche has x = 20, the Orobanche-group (Orobanche sect. Orobanche, Diphelypaea) has x = 19, and the Phelipanche-group (Orobanche sects. Gymnocaulis, Myzorrhiza, Trionychon) has x = 12, 24. A model of chromosome number evolution in Orobanche and related genera is presented: from two ancestral base numbers, xh = 5 and xh = 6, independent polyploidizations led to x = 20 (Cistanche) and (after dysploidization) x = 19 (Orobanche-group) and to x = 12 and x = 24 (Phelipanche-group), respectively.

  11. Chromosomal diversification and karyotype evolution of diploids in the cytologically diverse genus Prospero (Hyacinthaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospero (Hyacinthaceae) provides a unique system to assess the impact of genome rearrangements on plant diversification and evolution. The genus exhibits remarkable chromosomal variation but very little morphological differentiation. Basic numbers of x = 4, 5, 6 and 7, extensive polyploidy, and numerous polymorphic chromosome variants were described, but only three species are commonly recognized: P. obtusifolium, P. hanburyi, and P. autumnale s.l., the latter comprising four diploid cytotypes. The relationship between evolutionary patterns and chromosomal variation in diploids, the basic modules of the extensive cytological diversity, is presented. Results Evolutionary inferences were derived from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 35S rDNA, genome size estimations, and phylogenetic analyses of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 35S rDNA of 49 diploids in the three species and all cytotypes of P. autumnale s.l. All species and cytotypes possess a single 35S rDNA locus, interstitial except in P. hanburyi where it is sub-terminal, and one or two 5S rDNA loci (occasionally a third in P. obtusifolium) at fixed locations. The localization of the two rDNA types is unique for each species and cytotype. Phylogenetic data in the P. autumnale complex enable tracing of the evolution of rDNA loci, genome size, and direction of chromosomal fusions: mixed descending dysploidy of x = 7 to x = 6 and independently to x = 5, rather than successive descending dysploidy, is proposed. Conclusions All diploid cytotypes are recovered as well-defined evolutionary lineages. The cytogenetic and phylogenetic approaches have provided excellent phylogenetic markers to infer the direction of chromosomal change in Prospero. Evolution in Prospero, especially in the P. autumnale complex, has been driven by differentiation of an ancestral karyotype largely unaccompanied by morphological change. These new results provide a framework for detailed

  12. Karyotype Evolution and Phylogenetic Relationships of Cricetulus sokolovi Orlov et Malygin 1988 (Cricetidae, Rodentia) Inferred from Chromosomal Painting and Molecular Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplavskaya, Natalia S; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Serdyukova, Natalia A; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Yang, Fengtang; Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinghuan; Bannikova, Anna A; Surov, Alexey V; Lebedev, Vladimir S

    2017-01-01

    Sokolov's dwarf hamster (Cricetulus sokolovi) is the least studied representative of the striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis species group), the taxonomy of which remains controversial. The species was described based on chromosome morphology, but neither the details of the karyotype nor the phylogenetic relationships with other Cricetulus are known. In the present study, the karyotype of C. sokolovi was examined using cross-species chromosome painting. Molecular and cytogenetic data were employed to determine the phylogenetic position of Sokolov's hamster and to analyze the potential pathways of chromosome evolution in Cricetulus. Both the chromosome and molecular data support the species status of Sokolov's hamster. Phylogenetic analysis of the CYTB data placed C. sokolovi as sister to all other striped hamsters (sequence divergence of 8.1%). FISH data revealed that the karyotype of C. sokolovi is highly rearranged, with the most parsimonious scenario of its origin implying at least 4 robertsonian events and a centromere shift. Comparative cytogenetic data on Cricetinae suggest that their evolutionary history includes both periods of chromosomal conservatism and episodes of rapid chromosomal change. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Karyotypic evolution of the Medicago complex: sativa-caerulea-falcata inferred from comparative cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feng; Wang, Haiqing; Zhao, Yanyan; Liu, Ruijuan; Dou, Quanwen; Dong, Jiangli; Wang, Tao

    2017-04-21

    Polyploidy plays an important role in the adaptation and speciation of plants. The alteration of karyotype is a significant event during polyploidy formation. The Medicago sativa complex includes both diploid (2n = 2× = 16) and tetraploid (2n = 2× = 32) subspecies. The tetraploid M. ssp. sativa was regarded as having a simple autopolyploid origin from diploid ssp. caerulea, whereas the autopolyploid origin of tetraploid ssp. falcata from diploid form ssp. falcata is still in doubt. In this study, detailed comparative cytogenetic analysis between diploid to tetraploid species, as well as genomic affinity across different species in the M. sativa complex, were conducted based on comparative mapping of 11 repeated DNA sequences and two rDNA sequences by a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH patterns of the repeats in diploid subspecies caerulea were highly similar to those in tetraploid subspecies sativa. Distinctly different FISH patterns were first observed in diploid ssp. falcata, with only centromeric hybridizations using centromeric and multiple region repeats and a few subtelomeric hybridizations using subtelomeric repeats. Tetraploid subspecies falcata was unexpectedly found to possess a highly variable karyotype, which agreed with neither diploid ssp. falcata nor ssp. sativa. Reconstruction of chromosome-doubling process of diploid ssp. caerulea showed that chromosome changes have occurred during polyploidization process. The comparative cytogenetic results provide reliable evidence that diploid subspecies caerulea is the direct progenitor of tetraploid subspecies sativa. And autotetraploid ssp. sativa has been suggested to undergo a partial diploidization by the progressive accumulation of chromosome structural rearrangements during evolution. However, the tetraploid subspecies falcata is far from a simple autopolyploid from diploid subspecies falcata although no obvious morphological change was observed between these two

  14. Chromosome Evolution in the Free-Living Flatworms: First Evidence of Intrachromosomal Rearrangements in Karyotype Evolution of Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes, Macrostomida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadesenets, Kira S; Ershov, Nikita I; Berezikov, Eugene; Rubtsov, Nikolay B

    2017-10-30

    The free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano is a hidden tetraploid. Its genome was formed by a recent whole genome duplication followed by chromosome fusions. Its karyotype (2n = 8) consists of a pair of large chromosomes (MLI1), which contain regions of all other chromosomes, and three pairs of small metacentric chromosomes. Comparison of MLI1 with metacentrics was performed by painting with microdissected DNA probes and fluorescent in situ hybridization of unique DNA fragments. Regions of MLI1 homologous to small metacentrics appeared to be contiguous. Besides the loss of DNA repeat clusters (pericentromeric and telomeric repeats and the 5S rDNA cluster) from MLI1, the difference between small metacentrics MLI2 and MLI4 and regions homologous to them in MLI1 were revealed. Abnormal karyotypes found in the inbred DV1/10 subline were analyzed, and structurally rearranged chromosomes were described with the painting technique, suggesting the mechanism of their origin. The revealed chromosomal rearrangements generate additional diversity, opening the way toward massive loss of duplicated genes from a duplicated genome. Our findings suggest that the karyotype of M. lignano is in the early stage of genome diploidization after whole genome duplication, and further studies on M. lignano and closely related species can address many questions about karyotype evolution in animals.

  15. Chromosome Evolution in the Free-Living Flatworms: First Evidence of Intrachromosomal Rearrangements in Karyotype Evolution of Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes, Macrostomida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira S. Zadesenets

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano is a hidden tetraploid. Its genome was formed by a recent whole genome duplication followed by chromosome fusions. Its karyotype (2n = 8 consists of a pair of large chromosomes (MLI1, which contain regions of all other chromosomes, and three pairs of small metacentric chromosomes. Comparison of MLI1 with metacentrics was performed by painting with microdissected DNA probes and fluorescent in situ hybridization of unique DNA fragments. Regions of MLI1 homologous to small metacentrics appeared to be contiguous. Besides the loss of DNA repeat clusters (pericentromeric and telomeric repeats and the 5S rDNA cluster from MLI1, the difference between small metacentrics MLI2 and MLI4 and regions homologous to them in MLI1 were revealed. Abnormal karyotypes found in the inbred DV1/10 subline were analyzed, and structurally rearranged chromosomes were described with the painting technique, suggesting the mechanism of their origin. The revealed chromosomal rearrangements generate additional diversity, opening the way toward massive loss of duplicated genes from a duplicated genome. Our findings suggest that the karyotype of M. lignano is in the early stage of genome diploidization after whole genome duplication, and further studies on M. lignano and closely related species can address many questions about karyotype evolution in animals.

  16. The map-based genome sequence of Spirodela polyrhiza aligned with its chromosomes, a reference for karyotype evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hieu Xuan; Vu, Giang Thi Ha; Wang, Wenqin; Appenroth, Klaus J; Messing, Joachim; Schubert, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Duckweeds are aquatic monocotyledonous plants of potential economic interest with fast vegetative propagation, comprising 37 species with variable genome sizes (0.158-1.88 Gbp). The genomic sequence of Spirodela polyrhiza, the smallest and the most ancient duckweed genome, needs to be aligned to its chromosomes as a reference and prerequisite to study the genome and karyotype evolution of other duckweed species. We selected physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing Spirodela DNA inserts with little or no repetitive elements as probes for multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mcFISH), using an optimized BAC pooling strategy, to validate its physical map and correlate it with its chromosome complement. By consecutive mcFISH analyses, we assigned the originally assembled 32 pseudomolecules (supercontigs) of the genomic sequences to the 20 chromosomes of S. polyrhiza. A Spirodela cytogenetic map containing 96 BAC markers with an average distance of 0.89 Mbp was constructed. Using a cocktail of 41 BACs in three colors, all chromosome pairs could be individualized simultaneously. Seven ancestral blocks emerged from duplicated chromosome segments of 19 Spirodela chromosomes. The chromosomally integrated genome of S. polyrhiza and the established prerequisites for comparative chromosome painting enable future studies on the chromosome homoeology and karyotype evolution of duckweed species. © 2015 IPK Gatersleben. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Genome size and karyotype evolution in the slipper orchids (Cypripedioideae: Orchidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A; Abdelnour, G; Bennett, M; Leitch, I

    1998-05-01

    Nuclear DNA contents (4C) were estimated by Feulgen microdensitometry in 27 species of slipper orchids. These data and recent information concerning the molecular systematics of Cypripedioideae allow an interesting re-evaluation of karyotype and genome size variation among slipper orchids in a phylogenetic context. DNA amounts differed 5.7-fold, from 24.4 pg in Phragmipedium longifolium to 138.1 pg in Paphiopedilum wardii. The most derived clades of the conduplicate-leaved slipper orchids have undergone a radical process of genome fragmentation that is most parsimoniously explained by Robertsonian changes involving centric fission. This process seems to have occurred independently of genome size variation. However, it may reflect environmental or selective pressures favoring higher numbers of linkage groups in the karyotype.

  18. Cold Fusion: Massive Karyotype Evolution in the Antarctic Bullhead Notothen Notothenia coriiceps

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    Angel Amores

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Half of all vertebrate species share a series of chromosome fusions that preceded the teleost genome duplication (TGD, but we do not understand the causative evolutionary mechanisms. The “Robertsonian-translocation hypothesis” suggests a regular fusion of each ancestral acro- or telocentric chromosome to just one other by centromere fusions, thus halving the karyotype. An alternative “genome-stirring hypothesis” posits haphazard and repeated fusions, inversions, and reciprocal and nonreciprocal translocations. To study large-scale karyotype reduction, we investigated the decrease of chromosome numbers in Antarctic notothenioid fish. Most notothenioids have 24 haploid chromosomes, but bullhead notothen (Notothenia coriiceps has 1. To understand mechanisms, we made a RAD-tag meiotic map with ∼10,000 polymorphic markers. Comparative genomics aligned about a thousand orthologs of platyfish and stickleback genes along bullhead chromosomes. Results revealed that 9 of 11 bullhead chromosomes arose by fusion of just two ancestral chromosomes and two others by fusion of three ancestral chromosomes. All markers from each ancestral chromosome remained contiguous, implying no inversions across fusion borders. Karyotype comparisons support a history of: (1 Robertsonian fusions of 22 ancestral chromosomes in pairs to yield 11 fused plus two small unfused chromosomes, like N. angustata; (2 fusion of one of the remaining two ancestral chromosomes to a preexisting fused pair, giving 12 chromosomes like N. rossii; and (3 fusion of the remaining ancestral chromosome to another fused pair, giving 11 chromosomes in N. coriiceps. These results raise the question of what selective forces promoted the systematic fusion of chromosomes in pairs and the suppression of pericentric inversions in this lineage, and provide a model for chromosome fusions in stem teleosts.

  19. Chromosome Mapping of Repetitive Sequences in Rachycentron canadum (Perciformes: Rachycentridae): Implications for Karyotypic Evolution and Perspectives for Biotechnological Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobina, Uedson Pereira; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Souza, Luiz Gustavo Rodrigues; Calado, Leonardo Luiz; Tavares, Manoel; Manzella, João; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2011-01-01

    The cobia, Rachycentron canadum, a species of marine fish, has been increasingly used in aquaculture worldwide. It is the only member of the family Rachycentridae (Perciformes) showing wide geographic distribution and phylogenetic patterns still not fully understood. In this study, the species was cytogenetically analyzed by different methodologies, including Ag-NOR and chromomycin A3 (CMA3)/DAPI staining, C-banding, early replication banding (RGB), and in situ fluorescent hybridization with probes for 18S and 5S ribosomal genes and for telomeric sequences (TTAGGG)n. The results obtained allow a detailed chromosomal characterization of the Atlantic population. The chromosome diversification found in the karyotype of the cobia is apparently related to pericentric inversions, the main mechanism associated to the karyotypic evolution of Perciformes. The differential heterochromatin replication patterns found were in part associated to functional genes. Despite maintaining conservative chromosomal characteristics in relation to the basal pattern established for Perciformes, some chromosome pairs in the analyzed population exhibit markers that may be important for cytotaxonomic, population, and biodiversity studies as well as for monitoring the species in question. PMID:21541243

  20. The significance of cytogenetics for the study of karyotype evolution and taxonomy of water bugs (Heteroptera, Belostomatidae native to Argentina

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    Mónica Chirino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Male meiosis behaviour and heterochromatin characterization of three big water bug species were studied. Belostoma dentatum (Mayr, 1863, B. elongatum Montandon, 1908 and B. gestroi Montandon, 1903 possess 2n = 26 + X1X2Y (male. In these species, male meiosis is similar to that previously observed in Belostoma Latreille, 1807. In general, autosomal bivalents show a single chiasma terminally located and divide reductionally at anaphase I. On the other hand, sex chromosomes are achiasmatic, behave as univalents and segregate their chromatids equationally at anaphase I. The analysis of heterochromatin distribution and composition revealed a C-positive block at the terminal region of all autosomes in B. dentatum, a C-positive block at the terminal region and C-positive interstitial dots on all autosomes in B. elongatum, and a little C-positive band at the terminal region of autosomes in B. gestroi. A C-positive band on one bivalent was DAPI negative/CMA3 positive in the three species. The CMA3-bright band, enriched in GC base pairs, was coincident with a NOR detected by FISH. The results obtained support the hypothesis that all species of Belostoma with multiple sex chromosome systems preserve NORs in autosomal bivalents. The karyotype analyses allow the cytogenetic characterization and identification of these species belonging to a difficult taxonomic group. Besides, the cytogenetic characterization will be useful in discussions about evolutionary trends of the genome organization and karyotype evolution in this genus.

  1. Karyotypic evolution of ribosomal sites in buffalo subspecies and their crossbreed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Marafiga Degrandi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Domestic buffaloes are divided into two group based on cytogenetic characteristics and habitats: the "river buffaloes" with 2n = 50 and the "swamp buffaloes", 2n = 48. Nevertheless, their hybrids are viable, fertile and identified by a 2n = 49. In order to have a better characterization of these different cytotypes of buffaloes, and considering that NOR-bearing chromosomes are involved in the rearrangements responsible for the karyotypic differences, we applied silver staining (Ag-NOR and performed fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH experiments using 18S rDNA as probe. Metaphases were obtained through blood lymphocyte culture of 21 individuals, including river, swamp and hybrid cytotypes. Ag-NOR staining revealed active NORs on six chromosome pairs (3p, 4p, 6, 21, 23, 24 in the river buffaloes, whereas the swamp buffaloes presented only five NOR-bearing pairs (4p, 6, 20, 22, 23. The F1 crossbreed had 11 chromosomes with active NORs, indicating expression of both parental chromosomes. FISH analysis confirmed the numerical divergence identified with Ag-NOR. This result is explained by the loss of the NOR located on chromosome 4p in the river buffalo, which is involved in the tandem fusion with chromosome 9 in this subspecies. A comparison with the ancestral cattle karyotype suggests that the NOR found on the 3p of the river buffalo may have originated from a duplication of ribosomal genes, resulting in the formation of new NOR sites in this subspecies.

  2. Using chromosomal data in the phylogenetic and molecular dating framework: karyotype evolution and diversification in Nierembergia (Solanaceae) influenced by historical changes in sea level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, M C; Moscone, E A; Cocucci, A A

    2016-05-01

    Karyotype data within a phylogenetic framework and molecular dating were used to examine chromosome evolution in Nierembergia and to infer how geological or climatic processes have influenced in the diversification of this solanaceous genus native to South America and Mexico. Despite the numerous studies comparing karyotype features across species, including the use of molecular phylogenies, to date relatively few studies have used formal comparative methods to elucidate chromosomal evolution, especially to reconstruct the whole ancestral karyotypes. Here, we mapped on the Nierembergia phylogeny one complete set of chromosomal data obtained by conventional staining, AgNOR-, C- and fluorescent chromosome banding, and fluorescent in situ hybridisation. In addition, we used a Bayesian molecular relaxed clock to estimate divergence times between species. Nierembergia showed two major divergent clades: a mountainous species group with symmetrical karyotypes, large chromosomes, only one nucleolar organising region (NOR) and without centromeric heterochromatin, and a lowland species group with asymmetrical karyotypes, small chromosomes, two chromosomes pairs with NORs and centromeric heterochromatin bands. Molecular dating on the DNA phylogeny revealed that both groups diverged during Late Miocene, when Atlantic marine ingressions, called the 'Paranense Sea', probably forced the ancestors of these species to find refuge in unflooded areas for about 2 Myr. This split agrees with an increased asymmetry and heterochromatin amount, and decrease in karyotype length and chromosome size. Thus, when the two Nierembergia ancestral lineages were isolated, major divergences occurred in chromosomal evolution, and then each lineage underwent speciation separately, with relatively minor changes in chromosomal characteristics. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. DOES THE PATTERN OF CLONAL EVOLUTION IN THE KARYOTYPE OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA AND MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES DEPEND ON THE TYPE OF THE PRIMARY CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, S; Spassov, B; Nikolova, V; Christov, I; Tzvetkov, N; Simeonova, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to define if the type of primary chromosomal aberrations (CA) of the karyotype of patients with Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) determines the way and the rate of karyotype development. Conventional cytogenetic analysis was carried out on 248 AML and 105 MDS patients at diagnosis. Clonal evolution (CE) was found in 40% (51 of 128) of AML patients and in 47.5% (19 of 40) of MDS patients having CA in their karyotype. The first pattern we established was for the most frequent CA which initiate CE in 28 patients with a complex karyotype. These CA were non-balansed rearrangements in the following regions: 5q, 7q, 11q, 3q, monosomy 5, monosomy 7. The second pattern of CE was regarding the most frequent aneuploidias (+8, +11, +21, -Y, and the third pattern concerned balanced CA. We found significant difference in the distribution of karyotypes in different stages of progression between the first and the other two groups (p 0.5).

  4. A RAD-tag genetic map for the platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) reveals mechanisms of karyotype evolution among teleost fish.

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    Amores, Angel; Catchen, Julian; Nanda, Indrajit; Warren, Wesley; Walter, Ron; Schartl, Manfred; Postlethwait, John H

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian genomes can vary substantially in haploid chromosome number even within a small taxon (e.g., 3-40 among deer alone); in contrast, teleost fish genomes are stable (24-25 in 58% of teleosts), but we do not yet understand the mechanisms that account for differences in karyotype stability. Among perciform teleosts, platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) and medaka (Oryzias latipes) both have 24 chromosome pairs, but threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and green pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) have just 21 pairs. To understand the evolution of teleost genomes, we made a platyfish meiotic map containing 16,114 mapped markers scored on 267 backcross fish. We tiled genomic contigs along the map to create chromosome-length genome assemblies. Genome-wide comparisons of conserved synteny showed that platyfish and medaka karyotypes remained remarkably similar with few interchromosomal translocations but with numerous intrachromosomal rearrangements (transpositions and inversions) since their lineages diverged ∼120 million years ago. Comparative genomics with platyfish shows how reduced chromosome numbers in stickleback and green pufferfish arose by fusion of pairs of ancestral chromosomes after their lineages diverged from platyfish ∼195 million years ago. Zebrafish and human genomes provide outgroups to root observed changes. These studies identify likely genome assembly errors, characterize chromosome fusion events, distinguish lineage-independent chromosome fusions, show that the teleost genome duplication does not appear to have accelerated the rate of translocations, and reveal the stability of syntenies and gene orders in teleost chromosomes over hundreds of millions of years. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  5. Telomere-Centromere-Driven Genomic Instability Contributes to Karyotype Evolution in a Mouse Model of Melanoma

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    Amanda Gonçalves dos Santos Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy and chromosomal instability (CIN are hallmarks of most solid tumors. These alterations may result from inaccurate chromosomal segregation during mitosis, which can occur through several mechanisms including defective telomere metabolism, centrosome amplification, dysfunctional centromeres, and/or defective spindle checkpoint control. In this work, we used an in vitro murine melanoma model that uses a cellular adhesion blockade as a transforming factor to characterize telomeric and centromeric alterations that accompany melanocyte transformation. To study the timing of the occurrence of telomere shortening in this transformation model, we analyzed the profile of telomere length by quantitative fluorescent in situ hybridization and found that telomere length significantly decreased as additional rounds of cell adhesion blockages were performed. Together with it, an increase in telomere-free ends and complex karyotypic aberrations were also found, which include Robertsonian fusions in 100% of metaphases of the metastatic melanoma cells. These findings are in agreement with the idea that telomere length abnormalities seem to be one of the earliest genetic alterations acquired in the multistep process of malignant transformation and that telomere abnormalities result in telomere aggregation, breakage-bridge-fusion cycles, and CIN. Another remarkable feature of this model is the abundance of centromeric instability manifested as centromere fragments and centromeric fusions. Taken together, our results illustrate for this melanoma model CIN with a structural signature of centromere breakage and telomeric loss.

  6. New insights into the karyotype evolution of the free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes, Turbellaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadesenets, Kira S; Schärer, Lukas; Rubtsov, Nikolay B

    2017-07-20

    The free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano is a model organism for evolutionary and developmental biology studies. Recently, an unusual karyotypic diversity was revealed in this species. Specifically, worms are either 'normal' 2n = 8, or they are aneuploid with one or two additional large chromosome(s) (i.e. 2n = 9 or 2n = 10, respectively). Aneuploid worms did not show visible behavioral or morphological abnormalities and were successful in reproduction. In this study, we generated microdissected DNA probes from chromosome 1 (further called MLI1), chromosome 2 (MLI2), and a pair of similar-sized smaller chromosomes (MLI3, MLI4). FISH using these probes revealed that MLI1 consists of contiguous regions homologous to MLI2-MLI4, suggesting that MLI1 arose due to the whole genome duplication and subsequent fusion of one full chromosome set into one large metacentric chromosome. Therefore, one presumably full haploid genome was packed into MLI1, leading to hidden tetraploidy in the M. lignano genome. The study of Macrostomum sp. 8 - a sibling species of M. lignano - revealed that it usually has one additional pair of large chromosomes (2n = 10) showing a high homology to MLI1, thus suggesting hidden hexaploidy in its genome. Possible evolutionary scenarios for the emergence of the M. lignano and Macrostomum sp. 8 genomes are discussed.

  7. Karyotype evolution of giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) revealed by cross-species chromosome painting with Chinese muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi) and human (Homo sapiens) paints.

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    Huang, L; Nesterenko, A; Nie, W; Wang, J; Su, W; Graphodatsky, A S; Yang, F

    2008-01-01

    Considering the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis, GCA, 2n = 30) as a primitive species, its comparative genomic data are critical for our understanding of the karyotype evolution of pecorans. Here, we have established genome-wide chromosomal homologies between giraffe, Chinese muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi, MRE, 2n = 46) and human (Homo sapiens, HSA, 2n = 46) with whole sets of chromosome-specific paints from Chinese muntjac and human, in addition to providing a high-resolution G-banding karyotype of giraffe. Chinese muntjac and human chromosome paints detected 32 and 45 autosomal homologs in the genome of giraffe, respectively. Our results suggest that it would require at least thirteen fissions, six fusions and three intrachromosomal rearrangements to 'transform' the 2n = 44 eutherian ancestral karyotype to the 2n = 58 pecoran ancestral karyotype. During giraffe evolution, some ancestral eutherian syntenies (i.e. association of HSA3/21, 4/8, 7/16, 14/15, 16/19 and two forms of 12/22) have been retained, while several derived syntenies (i.e. associations of human homologous segments 2/1, 2/9, 5/19, 4/12/22, 8/9, and 10/20) have been produced. The reduction of chromosome number in giraffe from the 2n = 58 pecoran ancestral karyotype could be primarily attributed to extensive Robertsonian translocations of ancestral chromosomal segments. More complex chromosomal rearrangements (including tandem fusion, centromere repositioning and pericentric inversion) have happened during the evolution of GCA2 and GCA8. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Evolutionary breakpoints in the gibbon suggest association between cytosine methylation and karyotype evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Lucia; Harris, R Alan; Vessere, Gery M; Mootnick, Alan R; Humphray, Sean; Rogers, Jane; Kim, Sung K; Wall, Jeffrey D; Martin, David; Jurka, Jerzy; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; de Jong, Pieter J

    2009-06-01

    Gibbon species have accumulated an unusually high number of chromosomal changes since diverging from the common hominoid ancestor 15-18 million years ago. The cause of this increased rate of chromosomal rearrangements is not known, nor is it known if genome architecture has a role. To address this question, we analyzed sequences spanning 57 breaks of synteny between northern white-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus l. leucogenys) and humans. We find that the breakpoint regions are enriched in segmental duplications and repeats, with Alu elements being the most abundant. Alus located near the gibbon breakpoints (other Alus. Bisulphite allelic sequencing reveals that these gibbon Alus have a lower average density of methylated cytosine that their human orthologues. The finding of higher CpG content and lower average CpG methylation suggests that the gibbon Alu elements are epigenetically distinct from their human orthologues. The association between undermethylation and chromosomal rearrangement in gibbons suggests a correlation between epigenetic state and structural genome variation in evolution.

  9. Evolutionary breakpoints in the gibbon suggest association between cytosine methylation and karyotype evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Carbone

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Gibbon species have accumulated an unusually high number of chromosomal changes since diverging from the common hominoid ancestor 15-18 million years ago. The cause of this increased rate of chromosomal rearrangements is not known, nor is it known if genome architecture has a role. To address this question, we analyzed sequences spanning 57 breaks of synteny between northern white-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus l. leucogenys and humans. We find that the breakpoint regions are enriched in segmental duplications and repeats, with Alu elements being the most abundant. Alus located near the gibbon breakpoints (<150 bp have a higher CpG content than other Alus. Bisulphite allelic sequencing reveals that these gibbon Alus have a lower average density of methylated cytosine that their human orthologues. The finding of higher CpG content and lower average CpG methylation suggests that the gibbon Alu elements are epigenetically distinct from their human orthologues. The association between undermethylation and chromosomal rearrangement in gibbons suggests a correlation between epigenetic state and structural genome variation in evolution.

  10. Identification of the linkage group of the Z sex chromosomes of the sand lizard (Lacerta agilis, Lacertidae) and elucidation of karyotype evolution in lacertid lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Matsubara, Kazumi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nishida, Chizuko; Olsson, Mats; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2014-12-01

    The sand lizard (Lacerta agilis, Lacertidae) has a chromosome number of 2n = 38, with 17 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes, one pair of microchromosomes, a large acrocentric Z chromosome, and a micro-W chromosome. To investigate the process of karyotype evolution in L. agilis, we performed chromosome banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization for gene mapping and constructed a cytogenetic map with 86 functional genes. Chromosome banding revealed that the Z chromosome is the fifth largest chromosome. The cytogenetic map revealed homology of the L. agilis Z chromosome with chicken chromosomes 6 and 9. Comparison of the L. agilis cytogenetic map with those of four Toxicofera species with many microchromosomes (Elaphe quadrivirgata, Varanus salvator macromaculatus, Leiolepis reevesii rubritaeniata, and Anolis carolinensis) showed highly conserved linkage homology of L. agilis chromosomes (LAG) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5(Z), 7, 8, 9, and 10 with macrochromosomes and/or macrochromosome segments of the four Toxicofera species. Most of the genes located on the microchromosomes of Toxicofera were localized to LAG6, small acrocentric chromosomes (LAG11-18), and a microchromosome (LAG19) in L. agilis. These results suggest that the L. agilis karyotype resulted from frequent fusions of microchromosomes, which occurred in the ancestral karyotype of Toxicofera and led to the disappearance of microchromosomes and the appearance of many small macrochromosomes.

  11. Karyotypic Evolution and Chromosomal Organization of Repetitive DNA Sequences in Species of Panaque, Panaqolus, and Scobinancistrus (Siluriformes and Loricariidae) from the Amazon Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres-Alves, Thayana; Cardoso, Adauto Lima; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Sousa, Leandro Melo de; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Noronha, Renata Coelho Rodrigues

    2017-06-01

    Loricariidae family comprises the greatest variability of Neotropical catfish species, with more than 800 valid species. This family shows significant chromosomal diversity. Mapping of repetitive DNA sequences can be very useful in exploring such diversity, especially among groups that appear to share a preserved karyotypic macrostructure. We describe the karyotypes of Panaque armbrusteri and Panaqolus sp., as assessed using classical cytogenetic methods. Moreover, we offer a map of their repetitive sequences, including 18S and 5S ribosomal DNAs, the Rex1 and Rex3 retrotransposons, and the Tc1-mariner transposon in P. armbrusteri, Panaqolus sp., Scobinancistrus aureatus, and Scobinancistrus pariolispos. Those species share chromosome numbers of 2n = 52, but are divergent in their chromosome structures and the distributions of their repetitive DNA sequences. In situ hybridization with 18S and 5S rDNA probes confirms chromosome location in different pairs; in Panaqolus sp. these sites are in synteny. This multigene family organization can be explained by the occurrence of chromosome rearrangements, and possible events, such as transposition and unequal crossing-over. Rex1 and Rex3 retrotransposons and the Tc1-mariner transposon appeared predominantly dispersed and in small clusters in some chromosome regions. These data emphasize the importance of repetitive sequences in promoting the karyotypic evolution of these species.

  12. Asexual Reproduction Does Not Apparently Increase the Rate of Chromosomal Evolution: Karyotype Stability in Diploid and Triploid Clonal Hybrid Fish (Cobitis, Cypriniformes, Teleostei.

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    Zuzana Majtánová

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybridization, polyploidization and transitions from sexuality to asexuality considerably affect organismal genomes. Especially the last mentioned process has been assumed to play a significant role in the initiation of chromosomal rearrangements, causing increased rates of karyotype evolution. We used cytogenetic analysis and molecular dating of cladogenetic events to compare the rate of changes of chromosome morphology and karyotype in asexually and sexually reproducing counterparts in European spined loach fish (Cobitis. We studied metaphases of three sexually reproducing species and their diploid and polyploid hybrid clones of different age of origin. The material includes artificial F1 hybrid strains, representatives of lineage originated in Holocene epoch, and also individuals of an oldest known age to date (roughly 0.37 MYA. Thereafter we applied GISH technique as a marker to differentiate parental chromosomal sets in hybrids. Although the sexual species accumulated remarkable chromosomal rearrangements after their speciation, we observed no differences in chromosome numbers and/or morphology among karyotypes of asexual hybrids. These hybrids possess chromosome sets originating from respective parental species with no cytogenetically detectable recombinations, suggesting their integrity even in a long term. The switch to asexual reproduction thus did not provoke any significant acceleration of the rate of chromosomal evolution in Cobitis. Asexual animals described in other case studies reproduce ameiotically, while Cobitis hybrids described here produce eggs likely through modified meiosis. Therefore, our findings indicate that the effect of asexuality on the rate of chromosomal change may be context-dependent rather than universal and related to particular type of asexual reproduction.

  13. Asexual Reproduction Does Not Apparently Increase the Rate of Chromosomal Evolution: Karyotype Stability in Diploid and Triploid Clonal Hybrid Fish (Cobitis, Cypriniformes, Teleostei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majtánová, Zuzana; Choleva, Lukáš; Symonová, Radka; Ráb, Petr; Kotusz, Jan; Pekárik, Ladislav; Janko, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization, polyploidization and transitions from sexuality to asexuality considerably affect organismal genomes. Especially the last mentioned process has been assumed to play a significant role in the initiation of chromosomal rearrangements, causing increased rates of karyotype evolution. We used cytogenetic analysis and molecular dating of cladogenetic events to compare the rate of changes of chromosome morphology and karyotype in asexually and sexually reproducing counterparts in European spined loach fish (Cobitis). We studied metaphases of three sexually reproducing species and their diploid and polyploid hybrid clones of different age of origin. The material includes artificial F1 hybrid strains, representatives of lineage originated in Holocene epoch, and also individuals of an oldest known age to date (roughly 0.37 MYA). Thereafter we applied GISH technique as a marker to differentiate parental chromosomal sets in hybrids. Although the sexual species accumulated remarkable chromosomal rearrangements after their speciation, we observed no differences in chromosome numbers and/or morphology among karyotypes of asexual hybrids. These hybrids possess chromosome sets originating from respective parental species with no cytogenetically detectable recombinations, suggesting their integrity even in a long term. The switch to asexual reproduction thus did not provoke any significant acceleration of the rate of chromosomal evolution in Cobitis. Asexual animals described in other case studies reproduce ameiotically, while Cobitis hybrids described here produce eggs likely through modified meiosis. Therefore, our findings indicate that the effect of asexuality on the rate of chromosomal change may be context-dependent rather than universal and related to particular type of asexual reproduction.

  14. Association of the type of 5q loss with complex karyotype, clonal evolution, TP53 mutation status, and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkert, Sarah; Kohlmann, Alexander; Schnittger, Susanne; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    We analyzed 1,200 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) harboring a 5q deletion in order to clarify whether the type of 5q loss is associated with other biological markers and prognosis. We investigated all patients by chromosome banding analysis, FISH with a probe for EGR1 (5q31) and, if necessary, to resolve complex karyotypes with 24-color-FISH. Moreover, 420 patients were analyzed for mutations in the TP53 gene. The patient cohort was subdivided based on type of 5q loss: Patients with interstitial deletions and patients with 5q loss due to unbalanced rearrangements or monosomy 5. Loss of the long arm of chromosome 5 due to an unbalanced rearrangement occurred more often in AML (286/627; 45.6%) than MDS (188/573; 32.8%; P evolution (109/188; 58.0% vs. 124/385; 32.2%; P HR = 5.34; P = 0.032), whereas in AML presence of TP53 mutations was the strongest adverse prognostic factor (HR = 2.21; P = 0.026). In conclusion, in AML and MDS, loss of the long arm of chromosome 5 due to unbalanced translocations is associated with complex karyotype and in MDS, moreover, with clonal evolution, mutations in the TP53 gene and adverse prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Comparative Genomic In Situ Hybridization and the Possible Role of Retroelements in the Karyotypic Evolution of Three Akodontini Species

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    Naiara Pereira Araújo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available South American Akodontini rodents are characterized by a large number of chromosome rearrangements. Among them, the genus Akodon has been extensively analyzed with classical and molecular cytogenetics, which allowed the identification of a large number of intra- and interspecific chromosomal variation due to Robertsonian rearrangements, pericentric inversions, and heterochromatin additions/deletions. In order to shed some light on the cause of these rearrangements, we comparatively analyzed the karyotypes of three Akodontini species, Akodon cursor (2n = 14, FN = 19, A. montensis (2n = 24, FN = 42, and Necromys lasiurus (2n = 34, FN = 34, after GTG- and CBG-banding. The karyotypes differed by Robertsonian rearrangements, pericentric inversions, centromere repositioning, and heterochromatin variation. Genome comparisons were performed through interspecific fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with total genomic DNAs of each species as probes (GISH. Our results revealed considerable conservation of the euchromatic portions among the three karyotypes suggesting that they mostly differ in their heterochromatic regions. FISH was also performed to assess the distribution of telomeric sequences, long and short interspersed repetitive elements (LINE-1 and B1 SINE and of the endogenous retrovirus mysTR in the genomes of the three species. The results led us to infer that transposable elements have played an important role in the enormous chromosome variation found in Akodontini.

  16. Karyotype and Gene Order Evolution from Reconstructed Extinct Ancestors Highlight Contrasts in Genome Plasticity of Modern Rosid Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murat, Florent; Zhang, Rongzhi; Guizard, Sébastien; Gavranović, Haris; Flores, Raphael; Steinbach, Delphine; Quesneville, Hadi; Tannier, Eric; Salse, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    We used nine complete genome sequences, from grape, poplar, Arabidopsis, soybean, lotus, apple, strawberry, cacao, and papaya, to investigate the paleohistory of rosid crops. We characterized an ancestral rosid karyotype, structured into 7/21 protochomosomes, with a minimal set of 6,250 ordered protogenes and a minimum physical coding gene space of 50 megabases. We also proposed ancestral karyotypes for the Caricaceae, Brassicaceae, Malvaceae, Fabaceae, Rosaceae, Salicaceae, and Vitaceae families with 9, 8, 10, 6, 12, 9, 12, and 19 protochromosomes, respectively. On the basis of these ancestral karyotypes and present-day species comparisons, we proposed a two-step evolutionary scenario based on allohexaploidization involving the newly characterized A, B, and C diploid progenitors leading to dominant (stable) and sensitive (plastic) genomic compartments in any modern rosid crops. Finally, a new user-friendly online tool, “DicotSyntenyViewer” (available from http://urgi.versailles.inra.fr/synteny-dicot), has been made available for accurate translational genomics in rosids. PMID:25637221

  17. Species-specific shifts in centromere sequence composition are coincident with breakpoint reuse in karyotypically divergent lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulazel, Kira V; Ferreri, Gianni C; Eldridge, Mark DB; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that rapid divergence in centromere sequences accompanies rapid karyotypic change during speciation. However, the reuse of breakpoints coincident with centromeres in the evolution of divergent karyotypes poses a potential paradox. In distantly related species where the same centromere breakpoints are used in the independent derivation of karyotypes, centromere-specific sequences may undergo convergent evolution rather than rapid sequence divergence. To determine whether centromere sequence composition follows the phylogenetic history of species evolution or patterns of convergent breakpoint reuse through chromosome evolution, we examined the phylogenetic trajectory of centromere sequences within a group of karyotypically diverse mammals, macropodine marsupials (wallabies, wallaroos and kangaroos). Results The evolution of three classes of centromere sequences across nine species within the genus Macropus (including Wallabia) were compared with the phylogenetic history of a mitochondrial gene, Cytochrome b (Cyt b), a nuclear gene, selenocysteine tRNA (TRSP), and the chromosomal histories of the syntenic blocks that define the different karyotype arrangements. Convergent contraction or expansion of predominant satellites is found to accompany specific karyotype rearrangements. The phylogenetic history of these centromere sequences includes the convergence of centromere composition in divergent species through convergent breakpoint reuse between syntenic blocks. Conclusion These data support the 'library hypothesis' of centromere evolution within this genus as each species possesses all three satellites yet each species has experienced differential expansion and contraction of individual classes. Thus, we have identified a correlation between the evolution of centromere satellite sequences, the reuse of syntenic breakpoints, and karyotype convergence in the context of a gene-based phylogeny. PMID:17708770

  18. IS THE AMPLIFICATION OF c-MYC, MLL AND RUNX1 GENES IN AML AND MDS PATIENTS WITH TRISOMY 8, 11 AND 21 A FACTOR FOR A CLONAL EVOLUTION IN THEIR KARYOTYPE?

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    Angelova, S; Spassov, B; Nikolova, V; Christov, I; Tzvetkov, N; Simeonova, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was 1) to define if the amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes is related to the progressive changes of the karyotype in patients with AML and MDS with trisomy 8, 11 and 21 (+8, +11 and +21) in bone marrow and 2) can that amplification be accepted as part of the clonal evolution (CE). Karyotype analysis was performed in 179 patients with AML or MDS with the different chromosomal aberrations (CA) aged 16-81. The findings were distributed as follow: initiating balanced CA (n = 60), aneuploidia (n = 55), unbalanced CA (n = 64). Amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was found in 35% (7 out of 20) of AML and MDS patients with +8, +11 u +21 as single CA in their karyotype; in 63.6% of pts (7 out of 11)--with additional numerical or structural CA and in 75% (9 out of 12)--with complex karyotype. We assume that the amplification of the respective chromosomal regions in patients with +8, +11 and +21 is related to CE. Considering the amplification as a factor of CE, we established 3 patterns of karyotype development depending on the type of the initiating CA in it. Significant statistical differences were found between the three patterns regarding the karyotype distribution in the different stages of progression (p < 0.001).

  19. HEK293 in cell biology and cancer research: phenotype, karyotype, tumorigenicity, and stress-induced genome-phenotype evolution.

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    Stepanenko, A A; Dmitrenko, V V

    2015-09-15

    293 cell line (widely known as the Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells) and its derivatives were the most used cells after HeLa in cell biology studies and after CHO in biotechnology as a vehicle for the production of adenoviral vaccines and recombinant proteins, for analysis of the neuronal synapse formation, in electrophysiology and neuropharmacology. Despite the historically long-term productive exploitation, the origin, phenotype, karyotype, and tumorigenicity of 293 cells are still debated. 293 cells were considered the kidney epithelial cells or even fibroblasts. However, 293 cells demonstrate no evident tissue-specific gene expression signature and express the markers of renal progenitor cells, neuronal cells and adrenal gland. This complicates efforts to reveal the authentic cell type/tissue of origin. On the other hand, the potential to propagate the highly neurotropic viruses, inducible synaptogenesis, functionality of the endogenous neuron-specific voltage-gated channels, and response to the diverse agonists implicated in neuronal signaling give credibility to consider 293 cells of neuronal lineage phenotype. The compound phenotype of 293 cells can be due to heterogeneous, unstable karyotype. The mean chromosome number and chromosome aberrations differ between 293 cells and derivatives as well as between 293 cells from the different cell banks/labs. 293 cells are tumorigenic, whereas acute changes of expression of the cancer-associated genes aggravate tumorigenicity by promoting chromosome instability. Importantly, the procedure of a stable empty vector transfection can also impact karyotype and phenotype. The discussed issues caution against misinterpretations and pitfalls during the different experimental manipulations with 293 cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chromosome Painting in Callicebus nigrifrons Provides Insights into the Genome Evolution of Titi Monkeys and the Ancestral Callicebinae Karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Araújo, Naiara; Alves do Espírito Santo, Alice; do Socorro Pereira, Valéria; Stanyon, Roscoe; Svartman, Marta

    2017-01-01

    We studied the chromosomes of Callicebus nigrifrons with conventional and molecular cytogenetic methods. Our chromosome painting analysis in C. nigrifrons together with previous reports allowed us to hypothesize an ancestral Callicebinae karyotype with 2n = 48. The associations of human chromosomes (HSA) 2/22, 7/15, 10/11, and the inverted HSA2/16 would link Callicebus, Cheracebus, and Plecturocebus and would thus be present in the ancestral Callicebinae karyotype. Four fusions (HSA1b/1c, 3c/8b, 13/20, and 14/15/3/21) and 1 fission (HSA2/22) are synapomorphies of Callicebus. The associations HSA3/15 and HSA3/9 are chromosome features linking Callicebus and Cheracebus, whereas the association HSA13/17 would represent a link between Callicebus and the moloch group (Plecturocebus). Only 6 of the 33 recognized titi monkey species have now been painted with human chromosome-specific probes. Further analyses are needed to clarify the phylogenomic relationships in this species-rich group. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Chromosome Evolution in the Free-Living Flatworms : First Evidence of Intrachromosomal Rearrangements in Karyotype Evolution of Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes, Macrostomida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadesenets, Kira S.; Ershov, Nikita I.; Berezikov, Eugene; Rubtsov, Nikolay B.

    2017-01-01

    The free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano is a hidden tetraploid. Its genome was formed by a recent whole genome duplication followed by chromosome fusions. Its karyotype (2n = 8) consists of a pair of large chromosomes (MLI1), which contain regions of all other chromosomes, and three pairs of

  2. Evosystem Services: Rapid Evolution and the Provision of Ecosystem Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudman, Seth M; Kreitzman, Maayan; Chan, Kai M A; Schluter, Dolph

    2017-06-01

    Evolution is recognized as the source of all organisms, and hence many ecosystem services. However, the role that contemporary evolution might play in maintaining and enhancing specific ecosystem services has largely been overlooked. Recent advances at the interface of ecology and evolution have demonstrated how contemporary evolution can shape ecological communities and ecosystem functions. We propose a definition and quantitative criteria to study how rapid evolution affects ecosystem services (here termed contemporary evosystem services) and present plausible scenarios where such services might exist. We advocate for the direct measurement of contemporary evosystem services to improve understanding of how changing environments will alter resource availability and human well-being, and highlight the potential utility of managing rapid evolution for future ecosystem services. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The karyotypes of the thorny catfishes Wertheimeria maculata Steindachner, 1877 and Hassar wilderi Kindle, 1895 (Siluriformes: Doradidae) and their relevance in doradids chromosomal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eler, Eduardo S; Dergam, Jorge A; Vênere, Paulo C; Paiva, Lílian C; Miranda, Gabriela A; Oliveira, Alessandro A

    2007-05-01

    We studied the karyotypes of two doradids, the rare and endangered Wertheimeria maculata and a derived Amazonian species, Hassar wilderi. Cytogenetic characterization was assessed using conventional staining (Giemsa), C-banding, and NOR banding. Both species had 2n = 58 chromosomes but differed in their chromosome formulae, 24 m + 14sm + 8st + 12a for W. maculata and 32 m + 16sm + 10st for H. wilderi. In W. maculata heterochromatin was mainly telomeric, and three chromosomes had a fully heterochromatic arm; in H. wilderi heterochromatin was also predominantly telomeric and evident in many more chromosomes. Hassar wilderi also presented one pair of homologues with a fully heterochromatic arm. In both species, nucleolar organizer regions were restricted to one pair of subtelocentric chromosomes. Assuming a basal position for W. maculata, we hypothesized that underlying conserved diploid and NOR-bearing chromosome numbers, chromosomal evolution in doradids has involved pericentric inversions and an increase of heterochromatic blocks.

  4. Evidence of genetic differentiation and karyotype evolution of the sedges Cyperus ligularis L. and C. odoratus L. (Cyperaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geyner Alves dos Santos Cruz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The taxonomy of Cyperaceae is complex, with genera like Cyperus harboring species complexes. We analyzed the genetic similarity between Cyperus ligularis L. and C. odoratus L. based on DNA fingerprinting and cytogenetics. Significative genetic differentiation (G ST = 0.363 and low gene flow (N m = 0.877 indicated a clear genetic distinction between the two species. Moreover, the clustering analysis showed two distinct genetic groups, suggesting a lack of evidence for hybridization. The phenogram revealed two different lineages, and although all individuals of C. odoratus were collected from plots close to each other, they possessed greater genetic diversity than that observed among individuals of C. ligularis, which were sampled over a wider geographic range. Variation in chromosome number within the two species exhibited the opposite pattern, indicating greater karyotype stability in C. odoratus with 2n = 72 and 2n = 76, while the diploid number for C. ligularis varied from 2n = 66 to 88. The lower genetic variation in C. ligularis may be a result of the founder effect associated with seed dispersion and clonal reproduction. Field observations and analysis of reproductive biology should enrich the understanding of the genetic structure of the investigated populations and their role in successional processes.

  5. Karyotype characterization and evolution in South American species of Lathyrus (Notolathyrus, Leguminosae) evidenced by heterochromatin and rDNA mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalup, Laura; Samoluk, Sergio Sebastián; Neffa, Viviana Solís; Seijo, Guillermo

    2015-11-01

    Notolathyrus is a section of South American endemic species of the genus Lathyrus. The origin, phylogenetic relationship and delimitation of some species are still controversial. The present study provides an exhaustive analysis of the karyotypes of approximately half (10) of the species recognized for section Notolathyrus and four outgroups (sections Lathyrus and Orobus) by cytogenetic mapping of heterochromatic bands and 45S and 5S rDNA loci. The bulk of the parameters analyzed here generated markers to identify most of the chromosomes in the complements of the analyzed species. Chromosome banding showed interspecific variation in the amount and distribution of heterochromatin, and together with the distribution of rDNA loci, allowed the characterization of all the species studied here. Additionally, some of the chromosome parameters described (st chromosomes and the 45S rDNA loci) constitute the first diagnostic characters for the Notolathyrus section. Evolutionary, chromosome data revealed that the South American species are a homogeneous group supporting the monophyly of the section. Variation in the amount of heterochromatin was not directly related to the variation in DNA content of the Notolathyrus species. However, the correlation observed between the amount of heterochromatin and some geographical and bioclimatic variables suggest that the variation in the heterochromatic fraction should have an adaptive value.

  6. Repetitive DNAs highlight the role of chromosomal fusions in the karyotype evolution of Dascyllus species (Pomacentridae, Perciformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getlekha, Nuntaporn; Molina, Wagner Franco; de Bello Cioffi, Marcelo; Yano, Cassia Fernanda; Maneechot, Nuntiya; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Supiwong, Weerayuth; Tanomtong, Alongklod

    2016-04-01

    The Dascyllus genus consists of 11 species spread over vast regions of the Indo-Pacific, showing remarkable reductions in the diploid chromosome numbers (2n). The present study analyzed the karyotypes and other chromosomal characteristics of D. trimaculatus (2n = 48; 2st + 46a; NF = 50), D. carneus (2n = 48; 2st + 46a; NF = 50) and D. aruanus (2n = 30; 18m + 2st + 10a; NF = 50) from the Thailand Gulf (Pacific Ocean) and D. melanurus (2n = 48; 2st + 46a; NF = 50) from the Andaman Sea (Indian Ocean), employing conventional cytogenetic analyses and the chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNAs, using 18S and 5S rDNA, telomeric sequences and (CA)15, (GA)15, and (CAA)10 microsatellites as probes. The C-positive heterochromatin was found in the centromeric regions of most chromosomal pairs and 18S rDNA phenotypes were single in all species. However, in D. aruanus (2n = 30), which harbors nine metacentric pairs; the 5S rDNA sites were located in the centromeric region of the shortest one. The mapping of the telomeric sequences in D. aruanus revealed the presence of interstitial telomeric sites (ITS) in the centromeric region of four metacentric pairs, with one of these pairs also displaying an additional ITS in the long arms. Distinct chromosomal markers confirmed the reduction of the 2n by chromosomal fusions, highlighting the precise characterization of these rearrangements by the cytogenetic mapping of the repetitive DNAs.

  7. Inhibition of nitrification and carbon dioxide evolution as rapid tools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of nitrite formation and CO2 evolution displayed similar levels of sensitivities at 95% confidence levels. These results indicate that monitoring inhibition of metabolic processes rather than mortality was a more rapid and sensitive tool for ecotoxicological evaluation of chemicals employed in the petroleum industry in ...

  8. Cryptic population dynamics: rapid evolution masks trophic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takehito; Ellner, Stephen P; Jones, Laura E; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Lenski, Richard E; Hairston, Nelson G

    2007-09-01

    Trophic relationships, such as those between predator and prey or between pathogen and host, are key interactions linking species in ecological food webs. The structure of these links and their strengths have major consequences for the dynamics and stability of food webs. The existence and strength of particular trophic links has often been assessed using observational data on changes in species abundance through time. Here we show that very strong links can be completely missed by these kinds of analyses when changes in population abundance are accompanied by contemporaneous rapid evolution in the prey or host species. Experimental observations, in rotifer-alga and phage-bacteria chemostats, show that the predator or pathogen can exhibit large-amplitude cycles while the abundance of the prey or host remains essentially constant. We know that the species are tightly linked in these experimental microcosms, but without this knowledge, we would infer from observed patterns in abundance that the species are weakly or not at all linked. Mathematical modeling shows that this kind of cryptic dynamics occurs when there is rapid prey or host evolution for traits conferring defense against attack, and the cost of defense (in terms of tradeoffs with other fitness components) is low. Several predictions of the theory that we developed to explain the rotifer-alga experiments are confirmed in the phage-bacteria experiments, where bacterial evolution could be tracked. Modeling suggests that rapid evolution may also confound experimental approaches to measuring interaction strength, but it identifies certain experimental designs as being more robust against potential confounding by rapid evolution.

  9. Cryptic population dynamics: rapid evolution masks trophic interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehito Yoshida

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Trophic relationships, such as those between predator and prey or between pathogen and host, are key interactions linking species in ecological food webs. The structure of these links and their strengths have major consequences for the dynamics and stability of food webs. The existence and strength of particular trophic links has often been assessed using observational data on changes in species abundance through time. Here we show that very strong links can be completely missed by these kinds of analyses when changes in population abundance are accompanied by contemporaneous rapid evolution in the prey or host species. Experimental observations, in rotifer-alga and phage-bacteria chemostats, show that the predator or pathogen can exhibit large-amplitude cycles while the abundance of the prey or host remains essentially constant. We know that the species are tightly linked in these experimental microcosms, but without this knowledge, we would infer from observed patterns in abundance that the species are weakly or not at all linked. Mathematical modeling shows that this kind of cryptic dynamics occurs when there is rapid prey or host evolution for traits conferring defense against attack, and the cost of defense (in terms of tradeoffs with other fitness components is low. Several predictions of the theory that we developed to explain the rotifer-alga experiments are confirmed in the phage-bacteria experiments, where bacterial evolution could be tracked. Modeling suggests that rapid evolution may also confound experimental approaches to measuring interaction strength, but it identifies certain experimental designs as being more robust against potential confounding by rapid evolution.

  10. Repetitive sequence analysis and karyotyping reveal different genome evolution and speciation of diploid and tetraploid Tripsacum dactyloides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilin Zhu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the subtribe Maydeae, Tripsacum and Zea are closely related genera. Tripsacum is a horticultural crop widely used as pasture forage. Previous studies suggested that Tripsacum might play an important role in maize origin and evolution. However, our understanding of the genomics and the evolution of Tripsacum remains limited. In this study, two diploids, T. dactyloides var. meridionale (2n = 36, MR and T. dactyloides (2n = 36, DD, and one tetraploid, T. dactyloides (2n = 72, DL were sequenced by low-coverage genome sequencing followed by graph-based cluster analysis. The results showed that 63.23%, 59.20%, and 61.57% of the respective genome of MR, DD, and DL were repetitive DNA sequence. The proportions of different repetitive sequences varied greatly among the three species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis of mitotic metaphase chromosomes with satellite repeats as the probes showed that the FISH signal patterns of DL were more similar to that of DD than to that of MR. Comparative analysis of the repeats also showed that DL shared more common repeat families with DD than with MR. Phylogenetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer region sequences further supported the evolutionary relationship among the three species. Repetitive sequences comparison showed that Tripsacum shared more repeat families with Zea than with Coix and Sorghum. Our study sheds new light on the genomics of Tripsacum and differential speciation in the Poaceae family.

  11. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses of cryptic species within the Synbranchus marmoratus Bloch, 1795 (Synbranchiformes: Synbranchidae grouping: species delimitations, karyotypic evolution and intraspecific diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Utsunomia

    Full Text Available The fish species Synbranchus marmoratushas been reported to exist as a species complex due to high intraspecific karyotypic variability in spite of the difficulty or impossibility to distinguish them using morphological traits alone. The goal of this work was to use cytogenetic and molecular methods to determine the species delimitations and understand the karyoevolution ofS. marmoratususing samples collected from distinct Brazilian localities. Among the analyzed specimens, a large degree of cytogenetic variation related to diploid numbers and karyotype structure was observed, with karyotypes showing 2n=42, 44 and 46 chromosomes. In addition, using sequences of three mitochondrial genes, the phylogenetic relationships between every sample with a known karyotype were determined, which revealed significant nucleotide divergence among the karyomorphs. Also, the analyses indicate that chromosomal rearrangements occurred independently within the distinct lineages of S. marmoratuscomplex, which resulted in the appearance of distinct karyotypic variants in a non-linear fashion related to diploid numbers and in the appearance of similar non-homologous chromosomes. Finally, the integration of both molecular cytogenetic and phylogenetic approaches allowed the determination of specific chromosomes possibly involved in rearrangements and a better understanding about the evolutionary processes involved in the differentiation ofSynbranchusgenus.

  12. Differential genome evolution and speciation of Coix lacryma-jobi L. and Coix aquatica Roxb. hybrid guangxi revealed by repetitive sequence analysis and fine karyotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zexi; Liu, Huijun; He, Qunyan; Pu, Mingwei; Chen, Jian; Lai, Jinsheng; Li, Xuexian; Jin, Weiwei

    2014-11-25

    Coix, Sorghum and Zea are closely related plant genera in the subtribe Maydeae. Coix comprises 9-11 species with different ploidy levels (2n = 10, 20, 30, and 40). The exclusively cultivated C. lacryma-jobi L. (2n = 20) is widely used in East and Southeast Asia for food and medicinal applications. Three fertile cytotypes (2n = 10, 20, and 40) have been reported for C. aquatica Roxb. One sterile cytotype (2n = 30) closely related to C. aquatica has been recently found in Guangxi of China. This putative hybrid has been named C. aquatica HG (Hybrid Guangxi). The genome composition and the evolutionary history of C. lacryma-jobi and C. aquatica HG are largely unclear. About 76% of the genome of C. lacryma-jobi and 73% of the genome of C. aquatica HG are repetitive DNA sequences as shown by low coverage genome sequencing followed by similarity-based cluster analysis. In addition, long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposable elements are dominant repetitive sequences in these two genomes, and the proportions of many repetitive sequences in whole genome varied greatly between the two species, indicating evolutionary divergence of them. We also found that a novel 102 bp variant of centromeric satellite repeat CentX and two other satellites only appeared in C. aquatica HG. The results from FISH analysis with repeat probe cocktails and the data from chromosomes pairing in meiosis metaphase showed that C. lacryma-jobi is likely a diploidized paleotetraploid species and C. aquatica HG is possibly a recently formed hybrid. Furthermore, C. lacryma-jobi and C. aquatica HG shared more co-existing repeat families and higher sequence similarity with Sorghum than with Zea. The composition and abundance of repetitive sequences are divergent between the genomes of C. lacryma-jobi and C. aquatica HG. The results from fine karyotyping analysis and chromosome pairing suggested diploidization of C. lacryma-jobi during evolution and C. aquatica HG is a recently formed hybrid. The genome

  13. NanoKaryotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota

    Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and are also associated with heametological malignancies. Translocation is a rearrangement between two chromosome arms that results in two derivative chromosomes. The current detection methods such as karyotyping...

  14. Rapid evolution of a few members of nasuta-albomicans complex of Drosophila: study on two candidate genes, Sod1 and Rpd3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjini, Mysore S; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2013-05-01

    Drosophila nasuta nasuta (2n = 8) and D. n. albomicans (2n = 6) are morphologically identical, cross fertile and karyotypically dissimilar pair of chromosomal races belonging to nasuta subgroup of immigrans group of Drosophila. Interracial hybridization between these two races yielded karyotypically stabilized newly evolved Cytoraces with new combinations of chromosomes and DNA content, and are called nasuta-albomicans complex of Drosophila. Along with many other features, striking plasticity in the lifespan has been observed in the karyotypically stabilized members of nasuta-albomicans complex of Drosophila. These findings provide a strong background to understand any changes at the molecular levels. In view of this, we cloned and characterized Sod1 and Rpd3 in the members of nasuta-albomicans complex of Drosophila. The evolution of Sod1 and Rpd3 in D. n. nasuta and D. n. albomicans is contrasting with the other species of Drosophila, at the level of synonymous mutations, intron variation, InDels and secondary structure changes in protein. In the members of NAC of Drosophila there were synonymous changes, variations in intron sequences of Sod1, whereas, in Rpd3, synonymous, nonsynonymous, intron variation, and secondary structure changes in protein were observed. The contrasting differences in the levels of Rpd3 (and Sir2) proteins were also noticed among short-lived and long-lived Cytoraces. The Cytoraces have exhibited not only specific changes in Sod1 and Rpd3, but also show pronounced changes in the levels of synthesis of these proteins, which indicates rapid evolution of these Cytoraces in laboratory. Further these Cytoraces have become a model system to understand the process of anagenesis.

  15. Escape from bacterial iron piracy through rapid evolution of transferrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Matthew F.; Elde, Nels C.

    2015-01-01

    Iron sequestration provides an innate defense termed nutritional immunity, leading pathogens to scavenge iron from hosts. Although the molecular basis of this battle for iron is established, its potential as a force for evolution at host-pathogen interfaces is unknown. We show that the iron transport protein transferrin is engaged in ancient and ongoing evolutionary conflicts with TbpA, a transferrin surface receptor from bacteria. Single substitutions in transferrin at rapidly evolving sites reverse TbpA binding, providing a mechanism to counteract bacterial iron piracy among great apes. Furthermore, the C2 transferrin polymorphism in humans evades TbpA variants from Haemophilus influenzae, revealing a functional basis for standing genetic variation. These findings identify a central role for nutritional immunity in the persistent evolutionary conflicts between primates and bacterial pathogens. PMID:25504720

  16. Rapid evolution of manifold CRISPR systems for plant genome editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping Qi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Advanced CRISPR-Cas9 based technologies first validated in mammalian cell systems are quickly being adapted for use in plants. These new technologies increase CRISPR-Cas9’s utility and effectiveness by diversifying cellular capabilities through expression construct system evolution and enzyme orthogonality, as well as enhanced efficiency through delivery and expression mechanisms. Here, we review the current state of advanced CRISPR-Cas9 and Cpf1 capabilities in plants and cover the rapid evolution of these tools from first generation inducers of double strand breaks for basic genetic manipulations to second and third generation multiplexed systems with myriad functionalities, capabilities and specialized applications. We offer perspective on how to utilize these tools for currently untested research endeavors and analyze strengths and weaknesses of novel CRISPR systems in plants. Advanced CRISPR functionalities and delivery options demonstrated in plants are primarily reviewed but new technologies just coming to the forefront of CRISPR development, or those on the horizon, are briefly discussed. Topics covered are focused on the expansion of expression and delivery capabilities for CRISPR-Cas9 components and broadening targeting range through orthogonal Cas9 and Cpf1 proteins.

  17. Biomechanical consequences of rapid evolution in the polar bear lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J Slater

    Full Text Available The polar bear is the only living ursid with a fully carnivorous diet. Despite a number of well-documented craniodental adaptations for a diet of seal flesh and blubber, molecular and paleontological data indicate that this morphologically distinct species evolved less than a million years ago from the omnivorous brown bear. To better understand the evolution of this dietary specialization, we used phylogenetic tests to estimate the rate of morphological specialization in polar bears. We then used finite element analysis (FEA to compare the limits of feeding performance in the polar bear skull to that of the phylogenetically and geographically close brown bear. Results indicate that extremely rapid evolution of semi-aquatic adaptations and dietary specialization in the polar bear lineage produced a cranial morphology that is weaker than that of brown bears and less suited to processing tough omnivorous or herbivorous diets. Our results suggest that continuation of current climate trends could affect polar bears by not only eliminating their primary food source, but also through competition with northward advancing, generalized brown populations for resources that they are ill-equipped to utilize.

  18. Biomechanical consequences of rapid evolution in the polar bear lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Graham J; Figueirido, Borja; Louis, Leeann; Yang, Paul; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2010-11-05

    The polar bear is the only living ursid with a fully carnivorous diet. Despite a number of well-documented craniodental adaptations for a diet of seal flesh and blubber, molecular and paleontological data indicate that this morphologically distinct species evolved less than a million years ago from the omnivorous brown bear. To better understand the evolution of this dietary specialization, we used phylogenetic tests to estimate the rate of morphological specialization in polar bears. We then used finite element analysis (FEA) to compare the limits of feeding performance in the polar bear skull to that of the phylogenetically and geographically close brown bear. Results indicate that extremely rapid evolution of semi-aquatic adaptations and dietary specialization in the polar bear lineage produced a cranial morphology that is weaker than that of brown bears and less suited to processing tough omnivorous or herbivorous diets. Our results suggest that continuation of current climate trends could affect polar bears by not only eliminating their primary food source, but also through competition with northward advancing, generalized brown populations for resources that they are ill-equipped to utilize.

  19. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Z. A.; Dong, K. J.; Yu, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald's rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid-solid phase transition.

  20. Rapid measurement of transient velocity evolution using GERVAIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Colin J; Sederman, Andrew J; Pipe, Chris J; McKinley, Gareth H; Gladden, Lynn F; Johns, Mike L

    2010-01-01

    Rapid velocity measurements using GERVAIS (Gradient Echo Rapid Velocity and Acceleration Imaging Sequence), an EPI (Echo Planar Imaging) based technique capable of measuring velocity over an observation time of several milliseconds, are performed on a wide-gap Couette Rheo-NMR cell for the first time. A variable delay time between a control signal to initiate a transition in flow and the start of the measurement sequence is incorporated to allow investigation of the transient evolution of the velocity field following a step change in rotation rate. Both the commencement and the cessation of imposed shear stress are investigated for (i) a shear banding micellar solution of CPyCl (cetylpyridiniumchloride)/NaSal (sodium salicylate) in brine and (ii) a low molecular weight PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) oil. With respect to the micellar solution, an elastic shear wave is seen to propagate across the cell following the commencement of shear stress whilst an oscillatory 'recoil' is observed following the cessation of shear stress; neither of these phenomena were observed for the PDMS oil which exhibited a purely viscous response as expected for an incompressible Newtonian fluid. This technique has potential applications across a wide range of transient rheological investigations, particularly with respect to optically opaque materials. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. First cytogenetic analysis of Ichthyoelephas humeralis (Günther, 1860) by conventional and molecular methods with comments on the karyotypic evolution in Prochilodontidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursellino, Mauro Nirchio; Silva, Duílio Mazzoni Zerbinato de Andrade; Abad, César Quezada; Blacio, Wilmer Arnoldo Moreira; Romero, Omar Rogerio Sánchez; Oliveira, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We used conventional cytogenetic techniques (Giemsa, C-banding, Ag-NOR), and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 18S rDNA probes to investigate the karyotype and cytogenetic characteristics of Ichthyoelephas humeralis (Günther, 1860) from Ecuador. The specimens studied have a karyotype with 2n=54 biarmed chromosomes (32 M + 22 SM) and C-positive heterochromatin located on the centromeric, pericentromeric, interstitial, and terminal regions of some chromosomes. The nucleolus organizer regions occurred terminally on the long arm of chromosome pair 2. FISH confirmed the presence of only one 18S rDNA cluster with nonsyntenic localization with the 5S rDNA. Cytogenetic data allow us to refute the earlier morphological hypothesis of a sister relationship between Semaprochilodus Fowler, 1941 and Ichthyoelephas Posada Arango, 1909 and support the molecular proposal that Ichthyoelephas is a sister group to the monophyletic clade containing Prochilodus Agassiz, 1829 and Semaprochilodus. PMID:28123682

  2. First cytogenetic analysis of Ichthyoelephas humeralis (Günther, 1860 by conventional and molecular methods with comments on the karyotypic evolution in Prochilodontidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Nirchio Tursellino

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We used conventional cytogenetic techniques (Giemsa, C-banding, Ag-NOR, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with 5S and 18S rDNA probes to investigate the karyotype and cytogenetic characteristics of Ichthyoelephas humeralis (Günther, 1860 from Ecuador. The specimens studied have a karyotype with 2n=54 biarmed chromosomes (32 M + 22 SM and C-positive heterochromatin located on the centromeric, pericentromeric, interstitial, and terminal regions of some chromosomes. The nucleolus organizer regions occurred terminally on the long arm of chromosome pair 2. FISH confirmed the presence of only one 18S rDNA cluster with nonsyntenic localization with the 5S rDNA. Cytogenetic data allow us to refute the earlier morphological hypothesis of a sister relationship between Semaprochilodus Fowler, 1941 and Ichthyoelephas Posada Arango, 1909 and support the molecular proposal that Ichthyoelephas is a sister group to the monophyletic clade containing Prochilodus Agassiz, 1829 and Semaprochilodus.

  3. Chromosome evolution in the subtribe Bovina (Mammalia, Bovidae): the karyotype of the Cambodian banteng (Bos javanicus birmanicus) suggests that Robertsonian translocations are related to interspecific hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropiquet, Anne; Gerbault-Seureau, Michèle; Deuve, Jane L; Gilbert, Clément; Pagacova, Eva; Chai, Norin; Rubes, Jiri; Hassanin, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    Three subspecies of banteng (Bos javanicus) have been described: B. j. javanicus in Java, B. j. lowi in Borneo, and B. j. birmanicus in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. In this paper we provide the first description of the karyotype of the Cambodian banteng. The chromosomal complement of B. j. birmanicus differs from that of B. j. javanicus, which was previously found to be similar to that of cattle, Bos taurus (2n = 60). The Cambodian banteng karyotype has a diploid number of 2n = 56 (FN = 62) and the karyotype consists of 26 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes and two pairs of submetacentric chromosomes. Comparisons with other species of the subtribe Bovina show that the two pairs of bi-armed chromosomes resulted from two centric fusions involving the equivalent of cattle chromosomes 1 and 29, and 2 and 28, respectively. Cross-species fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) with B. taurus whole chromosome paints and satellite DNA I probes was used to identify the chromosomes involved in the translocations, and their orientation. We suggest that Robertsonian translocations (1;29) and (2;28) have been fixed in the common ancestor of Cambodian banteng as a consequence of hybridization with the kouprey (Bos sauveli) during the Pleistocene epoch.

  4. Interactive Karyotyping Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kotwaliwale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the wide use of newer techniques in genetic diagnostics, there remains a need for technologists to learn human chromosome morphology, identify abnormal metaphases and report clinical abnormalities. Global short age of cytogenetic trainers and a time consuming training process makes Karyotyping training difficult. We have developed a web based interactive Karyotyping training tool, KaryoTutor©, that allows technologists to learn karyotyping in an interactive environment and aids the trainer in the training process. KaryoTutor©provides visual clues for identifying abnormal chromosomes, provides instant test scores and includes a reference library of ideograms,sample chromosome images and reference materials. Trainees are able to recursively work on a case till a satisfactory result is achieved,with KaryoTutor providing interactive inputs.Additionally, trainers can assign cases and monitor trainee progress using audit trail management and other administrative features.

  5. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Z.A., E-mail: ze.tian@gmail.com [School of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Laboratory for Simulation and Modelling of Particulate Systems School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Dong, K.J.; Yu, A.B. [Laboratory for Simulation and Modelling of Particulate Systems School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald’s rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid–solid phase transition. - Highlights: • A comprehensive structural analysis is conducted focusing on crystallization. • The involved atoms in our analysis are more than 90% for all samples concerned. • A series of distinct intermediate states are found in crystallization of silver melt. • A novelty icosahedron-saturated state breeds the metastable bcc state.

  6. Breakage-fusion-bridge cycles and large insertions contribute to the rapid evolution of accessory chromosomes in a fungal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Daniel; Zala, Marcello; McDonald, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are a major driver of eukaryotic genome evolution, affecting speciation, pathogenicity and cancer progression. Changes in chromosome structure are often initiated by mis-repair of double-strand breaks in the DNA. Mis-repair is particularly likely when telomeres are lost or when dispersed repeats misalign during crossing-over. Fungi carry highly polymorphic chromosomal complements showing substantial variation in chromosome length and number. The mechanisms driving chromosome polymorphism in fungi are poorly understood. We aimed to identify mechanisms of chromosomal rearrangements in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. We combined population genomic resequencing and chromosomal segment PCR assays with electrophoretic karyotyping and resequencing of parents and offspring from experimental crosses to show that this pathogen harbors a highly diverse complement of accessory chromosomes that exhibits strong global geographic differentiation in numbers and lengths of chromosomes. Homologous chromosomes carried highly differentiated gene contents due to numerous insertions and deletions. The largest accessory chromosome recently doubled in length through insertions totaling 380 kb. Based on comparative genomics, we identified the precise breakpoint locations of these insertions. Nondisjunction during meiosis led to chromosome losses in progeny of three different crosses. We showed that a new accessory chromosome emerged in two viable offspring through a fusion between sister chromatids. Such chromosome fusion is likely to initiate a breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle that can rapidly degenerate chromosomal structure. We suggest that the accessory chromosomes of Z. tritici originated mainly from ancient core chromosomes through a degeneration process that included BFB cycles, nondisjunction and mutational decay of duplicated sequences. The rapidly evolving accessory chromosome complement may serve as a cradle for adaptive evolution in

  7. Surprisingly Rapid Orbital Evolution: A Compendium of Solar Type Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samec, Ronald George

    2015-08-01

    Solar type binaries are believed to be undergoing steady but slow angular momentum losses due to magnetic braking (Réville et al. 2015, Jiang et al. 2014) as stellar winds leave radially away on semi-rigid (out to the Alfvén radius) bipolar field lines: There is an outward radial flow of ions along the rotating magnetic fields. This is happening simultaneously as the gravitationally locked binary rotates about its center of mass. The stream of ions spiral outward resulting in a resistant torque, causing a decay in the orbital radius along with a period decrease due to Kepler’s laws. My past studies have included more than 25 binaries that appear to be undergoing magnetic braking. I have extended the number of systems to 75+ in this group by perusing the literature of modern precision synthetic light curve studies. Several interesting facts arise including their surprisingly rapid orbital evolution, much faster than would be suggested by the theory. Further results are presented in this study.

  8. Karyotype analysis of Rheum palmatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, J Q; Jia, Y Y; Fan, K; Sun, X J; Wang, X M

    2014-10-31

    Rheum palmatum, one of the source plants of the traditional Chinese medicine rhubarb, is anendemic and endangered species. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the chromosome number and karyotype of this species. Sectioning combined with micrography was used to analyze the karyotype. The following results were obtained: R. palmatum had a stable chromosome number 2n = 22; the basic number of chromosomes was 11; karyotype formula is 2n = 22 = 20 metacentric + 2 submetacentric, belonging to Stebbins' 1A type; and karyotype asymmetry index was 55.39%. The present study showed that R. palmatum has a primitive type of karyotype.

  9. [Genomic structure of the autotetraploid oat species Avena macrostachya inferred from comparative analysis of the ITS1 and ITS2 sequences: on the oat karyotype evolution during the early stages of the Avena species divergence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionov, A V; Tiupa, N B; Kim, E S; Machs, E M; Loskutov, I G

    2005-05-01

    To examine the genomic structure of Avena macrostachya, internal transcribed spacers, ITS1 and ITS2, as well as nuclear 5.8S tRNA genes from three oat species with AsAs karyotype (A. wiestii, A. hirtula, and A. atlantica), and those from A. longiglumis (AlAl), A. canariensis (AcAc), A. ventricosa (CvCv), A. pilosa, and A. clauda (CpCp) were sequenced. All species of the genus Avena examined represented a monophyletic group (bootstrap index = 98), within which two branches, i.e., species with A- and C-genomes, were distinguished (bootstrap indices = 100). The subject of our study, A. macrostachya, albeit belonging to the phylogenetic branch of C-genome oat species (karyotype with submetacentic and subacrocentric chromosomes), has preserved an isobrachyal karyotype, (i.e., that containing metacentric chromosomes), probably typical of the common Avena ancestor. It was suggested to classify the A. macrostachya genome as a specific form of C-genome, Cm-genome. Among the species from other genera studied, Arrhenatherum elatius was found to be the closest to Avena in ITS1 and ITS structure. Phylogenetic relationships between Avena and Helictotrichon remain intriguingly uncertain. The HPR389153 sequence from H. pratense genome was closest to the ITS1 sequences specific to the Avena A-genomes (p-distance = 0.0237), while the differences of this sequence from the ITS1 of A. macrostachya reached 0.1221. On the other hand, HAD389117 from H. adsurgens was close to the ITS1 specific to Avena C-genomes (p-distance = 0.0189), while its differences from the A-genome specific ITS1 sequences reached 0.1221. It seems likely that the appearance of highly polyploid (2n = 12-21x) species of H. pratense and H. adsurgens could be associated with interspecific hybridization involving Mediterranean oat species carrying A- and C-genomes. A hypothesis on the pathways of Avena chromosomes evolution during the early stages the oat species divergence is proposed.

  10. Rapid Pitch Angle Evolution of Suprathermal Electrons Behind Dipolarization Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. M.; Fu, H. S.; Cao, J. B.; Xu, Y.; Yu, Y. Q.; Kronberg, E. A.; Daly, P. W.

    2017-10-01

    The pitch angle distribution (PAD) of suprathermal electrons can have both spatial and temporal evolution in the magnetotail and theoretically can be an indication of electron energization/cooling processes there. So far, the spatial evolution of PAD has been well studied, leaving the temporal evolution as an open question. To reveal the temporal evolution of electron PAD, spacecraft should monitor the same flux tube for a relatively long period, which is not easy in the dynamic magnetotail. In this study, we present such an observation by Cluster spacecraft in the magnetotail behind a dipolarization front (DF). We find that the PAD of suprathermal electrons can evolve from pancake type to butterfly type during effect, which possibly exists behind the DF as well.

  11. Clinical utility of skin karyotype

    OpenAIRE

    Dorfman, Luiza E.; Silva, Agnes F. R. P.; Paskulin, Giorgio A.; Rosa, Rafael F. M.; Zen, Paulo R. G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTWe report the case of a patient with Patau syndrome, diagnosed by skin karyotype, emphasizing the applications and importance of this test. The pregnancy morphology ultrasound showed face defects and of central nervous system and heart chambers asymmetry. In the postnatal evaluation it was identified microcephaly, single central nostril, and other malformations. We performed skin karyotype that resulted in full trisomy 13. Our report highlights the possibility of performing karyotype ...

  12. Comparative study of mitotic chromosomes in two blowflies, Lucilia sericata and L. cluvia (Diptera, Calliphoridae), by C- and G-like banding patterns and rRNA loci, and implications for karyotype evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirino, Mónica G.; Rossi, Luis F.; Bressa, María J.; Luaces, Juan P.; Merani, María S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The karyotypes of Lucilia cluvia (Walker, 1849) and Lucilia sericata (Meigen, 1826) from Argentina were characterized using conventional staining and the C- and G-like banding techniques. Besides, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) were detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and silver staining technique. The chromosome complement of these species comprises five pairs of autosomes and a pair of sex chromosomes (XX/XY, female/male). The autosomes of both species have the same size and morphology, as well as C- and G-like banding patterns. The X and Y chromosomes of Lucilia cluvia are subtelocentric and easily identified due to their very small size. In Lucilia sericata, the X chromosome is metacentric and the largest of the complement, showing a secondary constriction in its short arm, whereas the Y is submetacentric and smaller than the X. The C-banding patterns reflect differences in chromatin structure and composition between the subtelocentric X and Y chromosomes of Lucilia cluvia and the biarmed sex chromosomes of Lucilia sericata. These differences in the sex chromosomes may be due to distinct amounts of constitutive heterochromatin. In Lucilia cluvia, the NORs are placed at one end of the long-X and of the long-Y chromosome arms, whereas one of the NORs is disposed in the secondary constriction of the short-X chromosome arm and the other on the long-Y chromosome arm in Lucilia sericata. Although the G-like banding technique does not yield G-bands like those in mammalian chromosomes, it shows a high degree chromosomal homology in both species because each pair of autosomes was correctly paired. This chromosome similarity suggests the absence of autosomal rearrangements during karyotype evolution in the two species studied. PMID:25893078

  13. Comparative study of mitotic chromosomes in two blowflies, Lucilia sericata and L. cluvia (Diptera, Calliphoridae, by C- and G-like banding patterns and rRNA loci, and implications for karyotype evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica G. Chirino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The karyotypes of Lucilia cluvia (Walker, 1849 and L. sericata (Meigen, 1826 from Argentina were characterized using conventional staining and the C- and G-like banding techniques. Besides, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs were detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and silver staining technique. The chromosome complement of these species comprises five pairs of autosomes and a pair of sex chromosomes (XX/XY, female/male. The autosomes of both species have the same size and morphology, as well as C- and G-like banding patterns. The X and Y chromosomes of L. cluvia are subtelocentric and easily identified due to their very small size. In L. sericata, the X chromosome is metacentric and the largest of the complement, showing a secondary constriction in its short arm, whereas the Y is submetacentric and smaller than the X. The C-banding patterns reflect differences in chromatin structure and composition between the subtelocentric X and Y chromosomes of L. cluvia and the biarmed sex chromosomes of L. sericata. These differences in the sex chromosomes may be due to distinct amounts of constitutive heterochromatin. In L. cluvia, the NORs are placed at one end of the long-X and of the long-Y chromosome arms, whereas one of the NORs is disposed in the secondary constriction of the short-X chromosome arm and the other on the long-Y chromosome arm in L. sericata. Although the G-like banding technique does not yield G-bands like those in mammalian chromosomes, it shows a high degree chromosomal homology in both species because each pair of autosomes was correctly paired. This chromosome similarity suggests the absence of autosomal rearrangements during karyotype evolution in the two species studied.

  14. Karyotype diversity and genome size variation in Neotropical Maxillariinae orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, A P; Koehler, S; Cabral, J S; Gomes, S S L; Viccini, L F; Barros, F; Felix, L P; Guerra, M; Forni-Martins, E R

    2017-03-01

    Orchidaceae is a widely distributed plant family with very diverse vegetative and floral morphology, and such variability is also reflected in their karyotypes. However, since only a low proportion of Orchidaceae has been analysed for chromosome data, greater diversity may await to be unveiled. Here we analyse both genome size (GS) and karyotype in two subtribes recently included in the broadened Maxillariinea to detect how much chromosome and GS variation there is in these groups and to evaluate which genome rearrangements are involved in the species evolution. To do so, the GS (14 species), the karyotype - based on chromosome number, heterochromatic banding and 5S and 45S rDNA localisation (18 species) - was characterised and analysed along with published data using phylogenetic approaches. The GS presented a high phylogenetic correlation and it was related to morphological groups in Bifrenaria (larger plants - higher GS). The two largest GS found among genera were caused by different mechanisms: polyploidy in Bifrenaria tyrianthina and accumulation of repetitive DNA in Scuticaria hadwenii. The chromosome number variability was caused mainly through descending dysploidy, and x=20 was estimated as the base chromosome number. Combining GS and karyotype data with molecular phylogeny, our data provide a more complete scenario of the karyotype evolution in Maxillariinae orchids, allowing us to suggest, besides dysploidy, that inversions and transposable elements as two mechanisms involved in the karyotype evolution. Such karyotype modifications could be associated with niche changes that occurred during species evolution. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. Comparative genome maps of the pangolin, hedgehog, sloth, anteater and human revealed by cross-species chromosome painting: further insight into the ancestral karyotype and genome evolution of eutherian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fengtang; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Li, Tangliang; Fu, Beiyuan; Dobigny, Gauthier; Wang, Jinghuan; Perelman, Polina L; Serdukova, Natalya A; Su, Weiting; O'Brien, Patricia Cm; Wang, Yingxiang; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Volobouev, Vitaly; Nie, Wenhui

    2006-01-01

    To better understand the evolution of genome organization of eutherian mammals, comparative maps based on chromosome painting have been constructed between human and representative species of three eutherian orders: Xenarthra, Pholidota, and Eulipotyphla, as well as between representative species of the Carnivora and Pholidota. These maps demonstrate the conservation of such syntenic segment associations as HSA3/21, 4/8, 7/16, 12/22, 14/15 and 16/19 in Eulipotyphla, Pholidota and Xenarthra and thus further consolidate the notion that they form part of the ancestral karyotype of the eutherian mammals. Our study has revealed many potential ancestral syntenic associations of human chromosomal segments that serve to link the families as well as orders within the major superordinial eutherian clades defined by molecular markers. The HSA2/8 and 7/10 associations could be the cytogenetic signatures that unite the Xenarthrans, while the HSA1/19p could be a putative signature that links the Afrotheria and Xenarthra. But caution is required in the interpretation of apparently shared syntenic associations as detailed analyses also show examples of apparent convergent evolution that differ in breakpoints and extent of the involved segments.

  16. Probing the Boundaries of Orthology: The Unanticipated Rapid Evolution of Drosophila centrosomin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisman, Robert C.; Kaufman, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid evolution of essential developmental genes and their protein products is both intriguing and problematic. The rapid evolution of gene products with simple protein folds and a lack of well-characterized functional domains typically result in a low discovery rate of orthologous genes. Additionally, in the absence of orthologs it is difficult to study the processes and mechanisms underlying rapid evolution. In this study, we have investigated the rapid evolution of centrosomin (cnn), an essential gene encoding centrosomal protein isoforms required during syncytial development in Drosophila melanogaster. Until recently the rapid divergence of cnn made identification of orthologs difficult and questionable because Cnn violates many of the assumptions underlying models for protein evolution. To overcome these limitations, we have identified a group of insect orthologs and present conserved features likely to be required for the functions attributed to cnn in D. melanogaster. We also show that the rapid divergence of Cnn isoforms is apparently due to frequent coding sequence indels and an accelerated rate of intronic additions and eliminations. These changes appear to be buffered by multi-exon and multi-reading frame maximum potential ORFs, simple protein folds, and the splicing machinery. These buffering features also occur in other genes in Drosophila and may help prevent potentially deleterious mutations due to indels in genes with large coding exons and exon-dense regions separated by small introns. This work promises to be useful for future investigations of cnn and potentially other rapidly evolving genes and proteins. PMID:23749319

  17. Time evolution of the wave equation using rapid expansion method

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Reynam C.

    2010-07-01

    Forward modeling of seismic data and reverse time migration are based on the time evolution of wavefields. For the case of spatially varying velocity, we have worked on two approaches to evaluate the time evolution of seismic wavefields. An exact solution for the constant-velocity acoustic wave equation can be used to simulate the pressure response at any time. For a spatially varying velocity, a one-step method can be developed where no intermediate time responses are required. Using this approach, we have solved for the pressure response at intermediate times and have developed a recursive solution. The solution has a very high degree of accuracy and can be reduced to various finite-difference time-derivative methods, depending on the approximations used. Although the two approaches are closely related, each has advantages, depending on the problem being solved. © 2010 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  18. Karyotypes versus Genomes: The Nymphalid Butterflies Melitaea cinxia, Danaus plexippus, and D. chrysippus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traut, Walther; Ahola, Virpi; Smith, David A S; Gordon, Ian J; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H

    2017-01-01

    The number of sequenced lepidopteran genomes is increasing rapidly. However, the corresponding assemblies rarely represent whole chromosomes and generally also lack the highly repetitive W sex chromosome. Knowledge of the karyotypes can facilitate genome assembly and further our understanding of sex chromosome evolution in Lepidoptera. Here, we describe the karyotypes of the Glanville fritillary Melitaea cinxia (n = 31), the monarch Danaus plexippus (n = 30), and the African queen D. chrysippus (2n = 60 or 59, depending on the source population). We show by FISH that the telomeres are of the (TTAGG)n type, as found in most insects. M. cinxia and D. plexippus have "conventional" W chromosomes which are heterochromatic in meiotic and somatic cells. In D. chrysippus, the W is inconspicuous. Neither telomeres nor W chromosomes are represented in the published genomes of M. cinxia and D. plexippus. Representation analysis in sequenced female and male D. chrysippus genomes detected an evolutionarily old autosome-Z chromosome fusion in Danaus. Conserved synteny of whole chromosomes, so called "macro synteny", in Lepidoptera permitted us to identify the chromosomes involved in this fusion. An additional and more recent sex chromosome fusion was found in D. chrysippus by karyotype analysis and classical genetics. In a hybrid population between 2 subspecies, D. c. chrysippus and D. c. dorippus, the W chromosome was fused to an autosome that carries a wing colour locus. Thus, cytogenetics and the present state of genome data complement one another to reveal the evolutionary history of the species. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Rapid adaptive evolution in novel environments acts as an architect of population range expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szűcs, M; Vahsen, M L; Melbourne, B A; Hoover, C; Weiss-Lehman, C; Hufbauer, R A

    2017-12-19

    Colonization and expansion into novel landscapes determine the distribution and abundance of species in our rapidly changing ecosystems worldwide. Colonization events are crucibles for rapid evolution, but it is not known whether evolutionary changes arise mainly after successful colonization has occurred, or if evolution plays an immediate role, governing the growth and expansion speed of colonizing populations. There is evidence that spatial evolutionary processes can speed range expansion within a few generations because dispersal tendencies may evolve upwards at range edges. Additionally, rapid adaptation to a novel environment can increase population growth rates, which also promotes spread. However, the role of adaptive evolution and the relative contributions of spatial evolution and adaptation to expansion are unclear. Using a model system, red flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum), we either allowed or constrained evolution of populations colonizing a novel environment and measured population growth and spread. At the end of the experiment we assessed the fitness and dispersal tendency of individuals originating either from the core or edge of evolving populations or from nonevolving populations in a common garden. Within six generations, evolving populations grew three times larger and spread 46% faster than populations in which evolution was constrained. Increased size and expansion speed were strongly driven by adaptation, whereas spatial evolutionary processes acting on edge subpopulations contributed less. This experimental evidence demonstrates that rapid evolution drives both population growth and expansion speed and is thus crucial to consider for managing biological invasions and successfully introducing or reintroducing species for management and conservation.

  20. Instability windows and evolution of rapidly rotating neutron stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakov, Mikhail E; Chugunov, Andrey I; Kantor, Elena M

    2014-04-18

    We consider an instability of rapidly rotating neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) with respect to excitation of r modes (which are analogous to Earth's Rossby waves controlled by the Coriolis force). We argue that finite temperature effects in the superfluid core of a neutron star lead to a resonance coupling and enhanced damping (and hence stability) of oscillation modes at certain stellar temperatures. Using a simple phenomenological model we demonstrate that neutron stars with high spin frequency may spend a substantial amount of time at these "resonance" temperatures. This finding allows us to explain puzzling observations of hot rapidly rotating neutron stars in LMXBs and to predict a new class of hot, nonaccreting, rapidly rotating neutron stars, some of which may have already been observed and tentatively identified as quiescent LMXB candidates. We also impose a new theoretical limit on the neutron star spin frequency, which can explain the cutoff spin frequency ∼730  Hz, following from the statistical analysis of accreting millisecond x-ray pulsars. In addition to explaining the observations, our model provides a new tool to constrain superdense matter properties by comparing measured and theoretically predicted resonance temperatures.

  1. Implementation of molecular karyotyping in clinical genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Lovrecic

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of technologies for the study of the human genome is an expected step after the discovery and sequencing of the entire human genome. Chromosomal microarrays, which allow us to perform tens of thousands of previously individual experiments simultaneously, are being utilized in all areas of human genetics and genomics. Initially, this was applicable only for research purposes, but in the last few years their clinical diagnostic purposes are becoming more and more relevant. Using molecular karyotyping (also chromosomal microarray, comparative genomic hybridization with microarray, aCGH, one can analyze microdeletions / microduplications in the whole human genome at once. It is a first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test instead of G-banded karyotyping in patients with developmental delay and/or congenital anomalies. Molecular karyotyping is used as a diagnostic test in patients with unexplained developmental delay and/or idiopathic intellectual disability and/or dysmorphic features and/or multiple congenital anomalies (DD/ID/DF/MCA. In addition, the method is used in prenatal diagnostics and in some centres also in preimplantation genetic diagnosis.The aim of this paper is to inform the professional community in the field about this new diagnostic method and its implementation in Slovenia, and to define the clinical situations where the method is appropriate.

  2. Clinical utility of skin karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza E. Dorfman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTWe report the case of a patient with Patau syndrome, diagnosed by skin karyotype, emphasizing the applications and importance of this test. The pregnancy morphology ultrasound showed face defects and of central nervous system and heart chambers asymmetry. In the postnatal evaluation it was identified microcephaly, single central nostril, and other malformations. We performed skin karyotype that resulted in full trisomy 13. Our report highlights the possibility of performing karyotype examination in cases when it is no longer possible to obtain a blood sample, thus providing the correct diagnosis and genetic counseling for the family.

  3. Rapid evolution of mimicry following local model extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcali, Christopher K; Pfennig, David W

    2014-06-01

    Batesian mimicry evolves when individuals of a palatable species gain the selective advantage of reduced predation because they resemble a toxic species that predators avoid. Here, we evaluated whether-and in which direction-Batesian mimicry has evolved in a natural population of mimics following extirpation of their model. We specifically asked whether the precision of coral snake mimicry has evolved among kingsnakes from a region where coral snakes recently (1960) went locally extinct. We found that these kingsnakes have evolved more precise mimicry; by contrast, no such change occurred in a sympatric non-mimetic species or in conspecifics from a region where coral snakes remain abundant. Presumably, more precise mimicry has continued to evolve after model extirpation, because relatively few predator generations have passed, and the fitness costs incurred by predators that mistook a deadly coral snake for a kingsnake were historically much greater than those incurred by predators that mistook a kingsnake for a coral snake. Indeed, these results are consistent with prior theoretical and empirical studies, which revealed that only the most precise mimics are favoured as their model becomes increasingly rare. Thus, highly noxious models can generate an 'evolutionary momentum' that drives the further evolution of more precise mimicry-even after models go extinct. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid Evolution of Silver Nanoparticle Resistance in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L. Graves

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent exponential increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles (eNPs means both greater intentional and unintentional exposure of eNPs to microbes. Intentional use includes the use of eNPs as biocides. Unintentional exposure results from the fact that eNPs are included in a variety of commercial products (paints, sunscreens, cosmetics. Many of these eNPs are composed of heavy metals or metal oxides such as silver, gold, zinc, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide. It is thought that since metallic/metallic oxide NPs impact so many aspects of bacterial physiology that it will difficult for bacteria to evolve resistance to them. This study utilized laboratory experimental evolution to evolve silver nanoparticle (AgNP resistance in the bacterium Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655, a bacterium that did not harbor any silver resistance elements. After 225 generations of exposure to the AgNP environment, the treatment populations demonstrated greater fitness versus control strains as measured by optical density (OD and colony forming units (CFU in the presence of varying concentrations of 10nm citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNP or silver nitrate (AgNO3. Genomic analysis shows that changes associated with AgNP resistance were already accumulating within the treatment populations by generation 100, and by generation 200 three mutations had swept to high frequency in the AgNP resistance stocks. This study indicates that despite previous claims to the contrary bacteria can easily evolve resistance to AgNPs, and this occurs by relatively simple genomic changes. These results indicate that care should be taken with regards to the use of eNPs as biocides as well as with regards to unintentional exposure of microbial communities to eNPs in waste products.

  5. Rapid evolution of silver nanoparticle resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Joseph L; Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Cunningham, Quincy; Campbell, Adero; Nonga, Herve; Harrison, Scott H; Barrick, Jeffrey E

    2015-01-01

    The recent exponential increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles (eNPs) means both greater intentional and unintentional exposure of eNPs to microbes. Intentional use includes the use of eNPs as biocides. Unintentional exposure results from the fact that eNPs are included in a variety of commercial products (paints, sunscreens, cosmetics). Many of these eNPs are composed of heavy metals or metal oxides such as silver, gold, zinc, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide. It is thought that since metallic/metallic oxide NPs impact so many aspects of bacterial physiology that it will difficult for bacteria to evolve resistance to them. This study utilized laboratory experimental evolution to evolve silver nanoparticle (AgNP) resistance in the bacterium Escherichia coli (K-12 MG1655), a bacterium that does not harbor any known silver resistance elements. After 225 generations of exposure to the AgNP environment, the treatment populations demonstrated greater fitness vs. control strains as measured by optical density (OD) and colony forming units (CFU) in the presence of varying concentrations of 10 nm citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNP) or silver nitrate (AgNO3). Genomic analysis shows that changes associated with AgNP resistance were already accumulating within the treatment populations by generation 100, and by generation 200 three mutations had swept to high frequency in the AgNP resistance stocks. This study indicates that despite previous claims to the contrary bacteria can easily evolve resistance to AgNPs, and this occurs by relatively simple genomic changes. These results indicate that care should be taken with regards to the use of eNPs as biocides as well as with regards to unintentional exposure of microbial communities to eNPs in waste products.

  6. Rapid evolution of distinct Helicobacter pylori subpopulations in the Americas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Thorell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available For the last 500 years, the Americas have been a melting pot both for genetically diverse humans and for the pathogenic and commensal organisms associated with them. One such organism is the stomach-dwelling bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which is highly prevalent in Latin America where it is a major current public health challenge because of its strong association with gastric cancer. By analyzing the genome sequence of H. pylori isolated in North, Central and South America, we found evidence for admixture between H. pylori of European and African origin throughout the Americas, without substantial input from pre-Columbian (hspAmerind bacteria. In the US, strains of African and European origin have remained genetically distinct, while in Colombia and Nicaragua, bottlenecks and rampant genetic exchange amongst isolates have led to the formation of national gene pools. We found three outer membrane proteins with atypical levels of Asian ancestry in American strains, as well as alleles that were nearly fixed specifically in South American isolates, suggesting a role for the ethnic makeup of hosts in the colonization of incoming strains. Our results show that new H. pylori subpopulations can rapidly arise, spread and adapt during times of demographic flux, and suggest that differences in transmission ecology between high and low prevalence areas may substantially affect the composition of bacterial populations.

  7. On parton number fluctuations at various stages of the rapidity evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, A.H. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York (United States); Munier, S., E-mail: Stephane.Munier@polytechnique.edu [Centre de physique théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France)

    2014-10-07

    Starting with the interpretation of parton evolution with rapidity as a branching–diffusion process, we describe the different kinds of fluctuations of the density of partons which affect the properties of QCD scattering amplitudes at moderately high energies. We then derive some of these properties as direct consequences of the stochastic picture. We get new results on the expression of the saturation scale of a large nucleus, and a modified geometric scaling valid at intermediate rapidities for dipole–dipole scattering.

  8. Description of the karyotypes of Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri) and Hubbs' beaked whale (M. carlhubbsi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Nozomi; Tajima, Yuko; Yamada, Tadasu K; Matsuda, Ayaka; Matsuishi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The genus Mesoplodon (Cetacea: Odontoceti: Ziphiidae) is one of the few cetacean genera with the karyotype 2n = 42. The 2n = 42 karyotype of M. europaeus and M. carlhubbsi is largely consistent with the general cetacean karyotype 2n = 44, although other 2n = 42 karyotypes do not exhibit clear homologies with the general cetacean karyotype. Therefore, the chromosomes of Mesoplodon species may be the key to understanding cetacean karyological evolution. In the present study, the male karyotypes of M. stejnegeri and M. carlhubbsi were examined. In both species, the diploid number of the male karyotype was 42. Both species had the following characteristics: 1) a huge subtelocentric X chromosome with a large C-block; 2) a small metacentric Y chromosome; 3) nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) in the terminal regions of a large autosome and one or two small metacentric autosomes; 4) small metacentric autosomes; 5) large submetacentric and subtelocentric autosomes; 6) less accumulated C-heterochromatin in the centromeric region; and 7) heteromorphism in C-heterochromatin accumulation between homologues. Characteristics 1 and 3 are peculiar to only the karyotypes of Mesoplodon species, whereas characteristics 4, 5, 6, and 7 are also found in the species with the general cetacean karyotype 2n = 44.

  9. Description of the karyotypes of Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri and Hubbs’ beaked whale (M. carlhubbsi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozomi Kurihara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genus Mesoplodon (Cetacea: Odontoceti: Ziphiidae is one of the few cetacean genera with the karyotype 2n = 42. The 2n = 42 karyotype of M. europaeus and M. carlhubbsi is largely consistent with the general cetacean karyotype 2n = 44, although other 2n = 42 karyotypes do not exhibit clear homologies with the general cetacean karyotype. Therefore, the chromosomes of Mesoplodon species may be the key to understanding cetacean karyological evolution. In the present study, the male karyotypes of M. stejnegeri and M. carlhubbsi were examined. In both species, the diploid number of the male karyotype was 42. Both species had the following characteristics: 1 a huge subtelocentric X chromosome with a large C-block; 2 a small metacentric Y chromosome; 3 nucleolus organizer regions (NORs in the terminal regions of a large autosome and one or two small metacentric autosomes; 4 small metacentric autosomes; 5 large submetacentric and subtelocentric autosomes; 6 less accumulated C-heterochromatin in the centromeric region; and 7 heteromorphism in C-heterochromatin accumulation between homologues. Characteristics 1 and 3 are peculiar to only the karyotypes of Mesoplodon species, whereas characteristics 4, 5, 6, and 7 are also found in the species with the general cetacean karyotype 2n = 44.

  10. Description of the karyotypes of Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri) and Hubbs’ beaked whale (M. carlhubbsi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Nozomi; Tajima, Yuko; Yamada, Tadasu K.; Matsuda, Ayaka; Matsuishi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The genus Mesoplodon (Cetacea: Odontoceti: Ziphiidae) is one of the few cetacean genera with the karyotype 2n = 42. The 2n = 42 karyotype of M. europaeus and M. carlhubbsi is largely consistent with the general cetacean karyotype 2n = 44, although other 2n = 42 karyotypes do not exhibit clear homologies with the general cetacean karyotype. Therefore, the chromosomes of Mesoplodon species may be the key to understanding cetacean karyological evolution. In the present study, the male karyotypes of M. stejnegeri and M. carlhubbsi were examined. In both species, the diploid number of the male karyotype was 42. Both species had the following characteristics: 1) a huge subtelocentric X chromosome with a large C-block; 2) a small metacentric Y chromosome; 3) nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) in the terminal regions of a large autosome and one or two small metacentric autosomes; 4) small metacentric autosomes; 5) large submetacentric and subtelocentric autosomes; 6) less accumulated C-heterochromatin in the centromeric region; and 7) heteromorphism in C-heterochromatin accumulation between homologues. Characteristics 1 and 3 are peculiar to only the karyotypes of Mesoplodon species, whereas characteristics 4, 5, 6, and 7 are also found in the species with the general cetacean karyotype 2n = 44. PMID:28981559

  11. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Rapid Evolution of an Extreme-Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Chua, Song Lin; Liu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    , comparative genomics has been employed to analyze the rapid evolution of an EDR Acinetobacter baumannii clone from the intensive care unit (ICU) of Rigshospitalet at Copenhagen. Two resistant A. baumannii strains, 48055 and 53264, were sequentially isolated from two individuals who had been admitted to ICU...

  12. A predator-2 prey fast-slow dynamical system for rapid predator evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piltz, Sofia Helena; Veerman, Frits; Maini, Philip K.

    2017-01-01

    We consider adaptive change of diet of a predator population that switches its feeding between two prey populations. We develop a novel 1 fast-3 slow dynamical system to describe the dynamics of the three populations amidst continuous but rapid evolution of the predator's diet choice. The two ext...

  13. Collateral damage: rapid exposure-induced evolution of pesticide resistance leads to increased susceptibility to parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Mieke; Stoks, Robby; Coors, Anja; van Doorslaer, Wendy; de Meester, Luc

    2011-09-01

    Although natural populations may evolve resistance to anthropogenic stressors such as pollutants, this evolved resistance may carry costs. Using an experimental evolution approach, we exposed different Daphnia magna populations in outdoor containers to the carbamate pesticide carbaryl and control conditions, and assessed the resulting populations for both their resistance to carbaryl as well as their susceptibility to infection by the widespread bacterial microparasite Pasteuria ramosa. Our results show that carbaryl selection led to rapid evolution of carbaryl resistance with seemingly no cost when assessed in a benign environment. However, carbaryl-resistant populations were more susceptible to parasite infection than control populations. Exposure to both stressors reveals a synergistic effect on sterilization rate by P. ramosa, but this synergism did not evolve under pesticide selection. Assessing costs of rapid adaptive evolution to anthropogenic stress in a semi-natural context may be crucial to avoid too optimistic predictions for the fitness of the evolving populations. © 2011 The Author(s).

  14. Solving QCD evolution equations in rapidity space with Markovian Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Golec-Biernat, K; Placzek, W; Skrzypek, M

    2009-01-01

    This work covers methodology of solving QCD evolution equation of the parton distribution using Markovian Monte Carlo (MMC) algorithms in a class of models ranging from DGLAP to CCFM. One of the purposes of the above MMCs is to test the other more sophisticated Monte Carlo programs, the so-called Constrained Monte Carlo (CMC) programs, which will be used as a building block in the parton shower MC. This is why the mapping of the evolution variables (eikonal variable and evolution time) into four-momenta is also defined and tested. The evolution time is identified with the rapidity variable of the emitted parton. The presented MMCs are tested independently, with ~0.1% precision, against the non-MC program APCheb especially devised for this purpose.

  15. Rapid and Recent Evolution of LTR Retrotransposons Drives Rice Genome Evolution During the Speciation of AA-Genome Oryza Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun-Jie; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2017-06-07

    The dynamics of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons and their contribution to genome evolution during plant speciation have remained largely unanswered. Here, we perform a genome-wide comparison of all eight Oryza AA-genome species, and identify 3911 intact LTR retrotransposons classified into 790 families. The top 44 most abundant LTR retrotransposon families show patterns of rapid and distinct diversification since the species split over the last ∼4.8 MY (million years). Phylogenetic and read depth analyses of 11 representative retrotransposon families further provide a comprehensive evolutionary landscape of these changes. Compared with Ty1-copia, independent bursts of Ty3-gypsy retrotransposon expansions have occurred with the three largest showing signatures of lineage-specific evolution. The estimated insertion times of 2213 complete retrotransposons from the top 23 most abundant families reveal divergent life histories marked by speedy accumulation, decline, and extinction that differed radically between species. We hypothesize that this rapid evolution of LTR retrotransposons not only divergently shaped the architecture of rice genomes but also contributed to the process of speciation and diversification of rice. Copyright © 2017 Zhang and Gao.

  16. Application of karyotype analysis in radiation hygiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovic, J. (Krajska Hygienicka Stanica, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-01-01

    Case studies are presented in which an analysis was used of the karyotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The results are also given of long-term monitoring of the karyotype in a group of employees of a nuclear power plant.

  17. Transgenic oncogenes induce oncogene-independent cancers with individual karyotypes and phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Andreas; Li, Nan; Nicholson, Joshua M; McCormack, Amanda A; Graessmann, Adolf; Duesberg, Peter

    2010-07-15

    Cancers are clones of autonomous cells defined by individual karyotypes, much like species. Despite such karyotypic evidence for causality, three to six synergistic mutations, termed oncogenes, are generally thought to cause cancer. To test single oncogenes, they are artificially activated with heterologous promoters and spliced into the germ line of mice to initiate cancers with collaborating spontaneous oncogenes. Because such cancers are studied as models for the treatment of natural cancers with related oncogenes, the following must be answered: 1) which oncogenes collaborate with the transgenes in cancers; 2) how do single transgenic oncogenes induce diverse cancers and hyperplasias; 3) what maintains cancers that lose initiating transgenes; 4) why are cancers aneuploid, over- and underexpressing thousands of normal genes? Here we try to answer these questions with the theory that carcinogenesis is a form of speciation. We postulate that transgenic oncogenes initiate carcinogenesis by inducing aneuploidy. Aneuploidy destabilizes the karyotype by unbalancing teams of mitosis genes. This instability thus catalyzes the evolution of new cancer species with individual karyotypes. Depending on their degree of aneuploidy, these cancers then evolve new subspecies. To test this theory, we have analyzed the karyotypes and phenotypes of mammary carcinomas of mice with transgenic SV40 tumor virus- and hepatitis B virus-derived oncogenes. We found that (1) a given transgene induced diverse carcinomas with individual karyotypes and phenotypes; (2) these karyotypes coevolved with newly acquired phenotypes such as drug resistance; (3) 8 of 12 carcinomas were transgene negative. Having found one-to-one correlations between individual karyotypes and phenotypes and consistent coevolutions of karyotypes and phenotypes, we conclude that carcinogenesis is a form of speciation and that individual karyotypes maintain cancers as they maintain species. Because activated oncogenes

  18. Karyotype differentiation in tellin shells (Bivalvia: Tellinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Souto, Daniel; Ríos, Gonzalo; Pasantes, Juan J

    2017-07-14

    Although Tellinidae is one of the largest and most diverse families of bivalves, its taxonomy is utterly chaotic. This is mainly due to the morphological diversity and homoplasy displayed by their shells and to the scarcity of the molecular phylogenetic studies performed on them. A molecular cytogenetic analysis of four tellin shell species, Bosemprella incarnata, Macomangulus tenuis, Moerella donacina and Serratina serrata, was performed. To molecularly characterize the analyzed specimens, the sequence of a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) was also studied. The karyotypes of the four species were composed of different amounts of bi-armed and telocentric chromosomes. The chromosomal mapping of 45S and 5S rDNA and H3 histone gene clusters by fluorescent in situ hybridization also revealed conspicuous differences on the distribution of these DNA sequences on their karyotypes. Vertebrate type telomeric sequences were located solely on both ends of each chromosome in all four tellin shells. We present clear evidence of the valuable information provided by FISH signals in both analyzing chromosome evolution in Tellinidae and as a further tool in identifying tellin shell specimens for molecular phylogenies.

  19. On parton number fluctuations at various stages of the rapidity evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Mueller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Starting with the interpretation of parton evolution with rapidity as a branching–diffusion process, we describe the different kinds of fluctuations of the density of partons which affect the properties of QCD scattering amplitudes at moderately high energies. We then derive some of these properties as direct consequences of the stochastic picture. We get new results on the expression of the saturation scale of a large nucleus, and a modified geometric scaling valid at intermediate rapidities for dipole–dipole scattering.

  20. Electrophoretic Karyotypes of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    OpenAIRE

    Errampalli, D.; Kohn, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophoretic karyotypes (EKs) of 83 isolates were variable within agricultural and natural populations of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, as well as among S. sclerotiorum, Sclerotinia minor, and Sclerotinia trifoliorum. Variation in EKs was not observed within six mitotic or three meiotic lineages of isolates. EKs of 8 to 10 chromosome-sized DNAs were observed. Homologous and heterologous probes hybridized to four linkage groups.

  1. Evolutionary dynamics of mammalian karyotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This special volume of Cytogenetic and Genome Research (edited by Roscoe Stanyon, University of Florence and Alexander Graphodatsky, Siberian division of the Russian Academy of Sciences is dedicated to the fascinating long search of the forces behind the evolutionary dynamics of mammalian karyotypes, revealed after the hypotonic miracle of the 1950s....

  2. Rapid Evolution of the Gaseous Exoplanetary Debris around the White Dwarf Star HE 1349–2305

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennihy, E.; Clemens, J. C.; Dunlap, B. H.; Fanale, S. M.; Fuchs, J. T.; Hermes, J. J.

    2018-02-01

    Observations of heavy metal pollution in white dwarf stars indicate that metal-rich planetesimals are frequently scattered into star-grazing orbits, tidally disrupted, and accreted onto the white dwarf surface, offering direct insight into the dynamical evolution of post-main-sequence exoplanetary systems. Emission lines from the gaseous debris in the accretion disks of some of these systems show variations on timescales of decades, and have been interpreted as the general relativistic precession of a recently formed, elliptical disk. Here we present a comprehensive spectroscopic monitoring campaign of the calcium infrared triplet emission in one system, HE 1349–2305, which shows morphological emission profile variations suggestive of a precessing, asymmetric intensity pattern. The emission profiles are shown to vary on a timescale of one to two years, which is an order of magnitude shorter than what has been observed in other similar systems. We demonstrate that this timescale is likely incompatible with general relativistic precession, and consider alternative explanations for the rapid evolution, including the propagation of density waves within the gaseous debris. We conclude with recommendations for follow-up observations, and discuss how the rapid evolution of the gaseous debris in HE 1349–2305 could be leveraged to test theories of exoplanetary debris disk evolution around white dwarf stars.

  3. Rapid evolution of tolerance to toxic Microcystis in two cladoceran grazers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaodong; Gao, Han; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Huishuang; Zhu, Xiao

    2016-04-28

    Evolutionary adaptation could assist organisms to cope with environmental changes, yet few experimental systems allow us to directly track evolutionary trajectory. Using experimental evolution, evolutionary tolerance to Microcystis aeruginosa was investigated in two cladocerans (Daphnia pulex and Simocephalus vetulus) to test the hypothesis that cladoceran grazers rapidly adapt to toxic cyanobacteria. After exposure for either three or six months, both grazers evolved a higher tolerance. The intrinsic rate of population increases in S. vetulus feeding on cyanobacteria was negatively correlated with that on green algae, which suggests that evolutionary adaptation in tolerance would carry a cost in the absence of cyanobacteria. However, the cyanobacterial selection resulted in a general increase in D. pulex when fed both cyanobacteria and green algae. Following a three-month relaxation of selection, S. vetulus in the selection line exhibited reverse evolution back to their original state when their diets were switched back to pure green algae. The present experimental evolution, both forwards and reverse, not only demonstrates the evolutionary responses of cladoceran grazers to toxic cyanobacterial cells in the laboratory, but also indicates that the grazer-cyanobacteria interaction would be an effective system to empirically study rapid evolution to environmental changes.

  4. The Rapid Evolution of an Ohnolog Contributes to the Ecological Specialization of Incipient Yeast Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, Chris; Nielly-Thibault, Lou; Maaroufi, Halim; Dubé, Alexandre K; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Charron, Guillaume; Landry, Christian R

    2017-09-01

    Identifying the molecular changes that lead to ecological specialization during speciation is one of the major goals of molecular evolution. One question that remains to be thoroughly investigated is whether ecological specialization derives strictly from adaptive changes and their associated trade-offs, or from conditionally neutral mutations that accumulate under relaxed selection. We used whole-genome sequencing, genome annotation and computational analyses to identify genes that have rapidly diverged between two incipient species of Saccharomyces paradoxus that occupy different climatic regions along a south-west to north-east gradient. As candidate loci for ecological specialization, we identified genes that show signatures of adaptation and accelerated rates of amino acid substitutions, causing asymmetric evolution between lineages. This set of genes includes a glycyl-tRNA-synthetase, GRS2, which is known to be transcriptionally induced under heat stress in the model and sister species S. cerevisiae. Molecular modelling, expression analysis and fitness assays suggest that the accelerated evolution of this gene in the Northern lineage may be caused by relaxed selection. GRS2 arose during the whole-genome duplication (WGD) that occurred 100 million years ago in the yeast lineage. While its ohnolog GRS1 has been preserved in all post-WGD species, GRS2 has frequently been lost and is evolving rapidly, suggesting that the fate of this ohnolog is still to be resolved. Our results suggest that the asymmetric evolution of GRS2 between the two incipient S. paradoxus species contributes to their restricted climatic distributions and thus that ecological specialization derives at least partly from relaxed selection rather than a molecular trade-off resulting from adaptive evolution. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Rapid evolution of the cerebellum in humans and other great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Robert A; Venditti, Chris

    2014-10-20

    Humans' unique cognitive abilities are usually attributed to a greatly expanded neocortex, which has been described as "the crowning achievement of evolution and the biological substrate of human mental prowess". The human cerebellum, however, contains four times more neurons than the neocortex and is attracting increasing attention for its wide range of cognitive functions. Using a method for detecting evolutionary rate changes along the branches of phylogenetic trees, we show that the cerebellum underwent rapid size increase throughout the evolution of apes, including humans, expanding significantly faster than predicted by the change in neocortex size. As a result, humans and other apes deviated significantly from the general evolutionary trend for neocortex and cerebellum to change in tandem, having significantly larger cerebella relative to neocortex size than other anthropoid primates. These results suggest that cerebellar specialization was a far more important component of human brain evolution than hitherto recognized and that technical intelligence was likely to have been at least as important as social intelligence in human cognitive evolution. Given the role of the cerebellum in sensory-motor control and in learning complex action sequences, cerebellar specialization is likely to have underpinned the evolution of humans' advanced technological capacities, which in turn may have been a preadaptation for language. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid evolution meets invasive species control: The potential for pesticide resistance in sea lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Erin S.; McLaughlin, Robert L.; Adams, Jean V.; Jones, Michael L.; Birceanu, Oana; Christie, Mark R.; Criger, Lori A.; Hinderer, Julia L.M.; Hollingworth, Robert M.; Johnson, Nicholas; Lantz, Stephen R.; Li, Weiming; Miller, James R.; Morrison, Bruce J.; Mota-Sanchez, David; Muir, Andrew M.; Sepulveda, Maria S.; Steeves, Todd B.; Walter, Lisa; Westman, Erin; Wirgin, Isaac; Wilkie, Michael P.

    2018-01-01

    Rapid evolution of pest, pathogen and wildlife populations can have undesirable effects; for example, when insects evolve resistance to pesticides or fishes evolve smaller body size in response to harvest. A destructive invasive species in the Laurentian Great Lakes, the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) has been controlled with the pesticide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) since the 1950s. We evaluated the likelihood of sea lamprey evolving resistance to TFM by (1) reviewing sea lamprey life history and control; (2) identifying physiological and behavioural resistance strategies; (3) estimating the strength of selection from TFM; (4) assessing the timeline for evolution; and (5) analyzing historical toxicity data for evidence of resistance. The number of sea lamprey generations exposed to TFM was within the range observed for fish populations where rapid evolution has occurred. Mortality from TFM was estimated as 82-90%, suggesting significant selective pressure. However, 57 years of toxicity data revealed no increase in lethal concentrations of TFM. Vigilance and the development of alternative controls are required to prevent this aquatic invasive species from evolving strategies to evade control.

  7. Karyotype analysis of Neodiplostomum seoulense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gab-Man; Lee, Soo-Ung; Park, Hyun-Young

    1998-01-01

    A karyotype analysis of the chromosome of Neodiplostomum seoulense, one of causative agents of human intestinal trematodiasis, was done from the gonad tissue by the squashing method. The chromosome number was n = 10 and 2n = 20. Chromosome length was 1.30-4.0 µm. Chromosome pairs in the complement consisted of two pairs of metacentric, five pairs of submetacentrics/subtelocentric and three pairs of telocentric chromosomes. These data were comparable with those of other intestinal trematodes. PMID:9868894

  8. Shifting Thresholds: Rapid Evolution of Migratory Life Histories in Steelhead/Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillis, Corey C; Moore, Jonathan W; Buoro, Mathieu; Hayes, Sean A; Garza, John Carlos; Pearse, Devon E

    2016-01-01

    Expression of phenotypic plasticity depends on reaction norms adapted to historic selective regimes; anthropogenic changes in these selection regimes necessitate contemporary evolution or declines in productivity and possibly extinction. Adaptation of conditional strategies following a change in the selection regime requires evolution of either the environmentally influenced cue (e.g., size-at-age) or the state (e.g., size threshold) at which an individual switches between alternative tactics. Using a population of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) introduced above a barrier waterfall in 1910, we evaluate how the conditional strategy to migrate evolves in response to selection against migration. We created 9 families and 917 offspring from 14 parents collected from the above- and below-barrier populations. After 1 year of common garden-rearing above-barrier offspring were 11% smaller and 32% lighter than below-barrier offspring. Using a novel analytical approach, we estimate that the mean size at which above-barrier fish switch between the resident and migrant tactic is 43% larger than below-barrier fish. As a result, above-barrier fish were 26% less likely to express the migratory tactic. Our results demonstrate how rapid and opposing changes in size-at-age and threshold size contribute to the contemporary evolution of a conditional strategy and indicate that migratory barriers may elicit rapid evolution toward the resident life history on timescales relevant for conservation and management of conditionally migratory species. © The American Genetic Association. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Karyomorphology and karyotype asymmetry in the South American Caesalpinia species (Leguminosae and Caesalpinioideae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, P S; Souza, M M; Corrêa, R X

    2014-10-20

    With the purpose of addressing the pattern of karyotype evolution in Caesalpinia species, chromosome morphology was characterized in five species from Brazil, and karyotypic asymmetry was analyzed in 14 species from South America. All accessions had the chromosome number 2n = 24, which was first described here for Caesalpinia laxiflora Tul. and Cenostigma macrophyllum Tul. The karyotype formula of C. laxiflora, Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul., and C. macrophyllum was 12 m. The formula varies amongst the populations of Caesalpinia bracteosa Tul. (11 m + 1 sm) and Caesalpinia echinata Lam. (10 m + 2 sm and 9 m + 3 sm). The intra- and interspecific variations in chromosome length were significant (analysis of variance, P karyotype (AI = 10.52), whereas Caesalpinia paraguarienses (D. Parodi) Burkat. and Caesalpinia gilliesii (Hook.) Benth. had the most symmetrical karyotypes (AI = 0.91 and 1.10, respectively). There has been a trend to lower AI values for the Caesalpinia s.l. species assigned in Libidibia and intermediate values for those combined into Poincianella. On the other hand, the karyotypes of Erythrostemon species had extremely different AI values. This study confirms the existence of karyotype variability in Caesalpinia s.l. while revealing a possible uniformity of this trait in some of the new genera that are being divided from Caesalpinia s.l. More broadly, the 2n = 24 chromosome number is conserved. Metacentric chromosomes and low AI values predominate among Caesalpinia s.l. and Cenostigma.

  10. Rapid adaptive evolution of photoperiodic response during invasion and range expansion across a climatic gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Jennifer; Mogi, Motoyoshi; O'Donnell, Deborah; DeCotiis, Mark; Toma, Takako; Armbruster, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Abstract Understanding the mechanisms of adaptation to spatiotemporal environmental variation is a fundamental goal of evolutionary biology. This issue also has important implications for anticipating biological responses to contemporary climate warming and determining the processes by which invasive species are able to spread rapidly across broad geographic ranges. Here, we compare data from a historical study of latitudinal variation in photoperiodic response among Japanese and U.S. populations of the invasive Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus with contemporary data obtained using comparable methods. Our results demonstrated rapid adaptive evolution of the photoperiodic response during invasion and range expansion across ∼15° of latitude in the United States. In contrast to the photoperiodic response, size-based morphological traits implicated in climatic adaptation in a wide range of other insects did not show evidence of adaptive variation in Ae. albopictus across either the U.S. (invasive) or Japanese (native) range. These results show that photoperiodism has been an important adaptation to climatic variation across the U.S. range of Ae. albopictus and, in conjunction with previous studies, strongly implicate the photoperiodic control of seasonal development as a critical evolutionary response to ongoing contemporary climate change. These results also emphasize that photoperiodism warrants increased attention in studies of the evolution of invasive species.

  11. Genome scale evolution of myxoma virus reveals host-pathogen adaptation and rapid geographic spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Peter J; Rogers, Matthew B; Fitch, Adam; Depasse, Jay V; Cattadori, Isabella M; Twaddle, Alan C; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Read, Andrew F; Holmes, Edward C; Ghedin, Elodie

    2013-12-01

    The evolutionary interplay between myxoma virus (MYXV) and the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) following release of the virus in Australia in 1950 as a biological control is a classic example of host-pathogen coevolution. We present a detailed genomic and phylogeographic analysis of 30 strains of MYXV, including the Australian progenitor strain Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS), 24 Australian viruses isolated from 1951 to 1999, and three isolates from the early radiation in Britain from 1954 and 1955. We show that in Australia MYXV has spread rapidly on a spatial scale, with multiple lineages cocirculating within individual localities, and that both highly virulent and attenuated viruses were still present in the field through the 1990s. In addition, the detection of closely related virus lineages at sites 1,000 km apart suggests that MYXV moves freely in geographic space, with mosquitoes, fleas, and rabbit migration all providing means of transport. Strikingly, despite multiple introductions, all modern viruses appear to be ultimately derived from the original introductions of SLS. The rapidity of MYXV evolution was also apparent at the genomic scale, with gene duplications documented in a number of viruses. Duplication of potential virulence genes may be important in increasing the expression of virulence proteins and provides the basis for the evolution of novel functions. Mutations leading to loss of open reading frames were surprisingly frequent and in some cases may explain attenuation, but no common mutations that correlated with virulence or attenuation were identified.

  12. Rapid recent human evolution and the accumulation of balanced genetic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    All evolutionary change can be traced to alterations in allele frequencies in populations over time. DNA sequencing on a massive scale now permits us to follow the genetic consequences as our species has diverged from our close relatives and as we have colonized different parts of the world and adapted to them. But it has been difficult to disentangle natural selection from many other factors that alter frequencies. These factors include mutation and intragenic reciprocal recombination, gene conversion, segregation distortion, random drift, and gene flow between populations (these last two are greatly influenced by splits and coalescences of populations over time). The first part of this review examines recent studies that have had some success in dissecting out the role of natural selection, especially in humans and Drosophila. Among many examples, these studies include those that have followed the rapid evolution of traits that may permit adaptation to high altitude in Tibetan and Andean populations. In some cases, directional selection has been so strong that it may have swept alleles close to fixation in the span of a few thousand years, a rapidity of change that is also sometimes encountered in other organisms. The second part of the review summarizes data showing that remarkably few alleles have been carried completely to fixation during our recent evolution. Some of the alleles that have not reached fixation may be approaching new internal equilibria, which would indicate polymorphisms that are maintained by balancing selection. Finally, the review briefly examines why genetic polymorphisms, particularly those that are maintained by negative frequency dependence, are likely to have played an important role in the evolution of our species. A method is suggested for measuring the contribution of these polymorphisms to our gene pool. Such polymorphisms may add to the ability of our species to adapt to our increasingly complex and challenging environment.

  13. Rapid evolution leads to differential population dynamics and top-down control in resurrectedDaphniapopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goitom, Eyerusalem; Kilsdonk, Laurens J; Brans, Kristien; Jansen, Mieke; Lemmens, Pieter; De Meester, Luc

    2018-01-01

    There is growing evidence of rapid genetic adaptation of natural populations to environmental change, opening the perspective that evolutionary trait change may subsequently impact ecological processes such as population dynamics, community composition, and ecosystem functioning. To study such eco-evolutionary feedbacks in natural populations, however, requires samples across time. Here, we capitalize on a resurrection ecology study that documented rapid and adaptive evolution in a natural population of the water flea Daphnia magna in response to strong changes in predation pressure by fish, and carry out a follow-up mesocosm experiment to test whether the observed genetic changes influence population dynamics and top-down control of phytoplankton. We inoculated populations of the water flea D. magna derived from three time periods of the same natural population known to have genetically adapted to changes in predation pressure in replicate mesocosms and monitored both Daphnia population densities and phytoplankton biomass in the presence and absence of fish. Our results revealed differences in population dynamics and top-down control of algae between mesocosms harboring populations from the time period before, during, and after a peak in fish predation pressure caused by human fish stocking. The differences, however, deviated from our a priori expectations. An S-map approach on time series revealed that the interactions between adults and juveniles strongly impacted the dynamics of populations and their top-down control on algae in the mesocosms, and that the strength of these interactions was modulated by rapid evolution as it occurred in nature. Our study provides an example of an evolutionary response that fundamentally alters the processes structuring population dynamics and impacts ecosystem features.

  14. Dismal outcome of therapy-related myeloid neoplasm associated with complex aberrant karyotypes and monosomal karyotype: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y L; Chia, W K; Yap, E C S W; Julia, M I; Leong, C F; Salwati, S; Wong, C L

    2016-12-01

    Individuals who are exposed to cytotoxic agents are at risk of developing therapyrelated myeloid neoplasms (t-MN). Cytogenetic findings of a neoplasm play an important role in stratifying patients into different risk groups and thus predict the response to treatment and overall survival. A 59-year-old man was diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Following this, he underwent all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) based chemotherapy and achieved remission. Four years later, the disease relapsed and he was given idarubicin, mitoxantrone and ATRA followed by maintenance chemotherapy (ATRA, mercaptopurine and methotrexate). He achieved a second remission for the next 11 years. During a follow-up later, his full blood picture showed leucocytosis, anaemia and leucoerythroblastic picture. Bone marrow examination showed hypercellular marrow with trilineage dysplasia, 3% blasts but no abnormal promyelocyte. Fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH) study of the PML/RARA gene was negative. Karyotyping result revealed complex abnormalities and monosomal karyotype (MK). A diagnosis of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm with unfavourable karyotypes and MK was made. The disease progressed rapidly and transformed into therapy-related acute myeloid leukaemia in less than four months, complicated with severe pneumonia. Despite aggressive treatment with antibiotics and chemotherapy, the patient succumbed to the illness two weeks after the diagnosis. Diagnosis of t-MN should be suspected in patients with a history of receiving cytotoxic agents. Karyotyping analysis is crucial for risk stratification as MK in addition to complex aberrant karyotypes predicts unfavourable outcome. Further studies are required to address the optimal management for patients with t-MN.

  15. Genetic drift and rapid evolution of viviparity in insular fire salamanders (Salamandra salamandra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velo-Antón, G; Zamudio, K R; Cordero-Rivera, A

    2012-04-01

    Continental islands offer an excellent opportunity to investigate adaptive processes and to time microevolutionary changes that precede macroevolutionary events. We performed a population genetic study of the fire salamander (Salamandra salamandra), a species that displays unique intraspecific diversity of reproductive strategies, to address the microevolutionary processes leading to phenotypic and genetic differentiation of island, coastal and interior populations. We used eight microsatellite markers to estimate genetic diversity, population structure and demographic parameters in viviparous insular populations and ovoviviparous coastal and interior populations. Our results show considerable genetic differentiation (F(ST) range: 0.06-0.27), and no clear signs of gene flow among populations, except between the large and admixed interior populations. We find no support for island colonization by rafting or intentional/accidental anthropogenic introductions, indicating that rising sea levels were responsible for isolation of the island populations approximately 9000 years ago. Our study provides evidence of rapid genetic differentiation between island and coastal populations, and rapid evolution of viviparity driven by climatic selective pressures on island populations, geographic isolation with genetic drift, or a combination of these factors. Studies of these viviparous island populations in early stages of divergence help us better understand the microevolutionary processes involved in rapid phenotypic shifts.

  16. Karyotype analysis of Ethiopian endemic Kniphofia species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Image analysis was used to study the karyotype of six Ethiopian Kniphofia species: K. foliosa, K. hildebrandtii, K. insignis, K. isoetifolia, K. schimperi and K. pumila. The first five are endemic to Ethiopia. All have somatic chromosome number of 2n = 12, and follow the same karyotype formula: 1m + 3sm + 2st. There was ...

  17. Karyotype Analysis Activity: A Constructivist Learning Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Noveera T.

    2015-01-01

    This classroom activity is based on a constructivist learning design and engages students in physically constructing a karyotype of three mock patients. Students then diagnose the chromosomal aneuploidy based on the karyotype, list the symptoms associated with the disorder, and discuss the implications of the diagnosis. This activity is targeted…

  18. Cancer karyotypes: survival of the fittest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Nicholson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells are typically characterized by complex karyotypes including both structural and numerical changes, with aneuploidy being a ubiquitous feature. It is becoming increasingly evident that aneuploidy per se can cause chromosome mis-segregation, which explains the higher rates of chromosome gain/loss observed in aneuploid cancer cells compared to normal diploid cells, a phenotype termed chromosomal instability (CIN. CIN can be caused by various mechanisms and results in extensive karyotypic heterogeneity within a cancer cell population. However, despite such karyotypic heterogeneity, cancer cells also display predominant karyotypic patterns. In this review we discuss the mechanisms of CIN, with particular emphasis on the role of aneuploidy on CIN. Further, we discuss the potential functional role of karyotypic patterns in cancer.

  19. Rapid evolution and range expansion of an invasive plant are driven by provenance-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenni, Rafael D; Bailey, Joseph K; Simberloff, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    To improve our ability to prevent and manage biological invasions, we must understand their ecological and evolutionary drivers. We are often able to explain invasions after they happen, but our predictive ability is limited. Here, we show that range expansions of introduced Pinus taeda result from an interaction between genetic provenance and climate and that temperature and precipitation clines predict the invasive performance of particular provenances. Furthermore, we show that genotypes can occupy climate niche spaces different from those observed in their native ranges and, at least in our case, that admixture is not a main driver of invasion. Genotypes respond to climate in distinct ways, and these interactions affect the ability of populations to expand their ranges. While rapid evolution in introduced ranges is a mechanism at later stages of the invasion process, the introduction of adapted genotypes is a key driver of naturalisation of populations of introduced species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  20. Nutritional immunity. Escape from bacterial iron piracy through rapid evolution of transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Matthew F; Elde, Nels C

    2014-12-12

    Iron sequestration provides an innate defense, termed nutritional immunity, leading pathogens to scavenge iron from hosts. Although the molecular basis of this battle for iron is established, its potential as a force for evolution at host-pathogen interfaces is unknown. We show that the iron transport protein transferrin is engaged in ancient and ongoing evolutionary conflicts with TbpA, a transferrin surface receptor from bacteria. Single substitutions in transferrin at rapidly evolving sites reverse TbpA binding, providing a mechanism to counteract bacterial iron piracy among great apes. Furthermore, the C2 transferrin polymorphism in humans evades TbpA variants from Haemophilus influenzae, revealing a functional basis for standing genetic variation. These findings identify a central role for nutritional immunity in the persistent evolutionary conflicts between primates and bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Rapid evolution towards heavy metal resistance by mountain birch around two subarctic copper-nickel smelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eränen, J K

    2008-03-01

    Adaptations to pollution among long-lived trees have rarely been documented, possibly because of their long reproductive cycles and the evolutionarily short timescales of anthropogenic pollution. Here, I present the results of a greenhouse experiment that suggest rapid evolutionary adaptation of mountain birch [Betula pubescens subsp. czerepanovii (Orlova) Hämet-Ahti] to heavy metal (HM) stress around two copper-nickel smelters in NW Russia. The adaptation incurs a cost with reduced performance of adapted seedlings in pristine conditions. The industrial barrens around the studied smelters are extremely high-stress sites with low seed germination and survival. It is likely that strong natural selection has eliminated all sensitive genotypes within one or two generations, with only the most tolerant individuals persisting and producing adapted seeds in the individual barrens. The results were similar from around both smelters, suggesting parallel evolution towards HM resistance.

  2. The Rapid Evolution of the Exciting Star of the Stingray Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindl, N.; Rauch, T.; Parthasarathy, M.; Werner, K.; Kruk, J.W.; Hamann, W. R.; Sander, A.; Todt, H.

    2014-01-01

    Context: SAO244567, the exciting star of the Stingray nebula, is rapidly evolving. Previous analyses suggested that it has heated up from an effective temperature of about 21 kK in 1971 to over 50 kK in the 1990s. Canonical post-asymptotic giant branch evolution suggests a relatively high mass while previous analyses indicate a low-mass star. Aims: A comprehensive model-atmosphere analysis of UV and optical spectra taken during 1988-2006 should reveal the detailed temporal evolution of its atmospheric parameters and provide explanations for the unusually fast evolution. Methods: Fitting line profiles from static and expanding non-LTE model atmospheres to the observed spectra allowed us to study the temporal change of effective temperature, surface gravity, mass-loss rate, and terminal wind velocity. In addition, we determined the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Results: We find that the central star has steadily increased its effective temperature from 38 kK in 1988 to a peak value of 60 kK in 2002. During the same time, the star was contracting, as concluded from an increase in surface gravity from log g = 4.8 to 6.0 and a drop in luminosity. Simultaneously, the mass-loss rate declined from log(M/M (solar mass) yr (exp -1)) = -9.0 to -11.6 and the terminal wind velocity increased from v (infinity) = 1800 km s (exp -1) to 2800 km s (exp -1). Since around 2002, the star stopped heating and has cooled down again to 55 kK by 2006. It has a largely solar surface composition with the exception of slightly subsolar carbon, phosphorus, and sulfur. The results are discussed by considering different evolutionary scenarios. Conclusions: The position of SAO244567 in the log T (sub eff) -log g plane places the star in the region of sdO stars. By comparison with stellar-evolution calculations, we confirm that SAO244567 must be a low-mass star (M nebula with a kinematical age of only about 1000 years. We speculate that the star could be a late He-shell flash object

  3. Multimodal imaging documentation of rapid evolution of retinal changes in handheld laser-induced maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhrami-Gavazi, Elona; Lee, Winston; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Kayserman, Larisa; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Freund, K Bailey

    2015-01-01

    To use multimodal imaging to document the relatively rapid clinical evolution of handheld laser-induced maculopathy (HLIM). To demonstrate that inadvertent ocular injury can result from devices mislabeled with respect to their power specifications. The clinical course of a 17-year-old male who sustained self-inflicted, central macular damage from a 20-25 s direct stare at a red-spectrum, handheld laser pointer ordered from an internet retailer is provided. Retrospective review of multimodal imaging that includes fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, MultiColor reflectance, eye-tracked spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), fundus autofluorescence, and microperimetry is used to describe the evolving clinical manifestations of HLIM in the first 3 months. Curvilinear bands of dense hyperreflectivity extending from the outer retina and following the Henle fibers were seen on SD-OCT immediately after injury. This characteristic appearance had largely resolved by 2 weeks. There was significant non-uniformity in the morphological characteristics of HLIM lesions between autofluorescence and reflectance images. The pattern of lesion evolution was also significantly different between imaging modalities. Analysis of the laser device showed its wavelength to be correctly listed, but the power was found to be 102.5-105 mW, as opposed to the laser -induced maculopathy, this finding can undergo rapid resolution in the span of several days. In the absence of this finding, other multimodal imaging clues and a careful history may aid in recognizing this diagnosis. A greater awareness regarding inaccurate labeling on some of these devices could help reduce the frequency of this preventable entity.

  4. Rapid Evolution of microRNA Loci in the Brown Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cock, J Mark; Liu, Fuli; Duan, Delin; Bourdareau, Simon; Lipinska, Agnieszka P; Coelho, Susana M; Tarver, James E

    2017-03-01

    Stringent searches for microRNAs (miRNAs) have so far only identified these molecules in animals, land plants, chlorophyte green algae, slime molds and brown algae. The identification of miRNAs in brown algae was based on the analysis of a single species, the filamentous brown alga Ectocarpus sp. Here, we have used deep sequencing of small RNAs and a recently published genome sequence to identify miRNAs in a second brown alga, the kelp Saccharina japonica. S. japonica possesses a large number of miRNAs (117) and these miRNAs are highly diverse, falling into 98 different families. Surprisingly, none of the S. japonica miRNAs share significant sequence similarity with the Ectocarpus sp. miRNAs. However, the miRNA repertoires of the two species share a number of structural and genomic features indicating that they were generated by similar evolutionary processes and therefore probably evolved within the context of a common, ancestral miRNA system. This lack of sequence similarity suggests that miRNAs evolve rapidly in the brown algae (the two species are separated by ∼95 Myr of evolution). The sets of predicted targets of miRNAs in the two species were also very different suggesting that the divergence of the miRNAs may have had significant consequences for miRNA function. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Rapid evolution of the intersexual genetic correlation for fitness in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Julie M.; Fuentes, Sara; Hesketh, Jack; Hill, Mark S.; Innocenti, Paolo; Morrow, Edward H.; Fowler, Kevin; Reuter, Max

    2016-01-01

    Sexual antagonism (SA) arises when male and female phenotypes are under opposing selection, yet genetically correlated. Until resolved, antagonism limits evolution toward optimal sex‐specific phenotypes. Despite its importance for sex‐specific adaptation and existing theory, the dynamics of SA resolution are not well understood empirically. Here, we present data from Drosophila melanogaster, compatible with a resolution of SA. We compared two independent replicates of the “LHM” population in which SA had previously been described. Both had been maintained under identical, controlled conditions, and separated for around 200 generations. Although heritabilities of male and female fitness were similar, the intersexual genetic correlation differed significantly, being negative in one replicate (indicating SA) but close to zero in the other. Using population sequencing, we show that phenotypic differences were associated with population divergence in allele frequencies at nonrandom loci across the genome. Large frequency changes were more prevalent in the population without SA and were enriched at loci mapping to genes previously shown to have sexually antagonistic relationships between expression and fitness. Our data suggest that rapid evolution toward SA resolution has occurred in one of the populations and open avenues toward studying the genetics of SA and its resolution. PMID:27077679

  6. Broadening of the thermal component of the prompt GRB emission due to rapid temperature evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharali, Priya; Sahayanathan, Sunder; Misra, Ranjeev; Boruah, Kalyanee

    2017-08-01

    The observations of the prompt emission of gamma ray bursts (GRB) by GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), on board Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, suggest the presence of a significant thermal spectral component, whose origin is not well understood. Recently, it has been shown that for long duration GRBs, the spectral width as defined as the logarithm of the ratio of the energies at which the spectrum falls to half its peak value, lie in the range of 0.84-1.3 with a median value of 1.07. Thus, while most of the GRB spectra are found to be too narrow to be explained by synchrotron emission from an electron distribution, they are also significantly broader than a blackbody spectrum whose width should be 0.54. Here, we consider the possibility that an intrinsic thermal spectrum from a fire-ball like model, may be observed to be broadened if the system undergoes a rapid temperature evolution. We construct a toy-model to show that for bursts with durations in the range 5-70 s, the widths of their 1 second time-averaged spectra can be at the most ≲ 0.557. Thus, while rapid temperature variation can broaden the detected spectral shape, the observed median value of ˜ 1.07 requires that there must be significant sub-photospheric emission and/or an anisotropic explosion to explain the broadening for most GRB spectra.

  7. Reconstruction of the ancestral marsupial karyotype from comparative gene maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing number of assembled mammalian genomes makes it possible to compare genome organisation across mammalian lineages and reconstruct chromosomes of the ancestral marsupial and therian (marsupial and eutherian) mammals. However, the reconstruction of ancestral genomes requires genome assemblies to be anchored to chromosomes. The recently sequenced tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) genome was assembled into over 300,000 contigs. We previously devised an efficient strategy for mapping large evolutionarily conserved blocks in non-model mammals, and applied this to determine the arrangement of conserved blocks on all wallaby chromosomes, thereby permitting comparative maps to be constructed and resolve the long debated issue between a 2n = 14 and 2n = 22 ancestral marsupial karyotype. Results We identified large blocks of genes conserved between human and opossum, and mapped genes corresponding to the ends of these blocks by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A total of 242 genes was assigned to wallaby chromosomes in the present study, bringing the total number of genes mapped to 554 and making it the most densely cytogenetically mapped marsupial genome. We used these gene assignments to construct comparative maps between wallaby and opossum, which uncovered many intrachromosomal rearrangements, particularly for genes found on wallaby chromosomes X and 3. Expanding comparisons to include chicken and human permitted the putative ancestral marsupial (2n = 14) and therian mammal (2n = 19) karyotypes to be reconstructed. Conclusions Our physical mapping data for the tammar wallaby has uncovered the events shaping marsupial genomes and enabled us to predict the ancestral marsupial karyotype, supporting a 2n = 14 ancestor. Futhermore, our predicted therian ancestral karyotype has helped to understand the evolution of the ancestral eutherian genome. PMID:24261750

  8. Karyotype and genome size in Euterpe Mart. (Arecaceae) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ludmila Cristina; de Oliveira, Maria do Socorro Padilha; Davide, Lisete Chamma; Torres, Giovana Augusta

    2016-01-01

    Euterpe (Martius, 1823), a genus from Central and South America, has species with high economic importance in Brazil, because of their palm heart and fruits, known as açaí berries. Breeding programs have been conducted to increase yield and establish cultivation systems to replace the extraction of wild material. These programs need basic information about the genome of these species to better explore the available genetic variability. The aim of this study was to compare Euterpe edulis (Martius, 1824), Euterpe oleracea (Martius, 1824) and Euterpe precatoria (Martius, 1842), with regard to karyotype, type of interphase nucleus and nuclear DNA amount. Metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei from root tip meristematic cells were obtained by the squashing technique and solid stained for microscope analysis. The DNA amount was estimated by flow cytometry. There were previous reports on the chromosome number of Euterpe edulis and Euterpe oleracea, but chromosome morphology of these two species and the whole karyotype of Euterpe precatoria are reported for the first time. The species have 2n=36, a number considered as a pleisomorphic feature in Arecoideae since the modern species, according to floral morphology, have the lowest chromosome number (2n=28 and 2n=30). The three Euterpe species also have the same type of interphase nuclei, classified as semi-reticulate. The species differed on karyotypic formulas, on localization of secondary constriction and genome size. The data suggest that the main forces driving Euterpe karyotype evolution were structural rearrangements, such as inversions and translocations that alter chromosome morphology, and either deletion or amplification that led to changes in chromosome size.

  9. Root tip chromosome karyotype analysis of hyacinth cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, F R; Liu, H H; Wang, F; Bao, R L; Liu, G X

    2015-09-10

    Karyotype analysis in plants helps to reveal the affinity relationships of species and their genetic evolution. The current study aimed to observe chromosome karyotypes and structures of Hyacinthus orientalis. Twenty hyacinth cultivars were introduced from Holland, and their water-cultivated root tips were used as experimental samples. A solution of colchicine (0.02%) and 8-hydroxyquinoline (0.02 M) was used as a 20-h pre-treatment. Subsequently, Carnot I was used for fixation and 45% acetic acid was used for dissociation. The squash method was selected to prepare chromosome spreads for microscopic observation. The basic chromosome number of the hyacinth cultivar was 8, and the number of chromosomes in the diploid, triploid, tetraploid, and aneuploid cultivars was 16, 23, 24, 31, and 32, respectively. The L-type chromosome was predominant in the chromosomal composition. The hyacinth satellite was located on the short arm in numbers equivalent to the ploidy. This satellite is located on the middle-sized chromosome in the fourth group of chromosomes, demonstrating that Hyacinthus has a more primitive evolution than Lilium and Polygonatum. Among 20 hyacinth cultivars, 'Fondant' had the highest level of evolution and a maximum asymmetric coefficient of 61.69%. Moreover, the ratio between the shortest and longest chromosomes in this cultivar was 4.40, and its karyotype was type 2C. This study may elucidate long-term homonym and synonym phenomena. It may also provide a method of cytological identification as well as direct proof of the high outcross compatibility between hyacinth cultivars.

  10. Evidence for rapid topographic evolution and crater degradation on Mercury from simple crater morphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, Caleb I.; Crowley, Malinda C.; Leight, Clarissa; Dyar, M. Darby; Minton, David A.; Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Thomson, Bradley J.; Watters, Wesley A.

    2017-06-01

    Examining the topography of impact craters and their evolution with time is useful for assessing how fast planetary surfaces evolve. Here, new measurements of depth/diameter (d/D) ratios for 204 craters of 2.5 to 5 km in diameter superposed on Mercury's smooth plains are reported. The median d/D is 0.13, much lower than expected for newly formed simple craters ( 0.21). In comparison, lunar craters that postdate the maria are much less modified, and the median crater in the same size range has a d/D ratio that is nearly indistinguishable from the fresh value. This difference in crater degradation is remarkable given that Mercury's smooth plains and the lunar maria likely have ages that are comparable, if not identical. Applying a topographic diffusion model, these results imply that crater degradation is faster by a factor of approximately two on Mercury than on the Moon, suggesting more rapid landform evolution on Mercury at all scales.Plain Language SummaryMercury and the Moon are both airless bodies that have experienced numerous impact events over billions of years. These impacts form craters in a geologic instant. The question examined in this manuscript is how fast these craters erode after their formation. To simplify the problem, we examined craters of a particular size (2.5 to 5 km in diameter) on a particular geologic terrain type (volcanic smooth plains) on both the Moon and Mercury. We then measured the topography of hundreds of craters on both bodies that met these criteria. Our results suggest that craters on Mercury become shallower much more quickly than craters on the Moon. We estimate that Mercury's topography erodes at a rate at least a factor of two faster than the Moon's.

  11. GPR50 is the mammalian ortholog of Mel1c: Evidence of rapid evolution in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malpaux Benoit

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The melatonin receptor subfamily contains three members Mel1a, Mel1b and Mel1c, found in all vertebrates except for Mel1c which is found only in fish, Xenopus species and the chicken. Another receptor, the melatonin related receptor known as GPR50, found exclusively in mammals and later identified as a member of the melatonin receptor subfamily because of its identity to the three melatonin receptors despite its absence of affinity for melatonin. The aim of this study was to describe the evolutionary relationships between GPR50 and the three other members of the melatonin receptor subfamily. Results Using an in silico approach, we demonstrated that GPR50 is the ortholog of the high affinity Mel1c receptor. It was necessary to also study the synteny of this gene to reach this conclusion because classical mathematical models that estimate orthology and build phylogenetic trees were not sufficient. The receptor has been deeply remodelled through evolution by the mutation of numerous amino acids and by the addition of a long C-terminal tail. These alterations have modified its affinity for melatonin and probably affected its interactions with the other two known melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 that are encoded by Mel1a and Mel1b genes respectively. Evolutionary studies provided evidence that the GPR50 group evolved under different selective pressure as compared to the orthologous groups Me11 a, b, and c. Conclusion This study demonstrated that there are only three members in the melatonin receptor subfamily with one of them (Me11c undergoing rapid evolution from fishes and birds to mammals. Further studies are necessary to investigate the physiological roles of this receptor.

  12. The red queen in the corn: agricultural weeds as models of rapid adaptive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigueira, C C; Olsen, K M; Caicedo, A L

    2013-04-01

    Weeds are among the greatest pests of agriculture, causing billions of dollars in crop losses each year. As crop field management practices have changed over the past 12 000 years, weeds have adapted in turn to evade human removal. This evolutionary change can be startlingly rapid, making weeds an appealing system to study evolutionary processes that occur over short periods of time. An understanding of how weeds originate and adapt is needed for successful management; however, relatively little emphasis has been placed on genetically characterizing these systems. Here, we review the current literature on agricultural weed origins and their mechanisms of adaptation. Where possible, we have included examples that have been genetically well characterized. Evidence for three possible, non-mutually exclusive weed origins (from wild species, crop-wild hybrids or directly from crops) is discussed with respect to what is known about the microevolutionary signatures that result from these processes. We also discuss what is known about the genetic basis of adaptive traits in weeds and the range of genetic mechanisms that are responsible. With a better understanding of genetic mechanisms underlying adaptation in weedy species, we can address the more general process of adaptive evolution and what can be expected as we continue to apply selective pressures in agroecosystems around the world.

  13. Life history lability underlies rapid climate niche evolution in the angiosperm clade Montiaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Ogburn, R; Edwards, Erika J

    2015-11-01

    Despite the recent focus on phylogenetic niche conservatism in macroevolutionary studies, many clades have diversified widely along multiple niche dimensions. The factors underlying lineage-specific niche lability are still not well understood. We examined morphological and climate niche evolution in Montiaceae (Caryophyllales), an ecologically variable plant lineage distributed primarily along the mountain chains of the western Americas. Montiaceae inhabit a broader range of temperatures than their relatives, with an increase in the evolutionary rate of temperature niche diversification at the node subtending this clade. Within Montiaceae, life history is highly labile and significantly correlated with temperature, with perennials consistently occurring in cooler environments. This elevated evolutionary lability facilitated repeated shifts between habitats as new environments were created by post-Eocene orogenic events and aridification in the western Americas. The shifts between annual and perennial forms are elaborations of an underlying rosette body plan in most cases, and may involve simple alterations in biomass allocation. Montiaceae stand as another clear counterexample to phylogenetic niche conservatism, and demonstrate a mechanism by which pronounced ecological shifts may occur frequently and rapidly among closely related species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Digital Direct-to-Consumer Advertising: A Perfect Storm of Rapid Evolution and Stagnant Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K.

    2016-01-01

    The adoption and use of digital forms of direct-to-consumer advertising (also known as "eDTCA") is on the rise. At the same time, the universe of eDTCA is expanding, as technology on Internet-based platforms continues to evolve, from static websites, to social media, and nearly ubiquitous use of mobile devices. However, little is known about how this unique form of pharmaceutical marketing impacts consumer behavior, public health, and overall healthcare utilization. The study by Kim analyzing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) notices of violations (NOVs) and warning letters regarding online promotional activities takes us in the right direction, but study results raise as many questions as it does answers. Chief among these are unanswered concerns about the unique regulatory challenges posed by the "disruptive" qualities of eDTCA, and whether regulators have sufficient resources and oversight powers to proactively address potential violations. Further, the globalization of eDTCA via borderless Internet-based technologies raises larger concerns about the potential global impact of this form of health marketing unique to only the United States and New Zealand. Collectively, these challenges make it unlikely that regulatory science will be able to keep apace with the continued rapid evolution of eDTCA unless more creative policy solutions are explored. PMID:27239871

  15. Rapid Evolution of Assortative Fertilization between Recently Allopatric Species of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir H. Ahmed-Braimah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The virilis group of Drosophila represents a relatively unexplored but potentially useful model to investigate the genetics of speciation. Good resolution of phylogenetic relationships and the ability to obtain fertile hybrid offspring make the group especially promising for analysis of genetic changes underlying reproductive isolation separate from hybrid sterility and inviability. Phylogenetic analyses reveal a close relationship between the sister species, Drosophila americana and D. novamexicana, yet excepting their contemporary allopatric distributions, factors that contribute to reproductive isolation between this species pair remain uncharacterized. A previous report has shown reduced progeny numbers in laboratory crosses between the two species, especially when female D. novamexicana are crossed with male D. americana. We show that the hatch rate of eggs produced from heterospecific matings is reduced relative to conspecific matings. Failure of eggs to hatch, and consequent reduction in hybrid progeny number, is caused by low fertilization success of heterospecific sperm, thus representing a postmating, prezygotic incompatibility. Following insemination, storage and motility of heterospecific sperm is visibly compromised in female D. novamexicana. Our results provide evidence for a mechanism of reproductive isolation that is seldom reported for Drosophila species, and indicate the rapid evolution of postmating, prezygotic reproductive barriers in allopatry.

  16. Gradual assembly of avian body plan culminated in rapid rates of evolution across the dinosaur-bird transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusatte, Stephen L; Lloyd, Graeme T; Wang, Steve C; Norell, Mark A

    2014-10-20

    The evolution of birds from theropod dinosaurs was one of the great evolutionary transitions in the history of life. The macroevolutionary tempo and mode of this transition is poorly studied, which is surprising because it may offer key insight into major questions in evolutionary biology, particularly whether the origins of evolutionary novelties or new ecological opportunities are associated with unusually elevated "bursts" of evolution. We present a comprehensive phylogeny placing birds within the context of theropod evolution and quantify rates of morphological evolution and changes in overall morphological disparity across the dinosaur-bird transition. Birds evolved significantly faster than other theropods, but they are indistinguishable from their closest relatives in morphospace. Our results demonstrate that the rise of birds was a complex process: birds are a continuum of millions of years of theropod evolution, and there was no great jump between nonbirds and birds in morphospace, but once the avian body plan was gradually assembled, birds experienced an early burst of rapid anatomical evolution. This suggests that high rates of morphological evolution after the development of a novel body plan may be a common feature of macroevolution, as first hypothesized by G.G. Simpson more than 60 years ago. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Rapid Evolution of an Extreme-Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Chua, Song Lin; Liu, Yang; Høiby, Niels; Andersen, Leif Percival; Givskov, Michael; Song, Zhijun; Yang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of extreme-drug-resistant (EDR) bacterial strains in hospital and nonhospital clinical settings is a big and growing public health threat. Understanding the antibiotic resistance mechanisms at the genomic levels can facilitate the development of next-generation agents. Here, comparative genomics has been employed to analyze the rapid evolution of an EDR Acinetobacter baumannii clone from the intensive care unit (ICU) of Rigshospitalet at Copenhagen. Two resistant A. baumannii strains, 48055 and 53264, were sequentially isolated from two individuals who had been admitted to ICU within a 1-month interval. Multilocus sequence typing indicates that these two isolates belonged to ST208. The A. baumannii 53264 strain gained colistin resistance compared with the 48055 strain and became an EDR strain. Genome sequencing indicates that A. baumannii 53264 and 48055 have almost identical genomes—61 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found between them. The A. baumannii 53264 strain was assembled into 130 contigs, with a total length of 3,976,592 bp with 38.93% GC content. The A. baumannii 48055 strain was assembled into 135 contigs, with a total length of 4,049,562 bp with 39.00% GC content. Genome comparisons showed that this A. baumannii clone is classified as an International clone II strain and has 94% synteny with the A. baumannii ACICU strain. The ResFinder server identified a total of 14 antibiotic resistance genes in the A. baumannii clone. Proteomic analyses revealed that a putative porin protein was down-regulated when A. baumannii 53264 was exposed to antimicrobials, which may reduce the entry of antibiotics into the bacterial cell. PMID:23538992

  18. Precipitate Evolution and Strengthening in Supersaturated Rapidly Solidified Al-Sc-Zr Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Kyle; Kampe, S. L.; Swenson, Douglas; Sanders, P. G.

    2017-04-01

    Because of the low diffusivities of scandium and zirconium in aluminum, trialuminide precipitates containing these elements have been reported to possess excellent thermal stability at temperatures of 573 K (300 °C) and higher. However, the relatively low equilibrium solubilities of these elements in aluminum limit the achievable phase fraction and, in turn, strengthening contributions from these precipitates. One method of circumventing this limitation involves the use of rapid solidification techniques to suppress the initial formation of precipitates in alloys containing higher solute compositions. This work specifically discusses the fabrication of supersaturated Al-Sc, Al-Zr, and Al-Sc-Zr alloys via melt spinning, in which supersaturations of at least 0.55 at. pct Zr and 0.8 at. pct Sc are shown to be attainable through XRD analysis. The resulting ribbons were subjected to a multistep aging heat treatment in order to encourage a core-shell precipitate morphology, the precipitate evolution behavior was monitored with XRD and TEM, and the aging behavior was observed. While aging in these alloys is shown to follow similar trends to conventionally processed materials reported in literature, with phase fraction increasing until higher aging temperatures causing a competing dissolution effect, the onset of precipitation begins at lower temperatures than previously observed and the peak hardnesses occurred at higher temperature steps due to an increased aging time associated with increased solute concentration. Peaking in strength at a higher temperature doesn't necessarily mean an increase in thermal stability, but rather emphasizes the need for intelligently designed heat treatments to take full advantage of the potential strengthening of supersaturated Al-Sc-Zr alloys.

  19. Rapid evolution of cancer/testis genes on the X chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson Andrew J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer/testis (CT genes are normally expressed only in germ cells, but can be activated in the cancer state. This unusual property, together with the finding that many CT proteins elicit an antigenic response in cancer patients, has established a role for this class of genes as targets in immunotherapy regimes. Many families of CT genes have been identified in the human genome, but their biological function for the most part remains unclear. While it has been shown that some CT genes are under diversifying selection, this question has not been addressed before for the class as a whole. Results To shed more light on this interesting group of genes, we exploited the generation of a draft chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes genomic sequence to examine CT genes in an organism that is closely related to human, and generated a high-quality, manually curated set of human:chimpanzee CT gene alignments. We find that the chimpanzee genome contains homologues to most of the human CT families, and that the genes are located on the same chromosome and at a similar copy number to those in human. Comparison of putative human:chimpanzee orthologues indicates that CT genes located on chromosome X are diverging faster and are undergoing stronger diversifying selection than those on the autosomes or than a set of control genes on either chromosome X or autosomes. Conclusion Given their high level of diversifying selection, we suggest that CT genes are primarily responsible for the observed rapid evolution of protein-coding genes on the X chromosome.

  20. Rapid evolution of female-biased genes among four species of Anopheles malaria mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Francesco; Windbichler, Nikolai; Waterhouse, Robert M; Cagnetti, Alessia; D'Amato, Rocco; Persampieri, Tania; Lawniczak, Mara K N; Nolan, Tony; Papathanos, Philippos Aris

    2017-09-01

    Understanding how phenotypic differences between males and females arise from the sex-biased expression of nearly identical genomes can reveal important insights into the biology and evolution of a species. Among Anopheles mosquito species, these phenotypic differences include vectorial capacity, as it is only females that blood feed and thus transmit human malaria. Here, we use RNA-seq data from multiple tissues of four vector species spanning the Anopheles phylogeny to explore the genomic and evolutionary properties of sex-biased genes. We find that, in these mosquitoes, in contrast to what has been found in many other organisms, female-biased genes are more rapidly evolving in sequence, expression, and genic turnover than male-biased genes. Our results suggest that this atypical pattern may be due to the combination of sex-specific life history challenges encountered by females, such as blood feeding. Furthermore, female propensity to mate only once in nature in male swarms likely diminishes sexual selection of post-reproductive traits related to sperm competition among males. We also develop a comparative framework to systematically explore tissue- and sex-specific splicing to document its conservation throughout the genus and identify a set of candidate genes for future functional analyses of sex-specific isoform usage. Finally, our data reveal that the deficit of male-biased genes on the X Chromosomes in Anopheles is a conserved feature in this genus and can be directly attributed to chromosome-wide transcriptional regulation that de-masculinizes the X in male reproductive tissues. © 2017 Papa et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. [Karyotype analysis of amniotic fluid cells and comparison of chromosomal abnormality rate during second trimester].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue-ping; Wu, Jun-ping; Li, Xiao-tian; Lei, Cai-xia; Xu, Jian-Zhong; Yin, Min

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the karyotypes of amniotic fluid cells and compare the incidence of chromosomal abnormality as well as to evaluate the clinical significance of abnormal karyotypes. A total of 13 648 pregnant women came to Shanghai Jiai Genetics and IVF Institute, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University to do amniocentesis from September 1998 to November 2010, and 13 795 amniotic fluid specimens were successfully extracted and cultured, thus 13 795 fetuses received karyotype diagnosis. These fetuses were grouped according to different indications. If maternal age was ≥ 35, the fetuses were grouped into the advanced maternal age group (4065); and if maternal serum screening test revealed high-risk of trisomy 18 or trisomy 21, the fetuses were grouped into the high-risk serum screening group (6462); and those with abnormal signs of ultrasound screening were grouped into the abnormal ultrasound signs group (1539); and if either of the parents was with chromosome abnormalities, the fetus was grouped into the paternal/maternal abnormality group (108); whereas the remainder were grouped in other factors group (1621). The amniotic fluid cells were in-situ cultured on coverslips, harvested by conventional G-banded methods, and then analyzed by two doctors. In order to get rapid diagnosis, some pregnant women whose gestational age ≥ 26 weeks accepted fluorescense in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH was done on 78 uncultured amniotic fluid specimens using probes located at chromosome 13, 18, 21, X, Y. Some parents were required to analyze lymphocyte karyotype to help judging the origin of abnormal karyotype. (1) Classification and composition of abnormal karyotypes in each group: a total of 388 abnormal karyotypes were found among 13 795 fetuses, and the abnormal rate was 2.813% (388/13 795). Of the 388 fetuses, aneuploidy was the most common pattern which was up to 59.8% (232/388); autosomal structural abnormality rate was 24.7% (96/388); mosaicism was 12

  2. Osmoregulatory physiology and rapid evolution of salinity tolerance in threespine stickleback recently introduced to fresh water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divino, Jeffrey N; Monette, Michelle Y.; McCormick, Stephen; Yancey, Paul H.; Flannery, Kyle G.; Bell, Michael A.; Rollins, Jennifer L.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Schultz, Eric T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Post-Pleistocene diversification of threespine stickleback in fresh water offers a valuable opportunity to study how changes in environmental salinity shape physiological evolution in fish. In Alaska, the presence of both ancestral oceanic populations and derived landlocked populations, including recent lake introductions, allows us to examine rates and direction of evolution of osmoregulation following halohabitat transition.

  3. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  4. Rapid evolution of the spin state of comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewits, Dennis; Farnham, Tony; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Manning Knight, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Cometary outgassing can produce torques that change the spin state of the nucleus, influencing the evolution and lifetimes of comets. If these torques spin up the rotation to the point that centripetal forces exceed the material strength of the nucleus, the comet may fragment. Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak passed Earth as close as 0.142 au in April 2017, allowing observations of the inner coma and an assessment of the rotational state of the nucleus. We acquired observations of comet 41P between March and May 2017 using the 4.3-m Discovery Channel Telescope and the UltraViolet-Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Earth-orbiting Swift Gamma Ray Burst Mission.We combined CN narrowband imaging and aperture photometry and found that the apparent rotation period of comet 41P more than doubled between March and May 2017, increasing from 20 hours to over 46 hours. Measurements of the periodicity in late-March by Knight et al. (CBET 4377, 2017) are consistent with this rate of increase. Comet 41P is the ninth comet for which a rotation period change has been observed (c.f. Samarasinha et al., in Comets II, 2004), but both the fractional change and the rate of change of the period far exceed those observed in the other comets. It is the combination of a slow rotation, high activity, and a small nucleus that contribute to the rapid changes of the rotation state of 41P. In addition, the active regions on the surface of 41P are likely oriented in a way such that its torques are highly optimized in comparison to many other comets.Extrapolating the comet’s rotation period using its current gas production rates and a simple activity model suggests that the nucleus will continue to spin down, possibly leading to an excited spin state in the next apparitions. Finally, 41P is known for its large outbursts, and our extrapolation suggest that the comet’s rotation period may have been close to the critical period for splitting in 2001, when it exhibited two significant

  5. Karyotypes of Saccharomyces sensu lato species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Randi Føns; Nilsson-Tilgren, Torsten; Piskur, Jure

    1999-01-01

    and Saccharomyces unisporus, 16 in Saccharomyces exiguus and seven in Saccharomyces kluyveri. The sizes of individual chromosomes were resolved and the approximate genome sizes were determined by the addition of individual chromosomes of the karyotypes. Apparently. the genome of S. exiguus, which is the only...... Saccharomyces sensu late yeast to contain small chromosomes, is larger than that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. On the other hand, other species exhibited genome sizes that were 10-25% smaller than that of S. cerevisiae. Well-defined karyotypes represent the basis for future genome mapping and sequencing projects...

  6. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillén Yolanda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. Results In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. Conclusions D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  7. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Yolanda; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  8. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. Results In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. Conclusions D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution. PMID:22296923

  9. New contributions to the study of Corixoidea: cytogenetic characterization of three species of Sigara from Argentina and the plausible mechanisms of karyotype evolution within Nepomorpha Nuevas contribuciones al estudio de Corixoidea: caracterización citogenética de tres especies de Sigara de Argentina y los posibles mecanismos de evolución del cariotipo en Nepomorpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Bressa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic studies in Heteroptera contribute to the analysis of evolutionary trends within the group. Heteroptera are characterized by the possession of holokinetic chromosomes, different sex chromosome mechanisms and a pair of m chromosomes in some species. In the present work, the male karyotype and meiosis in Sigara denseconscripta (Breddin, S. chrostowskii Jaczewski, and S. rubyae (Hungerford are described. The three species share a diploid chromosome number of 2n= 24 with a pair of m chromosomes and an XY/XX sex chromosome system. With this study the chromosome number of 30 species of Corixoidea are known and the modal karyotype is 2n= 20+2m+XY in males. The available cytogenetic information in Heteroptera led us to suggest that the presence of a pair of m chromosomes and an XY/XX sex chromosome system could be considered as plesiomorphic for Nepomorpha. The absence of m chromosomes in species of Ochteroidea and Nepoidea, and the sex chromosome systems X0 and Xn0 (male in species of Corixoidea, Naucoroidea, and Nepoidea should be considered as derived characters, which arose later in evolution.Los estudios citogenéticos en Heteroptera contribuyen al análisis de las tendencias evolutivas en el taxón. Los Heteroptera se caracterizan por poseer cromosomas holocinéticos, diferentes sistemas de cromosomas sexuales y un par de cromosomas m en algunas especies. En este trabajo describimos el cariotipo y la meiosis masculina de Sigara denseconscripta (Breddin, S. chrostowskii Jaczewski y S. rubyae (Hungerford. Las tres especies tienen un número diploide de 24, con un par de cromosomas m y un sistema de cromosomas sexuales XY/XX. Con estos resultados son 30 las especies de Corixoidea estudiadas citogenéticamente y el cariotipo modal de la superfamilia es 2n= 20+2m+XY en machos. La información citogenética disponible hasta el presente en Heteroptera nos permite sugerir que la presencia de cromosomas m y cromosomas sexuales XY/XX, ser

  10. Karyotype analysis and ribosomal gene localization of spotted knifejaw Oplegnathus punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P Z; Cao, D D; Liu, X B; Wang, Y J; Yu, H Y; Li, X J; Zhang, Q Q; Wang, X B

    2016-12-23

    The spotted knifejaw, Oplegnathus punctatus, is an important aquaculture fish species in China. To better understand the chromosomal microstructure and the karyotypic origin of this species, cytogenetic analysis was performed using Giemsa staining to identify metaphase chromosomes, C-banding to detect C-positive heterochromatin, silver staining to identify the nucleolus organizer regions (Ag-NORs), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for physical mapping of the major (18S rDNA) and minor (5S rDNA) ribosomal genes. The species showed a karyotype of 2n = 48 for females, composed of 2 submetacentric and 46 telocentric chromosomes, with a fundamental number (FN) = 50, while the karyotype of males was 2n = 47, composed of 1 exclusive large metacentric, 2 submetacentric, and 44 telocentric chromosomes, with FN = 50. These karyotype results suggest that O. punctatus might have an X 1 X 1 X 2 X 2 /X 1 X 2 Y multiple sex chromosome system. C-positive heterochromatin was distributed in the centromeres of all chromosomal pairs and in the terminal portions of some chromosomes. A single pair of Ag-positive NORs was found to be localized at the terminal regions of the short arms of the subtelocentric chromosome pair, which was supported by FISH of 18S rDNA. After FISH, 5S rDNA were located on the interstitial regions of the smallest telocentric chromosome pair. This study was the first to identify the karyotype of this species and will facilitate further research on karyotype evolution in the order Perciformes.

  11. Care of women with XY karyotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Pernille Bach; Kjartansdóttir, Kristín Rós; Fedder, Jens

    2010-01-01

    OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Evaluation of etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and associated disorders in XY women. RESULT(S): Many gene mutations can cause abnormal fetal development leading to androgen insensitivity syndrome or gonadal dysgenesis disorders. Females with these disorders have an XY karyotype but look...

  12. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) in hematological neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Birgitte S.; Pedersen, Rikke K.; Kerndrup, Gitte B.

    2001-07-01

    From November 1, 1997 till November 1, 2000 we have investigated 204 cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (nequals95), acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) (nequals40), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (nequals11), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (nequals9), chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL) (nequals4) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (nequals45) cytogenetically, using G-band analysis and spectral karyotyping (SKY). By SKY we were able to detect the abnormal clones in all cases but 9. In the G-band preparations these cases showed very few abnormal mitoses. The SKY either extended or confirmed the G-band findings in 94% of those with an abnormal karyotype. Cryptic translocations (translocations not suspected from the G-band karyotype) were found in 71 cases (26 AML, 9 ALL, 5 MDS, 2 CLL and 29 NHL). We find SKY a powerful adjuvant diagnostic tool that does not compromise one of the advantages of karyotyping techniques, the analysis of the entire genome which, in contrast to molecular biological techniques, still leave the possibility to get mroe answers than questions posed.

  13. [Comparative analysis of a new human cell line 4BL karyotype at long-term cultivation. Ploidy of chromosomal set].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopian, H R; Huleiuk, N L; Kushniruk, V O; Mykytenko, D O; Iatsyshyna, A P; Lukash, L L

    2013-01-01

    Long-term cultivation of human cells, including stem cells, can lead to substantial transformation of the karyotype and occurrence of genetic instability. The aim of this research was a comparative cytogenetic study of the karyotype of a new human stem cell line 4BL at 160 and 205 passages. The absence of 10 and 13 pairs of chromosomes and the monosomy of chromosomes 4, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 21, X were observed; also six regular marker chromosomes were detected. Chromosomes 1, 15 and 21 are involved in translocations t(l;11), t(5;15), t(12; 15), t(16;21). Modal class of the karyotype is within 41-43 chromosomes at both 160 and 205 passages. The frequency of polyploid cells have been increased from 2.8% at 160 passage up to 36% at 205 passage. Cells with a near-haploid karyotype were not detected at 205 passage (in contrast to 24.6% at 160 passages) and a decline of the level of premature separation of chromatids was observed. We assume stabilization of karyotype of the cell line 4BL at 205 passage and consider that further research is needed to predict the direction of karyotypic evolution of these cells in vitro.

  14. Trends on the Karyotype Acrocentrization Within Carangidae (Perciformes): A New Phylogenetic Evidence About a Traditional Marine Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobina, Uedson Pereira; Martinez, Pablo Ariel; Torres, Rodrigo Augusto; Souza, Gustavo

    2016-02-01

    Carangidae is a morphologically diverse family of marine fish, characterized by stable karyotypes, predominantly with 2n = 48, composed of acrocentric chromosomes (A). This stability is shared with other families of the order Perciformes, which resulted in the hypothesis that 48A is a plesiomorphic karyotype of the group. We tested this hypothesis in the Carangidae family using comparative phylogenetic methods, investigating the evolution of karyotype characters (including chromosome number, morphology, and number of chromosome arms per karyotype [fundamental number, FN]). Our analyses revealed that 2n = 48 is most likely the ancestral chromosome number for the family. However, an extremely variable number of FNs, always above 48, was observed in basal clades within the family and sister groups. On the other hand, the reduced FN = 48 was consistently observed only in the most derived clades, indicating a tendency for acrocentrization. The number of acrocentric chromosomes apparently was accompanied by a trend of reduction in the genome size (1C-value), suggesting that these changes might be correlated. Our data contradict the marine fish hypothesis that the 2n = 48 acrocentric karyotype is plesiomorphic, at least for Carangidae, and reveal the importance for the correct interpretation of karyotype in a temporal and phylogenetic context.

  15. Complex, not monosomal, karyotype is the cytogenetic marker of poorest prognosis in patients with primary myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcárcel, David; Ademà, Vera; Solé, Francesc; Ortega, Margarita; Nomdedeu, Benet; Sanz, Guillermo; Luño, Elisa; Cañizo, Consuelo; de la Serna, Javier; Ardanaz, Maite; Marco, Victor; Collado, Rosa; Grau, Javier; Montoro, Julia; Mallo, Mar; Vallespí, Teresa

    2013-03-01

    Complex karyotype (CK) is the poorest risk factor in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). It has recently been reported that monosomal karyotype (MK) worsens the prognosis of patients with CK. PATIENTS AND METHODS; We analyzed 1,054 adult patients with MDS with an abnormal karyotype from the Spanish Registry of MDS. The aim of the study was to describe the incidence, characteristics, and prognosis of MK; the main end points were overall survival (OS) and leukemia-free survival. MK was identified in 172 patients (16%), most of whom (88%) presented with CK. Variables significantly associated with OS were age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.90; P karyotype complexity (CK [three abnormalities]: HR, 1.81; P = .003; very CK [> three abnormalities]: HR, 2; P abnormalities of chromosome 5 and/or 7 (HR, 1.89; P karyotype complexity (CK: HR, 2.53; P = .002; very CK: HR, 2.77; P karyotype complexity, MK was not associated with OS or evolution to AML. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the prognostic value of MK in MDS is not independent and is mainly the result of its strong association with number of chromosomal abnormalities.

  16. Experimental observations of rapid Maize streak virus evolution reveal a strand-specific nucleotide substitution bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsani Arvind

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent reports have indicated that single-stranded DNA (ssDNA viruses in the taxonomic families Geminiviridae, Parvoviridae and Anellovirus may be evolving at rates of ~10-4 substitutions per site per year (subs/site/year. These evolution rates are similar to those of RNA viruses and are surprisingly high given that ssDNA virus replication involves host DNA polymerases with fidelities approximately 10 000 times greater than those of error-prone viral RNA polymerases. Although high ssDNA virus evolution rates were first suggested in evolution experiments involving the geminivirus maize streak virus (MSV, the evolution rate of this virus has never been accurately measured. Also, questions regarding both the mechanistic basis and adaptive value of high geminivirus mutation rates remain unanswered. Results We determined the short-term evolution rate of MSV using full genome analysis of virus populations initiated from cloned genomes. Three wild type viruses and three defective artificial chimaeric viruses were maintained in planta for up to five years and displayed evolution rates of between 7.4 × 10-4 and 7.9 × 10-4 subs/site/year. Conclusion These MSV evolution rates are within the ranges observed for other ssDNA viruses and RNA viruses. Although no obvious evidence of positive selection was detected, the uneven distribution of mutations within the defective virus genomes suggests that some of the changes may have been adaptive. We also observed inter-strand nucleotide substitution imbalances that are consistent with a recent proposal that high mutation rates in geminiviruses (and possibly ssDNA viruses in general may be due to mutagenic processes acting specifically on ssDNA molecules.

  17. Mass Balance Evolution of Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska, 1980–2100, and Its Implications for Surge Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kienholz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surge-type Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska, has undergone strong retreat since it last surged in 1936–1937. To assess its evolution during the late Twentieth and Twenty-first centuries and determine potential implications for surge likelihood, we run a simplified glacier model over the periods 1980–2015 (hindcasting and 2015–2100 (forecasting. The model is forced by daily temperature and precipitation fields, with downscaled reanalysis data used for the hindcasting. A constant climate scenario and an RCP 8.5 scenario based on the GFDL-CM3 climate model are employed for the forecasting. Debris evolution is accounted for by a debris layer time series derived from satellite imagery (hindcasting and a parametrized debris evolution model (forecasting. A retreat model accounts for the evolution of the glacier geometry. Model calibration, validation and parametrization rely on an extensive set of in situ and remotely sensed observations. To explore uncertainties in our projections, we run the glacier model in a Monte Carlo fashion, varying key model parameters and input data within plausible ranges. Our results for the hindcasting period indicate a negative mass balance trend, caused by atmospheric warming in the summer, precipitation decrease in the winter and surface elevation lowering (climate-elevation feedback, which exceed the moderating effects from increasing debris cover and glacier retreat. Without the 2002 rockslide deposits on Black Rapids' lower reaches, the mass balances would be more negative, by ~20% between the 2003 and 2015 mass-balance years. Despite its retreat, Black Rapids Glacier is substantially out of balance with the current climate. By 2100, ~8% of Black Rapids' 1980 area are projected to vanish under the constant climate scenario and ~73% under the RCP 8.5 scenario. For both scenarios, the remaining glacier portions are out of balance, suggesting continued retreat after 2100. Due to mass starvation, a surge in the Twenty

  18. Mass balance evolution of Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska, 1980-2100, and its implications for surge recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienholz, Christian; Hock, Regine; Truffer, Martin; Bieniek, Peter; Lader, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Surge-type Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska, has undergone strong retreat since it last surged in 1936-37. To assess its evolution during the late 20th and 21st centuries and determine potential implications for surge likelihood, we run a simplified glacier model over the periods 1980-2015 (hindcasting) and 2015-2100 (forecasting). The model is forced by daily temperature and precipitation fields, with downscaled reanalysis data used for the hindcasting. A constant climate scenario and an RCP 8.5 scenario based on the GFDL-CM3 climate model are employed for the forecasting. Debris evolution is accounted for by a debris layer time series derived from satellite imagery (hindcasting) and a parametrized debris evolution model (forecasting). A retreat model accounts for the evolution of the glacier geometry. Model calibration, validation and parametrization rely on an extensive set of in situ and remotely sensed observations. To explore uncertainties in our projections, we run the glacier model in a Monte Carlo fashion, varying key model parameters and input data within plausible ranges. Our results for the hindcasting period indicate a negative mass balance trend, caused by atmospheric warming in the summer, precipitation decrease in the winter and surface elevation lowering (climate-elevation feedback), which exceed the moderating effects from increasing debris cover and glacier retreat. Without the 2002 rockslide deposits on Black Rapids' lower reaches, the mass balances would be more negative, by 20% between the 2003 and 2015 mass-balance years. Despite its retreat, Black Rapids Glacier is substantially out of balance with the current climate. By 2100, 8% of Black Rapids' 1980 area are projected to vanish under the constant climate scenario and 73% under the RCP 8.5 scenario. For both scenarios, the remaining glacier portions are out of balance, suggesting continued retreat after 2100. Due to mass starvation, a surge in the 21st century is unlikely. The projected

  19. Rapid evolution of stability and productivity at the origin of a microbial mutualism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillesland, Kristina L.; Stahl, David A.

    2009-12-01

    Mutualistic interactions are taxonomically and functionally diverse. Despite their ubiquity, the basic ecological and evolutionary processes underlying their origin and maintenance are poorly understood. A major reason for this has been the lack of an experimentally tractable model system. We examine the evolution of an experimentally imposed obligate mutualism between sulfate-reducing and methanogenic microorganisms that have no known history of prior interaction. Twenty-four independent pairings (cocultures) of the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis were established and followed for 300 community doublings in two environments, one allowing for the development of a heterogeneous distribution of resources and the other not. Evolved cocultures grew up to 80percent faster and were up to 30percent more productive (biomass yield per mole substrate) than the ancestors. The evolutionary process was marked by periods of significant instability leading to extinction of two of the cocultures, but resulted in more stable, efficient, and productive mutualisms for most replicated pairings. Comparisons of evolved cocultures with those assembled from one evolved and one ancestral mutualist showed that evolution of both species contributed to improved productivity. Surprisingly, however, overall improvements in growth rate and yield were less than the sum of individual contributions, suggesting antagonistic interactions between mutations from the coevolved populations. Physical constraints on the transfer of metabolites in the evolution environment affected the evolution of M. maripaludis but not D. vulgaris. Together, these results show that challenges can imperil nascent obligate mutualisms and demonstrate the evolutionary responses that enable their persistence and future evolution.

  20. Host imprints on bacterial genomes--rapid, divergent evolution in individual patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Zdziarski

    Full Text Available Bacteria lose or gain genetic material and through selection, new variants become fixed in the population. Here we provide the first, genome-wide example of a single bacterial strain's evolution in different deliberately colonized patients and the surprising insight that hosts appear to personalize their microflora. By first obtaining the complete genome sequence of the prototype asymptomatic bacteriuria strain E. coli 83972 and then resequencing its descendants after therapeutic bladder colonization of different patients, we identified 34 mutations, which affected metabolic and virulence-related genes. Further transcriptome and proteome analysis proved that these genome changes altered bacterial gene expression resulting in unique adaptation patterns in each patient. Our results provide evidence that, in addition to stochastic events, adaptive bacterial evolution is driven by individual host environments. Ongoing loss of gene function supports the hypothesis that evolution towards commensalism rather than virulence is favored during asymptomatic bladder colonization.

  1. Radiation Driven Instability of Rapidly Rotating Relativistic Stars: Criterion and Evolution Equations Via Multipolar Expansion of Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugunov, A. I.

    2017-10-01

    I suggest a novel approach for deriving evolution equations for rapidly rotating relativistic stars affected by radiation-driven Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz instability. This approach is based on the multipolar expansion of gravitational wave emission and appeals to the global physical properties of the star (energy, angular momentum, and thermal state), but not to canonical energy and angular momentum, which is traditional. It leads to simple derivation of the Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz instability criterion for normal modes and the evolution equations for a star, affected by this instability. The approach also gives a precise form to simple explanation of the Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz instability; it occurs when two conditions are met: (a) gravitational wave emission removes angular momentum from the rotating star (thus releasing the rotation energy) and (b) gravitational waves carry less energy, than the released amount of the rotation energy. To illustrate the results, I take the r-mode instability in slowly rotating Newtonian stellar models as an example. It leads to evolution equations, where the emission of gravitational waves directly affects the spin frequency, being in apparent contradiction with widely accepted equations. According to the latter, effective spin frequency decrease is coupled with dissipation of unstable mode, but not with the instability as it is. This problem is shown to be superficial, and arises as a result of specific definition of the effective spin frequency applied previously. Namely, it is shown, that if this definition is taken into account properly, the evolution equations coincide with obtained here in the leading order in mode amplitude. I also argue that the next-to-leading order terms in evolution equations were not yet derived accurately and thus it would be more self-consistent to omit them.

  2. Microstructure evolution and thermal stability of rapidly solidified Al-Ni-Co-RE alloy

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    B. Karpe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of this work, Al-5Ni-1Co-3RE (RE-Rare Earth (Mischmetal rapidly solidified ribbons were manufactured and analyzed. The morphology of the as-cast structure, as well as the microstructural features were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Thermal stability has been investigated by combination of four point scanning electrical resistivity measurement (ER, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and microhardness measurement. From the results we can conclude, that Al-5Ni-1Co-3RE rapidly solidified alloys have good thermal stability due to very slow coarsening kinetics of precipitated particles.

  3. Bony cranial ornamentation linked to rapid evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Terry A.; Organ, Chris; Zanno, Lindsay E.

    2016-09-01

    Exaggerated cranial structures such as crests and horns, hereafter referred to collectively as ornaments, are pervasive across animal species. These structures perform vital roles in visual communication and physical interactions within and between species. Yet the origin and influence of ornamentation on speciation and ecology across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals. Here, we explore correlative evolution of osseous cranial ornaments with large body size in theropod dinosaurs using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We find that body size evolved directionally toward phyletic giantism an order of magnitude faster in theropod species possessing ornaments compared with unadorned lineages. In addition, we find a body mass threshold below which bony cranial ornaments do not originate. Maniraptoriform dinosaurs generally lack osseous cranial ornaments despite repeatedly crossing this body size threshold. Our study provides novel, quantitative support for a shift in selective pressures on socio-sexual display mechanisms in theropods coincident with the evolution of pennaceous feathers.

  4. Rapid evolution of virulence leading to host extinction under host-parasite coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaluk, Charlotte; Gildenhard, Markus; Mitschke, Andreas; Telschow, Arndt; Schulenburg, Hinrich; Joop, Gerrit

    2015-06-13

    Host-parasite coevolution is predicted to result in changes in the virulence of the parasite in order to maximise its reproductive success and transmission potential, either via direct host-to-host transfer or through the environment. The majority of coevolution experiments, however, do not allow for environmental transmission or persistence of long lived parasite stages, in spite of the fact that these may be critical for the evolutionary success of spore forming parasites under natural conditions. We carried out a coevolution experiment using the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and its natural microsporidian parasite, Paranosema whitei. Beetles and their environment, inclusive of spores released into it, were transferred from generation to generation. We additionally took a modelling approach to further assess the importance of transmissive parasite stages on virulence evolution. In all parasite treatments of the experiment, coevolution resulted in extinction of the host population, with a pronounced increase in virulence being seen. Our modelling approach highlighted the presence of environmental transmissive parasite stages as being critical to the trajectory of virulence evolution in this system. The extinction of host populations was unexpected, particularly as parasite virulence is often seen to decrease in host-parasite coevolution. This, in combination with the increase in virulence and results obtained from the model, suggest that the inclusion of transmissive parasite stages is important to improving our understanding of virulence evolution.

  5. Rapid evolution of coral proteins responsible for interaction with the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voolstra, Christian R; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Matz, Mikhail V; Bayer, Till; Aranda, Manuel; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Desalvo, Michael K; Lindquist, Erika; Szmant, Alina M; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Medina, Mónica

    2011-01-01

    Corals worldwide are in decline due to climate change effects (e.g., rising seawater temperatures), pollution, and exploitation. The ability of corals to cope with these stressors in the long run depends on the evolvability of the underlying genetic networks and proteins, which remain largely unknown. A genome-wide scan for positively selected genes between related coral species can help to narrow down the search space considerably. We screened a set of 2,604 putative orthologs from EST-based sequence datasets of the coral species Acropora millepora and Acropora palmata to determine the fraction and identity of proteins that may experience adaptive evolution. 7% of the orthologs show elevated rates of evolution. Taxonomically-restricted (i.e. lineage-specific) genes show a positive selection signature more frequently than genes that are found across many animal phyla. The class of proteins that displayed elevated evolutionary rates was significantly enriched for proteins involved in immunity and defense, reproduction, and sensory perception. We also found elevated rates of evolution in several other functional groups such as management of membrane vesicles, transmembrane transport of ions and organic molecules, cell adhesion, and oxidative stress response. Proteins in these processes might be related to the endosymbiotic relationship corals maintain with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. This study provides a birds-eye view of the processes potentially underlying coral adaptation, which will serve as a foundation for future work to elucidate the rates, patterns, and mechanisms of corals' evolutionary response to global climate change.

  6. The evolution of genomic GC content undergoes a rapid reversal within the genus Plasmodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbakht, Hamid; Xia, Xuhua; Hickey, Donal A

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum is extremely AT rich. This bias toward a low GC content is a characteristic of several, but not all, species within the genus Plasmodium. We compared 4283 orthologous pairs of protein-coding sequences between Plasmodium falciparum and the less AT-biased Plasmodium vivax. Our results indicate that the common ancestor of these two species was also extremely AT rich. This means that, although there was a strong bias toward A+T during the early evolution of the ancestral Plasmodium lineage, there was a subsequent reversal of this trend during the more recent evolution of some species, such as P. vivax. Moreover, we show that not only is the P. vivax genome losing its AT richness, it is actually gaining a very significant degree of GC richness. This example illustrates the potential volatility of nucleotide content during the course of molecular evolution. Such reversible fluxes in nucleotide content within lineages could have important implications for phylogenetic reconstruction based on molecular sequence data.

  7. Evolution in an Afternoon: Rapid Natural Selection and Adaptation of Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, Roger

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, rapid and low-cost technique for growing bacteria (or other microbes) in an environmental gradient, in order to determine the tolerance of the microbial population to varying concentrations of sodium chloride ions, and suggests how the evolutionary response of a microbial population to the selection pressure of the…

  8. Retrospective karyotype study in mentally retarded patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Wellcy Gonçalves; Marques, Fabiana Kalina; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes

    2016-01-01

    To describe the chromosomal alterations in patients with mental retardation (MR) using G-banding karyotype analysis. A retrospective study of the results G-banding karyotype analysis of 369 patients investigated for MR was performed. Based on the structural rearrangements found, the authors searched all chromosomal regions related with breakpoints, and these were compared with the literature on MR and databases. 338 (91.6%) normal cases, and 31 (8.4%) with some type of chromosomal abnormality were identified. Among the altered cases, 21 patients (67.8%) were identified with structural chromosomal alterations, nine (29%) with numerical alterations, and one (3.2%) with numerical and structural alterations. Structural chromosomal abnormalities were observed more frequently in this study. G-banding karyotyping contributes to the investigation of the causes of MR, showing that this technique can be useful for initial screening of patients. However, higher resolution techniques such as array based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MPLA) can detect submicroscopic alterations commonly associated with MR.

  9. Karyotypic characterization of Capsicum sp. accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willame Rodrigues do Nascimento Souza

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the chromosome number and the karyotype of Capsicum annuum, Capsicum chinense, Capsicum frutencens and Capsicum baccatum accessions in the active Capsicum sp. genebank at the Federal University of Piauí (BGC-UFPI. These species have great economic importance throughout the world, and their cytogenetic characterization can inform taxonomy and lead to improvement in the genus. Karyotypes were obtained from the rootlet meristems of the studied accessions using the squash method and Giemsa staining. The chromosome number 2n=2x=24 was verified for each of the four species. Chromosomal polymorphisms were observed for the C. frutencens accession BGC 37, which presented 12 pairs of metacentric chromosomes instead of 11 pairs of metacentric chromosomes and 1 submetacentric chromosome pair present in other accessions. In the accessions BGC 01 and BGC 37, secondary constrictions were observed in the 1 and 12 as well as in the 6 and 11 homologs, respectively. The karyotypes of the studied species were asymmetrical among themselves. The results obtained in this study confirm the high genetic diversity previously described in the literature for this genus.

  10. Rapid experimental evolution of pesticide resistance in C. elegans entails no costs and affects the mating system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia C Lopes

    Full Text Available Pesticide resistance is a major concern in natural populations and a model trait to study adaptation. Despite the importance of this trait, the dynamics of its evolution and of its ecological consequences remain largely unstudied. To fill this gap, we performed experimental evolution with replicated populations of Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to the pesticide Levamisole during 20 generations. Exposure to Levamisole resulted in decreased survival, fecundity and male frequency, which declined from 30% to zero. This was not due to differential susceptibility of males. Rather, the drug affected mobility, resulting in fewer encounters, probably leading to reduced outcrossing rates. Adaptation, i.e., increased survival and fecundity, occurred within 10 and 20 generations, respectively. Male frequency also increased by generation 20. Adaptation costs were undetected in the ancestral environment and in presence of Ivermectin, another widely-used pesticide with an opposite physiological effect. Our results demonstrate that pesticide resistance can evolve at an extremely rapid pace. Furthermore, we unravel the effects of behaviour on life-history traits and test the environmental dependence of adaptation costs. This study establishes experimental evolution as a powerful tool to tackle pesticide resistance, and paves the way to further investigations manipulating environmental and/or genetic factors underlying adaptation to pesticides.

  11. Rapid Evolution of piRNA Pathway in the Teleost Fish: Implication for an Adaptation to Transposon Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Minhan; Chen, Feng; Luo, Majing; Cheng, Yibin; Zhao, Huabin; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2014-01-01

    The Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is responsible for germline specification, gametogenesis, transposon silencing, and genome integrity. Transposable elements can disrupt genome and its functions. However, piRNA pathway evolution and its adaptation to transposon diversity in the teleost fish remain unknown. This article unveils evolutionary scene of piRNA pathway and its association with diverse transposons by systematically comparative analysis on diverse teleost fish genomes. Selective pressure analysis on piRNA pathway and miRNA/siRNA (microRNA/small interfering RNA) pathway genes between teleosts and mammals showed an accelerated evolution of piRNA pathway genes in the teleost lineages, and positive selection on functional PAZ (Piwi/Ago/Zwille) and Tudor domains involved in the Piwi–piRNA/Tudor interaction, suggesting that the amino acid substitutions are adaptive to their functions in piRNA pathway in the teleost fish species. Notably five piRNA pathway genes evolved faster in the swamp eel, a kind of protogynous hermaphrodite fish, than the other teleosts, indicating a differential evolution of piRNA pathway between the swamp eel and other gonochoristic fishes. In addition, genome-wide analysis showed higher diversity of transposons in the teleost fish species compared with mammals. Our results suggest that rapidly evolved piRNA pathway in the teleost fish is likely to be involved in the adaption to transposon diversity. PMID:24846630

  12. New fusion transcripts identified in normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiu Wen

    Full Text Available Genetic aberrations contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, half of AML cases do not contain the well-known aberrations detectable mostly by cytogenetic analysis, and these cases are classified as normal karyotype AML. Different outcomes of normal karyotype AML suggest that this subgroup of AML could be genetically heterogeneous. But lack of genetic markers makes it difficult to further study this subgroup of AML. Using paired-end RNAseq method, we performed a transcriptome analysis in 45 AML cases including 29 normal karyotype AML, 8 abnormal karyotype AML and 8 AML without karyotype informaiton. Our study identified 134 fusion transcripts, all of which were formed between the partner genes adjacent in the same chromosome and distributed at different frequencies in the AML cases. Seven fusions are exclusively present in normal karyotype AML, and the rest fusions are shared between the normal karyotype AML and abnormal karyotype AML. CIITA, a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression and truncated in B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin disease, is found to fuse with DEXI in 48% of normal karyotype AML cases. The fusion transcripts formed between adjacent genes highlight the possibility that certain such fusions could be involved in oncological process in AML, and provide a new source to identify genetic markers for normal karyotype AML.

  13. New fusion transcripts identified in normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hongxiu; Li, Yongjin; Malek, Sami N; Kim, Yeong C; Xu, Jia; Chen, Peixian; Xiao, Fengxia; Huang, Xin; Zhou, Xianzheng; Xuan, Zhenyu; Mankala, Shiva; Hou, Guihua; Rowley, Janet D; Zhang, Michael Q; Wang, San Ming

    2012-01-01

    Genetic aberrations contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, half of AML cases do not contain the well-known aberrations detectable mostly by cytogenetic analysis, and these cases are classified as normal karyotype AML. Different outcomes of normal karyotype AML suggest that this subgroup of AML could be genetically heterogeneous. But lack of genetic markers makes it difficult to further study this subgroup of AML. Using paired-end RNAseq method, we performed a transcriptome analysis in 45 AML cases including 29 normal karyotype AML, 8 abnormal karyotype AML and 8 AML without karyotype informaiton. Our study identified 134 fusion transcripts, all of which were formed between the partner genes adjacent in the same chromosome and distributed at different frequencies in the AML cases. Seven fusions are exclusively present in normal karyotype AML, and the rest fusions are shared between the normal karyotype AML and abnormal karyotype AML. CIITA, a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression and truncated in B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin disease, is found to fuse with DEXI in 48% of normal karyotype AML cases. The fusion transcripts formed between adjacent genes highlight the possibility that certain such fusions could be involved in oncological process in AML, and provide a new source to identify genetic markers for normal karyotype AML.

  14. Rapid Evolution of Coral Proteins Responsible for Interaction with the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Mikhail V.; Bayer, Till; Aranda, Manuel; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; DeSalvo, Michael K.; Lindquist, Erika; Szmant, Alina M.; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Medina, Mónica

    2011-01-01

    Background Corals worldwide are in decline due to climate change effects (e.g., rising seawater temperatures), pollution, and exploitation. The ability of corals to cope with these stressors in the long run depends on the evolvability of the underlying genetic networks and proteins, which remain largely unknown. A genome-wide scan for positively selected genes between related coral species can help to narrow down the search space considerably. Methodology/Principal Findings We screened a set of 2,604 putative orthologs from EST-based sequence datasets of the coral species Acropora millepora and Acropora palmata to determine the fraction and identity of proteins that may experience adaptive evolution. 7% of the orthologs show elevated rates of evolution. Taxonomically-restricted (i.e. lineage-specific) genes show a positive selection signature more frequently than genes that are found across many animal phyla. The class of proteins that displayed elevated evolutionary rates was significantly enriched for proteins involved in immunity and defense, reproduction, and sensory perception. We also found elevated rates of evolution in several other functional groups such as management of membrane vesicles, transmembrane transport of ions and organic molecules, cell adhesion, and oxidative stress response. Proteins in these processes might be related to the endosymbiotic relationship corals maintain with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. Conclusion/Relevance This study provides a birds-eye view of the processes potentially underlying coral adaptation, which will serve as a foundation for future work to elucidate the rates, patterns, and mechanisms of corals' evolutionary response to global climate change. PMID:21633702

  15. Rapid Evolution of Coral Proteins Responsible for Interaction with the Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voolstra, Christian R.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Matz, Mikhail V.; Bayer, Till; Aranda, Manuel; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; DeSalvo, Michael K.; Lindquist, Erika; Szmant, Alina M.; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Medina, Monica

    2011-01-31

    Background: Corals worldwide are in decline due to climate change effects (e.g., rising seawater temperatures), pollution, and exploitation. The ability of corals to cope with these stressors in the long run depends on the evolvability of the underlying genetic networks and proteins, which remain largely unknown. A genome-wide scan for positively selected genes between related coral species can help to narrow down the search space considerably. Methodology/Principal Findings: We screened a set of 2,604 putative orthologs from EST-based sequence datasets of the coral species Acropora millepora and Acropora palmata to determine the fraction and identity of proteins that may experience adaptive evolution. 7percent of the orthologs show elevated rates of evolution. Taxonomically-restricted (i.e. lineagespecific) genes show a positive selection signature more frequently than genes that are found across many animal phyla. The class of proteins that displayed elevated evolutionary rates was significantly enriched for proteins involved in immunity and defense, reproduction, and sensory perception. We also found elevated rates of evolution in several other functional groups such as management of membrane vesicles, transmembrane transport of ions and organic molecules, cell adhesion, and oxidative stress response. Proteins in these processes might be related to the endosymbiotic relationship corals maintain with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. Conclusion/Relevance: This study provides a birds-eye view of the processes potentially underlying coral adaptation, which will serve as a foundation for future work to elucidate the rates, patterns, and mechanisms of corals? evolutionary response to global climate change.

  16. Rapid evolution of coral proteins responsible for interaction with the environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian R Voolstra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Corals worldwide are in decline due to climate change effects (e.g., rising seawater temperatures, pollution, and exploitation. The ability of corals to cope with these stressors in the long run depends on the evolvability of the underlying genetic networks and proteins, which remain largely unknown. A genome-wide scan for positively selected genes between related coral species can help to narrow down the search space considerably. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened a set of 2,604 putative orthologs from EST-based sequence datasets of the coral species Acropora millepora and Acropora palmata to determine the fraction and identity of proteins that may experience adaptive evolution. 7% of the orthologs show elevated rates of evolution. Taxonomically-restricted (i.e. lineage-specific genes show a positive selection signature more frequently than genes that are found across many animal phyla. The class of proteins that displayed elevated evolutionary rates was significantly enriched for proteins involved in immunity and defense, reproduction, and sensory perception. We also found elevated rates of evolution in several other functional groups such as management of membrane vesicles, transmembrane transport of ions and organic molecules, cell adhesion, and oxidative stress response. Proteins in these processes might be related to the endosymbiotic relationship corals maintain with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. CONCLUSION/RELEVANCE: This study provides a birds-eye view of the processes potentially underlying coral adaptation, which will serve as a foundation for future work to elucidate the rates, patterns, and mechanisms of corals' evolutionary response to global climate change.

  17. Evolution of nano-structures of silver due to rapid thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal.mondal@saha.ac.in; Bhattacharyya, S. R., E-mail: shyamal.mondal@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)

    2014-04-24

    This report deals with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) effect on continuous silver film on Si(100) substrate. For this purpose silver films of different thicknesses were deposited and subsequently annealed at 500 and 800 °C. The as-deposited and annealed samples were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Formations of different nano-structures have been observed. Fragmentation of formed nanoislands also observed at temperature below melting temperature.

  18. Rapid evolution of regulatory element libraries for tunable transcriptional and translational control of gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erqing Jin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering cell factories for producing biofuels and pharmaceuticals has spurred great interests to develop rapid and efficient synthetic biology tools customized for modular pathway engineering. Along the way, combinatorial gene expression control through modification of regulatory element offered tremendous opportunity for fine-tuning gene expression and generating digital-like genetic circuits. In this report, we present an efficient evolutionary approach to build a range of regulatory control elements. The reported method allows for rapid construction of promoter, 5′UTR, terminator and trans-activating RNA libraries. Synthetic overlapping oligos with high portion of degenerate nucleotides flanking the regulatory element could be efficiently assembled to a vector expressing fluorescence reporter. This approach combines high mutation rate of the synthetic DNA with the high assembly efficiency of Gibson Mix. Our constructed library demonstrates broad range of transcriptional or translational gene expression dynamics. Specifically, both the promoter library and 5′UTR library exhibits gene expression dynamics spanning across three order of magnitude. The terminator library and trans-activating RNA library displays relatively narrowed gene expression pattern. The reported study provides a versatile toolbox for rapidly constructing a large family of prokaryotic regulatory elements. These libraries also facilitate the implementation of combinatorial pathway engineering principles and the engineering of more efficient microbial cell factory for various biomanufacturing applications.

  19. International, collaborative assessment of 146 000 prenatal karyotypes: expected limitations if only chromosome-specific probes and fluorescent in-situ hybridization are used

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, M.I.; Henry, G.P.; Miller, W.A.; Bui, T.H.; Snidjers, R.J.; Wapner, R.J.; Miny, P.; Johnson, M.P.; Peakman, D.; Johnson, A.; Nicolaides, K.; Holzgreve, W.; Ebrahim, S.A.D.; Babu, R.; Jackson, L.

    2017-01-01

    The development of chromosome-specific probes (CSP) and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) has allowed for very rapid identification of selected numerical abnormalities. We attempt here to determine, in principle, what percentage of abnormalities would be detectable if only CSP-FISH were performed without karyotype for prenatal diagnosis. A total of 146 128 consecutive karyotypes for prenatal diagnosis from eight centres in four countries for 5 years were compared with predicted detecti...

  20. Rapid evolution of piRNA pathway in the teleost fish: implication for an adaptation to transposon diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Minhan; Chen, Feng; Luo, Majing; Cheng, Yibin; Zhao, Huabin; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2014-05-19

    The Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is responsible for germline specification, gametogenesis, transposon silencing, and genome integrity. Transposable elements can disrupt genome and its functions. However, piRNA pathway evolution and its adaptation to transposon diversity in the teleost fish remain unknown. This article unveils evolutionary scene of piRNA pathway and its association with diverse transposons by systematically comparative analysis on diverse teleost fish genomes. Selective pressure analysis on piRNA pathway and miRNA/siRNA (microRNA/small interfering RNA) pathway genes between teleosts and mammals showed an accelerated evolution of piRNA pathway genes in the teleost lineages, and positive selection on functional PAZ (Piwi/Ago/Zwille) and Tudor domains involved in the Piwi-piRNA/Tudor interaction, suggesting that the amino acid substitutions are adaptive to their functions in piRNA pathway in the teleost fish species. Notably five piRNA pathway genes evolved faster in the swamp eel, a kind of protogynous hermaphrodite fish, than the other teleosts, indicating a differential evolution of piRNA pathway between the swamp eel and other gonochoristic fishes. In addition, genome-wide analysis showed higher diversity of transposons in the teleost fish species compared with mammals. Our results suggest that rapidly evolved piRNA pathway in the teleost fish is likely to be involved in the adaption to transposon diversity. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. HYPOTHESIS: PARALOG FORMATION FROM PROGENITOR PROTEINS AND PARALOG MUTAGENESIS SPUR THE RAPID EVOLUTION OF TELOMERE BINDING PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur J Lustig

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Through elegant studies in fungal cells and complex organisms, we propose a unifying paradigm for the rapid evolution of telomere binding proteins (TBPs that associate with either (or both telomeric DNA and telomeric proteins. TBPs protect and regulate telomere structure and function. Four critical factors are involved. First, TBPs that commonly bind to telomeric DNA include the c-Myb binding proteins, OB-fold single-stranded binding proteins, and G-G base paired Hoogsteen structure (G4 binding proteins. Each contributes independently or, in some cases, cooperatively, to provide a minimum level of telomere function. As a result of these minimal requirements and the great abundance of homologs of these motifs in the proteome, DNA telomere-binding activity may be generated more easily than expected. Second, telomere dysfunction gives rise to genome instability, through the elevation of recombination rates, genome ploidy, and the frequency of gene mutations. The formation of paralogs that diverge from their progenitor proteins ultimately can form a high frequency of altered TBPs with altered functions. Third, TBPs that assemble into complexes (e.g. mammalian shelterin derive benefits from the novel emergent functions. Fourth, a limiting factor in the evolution of TBP complexes is the formation of mutually compatible interaction surfaces amongst the TBPs. These factors may have different degrees of importance in the evolution of different phyla, illustrated by the apparently simpler telomeres in complex plants. Selective pressures that can utilize the mechanisms of paralog formation and mutagenesis to drive TBP evolution along routes dependent on the requisite physiologic changes.

  2. Coastal saltmarsh managed realignment drives rapid breach inlet and external creek evolution, Freiston Shore (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, Daniel A.; Möller, Iris; Spencer, Thomas; Smith, Geoffrey M.; Thomson, Andrew G.; Hill, Ross A.

    2014-03-01

    The creation of saltmarsh through the managed realignment of sea defences, implemented in NW Europe as a sustainable coastal defence option, represents a substantial hydrodynamic perturbation to the local coastal system. The impact of a significantly increased tidal prism on hydromorphological features was investigated at Freiston Shore, Lincolnshire UK. Local tidal conditions and inadequate drainage at this realignment trial contributed to significant channel erosion due to the establishment of water surface slopes and pooling between the newly realigned site and the adjacent intertidal zone. Very high spatial resolution aerial photography and blimp photography were used to monitor inlet evolution from breaching in August 2002 to March 2008, showing a highly non-linear response with breach channels increasing in width by up to 960% within 2.5 months. Airborne laser scanning/LiDAR and terrestrial laser scanning quantified breach channel volume increases, showing a similar pattern. Breach channel evolution did not follow established tidal prism-channel width/cross-sectional area relationships that are often used to guide realignment design. Pre- and post-breach rates of external creek morphology change between 1999 and 2006 were also quantified, with intertidal creeks attached to the breach channels increasing significantly after realignment in both width and depth. This study highlights the physical processes affected by managed realignment, and the importance of understanding the causes of complex water surface slopes at multiple scales.

  3. Rapid evolution of asymmetric reproductive incompatibilities in stalk-eyed flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Emily G; Brand, Cara L; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2014-02-01

    The steps by which isolated populations acquire reproductive incompatibilities remain poorly understood. One potentially important process is postcopulatory sexual selection because it can generate divergence between populations in traits that influence fertilization success after copulation. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of this form of reproductive isolation by conducting reciprocal crosses between variably diverged populations of stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni). First, we measure seven types of reproductive incompatibility between copulation and fertilization. We then compare fertilization success to hatching success to quantify hybrid inviability. Finally, we determine if sperm competition acts to reinforce or counteract any incompatibilities. We find evidence for multiple incompatibilities in most crosses, including failure to store sperm after mating, failure of sperm to reach the site of fertilization, failure of sperm to fertilize eggs, and failure of embryos to develop. Local sperm have precedence over foreign sperm, but this effect is due mainly to differences in sperm transfer and reduced hatching success. Crosses between recently diverged populations are asymmetrical with regard to the degree and type of incompatibility. Because sexual conflict in these flies is low, postcopulatory sexual selection, rather than antagonistic coevolution, likely causes incompatibilities due to mismatches between male and female reproductive traits. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Rapid evolution of avirulence genes in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ju; Si, Weina; Deng, Qiming; Li, Ping; Yang, Sihai

    2014-01-01

    Background Rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most devastating pathogens in rice. Avirulence genes in this fungus share a gene-for-gene relationship with the resistance genes in its host rice. Although numerous studies have shown that rice blast R-genes are extremely diverse and evolve rapidly in their host populations, little is known about the evolutionary patterns of the Avr-genes in the pathogens. Results Here, six well-characterized Avr-genes and seven randomly selected n...

  5. Sequences from first settlers reveal rapid evolution in Icelandic mtDNA pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgason, Agnar; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Ghosh, Shyamali; Sigurethardóttir, Sigrún; Sampietro, Maria Lourdes; Gigli, Elena; Baker, Adam; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Arnadóttir, Lilja; Thornorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefánsson, Kári

    2009-01-01

    A major task in human genetics is to understand the nature of the evolutionary processes that have shaped the gene pools of contemporary populations. Ancient DNA studies have great potential to shed light on the evolution of populations because they provide the opportunity to sample from the same population at different points in time. Here, we show that a sample of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 68 early medieval Icelandic skeletal remains is more closely related to sequences from contemporary inhabitants of Scotland, Ireland, and Scandinavia than to those from the modern Icelandic population. Due to a faster rate of genetic drift in the Icelandic mtDNA pool during the last 1,100 years, the sequences carried by the first settlers were better preserved in their ancestral gene pools than among their descendants in Iceland. These results demonstrate the inferential power gained in ancient DNA studies through the application of population genetics analyses to relatively large samples.

  6. Maturation trends indicative of rapid evolution preceded the collapse of northern cod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Esben M; Heino, Mikko; Lilly, George R; Morgan, M Joanne; Brattey, John; Ernande, Bruno; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2004-04-29

    Northern cod, comprising populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) off southern Labrador and eastern Newfoundland, supported major fisheries for hundreds of years. But in the late 1980s and early 1990s, northern cod underwent one of the worst collapses in the history of fisheries. The Canadian government closed the directed fishing for northern cod in July 1992, but even after a decade-long offshore moratorium, population sizes remain historically low. Here we show that, up until the moratorium, the life history of northern cod continually shifted towards maturation at earlier ages and smaller sizes. Because confounding effects of mortality changes and growth-mediated phenotypic plasticity are accounted for in our analyses, this finding strongly suggests fisheries-induced evolution of maturation patterns in the direction predicted by theory. We propose that fisheries managers could use the method described here as a tool to provide warning signals about changes in life history before more overt evidence of population decline becomes manifest.

  7. Karyotype and identification of sex in two endangered crane species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodpasture, C.; Seluja, G.; Gee, G.; Wood, Don A.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory procedure for sex identification of monomorphic birds was developed using modern cytological methods of detecting chromosome abnormalities in human amniotic fluid samples. A pin feather is taken from a pre-fledging bird for tissue culture and karyotype analysis. Through this method, the sex was identified and the karyotype described of the whooping crane (Grus americana) and the Mississippi sandhill crane (G. canadensis pulla). Giemsa-stained karyotypes of these species showed an identical chromosome constitution with 2n = 78 + 2. However, differences in the amount of centromeric heterochromatin were observed in the Mississippi sandhill crane when compared to the whooping crane C-banded karyotype.

  8. Microstructure Evolution and Biodegradation Behavior of Laser Rapid Solidified Mg–Al–Zn Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongxian He

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The too fast degradation of magnesium (Mg alloys is a major impediment hindering their orthopedic application, despite their superior mechanical properties and favorable biocompatibility. In this study, the degradation resistance of AZ61 (Al 6 wt. %, Zn 1 wt. %, remaining Mg was enhanced by rapid solidification via selective laser melting (SLM. The results indicated that an increase of the laser power was beneficial for enhancing degradation resistance and microhardness due to the increase of relative density and formation of uniformed equiaxed grains. However, too high a laser power led to the increase of mass loss and decrease of microhardness due to coarsened equiaxed grains and a reduced solid solution of Al in the Mg matrix. In addition, immersion tests showed that the apatite increased with the increase of immersion time, which indicated that SLMed AZ61 possessed good bioactivity.

  9. The evolution of structural and chemical heterogeneity during rapid solidification at gas atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golod, V. M.; Sufiiarov, V. Sh

    2017-04-01

    Gas atomization is a high-performance process for manufacturing superfine metal powders. Formation of the powder particles takes place primarily through the fragmentation of alloy melt flow with high-pressure inert gas, which leads to the formation of non-uniform sized micron-scale particles and subsequent their rapid solidification due to heat exchange with gas environment. The article presents results of computer modeling of crystallization process, simulation and experimental studies of the cellular-dendrite structure formation and microsegregation in different size particles. It presents results of adaptation of the approach for local nonequilibrium solidification to conditions of crystallization at gas atomization, detected border values of the particle size at which it is possible a manifestation of diffusionless crystallization.

  10. Genomic insights into the rapid emergence and evolution of MDR in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Alex J; Harrison, Ewan M; Stanczak-Mrozek, Kinga; Leggett, Bernadette; Waller, Andrew; Holmes, Mark A; Lloyd, David H; Lindsay, Jodi A; Loeffler, Anette

    2015-04-01

    MDR methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) strains have emerged rapidly as major canine pathogens and present serious treatment issues and concerns to public health due to their, albeit low, zoonotic potential. A further understanding of the genetics of resistance arising from a broadly susceptible background of S. pseudintermedius is needed. We sequenced the genomes of 12 S. pseudintermedius isolates of varied STs and resistance phenotypes. Nine distinct clonal lineages had acquired either staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec elements and/or Tn5405-like elements carrying up to five resistance genes [aphA3, sat, aadE, erm(B), dfrG] to generate MRSP, MDR methicillin-susceptible S. pseudintermedius and MDR MRSP populations. The most successful and clinically problematic MDR MRSP clones, ST68 SCCmecV(T) and ST71 SCCmecII-III, have further accumulated mutations in gyrA and grlA conferring resistance to fluoroquinolones. The carriage of additional mobile genetic elements (MGEs) was highly variable, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer is frequent in S. pseudintermedius populations. Importantly, the data suggest that MDR MRSP evolved rapidly by the acquisition of a very limited number of MGEs and mutations, and that the use of many classes of antimicrobials may co-select for the spread and emergence of MDR and XDR strains. Antimicrobial stewardship will need to be comprehensive, encompassing human medicine and veterinary disciplines to successfully preserve antimicrobial efficacy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Comparative chromosome painting of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) and saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) karyotypes with human and dromedary camel probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Perelman, Polina L; Grafodatskaya, Darya A; Nguyen, Trung T; Thompson, Mary; Roelke-Parker, Melody E; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2014-06-12

    Pronghorn (Antilocapridae, 2n = 58) and saola (Bovidae, 2n = 50) are members of Pecora, a highly diversified group of even-toed hoofed mammals. Karyotypes of these species were not involved in chromosome painting studies despite their intriguing phylogenetic positions in Pecora. To trace the chromosome evolution during very fast radiation of main families from the common Pecoran ancestor, high-resolution comparative chromosome maps of pronghorn and saola with human (HSA) and dromedary camel (CDR) painting probes were established. The human and dromedary camel painting probes revealed 50 and 64 conserved segments respectively in the pronghorn genome, while 51 and 63 conserved segments respectively in the saola genome. Integrative analysis with published comparative maps showed that inversions in chromosomes homologous to CDR19/35/19 (HSA 10/20/10), CDR12/34/12 (HSA12/22/12/22), CDR10/33/10 (HSA 11) are present in representatives of all five living Pecoran families. The pronghorn karyotype could have formed from a putative 2n = 58 Pecoran ancestral karyotype by one fission and one fusion and that the saola karyotype differs from the presumed 2n = 60 bovid ancestral karyotype (2n = 60) by five fusions. The establishment of high-resolution comparative maps for pronghorn and saola has shed some new insights into the putative ancestral karyotype, chromosomal evolution and phylogenic relationships in Pecora. No cytogenetic signature rearrangements were found that could unite the Antilocapridae with Giraffidae or with any other Pecoran families. Our data on the saola support a separate position of Pseudorigyna subtribe rather than its affinity to either Bovina or Bubalina, but the saola phylogenetic position within Bovidae remains unresolved.

  12. Comparative chromosome painting of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) and saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) karyotypes with human and dromedary camel probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Pronghorn (Antilocapridae, 2n = 58) and saola (Bovidae, 2n = 50) are members of Pecora, a highly diversified group of even-toed hoofed mammals. Karyotypes of these species were not involved in chromosome painting studies despite their intriguing phylogenetic positions in Pecora. Results To trace the chromosome evolution during very fast radiation of main families from the common Pecoran ancestor, high-resolution comparative chromosome maps of pronghorn and saola with human (HSA) and dromedary camel (CDR) painting probes were established. The human and dromedary camel painting probes revealed 50 and 64 conserved segments respectively in the pronghorn genome, while 51 and 63 conserved segments respectively in the saola genome. Integrative analysis with published comparative maps showed that inversions in chromosomes homologous to CDR19/35/19 (HSA 10/20/10), CDR12/34/12 (HSA12/22/12/22), CDR10/33/10 (HSA 11) are present in representatives of all five living Pecoran families. The pronghorn karyotype could have formed from a putative 2n = 58 Pecoran ancestral karyotype by one fission and one fusion and that the saola karyotype differs from the presumed 2n = 60 bovid ancestral karyotype (2n = 60) by five fusions. Conclusion The establishment of high-resolution comparative maps for pronghorn and saola has shed some new insights into the putative ancestral karyotype, chromosomal evolution and phylogenic relationships in Pecora. No cytogenetic signature rearrangements were found that could unite the Antilocapridae with Giraffidae or with any other Pecoran families. Our data on the saola support a separate position of Pseudorigyna subtribe rather than its affinity to either Bovina or Bubalina, but the saola phylogenetic position within Bovidae remains unresolved. PMID:24923361

  13. Sequences from first settlers reveal rapid evolution in Icelandic mtDNA pool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnar Helgason

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A major task in human genetics is to understand the nature of the evolutionary processes that have shaped the gene pools of contemporary populations. Ancient DNA studies have great potential to shed light on the evolution of populations because they provide the opportunity to sample from the same population at different points in time. Here, we show that a sample of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control region sequences from 68 early medieval Icelandic skeletal remains is more closely related to sequences from contemporary inhabitants of Scotland, Ireland, and Scandinavia than to those from the modern Icelandic population. Due to a faster rate of genetic drift in the Icelandic mtDNA pool during the last 1,100 years, the sequences carried by the first settlers were better preserved in their ancestral gene pools than among their descendants in Iceland. These results demonstrate the inferential power gained in ancient DNA studies through the application of population genetics analyses to relatively large samples.

  14. The relative importance of rapid evolution for plant-microbe interactions depends on ecological context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhorst, Casey P; Lennon, Jay T; Lau, Jennifer A

    2014-06-22

    Evolution can occur on ecological time-scales, affecting community and ecosystem processes. However, the importance of evolutionary change relative to ecological processes remains largely unknown. Here, we analyse data from a long-term experiment in which we allowed plant populations to evolve for three generations in dry or wet soils and used a reciprocal transplant to compare the ecological effect of drought and the effect of plant evolutionary responses to drought on soil microbial communities and nutrient availability. Plants that evolved under drought tended to support higher bacterial and fungal richness, and increased fungal : bacterial ratios in the soil. Overall, the magnitudes of ecological and evolutionary effects on microbial communities were similar; however, the strength and direction of these effects depended on the context in which they were measured. For example, plants that evolved in dry environments increased bacterial abundance in dry contemporary environments, but decreased bacterial abundance in wet contemporary environments. Our results suggest that interactions between recent evolutionary history and ecological context affect both the direction and magnitude of plant effects on soil microbes. Consequently, an eco-evolutionary perspective is required to fully understand plant-microbe interactions.

  15. Obstetric outcomes in women with Turner karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, A; Källén, K; Barrenäs, M-L; Landin-Wilhelmsen, K; Hanson, C; Bryman, I; Wennerholm, U-B

    2011-11-01

    Women with Turner syndrome (TS) have high risk of cardiovascular complications and hypertensive disorders. Few studies have analyzed obstetric outcome in women with TS. This study compared obstetric outcome in women with TS karyotype with women in the general population. The Swedish Genetic Turner Register was cross-linked with the Swedish Medical Birth Register between 1973 and 2007. Obstetric outcome in singletons was compared with a reference group of 56,000 women from the general population. Obstetric outcome in twins was described separately. A total of 202 singletons and three sets of twins were born to 115 women with a TS karyotype that was unknown in 52% at time of pregnancy. At first delivery, TS women of singletons were older than controls (median 30 vs. 26 yr, P < 0.0001). Preeclampsia occurred in 6.3 vs. 3.0% (P = 0.07). Aortic dissection occurred in one woman. Compared with the general population, the gestational age was shorter in children born by TS women (-6.4 d, P = 0.0067), and median birth weight was lower (-208 g, P = 0.0012), but sd scores for weight and length at birth were similar. The cesarean section rate was 35.6% in TS women and 11.8% in controls (P < 0.0001). There was no difference in birth defects in children of TS women as compared with controls. Obstetric outcomes in women with a TS karyotype were mostly favorable. Singletons of TS women had shorter gestational age, but similar size at birth, adjusted for gestational age and sex. Birth defects did not differ between TS and controls.

  16. Monosomal karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia: A better indicator of poor prognosis than a complex karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breems, Dimitri A.; van Putten, Wim L. J.; de Greef, Georgine E.; van Zelderen-Bhola, Shama L.; Gerssen-Schoorl, Klasien B. J.; Mellink, Clemens H. M.; Nieuwint, Aggie; Jotterand, Martine; Hagemeijer, Anne; Beverloo, H. Berna; Lowenberg, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of various cytogenetic components of a complex karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods Cytogenetics and overall survival (OS) were analyzed in 1,975 AML patients age 15 to 60 years. Results Besides AML with normal cytogenetics (CN)

  17. Monosomal karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia : A better indicator of poor prognosis than a complex karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breems, Dimitri A.; Van Putten, Wim L. J.; De Greef, Georgine E.; Van Zelderen-Bhola, Shama L.; Gerssen-Schoorl, Klasien B. J.; Mellink, Clemens H. M.; Nieuwint, Aggie; Jotterand, Martine; Hagemeijer, Anne; Beverloo, H. Berna; Lowenberg, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of various cytogenetic components of a complex karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods Cytogenetics and overall survival (OS) were analyzed in 1,975 AML patients age 15 to 60 years. Results Besides AML with normal cytogenetics (CN)

  18. Rapid birth-death evolution specific to xenobiotic cytochrome P450 genes in vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Genes vary greatly in their long-term phylogenetic stability and there exists no general explanation for these differences. The cytochrome P450 (CYP450 gene superfamily is well suited to investigating this problem because it is large and well studied, and it includes both stable and unstable genes. CYP450 genes encode oxidase enzymes that function in metabolism of endogenous small molecules and in detoxification of xenobiotic compounds. Both types of enzymes have been intensively studied. My analysis of ten nearly complete vertebrate genomes indicates that each genome contains 50-80 CYP450 genes, which are about evenly divided between phylogenetically stable and unstable genes. The stable genes are characterized by few or no gene duplications or losses in species ranging from bony fish to mammals, whereas unstable genes are characterized by frequent gene duplications and losses (birth-death evolution even among closely related species. All of the CYP450 genes that encode enzymes with known endogenous substrates are phylogenetically stable. In contrast, most of the unstable genes encode enzymes that function as xenobiotic detoxifiers. Nearly all unstable CYP450 genes in the mouse and human genomes reside in a few dense gene clusters, forming unstable gene islands that arose by recurrent local gene duplication. Evidence for positive selection in amino acid sequence is restricted to these unstable CYP450 genes, and sites of selection are associated with substrate-binding regions in the protein structure. These results can be explained by a general model in which phylogenetically stable genes have core functions in development and physiology, whereas unstable genes have accessory functions associated with unstable environmental interactions such as toxin and pathogen exposure. Unstable gene islands in vertebrates share some functional properties with bacterial genomic islands, though they arise by local gene duplication rather than horizontal gene

  19. Rapid evolution of virulence and drug resistance in the emerging zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T G Holden

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen that infects pigs and can occasionally cause serious infections in humans. S. suis infections occur sporadically in human Europe and North America, but a recent major outbreak has been described in China with high levels of mortality. The mechanisms of S. suis pathogenesis in humans and pigs are poorly understood.The sequencing of whole genomes of S. suis isolates provides opportunities to investigate the genetic basis of infection. Here we describe whole genome sequences of three S. suis strains from the same lineage: one from European pigs, and two from human cases from China and Vietnam. Comparative genomic analysis was used to investigate the variability of these strains. S. suis is phylogenetically distinct from other Streptococcus species for which genome sequences are currently available. Accordingly, approximately 40% of the approximately 2 Mb genome is unique in comparison to other Streptococcus species. Finer genomic comparisons within the species showed a high level of sequence conservation; virtually all of the genome is common to the S. suis strains. The only exceptions are three approximately 90 kb regions, present in the two isolates from humans, composed of integrative conjugative elements and transposons. Carried in these regions are coding sequences associated with drug resistance. In addition, small-scale sequence variation has generated pseudogenes in putative virulence and colonization factors.The genomic inventories of genetically related S. suis strains, isolated from distinct hosts and diseases, exhibit high levels of conservation. However, the genomes provide evidence that horizontal gene transfer has contributed to the evolution of drug resistance.

  20. Rapid evolution of virulence and drug resistance in the emerging zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Matthew T G; Hauser, Heidi; Sanders, Mandy; Ngo, Thi Hoa; Cherevach, Inna; Cronin, Ann; Goodhead, Ian; Mungall, Karen; Quail, Michael A; Price, Claire; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Sharp, Sarah; Croucher, Nicholas J; Chieu, Tran Bich; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Diep, To Song; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Kehoe, Michael; Leigh, James A; Ward, Philip N; Dowson, Christopher G; Whatmore, Adrian M; Chanter, Neil; Iversen, Pernille; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Slater, Josh D; Smith, Hilde E; Spratt, Brian G; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun; Bentley, Stephen; Barrell, Barclay G; Schultsz, Constance; Maskell, Duncan J; Parkhill, Julian

    2009-07-15

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen that infects pigs and can occasionally cause serious infections in humans. S. suis infections occur sporadically in human Europe and North America, but a recent major outbreak has been described in China with high levels of mortality. The mechanisms of S. suis pathogenesis in humans and pigs are poorly understood. The sequencing of whole genomes of S. suis isolates provides opportunities to investigate the genetic basis of infection. Here we describe whole genome sequences of three S. suis strains from the same lineage: one from European pigs, and two from human cases from China and Vietnam. Comparative genomic analysis was used to investigate the variability of these strains. S. suis is phylogenetically distinct from other Streptococcus species for which genome sequences are currently available. Accordingly, approximately 40% of the approximately 2 Mb genome is unique in comparison to other Streptococcus species. Finer genomic comparisons within the species showed a high level of sequence conservation; virtually all of the genome is common to the S. suis strains. The only exceptions are three approximately 90 kb regions, present in the two isolates from humans, composed of integrative conjugative elements and transposons. Carried in these regions are coding sequences associated with drug resistance. In addition, small-scale sequence variation has generated pseudogenes in putative virulence and colonization factors. The genomic inventories of genetically related S. suis strains, isolated from distinct hosts and diseases, exhibit high levels of conservation. However, the genomes provide evidence that horizontal gene transfer has contributed to the evolution of drug resistance.

  1. Rapid evolution of a recently retroposed transcription factor YY2 in mammalian genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, C; Lu, X; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2005-11-11

    YY2 was originally identified due to its unusual similarity to the evolutionarily well conserved, zinc-finger gene YY1. In this study, we have determined the evolutionary origin and conservation of YY2 using comparative genomic approaches. Our results indicate that YY2 is a retroposed copy of YY1 that has been inserted into another gene locus named Mbtps2 (membrane-bound transcription factor protease site 2). This retroposition is estimated to have occurred after the divergence of placental mammals from other vertebrates based on the detection of YY2 only in the placental mammals. The N-terminal and C-terminal regions of YY2 have evolved under different selection pressures. The N-terminal region has evolved at a very fast pace with very limited functional constraints whereas the DNA-binding, C-terminal region still maintains very similar sequence structure as YY1 and is also well conserved among placental mammals. In situ hybridizations using different adult mouse tissues indicate that mouse YY2 is expressed at relatively low levels in Purkinje and granular cells of cerebellum, and neuronal cells of cerebrum, but at very high levels in testis. The expression levels of YY2 is much lower than YY1, but the overall spatial expression patterns are similar to those of Mbtps2, suggesting a possible shared transcriptional control between YY2 and Mbtps2. Taken together, the formation and evolution of YY2 represent a very unusual case where a transcription factor was first retroposed into another gene locus encoding a protease and survived with different selection schemes and expression patterns.

  2. Evolution of rapidly solidified NiAlCu(B) alloy microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeppe, Tomasz; Ochin, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    This study concerned phase transformations observed after rapid solidification and annealing at 500, 700 and 800 degrees C in 56.3 Ni-39.9 Al-3.8 Cu-0.06 B (E1) and 59.8 Ni-36.0 Al-4.3 Cu-0.06 B (E2) alloys (composition in at.%). Injection casting led to a homogeneous structure of very small, one-phase grains (2-4 microm in size). In both alloys, the phase observed at room temperature was martensite of L1(0) structure. The process of the formation of the Ni(5)Al(3) phase by atomic reordering proceeded at 285-394 degrees C in the case of E1 alloy and 450-550 degrees C in the case of E2 alloy. Further decomposition into NiAl (beta) and Ni(3)Al (gamma') phases, the microstructure and crystallography of the phases depended on the path of transformations, proceeding in the investigated case through the transformation of martensite crystallographic variants. This preserved precise crystallographic orientation between the subsequent phases, very stable plate-like morphology and very small beta + gamma' grains after annealing at 800 degrees C.

  3. Mobile Technology in the Perioperative Arena: Rapid Evolution and Future Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Brian S; Gupta, Rajnish K; McEvoy, Matthew D

    2017-03-01

    Throughout the history of medicine, physicians have relied upon disruptive innovations and technologies to improve the quality of care delivered, patient outcomes, and patient satisfaction. The implementation of mobile technology in health care is quickly becoming the next disruptive technology. We first review the history of mobile technology over the past 3 decades, discuss the impact of hardware and software, explore the rapid expansion of applications (apps), and evaluate the adoption of mobile technology in health care. Next, we discuss how technology serves as the vehicle that can transform traditional didactic learning into one that adapts to the learning behavior of the student by using concepts such as the flipped classroom, just-in-time learning, social media, and Web 2.0/3.0. The focus in this modern education paradigm is shifting from teacher-centric to learner-centric, including providers and patients, and is being delivered as context-sensitive, or semantic, learning. Finally, we present the methods by which connected health systems via mobile devices increase information collection and analysis from patients in both clinical care and research environments. This enhanced patient and provider connection has demonstrated benefits including reducing unnecessary hospital readmissions, improved perioperative health maintenance coordination, and improved care in remote and underserved areas. A significant portion of the future of health care, and specifically perioperative medicine, revolves around mobile technology, nimble learners, patient-specific information and decision-making, and continuous connectivity between patients and health care systems. As such, an understanding of developing or evaluating mobile technology likely will be important for anesthesiologists, particularly with an ever-expanding scope of practice in perioperative medicine.

  4. Recurrent Rearrangement during Adaptive Evolution in an Interspecific Yeast Hybrid Suggests a Model for Rapid Introgression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Barbara; Paulish, Terry; Stanbery, Alison; Piotrowski, Jeff; Koniges, Gregory; Kroll, Evgueny; Louis, Edward J.; Liti, Gianni; Sherlock, Gavin; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Genome rearrangements are associated with eukaryotic evolutionary processes ranging from tumorigenesis to speciation. Rearrangements are especially common following interspecific hybridization, and some of these could be expected to have strong selective value. To test this expectation we created de novo interspecific yeast hybrids between two diverged but largely syntenic Saccharomyces species, S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum, then experimentally evolved them under continuous ammonium limitation. We discovered that a characteristic interspecific genome rearrangement arose multiple times in independently evolved populations. We uncovered nine different breakpoints, all occurring in a narrow ∼1-kb region of chromosome 14, and all producing an “interspecific fusion junction” within the MEP2 gene coding sequence, such that the 5′ portion derives from S. cerevisiae and the 3′ portion derives from S. uvarum. In most cases the rearrangements altered both chromosomes, resulting in what can be considered to be an introgression of a several-kb region of S. uvarum into an otherwise intact S. cerevisiae chromosome 14, while the homeologous S. uvarum chromosome 14 experienced an interspecific reciprocal translocation at the same breakpoint within MEP2, yielding a chimaeric chromosome; these events result in the presence in the cell of two MEP2 fusion genes having identical breakpoints. Given that MEP2 encodes for a high-affinity ammonium permease, that MEP2 fusion genes arise repeatedly under ammonium-limitation, and that three independent evolved isolates carrying MEP2 fusion genes are each more fit than their common ancestor, the novel MEP2 fusion genes are very likely adaptive under ammonium limitation. Our results suggest that, when homoploid hybrids form, the admixture of two genomes enables swift and otherwise unavailable evolutionary innovations. Furthermore, the architecture of the MEP2 rearrangement suggests a model for rapid introgression, a phenomenon seen in

  5. Recurrent rearrangement during adaptive evolution in an interspecific yeast hybrid suggests a model for rapid introgression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dunn

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome rearrangements are associated with eukaryotic evolutionary processes ranging from tumorigenesis to speciation. Rearrangements are especially common following interspecific hybridization, and some of these could be expected to have strong selective value. To test this expectation we created de novo interspecific yeast hybrids between two diverged but largely syntenic Saccharomyces species, S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum, then experimentally evolved them under continuous ammonium limitation. We discovered that a characteristic interspecific genome rearrangement arose multiple times in independently evolved populations. We uncovered nine different breakpoints, all occurring in a narrow ~1-kb region of chromosome 14, and all producing an "interspecific fusion junction" within the MEP2 gene coding sequence, such that the 5' portion derives from S. cerevisiae and the 3' portion derives from S. uvarum. In most cases the rearrangements altered both chromosomes, resulting in what can be considered to be an introgression of a several-kb region of S. uvarum into an otherwise intact S. cerevisiae chromosome 14, while the homeologous S. uvarum chromosome 14 experienced an interspecific reciprocal translocation at the same breakpoint within MEP2, yielding a chimaeric chromosome; these events result in the presence in the cell of two MEP2 fusion genes having identical breakpoints. Given that MEP2 encodes for a high-affinity ammonium permease, that MEP2 fusion genes arise repeatedly under ammonium-limitation, and that three independent evolved isolates carrying MEP2 fusion genes are each more fit than their common ancestor, the novel MEP2 fusion genes are very likely adaptive under ammonium limitation. Our results suggest that, when homoploid hybrids form, the admixture of two genomes enables swift and otherwise unavailable evolutionary innovations. Furthermore, the architecture of the MEP2 rearrangement suggests a model for rapid introgression, a

  6. Isolated single umbilical artery and fetal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagklis, T; Defigueiredo, D; Staboulidou, I; Casagrandi, D; Nicolaides, K H

    2010-09-01

    To determine the need for fetal karyotyping in cases of an isolated single umbilical artery (SUA) identified during the second-trimester routine anomaly scan. All patients booked for antenatal care and delivery in our hospital are offered two ultrasound scans in pregnancy, one at 11-13 weeks' gestation as part of screening for chromosomal defects and another at 20-23 weeks for detailed fetal examination. In addition we examine patients referred from other hospitals because of suspected fetal abnormalities during their routine second-trimester scan. We performed a search of the database to retrieve all cases with an SUA and reviewed the ultrasound findings, fetal karyotype and pregnancy outcome. There were 643 cases with SUA, including 424 (65.9%) where the condition was isolated, 133 (20.7%) with one major fetal defect and 86 (13.4%) with multiple defects. The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was 0% in the isolated SUA group, 3.7% in those with one defect and 50.7% in those with multiple defects. The commonest chromosomal abnormalities were trisomy 18, trisomy 13 and triploidy, which together accounted for 82.9% of cases. The finding of an SUA should prompt the sonographer to search for fetal defects and if these are found the risk for chromosomal abnormalities is increased. In cases of apparently isolated SUA there is no evidence of increased risk of chromosomal abnormalities. (c) 2010 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Karyotype and meiosis studies in Oxycatantops spissus (Walker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The standard karyotype of Oxycatantops spissus (Walker) (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Acridinae) from Limbe in the South West Province of Cameroon, comprises 2n = 23 acrocentric chromosomes in the male with the XO/XX sex determining mechanism [2n = 23 (22AA+XO)]. The karyotype structure is represented by five pairs of ...

  8. Karyotype instability in the ponerine ant genus Diacamma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To develop a better understanding of the mechanism involved in speciation of Diacamma, we have analysed karyotypes of D. ceylonense and 'nilgiri'. In both, we found surprising inter-individual and intra-individual karyotypic mosaicism. The observed numerical variability, both at intra-individual and inter-individual levels, ...

  9. Cytogenetic analysis of colorectal adenomas: karyotypic comparisons of synchronous tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomme, L; Bardi, G; Pandis, N

    1998-01-01

    in the colon, no karyotypic similarity between the lesions was found. Our findings indicate that whereas close, but macroscopically distinct, synchronous colorectal adenomas usually have a common pathway of progression, perhaps even the same clonal origin, large bowel adenomas at a considerable distance from...... one another exhibit karyotypic differences, indicating that they arise independently....

  10. Exploring Contemporary Issues in Genetics & Society: Karyotyping, Biological Sex, & Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    In this two-part activity, high school biology students examine human karyotyping, sex-chromosome-linked disorders, and the relationship between biological sex and gender. Through interactive simulations and a structured discussion lab, students create a human karyotype and diagnose chromosomal disorders in hypothetical patients, as well as…

  11. Studies on the chromosomes of tropical lilies 2: karyotype of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further to the work on the members of the West Tropical African “Lilies”, the karyotype of Gloriosa superba is reported. Chromosome count from root tip cells showed 2n = 56 and the karyotype consists of 16 pairs of metacentric chromosomes and 12 pairs of sub-metacentries. Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural ...

  12. Karyotype and meiosis studies in Oxycatantops spissus (Walker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RHUMSIKI

    The standard karyotype of Oxycatantops spissus (Walker) (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Acridinae) from. Limbe in the South West Province of Cameroon, comprises 2n = 23 acrocentric chromosomes in the male with the XO/XX sex determining mechanism [2n = 23 (22AA+XO)]. The karyotype structure is represented by five pairs of ...

  13. Karyotype studies on Tagetes erecta L. and Tagetes patula L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Karyotypes of nine Tagetes erecta L. accessions and three Tagetes patula L. accessions were studied. The chromosome numbers of T. erecta and T. patula were 2n=2x=24 and 2n=4x=48, respectively. The karyotype formulae of T. erecta L. 'Scarletade' and 'Perfection Yellow' are 2n=2x=24=4sm+20m; '9901AB' and ...

  14. Report of Bufo tihamicus karyotype from Saudi Arabia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdulaziz

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... This study gives a description of the Karyotype of the Tihama toad Bufo tihamicus from Saudi Arabia. Samples of males and females of Bufo tihamicus Parker were collected from Gazan Province of. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The karyotype consists of a diploid number 2n = 22 and the fundamental number ...

  15. Karyotypes of the Cnidium cnidiifolium and C. olaense (Apiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Volkova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The karyotypes of Cnidium cnidiifolium and C. olaense (Apiaceae have been studied for the first time. Karyological characteristics of the species have been revealed. Karyotype includes 11 pairs metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes.

  16. Karyotype evolution and species differentiation in the genus Rattus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dhananjoy

    2014-12-31

    Dec 31, 2014 ... Rattus is the most studied genus all over the world but species of the genus are not thoroughly reported from Manipur. The present paper deals with the morphometric, cytotaxonomic and phylogenetic studies of Manipur, India. The different species of Rattus namely Rattus rattus, Rattus brunneusculus, ...

  17. Karyotype evolution and species differentiation in the genus Rattus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rattus is the most studied genus all over the world but species of the genus are not thoroughly reported from Manipur. The present paper deals with the morphometric, cytotaxonomic and phylogenetic studies of Manipur, India. The different species of Rattus namely Rattus rattus, Rattus brunneusculus, Rattus tanezumi and ...

  18. Karyotypic evolution of human meningioma. Progression through malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casartelli, C; Rogatto, S R; Barbieri Neto, J

    1989-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of an untreated sarcomatous meningioma from a patient submitted to two surgeries separated by 1 year are reported. The material from the first surgery was mostly hypodiploid, with a modal chromosome number of 42. Alterations of chromosome 22 were found in 80.6% of the cells. ...

  19. Karyotypic Evolution of the Common and Silverleaf Sunflower Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam F. Heesacker

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Silverleaf sunflower ( Torrey and Gray has been an important source of favorable alleles for broadening genetic diversity and enhancing agriculturally important traits in common sunflower ( L., and, as the closest living relative of , provides an excellent model for understanding how apparently maladaptive chromosomal rearrangements became established in this genus. The genomes of and were comparatively mapped to identify syntenic and rearranged chromosomes and develop genomic blueprints for predicting the impact of chromosomal rearrangements on interspecific gene flow. Syntenic chromosomal segments were identified and aligned using 131 orthologous DNA marker loci distributed throughout the genome (299 DNA marker loci were mapped in . We identified 28 colinear chromosomal segments, 10 colinear chromosomes, and seven chromosomal rearrangements (five non-reciprocal translocations and two inversions. Four chromosomes carrying non-reciprocal translocations apparently arose from the duplication of two chromosomes, and three chromosomes apparently arose from end-to-end or end-to-opposite-end fusions of chromosomes or chromosome segments. Chromosome duplication may reduce the initial fitness costs of chromosomal rearrangements, thereby facilitating their establishment. Despite dramatic differences in chromosome architecture, a significant fraction of the genome appears to be accessible for introgression into .

  20. Fetal karyotype: can we always trust its result?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Leite Drummond

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively investigated six cases of discrepancy between prenatal fetal karyotype and postnatal findings. In five cases, the chromosomal abnormalities initially found by CVS or amniocentesis were not confirmed by later analyses and postnatal examination. In one case, the fetal karyotype found to be normal by CVS had to be checked due to sonographic features and clinical anomalies found after birth. In most cases, the normal development on sonographic examination raised the doubt about the abnormal fetal karyotype. Discrepant findings between fetal karyotype results and sonographic findings require great caution in their interpretation and counseling of parents. Placental confined mosaicism seems to be the most frequent cause of such discrepant results. The interpretation of fetal karyotype results should always be correlated with sonographic and clinical findings.

  1. Molecular karyotype single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of early fetal demise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Liu, Yan; He, Nan-nan; Hu, Lin-li; Zhang, Yi-le; Wang, Yang; Dong, Fang-li; Guo, Yi-hong; Su, Ying-chun; Sun, Ying-pu

    2013-08-01

    We explored the application of single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP array) in molecular karyotype analysis for early spontaneous abortion detection in assisted reproductive technology (ART). SNP array was performed in 81 cases. Of the 81 cases, 16 experienced natural conception (NC) and 65 were pregnant by ART. Of the 65 cases, 4 underwent artificial insemination (AI), 32 fresh in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET), 9 fresh intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and 20 thawed embryo transfer. In the 81 cases examined 69.1% displayed an abnormal molecular karyotype. In the subjects greater than 35 years of age, the abnormal molecular karyotype rate was 87.5% higher compared to 61.4% in younger individuals (P abnormal molecular karyotype rate or type between ART (64.6%) and NC (87.5%). Compared with traditional cytogenetic diagnosis, the SNP array can identify a greater number of abnormal karyotypes.

  2. The Ancestral Carnivore Karyotype As Substantiated by Comparative Chromosome Painting of Three Pinnipeds, the Walrus, the Steller Sea Lion and the Baikal Seal (Pinnipedia, Carnivora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Perelman, Polina L; Lemskaya, Natalya A; Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Proskuryakova, Anastasia A; Burkanov, Vladimir N; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Karyotype evolution in Carnivora is thoroughly studied by classical and molecular cytogenetics and supplemented by reconstructions of Ancestral Carnivora Karyotype (ACK). However chromosome painting information from two pinniped families (Odobenidae and Otariidae) is noticeably missing. We report on the construction of the comparative chromosome map for species from each of the three pinniped families: the walrus (Odobenus rosmarus, Odobenidae-monotypic family), near threatened Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus, Otariidae) and the endemic Baikal seal (Pusa sibirica, Phocidae) using combination of human, domestic dog and stone marten whole-chromosome painting probes. The earliest karyological studies of Pinnipedia showed that pinnipeds were characterized by a pronounced karyological conservatism that is confirmed here with species from Phocidae, Otariidae and Odobenidae sharing same low number of conserved human autosomal segments (32). Chromosome painting in Pinnipedia and comparison with non-pinniped carnivore karyotypes provide strong support for refined structure of ACK with 2n = 38. Constructed comparative chromosome maps show that pinniped karyotype evolution was characterized by few tandem fusions, seemingly absent inversions and slow rate of genome rearrangements (less then one rearrangement per 10 million years). Integrative comparative analyses with published chromosome painting of Phoca vitulina revealed common cytogenetic signature for Phoca/Pusa branch and supports Phocidae and Otaroidea (Otariidae/Odobenidae) as sister groups. We revealed rearrangements specific for walrus karyotype and found the chromosomal signature linking together families Otariidae and Odobenidae. The Steller sea lion karyotype is the most conserved among three studied species and differs from the ACK by single fusion. The study underlined the strikingly slow karyotype evolution of the Pinnipedia in general and the Otariidae in particular.

  3. The Ancestral Carnivore Karyotype As Substantiated by Comparative Chromosome Painting of Three Pinnipeds, the Walrus, the Steller Sea Lion and the Baikal Seal (Pinnipedia, Carnivora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta R Beklemisheva

    Full Text Available Karyotype evolution in Carnivora is thoroughly studied by classical and molecular cytogenetics and supplemented by reconstructions of Ancestral Carnivora Karyotype (ACK. However chromosome painting information from two pinniped families (Odobenidae and Otariidae is noticeably missing. We report on the construction of the comparative chromosome map for species from each of the three pinniped families: the walrus (Odobenus rosmarus, Odobenidae-monotypic family, near threatened Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus, Otariidae and the endemic Baikal seal (Pusa sibirica, Phocidae using combination of human, domestic dog and stone marten whole-chromosome painting probes. The earliest karyological studies of Pinnipedia showed that pinnipeds were characterized by a pronounced karyological conservatism that is confirmed here with species from Phocidae, Otariidae and Odobenidae sharing same low number of conserved human autosomal segments (32. Chromosome painting in Pinnipedia and comparison with non-pinniped carnivore karyotypes provide strong support for refined structure of ACK with 2n = 38. Constructed comparative chromosome maps show that pinniped karyotype evolution was characterized by few tandem fusions, seemingly absent inversions and slow rate of genome rearrangements (less then one rearrangement per 10 million years. Integrative comparative analyses with published chromosome painting of Phoca vitulina revealed common cytogenetic signature for Phoca/Pusa branch and supports Phocidae and Otaroidea (Otariidae/Odobenidae as sister groups. We revealed rearrangements specific for walrus karyotype and found the chromosomal signature linking together families Otariidae and Odobenidae. The Steller sea lion karyotype is the most conserved among three studied species and differs from the ACK by single fusion. The study underlined the strikingly slow karyotype evolution of the Pinnipedia in general and the Otariidae in particular.

  4. Rapid divergence of histones in Hydrozoa (Cnidaria) and evolution of a novel histone involved in DNA damage response in hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Puli Chandramouli; Ubhe, Suyog; Sirwani, Neha; Lohokare, Rasika; Galande, Sanjeev

    2017-08-01

    Histones are fundamental components of chromatin in all eukaryotes. Hydra, an emerging model system belonging to the basal metazoan phylum Cnidaria, provides an ideal platform to understand the evolution of core histone components at the base of eumetazoan phyla. Hydra exhibits peculiar properties such as tremendous regenerative capacity, lack of organismal senescence and rarity of malignancy. In light of the role of histone modifications and histone variants in these processes it is important to understand the nature of histones themselves and their variants in hydra. Here, we report identification of the complete repertoire of histone-coding genes in the Hydra magnipapillata genome. Hydra histones were classified based on their copy numbers, gene structure and other characteristic features. Genomic organization of canonical histone genes revealed the presence of H2A-H2B and H3-H4 paired clusters in high frequency and also a cluster with all core histones along with H1. Phylogenetic analysis of identified members of H2A and H2B histones suggested rapid expansion of these groups in Hydrozoa resulting in the appearance of unique subtypes. Amino acid sequence level comparisons of H2A and H2B forms with bilaterian counterparts suggest the possibility of a highly mobile nature of nucleosomes in hydra. Absolute quantitation of transcripts confirmed the high copy number of histones and supported the canonical nature of H2A. Furthermore, functional characterization of H2A.X.1 and a unique variant H2A.X.2 in the gastric region suggest their role in the maintenance of genome integrity and differentiation processes. These findings provide insights into the evolution of histones and their variants in hydra. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Convergent origins and rapid evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in metazoa: insights from the ctenophora and hydrozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derelle, Romain; Momose, Tsuyoshi; Manuel, Michael; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Houliston, Evelyn

    2010-04-01

    Replacement of mRNA 5' UTR sequences by short sequences trans-spliced from specialized, noncoding, spliced leader (SL) RNAs is an enigmatic phenomenon, occurring in a set of distantly related animal groups including urochordates, nematodes, flatworms, and hydra, as well as in Euglenozoa and dinoflagellates. Whether SL trans-splicing has a common evolutionary origin and biological function among different organisms remains unclear. We have undertaken a systematic identification of SL exons in cDNA sequence data sets from non-bilaterian metazoan species and their closest unicellular relatives. SL exons were identified in ctenophores and in hydrozoan cnidarians, but not in other cnidarians, placozoans, or sponges, or in animal unicellular relatives. Mapping of SL absence/presence obtained from this and previous studies onto current phylogenetic trees favors an evolutionary scenario involving multiple origins for SLs during eumetazoan evolution rather than loss from a common ancestor. In both ctenophore and hydrozoan species, multiple SL sequences were identified, showing high sequence diversity. Detailed analysis of a large data set generated for the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica revealed trans-splicing of given mRNAs by multiple alternative SLs. No evidence was found for a common identity of trans-spliced mRNAs between different hydrozoans. One feature found specifically to characterize SL-spliced mRNAs in hydrozoans, however, was a marked adenosine enrichment immediately 3' of the SL acceptor splice site. Our findings of high sequence divergence and apparently indiscriminate use of SLs in hydrozoans, along with recent findings in other taxa, indicate that SL genes have evolved rapidly in parallel in diverse animal groups, with constraint on SL exon sequence evolution being apparently rare.

  6. Form and function of damselfish skulls: rapid and repeated evolution into a limited number of trophic niches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, W James; Westneat, Mark W

    2009-01-01

    biomechanically defined link between structure and the functional ecology of fish skulls, and indicate that certain mechanisms for transmitting motion through their jaw linkages may require particular anatomical configurations, a conclusion that contravenes the concept of "many-to-one mapping" for fish jaw mechanics. Damselfish trophic evolution is characterized by rapid and repeated shifts between a small number of eco-morphological states, an evolutionary pattern that we describe as reticulate adaptive radiation. PMID:19183467

  7. Form and function of damselfish skulls: rapid and repeated evolution into a limited number of trophic niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper W James

    2009-01-01

    data support a tight and biomechanically defined link between structure and the functional ecology of fish skulls, and indicate that certain mechanisms for transmitting motion through their jaw linkages may require particular anatomical configurations, a conclusion that contravenes the concept of "many-to-one mapping" for fish jaw mechanics. Damselfish trophic evolution is characterized by rapid and repeated shifts between a small number of eco-morphological states, an evolutionary pattern that we describe as reticulate adaptive radiation.

  8. Karyotype Patterns of Hypsolebias antenori (Cyprinodontiformes: Rivulidae): An Endangered Killifish of the Semiarid Region of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Wallace Silva; Bezerra, Juliana Galvão; Lima-Filho, Paulo Augusto; Yamamoto, Maria Emília; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2014-01-01

    Annual fish which belong to the order Cyprinodontiformes constitute an excellent model for evolutionary studies. their short life cycle, distribution in ecologically dynamic environments, and low agility make them favorable for genetic analyses. The species Hypsolebias antenori (Rivulidae), encountered in seasonal pools located in the semiarid region of Northeastern Brazil, has been the object of surveys with a view to study its ecological and behavioral aspects. This study reports on the karyotype patterns of this species, which represents the first contribution to the cytogenetics of this genus. The karyotype of this species is composed of 2n = 48 chromosomes (6m + 4sm + 36st; NF = 96); the heterochromatic regions are located in centromeric or pericentromeric position and are more pronounced in the nucleolar organizer regions. Two sites Ag-NORs/CMA+/DAPI were identified in the short arms of pairs 2 (metacentric) and 21 (subtelocentric). Unlike the other species of this family which show an evolution modulated by events of centric fusions, H. antenori shows the maintenance of a basal diploid number and the large number of bibrachial elements indicates karyotypic diversification derived by pericentric inversions. Cytogenetic analyzes in this species will provide new taxonomic markers capable of being utilized in conservation issues and systematics. PMID:24693249

  9. The Karyotype of Microsternarchus aff. bilineatus: A First Case of Y Chromosome Degeneration in Gymnotiformes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Jéssica Almeida; Cardoso, Adauto Lima; Milhomem-Paixão, Susana Suely Rodrigues; Ready, Jonathan Stuart; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko

    2017-06-01

    Various species and lineages that until recently were identified as Microsternarchus bilineatus (Hypopomidae, Gymnotiformes) have a widespread distribution in the Amazon and Orinoco River basins and across the Guiana shield. Recent molecular studies show five distinct lineages for Microsternarchus from different localities. These results suggest that this previously monotypic genus actually consists of more than one species. Here, we describe the karyotype of M. aff. bilineatus from the Cururutuia River (Bragança, Pará, Brazil). The diploid number of 48 chromosomes (14 meta-submetacentric/34 subtelo-acrocentric) is found for males and females, with an XX/XY sex chromosome system. The nucleolar organizer region is found in the short arm of pair 9. Constitutive heterochromatin occurs in the pericentromeric region of all chromosomes, in the distal region of 3p, 5p, 7p, 8q, 9q, 16q, and Xq, in the interstitial region in 2p, 10q, 11q, and 12q and all along 4p, and in a large block of the Y chromosome. These results indicate extensive karyotype divergence between this population and samples from Igarapé Tarumã Grande (Negro River, Amazonas, Brazil) studied by other researchers. Moreover, despite the diversity of sex chromosome systems found in Gymnotiformes, the XX/XY sex chromosome system of M. aff. bilineatus is the first case of Y chromosome degeneration in this order. The present data are valuable to help understand karyotype evolution in Hypopomidae.

  10. Karyotype and chromosome variability in the armadillo Chaetophractus villosus in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, L F; Luaces, J P; Alonso, F M; Merani, M S

    2014-01-01

    Karyotype and cytotype variations for the large hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus villosus) were studied throughout the species' Argentine distribution. Peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures of 421 animals were used to obtain mitotic metaphases. Preparations were subjected to conventional staining, G- and C-banding, and FISH involving a telomeric probe. Meiotic analysis was performed on testis material from 10 adults. Spermatocytes were examined for synaptonemal complexes in microspreads. The karyotype (2n = 60 XX/XY; FN = 84 without XY) showed an autosomal complement of 6 metacentric and 7 submetacentric chromosomes; the remainder was acrocentric. The X chromosome was submetacentric and the Y acrocentric. Centromeric C+ marks were observed in all chromosomes except pair 16. Three NOR signals were detected in 6q, 12p, and 26p. Two chromosomal rearrangements were characterized in chromosome pair 1 a pericentric inversion seen in the material from Jacinto Aráuz, General Madariaga and Pellegrini and a deletion in the material from Loma Verde. Interstitial telomeric signals were observed in chromosome pairs 4, 12, 16, and 26. Pachytene spermatocyte analysis confirmed the basic chromosome number and morphologies observed in mitotic karyotypes. The evolution of C. villosus involved chromosomal rearrangements as recorded for other species of its superorder. The present results establish the basis for the cytogenetic characterization of this species. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Sex chromosomes and karyotype of the (nearly mythical creature, the Gila monster, Heloderma suspectum (Squamata: Helodermatidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Johnson Pokorná

    Full Text Available A wide variety of sex determination systems exist among squamate reptiles. They can therefore serve as an important model for studies of evolutionary transitions among particular sex determination systems. However, we still have only a limited knowledge of sex determination in certain important lineages of squamates. In this respect, one of the most understudied groups is the family Helodermatidae (Anguimorpha encompassing the only two venomous species of lizards which are potentially lethal to human beings. We uncovered homomorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in the Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum with a highly heterochromatic W chromosome. The sex chromosomes are morphologically similar to the ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes of monitor lizards (Varanidae. If the sex chromosomes of helodermatids and varanids are homologous, female heterogamety may be ancestral for the whole Anguimorpha group. Moreover, we found that the karyotype of the Gila monster consists of 2n = 36 chromosomes (14 larger metacentric chromosomes and 22 acrocentric microchromosomes. 2n = 36 is the widely distributed chromosomal number among squamates. In his pioneering works representing the only previous cytogenetic examination of the family Helodermatidae, Matthey reported the karyotype as 2n = 38 and suggested a different chromosomal morphology for this species. We believe that this was probably erroneously. We also discovered a strong accumulation of telomeric sequences on several pairs of microchromosomes in the Gila monster, which is a trait documented relatively rarely in vertebrates. These new data fill an important gap in our understanding of the sex determination and karyotype evolution of squamates.

  12. Karyotype Patterns of Hypsolebias antenori (Cyprinodontiformes: Rivulidae: An Endangered Killifish of the Semiarid Region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace Silva do Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Annual fish which belong to the order Cyprinodontiformes constitute an excellent model for evolutionary studies. their short life cycle, distribution in ecologically dynamic environments, and low agility make them favorable for genetic analyses. The species Hypsolebias antenori (Rivulidae, encountered in seasonal pools located in the semiarid region of Northeastern Brazil, has been the object of surveys with a view to study its ecological and behavioral aspects. This study reports on the karyotype patterns of this species, which represents the first contribution to the cytogenetics of this genus. The karyotype of this species is composed of 2n = 48 chromosomes (6m + 4sm + 36st; NF = 96; the heterochromatic regions are located in centromeric or pericentromeric position and are more pronounced in the nucleolar organizer regions. Two sites Ag-NORs/CMA+/DAPI were identified in the short arms of pairs 2 (metacentric and 21 (subtelocentric. Unlike the other species of this family which show an evolution modulated by events of centric fusions, H. antenori shows the maintenance of a basal diploid number and the large number of bibrachial elements indicates karyotypic diversification derived by pericentric inversions. Cytogenetic analyzes in this species will provide new taxonomic markers capable of being utilized in conservation issues and systematics.

  13. Karyotype characterization and ZZ/ZW sex chromosome heteromorphism in two species of the catfish genus Ancistrus Kner, 1854 (Siluriformes: Loricariidae from the Amazon basin

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    Renildo R. de Oliveira

    Full Text Available We present karyotypic characteristics and report on the occurrence of ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in Ancistrus ranunculus (rio Xingu and Ancistrus sp. "Piagaçu" (rio Purus, of the Brazilian Amazon. Ancistrus ranunculus has a modal number of 2n=48 chromosomes, a fundamental number (FN of 82 for both sexes, and the karyotypic formula was 20m+8sm+6st+14a for males and 19m+9sm+6st+14a for females. Ancistrus sp. "Piagaçu" presented 2n=52 chromosomes, FN= 78 for males and FN= 79 for females. The karyotypic formula was 16m+8sm+2st+26a for males and 16m+9sm+2st+25a for females. The high number of acrocentric chromosomes in karyotype of Ancistrus sp. "Piagaçu" differs from the majority of Ancistrini genera studied so far, and may have resulted from pericentric inversions and translocations. The lower number of chromosomes in A. ranunculus indicates that centric fusions also occurred in the evolution of Ancistrus karyotypes. We conclude that karyotypic characteristics and the presence of sex chromosomes can constitute important cytotaxonomic markers to identify cryptic species of Ancistrus. However, sex chromosomes apparently arose independently within the genus and thus do not constitute a reliable character to analyze phylogenetic relations among Ancistrus species.

  14. Karyotypic Determinants of Chromosome Instability in Aneuploid Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, William D.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies in cancer cells and budding yeast demonstrated that aneuploidy, the state of having abnormal chromosome numbers, correlates with elevated chromosome instability (CIN), i.e. the propensity of gaining and losing chromosomes at a high frequency. Here we have investigated ploidy- and chromosome-specific determinants underlying aneuploidy-induced CIN by observing karyotype dynamics in fully isogenic aneuploid yeast strains with ploidies between 1N and 2N obtained through a random meiotic process. The aneuploid strains exhibited various levels of whole-chromosome instability (i.e. chromosome gains and losses). CIN correlates with cellular ploidy in an unexpected way: cells with a chromosomal content close to the haploid state are significantly more stable than cells displaying an apparent ploidy between 1.5 and 2N. We propose that the capacity for accurate chromosome segregation by the mitotic system does not scale continuously with an increasing number of chromosomes, but may occur via discrete steps each time a full set of chromosomes is added to the genome. On top of such general ploidy-related effect, CIN is also associated with the presence of specific aneuploid chromosomes as well as dosage imbalance between specific chromosome pairs. Our findings potentially help reconcile the divide between gene-centric versus genome-centric theories in cancer evolution. PMID:22615582

  15. Investigations of rapid thermal annealing induced structural evolution of ZnO: Ge nanocomposite thin films via GISAXS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceylan, Abdullah, E-mail: aceylanabd@yahoo.com [Department of Physics Eng., Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Ozcan, Yusuf [Department of Electricity and Energy, Pamukkale University, Denizli (Turkey); Orujalipoor, Ilghar [Department of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Huang, Yen-Chih; Jeng, U-Ser [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Ide, Semra [Department of Physics Eng., Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-06-07

    In this work, we present in depth structural investigations of nanocomposite ZnO: Ge thin films by utilizing a state of the art grazing incidence small angle x-ray spectroscopy (GISAXS) technique. The samples have been deposited by sequential r.f. and d.c. sputtering of ZnO and Ge thin film layers, respectively, on single crystal Si(100) substrates. Transformation of Ge layers into Ge nanoparticles (Ge-np) has been initiated by ex-situ rapid thermal annealing of asprepared thin film samples at 600 °C for 30, 60, and 90 s under forming gas atmosphere. A special attention has been paid on the effects of reactive and nonreactive growth of ZnO layers on the structural evolution of Ge-np. GISAXS analyses have been performed via cylindrical and spherical form factor calculations for different nanostructure types. Variations of the size, shape, and distributions of both ZnO and Ge nanostructures have been determined. It has been realized that GISAXS results are not only remarkably consistent with the electron microscopy observations but also provide additional information on the large scale size and shape distribution of the nanostructured components.

  16. Evidence that implicit assumptions of 'no evolution' of disease vectors in changing environments can be violated on a rapid timescale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egizi, Andrea; Fefferman, Nina H; Fonseca, Dina M

    2015-04-05

    Projected impacts of climate change on vector-borne disease dynamics must consider many variables relevant to hosts, vectors and pathogens, including how altered environmental characteristics might affect the spatial distributions of vector species. However, many predictive models for vector distributions consider their habitat requirements to be fixed over relevant time-scales, when they may actually be capable of rapid evolutionary change and even adaptation. We examine the genetic signature of a spatial expansion by an invasive vector into locations with novel temperature conditions compared to its native range as a proxy for how existing vector populations may respond to temporally changing habitat. Specifically, we compare invasions into different climate ranges and characterize the importance of selection from the invaded habitat. We demonstrate that vector species can exhibit evolutionary responses (altered allelic frequencies) to a temperature gradient in as little as 7-10 years even in the presence of high gene flow, and further, that this response varies depending on the strength of selection. We interpret these findings in the context of climate change predictions for vector populations and emphasize the importance of incorporating vector evolution into models of future vector-borne disease dynamics. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. A history into genetic and epigenetic evolution of food tolerance: how humanity rapidly evolved by drinking milk and eating wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Carine

    2017-12-01

    Human exposure to wheat and milk is almost global worldwide. Yet the introduction of milk and wheat is very recent (5000-10 000 years) when compared to the human evolution. The last 4 decades have seen a rise in food allergy and food intolerance to milk and wheat. Often described as plurifactorial, the cause of allergic diseases is the result from an interplay between genetic predisposition and epigenetic in the context of environmental changes. Genetic and epigenetic understanding and their contribution to allergy or other antigen-driven diseases have considerably advanced in the last few years. Yet, environmental factors are also quite difficult to identify and associate with disease risk. Can we rethink our old findings and learn from human history and recent genetic studies? More than one million years separate Homo habilis to today's mankind, more than 1 million years to develop abilities to obtain food by foraging in diverse environments. One million year to adjust and fine-tune our genetic code and adapt; and only 1% of this time, 10 000 years, to face the three biggest revolutions of the human kind: the agricultural revolution, the industrial revolution and the postindustrial revolution. With big and rapid environmental changes come adaptation but with no time for fine-tuning. Today tolerance and adverse reactions to food may be a testimony of adaptation successes and mistakes.

  18. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G

    2014-06-01

    To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype.

  19. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Trevisan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype.DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on.DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome. These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky.CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype.

  20. Reproductive outcome and fetal karyotype of couples with recurrent miscarriages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S; Gao, L; Liu, Y; Tan, J; Wang, Y; Zhang, R; Liu, Y; Chen, H; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between fetal karyotype and parental chromosomal abnormalities, and assess the long-term reproductive outcomes in couples with recurrent miscarriages (RM). The reproductive outcomes of 34 couples with abnormal karyotypes and RM were investigated. Ultrasound examinations were performed during pregnancy, fetal karyotypes were determined following miscarriages, and successful pregnancy outcomes were recorded. Of the 34 couples, 20 individuals presented with chromosomal abnormalities, specifically in nine females and 11 males (45% vs 55%, chi2 = 0.2833,p > 0.05). Fifteen couples (44.1%) possessed karyotype polymorphisms, of which the most common variant was a long Y chromosome in males. The reproductive outcomes of subsequent pregnancies consisted of 25 live births of phenotypically normal infants (73.5%), one infant with multiple malformations (2.9%), and eight RM (23.6%). With regards to karyotypes, 69.2% (9/13) of couples had inversions and 73.3% (11/15) had karyotype polymorphisms that resulted in live births of phenotypically normal babies. Fetal karyotyping was performed in a total of 29 cases. Normal karyotypes were present in 48.3% (14/29) of cases, whereas 41.4% (12/29) had abnormalities (either numerical or structural), and 10.3% (3/29) has a karyotype polymorphism. There is a positive correlation between chromosomal abnormalities and spontaneous miscarriages. A complete evaluation and special treatment should be provided to couples with a history of recurrent miscarriage(s) during a subsequent pregnancy, particularly when one partner is a carrier of chromosome abnormalities (i.e., inversions of chromosome 9 and long Y chromosome in males). Prenatal diagnosis is necessary in carrier couples suffering from more than two miscarriages.

  1. Comparative analysis of function and interaction of transcription factors in nematodes: Extensive conservation of orthology coupled to rapid sequence evolution

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    Singh Rama S

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much of the morphological diversity in eukaryotes results from differential regulation of gene expression in which transcription factors (TFs play a central role. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an established model organism for the study of the roles of TFs in controlling the spatiotemporal pattern of gene expression. Using the fully sequenced genomes of three Caenorhabditid nematode species as well as genome information from additional more distantly related organisms (fruit fly, mouse, and human we sought to identify orthologous TFs and characterized their patterns of evolution. Results We identified 988 TF genes in C. elegans, and inferred corresponding sets in C. briggsae and C. remanei, containing 995 and 1093 TF genes, respectively. Analysis of the three gene sets revealed 652 3-way reciprocal 'best hit' orthologs (nematode TF set, approximately half of which are zinc finger (ZF-C2H2 and ZF-C4/NHR types and HOX family members. Examination of the TF genes in C. elegans and C. briggsae identified the presence of significant tandem clustering on chromosome V, the majority of which belong to ZF-C4/NHR family. We also found evidence for lineage-specific duplications and rapid evolution of many of the TF genes in the two species. A search of the TFs conserved among nematodes in Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens revealed 150 reciprocal orthologs, many of which are associated with important biological processes and human diseases. Finally, a comparison of the sequence, gene interactions and function indicates that nematode TFs conserved across phyla exhibit significantly more interactions and are enriched in genes with annotated mutant phenotypes compared to those that lack orthologs in other species. Conclusion Our study represents the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of TFs across three nematode species and other organisms. The findings indicate substantial conservation of transcription

  2. FISH analysis for TET2 deletion in a cohort of 362 Brazilian myeloid malignancies: correlation with karyotype abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Fábio Morato; Miguel, Carlos Eduardo; Lucena-Araujo, Antônio Roberto; de Lima, Ana Silvia Gouvêa; Falcão, Roberto Passetto; Rego, Eduardo Magalhães

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence of TET2 deletion by using a new FISH probe in a cohort of 362 Brazilian patients with myeloid neoplasms and their association with cytogenetic information (G-banding analysis). Normal karyotype was observed in 45.8 % of MDS (n = 44), 43.8 % of AML (n = 39) and 46.3 % of MPN (n = 82). Abnormalities of 4q24 (deletions, translocations or inversions) were associated with another chromosomal abnormality in four patients by G-banding analysis (2 MDS, 1 AML and 1 MPN). Interphase FISH analysis revealed deletion of TET2 in 21 patients (6 patients with abnormal karyotype and in 15 patients with normal karyotype). arrayCGH analysis revealed a cryptic deletion of the region 4q24 in all eight patients selected with myeloid malignancies (3 MDS, 1 AML and 4 MPN). Considering the significantly high cost of determining the mutational status of TET2 in patient samples by using conventional sequencing methods and sometimes the lack of regular use of SNP/aCGH array methodologies, FISH for the detection of TET2 abnormalities may become a potentially useful clinical tool. The search for alterations in TET2 gene may be important for the prediction of prognosis in normal/altered AML patients' karyotype or in the disease evolution of patients with MNP and MDS.

  3. Molecular evolution of the Bovini tribe (Bovidae, Bovinae: Is there evidence of rapid evolution or reduced selective constraint in Domestic cattle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCulloch Alan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If mutation within the coding region of the genome is largely not adaptive, the ratio of nonsynonymous (dN to synonymous substitutions (dS per site (dN/dS should be approximately equal among closely related species. Furthermore, dN/dS in divergence between species should be equivalent to dN/dS in polymorphisms. This hypothesis is of particular interest in closely related members of the Bovini tribe, because domestication has promoted rapid phenotypic divergence through strong artificial selection of some species while others remain undomesticated. We examined a number of genes that may be involved in milk production in Domestic cattle and a number of their wild relatives for evidence that domestication had affected molecular evolution. Elevated rates of dN/dS were further queried to determine if they were the result of positive selection, low effective population size (Ne or reduced selective constraint. Results We have found that the domestication process has contributed to higher dN/dS ratios in cattle, especially in the lineages leading to the Domestic cow (Bos taurus and Mithan (Bos frontalis and within some breeds of Domestic cow. However, the high rates of dN/dS polymorphism within B. taurus when compared to species divergence suggest that positive selection has not elevated evolutionary rates in these genes. Likewise, the low rate of dN/dS in Bison, which has undergone a recent population bottleneck, indicates a reduction in population size alone is not responsible for these observations. Conclusion The effect of selection depends on effective population size and the selection coefficient (Nes. Typically under domestication both selection pressure for traits important in fitness in the wild and Ne are reduced. Therefore, reduced selective constraint could be responsible for the observed elevated evolutionary ratios in domesticated species, especially in B. taurus and B. frontalis, which have the highest dN/dS in the

  4. Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Ulmschneider

    When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a fundamental question: Assuming that life has formed on an extraterrestrial planet, will it also develop toward intelligence? As this is hotly debated, we will now describe the development of life on Earth in more detail in order to show that there are good reasons why evolution should culminate in intelligent beings.

  5. Recurrent selection with reduced herbicide rates results in the rapid evolution of herbicide resistance in Lolium rigidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Paul; Powles, Stephen

    2005-04-01

    There has been much debate regarding the potential for reduced rates of herbicide application to accelerate evolution of herbicide resistance. We report a series of experiments that demonstrate the potential for reduced rates of the acetyl-co enzyme A carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicide diclofop-methyl to rapidly select for resistance in a susceptible biotype of Lolium rigidum. Thirty-six percent of individuals from the original VLR1 population survived application of 37.5 g diclofop-methyl ha(-1) (10% of the recommended field application rate). These individuals were grown to maturity and bulk-crossed to produce the VLR1 low dose-selected line VLR1 (0.1). Subsequent comparisons of the dose-response characteristics of the original and low dose-selected VLR1 lines demonstrated increased tolerance of diclofop-methyl in the selected line. Two further rounds of selection produced VLR1 lines that were resistant to field-applied rates of diclofop-methyl. The LD50 (diclofop-methyl dose required to cause 50% mortality) of the most resistant line was 56-fold greater than that of the original unselected VLR1 population, indicating very large increases in mean population survival after three cycles of selection. In vitro ACCase inhibition by diclofop acid confirmed that resistance was not due to an insensitive herbicide target-site. Cross-resistance studies showed increases in resistance to four herbicides: fluazifop-P-butyl, haloxyfop-R-methyl, clethodim and imazethapyr. The potential genetic basis of the observed response and implications of reduced herbicide application rates for management of herbicide resistance are discussed.

  6. Esthesioneuroblastoma in a boy with 47, XYY karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hee Cheol; Lee, Seong Wook; Jung, Hyun Joo; Park, Jun Eun

    2016-11-01

    Neuroblastomas are sometimes associated with abnormal constitutional karyotypes, but the XYY karyotype has been rarely described in neuroblastomas. Here, we report a case of an esthesioneuroblastoma in a boy with a 47, XYY karyotype. A 6-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital because of nasal obstruction and palpable cervical lymph node, which he first noticed several days previously. A polypoid mass in the right nasal cavity was detected through sinuscopy. Biopsy of the right nasal polyp was performed. Based on the result, the patient was diagnosed with a high-grade esthesioneuroblastoma. Nuclear imaging revealed increased uptake in both the right posterior nasal cavity and the right cervical IB-II space, suggesting metastatic lymph nodes. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a 47, XYY karyotype. Twelve courses of concurrent chemotherapy were administered. Three years after the completion of chemotherapy, the patient had had no disease recurrence. He manifested behavioral violence and temper tantrums, so we started methylphenidate for correction of the behavior.

  7. Karyotypic conservatism in the suborder Feliformia (Order Carnivora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Serdukova, N A; Nie, W; Alkalaeva, E Z; Fu, B; Robinson, T J; Yang, F

    2005-01-01

    Multidirectional comparative chromosome painting was used to investigate the karyotypic relationships among representative species from three Feliformia families of the order Carnivora (Viverridae, Hyaenidae and Felidae). Complete sets of painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the domestic dog, American mink, and human were hybridized onto metaphases of the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta, 2n = 40) and masked palm civet (Paguma larvata, 2n = 44). Extensive chromosomal conservation is evident in these two species when compared with the cat karyotype, and only a few events of chromosome fusion, fission and inversion differentiate the karyotypes of these Feliformia species. The comparative chromosome painting data have enabled the integration of the hyena and palm civet chromosomes into the previously established comparative map among the domestic cat, domestic dog, American mink and human and improved our understanding on the karyotype phylogeny of Feliformia species. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    OpenAIRE

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype.DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on.DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesio...

  9. New Fusion Transcripts Identified in Normal Karyotype Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxiu Wen; Yongjin Li; Malek, Sami N.; Kim, Yeong C.; Jia Xu; Peixian Chen; Fengxia Xiao; Xin Huang; Xianzheng Zhou; Zhenyu Xuan; Shiva Mankala; Guihua Hou; Rowley, Janet D.; Zhang, Michael Q.; San Ming Wang

    2012-01-01

    Genetic aberrations contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, half of AML cases do not contain the well-known aberrations detectable mostly by cytogenetic analysis, and these cases are classified as normal karyotype AML. Different outcomes of normal karyotype AML suggest that this subgroup of AML could be genetically heterogeneous. But lack of genetic markers makes it difficult to further study this subgroup of AML. Using paired-end RNAseq method, we performed a transcriptome analy...

  10. Electrophoretic karyotyping without the need for generating protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, K; Russell, B W; Mills, D

    1990-11-01

    Chromosome samples for pulsed-field electrophoresis have been prepared without first generating protoplasts. The technique involves treatment of intact, agarose-solidified cell material with protease in the presence of EDTA and SDS. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ustilago hordei, Tilletia caries, and T. controversa karyotypes are clearly resolved with this technique. Colonies of U. hordei and S. cerevisiae removed from the surface of agar-solidified media and prepared for PFGE by this abbreviated method also yield well resolved karyotypes.

  11. Monosomal karyotype predicts inferior survival independently of a complex karyotype in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuilten, Zoe K; Sundararajan, Vijaya; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Curtis, David J; Wood, Erica M; Campbell, Lynda J; Wall, Meaghan

    2015-09-01

    Conflicting data exist about the impact of a monosomal karyotype (MK) on overall survival (OS) for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and particularly for those with a complex karyotype (CK). This study was aimed at determining whether an MK is associated with OS independently of the number of cytogenetic abnormalities (CAs) in a population-based MDS cohort. Cancer registry data on incident MDS cases were linked with cytogenetic data and hospital administrative data from 2000 to 2010 for the Australian state of Victoria. Between 2000 and 2010, 1404 incident MDS cases with cytogenetic results were identified. A CK, defined as 3 or more abnormalities, was present in 126 (9%). A very complex karyotype (vCK), defined as 5 or more abnormalities, was present in 95 (7%). An MK was associated with worse OS in the whole cohort (median 6 vs 39 months, P < 0.001) including those with a coexisting CK (6 vs 17 months, P < 0.001) or vCK (6 vs 9 months, P = 0.02). After adjustments for the number of CAs, an MK remained independently associated with OS, although its effect size decreased with increasing cytogenetic complexity (hazard ratio for an MK, 4.81; 95% confidence interval, 3.08-7.52; hazard ratio for the number of CAs, 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-1.30; and hazard ratio for the interaction between an MK and CAs, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-0.89). These results support the clinical utility of an MK as an independent predictor of adverse outcomes for MDS patients, even among CK and vCK groups, although its prognostic effect decreases with increasing cytogenetic complexity. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  12. Rapid evolution in the wild: changes in body size, life-history traits, and behavior in hunted populations of the Japanese mamushi snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kiyoshi; Fox, Stanley F; Duvall, David

    2009-02-01

    Rapid evolution caused by human exploitation of wildlife is not usually addressed in studies of the impacts of such exploitation despite its direct relevance to population persistence. Japanese mamushi (Gloydius blomhoffii), an endemic venomous snake of the Japanese archipelago, has been heavily hunted by humans, and many populations appear to be declining or are already extirpated. We compared local populations that have been hunted regularly with populations that have not been hunted. Mamushi in hunted populations were smaller, had fewer vertebrae, produced more and smaller offspring, had increased reproductive effort among smaller females, and in nature fled at greater distances from an approaching human and were less defensive than mamushi in unhunted populations, as predicted from life-history theory. Heritability estimates for body size, number of vertebrae, and antipredator behavior were statistically significant, and neonates from hunted sites showed the same distribution of altered characters (compared with those from unhunted sites) as adults. Thus, distribution of the divergent trait between hunted and unhunted sites appeared in part to be genetically based, which suggests rapid evolution to human predation pressures. Trait distributions in hunted populations probably deviate from naturally (as opposed to anthropogenically) selected optima and, therefore, may have long-term negative repercussions on population persistence. Because rapid evolution affects a suite of parameters that characterize exploited populations, accurate understanding of the impacts of exploitation and effective resource management and conservation can only be achieved if evolutionary consequences are considered explicitly.

  13. Evidence for Karyotype Polymorphism in the Free-Living Flatworm, Macrostomum lignano, a Model Organism for Evolutionary and Developmental Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadesenets, Kira S; Vizoso, Dita B; Schlatter, Aline; Konopatskaia, Irina D; Berezikov, Eugene; Schärer, Lukas; Rubtsov, Nikolay B

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano has been successfully used in many areas of biology, including embryology, stem cells, sexual selection, bioadhesion and aging. The increased use of this powerful laboratory model, including the establishment of genomic resources and tools, makes it essential to have a detailed description of the chromosome organization of this species, previously suggested to have a karyotype with 2n = 8 and one pair of large and three pairs of small metacentric chromosomes. We performed cytogenetic analyses for chromosomes of one commonly used inbred line of M. lignano (called DV1) and uncovered unexpected chromosome number variation in the form of aneuploidies of the largest chromosomes. These results prompted us to perform karyotypic studies in individual specimens of this and other lines of M. lignano reared under laboratory conditions, as well as in freshly field-collected specimens from different natural populations. Our analyses revealed a high frequency of aneuploids and in some cases other numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities in laboratory-reared lines of M. lignano, and some cases of aneuploidy were also found in freshly field-collected specimens. Moreover, karyological analyses were performed in specimens of three further species: Macrostomum sp. 8 (a close relative of M. lignano), M. spirale and M. hystrix. Macrostomum sp. 8 showed a karyotype that was similar to that of M. lignano, with tetrasomy for its largest chromosome being the most common karyotype, while the other two species showed a simpler karyotype that is more typical of the genus Macrostomum. These findings suggest that M. lignano and Macrostomum sp. 8 can be used as new models for studying processes of partial genome duplication in genome evolution.

  14. Evidence for Karyotype Polymorphism in the Free-Living Flatworm, Macrostomum lignano, a Model Organism for Evolutionary and Developmental Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Aline; Konopatskaia, Irina D.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano has been successfully used in many areas of biology, including embryology, stem cells, sexual selection, bioadhesion and aging. The increased use of this powerful laboratory model, including the establishment of genomic resources and tools, makes it essential to have a detailed description of the chromosome organization of this species, previously suggested to have a karyotype with 2n = 8 and one pair of large and three pairs of small metacentric chromosomes. We performed cytogenetic analyses for chromosomes of one commonly used inbred line of M. lignano (called DV1) and uncovered unexpected chromosome number variation in the form of aneuploidies of the largest chromosomes. These results prompted us to perform karyotypic studies in individual specimens of this and other lines of M. lignano reared under laboratory conditions, as well as in freshly field-collected specimens from different natural populations. Our analyses revealed a high frequency of aneuploids and in some cases other numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities in laboratory-reared lines of M. lignano, and some cases of aneuploidy were also found in freshly field-collected specimens. Moreover, karyological analyses were performed in specimens of three further species: Macrostomum sp. 8 (a close relative of M. lignano), M. spirale and M. hystrix. Macrostomum sp. 8 showed a karyotype that was similar to that of M. lignano, with tetrasomy for its largest chromosome being the most common karyotype, while the other two species showed a simpler karyotype that is more typical of the genus Macrostomum. These findings suggest that M. lignano and Macrostomum sp. 8 can be used as new models for studying processes of partial genome duplication in genome evolution. PMID:27755577

  15. Evidence for Karyotype Polymorphism in the Free-Living Flatworm, Macrostomum lignano, a Model Organism for Evolutionary and Developmental Biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira S Zadesenets

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano has been successfully used in many areas of biology, including embryology, stem cells, sexual selection, bioadhesion and aging. The increased use of this powerful laboratory model, including the establishment of genomic resources and tools, makes it essential to have a detailed description of the chromosome organization of this species, previously suggested to have a karyotype with 2n = 8 and one pair of large and three pairs of small metacentric chromosomes. We performed cytogenetic analyses for chromosomes of one commonly used inbred line of M. lignano (called DV1 and uncovered unexpected chromosome number variation in the form of aneuploidies of the largest chromosomes. These results prompted us to perform karyotypic studies in individual specimens of this and other lines of M. lignano reared under laboratory conditions, as well as in freshly field-collected specimens from different natural populations. Our analyses revealed a high frequency of aneuploids and in some cases other numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities in laboratory-reared lines of M. lignano, and some cases of aneuploidy were also found in freshly field-collected specimens. Moreover, karyological analyses were performed in specimens of three further species: Macrostomum sp. 8 (a close relative of M. lignano, M. spirale and M. hystrix. Macrostomum sp. 8 showed a karyotype that was similar to that of M. lignano, with tetrasomy for its largest chromosome being the most common karyotype, while the other two species showed a simpler karyotype that is more typical of the genus Macrostomum. These findings suggest that M. lignano and Macrostomum sp. 8 can be used as new models for studying processes of partial genome duplication in genome evolution.

  16. Karyotype versus microarray testing for genetic abnormalities after stillbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Uma M; Page, Grier P; Saade, George R; Silver, Robert M; Thorsten, Vanessa R; Parker, Corette B; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Stoll, Barbara J; Heim-Hall, Josefine; Varner, Michael W; Goldenberg, Robert L; Bukowski, Radek; Wapner, Ronald J; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn D; O'Brien, Barbara M; Dudley, Donald J; Levy, Brynn

    2012-12-06

    Genetic abnormalities have been associated with 6 to 13% of stillbirths, but the true prevalence may be higher. Unlike karyotype analysis, microarray analysis does not require live cells, and it detects small deletions and duplications called copy-number variants. The Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network conducted a population-based study of stillbirth in five geographic catchment areas. Standardized postmortem examinations and karyotype analyses were performed. A single-nucleotide polymorphism array was used to detect copy-number variants of at least 500 kb in placental or fetal tissue. Variants that were not identified in any of three databases of apparently unaffected persons were then classified into three groups: probably benign, clinical significance unknown, or pathogenic. We compared the results of karyotype and microarray analyses of samples obtained after delivery. In our analysis of samples from 532 stillbirths, microarray analysis yielded results more often than did karyotype analysis (87.4% vs. 70.5%, P<0.001) and provided better detection of genetic abnormalities (aneuploidy or pathogenic copy-number variants, 8.3% vs. 5.8%; P=0.007). Microarray analysis also identified more genetic abnormalities among 443 antepartum stillbirths (8.8% vs. 6.5%, P=0.02) and 67 stillbirths with congenital anomalies (29.9% vs. 19.4%, P=0.008). As compared with karyotype analysis, microarray analysis provided a relative increase in the diagnosis of genetic abnormalities of 41.9% in all stillbirths, 34.5% in antepartum stillbirths, and 53.8% in stillbirths with anomalies. Microarray analysis is more likely than karyotype analysis to provide a genetic diagnosis, primarily because of its success with nonviable tissue, and is especially valuable in analyses of stillbirths with congenital anomalies or in cases in which karyotype results cannot be obtained. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.).

  17. Karyotype of cryopreserved bone marrow cells

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    M.L.L.F. Chauffaille

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities is important for the study of hematological neoplastic disorders since it facilitates classification of the disease. The ability to perform chromosome analysis of cryopreserved malignant marrow or peripheral blast cells is important for retrospective studies. In the present study, we compared the karyotype of fresh bone marrow cells (20 metaphases to that of cells stored with a simplified cryopreservation method, evaluated the effect of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as an in vitro mitotic index stimulator, and compared the cell viability and chromosome morphology of fresh and cryopreserved cells whenever possible (sufficient metaphases for analysis. Twenty-five bone marrow samples from 24 patients with hematological disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, megaloblastic anemia and lymphoma (8, 3, 3, 8, 1, and 1 patients, respectively were selected at diagnosis, at relapse or during routine follow-up and one sample was obtained from a bone marrow donor after informed consent. Average cell viability before and after freezing was 98.8 and 78.5%, respectively (P < 0.05. Cytogenetic analysis was successful in 76% of fresh cell cultures, as opposed to 52% of cryopreserved samples (P < 0.05. GM-CSF had no proliferative effect before or after freezing. The morphological aspects of the chromosomes in fresh and cryopreserved cells were subjectively the same. The present study shows that cytogenetic analysis of cryopreserved bone marrow cells can be a reliable alternative when fresh cell analysis cannot be done, notwithstanding the reduced viability and lower percent of successful analysis that are associated with freezing.

  18. A first glimpse of wild lupin karyotype variation as revealed by comparative cytogenetic mapping

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    Karolina Susek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Insight into plant genomes at the cytomolecular level provides useful information about their karyotype structure, enabling inferences about taxonomic relationships and evolutionary origins. The Old World lupins demonstrate a high level of genomic diversification involving variation in chromosome numbers (2n=32-52, basic chromosome numbers (x=5-7, 9, 13 and in nuclear genome size (2C DNA=0.97-2.68 pg. Lupins comprise both crop and wild species and provide an intriguing system to study karyotype evolution.In order to investigate lupin chromosome structure, heterologous FISH was used. Sixteen BACs that had been generated as chromosome markers for the reference species, Lupinus angustifolius, were used to identify chromosomes in the wild species and explore karyotype variation. While all ‘single-locus’ in L. angustifolius, in the wild lupins these clones proved to be ‘single-locus’, ‘single-locus’ with additional signals, ‘repetitive’ or had no detectable BAC-FISH signal. The diverse distribution of the clones in the targeted genomes suggests a complex evolution history, which possibly involved multiple chromosomal changes such as fusions/fissions and repetitive sequence amplification. Twelve BACs were sequenced and we found numerous transposable elements including DNA transposons as well as LTR and non-LTR retrotransposons with varying quantity and composition among the different lupin species. However, at this preliminary stage, no correlation was observed between the pattern of BAC-FISH signals and the repeat content in particular BACs. Here, we describe the first BAC-based chromosome-specific markers for the wild species: L. cosentinii, L. cryptanthus, L. pilosus, L. micranthus and one New World lupin, L. multiflorus. These BACs could constitute the basis for an assignment of the chromosomal and genetic maps of other lupins, e.g. L. albus and L. luteus. Moreover, we identified karyotype variation that helps illustrate the

  19. A First Glimpse of Wild Lupin Karyotype Variation As Revealed by Comparative Cytogenetic Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susek, Karolina; Bielski, Wojciech K; Hasterok, Robert; Naganowska, Barbara; Wolko, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Insight into plant genomes at the cytomolecular level provides useful information about their karyotype structure, enabling inferences about taxonomic relationships and evolutionary origins. The Old World lupins (OWL) demonstrate a high level of genomic diversification involving variation in chromosome numbers (2n = 32-52), basic chromosome numbers (x = 5-7, 9, 13) and in nuclear genome size (2C DNA = 0.97-2.68 pg). Lupins comprise both crop and wild species and provide an intriguing system to study karyotype evolution. In order to investigate lupin chromosome structure, heterologous FISH was used. Sixteen BACs that had been generated as chromosome markers for the reference species, Lupinus angustifolius, were used to identify chromosomes in the wild species and explore karyotype variation. While all "single-locus" in L. angustifolius, in the wild lupins these clones proved to be "single-locus," "single-locus" with additional signals, "repetitive" or had no detectable BAC-FISH signal. The diverse distribution of the clones in the targeted genomes suggests a complex evolution history, which possibly involved multiple chromosomal changes such as fusions/fissions and repetitive sequence amplification. Twelve BACs were sequenced and we found numerous transposable elements including DNA transposons as well as LTR and non-LTR retrotransposons with varying quantity and composition among the different lupin species. However, at this preliminary stage, no correlation was observed between the pattern of BAC-FISH signals and the repeat content in particular BACs. Here, we describe the first BAC-based chromosome-specific markers for the wild species: L. cosentinii, L. cryptanthus, L. pilosus, L. micranthus and one New World lupin, L. multiflorus. These BACs could constitute the basis for an assignment of the chromosomal and genetic maps of other lupins, e.g., L. albus and L. luteus. Moreover, we identified karyotype variation that helps illustrate the relationships between the

  20. Morbidity and mortality after childbirth in women with Turner karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, Anna; Källén, Karin; Bryman, Inger; Landin-Wilhelmsen, Kerstin; Barrenäs, Marie-Louise; Wennerholm, Ulla-Britt

    2013-07-01

    Do women with Turner karyotype have increased mortality and morbidity in the years after childbirth? No mortality occurred during pregnancy and follow-up in women with Turner karyotype, but a higher rate of circulatory and endocrine diseases and a high risk of aortic aneurysm were confirmed. Pregnancies in women with Turner karyotype are high-risk pregnancies with an increased risk of maternal mortality from aortic dissection and morbidity from hypertensive disorders. A retrospective Swedish population-based registry study of 124 women with Turner karyotype born between 1957 and 1987 and who gave birth between 1973 and 2010. Women with Turner karyotype without childbirth (n = 378) were selected as controls. A second control group consisted of women from the Swedish Medical Birth Register (MBR) (n = 1230) matched for maternal age, number of children and year of birth of the first child. Women with Turner karyotype were identified in the Swedish Genetic Turner Register. Data were obtained by using the unique personal identification number with cross linkage to the Swedish MBR, the Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Register and the Swedish Cancer Register. Hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used in the analysis of morbidity. No mortality occurred in women with Turner karyotype and childbirth. Diseases of the circulatory system occurred more often in women with Turner syndrome under the age of 40 years compared with the MBR control group (HR 4.59; 95% CI 2.75-7.66) but was similar at or above the age of 40 years. Morbidity from circulatory diseases was increased before pregnancy (HR 3.83; 95% CI 1.02-14.43) and during pregnancy or within 1 year after (HR 5.78; 95% CI 1.94-17.24), but was similar after 1 or more years after delivery (HR 1.91; 95% CI 0.74-4.96). Aortic aneurysm occurred in 11/502 (2.2%) women with Turner karyotype and in three women (2.4%) during pregnancy. The long-term follow-up showed that aortic dissection was a

  1. [Establishment of lymphocyte cell lines with abnormal chromosome karyotypes and its application in external quality assesment for chromosome karyotype analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Bin-huan; Cai, Jian-ping; Wang, Xu-min; You, Jian-fei; Jin, Yi; Wang, Xiao-hua

    2007-12-01

    To develop chromosome abnormal karyotype quality control cell and to explore the external quality assessment (EQA) method for chromosome karyotype analysis. The chromosome abnormal karyotype quality control cells were prepared by EB virus (EBV) transfection of human B lymphocyte strain establishment and were distributed to participating labs for EQA test of chromosome karyotype analysis project at appointed time. The evaluation results were obtained through 4 grades scoring. Six kinds of chromosome abnormal karyotype quality control cells were initially developed, the karyotypes of which were 46,X, t(Y;5)(q12;q21), 46, XY, 15p +, 46, XX, t(13;18)(q12;q21), 46, X, r(Xp), 46,X,t(Y;Y), 46,XX,t(9;20)(p13;p13) respectively. In the external quality assessment, feedbacks from the participating labs on the sequencing results of the six kinds of quality control cells showed that the wholly overlapping rate were 82.1%, 92.0%, 84.6%, 80.8%, 86.2%, 74.1% and the wholly deviation rate were 10.7%, 8.0%, 11.5%, 19.2%, 13.8%, 18.5%. The overall wholly overlapping rate, partial overlapping rate, partial deviation rate and wholly deviation rate turned out to be 83.2%, 0.6%, 2.5% and 13.7% respectively. The misdiagnose rate of chromosome karyotype analysis is rather high and regular external quality assessment is necessary to achieve dynamic information and improve diagnosis quality.

  2. Improved accuracy of hysteroembryoscopic biopsies for karyotyping early missed abortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Jaime; Martínez, Ma Carmen; Lara, Coral; Pellicer, Antonio; Remohí, José; Serra, Vicente

    2003-11-01

    To assess the potential of direct embryo and chorion biopsies obtained by hysteroembryoscopy for karyotyping early missed abortions. Clinical prospective descriptive study. Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, Valencia, Spain. Sixty-eight women (71 gestational sacs) with missed abortions. The gestational age on ultrasound was 6.3 weeks (range, 4-10 weeks). Transcervical hysteroembryoscopy before curettage. Comparison between the cytogenetic results from hysteroembryoscopic biospies and those of the curettage material. Hysteroembryoscopic biopsies could be taken in 97.2% of the gestational sacs. Direct embryo and chorion biopsies were suitable for chromosomal analysis. Selective samples identified misdiagnoses of the conventional curettage karyotype due to maternal contaminating tissues in 22.2% of the cases. Direct hysteroembryoscopic biopsies also enabled the diagnosis of a true placental mosaicism and the study of the individual karyotype of each gestational sac in bizygotic twin missed abortions. In early missed abortions, karyotypes from direct hysteroembryoscopic biopsies were more accurate than those from the curettage material. The finding of a 46,XX karyotype in the curettage material is not a reliable result.

  3. Karyotype complexity and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stölzel, F; Mohr, B; Kramer, M; Oelschlägel, U; Bochtler, T; Berdel, W E; Kaufmann, M; Baldus, C D; Schäfer-Eckart, K; Stuhlmann, R; Einsele, H; Krause, S W; Serve, H; Hänel, M; Herbst, R; Neubauer, A; Sohlbach, K; Mayer, J; Middeke, J M; Platzbecker, U; Schaich, M; Krämer, A; Röllig, C; Schetelig, J; Bornhäuser, M; Ehninger, G

    2016-01-15

    A complex aberrant karyotype consisting of multiple unrelated cytogenetic abnormalities is associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The European Leukemia Net classification and the UK Medical Research Council recommendation provide prognostic categories that differ in the definition of unbalanced aberrations as well as the number of single aberrations. The aim of this study on 3526 AML patients was to redefine and validate a cutoff for karyotype complexity in AML with regard to adverse prognosis. Our study demonstrated that (1) patients with a pure hyperdiploid karyotype have an adverse risk irrespective of the number of chromosomal gains, (2) patients with translocation t(9;11)(p21∼22;q23) have an intermediate risk independent of the number of additional aberrations, (3) patients with ⩾4 abnormalities have an adverse risk per se and (4) patients with three aberrations in the absence of abnormalities of strong influence (hyperdiploid karyotype, t(9;11)(p21∼22;q23), CBF-AML, unique adverse-risk aberrations) have borderline intermediate/adverse risk with a reduced overall survival compared with patients with a normal karyotype.

  4. Genome Size Diversity in Lilium (Liliaceae Is Correlated with Karyotype and Environmental Traits

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    Yun-peng Du

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome size (GS diversity is of fundamental biological importance. The occurrence of giant genomes in angiosperms is restricted to just a few lineages in the analyzed genome size of plant species so far. It is still an open question whether GS diversity is shaped by neutral or natural selection. The genus Lilium, with giant genomes, is phylogenetically and horticulturally important and is distributed throughout the northern hemisphere. GS diversity in Lilium and the underlying evolutionary mechanisms are poorly understood. We performed a comprehensive study involving phylogenetically independent analysis on 71 species to explore the diversity and evolution of GS and its correlation with karyological and environmental traits within Lilium (including Nomocharis. The strong phylogenetic signal detected for GS in the genus provides evidence consistent with that the repetitive DNA may be the primary contributors to the GS diversity, while the significant positive relationships detected between GS and the haploid chromosome length (HCL provide insights into patterns of genome evolution. The relationships between GS and karyotypes indicate that ancestral karyotypes of Lilium are likely to have exhibited small genomes, low diversity in centromeric index (CVCI values and relatively high relative variation in chromosome length (CVCL values. Significant relationships identified between GS and annual temperature and between GS and annual precipitation suggest that adaptation to habitat strongly influences GS diversity. We conclude that GS in Lilium is shaped by both neutral (genetic drift and adaptive evolution. These findings will have important consequences for understanding the evolution of giant plant genomes, and exploring the role of repetitive DNA fraction and chromosome changes in a plant group with large genomes and conservation of chromosome number.

  5. Single-cell sequencing reveals karyotype heterogeneity in murine and human malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Bjorn; Taudt, Aaron; Belderbos, Mirjam E; Porubsky, David; Spierings, Diana C J; de Jong, Tristan V; Halsema, Nancy; Kazemier, Hinke G; Hoekstra-Wakker, Karina; Bradley, Allan; de Bont, Eveline S J M; van den Berg, Anke; Guryev, Victor; Lansdorp, Peter M; Colomé-Tatché, Maria; Foijer, Floris

    2016-05-31

    Chromosome instability leads to aneuploidy, a state in which cells have abnormal numbers of chromosomes, and is found in two out of three cancers. In a chromosomal instable p53 deficient mouse model with accelerated lymphomagenesis, we previously observed whole chromosome copy number changes affecting all lymphoma cells. This suggests that chromosome instability is somehow suppressed in the aneuploid lymphomas or that selection for frequently lost/gained chromosomes out-competes the CIN-imposed mis-segregation. To distinguish between these explanations and to examine karyotype dynamics in chromosome instable lymphoma, we use a newly developed single-cell whole genome sequencing (scWGS) platform that provides a complete and unbiased overview of copy number variations (CNV) in individual cells. To analyse these scWGS data, we develop AneuFinder, which allows annotation of copy number changes in a fully automated fashion and quantification of CNV heterogeneity between cells. Single-cell sequencing and AneuFinder analysis reveals high levels of copy number heterogeneity in chromosome instability-driven murine T-cell lymphoma samples, indicating ongoing chromosome instability. Application of this technology to human B cell leukaemias reveals different levels of karyotype heterogeneity in these cancers. Our data show that even though aneuploid tumours select for particular and recurring chromosome combinations, single-cell analysis using AneuFinder reveals copy number heterogeneity. This suggests ongoing chromosome instability that other platforms fail to detect. As chromosome instability might drive tumour evolution, karyotype analysis using single-cell sequencing technology could become an essential tool for cancer treatment stratification.

  6. Sex Chromosomes and Karyotype of the (Nearly) Mythical Creature, the Gila Monster, Heloderma suspectum (Squamata: Helodermatidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorná, Martina Johnson; Rovatsos, Michail; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of sex determination systems exist among squamate reptiles. They can therefore serve as an important model for studies of evolutionary transitions among particular sex determination systems. However, we still have only a limited knowledge of sex determination in certain important lineages of squamates. In this respect, one of the most understudied groups is the family Helodermatidae (Anguimorpha) encompassing the only two venomous species of lizards which are potentially lethal to human beings. We uncovered homomorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in the Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) with a highly heterochromatic W chromosome. The sex chromosomes are morphologically similar to the ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes of monitor lizards (Varanidae). If the sex chromosomes of helodermatids and varanids are homologous, female heterogamety may be ancestral for the whole Anguimorpha group. Moreover, we found that the karyotype of the Gila monster consists of 2n = 36 chromosomes (14 larger metacentric chromosomes and 22 acrocentric microchromosomes). 2n = 36 is the widely distributed chromosomal number among squamates. In his pioneering works representing the only previous cytogenetic examination of the family Helodermatidae, Matthey reported the karyotype as 2n = 38 and suggested a different chromosomal morphology for this species. We believe that this was probably erroneously. We also discovered a strong accumulation of telomeric sequences on several pairs of microchromosomes in the Gila monster, which is a trait documented relatively rarely in vertebrates. These new data fill an important gap in our understanding of the sex determination and karyotype evolution of squamates. PMID:25119263

  7. [Correlation of chromosome karyotype with dyshaematopoiesis and reticulin in myelodysplastic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yan-Chao; Sun, Hui; Gan, Si-Lin; Liu, Yan-Fang; Xie, Xin-Sheng; Zhang, Qiu-Tang; Li, Tao; Gao, Juan

    2013-04-01

    This study was purposed to explore the correlation of chromosome karyotype with dyshaematopoiesis and reticulin in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The data of 202 MDS patients diagnosed and treated in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University were retrospectively analyzed in term of chromosome karyotype, dyshaematopoiesis and reticulin detection results. The chromosome karyotypes were categorized according to the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS). The results showed that there was a positive correlation between chromosome karyotype grading and number of lineages with dyshaematopoiesis (r = 0.443, P karyotypes were 44.4%, 71.4% and 96.3% respectively. There was a positive correlation between chromosome karyotype grading and reticulin grading (r = 0.451, P karyotypes were 36.8%, 64.3% and 92.6% respectively. The detected rate of multilineage dyshaematopoiesis, number of lineages with dyshaematopoiesis, the positive rate of reticulin and reticulin grade in patients with poor karyotypes were higher than those in patients with intermediate or good chromosome karyotypes (separately P karyotypes were higher than those in patients with good chromosome karyotypes (separately P karyotype grading positively correlates with the number of lineages with dyshaematopoiesis and reticulin grading. When the chromosome karyotype changed from good to poor, the detected rate of multilineage dyshaematopoiesis, number of lineages with dyshaematopoiesis, positive rate of reticulin and reticulin grading became higher and higher.

  8. Karyotype Learning Center: A Software For Teaching And Learning Cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelma Freire De Mesquita

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro cultivation of human cells is an essential part of the work of every diagnostic cytoge-netics laboratory. Almost all human cytogenetic studies involve the examination of dividing bloodcell population by blocking cell division at metaphase with subsequent processing and staining bybanding techniques. The chromosome constitution is described as Karyotype that states the totalnumber of chromosomes and the sex chromosome constitution. Karyotypes are prepared by cuttingup a photograph of the spread metaphase chromosomes, matching up homologous chromosomes andsticking them back down on a card or nowadays more often by getting an image analysis computerto do the job. Chromosomes are identied by their size, centromere position and banding pattern.Teaching a student how to detect and interpret even the most common chromosome abnormaliti-es is a major challenge: mainly, in a developing country where the laboratorial facilities are notalways available for a big number of students. Therefore, in this work we present an educationalsoftware for teaching undergraduate students of Medical and Life Sciences Courses how to arrangenormal and abnormal chromosomes in the form of karyotype. The user, using drag-and-drop, is da-red to match up homologous chromosome. For that, we have developed a free full access web site(http://www.biomol.net/cariotipo/ for hosting the software. The latter has proved to be light andfast even under slow dial-up connections. This web site also oers a theoretical introductory sectionwith basic concepts about karyotype. Up to now the software has been successfully applied to un-dergraduate courses at the University of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO. The students have approved thesoftware; to them the similarities with the well-known game solitaire turns the exercise more excitingand provides additional stimulus to learn and understand karyotype. Professors have also used thesoftware as complementary material in their regular classes

  9. [Prognostic significance of monosomal karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Yanyan; Xu, Junqing; Huang, Baohua; Liu, Xiaoqian; Liu, Yinghui; Chen, Liming; Chu, Xiaoxia

    2015-04-01

    To explore the prognostic significance of monosomal karyotype (MK) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The clinical data of 498 AML patients were analyzed retrospectively. Of the 498 patients, 233 (46.8%) cases had an abnormal karyotype. 42 patients fulfilled the criteria for MK, which were 8.4% of all cases and 18.0% of patients with abnormal karyotype, respectively. The most frequent autosomal monosomies were -7 and -17. 70 patients had complex karyotype (CK), in all patients and patients with abnormal karyotype accounted for 14.1% and 30.0%, respectively. Patients with MK were associated with significantly older (median age 62.5 vs 52 years, P=0.003), and lower HGB concentrations (62.5 vs 77 g/L, P=0.009) and lower WBC counts (7.0×10⁹/L vs 11.7×10⁹/L, P=0.008). Among MK cases, the most frequent chromosome abnormalities were complex karyotype, -7, -5, 7q-, and 5q-. In univariate analysis, MK patients had worse survival than those without MK (7.3 months vs 26.3 months, P<0.001). CK patients also had poorer outcomes than patients without CK (14.8 months vs 26.3 months, P<0.001). In CK patients, survival was worse in MK patients than patients without MK (7.4 months vs 19.2 months, P=0.007). By COX analysis, MK was an independent prognostic factor, beyond NCCN criteria and CK [HR=2.610 (1.632-4.175), P<0.001]. MK was an independent adverse prognostic factor in AML patients.

  10. Updating the maize karyotype by chromosome DNA sizing.

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    Jéssica Coutinho Silva

    Full Text Available The karyotype is a basic concept regarding the genome, fundamentally described by the number and morphological features of all chromosomes. Chromosome class, centromeric index, intra- and interchromosomal asymmetry index, and constriction localization are important in clinical, systematic and evolutionary approaches. In spite of the advances in karyotype characterization made over the last years, new data about the chromosomes can be generated from quantitative methods, such as image cytometry. Therefore, using Zea mays L., this study aimed to update the species' karyotype by supplementing information on chromosome DNA sizing. After adjustment of the procedures, chromosome morphometry and class as well as knob localization enabled describing the Z. mays karyotype. In addition, applying image cytometry, DNA sizing was unprecedentedly measured for the arms and satellite of all chromosomes. This way, unambiguous identification of the chromosome pairs, and hence the assembly of 51 karyograms, were only possible after the DNA sizing of each chromosome, their arms and satellite portions. These accurate, quantitative and reproducible data also enabled determining the distribution and variation of DNA content in each chromosome. From this, a correlation between DNA amount and total chromosome length evidenced that the mean DNA content of chromosome 9 was higher than that of chromosome 8. The chromosomal DNA sizing updated the Z. mays karyotype, providing insights into its dynamic genome with regards to the organization of the ten chromosomes and their respective portions. Considering the results and the relevance of cytogenetics in the current scenario of comparative sequencing and genomics, chromosomal DNA sizing should be incorporated as an additional parameter for karyotype definition. Based on this study, it can be affirmed that cytogenetic approaches go beyond the simple morphological description of chromosomes.

  11. Evolutionary genomics reveals lineage-specific gene loss and rapid evolution of a sperm-specific ion channel complex: CatSpers and CatSperbeta.

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    Xinjiang Cai

    Full Text Available The mammalian CatSper ion channel family consists of four sperm-specific voltage-gated Ca2+ channels that are crucial for sperm hyperactivation and male fertility. All four CatSper subunits are believed to assemble into a heteromultimeric channel complex, together with an auxiliary subunit, CatSperbeta. Here, we report a comprehensive comparative genomics study and evolutionary analysis of CatSpers and CatSperbeta, with important correlation to physiological significance of molecular evolution of the CatSper channel complex. The development of the CatSper channel complex with four CatSpers and CatSperbeta originated as early as primitive metazoans such as the Cnidarian Nematostella vectensis. Comparative genomics revealed extensive lineage-specific gene loss of all four CatSpers and CatSperbeta through metazoan evolution, especially in vertebrates. The CatSper channel complex underwent rapid evolution and functional divergence, while distinct evolutionary constraints appear to have acted on different domains and specific sites of the four CatSper genes. These results reveal unique evolutionary characteristics of sperm-specific Ca2+ channels and their adaptation to sperm biology through metazoan evolution.

  12. Karyotype analysis of some Onobrychis (sainfoin) species in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Akçelik Somay Esra; Avci S.; Uzun S.; Sancak C.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, karyotype analysis of the species of Onobrychis sp. was undertaken using the squash method. The results showed that the chromosome number of Onobrychis tournefortii (Willd.) Desv., O. gracilis Besser, O. hypargyrea Boiss. is 2n = 14 and O. argyrea Boiss. subsp. argyrea Boiss., 2n = 16. The karyotype formula of O. tournefortii (Willd.) Desv. is 4m+3sm, of O. hypargyrea Boiss. and O. gracilis Besser 3m+4sm, and of O. argyrea Boiss. subsp. argyrea Boiss. 2m+ 5sm+1 st.

  13. Karyotype analysis of some Onobrychis (sainfoin species in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akçelik Somay Esra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, karyotype analysis of the species of Onobrychis sp. was undertaken using the squash method. The results showed that the chromosome number of Onobrychis tournefortii (Willd. Desv., O. gracilis Besser, O. hypargyrea Boiss. is 2n = 14 and O. argyrea Boiss. subsp. argyrea Boiss., 2n = 16. The karyotype formula of O. tournefortii (Willd. Desv. is 4m+3sm, of O. hypargyrea Boiss. and O. gracilis Besser 3m+4sm, and of O. argyrea Boiss. subsp. argyrea Boiss. 2m+ 5sm+1 st.

  14. [Clustering analysis of karyotype resemblance-near coefficient for 6 Bupleurum species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yun; Qiao, Yonggang; Wu, Yuxiang

    2012-04-01

    To explore the genetic evolutionary distance between plants by using karyotype parameters identification of medicinal plants. The cluster analysis of karyotype resemblance-near coefficient and evolutionary distance was used for 6 Bupleurum species. The results showed that there were the biggest karyotype resemblance-near coefficient (0.9920) and the smallest evolutionary distance (D(e) = 0.0080) between B. scorzonerifolium and B. chinense, indicating the closest relationship, and the minimum karyotype resemblance-near coefficient (0.4794) and the maximum evolutionary distance (D(e) = 0.7352) between B. smityii and B. falcatum, indicating the most distant relationship. Karyotype was an important parameter for identification of medicinal plants because karyotype was stabilized for species. The genetic distance between in 6 species of Bupleurum species was obtained by karyotype clustering analysis of karyotype resemblance-near coefficient. There was the bigger evolutionary distance between the species which had different chromosome number.

  15. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

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    Cibele G. Sotero-Caio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62. As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae, focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  16. Scaling Chromosomes for an Evolutionary Karyotype: A Chromosomal Tradeoff between Size and Number across Woody Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guolu; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the expected scaling relationships between chromosome size and number across woody species and to clarify the importance of the scaling for the maintenance of chromosome diversity by analyzing the scaling at the inter- & intra-chromosomal level. To achieve for the goals, chromosome trait data were extracted for 191 woody species (including 56 evergreen species and 135 deciduous species) from the available literature. Cross-species analyses revealed a tradeoff among chromosomes between chromosome size and number, demonstrating there is selective mechanism crossing chromosomes among woody species. And the explanations for the result were presented from intra- to inter-chromosome contexts that the scaling may be compromises among scale symmetry, mechanical requirements, and resource allocation across chromosomes. Therein, a 3/4 scaling pattern was observed between total chromosomes and m-chromosomes within nucleus which may imply total chromosomes may evolve from more to less. In addition, the primary evolutionary trend of karyotype and the role of m-chromosomes in the process of karyotype evolution were also discussed.

  17. Rapid evolution and copy number variation of primate RHOXF2, an X-linked homeobox gene involved in male reproduction and possibly brain function

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    Zhang Rui

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeobox genes are the key regulators during development, and they are in general highly conserved with only a few reported cases of rapid evolution. RHOXF2 is an X-linked homeobox gene in primates. It is highly expressed in the testicle and may play an important role in spermatogenesis. As male reproductive system is often the target of natural and/or sexual selection during evolution, in this study, we aim to dissect the pattern of molecular evolution of RHOXF2 in primates and its potential functional consequence. Results We studied sequences and copy number variation of RHOXF2 in humans and 16 nonhuman primate species as well as the expression patterns in human, chimpanzee, white-browed gibbon and rhesus macaque. The gene copy number analysis showed that there had been parallel gene duplications/losses in multiple primate lineages. Our evidence suggests that 11 nonhuman primate species have one RHOXF2 copy, and two copies are present in humans and four Old World monkey species, and at least 6 copies in chimpanzees. Further analysis indicated that the gene duplications in primates had likely been mediated by endogenous retrovirus (ERV sequences flanking the gene regions. In striking contrast to non-human primates, humans appear to have homogenized their two RHOXF2 copies by the ERV-mediated non-allelic recombination mechanism. Coding sequence and phylogenetic analysis suggested multi-lineage strong positive selection on RHOXF2 during primate evolution, especially during the origins of humans and chimpanzees. All the 8 coding region polymorphic sites in human populations are non-synonymous, implying on-going selection. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that besides the preferential expression in the reproductive system, RHOXF2 is also expressed in the brain. The quantitative data suggests expression pattern divergence among primate species. Conclusions RHOXF2 is a fast-evolving homeobox gene in primates. The rapid

  18. Rapid evolution and copy number variation of primate RHOXF2, an X-linked homeobox gene involved in male reproduction and possibly brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ao-lei; Wang, Yin-qiu; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Cheng-hong; Wang, Jin-kai; Zhang, Rui; Che, Jun; Su, Bing

    2011-10-12

    Homeobox genes are the key regulators during development, and they are in general highly conserved with only a few reported cases of rapid evolution. RHOXF2 is an X-linked homeobox gene in primates. It is highly expressed in the testicle and may play an important role in spermatogenesis. As male reproductive system is often the target of natural and/or sexual selection during evolution, in this study, we aim to dissect the pattern of molecular evolution of RHOXF2 in primates and its potential functional consequence. We studied sequences and copy number variation of RHOXF2 in humans and 16 nonhuman primate species as well as the expression patterns in human, chimpanzee, white-browed gibbon and rhesus macaque. The gene copy number analysis showed that there had been parallel gene duplications/losses in multiple primate lineages. Our evidence suggests that 11 nonhuman primate species have one RHOXF2 copy, and two copies are present in humans and four Old World monkey species, and at least 6 copies in chimpanzees. Further analysis indicated that the gene duplications in primates had likely been mediated by endogenous retrovirus (ERV) sequences flanking the gene regions. In striking contrast to non-human primates, humans appear to have homogenized their two RHOXF2 copies by the ERV-mediated non-allelic recombination mechanism. Coding sequence and phylogenetic analysis suggested multi-lineage strong positive selection on RHOXF2 during primate evolution, especially during the origins of humans and chimpanzees. All the 8 coding region polymorphic sites in human populations are non-synonymous, implying on-going selection. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that besides the preferential expression in the reproductive system, RHOXF2 is also expressed in the brain. The quantitative data suggests expression pattern divergence among primate species. RHOXF2 is a fast-evolving homeobox gene in primates. The rapid evolution and copy number changes of RHOXF2 had been driven by

  19. Prognostic value of monosomal karyotype in comparison to complex aberrant karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia: a study on 824 cases with aberrant karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haferlach, Claudia; Alpermann, Tamara; Schnittger, Susanne; Kern, Wolfgang; Chromik, Jörg; Schmid, Christoph; Pielken, Hermann Josef; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Höffkes, Heinz-Gert; Haferlach, Torsten

    2012-03-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML) the subset with complex karyotype (CK) is traditionally regarded as the worst prognostic group. However, ≥ 3, ≥ 4, or ≥ 5 abnormalities have been variably used for its definition. Recently, monosomal karyotype (MSK) was suggested to indicate an even inferior outcome. We tested which definition fits best to identify the most unfavorable subgroup. After excluding patients with t(15;17)/PML-RARA, t(8;21)/RUNX1-RUNX1T1, inv (16)/t(16;16)/CBFB-MYH11, and normal karyotype, 824 patients with AML with cytogenetic abnormalities were analyzed. Patients with MSK or CK defined as ≥ 3, ≥ 4, or ≥ 5 abnormalities showed an inferior overall survival compared with the respective remaining patients not fulfilling these criteria (for all, P < .001). Hazard ratios were 1.93, 1.68, 1.94, and 1.92. CK ≥ 4 as a single parameter identified the largest proportion of patients with very poor risk. However, combining CK ≥ 4 and MSK detected an even larger number of patients with very unfavorable outcome (261 of 824; 31.7%).

  20. Karyotype analysis in octoploid and decaploid wild strawberries, Fragaria (Rosaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 20 wild species of strawberries in the genus Fragaria (Rosaceae), have a euploid series including diploid (2n = 2x = 14) through decaploid (2n = 10x = 70) members. Karyotyping has not been thoroughly examined. The objective of this research was to determine the chromosomal morphology and karyoty...

  1. Karyotype studies in some species of the family annonaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seeds of various accessions of Annona muricata, Greenwayodendron suaveolens and Cleistopholis patens were collected from the wet forest, dry forest and derived savanna areas of Nigeria to determine their karyotype. Each of the species has a chromosome number of n = 7 (2n = 14). A pair of satellited chromosomes ...

  2. Outcome of fetuses with enlarged nuchal translucency and normal karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilardo, C. M.; Pajkrt, E.; de Graaf, I.; Mol, B. W.; Bleker, O. P.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between nuchal translucency measurements and outcome of pregnancy with special regard to fetuses with an enlarged nuchal translucency and a normal karyotype. Fetal nuchal translucency measurements were performed on consecutive mothers attending

  3. Karyotype and nucleic acid content in Zantedeschia aethiopica Spr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of karyotype, nucleic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) content and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) were performed in Zantedeschia aethiopica and Zantedeschia elliottiana. Mitotic metaphase in both species showed 2n=32. The chromosomes of both species were quite similar ...

  4. A Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization System for Karyotyping Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of a universal soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) cytogenetic map that associates classical genetic linkage groups, molecular linkage groups and a sequence-based physical map with the karyotype has been impeded due to the soybean chromosomes themselves, which are tiny and morphological...

  5. Karyotype analyses of the species of the genus Jurinea Cass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, karyotype analyses of 13 species belonging to the genus Jurinea Cass. (Compositae) and grown naturally in Turkey were conducted. These taxa include Jurinea alpigena C. Koch, Jurinea ancyrensis Bornm., Jurinea aucherana DC., Jurinea cadmea Boiss., Jurinea cataonica Boiss. and Hausskn., Jurinea ...

  6. Karyotype and nucleic acid content in Zantedeschia aethiopica Spr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-07-03

    Jul 3, 2012 ... Analysis of karyotype, nucleic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) content and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) were performed in Zantedeschia aethiopica and. Zantedeschia elliottiana. Mitotic metaphase in both species showed 2n=32. The chromosomes of both species ...

  7. Poor Prognosis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Monosomal Karyotype

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    Junqing Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics and prognostic significance of monosomal karyotypes (MKs in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data for 498 patients with AML, of whom 233 (46.8% had an abnormal karyotype, including 42 with MKs (8.4% and 70 with a complex karyotype (CK (14.1%. Results: Patients with MKs were older (median age 62.5 vs. 52 years, p=0.003 and had lower median hemoglobin levels (62.5 vs. 77 g/L, p=0.009 and lower white blood cell counts (7.0×109/L vs. 11.7×109/L, p=0.008. Univariate analysis showed that patients with MKs or CKs had shorter overall survival than patients without these karyotypes (median survival time 7.3 vs. 26.3 months for MK, p<0.001, and 14.8 vs. 26.3 months for CK, p<0.001. In multivariable analysis for overall survival, MK and National Comprehensive Cancer Network prognostic group were the only significant factors. Conclusion: MK is an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in AML patients.

  8. Karyotypic studies of four species of the blackfly, Simulium (Diptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mallory

    2012-01-12

    Jan 12, 2012 ... Karyotypic studies were carried out on the mitotic chromosomes from the supraoesophageal ganglia of four species of the blackfly, Simulium. The four species were Simulium alcocki Pomeroy, Simulium damnosum Theobald sensu lacto and two yet unidentified species of Simulium herein referred to as US.

  9. Karyotype and C-banding analyses of haploid male chromosomes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosomes, with detailed karyotype information (number, shape, total length, relative length, arm ratio and centromeric index) and C-banding patterns in the somatic division of haploid male of Apis florae in Iran are described. Samples were obtained from the colonies in south of Iran. Prior to the swarming season, ...

  10. The karyotype and taxonomic status of Cryptomys hottentotus darlingi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The karyotype and taxonomic status of. Cryptomys hottentotus darlingi (Rodentia: Bath yergid ae). G.H, Aguilar. Department of ZOOlogy, University of Cape Town, Ronde- bosch, 7700 Republic of South Africa. Received JR November 1992; accepled J J May 1993. Cytogenetic analyses were performed on twenty specimens.

  11. Laser Rapid Manufacturing of Stainless Steel 316L/Inconel718 Functionally Graded Materials: Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties

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    Dongjiang Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two patterns of functionally graded materials (FGMs were successfully fabricated whose compositions gradually varied from 100% stainless steel 316L to 100% Inconel718 superalloy using laser engineered net shaping process. The microstructure characterization, composition analysis, and microhardness along the graded direction were investigated. The comparison revealed the distinctions in solidification behavior, microstructure evolution of two patterns. In the end, the abrasive wear resistance of the material was investigated.

  12. The association with Turner syndrome significantly affects the course of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in children, irrespective of karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aversa, Tommaso; Messina, Maria Francesca; Mazzanti, Laura; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Mussa, Alessandro; Faienza, Maria Felicia; Scarano, Emanuela; De Luca, Filippo; Wasniewska, Malgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Only few studies have investigated to now whether the association with Turner syndrome (TS) may affect the course of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in children. Aim of this study was to ascertain whether the presentation and long-term course of HT in TS children may be characterized by a peculiar and atypical pattern. The clinical and biochemical findings at HT diagnosis in 90 TS children (group A) were compared with those recorded in 449 girls with HT but without TS (group B); in group A patients, thyroid function tests were re-evaluated after a median time interval of 4.9 years. At HT diagnosis median TSH levels and the rate of cases presenting with a thyroid dysfunction picture were significantly lower in group A, irrespective of karyotype abnormalities. In group A only 34.8 % of the girls who had initially presented with euthyroidism remained euthyroid even at re-evaluation, whilst 67.7 % of those who had presented with subclinical hypothyroidism became overtly hypothyroid over time; also such evolutive pattern was irrespective of karyotype abnormalities. (1) In TS girls, HT presents with a milder hormonal pattern, which often deteriorates over time; (2) these biochemical features are not necessarily linked with a specific karyotype.

  13. Understanding rapid evolution in predator‐prey interactions using the theory of fast‐slow dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Michael H; Ellner, Stephen P

    2010-11-01

    The accumulation of evidence that ecologically important traits often evolve at the same time and rate as ecological dynamics (e.g., changes in species' abundances or spatial distributions) has outpaced theory describing the interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes with comparable timescales. The disparity between experiment and theory is partially due to the high dimensionality of models that include both evolutionary and ecological dynamics. Here we show how the theory of fast-slow dynamical systems can be used to reduce model dimension, and we use that body of theory to study a general predator-prey system exhibiting fast evolution in either the predator or the prey. Our approach yields graphical methods with predictive power about when new and unique dynamics (e.g., completely out-of-phase oscillations and cryptic dynamics) can arise in ecological systems exhibiting fast evolution. In addition, we derive analytical expressions for determining when such behavior arises and how evolution affects qualitative properties of the ecological dynamics. Finally, while the theory requires a separation of timescales between the ecological and evolutionary processes, our approach yields insight into systems where the rates of those processes are comparable and thus is a step toward creating a general ecoevolutionary theory.

  14. When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    For most species, evolutionary adaptation is not expected to be sufficiently rapid to buffer the effects of human-mediated environmental changes. Yet large persistent populations of small bodied fish residing in some of the most contaminated estuaries of the US have provided some...

  15. Study of karyotypes in Case of Recurrent Abortions in Gujarat

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    N. Parikh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: - The biological definition of miscarriage is the expulsion of the conceptus before viability has been achieved. The definition of recurrent miscarriage is three or more consecutive spontaneous abortions. The risk factors for recurrent miscarriage are epidemiological, genetic, anatomical disorders, endocrinal, reproductive tract infections, thrombophilic disorders, disorders of materno-fetal alloimmune relationships, environmental effects and psychological causes. About 50% to 60% of all first trimester abortions are associated with derangement of one or more chromosomal complements. Aim: - The aim of this study was to assess frequency and increasing the awareness of physician about the nature of chromosomal aberration that contribute to the occurrence of repeated abortions. Material & Methods: - Patient of recurrent abortion was investigated by history taking, examination and investigations. For present study 20 women having two or more consecutive spontaneous abortions, who attended outdoor & indoor patient department, were selected and karyotyping was done. In 10 of the above cases karyotype study of both partners was done. So in total 30 individuals (20 females & 10 males were selected for Cytogenetic study. In all cases relevant history and clinical findings and other investigations were noted. Blood samples were obtained and karyotype study was performed at Genetic Laboratory, B. J. Medical College, Ahmedabad. Results and Conclusions: - Cytogenetic evaluation by karyotypes revealed robertsonian translocation in one (5% female; this patient had a history of 2 spontaneous abortions and two times IVF failure, she had history of chocolate cyst of ovary and family history of infertility. No numerical anomaly; mosaicism or inversions were found in this study; 23 cases had normal karyotype and remaining 6 cases came out inconclusive.

  16. Recurrent selection with reduced 2,4-D amine doses results in the rapid evolution of 2,4-D herbicide resistance in wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Michael B; Walsh, Michael J; Flower, Ken C; Powles, Stephen B

    2016-11-01

    When used at effective doses, weed resistance to auxinic herbicides has been slow to evolve when compared with other modes of action. Here we report the evolutionary response of a herbicide-susceptible population of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.) and confirm that sublethal doses of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) amine can lead to the rapid evolution of 2,4-D resistance and cross-resistance to acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides. Following four generations of 2,4-D selection, the progeny of a herbicide-susceptible wild radish population evolved 2,4-D resistance, increasing the LD 50 from 16 to 138 g ha -1 . Along with 2,4-D resistance, cross-resistance to the ALS-inhibiting herbicides metosulam (4.0-fold) and chlorsulfuron (4.5-fold) was evident. Pretreatment of the 2,4-D-selected population with the cytochrome P450 inhibitor malathion restored chlorsulfuron to full efficacy, indicating that cross-resistance to chlorsulfuron was likely due to P450-catalysed enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism. This study is the first to confirm the rapid evolution of auxinic herbicide resistance through the use of low doses of 2,4-D and serves as a reminder that 2,4-D must always be used at highly effective doses. With the introduction of transgenic auxinic-herbicide-resistant crops in the Americas, there will be a marked increase in auxinic herbicide use and therefore the risk of resistance evolution. Auxinic herbicides should be used only at effective doses and with diversity if resistance is to remain a minimal issue. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) populations

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehead, Andrew; Clark, Bryan W.; Reid, Noah M.; Hahn, Mark E.; Nacci, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Abstract For most species, evolutionary adaptation is not expected to be sufficiently rapid to buffer the effects of human‐mediated environmental changes, including environmental pollution. Here we review how key features of populations, the characteristics of environmental pollution, and the genetic architecture underlying adaptive traits, may interact to shape the likelihood of evolutionary rescue from pollution. Large populations of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) persist in som...

  18. Quiescent-phase evolution of a surge-type glacier: Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, T.A.; Mayo, L.R.; Echelmeyer, K.A.; Harrison, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    Black Rapids Glacier, a surge-type glacier in the Alaska Range, most recently surged in 1936-37 and is currently in its quiescent phase. Mass balance, ice velocity and thickness change have been measured at three to ten sites from 1972 to 1994. The annual speed has undergone cyclical fluctuations of as much as 45% about the mean speed. Ice thickness and surface slope did not change enough to cause the speed fluctuations through changes in ice deformation, which indicates that they are being driven by changes in basal motion. The behavior of Black Rapids Glacier during this quiescent phase is significantly different from that of Variegated Glacier, another well-studied surge-type glacier in Alaska. The present medial-moraine configuration of Black Rapids Glacier indicates that a surge could occur at any time. However, ice velocity data indicate that the next surge may not be imminent. We believe that there is little chance that the next surge will cross and dam the Delta River.

  19. [Analysis of chromosome karyotype of oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Hong-Mei; Chen, Qian-Ming; Li, Bing-Qi

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the fundamental genetic character of oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts changes through contrasting and analyzing the oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and the normal fibroblasts of oral mucosa. The two kinds of cells were treated with colchicine and microsometic fluid, and then were expanded with cold acetic acid and formalized with methyl alcohol. The cells were observed under the oil microscope after Giemsa staining. The chromosome karyotype of the two kinds of cells was analyzed by Visus 2. 1. There were not obvious differences in the way of chromosome karyotype between the oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and the normal fibroblasts of oral mucosa. The basic genetic characteristics of the normal cells are conserved in the oral carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, which means the cells have no malignant changes.

  20. Electrophoretic molecular karyotype of the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervelatti Eliane P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrophoretic karyotype of the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum was established using contour-clamped homogeneous electric field (CHEF gel electrophoresis. Five chromosomal bands of approximately 3.0 to 5.8 megabase pairs (Mbp each were observed and together indicated that 22.05 Mbp of the total genome are organized as chromosomal macromolecules. In addition to establishing the number and size of T. rubrum chromosomes, these results open perspectives for the construction of chromosome-specific libraries and for the physical mapping of genes of interest, thus permitting future gene linkage studies in this pathogen. A detailed understanding of the karyotype and genomic organization of T. rubrum should contribute to further genetic, taxonomic and epidemiological studies of this dermatophyte.

  1. Transverse testicular ectopia with abnormal karyotype - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasymczuk, Jerzy; Kaminiarczyk-Pyzalka, Dominika; Krawczynski, Maciej; Niedziela, Marek; Wasko, Ryszard; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Jankowski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Growth disturbances and developmental malformations of external genitalia, such as hypospadias, bifid scrotum and micropenis, coexisting with non-palpable testes, may develop as a result of primary endocrinological dysfunctions as well as an effect secondary to chromosomal aberrations. Therefore, patients with these symptoms require specific diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. We present an example of TTE as a presentation of karyotype abnormalities. Clinical presentation - 9.5 year old boy presented with hypospadias, bilateral cryptorchidism and right inguinal hernia and short stature. Endocrine test showed low testosterone levels with adequate gonadal response. Laparoscopy was performed and revealed the presence of TTE. The presence of mosaic karyotype with abnormal Y chromosome does not exclude a possibility of testis migration disorders, including TTE, caused by other (possibly genetic) factors. Laparoscopy is a technique of choice for diagnosis and treatment in cases of cryptorchidism.

  2. Karyotype and nuclear DNA content of Trichomycterus areolatus (Siluriformes, Trichomycteridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Colihueque

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analysis of Trichomycterus areolatus, collected from the Tijeral and Huilma Rivers in southern Chile has shown a diploid chromosome number of 2n = 54, a fundamental number of FN = 106, and a karyotypic formula of 44m + 8sm + 2st. Intra-individual polymorphism of chromosome number (2n = 54, 55 and 56 in specimens from the Huilma River has also been documented, providing further evidence of the occurrence of this phenomenon in Trichomycterus. The karyotype exhibited large chromosome pairs: metacentric pairs 1 (relative length 7.54%, 2 (5.75% and 3 (5.09%, submetacentric pair 23 (5.25%, and subtelocentic pair 27 (5.28%. Nuclear DNA content analysis showed an average value of 5.04 ± 1.09 pg/nucleus. This DNA content is higher than the mean value described for other species in this genus.

  3. The precedence of syntax in the rapid emergence of human language in evolution as defined by the integration hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor eNóbrega

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Our core hypothesis is that the emergence of human language arose very rapidly from the linking of two pre-adapted systems found elsewhere in the animal world—an expression system, found, for example, in birdsong, and a lexical system, suggestively found in non-human primate calls (Miyagawa et al., 2013, 2014. We challenge the view that language has undergone a series of gradual changes—or a single preliminary protolinguistic stage—before achieving its full character. We argue that a full-fledged combinatorial operation Merge triggered the integration of these two pre-adapted systems, giving rise to a fully developed language. This goes against the gradualist view that there existed a structureless, protolinguistic stage, in which a rudimentary proto-Merge operation generated internally flat words. It is argued that compounds in present-day language are a fossilized form of this prior stage, a point which we will question.

  4. The precedence of syntax in the rapid emergence of human language in evolution as defined by the integration hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Vitor A; Miyagawa, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Our core hypothesis is that the emergence of human language arose very rapidly from the linking of two pre-adapted systems found elsewhere in the animal world-an expression system, found, for example, in birdsong, and a lexical system, suggestively found in non-human primate calls (Miyagawa et al., 2013, 2014). We challenge the view that language has undergone a series of gradual changes-or a single preliminary protolinguistic stage-before achieving its full character. We argue that a full-fledged combinatorial operation Merge triggered the integration of these two pre-adapted systems, giving rise to a fully developed language. This goes against the gradualist view that there existed a structureless, protolinguistic stage, in which a rudimentary proto-Merge operation generated internally flat words. It is argued that compounds in present-day language are a fossilized form of this prior stage, a point which we will question.

  5. Longitudinal analysis of the temporal evolution of Acinetobacter baumannii strains in Ohio, USA, by using rapid automated typing methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke K Decker

    Full Text Available Genotyping methods are essential to understand the transmission dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii. We examined the representative genotypes of A. baumannii at different time periods in select locations in Ohio, using two rapid automated typing methods: PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS, a form of multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, and repetitive-sequence-based-PCR (rep-PCR. Our analysis included 122 isolates from 4 referral hospital systems, in 2 urban areas of Ohio. These isolates were associated with outbreaks at 3 different time periods (1996, 2000 and 2005-2007. Type assignments of PCR/ESI-MS and rep-PCR were compared to each other and to worldwide (WW clone types. The discriminatory power of each method was determined using the Simpson's index of diversity (DI. We observed that PCR/ESI-MS sequence type (ST 14, corresponding to WW clone 3, predominated in 1996, whereas ST 12 and 14 co-existed in the intermediate period (2000 and ST 10 and 12, belonging to WW clone 2, predominated more recently in 2007. The shift from WW clone 3 to WW clone 2 was accompanied by an increase in carbapenem resistance. The DI was approximately 0.74 for PCR/ESI-MS, 0.88 for rep-PCR and 0.90 for the combination of both typing methods. We conclude that combining rapid automated typing methods such as PCR/ESI-MS and rep-PCR serves to optimally characterize the regional molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii. Our data also sheds light on the changing sequence types in an 11 year period in Northeast Ohio.

  6. Rapid selective sweep of pre-existing polymorphisms and slow fixation of new mutations in experimental evolution of Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aifen; Hillesland, Kristina L; He, Zhili; Schackwitz, Wendy; Tu, Qichao; Zane, Grant M; Ma, Qiao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Stahl, David A; Wall, Judy D; Hazen, Terry C; Fields, Matthew W; Arkin, Adam P; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the genetic basis of microbial evolutionary adaptation to salt (NaCl) stress, populations of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH), a sulfate-reducing bacterium important for the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur, carbon and nitrogen, and potentially the bioremediation of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides, were propagated under salt stress or non-stress conditions for 1200 generations. Whole-genome sequencing revealed 11 mutations in salt stress-evolved clone ES9-11 and 14 mutations in non-stress-evolved clone EC3-10. Whole-population sequencing data suggested the rapid selective sweep of the pre-existing polymorphisms under salt stress within the first 100 generations and the slow fixation of new mutations. Population genotyping data demonstrated that the rapid selective sweep of pre-existing polymorphisms was common in salt stress-evolved populations. In contrast, the selection of pre-existing polymorphisms was largely random in EC populations. Consistently, at 100 generations, stress-evolved population ES9 showed improved salt tolerance, namely increased growth rate (2.0-fold), higher biomass yield (1.8-fold) and shorter lag phase (0.7-fold) under higher salinity conditions. The beneficial nature of several mutations was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. All four tested mutations contributed to the shortened lag phases under higher salinity condition. In particular, compared with the salt tolerance improvement in ES9-11, a mutation in a histidine kinase protein gene lytS contributed 27% of the growth rate increase and 23% of the biomass yield increase while a mutation in hypothetical gene DVU2472 contributed 24% of the biomass yield increase. Our results suggested that a few beneficial mutations could lead to dramatic improvements in salt tolerance.

  7. Rapid evolution of ritual architecture in central Polynesia indicated by precise 230Th/U coral dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Warren D; Kahn, Jennifer G; Polito, Christina M; Kirch, Patrick V

    2010-07-27

    In Polynesia, the complex Society Islands chiefdoms constructed elaborate temples (marae), some of which reached monumental proportions and were associated with human sacrifice in the 'Oro cult. We investigated the development of temples on Mo'orea Island by 230Th/U dating of corals used as architectural elements (facing veneers, cut-and-dressed blocks, and offerings). The three largest coastal marae (associated with the highest-ranked chiefly lineages) and 19 marae in the inland 'Opunohu Valley containing coral architectural elements were dated. Fifteen corals from the coastal temples meet geochemical criteria for accurate 230Th/U dating, yield reproducible ages for each marae, and have a mean uncertainty of 9 y (2sigma). Of 41 corals from wetter inland sites, 12 show some diagenesis and may yield unreliable ages; however, the majority (32) of inland dates are considered accurate. We also obtained six 14C dates on charcoal from four marae. The dates indicate that temple architecture on Mo'orea Island developed rapidly over a period of approximately 140 y (ca. AD 1620-1760), with the largest coastal temples constructed immediately before initial European contact (AD 1767). The result of a seriation of architectural features corresponds closely with this chronology. Acropora coral veneers were superceded by cut-and-dressed Porites coral blocks on altar platforms, followed by development of multitier stepped altar platforms and use of pecked basalt stones associated with the late 'Oro cult. This example demonstrates that elaboration of ritual architecture in complex societies may be surprisingly rapid.

  8. Analyses of karyotypes and comparative physical locations of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... RG556 and the BAC clone, 44B4, were 8.0 and 41.3% in O. sativa, while 9.0 and 42.3% in O. officinalis, respectively. Based on a comparative RFLP map of a wild rice, O. officinalis and O. sativa, comparative analyses of karyotypes of O. officinalis were demonstrated firstly by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using a ...

  9. Clinical expression of Menkes disease in females with normal karyotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Lenartowicz, Malgorzata; Zabot, Marie-Therese

    2012-01-01

    Menkes Disease (MD) is a rare X-linked recessive fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene, and most patients are males. Female carriers are mosaics of wild-type and mutant cells due to the random X inactivation, and they are rarely affected. In the largest cohort of ...... patients reported so far which consists of 517 families we identified 9 neurologically affected carriers with normal karyotypes....

  10. Karyotypic differences between cells from placenta and other fetal tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verjaal, M.; Leschot, N. J.; Wolf, H.; Treffers, P. E.

    1987-01-01

    Six cases are reported with discrepancies between the karyotypes of placental cells and cells from other fetal tissue. The respective findings were: 48, + 7, + 18 resp. 47, + 18. 46,i(18q) resp. 46,del18(p11). 46,XX resp. 46,XX/47,XXX. 46,X,Yq+ and 46,XY resp. 46,XY. 46/47, + 12 resp. 46. 46/47, + 5

  11. [Aberration of somatic karyotype in normozoospermic males from infertile couples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordalska, A; Barczyk, A; Hübner, H; Malinowski, A; Szpakowski, M

    1998-06-01

    During the complex investigation of couple infertility, a group of 40 normozoospermic males having low density of semen was selected. Cytogenetic analysis revealed 2 cases of somatic karyotype aberrations: 47,XYY and 46,XY,t(14;19), and 2 cases of chromosomal polymorphisms: 46,XYq+ i 46,XY,14p+. In the article the mechanism of fertility disturbances evoked by these findings is discussed in aspects of the function of spermatozoa and its genetic material content.

  12. Phenotypes and karyotypes of human malignant mesothelioma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relan, Vandana; Morrison, Leanne; Parsonson, Kylie; Clarke, Belinda E; Duhig, Edwina E; Windsor, Morgan N; Matar, Kevin S; Naidoo, Rishendran; Passmore, Linda; McCaul, Elizabeth; Courtney, Deborah; Yang, Ian A; Fong, Kwun M; Bowman, Rayleen V

    2013-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumour of serosal surfaces most commonly pleura. Characterised cell lines represent a valuable tool to study the biology of mesothelioma. The aim of this study was to develop and biologically characterise six malignant mesothelioma cell lines to evaluate their potential as models of human malignant mesothelioma. Five lines were initiated from pleural biopsies, and one from pleural effusion of patients with histologically proven malignant mesothelioma. Mesothelial origin was assessed by standard morphology, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and immunocytochemistry. Growth characteristics were assayed using population doubling times. Spectral karyotyping was performed to assess chromosomal abnormalities. Authentication of donor specific derivation was undertaken by DNA fingerprinting using a panel of SNPs. Most of cell lines exhibited spindle cell shape, with some retaining stellate shapes. At passage 2 to 6 all lines stained positively for calretinin and cytokeratin 19, and demonstrated capacity for anchorage-independent growth. At passage 4 to 16, doubling times ranged from 30-72 hours, and on spectral karyotyping all lines exhibited numerical chromosomal abnormalities ranging from 41 to 113. Monosomy of chromosomes 8, 14, 22 or 17 was observed in three lines. One line displayed four different karyotypes at passage 8, but only one karyotype at passage 42, and another displayed polyploidy at passage 40 which was not present at early passages. At passages 5-17, TEM showed characteristic features of mesothelioma ultrastructure in all lines including microvilli and tight intercellular junctions. These six cell lines exhibit varying cell morphology, a range of doubling times, and show diverse passage-dependent structural chromosomal changes observed in malignant tumours. However they retain characteristic immunocytochemical protein expression profiles of mesothelioma during maintenance in artificial culture systems. These

  13. Phenotypes and karyotypes of human malignant mesothelioma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Relan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumour of serosal surfaces most commonly pleura. Characterised cell lines represent a valuable tool to study the biology of mesothelioma. The aim of this study was to develop and biologically characterise six malignant mesothelioma cell lines to evaluate their potential as models of human malignant mesothelioma. METHODS: Five lines were initiated from pleural biopsies, and one from pleural effusion of patients with histologically proven malignant mesothelioma. Mesothelial origin was assessed by standard morphology, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and immunocytochemistry. Growth characteristics were assayed using population doubling times. Spectral karyotyping was performed to assess chromosomal abnormalities. Authentication of donor specific derivation was undertaken by DNA fingerprinting using a panel of SNPs. RESULTS: Most of cell lines exhibited spindle cell shape, with some retaining stellate shapes. At passage 2 to 6 all lines stained positively for calretinin and cytokeratin 19, and demonstrated capacity for anchorage-independent growth. At passage 4 to 16, doubling times ranged from 30-72 hours, and on spectral karyotyping all lines exhibited numerical chromosomal abnormalities ranging from 41 to 113. Monosomy of chromosomes 8, 14, 22 or 17 was observed in three lines. One line displayed four different karyotypes at passage 8, but only one karyotype at passage 42, and another displayed polyploidy at passage 40 which was not present at early passages. At passages 5-17, TEM showed characteristic features of mesothelioma ultrastructure in all lines including microvilli and tight intercellular junctions. CONCLUSION: These six cell lines exhibit varying cell morphology, a range of doubling times, and show diverse passage-dependent structural chromosomal changes observed in malignant tumours. However they retain characteristic immunocytochemical protein expression profiles of

  14. In situ investigation on rapid microstructure evolution in extreme complex environment by developing a new AFBP-TVM sparse tomography algorithm from original CS-XPCMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Dong, Bo; Hu, Xiaofang; Xiao, Yu; Wang, Yang

    2017-09-01

    A new sparse tomography method for observing the rapid internal microstructure evolution of material, called the Algebraic Filtered-Back-Projection and Total Variation Minimization (AFBP-TVM) iteration sparse reconstruction algorithm, was proposed in this paper. The new algorithm was developed by combining the two techniques of the Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) and the Filtered-Back-Projection (FBP) on the basis of analysis in linear space. A series of numerical reconstruction experiments were conducted to validate the new algorithm. The results indicated the new algorithm can obtain satisfactory reconstruction images from 1/6 of the projections that were used in traditional algorithms. So the time spent on projection acquisition process can be reduced to 1/6 of that in traditional tomography method. The quality of images reconstructed by new algorithm was better than other algorithms, which was evaluated by three quantitative parameters. The normalized average absolute distance criterion and the normalized mean square criterion, which were used to evaluate the relative error of the reconstruction results (smaller value means better quality of reconstruction), decreased from 0.3758 to 0.1272 and from 0.1832 to 0.0894 respectively. The standardized covariance criterion, which was used to evaluate the similarity level (greater value means higher accuracy of reconstruction), increased from 92.72% to 99.30%. Finally, the new algorithm was validated under actual experimental conditions. The results indicated that the AFBP-TVM algorithm obtained better reconstruction quality than other algorithms. It meant that the AFBP-TVM algorithm may be a suitable method for in situ investigation on material's rapid internal microstructure evolution in extreme complex environment.

  15. Profuse color-evolution-based fluorescent test paper sensor for rapid and visual monitoring of endogenous Cu(2+) in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yueqing; You, Junhui; You, Zhengyi; Dong, Fang; Du, Shuhu; Zhang, Liying

    2018-01-15

    The fluorescent paper for colorimetric detection of metal ions has been widely fabricated using various sensing probes, but it still remains an elusive task to design a test paper with multicolor variation with target dosages for accurate determination. Herein, we report a profuse color-evolution-based fluorescent test paper sensor for rapid and visual monitoring of Cu(2+) in human urine by printing tricolor probe onto filter paper. The tricolor probe consists of blue-emission carbon dots (bCDs), green-emission quantum dots (gQDs) and red-emission quantum dots (rQDs), which is based on the principle that the fluorescence of gQDs and rQDs are simultaneously quenched by Cu(2+), whereas the bCDs as the photostable internal standard is insensitive to Cu(2+). Upon the addition of different amounts of Cu(2+), the ratiometric fluorescence intensity of the tricolor probe continuously varied, leading to color changes from shallow pink to blue with a detection limit of 1.3nM. When the tricolor probe solution was printed onto a sheet of filter paper, as-obtained test paper displayed a more profuse color evolution from shallow pink to light salmon to dark orange to olive drab to dark olive green to slate blue to royal blue and to final dark blue with the increase of Cu(2+) concentration compared with dual-color probe-based test paper, and dosage scale as low as 6.0nM was clearly discriminated. The sensing test paper is simple, rapid and inexpensive, and serves as a visual platform for ultrasensitive monitoring of endogenous Cu(2+) in human urine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Guiding the evolution to catch the virus: An in silico study of affinity maturation against rapidly mutating antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenshen; Burton, Dennis; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    2014-03-01

    The immune system comprises an intricate and evolving collection of cells and molecules that enables a defense against pathogenic agents. Its workings present a rich source of physical problems that impact human health. One intriguing example is the process of affinity maturation (AM) through which an antibody (Ab)--a component of the host immune system--evolves to more efficiently bind an antigen (Ag)--a unique part of a foreign pathogen such as a virus. Sufficiently strong binding to the Ag enables recognition and neutralization. A major challenge is to contain a diversifying mixture of Ag variants, that arise in natural infection, from evading Ab neutralization. This entails a thorough understanding of AM against multiple Ag species and mutating Ag. During AM, Ab-encoding cells undergo cycles of mutation and selection, a process reminiscent of Darwinian evolution yet occurring in real time. We first cast affinity-dependent selection into an extreme value problem and show how the binding characteristics scale with Ag diversity. We then develop an agent-based residue-resolved computational model of AM which allows us to track the evolutionary trajectories of individual cells. This dynamic model not only reveals significant stochastic effects associated with the relatively small and highly dynamic population size, it also uncovers the markedly distinct maturation outcomes if designed Ag variants are presented in different temporal procedures. Insights thus obtained would guide rational design of vaccination protocols.

  17. Microstructure evolution in the rapidly quenched Fe{sub 78}Si{sub 9}B{sub 13} ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.-M., E-mail: weiminw@sdu.edu.c [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Jin, S.F. [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Zhang, J.T.; Huang, T.; Wang, L.; Bian, X.F. [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2009-11-01

    We report microstructure evolution in as-spun Fe{sub 78}Si{sub 9}B{sub 13} ribbons under various wheel speeds (s), which was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). With decreasing s, the volume fraction of the residual amorphous phase (V{sub a}) in the as-spun ribbons decreases gradually, and the total exothermic heat of the crystallization in the DSC curves also decreases, but the ratio of the exothermic heat of the second crystallization to the first one is on the contrary. alpha-Fe is found in the ribbon with s of 32.9 m/s, while alpha-Fe, eutectic alpha-Fe+Fe{sub 2}B, and Fe{sub 3}Si phases are found in ribbons with s of 25.6 and 18.3 m/s. The phase precipitating behavior in cooling processes is well consistent with the annealing process in the literatures.

  18. Ovotesticular disorder of sex development with unusual karyotype: patient report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Georgette Beatriz; Ribeiro Andrade, Juliana Gabriel; Guaragna-Filho, Guilherme; Sewaybricker, Letícia Esposito; Miranda, Márcio Lopes; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa Trevas; Guerra-Júnior, Gil

    2015-05-01

    Ovotesticular disorder of sex development (OT-DSD) (true hermaphroditism) is an anatomopathological diagnosis based on the findings of testicular and ovarian tissues in the same subject, in the same gonad (ovotestis), or in separate gonads. OT-DSD is a rare cause of sex ambiguity, and the most common karyotype is 46,XX; mosaics and chimeras are found only in 10%-20%. To report a case of an OT-DSD patient with a rare karyotype constitution. A 2-month-old child with male sex assignment was referred to our clinic for investigation of sex ambiguity. He was the second child of healthy unrelated parents; pregnancy and labor were uneventful. On physical examination, he had a 2.3-cm phallus and perineal hypospadias (Prader grade III); the right gonad was in the labioscrotal fold and the left was found in the inguinal channel. Karyotype was 46,XX/47,XXY/48,XXYY. Anatomopathological examination of gonads revealed right testis and left ovotestis. The male sex assignment was maintained; the child underwent left gonadectomy, removal of Mullerian structures and urethroplasty. A thorough revision of literature revealed a single case of OT-DSD with the same chromosome constitution. Gonadal biopsy is necessary to establish diagnosis in cases of sex chromosome mosaicism.

  19. Clinical disease characteristics according to karyotype in Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Young Yeo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Turner syndrome (TS is a disorder in which various anomalies can be accompanied, especially cardiovascular, renal, thyroid and auditory problems. The aim of this study is to identify the incidence of these disorders in patients with TS according to karyotype. Methods : We reviewed medical records of 90 patients with TS diagnosed by chromosomal analysis in 4 hospitals from Jan 1998 to Dec 2007. We evaluated these cases by prepared protocol of 4 medical problems. Results : The distribution of karyotype was 45,X (47.8%, mosaic pattern (34.4% and structural aberration group (17.8 %. Renal anomalies, cardiovascular anomalies, thyroid disorders and auditory problems are accompanied in 4.4%, 10.0 %, 11.1% and 5.6%, respectively. 45,X group had renal anomalies (7.0%, cardiovascular anomalies (18.6%, thyroid disorders (9.3% and auditory problems (11.6%. Mosaic group had renal anomalies (3.2%, thyroid disorders (12.9%, no cardiovascular anomalies and auditory problems. Structural aberration group had cardiovascular anomalies (6.3%, thyroid disorders (12.5% and no other 2 problems. Patients with 45,X group had a significant higher incidence of cardiovascular anomalies (P=0.025. Conclusion : Our results indicate that there are differences clinically according to karyotype of TS, especially in incidence of cardiovascular anomalies.

  20. Correlation of sole prenatal indication to fetal chromosomal karyotype abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying XU

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To analysis the clinical high risk factors for fetal chromosomal abnormalities. Methods  Amniocentesis, chromosomal karyotype analysis and other related methods were performed on 4829 pregnant women, who presented sole indication of prenatal diagnosis such as advanced age, high risk factors and fetal ultrasound abnormalities, for analyzing the correlations of those women to the incidence of fetal chromosomal abnormalities. Results  The detection rates of abnormal karyotype were 5.0% (57/1143, 1.7% (40/2367 and 4.3% (57/1319 in the older women group (age>35, abnormal maternal serological screening group and abnormal fetal ultrasound finding group, respectively. The detection rats of karyotype abnormality were 6.9% (23/333 in women with fetal congenital heart diseases, 8.5% (20/234 in those with abnormal amniotic fluid, 1.1% (1/89 in those with fetal ventriculomegaly, 1.1% (10/898 in those with fetal intracardiac hyperechogenicity, 5.9% (2/34 in those with fetal choroid cyst and 5.6% (1/18 in those with fetal renal pelvis broadening. Conclusion  The pregnant women with age>35, fetal sonographic structural anomalies or two or more soft marker abnormalities should be prenatally diagnosed and doing the genetic counseling combined with the family history. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.02.14

  1. Prognostic Effect of Complex Karyotype, Monosomal Karyotype, and Chromosome 17 Abnormalities in B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoral, Priya; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Craddock, Kenneth J; Schimmer, Aaron; Chang, Hong

    2017-04-01

    The effect of monosomal karyotype (MK), complex karyotype (CK), and chromosome 17 abnormalities (abnl 17) on prognosis in B-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (B-ALL) has not yet been established. We conducted a retrospective analysis of prognostic factors on 237 adult patients with B-ALL treated at our institution. Older age (older than 60 years), higher white blood cell count (> 30), and abnl 17 were associated with shorter overall survival in univariate analysis, but multivariable analysis only identified older age as an independent poor prognostic actor. There was a significant correlation between abnl 17 and older age. In contrast to the patients with acute myeloid leukemia, our results show that MK and CK do not play a predictive role in patients with B-ALL, but further study is required to determine whether specific changes on chromosome 17 might have prognostic value when investigated separately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. AGN-host connection at 0.5 < z < 2.5: A rapid evolution of AGN fraction in red galaxies during the last 10 Gyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Elbaz, D.; Alexander, D. M.; Xue, Y. Q.; Gabor, J. M.; Juneau, S.; Schreiber, C.; Zheng, X.-Z.; Wuyts, S.; Shi, Y.; Daddi, E.; Shu, X.-W.; Fang, G.-W.; Huang, J.-S.; Luo, B.; Gu, Q.-S.

    2017-05-01

    We explore the dependence of the incidence of moderate-luminosity (L0.5-8 keV = 1041.9-43.7 erg s-1) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the distribution of their accretion rates on host color at 0.5 mass-complete parent galaxy sample down to M∗ > 1010 M⊙. We use extinction-corrected rest-frame U-V colors to divide both AGN hosts and non-AGN galaxies into red sequence (red), green valley (green), and blue cloud (blue) populations. We find that the fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN at fixed X-ray luminosity increases with stellar mass and redshift for all the three galaxy populations, independent of their colors. However, both the AGN fraction at fixed stellar mass and its evolution with redshift are clearly dependent on host colors. Most notably, red galaxies have the lowest AGN fraction ( 5%) at z 1 yet with most rapid evolution with redshift, increasing by a factor of 5 (24%) at z 2. Green galaxies exhibit the highest AGN fraction across all redshifts, which is most pronounced at z 2 with more than half of them hosting an AGN at M∗ > 1010.6 M⊙. Together with the high AGN fraction in red galaxies at z 2, this indicates that (X-ray) AGNs could be important in both transforming (quenching) star-forming galaxies into quiescent ones and subsequently maintaining their quiescence at high redshift. Furthermore, consistent with previous studies at lower redshifts, we show that the probability of hosting an AGN for the total galaxy population can be characterized by a universal Eddington ratio (as approximated by LX/M∗) distribution (p(λEdd) λEdd-0.4), which is independent on host mass. Yet consistent with their different AGN fractions, galaxies with different colors appear to also have different p(λEdd) with red galaxies exhibiting more rapid redshift evolution compared with that for green and blue galaxies. Evidence for a steeper power-law distribution of p(λEdd) in red galaxies (p(λEdd) λEdd-0.6) is also presented, though larger samples are needed to

  3. Abnormal non-invasive prenatal test results concordant with karyotype of cytotrophoblast but not reflecting abnormal fetal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srebniak, M I; Diderich, K E M; Noomen, P; Dijkman, A; de Vries, F A T; van Opstal, D

    2014-07-01

    We present a unique case in which non-invasive and invasive prenatal diagnoses showed abnormal, but discordant, results. A patient with abnormal non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) results, indicating a 99% risk for monosomy X, was referred to our center for genetic counseling and confirmatory studies. Cytogenetic analysis of uncultured mesenchymal core of chorionic villi (CV) revealed a mosaic male karyotype consisting of two abnormal cell lines: one with monosomy X and the other with an isodicentric chromosome Y. Array analysis of the trophoblast confirmed the NIPT results. Based on the CV results, the patient opted for termination of pregnancy. After extensive counseling by a clinical geneticist about the possible outcomes and by a gynecologist about the risk of a second-trimester abortion procedure, the patient agreed to undergo early amniocentesis. Amniocentesis confirmed that the fetus had a male karyotype with an isodicentric chromosome Y, and the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array profile suggested absence of the monosomy X cell line. The male infant was expected to be infertile. The patient finally decided to continue the pregnancy. Our case confirms that NIPT results are comparable with those of short-term cultured CV investigating the cytotrophoblast. Our patient was not aware that the NIPT results reveal the placental karyotype, which sometimes may be different from the fetal karyotype. Pretest counseling and providing the risk figures for false-positive and false-negative NIPT results are of great importance in order to discourage women from terminating pregnancies based on NIPT results alone. Copyright © 2014 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Karyotype of Alstroemeria diluta Ehr. Bayer subsp. chrysantha (Alstroemeriaceae Karyotype of Alstroemeria diluta Ehr. Bayer subsp. chrysantha (Alstroemeriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Baeza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The karyotype of Alstroemeria diluta subsp. chrysantha Ehr. Bayer from Chile was examined. The species has 2n = 2x = 16 chromosomes, with 4m + 4sm + 2st-sat + 4t + 2t-sat. The reported karyotype is very asymmetrical (AsK % = 71.4 and Syi = 40.0%. This karyotype is similar to that published previously for Alstroemeria graminea Phil.Alstroemeria diluta subsp. chrysantha Ehr. Bayer (Alstroemeriaceae fue examinada citológicamente. Esta especie presenta un número cromosómico somático de 2n = 2x = 16 cromosomas, con una fórmula haploide constituida por 4m + 4sm + 2st-sat + 4t + 2t-sat cromosomas. El cariotipo es muy asimétrico, con valores de AsK % = 71,4 y Syi = 40,0%. Estos resultados se compararon con los de Alstroemeria graminea Phil., especie que presenta un cariotipo muy similar.

  5. Immortality of cancers: a consequence of inherent karyotypic variations and selections for autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesberg, Peter; McCormack, Amanda

    2013-03-01

    Immortality is a common characteristic of cancers, but its origin and purpose are still unclear. Here we advance a karyotypic theory of immortality based on the theory that carcinogenesis is a form of speciation. Accordingly, cancers are generated from normal cells by random karyotypic rearrangements and selection for cancer-specific reproductive autonomy. Since such rearrangements unbalance long-established mitosis genes, cancer karyotypes vary spontaneously but are stabilized perpetually by clonal selections for autonomy. To test this theory we have analyzed neoplastic clones, presumably immortalized by transfection with overexpressed telomerase or with SV40 tumor virus, for the predicted clonal yet flexible karyotypes. The following results were obtained: (1) All immortal tumorigenic lines from cells transfected with overexpressed telomerase had clonal and flexible karyotypes; (2) Searching for the origin of such karyotypes, we found spontaneously increasing, random aneuploidy in human fibroblasts early after transfection with overexpressed telomerase; (3) Late after transfection, new immortal tumorigenic clones with new clonal and flexible karyotypes were found; (4) Testing immortality of one clone during 848 unselected generations showed the chromosome number was stable, but the copy numbers of 36% of chromosomes drifted ± 1; (5) Independent immortal tumorigenic clones with individual, flexible karyotypes arose after individual latencies; (6) Immortal tumorigenic clones with new flexible karyotypes also arose late from cells of a telomerase-deficient mouse rendered aneuploid by SV40 virus. Because immortality and tumorigenicity: (1) correlated exactly with individual clonal but flexible karyotypes; (2) originated simultaneously with such karyotypes; and (3) arose in the absence of telomerase, we conclude that clonal and flexible karyotypes generate the immortality of cancers.

  6. Limitations of G-banding Karyotype Analysis with Peripheral Lymphocytes in Diagnosing Mixed Gonadal Dysgenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Ikuko; Miyamoto, Junko; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2006-01-01

    Mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD) is an abnormal sexual differentiation syndrome usually presenting with ambiguous genitalia. Karyotype analysis is one of the essential components in the diagnosis of MGD and is conventionally done with peripheral lymphocytes by the G-banding technique. It is speculated that this conventional karyotype analysis has limitations since there are often difference in gonadal tissue analysis. Here we present four cases of MGD, in which karyotype analysis were performed...

  7. Utility of fetal karyotype in the evaluation of phenotypically abnormal stillbirths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinar, Halit; Carpenter, Marshall; Martin, Benjamin J; Tantravahi, Umadevi

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to test the hypothesis that stillbirths without aneuploidy-associated phenotypes have a low incidence of karyotypic abnormalities, similar among those with and without other anatomic defects. We employed a uniform postmortem protocol to examine fetuses and placentas in 962 consecutive stillbirths measuring > or =20 weeks in clinically determined gestational age submitted to the Women and Infants Hospital Division of Perinatal Pathology from 1990 through 2005. Classification of anatomic (macroscopic) abnormalities was based on a priori criteria. Anatomic fetal abnormalities were noted in 387 cases. Conventional karyotype analysis was successfully performed on 346 fetal tissue samples, 114 in anatomically normal and 232 in anatomically abnormal fetuses. The distribution of karyotypic abnormalities among cases with and without anatomic abnormalities was compared. Of the 962 stillbirths, 40% (387) had malformations. Tissue culture for karyotype analysis was attempted in 412 cases from both groups and failed in 66 cases (16%). At the 450 to 500-band resolution level, 60 of the remaining 346 karyotypes were abnormal. Of the 232 malformation cases with successful karyotyping, 59 had phenotypic attributes indicative of aneuploidy, all of which had later karyotype confirmation. Of the remaining 173 anomalous fetuses with karyotype analysis, only 1 demonstrated a karyotypic abnormality. All 114 karyotypes performed in stillbirths without anatomic abnormalities were normal. Among > or =20-week stillbirths, aneuploid karyotypes are uncommon except in fetuses with suspect phenotypes. The 95% probability estimates of karyotype abnormality in the phenotypically abnormal and normal stillbirths, 5.5% and 5.6%, respectively, do not differ. These data do not have sufficient power to detect a small difference in rates ofkaryotypic abnormalities between the 2 groups of > or =20-week stillbirths. However, this series indicates that this technology is

  8. Standard karyotype and nucleolus organizer region of Neotropical blindsnake Typhlops brongersmianus (Serpentes: Typhlopidae

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    José Augusto Ruiz García

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The karyotype of Typhlops brongersmianus is reported on the basis of specimens from north-eastern Argentina. The conventional Giemsa staining showed that the species has 2n = 34 chromosomes, including 8 pairs of macrochromosomes and 9 pairs of microchromosomes. Ag-NOR staining revealed the NORs location on a pair of macrochromosomes. The chromosome number and karyotypic morphology are similar to those of Neotropical typhlopid previously karyotyped.

  9. A Yolk Sac Larger Than 5 mm Suggests an Abnormal Fetal Karyotype, Whereas an Absent Embryo Indicates a Normal Fetal Karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Satoshi; Shiozaki, Arihiro; Yoneda, Noriko; Sameshima, Azusa; Ito, Mika; Shima, Tomoko; Nakashima, Akitoshi; Yoshino, Osamu; Kigawa, Mika; Takamori, Ryosuke; Shinagawa, Yasuhiro; Saito, Shigeru

    2017-11-01

    It is very hard to estimate an abnormal or normal fetal karyotype in miscarriage before surgery. We investigated whether the abnormal fetal karyotype in early miscarriage could be estimated by comprehensive ultrasonographic findings by a multivariate analysis. One hundred fifty-one patients with early miscarriage (abnormal karyotype and those with a normal one, and the size and configuration of the gestational sac, yolk sac, and embryo at diagnosis of early miscarriage were also evaluated. The rate of abnormal fetal karyotypes was 66.2 % (100 of 151). A maternal age older than 35 years (odds ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-7.4; P = .005), yolk sac larger than 5 mm (odds ratio, 6.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-22.7, P abnormal fetal karyotype by multiple logistic regression analysis. At the point of early miscarriage diagnosis, a yolk sac larger than 5 mm suggests an abnormal fetal karyotype, whereas an absent embryo indicates a normal fetal karyotype. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  10. Karyotype divergence and spreading of 5S rDNA sequences between genomes of two species: darter and emerald gobies ( Ctenogobius , Gobiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Filho, P A; Bertollo, L A C; Cioffi, M B; Costa, G W W F; Molina, W F

    2014-01-01

    Karyotype analyses of the cryptobenthic marine species Ctenogobius boleosoma and C. smaragdus were performed by means of classical and molecular cytogenetics, including physical mapping of the multigene 18S and 5S rDNA families. C. boleosoma has 2n = 44 chromosomes (2 submetacentrics + 42 acrocentrics; FN = 46) with a single chromosome pair each carrying 18S and 5S ribosomal sites; whereas C. smaragdus has 2n = 48 chromosomes (2 submetacentrics + 46 acrocentrics; FN = 50), also with a single pair bearing 18S rDNA, but an extensive increase in the number of GC-rich 5S rDNA sites in 21 chromosome pairs. The highly divergent karyotypes among Ctenogobius species contrast with observations in several other marine fish groups, demonstrating an accelerated rate of chromosomal evolution mediated by both chromosomal rearrangements and the extensive dispersion of 5S rDNA sequences in the genome. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. [Role of Dynamic Monitoring Chromosome Karyotypes for Evaluation of Chemotherapy Efficacy in Patients with Acute Leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Chun; Li, Wei; Wang, Huan; Chen, Xi; Li, Jun; Chai, Tie

    2015-06-01

    To explore the role of dynamic monitoring the karyotype changes for evaluation of chemotherapy efficacy in patients with acute leukemia. A total of 80 patients with acute leukemia were collected and according to FAB classification standards they were divided into 65 cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 15 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); R banding technique was used taken to detect their chromosome and to analyze the relationship between chromosome and efficacy of chemotherapy. Out of 65 cases of AML, 31 cases showed abnormal karyotypes and their aberration rate was 47.7%; among 31 cases of AML with chromosome abnormalities, the t (15; 17) was found in 9 cases and they accounted for 29%; t (8; 21) was found in 7 cases and they accounted for 22.6%; other karyotype and complex karyotypes were found in 15 cases and they accounted for 48.4%; the remission rate of t (15; 17) group was 88.9%, remission rate of t (8; 21) group was 71.4%, remission rate of other karyotype group was 66.7%. The comparison of between different groups showed that remission rate of t (15; 17) group was significantly higher than that in T (8; 21) group, other karyotype group and normal karyotype group (χ2=9.625,14.267,7.768, P0.05). In 15 cases of ALL, 8 cases with normal karyotype accounted for 53.3%, 7 cases with abnormal karyotype accounted for 46.7% of ALL; as compared with AML, no significant difference was shown (χ2=0.020, P>0.05); the remission rates of patients with normal karyotype and abnormal karyotype were 87.5% and 42.9% respectively, the difference between the two groups had statistical significance (χ2=43.834, Pleukemia.

  12. Origin of new Brassica types from a single intergeneric hybrid between B. rapa and Orychophragmus violaceus by rapid chromosome evolution and introgression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuan-Yuan; Wan-Yan, Rui-Hong; Li, Zai-Yun

    2007-12-01

    Many novel lines were established from an intergeneric mixoploid between Brassica rapa (2n = 20) and Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24) through successive selections for fertility and viability. Pedigrees of individual F(2) plants were advanced to the 10th generation by selfing. Their breeding habit was self-compatible and different from the self-incompatibility of their female parent B. rapa, and these lines were reproductively isolated to different degrees from B. rapa and B. napus. The lines with high productivity showed not only a wide spectrum of phenotypes but also obvious variations in fatty acid profiles of seed oil and glucosinolate contents in seed meal. These lines had 2n = 36, 37, 38, 39 and 40, with 2n = 38 being most frequent (64.56%), and no intact O. violaceus chromosomes were detected by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) analysis. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses revealed a high extent of variation in genomic compositions across all the lines. O. violaceus-specific bands, deleted bands in B. rapa and novel bands for two parents were detected in these lines, with novel bands being the most frequent. The morphological and genetic divergence of these novel types derived from a single hybrid is probably due to rapid chromosomal evolution and introgression, and provides new genetic resources for rapeseed breeding.

  13. Chromosomal evolution in small mammals (Insectivora, Chiroptera, Rodentia

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    Jan Zima

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extensive descriptive, comparative, and experimental research on the chromosomes of natural populations of small mammals has been conducted in the last 50 years. These studies have revealed a surprisingly large amount of karyotypic variation within and between individuals, populations, species, and higher taxa. In the Palaearctic region, the karyotypes of 80 to 90% of the species of insectivores, bats and rodents have already been described, and almost all European species belonging to these orders have been examined. More than 40 cryptic species of small mammals with a unique karyotype have been described in the Palaearctic region, including 24 species in Europe. A polymorphic or polytypic karyotype was found in 118 Palaearctic and 42 European species. This high degree of intraspecific karyotypic variation has resulted in problems in the naming of various chromosomal races, since the subspecies is clearly not the appropriate category for this purpose. The driving forces of karyotypic evolution may be found either in selection or drift acting at the organismal level, or in the internal processes occurring within the cell. The forces acting at the organismal level are based on either negative heterosis of chromosomal rearrangements or on the altered pattern of gene expression resulting from karyotypic repatterning. Little evidence for the direct adaptive nature of chromosomal alterations has been presented up to now and the significance of this factor remains unclear. Chromosomal change is, however, obviously correlated with speciation and divergent evolution, even if karyotypic alterations in certain lineages need not be directly related to the formation of a reproductive barrier. Chromosomal studies are still an important tool to record and describe biological diversity, and often represent a simple and indispensable method for identification of various taxa.

  14. Reconstruction of gross avian genome structure, organization and evolution suggests that the chicken lineage most closely resembles the dinosaur avian ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Michael N; Farré, Marta; Lithgow, Pamela E; Fowler, Katie E; Skinner, Benjamin M; O'Connor, Rebecca; Fonseka, Gothami; Backström, Niclas; Matsuda, Yoichi; Nishida, Chizuko; Houde, Peter; Jarvis, Erich D; Ellegren, Hans; Burt, David W; Larkin, Denis M; Griffin, Darren K

    2014-12-11

    The availability of multiple avian genome sequence assemblies greatly improves our ability to define overall genome organization and reconstruct evolutionary changes. In birds, this has previously been impeded by a near intractable karyotype and relied almost exclusively on comparative molecular cytogenetics of only the largest chromosomes. Here, novel whole genome sequence information from 21 avian genome sequences (most newly assembled) made available on an interactive browser (Evolution Highway) was analyzed. Focusing on the six best-assembled genomes allowed us to assemble a putative karyotype of the dinosaur ancestor for each chromosome. Reconstructing evolutionary events that led to each species' genome organization, we determined that the fastest rate of change occurred in the zebra finch and budgerigar, consistent with rapid speciation events in the Passeriformes and Psittaciformes. Intra- and interchromosomal changes were explained most parsimoniously by a series of inversions and translocations respectively, with breakpoint reuse being commonplace. Analyzing chicken and zebra finch, we found little evidence to support the hypothesis of an association of evolutionary breakpoint regions with recombination hotspots but some evidence to support the hypothesis that microchromosomes largely represent conserved blocks of synteny in the majority of the 21 species analyzed. All but one species showed the expected number of microchromosomal rearrangements predicted by the haploid chromosome count. Ostrich, however, appeared to retain an overall karyotype structure of 2n=80 despite undergoing a large number (26) of hitherto un-described interchromosomal changes. Results suggest that mechanisms exist to preserve a static overall avian karyotype/genomic structure, including the microchromosomes, with widespread interchromosomal change occurring rarely (e.g., in ostrich and budgerigar lineages). Of the species analyzed, the chicken lineage appeared to have undergone

  15. Report of Bufo tihamicus karyotype from Saudi Arabia | Al-Shehri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study gives a description of the Karyotype of the Tihama toad Bufo tihamicus from Saudi Arabia. Samples of males and females of Bufo tihamicus Parker were collected from Gazan Province of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The karyotype consists of a diploid number 2n = 22 and the fundamental number NF = 44 in both of ...

  16. Variation in genome size and karyotype among closely related parasitoids of aphids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome sizes and karyotypes can provide crucial insights into important characteristics of genomes, as well as providing data for phylogenetic inferences. We measured genome sizes and determined the karyotypes of nine species of aphid parasitoids in the genus Aphelinus. Genome sizes estimated from...

  17. Plasmodium berghei: in vivo generation and selection of karyotype mutants and non-gametocyte producer mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, C. J.; Ramesar, J.; van den Berg, F. M.; Mons, B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously reported that karyotype and gametocyte-producer mutants spontaneously arose during in vivo asexual multiplication of Plasmodium berghei. Here we studied the rate of selection of these mutants in vivo. Gametocyte production and karyotype pattern were established at regular intervals

  18. The Influence of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray-Based Molecular Karyotype on Preimplantation Embryonic Development Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; He, Nannan; Jin, Haixia; Liu, Yan; Guo, Yihong; Su, Yingchun; Sun, Yingpu

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of the molecular karyotype based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray on embryonic development potential in preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we retrospectively analyzed the clinical data generated by PGD using embryos retrieved from parents with chromosome rearrangements in our center. In total, 929 embryos from 119 couples had exact diagnosis and development status. The blastocyst formation rate of balanced molecular karyotype embryos was 56.6% (276/488), which was significantly higher than that of genetic imbalanced embryos 24.5% (108/441) (P35 respectively. Blastocyst formation rates of male and female embryos were 44.5% (183/411) and 38.8% (201/518) respectively, with no significant difference between them (P>0.05). The rates of balanced molecular karyotype embryos vary from groups of embryos with different cell numbers at 68 hours after insemination. The blastocyst formation rate of embryos with 6-8 cells (48.1%) was significantly higher than that of embryos with 8 cells (42.9%) (Pabnormal molecular karyotypes in the subgroup of the arrest, morula and blastocyst. Thus, we conclude that embryos with balanced molecular karyotype have significant higher development potential than those with imbalanced molecular karyotype whilst maternal age, embryo gender and types of abnormal molecular karyotype have no significant influence on blastocyst formation. Compared with embryos with 8 cells, embryos with 6-8 blastomeres have higher rate of balanced molecular karyotype and blastocyst formation.

  19. Semi-automated detection of aberrant chromosomes in bivariate flow karyotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, G. A.; Manders, E. M.; Rens, W.; Slater, R.; Aten, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described that is designed to compare, in a standardized procedure, bivariate flow karyotypes of Hoechst 33258 (HO)/Chromomycin A3 (CA) stained human chromosomes from cells with aberrations with a reference flow karyotype of normal chromosomes. In addition to uniform normalization of

  20. Normal karyotype mosaicism in adult AML patients with adverse-risk and undefined karyotype: preliminary report of treatment outcomes after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hee-Je; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Cho, Byung-Sik; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won

    2013-06-01

    Karyotype analysis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the powerful prognostic factors for complete remission (CR), relapse, and overall survival (OS). Cytogenetic mosaicism is considered to be one of the important characteristics in expression of phenotypic manifestations. However, it has not come into focus due to emerging molecular biological approaches and the results of a number of mutation studies. Clinical correlates and prognostic relevance of mosaicism were evaluated in 163 AML patients [adverse-risk karyotypes (n = 72) and undefined karyotypes (n = 91)]. All patients were treated by induction and consolidation chemotherapies and finally went on hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT). Patients were divided into two subgroups, either with or without normal karyotype (NK) mosaicism. Seventy patients exhibited NK mosaicism and 93 did not. There were no significant differences in age, gender, chemotherapy cycles to achieve CR, HSCT donor type, source or intensity properties between the two subgroups. We found that NK mosaicism remaining in adverse-risk and undefined karyotype at diagnosis significantly correlates with better OS (p = 0.001) and lower CIR (p = 0.021) rate after HSCT. Our data show that the poor prognostic properties of unfavorable risk karyotype can be overcome to a great extent by allogeneic HSCT and chronic GVHD, especially in the subgroup with NK mosaicism. Cytogenetic mosaicism at initial diagnosis can be an influential factor for survival outcomes, even after HSCT.

  1. [Comparison of chromosome karyotype between myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia patients confirmed at the same period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming; Wen, Bing-Zhao; Li, Ling; Chen, Shuang; Cheng, Hong; Hao, Jian-Ping; Chen, Rong; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Fang

    2014-04-01

    This study was purposed to compare and analyze the relationship between the abnormality of chromosome karyotypes and diagnosis, prognosis of MDS and AML patients, as well as to explore the characteristics of chromosome prognostic stratification in MDS and AML patients of different ages. The cytogenetic karyotype analysis was performed in 134 cases of MDS and 123 cases of AML by using bone marrow short-term culture and R-banding technique. The results indicated that the detected rates of chromosome abnormal karyotypes in MDS and AML patients were 41% and 61% respectively. The abnormal karyotype analysis of MDS and AML group showed that the abnormal karyotype in MDS group displayed number abnormality as the dominate (mainly the +8), while the abnormal karyotype in AML group displayed structure abnormality as the dominant [mainly, t(15;17) and t(8;21)]. The detected abnormal karyotype are mainly for the +8 which has ambiguous correlation with FAB subtype; the detection rates of complex karyotype abnormalities, favourable prognosis karyotype as well as poor prognosis karyotype in the MDS group obviously higher than that of AML group. Among patients with MDS transformed into AML, 12 cases had chromosome abnormal karyotype. There were 3 cases of chromosome abnormal karyotype in AML group which were transformed by MDS. The analysis of age stratification between two groups showed that the detected rate of abnormal karyotype was enhanced with the increase of age in MDS group, and detected rate in ≥ 60 years old group was obviously higher than that in patients with ≤ 30 age group.The detected rate of complex karyotype abnormalities in three age groups of MDS did not show statistical difference; the detected rate of abnormal karyotype in AML group decreased with the increase of age, the detected rate in ≤ 30 years old group was obviously higher than that in ≥ 60 age group,while the detection rate of complex karyotype abnormalities showed that the detected rate in

  2. A new sympatric region for distinct karyotypic forms of Hoplias malabaricus (Pisces, Erythrinidae

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    G. G. Born

    Full Text Available Specimens of Hoplias malabaricus from Lagoa Carioca, an isolated lake of the Rio Doce State Park (state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, were cytogenetically studied. The diploid number was found to be constant, i.e., 2n = 42 chromosomes, although two karyotypic forms were found: karyotype A, characterized by 22M + 20SM chromosomes, observed only in a male specimen, and karyotype B, characterized by 24M + 16SM + 2ST and 24M + 17SM + 1ST chromosomes in female and male specimens, respectively. This sex difference found in karyotype B is related to an XX/XY sex chromosome system. Another female specimen of H. malabaricus, also carrying karyotype A, had previously been found in the same lake. The available data indicate that two sympatric cytotypes of H. malabaricus exist in the Lagoa Carioca, with cytotype A occurring at a lower frequency and differing from cytotype B by undifferentiated sex chromosomes.

  3. [Comparative study of prenatal diagnosis with single nucleotide polymorphism array and karyotype analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ling; Zhao, Nan; Wei, Yuan; Zhong, Su; Liu, Ping; Qiao, Jie

    2014-10-18

    To compare the roles of single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP array) and karyotype analysis in high-risk pregnant women prenatal diagnosis. From July 2012 to December 2013, a total of 141 pregnant women with high-risk in prenatal diagnosis were selected as the object of study in Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, 78 cases of umbilical cord puncture and 63 of amnion cavity puncture , both taking SNP array detection and karyotype analysis. The abnormality karyotype rate was 6.4%, the abnormal rate of SNP array result was 11.3%, and the abnormal rate of the combined two methods for detecting was 12.1%. There were significant differences between the SNP array and karyotype analysis (P=0.039). There were obvious differences between the two techniques. It is an effective way to determine genetic disease by integrating SNP array and karyotype analysis in prenatal diagnosis.

  4. Rapid chemical evolution of tropospheric volcanic emissions from Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, based on observations of ozone and halogen-containing gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Cynthia A.; Kelly, Peter; Kern, Christoph; Roberts, T.J.; Aluppe, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report results from an observational and modeling study of reactive chemistry in the tropospheric plume emitted by Redoubt Volcano, Alaska. Our measurements include the first observations of Br and I degassing from an Alaskan volcano, the first study of O3 evolution in a volcanic plume, as well as the first detection of BrO in the plume of a passively degassing Alaskan volcano. This study also represents the first detailed spatially-resolved comparison of measured and modeled O3 depletion in a volcanic plume. The composition of the plume was measured on June 20, 2010 using base-treated filter packs (for F, Cl, Br, I, and S) at the crater rim and by an instrumented fixed-wing aircraft on June 21 and August 19, 2010. The aircraft was used to track the chemical evolution of the plume up to ~ 30 km downwind (2 h plume travel time) from the volcano and was equipped to make in situ observations of O3, water vapor, CO2, SO2, and H2S during both flights plus remote spectroscopic observations of SO2 and BrO on the August 19th flight. The airborne data from June 21 reveal rapid chemical O3 destruction in the plume as well as the strong influence chemical heterogeneity in background air had on plume composition. Spectroscopic retrievals from airborne traverses made under the plume on August 19 show that BrO was present ~ 6 km downwind (20 min plume travel time) and in situ measurements revealed several ppbv of O3 loss near the center of the plume at a similar location downwind. Simulations with the PlumeChem model reproduce the timing and magnitude of the observed O3 deficits and suggest that autocatalytic release of reactive bromine and in-plume formation of BrO were primarily responsible for the observed O3 destruction in the plume. The measurements are therefore in general agreement with recent model studies of reactive halogen formation in volcanic plumes, but also show that field studies must pay close attention to variations in the composition of

  5. Abnormal embryonic karyotype is the most frequent cause of recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi; Ozaki, Yasuhiko; Katano, Kinue; Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Kitaori, Tamao; Mizutani, Eita

    2012-08-01

    We previously found that a normal karyotype in a previous miscarriage is a predictor of subsequent miscarriage. However, the prevalence of recurrent miscarriage caused by an abnormal embryonic karyotype has not yet been reported, since embryonic karyotype is not typically analyzed during conventional examinations. A total of 482 patients who underwent both embryonic karyotype determination and conventional examinations for recurrent miscarriage were enrolled in this study. The distribution of the causes and the live birth rate for each cause were examined. The total percentage of subjects in whom conventional causes of recurrent miscarriage could be detected was 29.5%. The prevalence of the abnormal embryonic karyotype was 41.1% in the subjects in whom no conventional causes of miscarriage could be identified. The prevalence of recurrent miscarriage of truly unexplained cause, that is, of subjects without conventional causes in whom the embryonic karyotype was ascertained to be normal, was 24.5%. Among the patients in whom the first determination revealed an abnormal embryonic karyotype, 76.2% (32/42) showed an abnormal embryonic karyotype in the repeat determination as well. The cumulative live birth rate (71.9%) in women with recurrent miscarriages caused by the abnormal embryonic karyotype was significantly higher than that (44.7%) in women with recurrent miscarriages associated with the embryonal euploidy. An abnormal embryonic karyotype was found to represent the commonest cause of recurrent miscarriage, and the percentage of cases with recurrent miscarriage of truly unexplained cause was limited to 24.5%.The two groups should be distinguished for both clinical and research purposes.

  6. Asexual reproduction induces a rapid and permanent loss of sexual reproduction capacity in the rice fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae: results of in vitro experimental evolution assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Dounia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexual reproduction is common in eukaryotic microorganisms, with few species reproducing exclusively asexually. However, in some organisms, such as fungi, asexual reproduction alternates with episodic sexual reproduction events. Fungi are thus appropriate organisms for studies of the reasons for the selection of sexuality or clonality and of the mechanisms underlying this selection. Magnaporthe oryzae, an Ascomycete causing blast disease on rice, reproduces mostly asexually in natura. Sexual reproduction is possible in vitro and requires (i two strains of opposite mating types including (ii at least one female-fertile strain (i.e. a strain able to produce perithecia, the female organs in which meiosis occurs. Female-fertile strains are found only in limited areas of Asia, in which evidence for contemporary recombination has recently been obtained. We induced the forced evolution of four Chinese female-fertile strains in vitro by the weekly transfer of asexual spores (conidia between Petri dishes. We aimed to determine whether female fertility was rapidly lost in the absence of sexual reproduction and whether this loss was controlled genetically or epigenetically. Results All the strains became female-sterile after 10 to 19 rounds of selection under asexual conditions. As no single-spore isolation was carried out, the observed decrease in the production of perithecia reflected the emergence and the invasion of female-sterile mutants. The female-sterile phenotype segregated in the offspring of crosses between female-sterile evolved strains and female-fertile wild-type strains. This segregation was maintained in the second generation in backcrosses. Female-sterile evolved strains were subjected to several stresses, but none induced the restoration of female fertility. This loss of fertility was therefore probably due to genetic rather than epigenetic mechanisms. In competition experiments, female-sterile mutants produced similar

  7. Duplication of AP1 within the Spinacia oleracea L. AP1/FUL clade is followed by rapid amino acid and regulatory evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, D Noah; Golenberg, Edward M

    2009-02-01

    The AP1/FUL clade of MADS box genes have undergone multiple duplication events among angiosperm species. While initially identified as having floral meristem identity and floral organ identity function in Arabidopsis, the role of AP1 homologs does not appear to be universally conserved even among eudicots. In comparison, the role of FRUITFULL has not been extensively explored in non-model species. We report on the isolation of three AP1/FUL genes from cultivated spinach, Spinacia oleracea L. Two genes, designated SpAPETALA1-1 (SpAP1-1) and SpAPETALA1-2 (SpAP1-2), cluster as paralogous genes within the Caryophyllales AP1 clade. They are highly differentiated in the 3', carboxyl-end encoding region of the gene following the third amphipathic alpha-helix region, while still retaining some elements of a signature AP1 carboxyl motifs. In situ hybridization studies also demonstrate that the two paralogs have evolved different temporal and spatial expression patterns, and that neither gene is expressed in the developing sepal whorl, suggesting that the AP1 floral organ identity function is not conserved in spinach. The spinach FRUITFULL homolog, SpFRUITFULL (SpFUL), has retained the conserved motif and groups with Caryophyllales FRUITFULL homologs. SpFUL is expressed in leaf as well as in floral tissue, and shows strong expression late in flower development, particularly in the tapetal layer in males, and in the endothecium layer and stigma, in the females. The combined evidence of high rates of non-synonymous substitutions and differential expression patterns supports a scenario in which the AP1 homologs in the spinach AP1/FUL gene family have experienced rapid evolution following duplication.

  8. Longitudinal hormonal evaluation in a patient with disorder of sexual development, 46,XY karyotype and one NR5A1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedace, Lucia; Laino, Luigi; Preziosi, Nicoletta; Valentini, Maria Stella; Scommegna, Salvatore; Rapone, Anna Maria; Guarino, Nino; Boscherini, Brunetto; De Bernardo, Carmelilia; Marrocco, Giacinto; Majore, Silvia; Grammatico, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (encoded by the NR5A1 gene) is a critical regulator of reproduction, controlling transcription of key genes involved in sexual dimorphism. To date, NR5A1 variants have been found in individuals with a 46,XY karyotype and gonadal dysgenesis, as well as with a wide spectrum of genital anomalies and, in some patients, with adrenal insufficiency. We describe evolution of gonadal function, from the neonatal period to puberty, in a patient with a 46,XY karyotype, a disorder of sexual development, and a mutation (c.691_699dupCTGCAGCTG) in the NR5A1 gene. The patient, ascertained at birth due to ambiguous genitalia, showed normal values of plasma testosterone in the late neonatal period. Evaluation of the hormonal profile over time indicated severe tubular testicular hypofunction suggestive for a 46,XY disorder of gonadal development. A comprehensive review of published reports of 46,XY and disordered sexual development related to the NR5A1 gene confirmed the clinical and hormonal variability in patients with NR5A1 mutations. Analysis of multiple data allowed us to define the most common features associated with NR5A1 mutations. We further confirmed the indication to perform NR5A1 screening in patients with 46,XY karyotype and disordered sexual development even when Müllerian structures appear to be absent and plasma testosterone levels are within the normal range for age. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Analysis of sperm karyotypes in a patient treated with griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Evelyn M; Lowry, R Brian; Martin, Renée H

    2007-01-01

    Griseofulvin is known to interfere with chromosome segregation by binding to microtubule-associated proteins. Studies in mouse germ cells have demonstrated that griseofulvin can induce aneuploidy (numerical chromosome abnormalities) at therapeutic concentrations. The aim of this study was to determine if chronic griseofulvin treatment led to an increased frequency of sperm chromosome abnormalities in one male subject. We analyzed 290 full sperm karyotypes using the human sperm-hamster oocyte fusion system. The frequency of X- and Y-bearing sperm was equal. There was no increase in the frequency of numerical (1.7%) or structural (9.3%) abnormalities in the subject compared to unexposed controls. Although reassuring, this is the first report on this subject and future studies are needed to assess the risk of griseofulvin.

  10. Molecular Karyotype of the White Rot Fungus Pleurotus ostreatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraya, Luis M.; Pérez, Gumer; Peñas, María M.; Baars, Johan J. P.; Mikosch, Thomas S. P.; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Ramírez, Lucía

    1999-01-01

    The white rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus is an edible basidiomycete with increasing agricultural and biotechnological importance. Genetic manipulation and breeding of this organism are restricted because of the lack of knowledge about its genomic structure. In this study, we analyzed the genomic constitution of P. ostreatus by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis optimized for the separation of its chromosomes. We have determined that it contains 11 pairs of chromosomes with sizes ranging from 1.4 to 4.7 Mbp. In addition to chromosome separation, the use of single-copy DNA probes allowed us to resolve the ambiguities caused by chromosome comigration. When the two nuclei present in the dikaryon were separated by protoplasting, analysis of their karyotypes revealed length polymorphisms affecting various chromosomes. This is, to our knowledge, the clearest chromosome separation available for this species. PMID:10427028

  11. Congenital heart defect in sibs with discordant karyotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilio, M C; Marino, B; Canepa, S A; Borzaga, U; Giannotti, A; Dallapiccola, B

    1998-11-02

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are genetically heterogeneous, associated with a variety of genetic conditions. Familial aggregation of CHD in patients with and without Down syndrome is rare. We report on the occurrence of concordant CHD in three sets of sibs with discordant karyotypes. In the first family, atrioventricular canal (AVC) was diagnosed in a chromosomally normal child and in his brother with Down syndrome. In the second family, AVC was associated with trisomy 21 in one sib and with trisomy 18 in the other. In the third family, tetralogy of Fallot was present in one patient with Down syndrome and in his nonsyndromic sister. Although the genetic heterogeneity of Down and non-Down CHD is not disputed, a susceptibility to both euploid and aneuploid CHDs could exist, and common predisposing factors could play a role in both conditions.

  12. Activation of autophagy in cells with abnormal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingele, Silvia; Stoehr, Gabriele; Storchova, Zuzana

    2013-02-01

    The presence of even one extra chromosome severely impairs cellular growth. This effect of aneuploidy (a term describing chromosome numbers deviating from multiples of haploid chromosome content) has been observed in many different organisms, from yeast to humans. Accordingly, abnormal karyotypes are detected in nearly 30% of spontaneously aborted embryos. The rarely surviving infants, such as with trisomy of chromosome 21, are severely handicapped. The causes remain enigmatic, although recent studies exploiting yeast and mouse models provided first glimpses of the imbalanced inner life of aneuploid cells. Using comparative genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics we have analyzed the fate of the transcripts and proteins coded on the extra chromosomes as well as the general response to aneuploidy in human cells.

  13. Karyotype Diversity and Evolutionary Trends in Armored Catfish Species of the Genus Harttia (Siluriformes: Loricariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Daniel Rodrigues; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Lui, Roberto Laridondo; Traldi, Josiane Baccarin; Bueno, Vanessa; Martinez, Juliana de Fátima; Brandão, Heleno; Oyakawa, Osvaldo Takeshi; Moreira Filho, Orlando

    2017-04-01

    Most species of the genus Harttia inhabits the headwaters of small tributaries, but some species are restricted to the main channel of some rivers. This feature, combined with limited dispersal ability, leads to the formation of small isolated populations with reduced gene flow. Currently, there are 23 taxonomically defined and recognized species, and 17 of these are found in Brazil, distributed in several hydrographic basins. Despite this diversity, few chromosomal data for the species belonging to this genus are found in the literature. Thus, this study analyzed, by classical and molecular cytogenetics methodologies, the chromosomal diversity of this genus, to discuss the processes that are involved in the evolution and karyotype differentiation of the species of the group. Seven species of Harttia were analyzed: H. kronei, H. longipinna, H. gracilis, H. punctata, H. loricariformis, H. torrenticola, and H. carvalhoi. The chromosomal diversity found in these species includes different diploid and fundamental numbers, distinct distribution of several repetitive sequences, the presence of supernumerary chromosomes in H. longipinna and multiple sex chromosome systems of the type XX/XY 1 Y 2 in H. carvalhoi and X 1 X 1 X 2 X 2 /X 1 X 2 Y in H. punctata. Lastly, our data highlight the genus Harttia as an excellent model for evolutionary studies.

  14. Genomic and karyotypic variation in Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae

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    Vladimir Gokhman

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 has served as a model insect for over a century. Sequencing of the 11 additional Drosophila Fallen, 1823 species marks substantial progress in comparative genomics of this genus. By comparison, practically nothing is known about the genome size or genome sequences of parasitic wasps of Drosophila. Here, we present the first comparative analysis of genome size and karyotype structures of Drosophila parasitoids of the Leptopilina Förster, 1869 and Ganaspis Förster, 1869 species. The gametic genome size of Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896 is larger than those of the three Leptopilina species studied. The genome sizes of all parasitic wasps studied here are also larger than those known for all Drosophila species. Surprisingly, genome sizes of these Drosophila parasitoids exceed the average value known for all previously studied Hymenoptera. The haploid chromosome number of both Leptopilina heterotoma (Thomson, 1862 and L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 is ten. A chromosomal fusion appears to have produced a distinct karyotype for L. boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979 (n = 9, whose genome size is smaller than that of wasps of the L. heterotoma clade. Like L. boulardi, the haploid chromosome number for G. xanthopoda is also nine. Our studies reveal a positive, but non linear, correlation between the genome size and total chromosome length in Drosophila parasitoids. These Drosophila parasitoids differ widely in their host range, and utilize different infection strategies to overcome host defense. Their comparative genomics, in relation to their exceptionally well-characterized hosts, will prove to be valuable for understanding the molecular basis of the host-parasite arms race and how such mechanisms shape the genetic structures of insect communities.

  15. Complex karyotype in mantle cell lymphoma is a strong prognostic factor for the time to treatment and overall survival, independent of the MCL international prognostic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Terré, Christine; Jardin, Fabrice; Radford, Isabelle; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Penther, Dominique; Bastard, Christian; Rigaudeau, Sophie; Pilorge, Sylvain; Morschhauser, Franck; Bouscary, Didier; Delarue, Richard; Farhat, Hassan; Rousselot, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Tilly, Hervé; Chevret, Sylvie; Castaigne, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is usually an aggressive disease. However, a few patients do have an "indolent" evolution (iMCL) defined by a long survival time without intensive therapy. Many studies highlight the prognostic role of additional genetic abnormalities, but these abnormalities are not routinely tested for and do not yet influence the treatment decision. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic impact of these additional abnormalities detected by conventional cytogenetic testing, as well as their relationships with the clinical characteristics and their value in identifying iMCL. All consecutive MCL cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2011 at four institutions were retrospectively selected on the basis of an informative karyotype with a t(11;14) translocation at the time of diagnosis. A total of 125 patients were included and followed for an actual median time of 35 months. The median overall survival (OS) and survival without treatment (TFS) were 73.7 and 1.3 months, respectively. In multivariable Cox models, a high mantle cell lymphoma international prognostic index score, a complex karyotype, and blastoid morphology were independently associated with a shortened OS. Spleen enlargement, nodal presentation, extra-hematological involvement, and complex karyotypes were associated with shorter TFS. A score based on these factors allowed for the identification of "indolent" patients (median TFS 107 months) from other patients (median TFS: 1 month). In conclusion, in this multicentric cohort of MCL patients, a complex karyotype was associated with a shorter survival time and allowed for the identification of iMCL at the time of diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The diversity of karyotypes and genomes within section Syllinum of the Genus Linum (Linaceae revealed by molecular cytogenetic markers and RAPD analysis.

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    Nadezhda L Bolsheva

    Full Text Available The wide variation in chromosome number found in species of the genus Linum (2n = 16, 18, 20, 26, 28, 30, 32, 36, 42, 72, 84 indicates that chromosomal mutations have played an important role in the speciation of this taxon. To contribute to a better understanding of the genetic diversity and species relationships in this genus, comparative studies of karyotypes and genomes of species within section Syllinum Griseb. (2n = 26, 28 were carried out. Elongated with 9-aminoacridine chromosomes of 10 species of section Syllinum were investigated by C- and DAPI/С-banding, CMA and Ag-NOR-staining, FISH with probes of rDNA and of telomere repeats. RAPD analysis was also performed. All the chromosome pairs in karyotypes of the studied species were identified. Chromosome DAPI/C-banding patterns of 28-chromosomal species were highly similar. Two of the species differed from the others in chromosomal location of rDNA sites. B chromosomes were revealed in all the 28-chromosomal species. Chromosomes of Linum nodiflorum L. (2n = 26 and the 28-chromosomal species were similar in DAPI/C-banding pattern and localization of several rDNA sites, but they differed in chromosomal size and number. The karyotype of L. nodiflorum was characterized by an intercalary site of telomere repeat, one additional 26S rDNA site and also by the absence of B chromosomes. Structural similarities between different chromosome pairs in karyotypes of the studied species were found indicating their tetraploid origin. RAPD analysis did not distinguish the species except L. nodiflorum. The species of section Syllinum probably originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. The 28-chromosomal species were closely related, but L. nodiflorum diverged significantly from the rest of the species probably due to chromosomal rearrangements occurring during evolution.

  17. A nonmosaic 45,X karyotype in a mother with Turner's syndrome and in her daughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, Martine; Rooman, Raoul P A; Wauters, Jan; Jacqemyn, Yves; Du Caju, Marc V L

    2004-10-01

    To describe a woman with a nonmosaic (45,X) form of Turner's syndrome who gave birth to a girl with 45,X Turner syndrome. Patient report. Outpatient clinic of a university hospital. A woman with typical phenotypic features of Turner syndrome and a 45,X karyotype and her daughter with the same karyotype. None. Routine karyotype analysis on 200 white blood cells on two different occasions, on skin fibroblasts (1,000 mitoses) and on ovarian fibroblasts. Translocation of X-chromosome material was investigated by a complete X paint and fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis. The patient had a spontaneous puberty and became pregnant on three occasions. Her first daughter has a normal karyotype, the second pregnancy ended in spontaneous abortion, and after the third pregnancy, a girl was born with a 45,X karyotype. Karyotype analysis of a large number of mitoses in three different cell types failed to demonstrate any mosaicism. Translocation of X-chromosome material was ruled out by fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis with an X paint. This is a rare case of pregnancy in a nonmosaic Turner syndrome patient and, to our knowledge, is the only one that resulted in a live-born baby with the same karyotype. Cryptic mosaicism could not be found despite thorough investigations. Some hypotheses are presented that may explain this unique event.

  18. [Application of chromosome microarray analysis for patients with skeletal anomalies and a normal karyotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaoli; Fu, Fang; Li, Ru; Zhang, Yongling; Yang, Xin; Han, Jin; Pan, Min; Zhen, Li; Liao, Can

    2016-06-01

    To analyze patients with skeletal anomalies (SA) but a normal karyotype using chromosome microarray analysis (CMA). From June 2012 to May 2015, 43 children found to have skeletal anomalies with or without other abnormalities were subjected to karyotyping analysis. For those with a normal karyotype, DNA was extracted and hybridized with Affymetrix CytoScan 750 kb arrays following the manufacturer's protocol. The results were analyzed with CHAS v2.0 software. Two patients (4.65%) were detected with an abnormal karyotype. The remaining 41 patients with a normal karyotype were classified into 3 groups: isolated SA (n=17), SA with mental retardation (n=6), and SA with other structural anomalies (n=18). Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs) were found in 21.95% (9/41) of the cases, which included 17.65% (3/17) with isolated SA, 33.33% (2/6) with SA and mental retardation, and 22.22% (4/18) of SA with other structural deformities. Whole-genome CMA can detect clinically significant CNVs which may not be found by conventional karyotyping analysis and increase the detection rate by approximately 21.95%. It may be recommended for patients with SA but a normal karyotype.

  19. Genome downsizing and karyotype constancy in diploid and polyploid congeners: a model of genome size variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Lidia; Realini, María Florencia; Fourastié, María Florencia; García, Ana María; González, Graciela Esther

    2014-06-26

    Evolutionary chromosome change involves significant variation in DNA amount in diploids and genome downsizing in polyploids. Genome size and karyotype parameters of Hippeastrum species with different ploidy level were analysed. In Hippeastrum, polyploid species show less DNA content per basic genome than diploid species. The rate of variation is lower at higher ploidy levels. All the species have a basic number x = 11 and bimodal karyotypes. The basic karyotypes consist of four short metacentric chromosomes and seven large chromosomes (submetacentric and subtelocentric). The bimodal karyotype is preserved maintaining the relative proportions of members of the haploid chromosome set, even in the presence of genome downsizing. The constancy of the karyotype is maintained because changes in DNA amount are proportional to the length of the whole-chromosome complement and vary independently in the long and short sets of chromosomes. This karyotype constancy in taxa of Hippeastrum with different genome size and ploidy level indicates that the distribution of extra DNA within the complement is not at random and suggests the presence of mechanisms selecting for constancy, or against changes, in karyotype morphology. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  20. [Cytogenetic study of Down syndrome cases in southern Hainan Province and report of a rare case of abnormal karyotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-feng; Lin, Ling; Chen, Ze-ya

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the distribution and characteristic of the karyotypes in Down syndrome (DS) patients in southern Hainan Province, China. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in 132 cases clinically suspected of DS. Eighty-six of the cases were diagnosed as DS with karyotype analysis. Among the DS patients in southern Hainan, 93.02% of the cases had typical trisomy 21, 3.49% had translocation, and 3.49% had mosaic karyotype. The percentage of DS babies born by younger mothers (karyotype is more frequent in DS cases than translocation and mosaic karyotypes in southern Hainan Province, where the mother delivering a child with DS tends to be younger.

  1. Comparative karyotype analysis in diploid and triploid Dolichoplana carvalhoi (Tricladida, Terricola, Rhynchodemidae from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Alvarez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present cytogenetic data for the land planarian Dolichoplana carvalhoi. Two different karyotypes, one diploid (2n = 2x = 14 chromosomes and one triploid (2n = 3x = 21 chromosomes, corresponding to two morphological body patterns, are described. Chromosomes from regenerating blastema were studied after routine Giemsa staining and CBG banding. Our analyses revealed heteromorphisms in chromosomes 2, 3 and 4 of the diploid karyotype and in chromosomes 1, 3 and 7 of the triploid karyotype. Further studies are needed in order to determine if the two morphological patterns of D. carvalhoi represent distinct species.

  2. Genome size in Anthurium evaluated in the context of karyotypes and phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Barbara J; Suzuki, Jon Y

    2012-01-01

    Anthurium is an important horticultural crop from the family Araceae, order Alismatales, a lineage considered to have diverged from other monocots prior to the cereals. Genome size and its distribution in Anthurium were investigated to gain a basic understanding of genome organization in this large genus and to forge a firm foundation for advancement of molecular approaches for the study of Anthurium. Currently, genome size estimates have been reported for only two Anthurium samples. Bulk nuclear DNA content estimates were obtained by flow cell cytometry using leaf tissue collected from Anthurium species of different subgeneric groups and from commercial cultivars. The most current and well-supported topology of subgeneric, sectional relationships was applied to present genome size estimates in the context of reported chromosome counts, karyotypes, putative phylogenetic relationships, observed phenotypes and pedigree. Genome size estimates based on bulk nuclear DNA content for 77 accessions representing 34 species and 9 cultivars were obtained, including initial estimates for 33 Anthurium species, and both the smallest (Anthurium obtusum; Tetraspermium) and largest (Anthurium roseospadix; Calomystrium) Anthurium genome sizes reported to date. Genome size did not distinguish any subgeneric section, but ranged 5-fold (4.42-20.83 pg/2 C) despite consistent 2N= 30 chromosome counts. Intraspecies genome size variation >20 % is reported for Anthurium ravenii, A. watermaliense and A. gracile. Genome size estimates for Anthurium species spanning 13 recognized subgeneric sections indicate that genome size does not generally correlate with chromosome count or phylogenetic relationships. Mechanisms of genome expansion and contraction, including amplification and reduction of repetitive elements, polyploidy, chromosome reorganization/loss, may be involved in genome evolution in Anthurium as in other species. The new information on Anthurium genome sizes provides a platform for

  3. Disparity mutagenesis model possesses the ability to realize both stable and rapid evolution in response to changing environments without altering mutation rates.

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    Ichiro Fujihara

    2016-08-01

    As long as the fidelity difference between the lagging and leading strand was kept high enough, the robustness of the disparity model was very high. The acceleration or slowdown of evolution can be unambiguously introduced only by environmental changes, and the seesawing mutation rate is not the necessary condition for changing the speed of evolution.

  4. Evolution of the East Pacific Rise at 16° 19° S since 5 Ma: Bisection of overlapping spreading centers by new, rapidly propagating ridge segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Marie-Helene; Scheirer, Daniel S.; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1996-02-01

    Nearly complete side-scan, bathymetry and magnetic coverage documents the evolution of the geometry of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) between 16° and 19° S since 5 Ma. Lineaments visible in SeaMARC II, H-MR1 and Sea Beam 2000 side-scan data correspond dominantly to normal fault scarps which have developed in the axial region perpendicular to the least compressive stress. Except near overlapping spreading centers (OSCs), the lineament orientations are taken to represent the perpendicular to the instantaneous Pacific-Nazca spreading direction. Their dominant orientation in the axial region is 012°, in good agreement with the prediction of the current model of relative plate motion (DeMets et al., 1994). However, the variations of the lineament azimuths with age show that there has been a small (3° 5°) clockwise change in the Nazca-Pacific relative motion since 5 Ma. There is also a distinct population of lineaments which strike counterclockwise to the ambient orientation. These discordant lineaments form somewhat coherent patterns on the seafloor and represent the past migration tracks of several left-stepping OSCs. Concurrent analysis of these discordant zones and the magnetic anomalies, reveals that up to 1 Ma, the EPR was offset by a few large, left-stepping OSCs. These OSCs were bisected into smaller OSCs by new spreading segments forming within their overlap basins. The smaller OSCs proceeded to migrate rapidly and were further bisected by newly spawned ridge segments until the present staircase of small, left-stepping OSCs was achieved. By transferring lithosphere from one plate to the other, these migration events account remarkably well for the variable spreading asymmetry in the area. Between 16° and 19° S, the present EPR is magmatically very “robust”, as evidenced by its inflated morphology, the profuse volcanic and hydrothermal activity observed from submerisbles and towed cameras, the geochemistry of axial basalts, and seismic and gravity data

  5. Leuciscus (Pisces, Cyprinidae karyotypes: Transect of Portuguese populations

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    Maria João Collares-Pereira

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The presently described Iberian chubs - Leuciscus carolitertii and L. pyrenaicus - sampled throughout their distribution ranges in Portugal were cytogenetically analyzed. Their chromosome numbers were consistently 2n = 50, except for two specimens of L. carolitertii, which exhibited a supernumerary chromosome in some of the metaphases. The karyotypes were found to be highly typical for other Leuciscus taxa, as well as for European leuciscine cyprinids: the chromosome sets are dominated by metacentric and submetacentric elements with a reduced number of acrocentric pairs (three to four; the largest pair of the complements belongs typically to this latter category. The chubs from northern drainages, assignable to L. carolitertii, have apparently a more stable karyotype structure (12M:30S:8A than the chubs from L. pyrenaicus, which have 12M:32S:6A, but may exhibit in the most southern river basins (Guadiana, Mira, Aljezur, Bordeira and Arade more variable karyotypes. Besides, these data support the very recent discovery of two genetically distinct Leuciscus taxa in this region of the Iberian Peninsula, suggesting the stochastic fixation of structural chromosome rearrangements in these small and isolated drainages, which may be affected by bottlenecks due to significant variations in hydrological regimes. The NORs were apparently located in one small submetacentric pair of chromosomes and the presence of a heteromorphic sex chromosome system of the ZW/ZZ type was also evidenced for the Iberian endemic chubs.A análise citogenética dos dois endemismos de Leuciscus atualmente descritos na Península Ibérica foi efetuada em amostras obtidas ao longo da sua área de distribuição. Apresentaram um valor diplóide de 2n = 50, com exceção de dois exemplares de L. carolitertii, os quais exibiam um cromossomo supranumerário em algumas metáfases. Caracterizaram-se por um padrão cariológico idêntico ao dos restantes táxons do mesmo g

  6. Comprehensive and definitive molecular cytogenetic characterization of HeLa cells by spectral karyotyping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Macville, M; Schröck, E; Padilla-Nash, H; Keck, C; Ghadimi, B M; Zimonjic, D; Popescu, N; Ried, T

    1999-01-01

    .... Twenty clonally abnormal chromosomes were found. Comparison with previously reported HeLa G-banding karyotypes revealed a remarkably stable cytogenetic constitution because 18 of 20 markers that were found were present before...

  7. [Abnormal Karyotypes Involving 1q21 and 12p13 and Their Clinical Significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ru; Sun, Wan-Ling

    2015-10-01

    Many hematological malignances involve recurrent chromosomal abnormalities, and the reciprocal translocation is one of them. However, there are a lot of chromosomal abnormalities with lower incidence and unclear clinical significance. Among them, the one abnormal karyotype translocation, t (1;12) (q21; p13) is a rare karyotype change. Only 6 patients had been reported to have this karyotype and all of them suffered from hematologic diseases, including one case of acute myeloid leukemia, one case of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, two children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, one case of chronic myeloid leukemia at accelerated phase and one case of multiple myeloma. Among them, the fusion gene were detectable in two cases. In this article, the common chromoscme karyotype abnormality involving 1q21 and 12p13, and genes involving in these regious are summarized, moreover the reported cases of t(1;12) (q21;p13) are reviewed.

  8. Karyotypes of two rare rodents, Hapalomys delacouri and Typhlomys cinereus (Mammalia, Rodentia, from Vietnam

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    Alexei Abramov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Karyotypes of Hapalomys delacouri (Rodentia, Muridae and Typhlomys cinereus (Rodentia, Platacanthomyidae from Vietnam are described for the first time. The diploid karyotype of H. delacouri is 38 (NFa=48, consisting of six pairs of bi-armed and 12 pairs of acrocentric autosomes decreasing in size; plus a large metacentric X chromosome and Y chromosome, also metacentric, that is equal in size to the largest pair of acrocentric autosomes. The newly described karyotype differs significantly from that reported for H. delacouri from northern Thailand. The latter record very likely represents a different species of Hapalomys, possibly the taxon H. pasquieri described from north-central Laos. The diploid karyotype of Typhlomys cinereus is 38 (NF=48, consisting of five pairs of meta- to submetacentric and 14 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes varying in size from large to small; sex chromosomes were not defined.

  9. Karyotype, Meiosis And Sperm Formation In The Land Snail Macrochlamys Indica

    OpenAIRE

    El Alfy, Nagla Z. [نجلاء زكي الالفي; Abdel-Rehim, A. H.; Al-Ali, K. A

    1994-01-01

    Karyotype analysis, meiosis and sperm formation of the land snail Macrochlamys indica collected from different farms of ornamental plants in Doha city of the State of Qatar were investigated. The chromosome number is n=24 and 2n=48. In the karyotype analysis, the chromosomes were categorized into two groups; fifteen pairs of L's shaped submetacentric and nine pairs of V's shaped metacentric. Several stages of first and second meiotic cell division were observed and described. Differentiati...

  10. Predicting fetal karyotype in fetuses with omphalocele: The current role of ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zork, N M; Pierce, S; Zollinger, T; Kominiarek, M

    2014-01-01

    To assess the ability of ultrasound in predicting abnormal karyotype in pregnancies with prenatally diagnosed omphaloceles and to compare its test characteristics to previously published studies. A retrospective case-control study of omphaloceles diagnosed at one center was performed from 1995-2007. Cases were those with an abnormal karyotype and controls were those with a normal karyotype. Data collection included demographics, karyotype results, and ultrasound findings. The number and type of associated anomalies were compared between the cases and controls. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for predicting an abnormal karyotype were calculated from previously published studies. Of the 73 subjects, there were 12 cases and 61 controls. The majority of women were Caucasian and primigravida. The cases were less likely to have an isolated omphalocele [1 (8.3%) vs. 27 (42.6%), OR = 0.122; 95% CI: 0.02-0.08] but were more likely to have two or more major anomalies [8 (66.7%) vs. 17 (27.9%), OR = 5.18; 95% CI: 1.19-24.04)] compared to the controls. Cardiac anomalies and only one additional major anomaly were not different between the two groups, P > 0.05. The test characteristics for this study were similar to previously published studies. Isolated omphaloceles were more likely to have a normal karyotype; however fetuses with multiple anomalies were more likely to have an abnormal karyotype. Despite advances in ultrasound technology, its ability for predicting an abnormal karyotype in these fetuses has not improved.

  11. Karyotypic polymorphism and evolution within and between the Liolaemus monticola (Iguanidae "northern 2n = 38-40" chromosome race populations in central Chile Polimorfismo cromosómico y evolución intra e inter poblacional de la raza cromosómica "Norte 2n = 28-40" de Liolaemus monticola (Iguanidae en Chile Central

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    MADELEINE LAMBOROT

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal genotypes were scored from 359 Liolaemus monticola lizards of the "northern, 2n = 38-40" chromosomal race from 21 locality samples between the Maipo (and one of its tributaries and the Aconcagua (and one of its tributaries ribers, plus a sample from the interracial hybridization zone, and some representative locality samples of the "southern 2n = 34" and the "multiple fission 2n = 42-44" chromosomal races for comparisons. The first seven variable chromosomal pairs were coded as Mendelian genotypes and statistically summarized by several clustering and population genetic algorithms. Spatial and temporal differentiation was assessed by chromosome frequencies, chromosomal diversity and heterozygosity. While no differentiation was found for diversity in the "northern 2n = 38-40" race, chromosomal frequencies and heterozygosity showed significant spatial differentiation that permit distinguishing between the coastal, Andean and transversal mountain range populations. The sample of Cuesta Chacabuco may represent a hybrid zone between the other two range samples. The origin of the chromosomal rearrangements, the population cytogenetics, and the recombination patterns resulting from chromosomal heterozygosity are compared in these chromosomal races, thus expanding the geographical area. These patterns are discussed with respect to the evolution of this complex in Chile and the importance of the riverine barriers in central ChileSe cuantificaron los "genotipos" cromosómicos para 359 lagartijas de 21 muestras poblacionales de la raza "Norte, 2n = 38-40" comprendida entre los ríos: río Maipo y uno de sus afluentes el río Yeso y río Aconcagua (y uno de sus afluentes el río Juncal. Con fines comparativos agregamos una muestra de la zona de hibridación interracial, algunas muestras representativas de la raza "Sur 2n = 34" y una de la raza "múltiples fisiones 2n = 42-44". Los siete primeros pares cromosómicos variables fueron codificados

  12. Ring chromosome in myeloid neoplasms is associated with complex karyotype and disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Matthew W; Pozdnyakova, Olga; Geyer, Julia T; Dal Cin, Paola; Hasserjian, Robert P

    2017-10-01

    Ring chromosome (RC) is a poorly understood genetic anomaly seen in myeloid neoplasms. This study aims to shed light on the clinical significance of this finding. We identified 96 cases of myeloid neoplasms with RC from 3 academic hospitals. Clinicopathologic features and overall (OS) and leukemia-free survival were reviewed and compared to cases of myeloid neoplasms lacking RC. We identified 59 acute myeloid leukemias (AML-RC) and 37 myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS-RC) with RC identified on routine karyotyping. Seventy-five percent of AML-RC and 97% of MDS-RC had complex (>3 independent cytogenetic abnormalities) karyotypes. The median OS of AML-RC with complex karyotype was significantly shorter than AML-RC patients with a non-complex (≤3 independent cytogenetic abnormalities) karyotype (P=.001), but similar to AML patients with complex karyotype lacking RC (P=not significant). Compared to complex-karyotype MDS lacking RC, MDS-RC patients had shorter leukemia-free survival (P=.016) and a trend for shorter OS (P=.10). RCs were sometimes lost after therapy or appeared during disease relapse, suggesting that they may be associated with genetic instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The frequencies of the presence of embryonic pole and cardiac activity in early miscarriages with abnormal karyotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yukun; Liu, Yinglin; Chen, Hui; Du, Tao; Tan, Jianping; Zhang, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the frequencies of the presence of an embryonic pole and cardiac activity in miscarriages with normal and abnormal embryonic karyotypes. From January 2008 to December 2012, 405 patients with early miscarriage were evaluated during pregnancy by regular ultrasound, and karyotyping was performed on chorionic villus tissue after curettage. The frequencies of the presence of an embryonic pole and cardiac activity were compared between patients with a normal embryonic karyotype and patients with an abnormal embryonic karyotype. Of the 405 samples, 224 cases (55.3%) had an abnormal karyotype, and 181 cases (44.7%) had a normal karyotype. The frequencies of the presence of an embryonic pole and cardiac activity in miscarriages with normal embryonic chromosomes (71.8% and 57.5%, respectively) were similar to those of miscarriages with abnormal embryonic chromosomes (74.1% and 62.1%, respectively). The frequencies of the presence of an embryonic pole and cardiac activity were higher in miscarriages with viable autosomal trisomies (trisomies 21, 13, and 18), monosomy X, and triploidy than in miscarriages with a normal karyotype or other abnormal karyotypes. The frequencies of the presence of an embryonic pole and cardiac activity are higher in miscarriages with viable autosomal trisomies, monosomy X, and triploidy than in miscarriages with a normal karyotype or other abnormal karyotypes.

  14. Chromosome evolution in Solanum traced by cross-species BAC-FISH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szinay, D.; Wijnker, E.; Berg, van den R.G.; Visser, R.G.F.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Bai, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are relatively rare evolutionary events and can be used as markers to study karyotype evolution. This research aims to use such rearrangements to study chromosome evolution in Solanum. Chromosomal rearrangements between Solanum crops and several related wild species were

  15. Karyotype and reproduction mode of the rodent parasite Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Akina; Tanaka, Teruhisa; Takaishi, Maho; Fujii, Yumiko; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Hasegawa, Koichi; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2014-11-01

    SUMMARY Strongyloides venezuelensis is a parasitic nematode that infects rodents. Although Strongyloides species described to date are known to exhibit parthenogenetic reproduction in the parasitic stage of their life cycle and sexual reproduction in the free-living stage, we did not observe any free-living males in S. venezuelensis in our strain, suggesting that the nematode is likely to depend on parthenogenetic reproduction. We confirmed by cytological analysis that S. venezuelensis produces eggs by parthenogenesis during the parasitic stage of its life cycle. Phylogenetic analysis using nearly the full length of 18S and D3 region of 28S ribosomal RNA gene suggested that S. venezuelensis is distantly related to another rodent parasite, namely Strongyloides ratti, but more closely related to a ruminant parasite, Strongyloides papillosus. Karyotype analysis revealed S. venezuelensis reproduces with mitotic parthenogenesis, and has the same number of chromosomes as S. papillosus (2n = 4), but differs from S. ratti (2n = 6) in this regard. These results, taken together, suggest that S. venezuelensis evolved its parasitism for rodents independently from S. ratti and, therefore, is likely to have a different reproductive strategy.

  16. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A.; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Luger, Selina M.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Litzow, Mark R.; Marks, David I.; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F.; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A.; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Schouten, Harry C.; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S.; Uy, Geoffrey L.; Wood, William A.; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S.; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, N=240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MK+MDS, N=221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes compared to other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, N=3,360; MDS, N=1,373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) from 1998 to 2011. MK+AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio [HR] 1.98, pabnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (HR 1.72, p<0.01) and MDS (HR1.79, p<0.01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. PMID:26327629

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of an at-rich satellite DNA and its contribution to karyotype differentiation in wild diploid Arachis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoluk, Sergio Sebastián; Robledo, Germán; Bertioli, David; Seijo, José Guillermo

    2017-04-01

    Satellite DNA (satDNA) is a major component of the heterochromatic regions of eukaryote genomes and usually shows a high evolutionary dynamic, even among closely related species. Section Arachis (genus Arachis) is composed of species belonging to six different genomes (A, B, D, F, G and K). The most distinguishing features among these genomes are the amount and distribution of the heterochromatin in the karyotypes. With the objective of gaining insight into the sequence composition and evolutionary dynamics of the heterochromatin fraction in Arachis, we investigated here the sequence diversity, genomic abundance, and chromosomal distribution of a satDNA family (ATR-2) among seven diploid species of section Arachis. All of the isolated sequences were AT-rich and highly conserved at both intraspecific and interspecific levels, without any species-specific polymorphism. Pairwise comparisons of isolated ATR-2 monomers revealed that most of the nucleotide sites were in the first two transitional stages of Strachan's model. However, the abundance of ATR-2 was significantly different among genomes according to the 'library hypothesis'. Fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that ATR-2 is a main component of the DAPI + centromeric heterochromatin of the A, F, and K genomes. Thus, the evolution of the different heterochromatin patterns observed in Arachis genomes can be explained, at least in part, by the differential representation of ATR-2 among the different species or even among the chromosomes of the same complement. These findings are the first to demonstrate the participation of satDNA sequences in the karyotype diversification of wild diploid Arachis species.

  18. Karyotype and Mapping of Repetitive DNAs in the African Butterfly Fish Pantodon buchholzi, the Sole Species of the Family Pantodontidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ráb, Petr; Yano, Cassia F; Lavoué, Sébastien; Jegede, Oladele I; Bertollo, Luiz A C; Ezaz, Tariq; Majtánová, Zuzana; de Oliveira, Ezequiel A; Cioffi, Marcelo B

    2016-01-01

    The monophyletic order Osteoglossiformes represents one of the most ancestral groups of teleosts and has at least 1 representative in all continents of the southern hemisphere, with the exception of Antarctica. However, despite its phylogenetic and biogeographical importance, cytogenetic data in Osteoglossiformes are scarce. Here, karyotype and chromosomal characteristics of the lower Niger River population of the African butterfly fish Pantodon buchholzi, the sole species of the family Pantodontidae (Osteoglossiformes), were examined using conventional and molecular cytogenetic approaches. All specimens examined had 2n = 46 chromosomes, with a karyotype composed of 5 pairs of metacentric, 5 pairs of submetacentric, and 13 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes in both sexes. No morphologically differentiated sex chromosomes were identified. C-bands were located in the centromeric/pericentromeric region of all chromosomes and were associated with the single AgNOR site. FISH with ribosomal DNA probes revealed that both 5S and 18S rDNA were present in only 1 pair of chromosomes each, but did not colocalize. CMA3+ bands were observed near the telomeres in several chromosome pairs and also at the 18S rDNA sites. The mapping of di- and trinucleotide repeat motifs, Rex6 transposable element, and U2 snRNA showed a scattered distribution over most of the chromosomes, but for some microsatellites and the U2 snRNA also a preferential accumulation at telomeric regions. This study presents the first detailed cytogenetic analysis in the African butterfly fish by both conventional and molecular cytogenetic protocols. This is the first of a series of further cytogenetic and cytogenomic studies on osteoglossiforms, aiming to comprehensively examine the chromosomal evolution in this phylogenetically important fish order. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Prognostic significance of complex karyotype and monosomal karyotype in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with risk-adapted protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlló, Cristina; Ribera, Josep-María; Morgades, Mireia; Granada, Isabel; Montesinos, Pau; González-Campos, José; Fernández-Abellán, Pascual; Tormo, Mar; Bethencourt, Concepción; Brunet, Salut; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Moreno, María-José; Sarrà, Josep; Del Potro, Eloy; Barba, Pere; Bernal, Teresa; Grande, Carlos; Grau, Javier; Cervera, José; Feliu, Evarist

    2014-12-15

    The karyotype is a predictor of outcomes in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The unfavorable prognostic significance of complex karyotype (CK) has been reported, whereas the prognostic relevance of monosomal karyotype (MK) has not been consistently evaluated. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of CK and MK in adults with ALL treated with risk-adapted protocols of the Spanish PETHEMA Group. The karyotypes of 881 adult ALL patients treated according to the protocols of the PETHEMA Group between 1993 and 2012 were centrally reviewed. CK and MK were assessed according to Moorman's criteria, and Breem's criteria, respectively. Specific analyses according to the risk groups and to the presence of t(9:22) were performed. Of 364 evaluable patients 33 (9.2%) had CK, and 68 of 535 evaluable patients (12.8%) had MK. Complete remission rate, remission duration, and overall survival were not significantly different according to the presence of CK or MK in the whole series, according to the B or T lineage, in the high-risk group, or in patients with t(9;22), regardless of imatinib treatment, and in patients who received chemotherapy alone or chemotherapy followed by stem cell transplantation Our study shows that CK and MK were not associated with a worse prognosis in adult patients with ALL treated with risk-adapted or subtype-oriented protocols. In patients with Ph+ ALL, MK did not have an impact on prognosis irrespective of imatinib treatment. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  20. Multicolor banding remains an important adjunct to array CGH and conventional karyotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bint, Susan M; Davies, Angela F; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie

    2013-12-05

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) for high resolution detection of chromosome imbalance, and karyotype analysis using G-banded chromosomes for detection of chromosome rearrangements, provide a powerful diagnostic armoury for clinical cytogenetics. However, abnormalities detected by karyotype analysis cannot always be characterised by scrutinising the G-banded pattern alone, and imbalance detected by array CGH cannot always be visualised in the context of metaphase chromosomes. In some cases further techniques are needed for detailed characterisation of chromosomal abnormalities. We investigated seven cases involving structural chromosome rearrangements detected by karyotype analysis, and one case where imbalance was primarily detected by array CGH. Multicolor banding (MCB) was used in all cases and proved invaluable in understanding the detailed structure of the abnormalities. Karyotype analysis detected structural chromosome rearrangements in 7 cases and MCB was used to help refine the karyotype for each case. Array CGH detected imbalance in an eighth case, where previously, G-banded chromosome analysis had reported a normal karyotype. Karyotype analysis of a second tissue type revealed this abnormality in mosaic form; however, MCB was needed in order to characterise this rearrangement. MCB provided information for the delineation of small deletions, duplications, insertions and inversions and helped to assign breakpoints which were difficult to identify from G-banded preparations due to ambiguous banding patterns. Despite the recent advance of array CGH in molecular cytogenetics we conclude that fluorescence in situ hybridization, including MCB, is still required for the elucidation of structural chromosome rearrangements, and remains an essential adjunct in modern diagnostic laboratories.

  1. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular Karyotype and Chromosomal Localization of Genes Encoding -tubulin, Cysteine Proteinase, hsp 70 and Actin in Trypanosoma rangeli

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    CB Toaldo; M Steindel; MA Sousa; CC Tavares

    2001-01-01

    The molecular karyotype of nine Trypanosoma rangeli strains was analyzed by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, followed by the chromosomal localization of -tubulin, cysteine...

  3. Minute Y chromosomes and karyotype evolution in Madagascan iguanas (Squamata: Iguania: Opluridae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Altmanová, M.; Rovatsos, M.; Kratochvíl, L.; Johnson Pokorná, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 3 (2016), s. 618-633 ISSN 0024-4066 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/0718 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Anolis * comparative genome hybridization * Chalarodon * heterochromatin * interstitial telomeric sequences Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.288, year: 2016

  4. The role of chromosomal fusion in the karyotypic evolution of the genus Ageneiosus (Siluriformes: Auchenipteridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Laridondo Lui

    Full Text Available Ageneiosus is the most widely distributed genus of the family Auchenipteridae among South American river basins. Although chromosome studies in the family are scarce, this genus has the largest number of analyzed species, with 2n = 54 to 56 chromosomes, differing from the rest of the family (2n = 58. This study aimed to analyze Ageneiosus inermis from the Araguaia River basin. The diploid number found was of 56 chromosomes. Heterochromatin was allocated in terminal region of most chromosomes, plus a pericentromeric heterochromatic block in pair 1, a pair distinguished by size in relation to other chromosomes pairs. AgNORs were detected in only one submetacentric chromosome pair, which was confirmed by FISH. 5S rDNA was present in only one metacentric chromosome pair. Hybridization with [TTAGGG]n sequence marked the telomeres of all chromosomes, in addition to an ITS in the proximal region of the short arm of pair 1. The repetitive [GATA]n sequence was dispersed, with preferential location in terminal region of the chromosomes. Ageneiosus has a genomic organization somewhat different when compared to other Auchenipteridae species. Evidences indicate that a chromosomal fusion originated the first metacentric chromosome pair in A. inermis, rearrangement which may be a basal event for the genus Ageneiosus é o gênero da família Auchenipteridae mais amplamente distribuído em bacias da América do Sul. Apesar dos estudos cromossômicos nesta família serem escassos, este gênero tem o maior número de espécies analisadas, com número diploide variando de 54 a 56 cromossomos, o que difere do restante da família (2n = 58. Este estudo objetivou analisar Ageneiosus inermis da bacia do rio Araguaia. O número diploide encontrado foi de 56 cromossomos. A heterocromatina se mostrou localizada na região terminal da maioria dos cromossomos, além de um bloco heterocromático pericentromérico no par 1, um par facilmente distinguível no cariótipo pelo seu maior tamanho quando comparado aos outros pares do complemento. AgRONs foram detectadas em somente um par de cromossomos submetacêntricos, que foi confirmado pela FISH. 5S rDNA se mostrou presente em somente um par de cromossomos metacêntricos. A hibridização com a sequência [TTAGGG]n marcou os telômeros de todos os cromossomos, além de um ITS (sequência telomérica intersticial na região proximal do braço curto do par 1. A sequência repetitiva [GATA]n se mostrou dispersa, com localização preferencial na região terminal dos cromossomos. Ageneiosus apresenta uma organização genômica um pouco diferente quando comparada a outras espécies de Auchenipteridae. As evidências indicam que uma fusão cromossômica originou o primeiro par de cromossomos metacêntricos de A. inermis, rearranjo que parece ser um evento basal para o gênero.

  5. Cariótipo Fetal em Líquido Pleural Obtido por Toracocentese Fetal Karyotyping of Pleural Fluid Obtained by Thoracocentesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Vieira Cabral

    2001-05-01

    blood. Results: the fetal karyotype was successful in 12 cases. There were 4 abnormal results, all of them were Down syndromes, and in the other 8 cases the chromosomal analyses were normal. The fetal karyotype was confirmed and compared by newborn blood chromosomal analysis, genetic evaluation or necropsy. There were no maternal or fetal side effects related to the procedure. Conclusions: the fetal karyotyping performed in pleural effusions obtained by intrauterine thoracocentesis proved to be highly efficient and safe. It must be the method of choice for rapid karyotyping in fetuses with pleural edema.

  6. Pregnancy outcome for fetuses with increased nuchal translucency but normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithner, Christina Unger; Kublickas, Marius; Ek, Sverker

    2016-03-01

    To investigate pregnancy outcome for fetuses with nuchal translucency (NT) ≥3.5 mm but normal karyotype in the Stockholm (Sweden) area. A retrospective population-based cohort study. From 2006 to 2012, fetal NT was measured in 55123 singleton pregnancies. There were 341 pregnancies with NT thickness ≥3.5 mm; 139 had a normal karyotype, 164 had an abnormal karyotype and 38 were removed from the study. Pregnancy outcome was defined as adverse (termination of pregnancy [TOP], miscarriage [MC], intrauterine fetal death [IUFD], or delivery of a child with structural defects or genetic disorders), or favourable (delivery of a child without any structural defects or genetic disorders diagnosed before discharge). Of the 139 high NT pregnancies with normal karyotype, 110 (79.2%) resulted in live births, one (0.7%) IUFD, 23 (16.5%) TOP and five (3.6%) MC. The risk of an adverse pregnancy outcome increased with increasing NT. Structural fetal defects were found in 28 (19.5%) of pregnancies undergoing second trimester ultrasound screening, of which seven resulted in live births and 21 were terminated. The most common structural defect was cardiac defects. Adverse pregnancy outcome increased with increasing NT, even with normal karyotype, however, the prognosis is good if the second trimester ultrasound screening is normal. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. New approach to phenotypic variability and karyotype-phenotype correlation in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel-Neto, Jamil; Carvalho, Annelise B; Marques-de-Faria, Antonia Paula; Guerra-Júnior, Gil; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa T

    2016-04-01

    Phenotypic variability of Turner syndrome (TS) challenges clinicians, and undiagnosed mosaicism may lead to conflicting results of karyotype-phenotype correlations. This study assessed the extent of phenotypic variability and investigated the presence of karyotype-phenotype correlations. The sample comprised 80 patients with ≥50 cells analyzed in karyotype. Twenty were 45,X/46,X,+mar; three groups of 20 patients were constructed by matching those girls with the nearest-aged patient with 45,X, 45,X/46,XX and 45,X/46,X,i(Xq) or 46,X,i(Xq) karyotype. Data were obtained on height z-score, dysmorphic features, echocardiogram and urinary system sonography. The number of dysmorphic features ranged from one to 16 and was not correlated to age at diagnosis or height. The groups did not differ in height, number of dysmorphic features, cardiovascular and urinary system anomalies and frequency of any specific feature, except for short fourth metacarpal. Wide phenotypical variability of TS may be objectively described and its clinical picture is not correlated to karyotype.

  8. Is routine karyotyping required in prenatal samples with a molecular or metabolic referral?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooper Angelique JA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As a routine, karyotyping of invasive prenatal samples is performed as an adjunct to referrals for DNA mutation detection and metabolic testing. We performed a retrospective study on 500 samples to assess the diagnostic value of this procedure. These samples included 454 (90.8% chorionic villus (CV and 46 (9.2% amniocenteses specimens. For CV samples karyotyping was based on analyses of both short-term culture (STC and long-term culture (LTC cells. Overall, 19 (3.8% abnormal karyotypes were denoted: four with a common aneuploidy (trisomy 21, 18 and 13, two with a sex chromosomal aneuploidy (Klinefelter syndrome, one with a sex chromosome mosaicism and twelve with various autosome mosaicisms. In four cases a second invasive test was performed because of an abnormal finding in the STC. Taken together, we conclude that STC and LTC karyotyping has resulted in a diagnostic yield of 19 (3.8% abnormal cases, including 12 cases (2.4% with an uncertain significance. From a diagnostic point of view, it is desirable to limit uncertain test results as secondary test findings. Therefore, we recommend a more targeted assay, such as e.g. QF-PCR, as a replacement of the STC and to provide parents the autonomy to choose between karyotyping and QF-PCR.

  9. [Application and evaluation of invasive prenatal diagnostic techniques and analysis of chromosomal karyotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqiong; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Shaoling; Zhou, Zhongmin; Zhu, Fufan; Ding, Yiling

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the safety, effectiveness and complications of serial invasive prenatal diagnostic techniques, and to investigate the prenatal diagnosis indication as well as to analyze the abnormal chromosomal karyotype. We retrospectively studied all patients from March 2005 to May 2012 who received amniocentesis and cordocentesis in the prenatal diagnosis center of Second Xiangya Hospital. The indication of the procedure, successful rate and complications were evaluated, and 25 abnormal chromosome nuclear types were analyzed. A total of 669 patients received invasive prenatal diagnosis from March 2005 to May 2012 in Second Xiangya Hospital: 598 received amniocentesis and 71 cordocentesis carried out. Compared with the cordocentesis group, the amniocentesis group had higher achievement ratio (91.54% vs 100%, Pabnormal karyotypes (11.27% vs 2.84%, Pabnormality were the top 3 indications of amniocentesis and cordocentesis. We found 25 abnormal karyotypes, including 6 cases of trisomy 21, 4 sex chromosomal abnormalities, 7 autosomal balanced translocations, 1 marker chromosome, and 7 mosaics. As a widely used invasive prenatal diagnosis, amniocentesis is safe and effective. The complications of cordocentesis are much higher than those of amniocentesis, which is not a proper routine procedure for prenatal diagnosis of abnormal karyotype. The analysis of karyotype not only can identify fetal chromosome abnormality, but also provide the scientific basis for pregnancy continuation, thus reducing the ratio of birth defect.

  10. Combined method for simultaneous morphology, immunophenotype and karyotype (MAC in leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Lopes Ferrari Chauffaille

    Full Text Available In the present study, a combined method (CM for attaining simultaneous identification of leukemic cell morphology, karyotype and immunophenotype has been evaluated in 21 patients with acute leukemia and 1 with CML in blast crisis were studied for morphology, citochemistry, immunophenotype and karyotype. Karyotype was performed in a bone marrow sample by using conventional techniques. In each case, direct method (DM and/or three cultures were tried. The CM consisted in separating a small part of the material resulting from any of the cultures or DM, preparing slides through cytospin and immunophenotyping through APAAP method using the same monoclonal antibodies (MoAb as for diagnosis. In 14 cases, the metaphases proved positive to the MoAb: in 4, the cells with abnormality had their origin defined; in other 4 the karyotype was normal preventing any identification; 6 cases had minimal abnormalities not visible through CM; and in two cases abnormal karyotypes were detected only in the cultures with GM-CSF. This study showed that CM is feasible in cases where evident numerical or structural chromosomal abnormalties are present.

  11. Chorionic villus sampling for abnormal screening compared to historical indications: prevalence of abnormal karyotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Nicole E; Fraley, Gwen; Feist, Cori; Burns, Michael J; Pereira, Leonardo

    2012-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of abnormal karyotype results in women undergoing chorionic villus sampling (CVS) for abnormal first trimester screening compared to CVS for historical indications (advanced maternal age (AMA) or prior aneuploidy). Retrospective cohort of all patients undergoing CVS at Oregon Health & Science University from January 2006 to June 2010. Patients were separated based on CVS indication: (1) positive ultrasound (U/S) or serum screening; or (2) AMA or prior aneuploidy with normal or no screening. Prevalence of abnormal karyotype results were compared between groups. Fetal karyotyping was successful in 500 of 506 CVS procedures performed. 203 CVS were performed for positive screening with 69 abnormal karyotypes (34.0%). 264 CVS were performed for historical indications with 11 abnormal karyotypes (4.2%). This difference was statistically significant (χ(2) 71.9, p abnormal U/S and/or serum screening (35 U/S, 4 serum, 3 U/S and serum). Combined ultrasound and serum screening should be recommended to all women, including AMA women, prior to undergoing invasive testing to improve risk-based counseling and minimize morbidity.

  12. Contrasting the Chromosomal Organization of Repetitive DNAs in Two Gryllidae Crickets with Highly Divergent Karyotypes.

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    Octavio M Palacios-Gimenez

    Full Text Available A large percentage of eukaryotic genomes consist of repetitive DNA that plays an important role in the organization, size and evolution. In the case of crickets, chromosomal variability has been found using classical cytogenetics, but almost no information concerning the organization of their repetitive DNAs is available. To better understand the chromosomal organization and diversification of repetitive DNAs in crickets, we studied the chromosomes of two Gryllidae species with highly divergent karyotypes, i.e., 2n(♂ = 29,X0 (Gryllus assimilis and 2n = 9, neo-X1X2Y (Eneoptera surinamensis. The analyses were performed using classical cytogenetic techniques, repetitive DNA mapping and genome-size estimation. Conserved characteristics were observed, such as the occurrence of a small number of clusters of rDNAs and U snDNAs, in contrast to the multiple clusters/dispersal of the H3 histone genes. The positions of U2 snDNA and 18S rDNA are also conserved, being intermingled within the largest autosome. The distribution and base-pair composition of the heterochromatin and repetitive DNA pools of these organisms differed, suggesting reorganization. Although the microsatellite arrays had a similar distribution pattern, being dispersed along entire chromosomes, as has been observed in some grasshopper species, a band-like pattern was also observed in the E. surinamensis chromosomes, putatively due to their amplification and clustering. In addition to these differences, the genome of E. surinamensis is approximately 2.5 times larger than that of G. assimilis, which we hypothesize is due to the amplification of repetitive DNAs. Finally, we discuss the possible involvement of repetitive DNAs in the differentiation of the neo-sex chromosomes of E. surinamensis, as has been reported in other eukaryotic groups. This study provided an opportunity to explore the evolutionary dynamics of repetitive DNAs in two non-model species and will contribute to the

  13. Intraspecific karyotypic polymorphism is highly concordant with allozyme variation in Lysimachia mauritiana (Primulaceae: Myrsinoideae) in Taiwan: implications for the colonization history and dispersal patterns of coastal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Yoshiko; Chung, Kuo-Fang; Chen, Chih-Hui; Hoshi, Yoshikazu; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Chou, Chang-Hung; Oginuma, Kazuo; Peng, Ching-I

    2012-11-01

    Investigating intraspecific karyotypic and genetic variations jointly can provide unique insights into how historical, ecological and cytogenetic factors influence microevolution. A coastal herb, Lysimachia mauritiana, exhibits extensive karyotypic polymorphism and displays a complex cytogeographic pattern across the Ryukyus. To explore whether a similar degree of chromosomal variation exists south of the Ryukyus, and in an attempt to ascertain the mechanisms that may have generated the patterns, comprehensive sampling was conducted in Taiwan. Karyotypes were analysed at mitotic metaphase for 550 individuals from 42 populations throughout Taiwan Proper and its adjacent islands. In addition, genetic variation was estimated using 12 allozymes (21 loci) of 314 individuals sampled from 12 localities. Four chromosome numbers and eight cytotypes, including four endemic cytotypes, were detected. Cytotype distributions were highly structured geographically, with single cytotypes present in most populations and four major cytotypes dominating the north, east and south of Taiwan and the Penghu Archipelago. Allozyme variation was very low and F-statistics indicated an extremely high level of population differentiation, implying limited gene flow among populations. Cluster analysis of allozyme variation uncovered four geographic groups, each corresponding perfectly to the four dominant cytotypes. The geographic structure of cytotype distribution and allozyme variation probably resulted from severe genetic drift triggered by genetic bottlenecks, suggesting that Taiwanese populations were likely to be derived from four independent founder events. In the few localities with multiple cytotypes, cytogeographic patterns and inferences of chromosomal evolution revealed a trend of northward dispersal, consistent with the course of the Kuroshio Current that has been influential in shaping the coastal biota of the region. The data elucidate the patterns of colonization and the effects

  14. Correlations between immunological phenotype and karyotype in malignant lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, E G; Arthur, D C; Gajl-Peczalska, K J; LeBien, T W; Peterson, B A; Hurd, D D; Bloomfield, C D

    1986-12-01

    We have correlated immunological characteristics and karyotypic abnormalities from lymphomas in 118 patients. T-lymphomas differed significantly from B- and non-B-, non-T-lymphomas in having more normal metaphases, trisomy 19, and breaks at 1q21, 2q21, 3q27, 4q21, and 17q21 (P less than or equal to 0.03). Non-T-lymphomas had breaks in 18q in one-half the cases, but only one of 11 T-lymphomas had such breaks (P = 0.02). Among B-lymphomas, specific chromosome abnormalities were associated with the type of immunoglobulin heavy but not light chain expressed. A break at 14q22 or q24 was associated with surface delta mu-immunoglobulin (P = 0.02); trisomy 22 or a break in 22q and a break at 2q32 was associated with surface gamma-immunoglobulin (P less than 0.001); and trisomy 12 and a break at 2p13 was associated with cytoplasmic gamma-immunoglobulin (P less than 0.01). Among B-lymphomas, several cytogenetic abnormalities were associated (P less than or equal to 0.02) with expression of CD24 or CD9 surface antigens. Lack of CD24 was associated with breaks in 2p25, 5q, and 6q21; CD9 was associated with a break at 6q15. Associations with a specific immunological phenotype were not identified for cytogenetic abnormalities involving a band to which genes encoding immunoglobulin or the T-cell receptor have been localized. Breaks were common at 14q32, the genomic site of the immunoglobulin heavy chain loci, in B-, non-B-, non-T-, and T-lymphomas. In T-lymphomas this may be because this is the site of the AKT1 oncogene. Breaks were uncommonly found at the light chain loci or the genomic sites encoding the T-cell receptor. However, the recurring breakpoints associated with T-lymphomas were commonly found on chromosomes to which genes coding for various T-cell antigens have recently been provisionally assigned.

  15. Submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with increased nuchal translucency and normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Li, Ru; Fu, Fang; Zhang, Yongling; Li, Dongzhi; Liao, Can

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with increased nuchal translucency (NT) and normal karyotype. Total of 296 fetuses with increased NT (≥3.0 mm) were tested by conventional karyotyping. When cytogenetic analysis showed normal chromosome, the pregnancies were then consulted for array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis and received subsequent morphology scan between 20 and 24 weeks gestation. Submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities were assessed and compared between the fetuses with and without structural defects. Chromosomal abnormality was identified in 19.9% (59/296) fetuses. Two hundred and twenty samples were tested by array CGH. Submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 9.1% (20/220) fetuses. For the fetuses with abnormal morphology scan, the detection rate of submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities was higher than those with normal morphology scan (26.9% versus 6.7%, p karyotype, especially when the structural defects were found at second or third trimester.

  16. Multicolor Karyotyping and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization-Banding (MCB/mBAND).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehr, Thomas; Othman, Moneeb A K; Rittscher, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) approaches are routine applications in tumor as well as clinical cytogenetics nowadays. The first approach when thinking about mFISH is multicolor karyotyping using human whole chromosome paints as probes; this can be achieved by narrow-band filter-based multiplex-FISH (M-FISH) or interferometer/spectroscopy-based spectral karyotyping (SKY). Besides, various FISH-based banding approaches were reported in the literature, including multicolor banding (MCB/mBAND) the latter being evaluated by narrow-band filters, and using specific software. Here, we describe the combined application of multicolor karyotyping and MCB/mBAND for the characterization of simple and complex acquired chromosomal changes in cancer cytogenetics.

  17. [Fetal abnormalities and prognosis associated with increased nuchal translucency and abnormal karyotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Fátima Aparecida Targino; Brizot, Maria de Lourdes; Lopes, Lilian M; Liao, Adolfo Wenjaw; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with increased nuchal translucency (NT) measurement. Incidence of structural abnormalities and pregnancy outcome was also described in fetuses with increased NT and abnormal karyotype. This was a retrospective study involving 246 fetuses with increased NT and known karyotype followed at the Fetal Medicine Unit, Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University Medical School. Fetal karyotype was abnormal in 14.2% of the cases. Ultrasound anomaly scan and specialized echocardiographic studies in these cases showed fetal structural abnormalities in 80.8% and cardiac defects were found in 61.5% of the fetuses. Pregnancy outcome was abnormal in 76.5% of these women. Increased NT measurement at 11 to 13 weeks and 6 days is an important marker for fetal chromosomal and structural abnormalities, mainly fetal cardiac defects. This finding also indicates increased risk of spontaneous fetal and neonatal death.

  18. El cariotipo fundamental de Alstroemeria patagonica (Alstroemeriaceae The fundamental karyotype of Alstroemeria patagonia (Alstroemeriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Baeza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe el cariotipo de Alstroemeria patagonica Phil. a partir de material de Chile. Esta especie presenta un cariotipo 2n = 2x = 16, y una fórmula haploide de 1m + 2sm + 1sm-sat + 2st + 1st-sat + 1t. El cariotipo encontrado es muy asimétrico (AsK % = 76,0.The karyotype of Alstroemeria patagonia Phil. from Chile was described. The species had a karyotype 2n = 2x = 16, and the haploid formula was 1m + 2sm + 1sm-sat + 2st + 1st-sat + 1t. The reported karyotype was very asymmetric (AsK % = 76.0.

  19. Digital karyotyping reveals probable target genes at 7q21.3 locus in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shengyue

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a worldwide malignant liver tumor with high incidence in China. Subchromosomal amplifications and deletions accounted for major genomic alterations occurred in HCC. Digital karyotyping was an effective method for analyzing genome-wide chromosomal aberrations at high resolution. Methods A digital karyotyping library of HCC was constructed and 454 Genome Sequencer FLX System (Roche was applied in large scale sequencing of the library. Digital Karyotyping Data Viewer software was used to analyze genomic amplifications and deletions. Genomic amplifications of genes detected by digital karyotyping were examined by real-time quantitative PCR. The mRNA expression level of these genes in tumorous and paired nontumorous tissues was also detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results A total of 821,252 genomic tags were obtained from the digital karyotyping library of HCC, with 529,162 tags (64% mapped to unique loci of human genome. Multiple subchromosomal amplifications and deletions were detected through analyzing the digital karyotyping data, among which the amplification of 7q21.3 drew our special attention. Validation of genes harbored within amplicons at 7q21.3 locus revealed that genomic amplification of SGCE, PEG10, DYNC1I1 and SLC25A13 occurred in 11 (21%, 11 (21%, 11 (21% and 23 (44% of the 52 HCC samples respectively. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of SGCE, PEG10 and DYNC1I1 were significantly up-regulated in tumorous liver tissues compared with corresponding nontumorous counterparts. Conclusions Our results indicated that subchromosomal region of 7q21.3 was amplified in HCC, and SGCE, PEG10 and DYNC1I1 were probable protooncogenes located within the 7q21.3 locus.

  20. Digital karyotyping reveals probable target genes at 7q21.3 locus in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Zhang, Hongyi; Liang, Jianping; Yan, Huadong; Chen, Yangyi; Shen, Yan; Kong, Yalin; Wang, Shengyue; Zhao, Guoping; Jin, Weirong

    2011-07-19

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a worldwide malignant liver tumor with high incidence in China. Subchromosomal amplifications and deletions accounted for major genomic alterations occurred in HCC. Digital karyotyping was an effective method for analyzing genome-wide chromosomal aberrations at high resolution. A digital karyotyping library of HCC was constructed and 454 Genome Sequencer FLX System (Roche) was applied in large scale sequencing of the library. Digital Karyotyping Data Viewer software was used to analyze genomic amplifications and deletions. Genomic amplifications of genes detected by digital karyotyping were examined by real-time quantitative PCR. The mRNA expression level of these genes in tumorous and paired nontumorous tissues was also detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. A total of 821,252 genomic tags were obtained from the digital karyotyping library of HCC, with 529,162 tags (64%) mapped to unique loci of human genome. Multiple subchromosomal amplifications and deletions were detected through analyzing the digital karyotyping data, among which the amplification of 7q21.3 drew our special attention. Validation of genes harbored within amplicons at 7q21.3 locus revealed that genomic amplification of SGCE, PEG10, DYNC1I1 and SLC25A13 occurred in 11 (21%), 11 (21%), 11 (21%) and 23 (44%) of the 52 HCC samples respectively. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of SGCE, PEG10 and DYNC1I1 were significantly up-regulated in tumorous liver tissues compared with corresponding nontumorous counterparts. Our results indicated that subchromosomal region of 7q21.3 was amplified in HCC, and SGCE, PEG10 and DYNC1I1 were probable protooncogenes located within the 7q21.3 locus.

  1. 46,XX Karyotype in a Male with Ambigious Genitalia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Balkan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available 40 days old case who were diagnosed with ambigious genitalia were sentto laboratory of cytogenetics. Mother was 26 years old and have to alivechildren and case were the second child and applied to Child SurgeryDepartment due to continiously vomiting and uneasy conditions. Sexualdevelopment were as male on physical examinations. Cell culture wasapplied for chromosomal analysis. Slides were stained with GiemsaBanding Staining (GTG and 100 cells were totaly counted and karyotypingwere done with 15 metaphase. Chromosome with 46,XX karyotype. Casewere taken under consideration of congenital adrenel hyperplasia afterevalution of karyotype. Case were discussed according to by information ofpresents literatures.

  2. Karyotype, Pedigree and cone-beam computerized tomography analysis of a case of nonsyndromic pandental anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Umesh; Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Kaur Dharmani, Charan Kamal; Rajput, Akhil; Mittal, Priya; Abraham, Sathish; Soni, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    This case report presented a karyotype and pedigree analysis of a case with unusual combination of dental anomalies: Generalized short roots, talon cusps, dens invagination, low alveolar bone heights, very prominent cusp of carabelli and protostylid on first permanent molars, taurodontism of second permanent molars, rotated, missing and impacted teeth. None of the anomalies alone are rare. However, until date, nonsyndromic pandental anomalies that are affecting entire dentition with detailed karyotype, pedigree and cone-beam computerized tomography analysis have not been reported. The occurrence of these anomalies is probably incidental as the conditions are etiologically unrelated.

  3. Karyotype, Pedigree and cone-beam computerized tomography analysis of a case of nonsyndromic pandental anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Umesh; Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Kaur Dharmani, Charan Kamal; Rajput, Akhil; Mittal, Priya; Abraham, Sathish; Soni, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    This case report presented a karyotype and pedigree analysis of a case with unusual combination of dental anomalies: Generalized short roots, talon cusps, dens invagination, low alveolar bone heights, very prominent cusp of carabelli and protostylid on first permanent molars, taurodontism of second permanent molars, rotated, missing and impacted teeth. None of the anomalies alone are rare. However, until date, nonsyndromic pandental anomalies that are affecting entire dentition with detailed karyotype, pedigree and cone-beam computerized tomography analysis have not been reported. The occurrence of these anomalies is probably incidental as the conditions are etiologically unrelated. PMID:26283856

  4. Influence of system controls on the Late Quaternary geomorphic evolution of a rapidly-infilled incised-valley system: The lower Manawatu valley, North Island New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Alastair J. H.; Fuller, Ian C.

    2018-02-01

    The Manawatu incised-valley estuary was rapidly infilled between 12,000-4700 cal. yr BP. A combination of empirical measurements of sedimentation rates, a reconstruction of relative sea-level (RSL) change, and digital elevation models of key surfaces within the Holocene sedimentary fill of the valley were integrated to produce a numerical model to investigate the influence of the system controls of sea-level change, sediment flux, and accommodation space on the rapid infilling history of the palaeo-estuary. The numerical model indicates that sediment flux into the palaeo-estuary was greatest during the Holocene marine transgression between 12,000-8000 years BP. The average rate of sediment deposition in the estuary during this period was 1.0 M m3 yr- 1. This rapid rate of sedimentation was controlled by the rate of accommodation space creation, as regulated by the rate of sea-level rise and the antecedent configuration of the valley. By the time sea levels stabilised c. 7500 cal. yr BP, the palaeo-estuary had been substantively infilled. Limited accommodation space resulted in rapid infilling of the central basin, though sediment flux into the estuary between 7100 and 4500 cal. yr BP was at a lower rate of 234,000 m3 yr- 1. The limited accommodation space also influenced hydrodynamic conditions in the estuarine central basin, driving export of fine-grained sediment from the estuary. Once the accommodation space of the estuarine basin was infilled sediment bypassed the system, with a consequent reduction in the sedimentation rate in the valley. More accurate partitioning of the sources of sediment driving the infilling is necessary to quantify sediment bypassing. Post-depositional lowering of RSL index points from the valley is driven by neotectonics and sediment compaction.

  5. Rapid Evolution to Blast Crisis Associated with a Q252H ABL1 Kinase Domain Mutation in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. McCarron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A minority of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients express variant transcripts of which the e19a2 BCR-ABL1 fusion is the most common. Instances of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI resistance in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML patients have rarely been reported. A case of e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML is described in whom imatinib resistance, associated with a Q252H ABL1 kinase domain mutation, became apparent soon after initiation of TKI therapy. The patient rapidly transformed to myeloid blast crisis (BC with considerable bone marrow fibrosis and no significant molecular response to a second generation TKI. The clinical course was complicated by comorbidities with the patient rapidly succumbing to advanced disease. This scenario of Q252H-associated TKI resistance with rapid BC transformation has not been previously documented in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML. This case highlights the considerable challenges remaining in the management of TKI-resistant BC CML, particularly in the elderly patient.

  6. Increased nuchal translucency with normal karyotype: a follow-up study of 100 cases supplemented with CGH and MLPA analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, K V; Kirchhoff, M; Nygaard, U

    2009-01-01

    karyotype on conventional karyotyping. METHODS: Chorionic villus samples from 100 fetuses with NT > or = 99(th) percentile and normal G-banding analysis and MLPA for detection of aneuploidies for chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y were included. Examinations were supplemented by HR-CGH and MLPA for syndromes...

  7. FSH, LH, inhibin B and estradiol levels in Turner syndrome depend on age and karyotype: longitudinal study of 70 Turner girls with or without spontaneous puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Casper P; Main, Katharina M; Kjaergaard, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian function in Turner syndrome (TS) patients depends on the specific karyotype. This retrospective clinical study evaluates the pituitary-gonadal axis during infancy, childhood and adolescence in TS patients according to karyotype and ovarian function....

  8. Description of a new species and the karyotype of the cavernicolous millipede Pseudonannolene Silvestri and the karyotype of Pseudonannolene strinatti Mauriès (Diplopoda, Pseudonannolenida, Pseudonannolenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmem Silvia Fontanetti

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudonannolene tocaiensis, sp.n. is described from Brazil, São Paulo, Itirapina. The karyotypes of P. tocaiensis, sp.n. and P. strinatti Mauriès, 1974 are also presented, both species are found in cave environments. P. tocaiensis has 2n=20, XY and P. strinatti, 2n=16; it was not possible to observe the sex determination mechanism in the latter.

  9. Adverse prognostic impact of abnormal lesions detected by genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism array-based karyotyping analysis in acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jun Ho; Huh, Jungwon; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Moon, Joon Ho; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Won, Jong Ho; Mun, Yeung Chul; Kim, Hawk; Park, Jinny; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2011-12-10

    This study attempted to analyze the prognostic role of single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A) -based karyotying in 133 patients with acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK), which presents with diverse clinical outcomes, thus requiring further stratification of patient subgroups according to their prognoses. A total of 133 patients with AML-NK confirmed by metaphase cytogenetics (MC) and fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis were included in this study. Analysis by Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 Array was performed by using DNAs derived from marrow samples at diagnosis. Forty-three patients (32.3%) had at least one abnormal SNP lesion that was not detected by MC. One hundred thirteen abnormal SNP lesions included 55 losses, 23 gains, and 35 copy-neutral losses of heterozygosity. Multivariate analyses showed that detection of abnormal SNP lesions by SNP-A karyotyping results in an unfavorable prognostic value for overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 2.69; 95% CI, 1.50 to 4.82; P = .001); other significant prognostic factors included secondary AML (HR, 5.55; 95% CI, 1.80 to 17.14; P = .003), presence of the FLT3 mutation (HR, 3.17; 95% CI, 1.71 to 5.87; P abnormal SNP lesions detected by SNP-A karyotyping might indicate an adverse prognosis in patients with AML-NK, thus requiring a more sophisticated treatment strategy for improvement of treatment outcomes.

  10. On the allopolyploid origin and genome structure of the closely related species Hordeum secalinum and Hordeum capense inferred by molecular karyotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Ángeles; de Bustos, Alfredo; Jouve, Nicolás

    2017-08-01

    To provide additional information to the many phylogenetic analyses conducted within Hordeum , here the origin and interspecific affinities of the allotetraploids Hordeum secalinum and Hordeum capense were analysed by molecular karyotyping. Karyotypes were determined using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) to distinguish the sub-genomes and , plus fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/non-denaturing (ND)-FISH to determine the distribution of ten tandem repetitive DNA sequences and thus provide chromosome markers. Each chromosome pair in the six accessions analysed was identified, allowing the establishment of homologous and putative homeologous relationships. The low-level polymorphism observed among the H. secalinum accessions contrasted with the divergence recorded for the sub-genome of the H. capense accessions. Although accession H335 carries an intergenomic translocation, its chromosome structure was indistinguishable from that of H. secalinum . Hordeum secalinum and H. capense accession H335 share a hybrid origin involving Hordeum marinum subsp. gussoneanum as the genome donor and an unidentified genome progenitor. Hordeum capense accession BCC2062 either diverged, with remodelling of the sub-genome, or its genome was donated by a now extinct ancestor. A scheme of probable evolution shows the intricate pattern of relationships among the Hordeum species carrying the genome (including all H. marinum taxa and the hexaploid Hordeum brachyantherum ).

  11. FSH, LH, inhibin B and estradiol levels in Turner syndrome depend on age and karyotype: longitudinal study of 70 Turner girls with or without spontaneous puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Casper P; Main, Katharina M; Kjaergaard, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian function in Turner syndrome (TS) patients depends on the specific karyotype. This retrospective clinical study evaluates the pituitary-gonadal axis during infancy, childhood and adolescence in TS patients according to karyotype and ovarian function.......Ovarian function in Turner syndrome (TS) patients depends on the specific karyotype. This retrospective clinical study evaluates the pituitary-gonadal axis during infancy, childhood and adolescence in TS patients according to karyotype and ovarian function....

  12. Karyotype variability in neotropical catfishes of the family Pimelodidae (Teleostei: Siluriformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Américo Moraes Neto

    Full Text Available Karyotypic data are presented for four species of fish belonging to the Pimelodidae family. These species show a conserved diploid number, 2n = 56 chromosomes, with different karyotypic formulae. The analyzed species showed little amount of heterochromatin located preferentially in the centromeric and telomeric regions of some chromosomes. The nucleolus organizer regions activity (Ag-NORs and the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, with 18S and 5S probes, showing only one chromosome pair marked bearer of ribosomal genes, the only exception was Pimelodus britskii that presented multiple NORs and syntenic location of the 18S and 5S probes. Non-Robertsonian events, as pericentric inversion and NORs duplication are requested to explain the karyotype diversification in Pseudoplatystoma from the rio Paraguay (MS, Pimelodus from the rio Iguaçu (PR, Sorubim from the rio Paraguay (MS and Steindachneridion from the rio Paraíba do Sul (SP. The obtained data for the karyotype macrostructure of these species corroborates a conserved pattern observed in Pimelodidae. On the other hand, interspecific variations detected by molecular cytogenetics markers made possible cytotaxonomic inferences and differentiation of the species here analyzed.

  13. Karyotype analysis of Lilium longiflorum and Lilium rubellum by chromosome banding and fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, K.B.; Wennekes, J.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Jacobsen, E.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Detailed karyotypes of Lilium longiflorum and L. rubellum were constructed on the basis of chromosome arm lengths, C-banding, AgNO3 staining, and PI-DAPI banding, together with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with the 5S and 45S rDNA sequences as probes. The C-banding patterns that were

  14. Reference karyotype and cytomolecular map for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Nurul Islam-faridi; C. Dana Nelson; Thomas L. Kubisiak

    2007-01-01

    A reference karyotype is presented for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L., subgenus Pinus , section Pinus, subsection Australes), based on fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), using 18s-28s rDNA, 5s rDNA, and Arabidopsis-type telomere repeat sequence (A-type TRS). Well...

  15. First Description of the Karyotype and Sex Chromosomes in the Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Altmanová, Marie; Rovatsos, Michail; Velenský, Petr; Vodička, Roman; Rehák, Ivan; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) is the largest lizard in the world. Surprisingly, it has not yet been cytogenetically examined. Here, we present the very first description of its karyotype and sex chromosomes. The karyotype consists of 2n = 40 chromosomes, 16 macrochromosomes and 24 microchromosomes. Although the chromosome number is constant for all species of monitor lizards (family Varanidae) with the currently reported karyotype, variability in the morphology of the macrochromosomes has been previously documented within the group. We uncovered highly differentiated ZZ/ZW sex microchromosomes with a heterochromatic W chromosome in the Komodo dragon. Sex chromosomes have so far only been described in a few species of varanids including V. varius, the sister species to Komodo dragon, whose W chromosome is notably larger than that of the Komodo dragon. Accumulations of several microsatellite sequences in the W chromosome have recently been detected in 3 species of monitor lizards; however, these accumulations are absent from the W chromosome of the Komodo dragon. In conclusion, although varanids are rather conservative in karyotypes, their W chromosomes exhibit substantial variability at the sequence level, adding further evidence that degenerated sex chromosomes may represent the most dynamic genome part. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Comparative Chromosome Map and Heterochromatin Features of the Gray Whale Karyotype (Cetacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Proskuryakova, Anastasia A; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Lemskaya, Natalia A; Perelman, Polina L; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Cetacean karyotypes possess exceptionally stable diploid numbers and highly conserved chromosomes. To date, only toothed whales (Odontoceti) have been analyzed by comparative chromosome painting. Here, we studied the karyotype of a representative of baleen whales, the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus, Mysticeti), by Zoo-FISH with dromedary camel and human chromosome-specific probes. We confirmed a high degree of karyotype conservation and found an identical order of syntenic segments in both branches of cetaceans. Yet, whale chromosomes harbor variable heterochromatic regions constituting up to a third of the genome due to the presence of several types of repeats. To investigate the cause of this variability, several classes of repeated DNA sequences were mapped onto chromosomes of whale species from both Mysticeti and Odontoceti. We uncovered extensive intrapopulation variability in the size of heterochromatic blocks present in homologous chromosomes among 3 individuals of the gray whale by 2-step differential chromosome staining. We show that some of the heteromorphisms observed in the gray whale karyotype are due to distinct amplification of a complex of common cetacean repeat and heavy satellite repeat on homologous autosomes. Furthermore, we demonstrate localization of the telomeric repeat in the heterochromatin of both gray and pilot whale (Globicephala melas, Odontoceti). Heterochromatic blocks in the pilot whale represent a composite of telomeric and common repeats, while heavy satellite repeat is lacking in the toothed whale consistent with previous studies. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Karyotype variation is indicative of subgenomic and ecotypic differentiation in switchgrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cytogenetic study was conducted on a dihaploid individual (2n'='2X'='18) of switchgrass to establish a chromosome karyotype. Size differences, condensation patterns, and arm-length ratios were used as identifying features and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) assigned 5S and 45S rDNA loci...

  18. Karyotype of Persian Chub, Petroleuciscus persidis (Coad, 1981) (Actinopterygii: Cyprinidae) from Southern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    ESMAEILI, H. R.; PIRAVAR, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The diploid chromosome number of Persian chub, Petroleuciscus persidis (Coad, 1981), was 2n = 50, comprising 29 metacentric, 18 submetacentric, and 3 subtelocentric chromosomes and the number of arms was 97. A detailed karyotype of this endemic cyprinid fish of southern Iran was established for the first time in this study.

  19. Double trisomy with 48, XXX+ 21 karyotype in a Down's syndrome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 87; Issue 3. Double trisomy with 48, XXX+21 karyotype in a Down's syndrome child from Jammu and Kashmir, India. Wahied Khawar Balwan Parvinder Kumar T. R. Raina Subash Gupta. Research Note Volume 87 Issue 3 December 2008 pp 257-259 ...

  20. Pregnancy outcome and nuchal translucency measurements in fetuses with a normal karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pajkrt, E.; Mol, B. W.; Bleker, O. P.; Bilardo, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between nuchal translucency thickness and pregnancy and fetal outcome in fetuses with a normal karyotype and without structural malformations. Fetal nuchal translucency measurements were performed in 2088 chromosomally and structurally normal

  1. Karyotype Analysis in Wild Diploid, Tetraploid, and Hexaploid Strawberries, Fragaria (Rosaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Strawberry, genus Fragaria (Rosaceae) has a basic chromosome count of x = 7, and is comprised of 20 wild species having an euploid series from diploid (2n = 2x = 14) through decaploid (2n = 10x = 70). Few karyotypes of species in this genus have been reported. The objective of this research was ...

  2. Page 1 Ife.Journal of Sciencevol. 9, no.2(2007) 161 KARYOTYPE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were collected from the wet forest, dry forest and derived savanna areas of Nigeria to determine their karyotype. Each of the species has a chromosome number of n = 7 (2n = 14). A pair of satellited chromosomes was observed in the genome of Greenwayodendron suaveolens and Cleistopholis patens. The centromeric ...

  3. Synchrony of oculocutaneous albinism, the Prader-Willi syndrome, and a normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, C E; Beighton, P H

    1989-01-01

    A Chinese girl with oculocutaneous albinism has the Prader-Willi syndrome and a normal karyotype. This association emphasises the importance of further molecular study of the 15(q12) region of the genome in the search for the locus of an albinism gene. Images PMID:2732995

  4. Karyotype differentiation of four Cestrum species (Solanaceae based on the physical mapping of repetitive DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéferson Nunes Fregonezi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the karyotypes of four Brazilian Cestrum species (C. amictum, C. intermedium, C. sendtnerianum and C. strigilatum using conventional Feulgen staining, C-Giemsa and C-CMA3/DAPI banding, induction of cold-sensitive regions (CSRs and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with rDNA probes. We found that the karyotypes of all four species was 2n = 2x = 16, with, except for the eighth acrocentric pair, a predominance of meta- and submetacentric chromosomes and various heterochromatin classes. Heterochromatic types previously unreported in Cestrum as neutral C-CMA3(0/DAPI0 bands, CMA3+ bands not associated with NORs, and C-Giemsa/CSR/DAPI- bands were found. The heterochromatic blocks varied in size, number, position and composition. The 45S rDNA probe preferentially located in the terminal and subterminal regions of some chromosomes, while 5S rDNA appeared close to the centromere of the long arm of pair 8. These results suggest that karyotype differentiation can occur mainly due to changes in repetitive DNA, with little modification in the general composition of the conventionally stained karyotype.

  5. [Analysis of the karyotype abnormalities and its prognostic in 298 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuefen; Wei, Juying; Wang, Jinghan; Ren, Yanling; Zhou, Xinping; Mei, Chen; Ye, Li; Xie, Lili; Hu, Chao; Jin, Jie; Tong, Hongyan

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between cytogenetic markers with World Health Organization (WHO) classification, disease progress and prognosis in cases with primary myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). 298 patients with de novo MDS from the first affiliated hospital of medical school, Zhejiang University were enrolled in the retrospective analysis of WHO classification, karyotype, and prognosis. Follow-up study was also conducted. The WHO classifications at first diagnosis were as follows: refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD), 18 cases; refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS), 8 cases; refractory cytopenia with multiline dysplasia (RCMD), 104 cases; refractory anemia with excess blasts-1, 76 cases; refractory anemia with excess blasts-2, 85 cases; MDS unclassified (MDS-U), 5 cases involved; and single del (5q), 2 cases. 39.6% of MDS patients carried karyotypic abnormalities. Among them, the frequency of numerical abnormalities, structural abnormalities and the existence of composite abnormalities were 45, 31, and 42, respectively. The composite abnormalities were unbalanced translocations and complex chromosomal abnormalities. The incidence of both karyotypic abnormalities and complex chromosomal abnormalities in RAEB group was higher than that in non-RAEB group (Pkaryotypic abnormalities (Pkaryotypic abnormalities, had worse prognosis than those with normal chromosomes. Karyotype was identified with an independent risk factor in MDS patients. Therefore, the information on cytogenetic analysis was critical for diagnosis, prognosis and individual treatment. MDS patients presenting+8 chromosome, an intermediate risk factor, were associated with a poorer outcome compared to cases with normal chromosomes in RAEB group.

  6. Karyotypes of four species of Xenodontini snakes (Serpentes: Dipsadidae) and implications for taxonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcione, C.; Hernando, A.; Barrasso, D.A.; Pietro, di D.

    2016-01-01

    The karyotypes of four South American Xenodontini snake species, Lygophis dilepis, L. meridionalis, L. flavifrenatus and L. anomalus, are here described for the first time. We studied specimens from northeastern Argentina using conventional and silver (Ag-NOR) staining. While the typical ophidian

  7. Karyotype of asparagus by physical mapping of 45S and 5S rDNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is an econom- ically important plant with 2n = 2x = 20 chromosomes and a haploid genome size of 1323 Mb (Bennett and Leitch. 2003). The karyotype of asparagus consists of five long. (L), one medium (M) and four small (S) chromosomes. (Löptien 1976). Plants of this ...

  8. The Evolution of Genome Structure by Natural and Sexual Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Progress on understanding how genome structure evolves is accelerating with the arrival of new genomic, comparative, and theoretical approaches. This article reviews progress in understanding how chromosome inversions and sex chromosomes evolve, and how their evolution affects species' ecology. Analyses of clines in inversion frequencies in flies and mosquitoes imply strong local adaptation, and roles for both over- and under dominant selection. Those results are consistent with the hypothesis that inversions become established when they capture locally adapted alleles. Inversions can carry alleles that are beneficial to closely related species, causing them to introgress following hybridization. Models show that this "adaptive cassette" scenario can trigger large range expansions, as recently happened in malaria mosquitoes. Sex chromosomes are the most rapidly evolving genome regions of some taxa. Sexually antagonistic selection may be the key force driving transitions of sex determination between different pairs of chromosomes and between XY and ZW systems. Fusions between sex-chromosomes and autosomes most often involve the Y chromosome, a pattern that can be explained if fusions are mildly deleterious and fix by drift. Sexually antagonistic selection is one of several hypotheses to explain the recent discovery that the sex determination system has strong effects on the adult sex ratios of tetrapods. The emerging view of how genome structure evolves invokes a much richer constellation of forces than was envisioned during the Golden Age of research on Drosophila karyotypes. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. [Perinatal and pediatric follow up of children with increased nuchal translucency and normal karyotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Lívia Adriano; Silva, Sônia Valadares Lemos; de Faria, Roberto Buenfil; Lippi, Umberto Gazi; Lopes, Reginaldo Guedes Coelho

    2013-06-01

    To analyze the perinatal and pediatric outcome of fetuses that showed nuchal translucency (NT) above the 95th percentile (P95) and a normal karyotype in order to obtain data allowing better maternal prenatal counseling. fetuses from a tertiary obstetric service with an NT above P95 and a normal karyotype were analyzed between 2005 and 2011. We analyzed gestational ultrasound follow-up, fetal and postnatal echocardiography (ECHO), weight, length and Apgar score at birth, and neuropsychomotor development by the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) up to July 2012. During this period, there were 116 cases of nuchal translucency above the 95th percentile, and the fetal karyotype was determined in 79 of them (68%). Forty-three analyses were normal (54.4%) and 36 were altered (45.6%). Among the fetuses with a normal karyotype, one was miscarried at 15 weeks of gestation with Cantrel pentalogy and one died at 24 weeks with several structural abnormalities. There was one neonatal death of unknown cause and two cases of intraventricular communication (IVC) detected by fetal ECHO. Postnatal echocardiography revealed the persistence of IVC in one case and one case of atrial septal defect (ASD) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Of the 40 surviving children, only 1 showed delayed speech development and another presented autism. The remaining cases resulted in normal neurodevelopment. During the monitoring of fetuses with increased NT and a normal karyotype, parents can be best advised that when a 2nd trimester morphological-echocardiography ultrasound study is normal, the probability of the child being born alive and well is high (93.5%).

  10. Karyotypic similarities between two species of Rhamphichthys (Rhamphichthyidae, Gymnotiformes) from the Amazon basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Patrícia Corrêa; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Silva, Danillo dos Santos; Milhomem, Susana Suely Rodrigues; Cardoso, Adauto Lima; de Oliveira, Jonas Alves; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The family Rhamphichthyidae includes three genera: Rhamphichthys Müller et Troschel, 1846, Gymnorhamphichthys M. M. Ellis, 1912 and Iracema Triques, 1996. From this family, only the species Rhamphichthys hanni Meinken, 1937 has had its karyotype described. Here, we describe the karyotypes of two additional Rhamphichthys species: Rhamphichthys marmoratus Castelnau, 1855 from the Reserva de Desenvolvimento Sustentável Mamirauá, Amazonas state and Rhamphichthys prope rostratus Linnaeus, 1766 from Pará state, both in Brazil. Our karyotypic analyses demonstrated that the diploid number is conserved for the genus (2n = 50), but the karyotypic formulas (KFs) differed between Rhamphichthys marmoratus (44m/sm+6a) and Rhamphichthys prope rostratus (42m/sm+8a). In both species, the constitutive heterochromatin (CH) was located in the centromeric region of most chromosomes. Large heterochromatic blocks were found on the long arms of pairs 4 and 14 in Rhamphichthys marmoratus and on chromosomes 3, 4 and 19 in Rhamphichthys prope rostratus, which also has a heteromorphism in chromosome pair 1. The CH was DAPI positive, indicating that it is rich in AT base pairs. The Nucleolus Organizer Region (NOR) showed staining at a single location in both species: the long arm of pair 1 in Rhamphichthys marmoratus and the long arm of pair 12 in Rhamphichthys prope rostratus, where it showed a size heteromorphism. CMA3 staining coincided with that of Ag-NOR, indicating that the ribosomal genes contain interspaced GC-rich sequences. FISH with an 18S rDNA probe confirmed that there is only one NOR site in each species. These results can be used as potential cytogenetic markers for fish populations, and comparative analysis of the karyotypes of Hypopygus Hoedman, 1962, Rhamphichthys and Steatogenys Boulenger, 1898 suggests that the first two genera diverged later that the third. PMID:24455102

  11. Karyotype analysis of mithun (Bos frontalis) and mithun bull x Brahman cow hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, K-X; He, Z-X; Nie, W-H; Zhang, J-C; Jin, X-D; Yang, G-R; Yuan, X-P; Huang, B-Z; Zhang, Y-P; Zan, L-S

    2012-01-19

    We examined the cytogenetics of mithun (Bos frontalis), a domesticated version of the Asian gaur, and hybrids (F(1) generation) produced by artificial insemination of Brahman cows (Bos indicus) with mithun semen. Reproductive potential was also examined in the F(1) generation and a backcrossed heifer for utilization of heterosis. Metaphase chromosome spreads were examined by conventional staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization hybridized with the entire chromosome 1 of mithun as a specific probe. Chromosome 1 of mithun was found to be equivalent to Bos taurus chromosomes 2 and 28. The karyotype of the female mithun (N = 4) comprised 58 chromosomes, including 54 acrocentric and four large submetacentric chromosomes, without the four acrocentric chromosomes found in the domesticated species B. indicus. However, one of the four female mithuns with a normal mithun phenotype had an abnormal karyotype (2n = 59), indicating introgression from B. taurus or B. indicus. The F(1) karyotypes (N = 6, 3♂3♀) of the mithun bull × Brahman cow cross had 2n = 59, intermediate between their parents; they were consistent heterozygous carriers with a centric fusion involving rob(2;28), as expected. Two pronounced red signals were seen in the mithun karyotypes, three red signals in the mithun × Brahman hybrids, and four red signals in the Brahman cattle, in good agreement with centric fusion of bovine rob(2;28). The female backcross hybrid (N = 1) with 2n = 59 had a similar chromosome configuration to the F(1) karyotypes and had rob(2;28). Such female backcross hybrids normally reproduce; however, the F(1) bulls (N = 3) had not yet generated normal sperm at 24 months.

  12. Pt-Enhanced Mesoporous Ti3+/TiO2 with Rapid Bulk to Surface Electron Transfer for Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Zichao; Wang, Wenchao; Li, Guisheng; Tian, Fenghui; Schanze, Kirk S; Li, Hexing

    2017-05-24

    Pt-doped mesoporous Ti3+ self-doped TiO2 (Pt-Ti3+/TiO2) is in situ synthesized via an ionothermal route, by treating metallic Ti in an ionic liquid containing LiOAc, HOAc, and a H2PtCl6 aqueous solution under mild ionothermal conditions. Such Ti3+-enriched environment, as well as oxygen vacancies, is proven to be effective for allowing the in situ reduction of Pt4+ ions uniformly located in the framework of the TiO2 bulk. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of Pt-Ti3+/TiO2 is significantly higher than that of the photoreduced Pt loaded on the original TiO2 and commercial P25. Such greatly enhanced activity is due to the various valence states of Pt (Ptn+, n = 0, 2, or 3), forming Pt-O bonds embedded in the framework of TiO2 and ultrafine Pt metal nanoparticles on the surface of TiO2. Such Ptn+-O bonds could act as the bridges for facilitating the photogenerated electron transfer from the bulk to the surface of TiO2 with a higher electron carrier density (3.11 × 1020 cm-3), about 2.5 times that (1.25 × 1020 cm-3) of the photoreduced Pt-Ti3+/TiO2 sample. Thus, more photogenerated electrons could reach the Pt metal for reducing protons to H2.

  13. Positive selection drives rapid evolution of certain amino acid residues in an evolutionarily highly conserved interferon-inducible antiviral protein of fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Abinash

    2013-01-01

    Viperin, an evolutionarily highly conserved interferon-inducible multifunctional protein, has previously been reported to exhibit antiviral activity against a wide range of DNA and RNA viruses. Utilizing the complete nucleotide coding sequence data of fish viperin antiviral genes, and employing the maximum likelihood-based codon substitution models, the present study reports the pervasive role of positive selection in the evolution of viperin antiviral protein in fishes. The overall rate of nonsynonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) substitutions (dN/dS) for the three functional domains of viperin (N-terminal, central domain and C-terminal) were 1.1, 0.12, and 0.24, respectively. Codon-by-codon substitution analyses have revealed that while most of the positively selected sites were located at the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix domain, few amino acid residues at the C-terminal domain were under positive selection. However, none of the sites in the central domain were under positive selection. These results indicate that, although viperin is evolutionarily highly conserved, the three functional domains experienced differential selection pressures. Taken together with the results of previous studies, the present study suggests that the persistent antagonistic nature of surrounding infectious viral pathogens might be the likely cause for such adaptive evolutionary changes of certain amino acids in fish viperin antiviral protein.

  14. [Application of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification for rapid detection of aneuploidies and structural chromosomal abnormalities in prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Hu, Ping; Luo, Chunyu; Ji, Qiuqing; Zhou, Jing; Liu, An; Ma, Dingyuan; Xu, Zhengfeng

    2014-02-01

    To explore the value of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for rapid detection of aneuploidies and structural chromosomal abnormalities during prenatal diagnosis. Two hundred and eight six amniotic fluid samples were analyzed with both MLPA and conventional karyotyping. Structural abnormalities were verified with array comparative genomic hybridization. Ten cases of trisomy 21, 2 cases of trisomy 18, 1 case of trisomy 13, 1 case of mosaic trisomy 21, 1 case of 45,X, 1 case of large deletion of Xp, 1 case of trisomy 18p and 1 case of large deletion of 18p and 18q were identified. The same results were derived by both MLPA and conventional karyotyping. Structural abnormalities were verified by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) with 100% accuracy. In addition to aneuploidies, MLPA can rapidly identify large deletions and duplications of chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X and Y. MLPA is supplementary to conventional karyotyping for identification of such chromosomal abnormalities prenatal diagnosis.

  15. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  16. The relationship between clinical feature, complex immunophenotype, chromosome karyotype, and outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bingjie; Zhou, Lanlan; Jiang, Xuejie; Li, Xiaodong; Zhong, Qingxiu; Wang, Zhixiang; Yi, Zhengshan; Zheng, Zhongxin; Yin, Changxin; Cao, Rui; Liao, Libin; Meng, Fanyi

    2015-01-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is a complex entity expressing both lymphoid and myeloid immunophenotyping. In the present study, 47 MPAL, 60 lymphoid antigen-positive acute myeloid leukemia (Ly(+)AML), and 90 acute myeloid leukemia with common myeloid immunophenotype (Ly(-)AML) patients were investigated. We found that, in MPAL patients, there were high proportions of blast cells in bone marrow and incidence of hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and Philadelphia chromosome. The overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in MPAL patients were significantly shorter than those in Ly(+)AML and Ly(-)AML. With regard to the patients with normal karyotype only, the OS and RFS of MPAL were significantly lower than those of the Ly(+)AML and Ly(-)AML; but there were no significant differences in OS and RFS among the patients with complex karyotype. The OS rates of 3 groups with complex karyotype were lower than those of patients with normal karyotype. In Cox multivariate analysis, complex karyotype was an independent pejorative factor for both OS and RFS. Therefore, MPAL is confirmed to be a poor-risk disease while Ly(+)AML does not impact prognosis. Complex karyotype is an unfavorable prognosis factor in AML patients with different immunophenotype. Mixed immunophenotype and complex karyotype increase the adverse risk when they coexist.

  17. Molecular analysis of miscarriage products using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA): alternative to conventional karyotype analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Won; Lyu, Sang Woo; Sung, Se Ra; Sung, Sae Ra; Park, Ji Eun; Cha, Dong Hyun; Yoon, Tae Ki; Ko, Jung Jae; Shim, Sung Han

    2015-02-01

    The present study aims to evaluate whether multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique with subtelomeric probes is to be an alternative method of routine G-banding chromosome analysis from pregnancy loss. A review of 5 years (from 2005 to 2009) of karyotype for products of conception (POCs) was carried out. From June 2010 to June 2012, MLPA was performed in parallel with karyotype analysis on 347 miscarriages. Karyotyped miscarriages served as controls in this blinded study. Abnormal results were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. A review of 5 years of karyotype results for POCs indicated that 11.46 % of cases failed to karyotyping. In the study periods, MLPA results were successfully obtained from all cases including 51 (14.7 %) culture failed cases, chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 27 (52.9 %) of cases which failed to grow or could not be cultivated. It took 3 weeks by conventional karyotyping, but it required at least 24 h and at most a week by MLPA from tissue sampling to final reporting. 47 cases showed discordant results between karyotyping and MLPA because of maternal cell contamination, polyploidy, mosaicism, or balanced translocation. MLPA technique is relatively low cost, less labor intensive and reduces waiting time with high accuracy compared with conventional cytogenetic analysis. Therefore, MLPA can be the first approach for chromosome analysis from pregnancy loss.

  18. Added value of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA) over karyotyping in Early Pregnancy Loss - a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauta, Montse; Grande, Maribel; Rodriguez-Revenga, Laia; Kolomietz, Elena; Borrell, Antoni

    2017-10-21

    To perform a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis to estimate the added value of chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) over karyotyping in early pregnancy loss. This was a systematic review conducted in accordance with PRISMA criteria. All articles identified in PubMed, Ovid Medline and Web of Science, from January 2000 to April 2017 describing copy number variants (CNVs) in early pregnancy losses (up to 20 weeks) were included. Risk differences were pooled to estimate the CMA incremental yield over karyotyping overall, and after stratification. In addition, test success rate, defined as the proportion of informative results, was compared in series in which CMA and karyotyping were performed concurrently. Twenty-three studies with full data available met the inclusion criteria for analysis, reporting 5520 pregnancy losses up to 20 weeks. In series in which CMA and karyotyping was performed concurrently, CMA showed a significant improvement in success rate providing informative results in 95% (95%CI: 94%-96%) of cases compared to karyotyping with only 67% of cases with informative results (95%CI: 64%-70%) Combined data from reviewed studies revealed a 2% (95%CI: 1%-2%) incremental yield of pathogenic CNV by CMA over karyotyping. The most common pathogenic CNVs reported were 22q11.21 and 1p36.33 deletion. The CMA use provides a significant increase in test success rate and incremental diagnostic yield in early pregnancy losses, as compared to conventional karyotyping. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid tectonic and paleogeographic evolution associated with the development of the Chucal anticline and the Chucal-Lauca Basin in the Altiplano of Arica, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Reynaldo; Chávez, Alvaro N.; Elgueta, Sara; Hérail, Gérard; Flynn, John J.; Croft, Darin A.; Wyss, André R.; Riquelme, Rodrigo; García, Marcelo

    2005-05-01

    The east-vergent Chucal thrust system, on the east side of the Chapiquiña-Belén ridge in the Western Cordillera, was continuously or almost continuously active for ˜18 m.y. (2.7 Ma). Contractional activity deformed late Oligocene tuffaceous, fluvial, or distal alluvial deposits of the uppermost Lupica Formation; fluvial and lacustrine deposits of the Miocene Chucal Formation; tuffaceous and coarse fluvial deposits of the Quebrada Macusa Formation; and the lower part of the westernmost, latest Miocene?—Pliocene, essentially lacustrine Lauca Formation. It controlled the paleogeographic and paleoenvironmental conditions in which these units were deposited. More humid conditions on the east side of the Chapiquiña-Belén ridge favored the development of an abundant mammal fauna and flora. The deformation is characterized by the Jaropilla thrust fault and the Chucal anticline, which is east of the fault. Deformation on the Chucal anticline began before the deposition of the Chucal Formation and was controlled by a blind thrust fault. The west flank has a nearly constant dip (45-50°) to the west and nearly continuous stratigraphic units, whereas on the east flank, the dip angle is variable, diminishing away from the axis, and the stratigraphic units are discontinuous. The anticline growth on this flank caused the development of three observable progressive unconformities. Deformation was particularly rapid during the deposition of the ˜600 m thick Chucal Formation (between the 21.7±0.8 Ma old uppermost Lupica Formation and the 17.5±0.4 Ma old base of the Quebrada Macusa Formation, a 4 m.y. period). The deformation rate decreased during the deposition of both (1) the ˜200 m thick Quebrada Macusa Formation (between the 17.5±0.4 Ma age of its basal deposits and the ˜11 Ma age of its uppermost levels, a 7 m.y. period) and (2) the lower Lauca Formation (between the ˜11 Ma age of the upper Quebrada Macusa Formation and the 2.3±0.7 Ma old Lauca ignimbrite, which

  20. Mass extinction, gradual cooling, or rapid radiation? Reconstructing the spatiotemporal evolution of the ancient angiosperm genus Hedyosmum (Chloranthaceae) using empirical and simulated approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Alexandre; Sanmartín, Isabel

    2011-10-01

    Chloranthaceae is a small family of flowering plants (65 species) with an extensive fossil record extending back to the Early Cretaceous. Within Chloranthaceae, Hedyosmum is remarkable because of its disjunct distribution--1 species in the Paleotropics and 44 confined to the Neotropics--and a long "temporal gap" between its stem age (Early Cretaceous) and the beginning of the extant radiation (late Cenozoic). Is this gap real, reflecting low diversification and a recent radiation, or the signature of extinction? Here we use paleontological data, relaxed-clock molecular dating, diversification analyses, and parametric ancestral area reconstruction to investigate the timing, tempo, and mode of diversification in Hedyosmum. Our results, based on analyses of plastid and nuclear sequences for 40 species, suggest that the ancestor of Chloranthaceae and the Hedyosmum stem lineages were widespread in the Holarctic in the Late Cretaceous. High extinction rates, possibly associated with Cenozoic climatic fluctuations, may have been responsible for the low extant diversity of the family. Crown group Hedyosmum originated c. 36-43 Ma and colonized South America from the north during the Early-Middle Miocene (c. 20 Ma). This coincided with an increase in diversification rates, probably triggered by the uplift of the Northern Andes from the Mid-Miocene onward. This study illustrates the advantages of combining paleontological, phylogenetic, and biogeographic data to reconstruct the spatiotemporal evolution of an ancient lineage, for which the extant diversity is only a remnant of past radiations. It also shows the difficulties of inferring patterns of lineage diversification when incomplete taxon sampling is combined with high extinction rates.

  1. New recombinant HLA-B alleles in a tribe of South American Amerindians indicate rapid evolution of MHC class I loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, D I; McAdam, S N; Liu, X; Strang, C R; Milford, E L; Levine, C G; Garber, T L; Dogon, A L; Lord, C I; Ghim, S H

    1992-05-28

    Evidence suggests that the New World was colonized only 11,000-40,000 years ago by Palaeo-Indians. The descendants of these Palaeo-Indians therefore provide a unique opportunity to study the effects of selection on major histocompatibility complex class I genes over a short period. Here we analyse the class I alleles of the Waorani of South America and the Zuni of North America. Four of the Waorani HLA-B alleles were new functional variants which could be accounted for by intralocus recombination. In contrast, all of the Zuni HLA-A and -B molecules were present in caucasians and orientals. This suggests that the new Waorani HLA-B variants arose in South America. The description of four new HLA-B alleles in the Waorani and another five new HLA-B alleles from two other tribes of South American Amerindians indicates that the HLA-B locus can evolve rapidly in isolated populations. These studies underline the importance of gathering genetic data on endangered native human populations.

  2. [The species and karyotype composition of malaria mosquito larvae in different water reservoirs of the city of Moscow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanygina, E Iu; Gordeev, M I; Moskaev, A V; Ganushkina, L A

    2014-01-01

    The species and karyotype composition of malaria mosquito larvae was investigated in different water reservoirs of the city of Moscow. Cytogenetic analysis identified 2 malaria mosquito species: An. maculipennis Mg and An. messeae Fall. An. messeae was predominant in all the biotopes studied. The proportion of An. maculipennis varied from 0 to 23.8% and averaged 6.27%. An. messeae larvae were found to have chromosomal polymorphism. Individual local An. messeae populations having a definite, historically established, time and space resistant karyotype structure were shown to form in Moscow. The resistance of the karyotype structure of the populations was provided by reversible fluctuations in the rate of chromosomal inversions.

  3. Comparison of the karyotypes ofPsathyrostachys juncea andP. huashanica (Poaceae) studied by banding techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib; Bothmer, R. von

    1986-01-01

    The karyotypes of P. juncea (Elymus junceus) and P. huashanica (both outbreeders) were investigated by Feulgen-staining and by C-, N-, and Ag-banding, based on a single plant in each case. Both species have 2n = 2x = 14 and large chromosomes, possibly a generic character. The karyotype of P. juncea....... The patterns of both taxa are polymorphic, supporting that both taxa are outbreeders. The karyotypic characters suggest that P. juncea is more closely related to P. fragilis than either is to P. huashanica. N-banding stains weakly. Silver nitrate staining demonstrates that nucleolus organizers of both species...

  4. Giemsa C-banded karyotypes of Hordeum secalinum, H. capense and their interspecific hybrids with H. vulgare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib; Bothmer, R. von; Jacobsen, N.

    1986-01-01

    The European H. secalinum (2n = 4x = 48) and the South African H. capense (2n = 4x = 28) had similar karyotypes with ten pairs of metacentrics, three of submetacentrics, and one of SAT-chromosomes. The C-banded karyotypes of H. secalinum from northern Europe were characterized by banding patterns...... reproductive system. No banding pattern polymorphism was present within plants of H. secalinum from Spain and H. capense, suggesting self-pollination. In both species banding pattern polymorphism was prevalent among plants. Together with other evidence the fairly similar basic C-banded karyotypes of the two...

  5. RAPID automated patient selection for reperfusion therapy: a pooled analysis of the Echoplanar Imaging Thrombolytic Evaluation Trial (EPITHET) and the Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution (DEFUSE) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansberg, Maarten G; Lee, Jun; Christensen, Soren; Straka, Matus; De Silva, Deidre A; Mlynash, Michael; Campbell, Bruce C; Bammer, Roland; Olivot, Jean-Marc; Desmond, Patricia; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Albers, Gregory W

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if automated MRI analysis software (RAPID) can be used to identify patients with stroke in whom reperfusion is associated with an increased chance of good outcome. Baseline diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MRI scans from the Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution study (DEFUSE; n=74) and the Echoplanar Imaging Thrombolytic Evaluation Trial (EPITHET; n=100) were reprocessed with RAPID. Based on RAPID-generated diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging lesion volumes, patients were categorized according to 3 prespecified MRI profiles that were hypothesized to predict benefit (Target Mismatch), harm (Malignant), and no effect (No Mismatch) from reperfusion. Favorable clinical response was defined as a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 0 to 1 or a ≥ 8-point improvement on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at Day 90. In Target Mismatch patients, reperfusion was strongly associated with a favorable clinical response (OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 2.1 to 15.3) and attenuation of infarct growth (10 ± 23 mL with reperfusion versus 40 ± 44 mL without reperfusion; P<0.001). In Malignant profile patients, reperfusion was not associated with a favorable clinical response (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.1 to 5.8) or attenuation of infarct growth (85 ± 74 mL with reperfusion versus 95 ± 79 mL without reperfusion; P=0.7). Reperfusion was also not associated with a favorable clinical response (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.1 to 9.4) or attenuation of lesion growth (10 ± 15 mL with reperfusion versus 17 ± 30 mL without reperfusion; P=0.9) in No Mismatch patients. MRI profiles that are associated with a differential response to reperfusion can be identified with RAPID. This supports the use of automated image analysis software such as RAPID for patient selection in acute stroke trials.

  6. Phylogenetics and evolution of Su(var)3-9 SET genes in land plants: rapid diversification in structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinyu; Ma, Hong; Chen, Zhiduan

    2011-03-09

    Plants contain numerous Su(var)3-9 homologues (SUVH) and related (SUVR) genes, some of which await functional characterization. Although there have been studies on the evolution of plant Su(var)3-9 SET genes, a systematic evolutionary study including major land plant groups has not been reported. Large-scale phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses can help to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms and contribute to improve genome annotation. Putative orthologs of plant Su(var)3-9 SET protein sequences were retrieved from major representatives of land plants. A novel clustering that included most members analyzed, henceforth referred to as core Su(var)3-9 homologues and related (cSUVHR) gene clade, was identified as well as all orthologous groups previously identified. Our analysis showed that plant Su(var)3-9 SET proteins possessed a variety of domain organizations, and can be classified into five types and ten subtypes. Plant Su(var)3-9 SET genes also exhibit a wide range of gene structures among different paralogs within a family, even in the regions encoding conserved PreSET and SET domains. We also found that the majority of SUVH members were intronless and formed three subclades within the SUVH clade. A detailed phylogenetic analysis of the plant Su(var)3-9 SET genes was performed. A novel deep phylogenetic relationship including most plant Su(var)3-9 SET genes was identified. Additional domains such as SAR, ZnF_C2H2 and WIYLD were early integrated into primordial PreSET/SET/PostSET domain organization. At least three classes of gene structures had been formed before the divergence of Physcomitrella patens (moss) from other land plants. One or multiple retroposition events might have occurred among SUVH genes with the donor genes leading to the V-2 orthologous group. The structural differences among evolutionary groups of plant Su(var)3-9 SET genes with different functions were described, contributing to the design of further experimental studies.

  7. Phylogenetics and evolution of Su(var3-9 SET genes in land plants: rapid diversification in structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Hong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants contain numerous Su(var3-9 homologues (SUVH and related (SUVR genes, some of which await functional characterization. Although there have been studies on the evolution of plant Su(var3-9 SET genes, a systematic evolutionary study including major land plant groups has not been reported. Large-scale phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses can help to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms and contribute to improve genome annotation. Results Putative orthologs of plant Su(var3-9 SET protein sequences were retrieved from major representatives of land plants. A novel clustering that included most members analyzed, henceforth referred to as core Su(var3-9 homologues and related (cSUVHR gene clade, was identified as well as all orthologous groups previously identified. Our analysis showed that plant Su(var3-9 SET proteins possessed a variety of domain organizations, and can be classified into five types and ten subtypes. Plant Su(var3-9 SET genes also exhibit a wide range of gene structures among different paralogs within a family, even in the regions encoding conserved PreSET and SET domains. We also found that the majority of SUVH members were intronless and formed three subclades within the SUVH clade. Conclusions A detailed phylogenetic analysis of the plant Su(var3-9 SET genes was performed. A novel deep phylogenetic relationship including most plant Su(var3-9 SET genes was identified. Additional domains such as SAR, ZnF_C2H2 and WIYLD were early integrated into primordial PreSET/SET/PostSET domain organization. At least three classes of gene structures had been formed before the divergence of Physcomitrella patens (moss from other land plants. One or multiple retroposition events might have occurred among SUVH genes with the donor genes leading to the V-2 orthologous group. The structural differences among evolutionary groups of plant Su(var3-9 SET genes with different functions were described, contributing to the

  8. Karyotype characterization of in vivo- and in vitro-derived porcine parthenogenetic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Manling; Hou, Dongxia; Han, Xuejie; Jin, Yong; Zhao, Lihua; Nie, Xiaowei; Zhou, Xin; Yun, Ting; Zhao, Yuhang; Huang, Xianghua; Hou, Daorong; Yang, Ning; Wu, Zhaoqiang; Li, Xueling; Li, Rongfeng

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian haploid cell lines provide useful tools for both genetic studies and transgenic animal production. To derive porcine haploid cells, three sets of experiments were conducted. First, genomes of blastomeres from 8-cell to 16-cell porcine parthenogenetically activated (PA) embryos were examined by chromosome spread analysis. An intact haploid genome was maintained by 48.15% of blastomeres. Based on this result, two major approaches for amplifying the haploid cell population were tested. First, embryonic stem-like (ES-like) cells were cultured from PA blastocyst stage embryos, and second, fetal fibroblasts from implanted day 30 PA fetuses were cultured. A total of six ES-like cell lines were derived from PA blastocysts. No chromosome spread with exactly 19 chromosomes (the normal haploid complement) was found. Four cell lines showed a tendency to develop to polyploidy (more than 38 chromosomes). The karyotypes of the fetal fibroblasts showed different abnormalities. Cells with 19-38 chromosomes were the predominant karyotype (59.48-60.91%). The diploid cells were the second most observed karyotype (16.17%-22.73%). Although a low percentage (3.45-8.33%) of cells with 19 chromosomes were detected in 18.52% of the fetus-derived cell lines, these cells were not authentic haploid cells since they exhibited random losses or gains of some chromosomes. The haploid fibroblasts were not efficiently enriched via flow cytometry sorting. On the contrary, the diploid cells were efficiently enriched. The enriched parthenogenetic diploid cells showed normal karyotypes and expressed paternally imprinted genes at extremely low levels. We concluded that only a limited number of authentic haploid cells could be obtained from porcine cleavage-stage parthenogenetic embryos. Unlike mouse, the karyotype of porcine PA embryo-derived haploid cells is not stable, long-term culture of parthenogenetic embryos, either in vivo or in vitro, resulted in abnormal karyotypes. The porcine PA

  9. [Study on karyotypic abnormalities and its prognostic significance in Chinese patients with primary myelodysplastic syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Liu, Xu-Ping; Nie, Ling; Yu, Ming-Hua; Zhang, Yue; Qin, Tie-Jun; Xiao, Zhi-Jian

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the features and prognostic significance of chromosomal karyotype in patients with primary myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Results of chromosomal karyotypes of 351 adult patients with primary MDS were retrospectively analyzed. Two hundred and thirty-seven cases (67.5%) had karyotypic abnormalities. Of them, 99 (41.7%) were numerical, 70 (29.5%) were structural, and 68 (28.8%) were complex abnormalities. In addition, among the 237 patients with chromosomal abnormalities, 130 (54.8%) showed single abnormality, 54 (22.8%) double abnormalities and 53 (22.4%) complex abnormalities (> or = 3 two independent aberrations). Four cases (1.7%) were multiploid. Aneuploidy or of chromosomal arm anomaly were detected all of the 46 chromosomes and the aberrations in frequent order were +8, -20/20q-, -7/7q-, -5/5q-, -18, -11/11q-/, +21, -Y, -21, -10, -16, -22, +9, del(12)(p12). The incidence of -5/5q- (5.1%) was lower in our series than in western countries (8.7% -23.4%) and 5q- syndrome was even less (0.3%). The incidences of +8 (19.1%) and -20/20q- (9.4%) were higher in our series than in western countries (1.2% -7.0%, 2.0% -3.5%, respectively). Chromosome translocations were detected in 31 cases (13.1%), including 12 novel translocations that have not been reported in MDS patients before. In addition, i(17)(q10) was detected in 9 cases (3.8%) of which 6 were simplex abnormality. Chromosomal duplication presented in 7 cases (3.0%) with 4 cases involved chromosome 1. According to IPSS chromosomal prognostic classification, the incidence of poor-risk karyotypes was increased in the advanced WHO subtypes (P chromosomal prognostic classification, the median OS of patients with good, intermediate and poor-risk cytogenetic subgroup were 51 (95% CI 25-77), 35 (95% CI 5-65) and 13 (95% CI 9-17) months, respectively (P = 0.004) and for NN-AN-AA karyotype classification, the median OS of NN, AN and AA were 51 (95% CI 24-78), 36 (95% CI 0.3-71) and 23 (95% CI 10-35) months

  10. Karyotypes of some medium-sized Dytiscidae (Agabinae and Colymbetinae) (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Robert B; Clery, Molly J; Carter, Jodie C; Wenczek, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    An account is given of the karyotypes of 29 species of medium sized Dytiscidae (Coleoptera). Of the 20 species of Agabus Leach, 1817, 18 have karyotypes comprising 21 pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes which are either X0(♂) or XX (♀). These species are Agabus serricornis (Paykull, 1799), Agabus labiatus (Brahm, 1791), Agabus congener (Thunberg, 1794), Agabus lapponicus (Thomson, 1867), Agabus thomsoni (J. Sahlberg, 1871), Agabus confinis (Gyllenhal, 1808), Agabus sturmii (Gyllenhal, 1808), Agabus bipustulatus (Linnaeus, 1767), Agabus nevadensis Håkan Lindberg, 1939, Agabus wollastoni Sharp, 1882, Agabus melanarius Aubé, 1837, Agabus biguttatus (Olivier, 1795), Agabus binotatus Aubé, 1837, Agabus affinis (Paykull, 1798), Agabus unguicularis (Thomson, 1867), Agabus ramblae Millan & Ribera, 2001, Agabus conspersus (Marsham, 1802) and Agabus nebulosus (Forster, 1771). However two species, Agabus infuscatus Aubé, 1838 and Agabus adpressus Aubé, 1837, have developed a neo-XY system, with karyotypes comprising 21 pairs of autosomes and XY sex chromosomes (♂). No chromosomal differences have been detected between typical Agabus bipustulatus and Agabus bipustulatus var. solieri Aubé, 1837, nor have any been found between the three species of the Agabus bipustulatus complex (Agabus bipustulatus, Agabus nevadensis and Agabus wollastoni). The four species of Colymbetes Clairville, 1806, Colymbetes fuscus (Linnaeus, 1758), Colymbetes paykulli Erichson, 1837, Colymbetes piceus Klug, 1834 and Colymbetes striatus (Linnaeus, 1758) have karyotypes comprising 20 pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes which are X0 (♂), XX (♀). Two of the species of Rhantus Dejean, 1833, Rhantus exsoletus (Forster, 1771) and Rhantus suturellus (Harris, 1828) have karyotypes comprising 20 pairs of autosomes and X0/XX sex chromosomes, but the other three species, Rhantus grapii (Gyllenhal, 1808), Rhantus frontalis (Marsham, 1802) and Rhantus suturalis (Macleay, 1825) have 22 pairs of

  11. Karyotypes of some medium-sized Dytiscidae (Agabinae and Colymbetinae (Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Angus

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An account is given of the karyotypes of 29 species of medium sized Dytiscidae (Coleoptera. Of the 20 species of Agabus Leach, 1817, 18 have karyotypes comprising 21 pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes which are either X0(♂ or XX (♀. These species are A. serricornis (Paykull, 1799, A. labiatus (Brahm, 1791, A. congener (Thunberg, 1794, A. lapponicus (Thomson, 1867, A. thomsoni (J. Sahlberg, 1871, A. confinis (Gyllenhal, 1808, A. sturmii (Gyllenhal, 1808, A. bipustulatus (Linnaeus, 1767, A. nevadensis Håkan Lindberg, 1939, A. wollastoni Sharp, 1882, A. melanarius Aubé, 1837, A. biguttatus (Olivier, 1795, A. binotatus Aubé, 1837, A. affinis (Paykull, 1798, A. unguicularis (Thomson, 1867, A. ramblae Millan & Ribera, 2001, A. conspersus (Marsham, 1802 and A. nebulosus (Forster, 1771. However two species, A. infuscatus Aubé, 1838 and A. adpressus Aubé, 1837, have developed a neo-XY system, with karyotypes comprising 21 pairs of autosomes and XY sex chromosomes (♂. No chromosomal differences have been detected between typical A. bipustulatus and A. bipustulatus var. solieri Aubé, 1837, nor have any been found between the three species of the A. bipustulatus complex (A. bipustulatus, A. nevadensis and A. wollastoni. The four species of Colymbetes Clairville, 1806, C. fuscus (Linnaeus, 1758, C. paykulli Erichson, 1837, C. piceus Klug, 1834 and C. striatus (Linnaeus, 1758 have karyotypes comprising 20 pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes which are X0 (♂, XX (♀. Two of the species of Rhantus Dejean, 1833, R. exsoletus (Forster, 1771 and R. suturellus (Harris, 1828 have karyotypes comprising 20 pairs of autosomes and X0/XX sex chromosomes, but the other three species, R. grapii (Gyllenhal, 1808, R. frontalis (Marsham, 1802 and R. suturalis (Macleay, 1825 have 22 pairs of autosomes and X0/XX sex chromosomes. Agabus congener and Rhantus suturellus may have one B-chromosome. Nine of the species have previously published karyotype data but

  12. Karyotype characterization of in vivo- and in vitro-derived porcine parthenogenetic cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available Mammalian haploid cell lines provide useful tools for both genetic studies and transgenic animal production. To derive porcine haploid cells, three sets of experiments were conducted. First, genomes of blastomeres from 8-cell to 16-cell porcine parthenogenetically activated (PA embryos were examined by chromosome spread analysis. An intact haploid genome was maintained by 48.15% of blastomeres. Based on this result, two major approaches for amplifying the haploid cell population were tested. First, embryonic stem-like (ES-like cells were cultured from PA blastocyst stage embryos, and second, fetal fibroblasts from implanted day 30 PA fetuses were cultured. A total of six ES-like cell lines were derived from PA blastocysts. No chromosome spread with exactly 19 chromosomes (the normal haploid complement was found. Four cell lines showed a tendency to develop to polyploidy (more than 38 chromosomes. The karyotypes of the fetal fibroblasts showed different abnormalities. Cells with 19-38 chromosomes were the predominant karyotype (59.48-60.91%. The diploid cells were the second most observed karyotype (16.17%-22.73%. Although a low percentage (3.45-8.33% of cells with 19 chromosomes were detected in 18.52% of the fetus-derived cell lines, these cells were not authentic haploid cells since they exhibited random losses or gains of some chromosomes. The haploid fibroblasts were not efficiently enriched via flow cytometry sorting. On the contrary, the diploid cells were efficiently enriched. The enriched parthenogenetic diploid cells showed normal karyotypes and expressed paternally imprinted genes at extremely low levels. We concluded that only a limited number of authentic haploid cells could be obtained from porcine cleavage-stage parthenogenetic embryos. Unlike mouse, the karyotype of porcine PA embryo-derived haploid cells is not stable, long-term culture of parthenogenetic embryos, either in vivo or in vitro, resulted in abnormal karyotypes. The

  13. The origin and evolution of mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, John S.; Ley, Timothy J.; Link, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher A.; Larson, David E.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wartman, Lukas D.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Liu, Fulu; Xia, Jun; Kandoth, Cyriac; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Dooling, David J.; Wallis, John W.; Chen, Ken; Harris, Christopher C.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle M.; Lu, Charles; Zhang, Qunyuan; Lin, Ling; O’Laughlin, Michelle D.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Delehaunty, Kim D.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Magrini, Vincent J.; McGrath, Sean D.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Hundal, Jasreet; Cook, Lisa L.; Swift, Gary W.; Reed, Jerry P.; Alldredge, Patricia A.; Wylie, Todd N.; Walker, Jason R.; Watson, Mark A.; Heath, Sharon E.; Shannon, William D.; Varghese, Nobish; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Baty, Jack D.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Klco, Jeffery M.; Tomasson, Michael H.; Westervelt, Peter; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; DiPersio, John F.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Most mutations in cancer genomes are thought to be acquired after the initiating event, which may cause genomic instability, driving clonal evolution. However, for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), normal karyotypes are common, and genomic instability is unusual. To better understand clonal evolution in AML, we sequenced the genomes of AML samples with a known initiating event (PML-RARA) vs. normal karyotype AML samples, and the exomes of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from healthy people. Collectively, the data suggest that most of the mutations found in AML genomes are actually random events that occurred in HSPCs before they acquired the initiating mutation; the mutational history of that cell is “captured” as the clone expands. In many cases, only one or two additional, cooperating mutations are needed to generate the malignant founding clone. Cells from the founding clone can acquire additional cooperating mutations, yielding subclones that can contribute to disease progression and/or relapse. PMID:22817890

  14. Pregnancy and delivery outcomes following a pathological second trimester triple test screening result and a normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Adi Y; Weiss, Inbal; Friger, Michael; Hershkovitz, Reli

    2012-12-01

    To investigate whether obstetrical complications are increased in pregnancies with a normal karyotype and an abnormal triple test (TT) (≥1:380 or more) where all analytes were within the normal range. A retrospective cohort study of women who underwent a TT and delivered in a tertiary medical center, was conducted. Patients were divided into a study group (pregnancies with abnormal TT) and a control group (normal TT). In both groups, the analyte concentrations were within the normal range and the karyotype was normal. Demographic and clinical characteristics, antenatal factors, gestational complications and perinatal outcomes were compared between the groups. An abnormal TT result in the presence of normal analytes and a normal karyotype, had no impact on obstetrical complications. A direct association between elevated values of hCG within the normal range (0-2.0 MoM) and pathological TT was noticed (OR = 2.6, p karyotype, had no influence on rate of obstetrical complications.

  15. [Expression of CD25 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Is An Adverse Prognostic Factor Independent of the Chromosome Karyotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Fang; Dong, Li; Wang, Chong; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Qiu-Tang; Wang, Meng; Li, Tao; Xu, Yan; Ma, Jie; Xie, Xin-Sheng; Sun, Ling; Wan, Ding-Ming

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the CD25 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its significance. Clinical data of 168 newly diagnosed AML patients (except APL) were collected. The expression of CD25 in AML patients and its clinical characteristics were retrospectively analyzed. The leukemia cells of 29 out of 168 cases (17.26%) expressed CD25 antigen. Most of CD25 positive AML patients were occurred in patients with unfavourable or normal karyotype, higher WBC and Plt count at diagnosis and higher percentage of blasts in peripheral blood and bone marrow. Compared with CD25(-) AML patients, CD25(+) AML patients had lower CR rate (the CR rate of 1 course of treatment were 49.02% and 16.00%, respectively, P karyotype were not significantly different from that in patients with intermediate karyotype (P karyotype in terms of low complete remission rate and short survival time.

  16. Karyotype Diversity in Doradidae (Siluriformes, Doradoidea) and Presence of the Heteromorphic ZZ/ZW Sex Chromosome System in the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagui, Fábio Hiroshi; Moura, Lucas Ferreira de; Ferreira, Daniela Cristina; Centofante, Liano; Vitorino, Carla de Andrade; Bueno, Vanessa; Margarido, Vladimir Pavan; Venere, Paulo Cesar

    2017-06-01

    Karyotypes and other chromosomal markers as revealed by conventional and molecular cytogenetic protocols in four species of the catfish family Doradidae from the Araguaia-Tocantins river basin, namely Hassar wilderi, Leptodoras cataniae, Tenellus leporhinus and Tenellus trimaculatus were examined. All species had diploid chromosome number 2n = 58 and karyotypes dominated by biarmed chromosomes, simple NOR phenotype, that is, one chromosome pair bearing this site in terminal position, but some differences in karyotypes and distribution of constitutive heterochromatin, position of rDNA sites. Such characteristics appeared species-specific. A ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system was found in Tenellus trimaculatus, resulting likely from the amplification of the heterochromatin, followed by a paracentric inversion. Our results confirmed low karyotype differentiation observed until now among representatives of this endemic catfish family.

  17. [Application of combined chromosome karyotype analysis and multiplex ligation probe amplification technique for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Yu, Dongyi

    2016-12-10

    To assess the value of combined chromosome karyotype analysis and multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) assay for the prenatal diagnosis of fetuses with abnormalities detected by ultrasonography. With informed consent obtained, 72 pregnant women with ultrasound detected fetal structural abnormalities underwent percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling. Routine karyotype analysis and MLPA assay were used to detect potential chromosomal deletions and duplications. Five cases were found with an abnormal karyotype. In addition, the MLPA has detected 2 chromosomal microdeletions and 1 microduplication. Together the two methods have yielded a detection rate of 11.11%. For fetal abnormalities revealed by ultrasonography, combined karyotype analysis and MLPA assay can provide a better option for its efficiency and simplicity.

  18. Unusually stable abnormal karyotype in a highly aggressive melanoma negative for telomerase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irminger-Finger Irmgard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant melanomas are characterized by increased karyotypic complexity, extended aneuploidy and heteroploidy. We report a melanoma metastasis to the peritoneal cavity with an exceptionally stable, abnormal pseudodiploid karyotype as verified by G-Banding, subtelomeric, centromeric and quantitative Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH. Interestingly this tumor had no detectable telomerase activity as indicated by the Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol. Telomeric Flow-FISH and quantitative telomeric FISH on mitotic preparations showed that malignant cells had relatively short telomeres. Microsatellite instability was ruled out by the allelic pattern of two major mononucleotide repeats. Our data suggest that a combination of melanoma specific genomic imbalances were sufficient and enough for this fatal tumor progression, that was not accompanied by genomic instability, telomerase activity, or the engagement of the alternative recombinatorial telomere lengthening pathway.

  19. The First Reported Case of Meckel-Gruber Syndrome Associated With Abnormal Karyotype Mosaic Trisomy 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierna, Zuzana; Janega, Pavol; Grochal, Frantisek; Ferianec, Vladimir; Braxatorisova, Tatiana; Strieskova, Lucia; Malova, Jana; Jungova, Petra; Szemes, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a rare lethal autosomal recessive disorder with typical anomalies including encephalocele, multicystic renal dysplasia, congenital liver fibrosis, and polydactyly. MKS is caused by mutations of genes localized on different chromosomes. Karyotypes of published Meckel-Gruber syndrome cases are without any aberrations. We present a male fetus with meningoencephalocele, multicystic renal dysplasia, congenital liver fibrosis, and other anomalies. Standard cytogenetic examination of cultured fetal skin and muscle fibroblasts showed mosaic trisomy 17. Homozygous deletion in CC2D2A gene was found by Sanger sequencing. This is to our knowledge the first case of genetically confirmed Meckel-Gruber syndrome with incidental cofinding of mosaic trisomy 17. Abnormal karyotype does not exclude diagnosis of MKS with risk of recurrence 25% in next pregnancy. In the case of anomalies typical for Meckel-Gruber syndrome, genetic analysis is indicated.

  20. Germinoma in the basal ganglia with an abnormal karyotype: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, En; Wang, Xiaojuan; Hao, Zhuofang; Chen, Zheng; Lu, Xuefen

    2010-05-01

    Germ cell tumor of basal ganglia with abnormal constitutional karyotype has been rarely reported. A 9-year-old boy presented with precocious puberty and right hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high intensity on T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in the left basal ganglia and ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy predominantly in the basal ganglia and midbrain. Germinoma in the left basal ganglia was confirmed by stereotactic biopsy and immunochemical examination. His constitutional karyotype was 46, XY, t (8; 1