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Sample records for rapid initial decay

  1. Rapidly decaying solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazenave, T. (Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France). Lab. d' Analyse Numerique); Weissler, F.B. (ENS, 94 - Cachan (France). Centre de Mathematiques Paris-7 Univ., 94 - Creteil (France). UFR de Sciences)

    1992-06-01

    We consider global solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation iu{sub t}+{Delta}u={lambda}vertical strokeuvertical stroke{sup {alpha}}u, in R{sup N}, (NLS) where {lambda}{epsilon}R and 0<{alpha}< 4/N-2. In particular, for {alpha}>{alpha}{sub 0}=(2-N+{radical}(N{sup 2}+12N+4))/2N, we show that for every ({phi}{epsilon}H{sup 1}(R{sup N}) such that x{phi}(x){epsilon}L{sup 2}(R{sup N}), the solution of (NLS) with initial value {phi}(x)e{sup i(bvertical} {sup strokexvertical} {sup stroke2/4)} is global and rapidly decaying as t{yields}{infinity} if b is large enough. Furthermore, by applying the pseudo-conformal transformation and studying the resulting nonautonomous nonlinear Schroedinger equation, we obtain both new results and simpler proofs of some known results concerning the scattering theory. In particular, we construct the wave operators for 4/N+2<{alpha}<4/N-2. Also, we establish a low energy scattering theory for the same range of {alpha} and show that, at least for {lambda}<0, the lower bound on {alpha} is optimal. Finally, if {lambda}>0, we prove asymptotic completeness for {alpha}{sub 0}{<=}{alpha}<4/N-2. (orig.).

  2. Searching for Rapid Orbital Decay of WASP-18b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Ashlee N.; Deming, Drake; Hamilton, Douglas [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Delrez, Laetitia [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Barker, Adrian J. [Department of Applied Mathematics, School of Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Gillon, Michael; Jehin, Emmanuel, E-mail: awilkins@astro.umd.edu [Space Sciences, Technologies and Astrophysics Research (STAR) Institute, Université de Liège, allée du 6 Août 19C, B-4000 Lige (Belgium)

    2017-02-20

    The WASP-18 system, with its massive and extremely close-in planet, WASP-18b ( M{sub p} = 10.3 M{sub J}, a = 0.02 au, P = 22.6 hr), is one of the best-known exoplanet laboratories to directly measure Q ′, the modified tidal quality factor and proxy for efficiency of tidal dissipation, of the host star. Previous analysis predicted a rapid orbital decay of the planet toward its host star that should be measurable on the timescale of a few years, if the star is as dissipative as is inferred from the circularization of close-in solar-type binary stars. We have compiled published transit and secondary eclipse timing (as observed by WASP, TRAPPIST, and Spitzer ) with more recent unpublished light curves (as observed by TRAPPIST and Hubble Space Telescope ) with coverage spanning nine years. We find no signature of a rapid decay. We conclude that the absence of rapid orbital decay most likely derives from Q ′ being larger than was inferred from solar-type stars and find that Q ′ ≥ 1 × 10{sup 6}, at 95% confidence; this supports previous work suggesting that F stars, with their convective cores and thin convective envelopes, are significantly less tidally dissipative than solar-type stars, with radiative cores and large convective envelopes.

  3. RapidSim: An application for the fast simulation of heavy-quark hadron decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Needham, M. D.

    2017-05-01

    RapidSim is a lightweight application for the fast simulation of phase space decays of beauty and charm quark hadrons, allowing for quick studies of the properties of signal and background decays in particle physics analyses. Based upon the TGenPhaseSpace class from the ROOT application it uses externally provided fixed-order next-to-leading-logarithm calculations to boost the initial beauty and charm hadrons to the appropriate energy for the production environment of interest. User-defined momentum resolution functions can be used to mimic the effect of imperfect track reconstruction. User-defined efficiency shapes can be applied during generation to reproduce the effects of geometric and kinematic requirements on final state particles as well as the dynamics of the decay. The effect of mis-identification of the final state particles is simple to configure via configuration files, while the framework can easily be extended to include additional particle types. This paper describes the RapidSim framework, features and some example use cases.

  4. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-11-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the O-ion/H-ion abundance ratio. Of unique interest to ring current dynamics are the spatial-temporal decay characteristics of the two injected populations. We observe that He-ions decay more quickly at lower L shells, on the order of ∼0.8 day at L shells of 3-4, and decay more slowly with higher L shell, on the order of ∼1.7 days at L shells of 5-6. Conversely, O-ions decay very rapidly (∼1.5 h) across all L shells. The He-ion decay time are consistent with previously measured and calculated lifetimes associated with charge exchange. The O-ion decay time is much faster than predicted and is attributed to the inclusion of higher-energy (> 500 keV) O-ions in our decay rate estimation. We note that these measurements demonstrate a compelling need for calculation of high-energy O-ion loss rates, which have not been adequately studied in the literature to date. We report initial observations of ring current ionsWe show that He-ion decay rates are consistent with theoryWe show that O-ions with energies greater than 500 keV decay very rapidly.

  5. Rapidity-Rank Structure of $p\\overline{p}$ Pairs in Hadronic $Z^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Azhinenko, I.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borgland, A.W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chabaud, V.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Shlyapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crepe-Renaudin, Sabine; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Gerdyukov, L.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T.L.; Heuser, J.M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Huet, K.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovansky, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, Hansjorg; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kuznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumshtein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Lorstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T.G.M.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Myagkov, A.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjornmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Moraes, D.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Munich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Navas, Sergio; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Royon, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Yu.; Segar, A.M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkachev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Van Dam, Piet; Van den Boeck, W.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zinchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zucchelli, G.C.; Zumerle, G.

    2000-01-01

    The rapidity-rank structure of \\ppb pairs is used to analyze the mechanism of baryon production in hadronic \\zz decay. The relative occurrence of the rapidity-ordered configuration \\pmpb, where $M$ is a meson, and that of \\ppb adjacent pairs is compared. The data are found to be consistent with predictions from a mechanism producing adjacent-rank \\ppb pairs, without requiring `string-ordered' \\pmpb configurations. An upper limit of 15\\% at 90\\% confidence is determined for the \\pmpb contribution.

  6. Universal decay cascade model for dynamic quantum dot initialization

    OpenAIRE

    Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs; Kaestner, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic quantum dots can be formed by time-dependent electrostatic potentials in nanoelectronic devices, such as gate- or surface-acoustic-wave-driven electron pumps. Ability to control the number of captured electrons with high precision is required for applications in fundamental metrology and quantum information processing. In this work we propose and quantify a scheme to initialize quantum dots with a controllable number of electrons. It is based on the stochastic decrease in the electron...

  7. Far field velocity potential induced by a rapidly decaying vorticity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Rupert; Ting, LU

    1990-01-01

    The velocity field induced by a vorticity distribution decaying rapidly in the distance from the origin is investigated. It is shown that the sum of vector potentials for the velocity field can be expressed as a linear combination of Mn values, where Mn denotes the number of linearly independent vector functions of nth order. It is then shown that only the linear combinations 2n + 1 of these Mn vector functions contribute to the far field velocity which is irrotational, and that the corresponding scalar potential is then represented by a linear combination of 2n + 1 spherical harmonics of nth order whose coefficients are linear combinations of nth moments of vorticity.

  8. Higgsplosion: Solving the hierarchy problem via rapid decays of heavy states into multiple Higgs bosons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin V. Khoze

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and discuss two inter-related mechanisms operative in the electroweak sector of the Standard Model at high energies. Higgsplosion, the first mechanism, occurs at some critical energy in the 25 to 103 TeV range, and leads to an exponentially growing decay rate of highly energetic particles into multiple Higgs bosons. We argue that this is a well-controlled non-perturbative phenomenon in the Higgs-sector which involves the final state Higgs multiplicities n in the regime nλ≫1 where λ is the Higgs self-coupling. If this mechanism is realised in nature, the cross-sections for producing ultra-high multiplicities of Higgs bosons are likely to become observable and even dominant in this energy range. At the same time, however, the apparent exponential growth of these cross-sections at even higher energies will be tamed and automatically cut-off by a related Higgspersion mechanism. As a result, and in contrast to previous studies, multi-Higgs production does not violate perturbative unitarity. Building on this approach, we then argue that the effects of Higgsplosion alter quantum corrections from very heavy states to the Higgs boson mass. Above a certain energy, which is much smaller than their masses, these states would rapidly decay into multiple Higgs bosons. The heavy states become unrealised as they decay much faster than they are formed. The loop integrals contributing to the Higgs mass will be cut off not by the masses of the heavy states, but by the characteristic loop momenta where their decay widths become comparable to their masses. Hence, the cut-off scale would be many orders of magnitude lower than the heavy mass scales themselves, thus suppressing their quantum corrections to the Higgs boson mass.

  9. Interference between two resonant transitions with distinct initial and final states connected by radiative decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, A.; Horbatsch, M.; Hessels, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    The resonant line shape from driving a transition between two states, |a 〉 and |b 〉 , can be distorted due to a quantum-mechanical interference effect involving a resonance between two different states, |c 〉 and |d 〉 , if |c 〉 has a decay path to |a 〉 and |d 〉 has a decay path to |b 〉 . This interference can cause a shift of the measured resonance, despite the fact that the two resonances do not have a common initial or final state. As an example, we demonstrate that such a shift affects measurements of the atomic hydrogen 2 S1 /2 -to-2 P1 /2 Lamb-shift transition due to 3 S -to-3 P transitions if the 3 S1 /2 state has some initial population.

  10. Spanwise Spacing Effects on the Initial Structure and Decay of Axial Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, B. J.; Reichert, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    The initial structure and axial decay of an array of streamwise vortices embedded in a turbulent pipe boundary layer is experimentally investigated. The vortices are shed in counter-rotating fashion from an array of equally-spaced symmetric airfoil vortex generators. Vortex structure is quantified in terms of crossplane circulation and peak streamwise vorticity. Flow conditions are subsonic and incompressible. The focus of this study is on the effect of the initial spacing between the parent vortex generators. Arrays with vortex generators spaced at 15 and 30 degrees apart are considered. When the spacing between vortex generators is decreased the circulation and peak vorticity of the shed vortices increases. Analysis indicates this strengthening results from regions of fluid acceleration in the vicinity of the vortex generator array. Decreased spacing between the constituent vortices also produces increased rates of circulation and peak vorticity decay.

  11. Apoptosis Triggers Specific, Rapid, and Global mRNA Decay with 3′ Uridylated Intermediates Degraded by DIS3L2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall P. Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a tightly coordinated cell death program that damages mitochondria, DNA, proteins, and membrane lipids. Little is known about the fate of RNA as cells die. Here, we show that mRNAs, but not noncoding RNAs, are rapidly and globally degraded during apoptosis. mRNA decay is triggered early in apoptosis, preceding membrane lipid scrambling, genomic DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic changes to translation initiation factors. mRNA decay depends on mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and is amplified by caspase activation. 3′ truncated mRNA decay intermediates with nontemplated uridylate-rich tails are generated during apoptosis. These tails are added by the terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTases ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11, and the uridylated transcript intermediates are degraded by the 3′ to 5′ exonuclease DIS3L2. Knockdown of DIS3L2 or the TUTases inhibits apoptotic mRNA decay, translation arrest, and cell death, whereas DIS3L2 overexpression enhances cell death. Our results suggest that global mRNA decay is an overlooked hallmark of apoptosis.

  12. The 9-methyl group of retinal is essential for rapid Meta II decay and phototransduction quenching in red cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, Maureen E; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Ala-Laurila, Petri; Crouch, Rosalie K; Govardovskii, Victor I; Cornwall, M Carter

    2009-08-01

    Cone photoreceptors of the vertebrate retina terminate their response to light much faster than rod photoreceptors. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this rapid response termination in cones are poorly understood. The experiments presented here tested two related hypotheses: first, that the rapid decay rate of metarhodopsin (Meta) II in red-sensitive cones depends on interactions between the 9-methyl group of retinal and the opsin part of the pigment molecule, and second, that rapid Meta II decay is critical for rapid recovery from saturation of red-sensitive cones after exposure to bright light. Microspectrophotometric measurements of pigment photolysis, microfluorometric measurements of retinol production, and single-cell electrophysiological recordings of flash responses of salamander cones were performed to test these hypotheses. In all cases, cones were bleached and their visual pigment was regenerated with either 11-cis retinal or with 11-cis 9-demethyl retinal, an analogue of retinal lacking the 9-methyl group. Meta II decay was four to five times slower and subsequent retinol production was three to four times slower in red-sensitive cones lacking the 9-methyl group of retinal. This was accompanied by a significant slowing of the recovery from saturation in cones lacking the 9-methyl group after exposure to bright (>0.1% visual pigment photoactivated) but not dim light. A mathematical model of the turn-off process of phototransduction revealed that the slower recovery of photoresponse can be explained by slower Meta decay of 9-demethyl visual pigment. These results demonstrate that the 9-methyl group of retinal is required for steric chromophore-opsin interactions that favor both the rapid decay of Meta II and the rapid response recovery after exposure to bright light in red-sensitive cones.

  13. Impact of advanced water conservation features and new copper pipe on rapid chloramine decay and microbial regrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Caroline; Elfland, Carolyn; Edwards, Marc

    2012-03-01

    Taste and odor issues occurring in new buildings were attributed to rapid loss of chloramine residual, high levels of microbes in the potable water system, and high water age due to use of advanced water conservation devices. Laboratory experiments confirmed that chloramine could decay rapidly in the presence of new copper pipe, providing a possible explanation for the rapid disinfectant loss in the new buildings. Higher temperature and lower pH also accelerated the rate of chloramine decay in copper pipes. The reaction was slowed by the addition of phosphate inhibitor or aluminum, which presumably formed barriers between the pipe wall and the chloramine in the bulk water. Additional research is needed to better understand how to maintain high quality water in buildings while also conserving water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Wallops Flight Facility Rapid Response Range Operations Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Bruce E.; Kremer, Steven E.

    2004-01-01

    becomes how can a launch site provide acceptably responsive mission services to a particular customer without dedicating extensive resources and while continuing to serve other projects? NASA's Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) is pursuing solutions to exactly this challenge. NASA, in partnership with the Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority, has initiated the Rapid Response Range Operations Initiative (R3Ops). R3Ops is a multi-phased effort to incrementally establish and demonstrate increasingly responsive launch operations, with an ultimate goal of providing ELV-class services in a maximum of 7-10 days from initial notification routinely, and shorter schedules possible with committed resources. This target will be pursued within the reality of simultaneous concurrent programs, and ideally, largely independent of specialized flight system configurations. WFF has recently completed Phase 1 of R3Ops, an in-depth collection (through extensive expert interviews) and software modeling of individual steps by various range disciplines. This modeling is now being used to identify existing inefficiencies in current procedures, to identify bottlenecks, and show interdependencies. Existing practices are being tracked to provide a baseline to benchmark against as new procedures are implemented. This paper will describe in detail the philosophies behind WFF's R3Ops, the data collected and modeled in Phase 1, and strategies for meeting responsive launch requirements in a multi-user range environment planned for subsequent phases of this initiative.

  15. Rapid decay of nonlinear whistler waves in two dimensions: Full particle simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Saito, Shinji; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro

    2017-05-01

    The decay of a nonlinear, short-wavelength, and monochromatic electromagnetic whistler wave is investigated by utilizing a two-dimensional (2D) fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The simulation is performed under a low-beta condition in which the plasma pressure is much lower than the magnetic pressure. It has been shown that the nonlinear (large-amplitude) parent whistler wave decays through the parametric instability in a one-dimensional (1D) system. The present study shows that there is another channel for the decay of the parent whistler wave in 2D, which is much faster than in the timescale of the parametric decay in 1D. The parent whistler wave decays into two sideband daughter whistlers propagating obliquely with respect to the ambient magnetic field with a frequency close to the parent wave and two quasi-perpendicular electromagnetic modes with a frequency close to zero via a 2D decay instability. The two sideband daughter oblique whistlers also enhance a nonlinear longitudinal electrostatic wave via a three-wave interaction as a secondary process.

  16. Toxicant induced changes on delayed fluorescence decay kinetics of cyanobacteria and green algae: a rapid and sensitive biotest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Leunert

    Full Text Available Algal tests have developed into routine tools for testing toxicity of pollutants in aquatic environments. Meanwhile, in addition to algal growth rates, an increasing number of fluorescence based methods are used for rapid and sensitive toxicity measures. The present study stresses the suitability of delayed fluorescence (DF as a promising parameter for biotests. DF is based on the recombination fluorescence at the reaction centre of photosystem II, which is emitted only by photosynthetically active cells. We analyzed the effects of three chemicals (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU, 3,5 Dichlorophenol (3,5 DCP and copper on the shape of the DF decay kinetics for potential use in phytoplankton toxicity tests. The short incubation tests were done with four phytoplankton species, with special emphasis on the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. All species exhibited a high sensitivity to DCMU, but cyanobacteria were more affected by copper and less by 3,5 DCP than the tested green algae. Analyses of changes in the DF decay curve in response to the added chemicals indicated the feasibility of the DF decay approach as a rapid and sensitive testing tool.

  17. Electron Dynamics of Interatomic Coulombic Decay in Quantum Dots: Singlet Initial State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cederbaum Lorenz S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigated the interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD of a resonance singlet state in a model potential for two few-electron semiconductor quantum dots (QDs by means of electron dynamics. We demonstrate that ICD is the major decay process of the resonance for the singlet wave function and compare the total and partial decay widths as a function of the QD separation with that from our previous study on the corresponding triplet states [1].

  18. Rapidity-Alignment and $mrm{p}_T$ Compensation of Particle Pairs in Hadronic $Z^0$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Bellunato, T.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Brodzicka, J.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carimalo, C.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chung, S.U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jalocha, P.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Johansson, P.D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kurowska, J.; Laforge, B.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McNulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monig, Klaus; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nygren, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zupan, M.

    2002-01-01

    Observation is made of rapidity-alignment of \\KK and \\pp pairs which results from their asymmetric orientation in rapidity, with respect to the direction from primary quark to antiquark. The \\KK and \\pp data are consistent with predictions from the fragmentation string model. However, the \\pp data strongly disagree with the conventional implementation of the cluster model. The non-perturbative process of `gluon splitting to diquarks' has to be incorporated into the cluster model for it to agree with the data. Local conservation of \\pT between particles nearby in rapidity (i.e., \\pT compensation) is analysed with respect to the thrust direction for \\pipix, \\KKx, and \\pp pairs. In this case, the string model provides fair agreement with the data. The cluster model is incompatible with the data for all three particle pairs. The model with its central premiss of isotropically-decaying clusters predicts a \\pT correlation not seen in the data.

  19. Discrete diffraction managed solitons: Threshold phenomena and rapid decay for general nonlinearities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi-Ran; Hundertmark, Dirk; Lee, Young-Ran

    2017-10-01

    We prove a threshold phenomenon for the existence/non-existence of energy minimizing solitary solutions of the diffraction management equation for strictly positive and zero average diffraction. Our methods allow for a large class of nonlinearities; they are, for example, allowed to change sign, and the weakest possible condition, it only has to be locally integrable, on the local diffraction profile. The solutions are found as minimizers of a nonlinear and nonlocal variational problem which is translation invariant. There exists a critical threshold λcr such that minimizers for this variational problem exist if their power is bigger than λcr and no minimizers exist with power less than the critical threshold. We also give simple criteria for the finiteness and strict positivity of the critical threshold. Our proof of existence of minimizers is rather direct and avoids the use of Lions' concentration compactness argument. Furthermore, we give precise quantitative lower bounds on the exponential decay rate of the diffraction management solitons, which confirm the physical heuristic prediction for the asymptotic decay rate. Moreover, for ground state solutions, these bounds give a quantitative lower bound for the divergence of the exponential decay rate in the limit of vanishing average diffraction. For zero average diffraction, we prove quantitative bounds which show that the solitons decay much faster than exponentially. Our results considerably extend and strengthen the results of Hundertmark and Lee [J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 1-38 (2012) and Commun. Math. Phys. 309(1), 1-21 (2012)].

  20. Soil attributes and microclimate are important drivers of initial deadwood decay in sub-alpine Norway spruce forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fravolini, Giulia; Egli, Markus; Derungs, Curdin; Cherubini, Paolo; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Gómez-Brandón, María; Bardelli, Tommaso; Tognetti, Roberto; Lombardi, Fabio; Marchetti, Marco

    2016-11-01

    Deadwood is known to significantly contribute to global terrestrial carbon stocks and carbon cycling, but its decay dynamics are still not thoroughly understood. Although the chemistry of deadwood has been studied as a function of decay stage in temperate to subalpine environments, it has generally not been related to time. We therefore studied the decay (mass of deadwood, cellulose and lignin) of equal-sized blocks of Picea abies wood in soil-mesocosms over two years in the Italian Alps. The 8 sites selected were along an altitudinal sequence, reflecting different climate zones. In addition, the effect of exposure (north- and south-facing slopes) was taken into account. The decay dynamics of the mass of deadwood, cellulose and lignin were related to soil parameters (pH, soil texture, moisture, temperature) and climatic data. The decay rate constants of Picea abies deadwood were low (on average between 0.039 and 0.040y(-1)) and of lignin close to zero (or not detectable), while cellulose reacted much faster with average decay rate constants between 0.110 and 0.117y(-1). Our field experiments showed that local scale factors, such as soil parameters and topographic properties, influenced the decay process: higher soil moisture and clay content along with a lower pH seemed to accelerate wood decay. Interestingly, air temperature negatively correlated with decay rates or positively with the amount of wood components on south-facing sites. It exerted its influence rather on moisture availability, i.e. the lower the temperature the higher the moisture availability. Topographic features were also relevant with generally slower decay processes on south-facing sites than on north-facing sites owing to the drier conditions, the higher pH and the lower weathering state of the soils (less clay minerals). This study highlights the importance of a multifactorial consideration of edaphic parameters to unravel the complex dynamics of initial wood decay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  1. First aid to Cultural Heritage. Training initiatives on rapid documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro Vidal, A.; Tandon, A.; Eppich, R.

    2015-08-01

    Recent dramatic events have brought to the forefront the debate on how to protect, safeguard and document Cultural Heritage in conflict areas. Heritage places have become battlefields, sources of illicit trafficking and even deliberate targets of destruction because of the politicisation to further conflict ideologies as well as misinterpretation of the values they represent. Is it possible to protect Cultural Heritage under such circumstances? If yes, when is the right time to intervene and who can help in this task? How can documentation and training assist? The International Course on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis promoted by ICCROM (The International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property) in collaboration with various partners focuses specifically on ways to help in such difficult and stressful situations. This paper explores the methodological approach and highlights the special circumstances that surround rapid documentation and preliminary condition assessment in conflict areas, and in cases of complex emergencies such as an earthquake striking a conflict area. The paper identifies international actors that might play a special and crucial role in the first steps of such a situation and recognizes the need for training activities to strengthen capacities for disaster response to cultural heritage at national and regional levels.

  2. First aid to Cultural Heritage. Training initiatives on rapid documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almagro Vidal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent dramatic events have brought to the forefront the debate on how to protect, safeguard and document Cultural Heritage in conflict areas. Heritage places have become battlefields, sources of illicit trafficking and even deliberate targets of destruction because of the politicisation to further conflict ideologies as well as misinterpretation of the values they represent. Is it possible to protect Cultural Heritage under such circumstances? If yes, when is the right time to intervene and who can help in this task? How can documentation and training assist? The International Course on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis promoted by ICCROM (The International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property in collaboration with various partners focuses specifically on ways to help in such difficult and stressful situations. This paper explores the methodological approach and highlights the special circumstances that surround rapid documentation and preliminary condition assessment in conflict areas, and in cases of complex emergencies such as an earthquake striking a conflict area. The paper identifies international actors that might play a special and crucial role in the first steps of such a situation and recognizes the need for training activities to strengthen capacities for disaster response to cultural heritage at national and regional levels.

  3. Heavy flavour decay muon production at forward rapidity in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergmann, Cyrano; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Nicolas; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Bottger, Stefan; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Bugaiev, Kyrylo; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caballero Orduna, Diego; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Caselle, Michele; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chiavassa, Emilio; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Coffin, Jean-Pierre Michel; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Azevedo Moregula, Andrea; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Del Castillo Sanchez, Eduardo; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fearick, Roger Worsley; Fedunov, Anatoly; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Fragkiadakis, Michail; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerra Gutierrez, Cesar; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Gutbrod, Hans; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Hasegan, Dumitru; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hille, Per Thomas; Hippolyte, Boris; Horaguchi, Takuma; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Huber, Sebastian Bernd; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter; Jancurova, Lucia; Jangal, Swensy Gwladys; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Janik, Rudolf; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jirden, Lennart; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jung, Won Woong; Jusko, Anton; Kakoyan, Vanik; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalisky, Matus; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kliemant, Michael; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Koch, Kathrin; Kohler, Markus; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Korneev, Andrey; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Kour, Ravjeet; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kraus, Ingrid Christine; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasily; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Bornec, Yves; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lefevre, Frederic; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Leistam, Lars; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Liu, Lijiao; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohn, Stefan Bernhard; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luquin, Lionel; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Martashvili, Irakli; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Maslov, Nikolai; Masoni, Alberto; Mastromarco, Mario; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matthews, Zoe Louise; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayani, Daniel; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Michalon, Alain; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Musa, Luciano; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Naumov, Nikolay; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nazarov, Gleb; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Ochirov, Alexander; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Ortona, Giacomo; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otterlund, Ingvar; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, S; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Piccotti, Anna; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piuz, Francois; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pocheptsov, Timur; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puchagin, Sergey; Puddu, Giovanna; Pulvirenti, Alberto; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Radomski, Sylwester; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sano, Satoshi; Santo, Rainer; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schreiner, Steffen; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Scott, Rebecca; Segato, Gianfranco; Selioujenkov, Ilya; Senyukov, Serhiy; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Sgura, Irene; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shimomura, Maya; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Siciliano, Melinda; Sicking, Eva; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Sinha, Bikash; Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Sputowska, Iwona; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stefanini, Giorgio; Steinbeck, Timm Morten; Steinpreis, Matthew; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strabykin, Kirill; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sukhorukov, Mikhail; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szostak, Artur Krzysztof; Tagridis, Christos; Takahashi, Jun; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Thomas, Jim; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Tlusty, David; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Tosello, Flavio; Traczyk, Tomasz; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urban, Jozef; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; van der Kolk, Naomi; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernekohl, Don Constantin; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vikhlyantsev, Oleg; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vranic, Danilo; Øvrebekk, Gaute; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Dong; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Yaping; Watanabe, Kengo; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Alexander; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Shiming; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo

    2013-07-16

    The production of muons from heavy flavour decays is measured at forward rapidity in proton--proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV collected with the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The analysis is carried out on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity $L_{int}$ = 16.5 nb$^{-1}$. The transverse momentum and rapidity differential production cross sections of muons from heavy flavour decays are measured in the rapidity range 2.5 < y < 4, over the transverse momentum range 2 < $p_{t}$ < 12 GeV/c. The results are compared to predictions based on perturbative QCD calculations.

  4. Convergent losses of decay mechanisms and rapid turnover of symbiosis genes in mycorrhizal mutualists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Annegret; Kuo, Alan; Nagy, Laszlo G; Morin, Emmanuelle; Barry, Kerrie W; Buscot, Francois; Canbäck, Björn; Choi, Cindy; Cichocki, Nicolas; Clum, Alicia; Colpaert, Jan; Copeland, Alex; Costa, Mauricio D; Doré, Jeanne; Floudas, Dimitrios; Gay, Gilles; Girlanda, Mariangela; Henrissat, Bernard; Herrmann, Sylvie; Hess, Jaqueline; Högberg, Nils; Johansson, Tomas; Khouja, Hassine-Radhouane; LaButti, Kurt; Lahrmann, Urs; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika A; Lipzen, Anna; Marmeisse, Roland; Martino, Elena; Murat, Claude; Ngan, Chew Y; Nehls, Uwe; Plett, Jonathan M; Pringle, Anne; Ohm, Robin A; Perotto, Silvia; Peter, Martina; Riley, Robert; Rineau, Francois; Ruytinx, Joske; Salamov, Asaf; Shah, Firoz; Sun, Hui; Tarkka, Mika; Tritt, Andrew; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Zuccaro, Alga; Tunlid, Anders; Grigoriev, Igor V; Hibbett, David S; Martin, Francis

    2015-04-01

    To elucidate the genetic bases of mycorrhizal lifestyle evolution, we sequenced new fungal genomes, including 13 ectomycorrhizal (ECM), orchid (ORM) and ericoid (ERM) species, and five saprotrophs, which we analyzed along with other fungal genomes. Ectomycorrhizal fungi have a reduced complement of genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs), as compared to their ancestral wood decayers. Nevertheless, they have retained a unique array of PCWDEs, thus suggesting that they possess diverse abilities to decompose lignocellulose. Similar functional categories of nonorthologous genes are induced in symbiosis. Of induced genes, 7-38% are orphan genes, including genes that encode secreted effector-like proteins. Convergent evolution of the mycorrhizal habit in fungi occurred via the repeated evolution of a 'symbiosis toolkit', with reduced numbers of PCWDEs and lineage-specific suites of mycorrhiza-induced genes.

  5. Nuclear RNA Decay Pathways Aid Rapid Remodeling of Gene Expression in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresson, Stefan; Tuck, Alex; Staneva, Desislava; Tollervey, David

    2017-03-02

    In budding yeast, the nuclear RNA surveillance system is active on all pre-mRNA transcripts and modulated by nutrient availability. To test the role of nuclear surveillance in reprogramming gene expression, we identified transcriptome-wide binding sites for RNA polymerase II and the exosome cofactors Mtr4 (TRAMP complex) and Nab3 (NNS complex) by UV crosslinking immediately following glucose withdrawal (0, 4, and 8 min). In glucose, mRNA binding by Nab3 and Mtr4 was mainly restricted to promoter-proximal sites, reflecting early transcription termination. Following glucose withdrawal, many growth-related mRNAs showed reduced transcription but increased Nab3 binding, accompanied by downstream recruitment of Mtr4, and oligo(A) tailing. We conclude that transcription termination is followed by TRAMP-mediated RNA decay. Upregulated transcripts evaded increased surveillance factor binding following glucose withdrawal. Some upregulated genes showed use of alternative transcription starts to bypass strong NNS binding sites. We conclude that nuclear surveillance pathways regulate both positive and negative responses to glucose availability. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hyperuniformity of initial conditions and critical decay of a diffusive epidemic process belonging to the Manna class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sungchul; Kim, Jin Min

    2017-07-01

    For a fixed-energy Manna sandpile model belonging to a Manna class in one dimension (d =1 ), we recently showed that the critical decay is different for random and regular initial conditions (ICs). Compared with previous results of natural IC for several models, we suggested for the Manna class that the critical decay depends on the characteristics of the three ICs. But the dependence on the random and regular ICs was shown only for a single model. In this work, we study the critical decay for the random and regular ICs for another model of the Manna class in d =1 , a diffusive epidemic process. It is shown that the critical decay exponent agrees with the previous result for each IC, which verifies that IC dependence is a common feature of the Manna class. In addition, for the random and regular ICs, we measure the variance σ2(r ) of total particle density in a region of size r by increasing r up to system size and investigate its temporal evolution toward the value σq2(r ) of the quasisteady state at criticality. In d =1 ,σ2(r ) scales as σ2(r ) ˜r-ψ with ψ =1 for random distributions and 1 toward σq2(r ) and the regular IC becomes a hyperuniform distribution of ψ =2 in the beginning of the evolution. We estimate ψ =1.45 (3 ) for both the quasisteady state and absorbing states, so the quasisteady state is also as hyperuniform as absorbing states. The hyperuniformity of the quasisteady state shows that the natural IC also should be hyperuniform as much as the quasisteady state, because the natural IC is obtained from particle configurations close to the quasisteady state. Consequently, the different ψ of the three ICs suggest that σ2(r ) can classify the characteristics of the three ICs in a unified way and the different degree of hyperuniformity of the ICs provides another explanation for the observed IC-dependent critical decay in a point of view of initial fluctuations and correlations.

  7. Human nonsense-mediated RNA decay initiates widely by endonucleolysis and targets snoRNA host genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Chen, Yun; Ardal, Britt

    2014-01-01

    . We also show that a large proportion of genes hosting snoRNAs in their introns produce considerable amounts of NMD-sensitive splice variants, indicating that these RNAs are merely by-products of a primary snoRNA production process. Additionally, transcripts from genes encoding multiple snoRNAs often...... yield alternative transcript isoforms that allow for differential expression of individual coencoded snoRNAs. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that snoRNA host genes need to be highly transcribed to accommodate high levels of snoRNA production and that the expression of individual snoRNAs......Eukaryotic RNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs) are eliminated by nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). While human nonsense RNA degradation can be initiated either by an endonucleolytic cleavage event near the PTC or through decapping, the individual contribution of these activities...

  8. Early initiation of postpartum contraception: does it decrease rapid repeat pregnancy in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Lauren F; Gohari, Amir C; McEvoy, Anna K; Desale, Sameer Y; Gomez-Lobo, Veronica

    2015-02-01

    Rapid repeat adolescent pregnancy is a significant public health concern. An effective and practical means of decreasing unintended second adolescent pregnancies needs to be identified. The objective of this study is to determine if early initiation of contraception, and in particular long acting reversible contraception (LARC), decreases rapid repeat pregnancy among first time adolescent mothers. Retrospective cohort study. Urban teaching hospital. 340 first-time adolescent mothers age ≤ 19. None, study was retrospective. Repeat pregnancy within 2 years. 340 first time adolescent mothers with a documented follow-up time of 2 years had a repeat pregnancy rate of 35%. Average time from delivery to repeat pregnancy was 9.9 ± 6.4 months. Logistic regression analysis comparing adolescents with and without repeat pregnancy revealed that leaving the hospital postpartum without initiating any contraception was associated with significant increase risk of repeat pregnancy (OR = 2.447, 95% CI 1.326-4.515). Follow-up within 8 weeks postpartum was associated with lower chance of repeat pregnancy (OR = 0.322, 95% CI 0.172-0.603). Initiation of a LARC method (either an intrauterine device or etonogestrel subdermal implant) by 8 weeks postpartum was also associated with decreased chance of rapid repeat pregnancy (OR = 0.118, 95% CI 0.035-0.397). Adolescent mothers who initiate a LARC method within 8 weeks of delivery are less likely to have a repeat pregnancy within 2 years than those who choose other methods or no method. First time adolescent mothers should be counseled about this advantage of using LARC. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Production of muons from heavy flavour decays at forward rapidity in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt {s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Nicolas; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Bugaiev, Kyrylo; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chiavassa, Emilio; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fedunov, Anatoly; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonschior, Alexey; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerra Gutierrez, Cesar; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Gutbrod, Hans; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Hasegan, Dumitru; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hille, Per Thomas; Hippolyte, Boris; Horaguchi, Takuma; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter; Jangal, Swensy Gwladys; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Janik, Rudolf; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jha, Deeptanshu Manu; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jirden, Lennart; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jusko, Anton; Kakoyan, Vanik; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Koch, Kathrin; Kohler, Markus; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Korneev, Andrey; Kour, Ravjeet; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kraus, Ingrid Christine; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasily; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Bornec, Yves; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lefevre, Frederic; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Leistam, Lars; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Liu, Lijiao; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohn, Stefan Bernhard; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luquin, Lionel; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Marin Tobon, Cesar Augusto; Markert, Christina; Martashvili, Irakli; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Mastromarco, Mario; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matthews, Zoe Louise; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayani, Daniel; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Musa, Luciano; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Naumov, Nikolay; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nazarov, Gleb; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortona, Giacomo; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, S; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Piccotti, Anna; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piuz, Francois; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puchagin, Sergey; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Pujol Teixido, Jordi; Pulvirenti, Alberto; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Radomski, Sylwester; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, Bartolomeu; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sano, Satoshi; Santo, Rainer; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schreiner, Steffen; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Scott, Rebecca; Segato, Gianfranco; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senyukov, Serhiy; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shimomura, Maya; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Siciliano, Melinda; Sicking, Eva; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, catherine; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Sputowska, Iwona; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stefanini, Giorgio; Steinbeck, Timm Morten; Steinpreis, Matthew; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strabykin, Kirill; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sukhorukov, Mikhail; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szostak, Artur Krzysztof; Szymanski, Maciej; Takahashi, Jun; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Tosello, Flavio; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urban, Jozef; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; van der Kolk, Naomi; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vikhlyantsev, Oleg; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vranic, Danilo; Øvrebekk, Gaute; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Dong; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Yaping; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Alexander; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Shiming; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration has measured the inclusive production of muons from heavy flavour decays at forward rapidity, 2.5 < y < 4, in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt {s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. The pt-differential inclusive cross section of muons from heavy flavour decays in pp collisions is compared to perturbative QCD calculations. The nuclear modification factor is studied as a function of pt and collision centrality. A weak suppression is measured in peripheral collisions. In the most central collisions, a suppression of a factor of about 3-4 is observed in 6 < pt < 10 GeV/c. The suppression shows no significant pt dependence.

  10. Post-transcriptional control by bacteriophage T4: mRNA decay and inhibition of translation initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Eric S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over 50 years of biological research with bacteriophage T4 includes notable discoveries in post-transcriptional control, including the genetic code, mRNA, and tRNA; the very foundations of molecular biology. In this review we compile the past 10 - 15 year literature on RNA-protein interactions with T4 and some of its related phages, with particular focus on advances in mRNA decay and processing, and on translational repression. Binding of T4 proteins RegB, RegA, gp32 and gp43 to their cognate target RNAs has been characterized. For several of these, further study is needed for an atomic-level perspective, where resolved structures of RNA-protein complexes are awaiting investigation. Other features of post-transcriptional control are also summarized. These include: RNA structure at translation initiation regions that either inhibit or promote translation initiation; programmed translational bypassing, where T4 orchestrates ribosome bypass of a 50 nucleotide mRNA sequence; phage exclusion systems that involve T4-mediated activation of a latent endoribonuclease (PrrC and cofactor-assisted activation of EF-Tu proteolysis (Gol-Lit; and potentially important findings on ADP-ribosylation (by Alt and Mod enzymes of ribosome-associated proteins that might broadly impact protein synthesis in the infected cell. Many of these problems can continue to be addressed with T4, whereas the growing database of T4-related phage genome sequences provides new resources and potentially new phage-host systems to extend the work into a broader biological, evolutionary context.

  11. Outcomes of acutely HIV-1-infected individuals following rapid antiretroviral therapy initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girometti, Nicolò; Nwokolo, Nneka; McOwan, Alan; Whitlock, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Few data exist on the benefits and acceptability of rapid initiation of antiretroviral treatment in acute HIV infection (AHI). We analysed a large cohort of acutely infected HIV patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) to determine uptake, linkage into care and time to achieve viral suppression. Case notes of all individuals diagnosed with AHI between May 2014 and October 2015 at 56 Dean Street, a sexual health clinic in London, UK were reviewed. AHI was defined through documentation of plasma HIV RNA positivity only, plasma HIV RNA and p24 antigen positivity with a negative HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test or HIV EIA test switching from negative to positive within 6 weeks. Between-group comparisons of time to viral suppression according to ART chosen were performed using the log-rank test. We identified 113 individuals with AHI. Linkage to care was 95%. 77% of patients started ART at first medical appointment: all men who have sex with men, median age 35 years, median viral load (VL) log10 6.45, median CD4+ T-cell count 483 cells/mm3. Median time from diagnosis to ART initiation was 20 days. At 24 weeks, no patients had discontinued ART; 99% of patients achieved viral suppression by 24 weeks, with a median time to documented VL suppression of 74 days. Viral suppression was more rapid with integrase inhibitors compared with other regimens (median 41 versus 88.5 days, PHIV infection, individuals demonstrated high ART uptake and rapid VL suppression suggesting that early treatment with antiretrovirals is acceptable and efficacious.

  12. Condition Help: A Patient- and Family-Initiated Rapid Response System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Elizabeth L; Rack, Laurie L; Chen, Ling-Wan; Bump, Gregory M

    2017-03-01

    Rapid response teams (RRTs) help in delivering safe, timely care. Typically they are activated by clinicians using specific parameters. Allowing patients and families to activate RRTs is a novel intervention. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center developed and implemented a patient- and family-initiated rapid response system called Condition Help (CH). When the CH system is activated, a patient care liaison or an on-duty administrator meets bedside with the unit charge nurse to address the patient's concerns. In this study, we collected demographic data, call reasons, call designations (safety or nonsafety), and outcome information for all CH calls made during the period January 2012 through June 2015. Two hundred forty patients/family members made 367 CH calls during the study period. Most calls were made by patients (76.8%) rather than family members (21.8%). Of the 240 patients, 43 (18%) made multiple calls; their calls accounted for 46.3% of all calls (170/367). Inadequate pain control was the reason for the call in most cases (48.2%), followed by dissatisfaction with staff (12.5%). The majority of calls involved nonsafety issues (83.4%) rather than safety issues (11.4%). In 41.4% of cases, a change in care was made. Patient- and family-initiated RRTs are designed to engage patients and families in providing safer care. In the CH system, safety issues are identified, but the majority of calls involve nonsafety issues. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:157-161.

  13. Rapid fore-arc extension and detachment-mode spreading following subduction initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Antony; Anderson, Mark W.; Omer, Ahmed; Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2017-11-01

    Most ophiolites have geochemical signatures that indicate formation by suprasubduction seafloor spreading above newly initiated subduction zones, and hence they record fore-arc processes operating following subduction initiation. They are frequently underlain by a metamorphic sole formed at the top of the downgoing plate and accreted below the overlying suprasubduction zone lithosphere immediately following ophiolite formation. Paleomagnetic analyses of ophiolites can provide important insights into the enigmatic geodynamic processes operating in this setting via identification of tectonic rotations related to upper plate extension. Here we present net tectonic rotation results from the Late Cretaceous Mersin ophiolite of southern Turkey that document rapid and progressive rotation of ophiolitic rocks and their associated metamorphic sole. Specifically, we demonstrate that lower crustal cumulate rocks and early dykes intruded into the underlying mantle section have undergone extreme rotation around ridge-parallel, shallowly-plunging axes, consistent with oceanic detachment faulting during spreading. Importantly, later dykes cutting the metamorphic sole experienced rotation around the same axis but with a lower magnitude. We show that these rotations occurred via a common mechanism in a pre-obduction, fore-arc setting, and are best explained by combining (hyper)extension resulting from detachment-mode, amagmatic suprasubduction zone spreading in a fore-arc environment with a recently proposed mechanism for exhumation of metamorphic soles driven by upper plate extension. Available age constraints demonstrate that extreme rotation of these units was accommodated rapidly by these processes over a time period of <∼3 Myr, comparable with rates of rotation seen in oceanic core complexes in the modern oceans.

  14. Systemic and rapidly progressive light-chain deposition disease initially presenting as tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Soma, Jun; Nakaya, Izaya; Yahata, Mayumi; Sakuma, Tsutomu; Yaegashi, Hiroshi; Sato, Akiyoshi; Wano, Masaharu; Sato, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    A 42-year-old woman was admitted to a hospital after first-time detection of proteinuria and hematuria during a routine medical check-up. Because her serum creatinine level had rapidly increased from 0.9 to 3.2 mg/dl since measurement 3 months earlier, she was referred to our hospital. Renal biopsy revealed extensive tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis with mild leukocyte infiltration. Glomeruli showed minimal changes, and no immunoglobulin or complement deposition was observed by immunofluorescence. Oral prednisolone was commenced under the diagnosis of chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, and she discharged once. However, its effects were transient; her renal function deteriorated rapidly and hemodialysis was initiated 5 months after her initial check-up. On readmission, urinary Bence-Jones protein κ-type was detected, and examination of bone marrow led to a diagnosis of Bence-Jones κ-type multiple myeloma. Light-chain staining using a renal biopsy specimen obtained 2 months earlier showed κ-light-chain deposition on tubular basement membranes but not glomeruli. Despite undergoing chemotherapy with vincristine, doxirubicin, and dexamethasone, the patient died suddenly from a cardiac arrhythmia. Autopsy showed κ-light-chain deposition in the heart, thyroid, liver, lungs, spleen, and ovaries. Congo red staining yielded negative results. Typical light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) characterized by nodular glomerulosclerosis was observed in the kidneys. This case demonstrates that tubulointerstitial nephritis can be an early pathological variant of LCDD, which may be followed by accelerated and massive light-chain deposition in glomeruli.

  15. Constraints on rapidity-dependent initial conditions from charged-particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Weiyao; Moreland, J. Scott; Bernhard, Jonah E.; Bass, Steffen A.

    2017-10-01

    We study the initial three-dimensional spatial configuration of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions using centrality and pseudorapidity-dependent measurements of the medium's charged particle density and two-particle correlations. A cumulant-generating function is first used to parametrize the rapidity dependence of local entropy deposition and extend arbitrary boost-invariant initial conditions to nonzero beam rapidities. The model is then compared to p +Pb and Pb + Pb charged-particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle pseudorapidity correlations and systematically optimized using Bayesian parameter estimation to extract high-probability initial condition parameters. The optimized initial conditions are then compared to a number of experimental observables including the pseudorapidity-dependent anisotropic flows, event-plane decorrelations, and flow correlations. We find that the form of the initial local longitudinal entropy profile is well constrained by these experimental measurements.

  16. Use of peak decay analysis and affinity microcolumns containing silica monoliths for rapid determination of drug-protein dissociation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Michelle J; Hage, David S

    2011-04-15

    This report examined the use of silica monoliths in affinity microcolumns containing human serum albumin (HSA) to measure the dissociation rates for various drugs from this protein. Immobilized HSA and control monolith columns with dimensions of 1 mm × 4.6 mm i.d. were prepared for this work and used with a noncompetitive peak decay method. Several drugs known to bind HSA were examined, such as warfarin, diazepam, imipramine, acetohexamide, and tolbutamide. Items that were studied and optimized in this method included the sample volume, sample concentration, and elution flow rate. It was found that flow rates up to 10 mL/min could be used in this approach. Work with HSA silica monoliths at these high flow rates made it possible to provide dissociation rate constants for drugs such as warfarin in less than 40s. The dissociation rate constants that were measured gave good agreement with values reported in the literature or that had been obtained with other solutes that had similar binding affinities for HSA. This approach is a general one that should be useful in examining the dissociation of other drugs from HSA and in providing a high-throughput method for screening drug-protein interactions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Accumulation and Rapid Decay of Non-LTR Retrotransposons in the Genome of the Three-Spine Stickleback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blass, Eryn; Bell, Michael; Boissinot, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    LTR-RT decay in fish occurs mostly through large deletions and not by the accumulation of small deletions. PMID:22534163

  18. Decay characteristics and erosion-related transport of glyphosate in Chinese loess soil under field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Wang, Fei; Martins Bento, Celia; Meng, L.; Dam, van R.C.J.; Mol, J.G.J.; Liu, Guobin; Ritsema, C.J.; Geissen, V.

    2015-01-01

    The decay characteristics and erosion-related transport of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were monitored for 35 d at different slope gradients and rates of application in plots with loess soil on the Loess Plateau, China. The initial glyphosate decayed rapidly (half-life of 3.5 d)

  19. Elliptic flow of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at root s(NN)=2.76 TeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, J.; Adamova, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anticic, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshaeuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnafoldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Boggild, H.; Boldizsar, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossu, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; del Valle, Z. Conesa; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Cortes Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crkovska, J.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Souza, R. D.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Denes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divia, R.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Doenigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernandez Tellez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhoje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, M.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glaessel, P.; Gomez Coral, D. M.; Ramirez, A. Gomez; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; Gonzalez-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Haake, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbaer, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Hughes, C.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Isakov, V.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacak, B.; Jacazio, N.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, M. Mohisin; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Kralik, I.; Kravcakova, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kucera, V.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lehner, S.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Monzon, I. Leon; Leon Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Levai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Lopez Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lupi, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mares, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marin, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martinengo, P.; Martinez, M. I.; Garcia, G. Martinez; Pedreira, M. Martinez; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Perez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Mhlanga, S.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montano Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; De Godoy, D. A. Moreira; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muehlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Muenning, K.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; De Oliveira, R. A. Negrao; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paic, G.; Pal, S. K.; Palni, P.; Pan, J.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Da Costa, H. Pereira; Peresunko, D.; Lezama, E. Perez; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petracek, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Ploskon, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Poppenborg, H.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rasanen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Ravasenga, I.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Cahuantzi, M. Rodriguez; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Roed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Rohrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Safarik, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sandor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, M.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Sefcik, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Sumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Szabo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Munoz, G. Tejeda; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thader, J.; Thakur, D.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Tikhonov, A.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Limon, S. Vergara; Vernet, R.; Vickovic, L.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voelkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrlakova, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weiser, D. F.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Willems, G. A.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yalcin, S.; Yano, S.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Zavada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, C.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.; Collaboration, ALICE

    2016-01-01

    The elliptic flow of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at mid-rapidity (|y| <0.7) is measured in Pb-Pb collisions at TeV with ALICE at the LHC. The particle azimuthal distribution with respect to the reaction plane can be parametrized with a Fourier expansion, where the second coefficient

  20. Initial decay of woody fragments in soil is influenced by size, vertical position, nitrogen availability and soil origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wal, A.; De Boer, W.; Smant, W.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Fast-growing bacteria and fungi are expected to cause the initial stage of decomposition of woody fragments in and on soils, i.e. the respiration of sugars, organic acids, pectin and easily accessible cellulose and hemi-cellulose. However, little is known about the factors regulating initial wood

  1. Rapid fore-arc extension and detachment-mode spreading following subduction initiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morris, Antony; Anderson, Mark W.; Omer, Ahmed; Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269263624

    2017-01-01

    Most ophiolites have geochemical signatures that indicate formation by suprasubduction seafloor spreading above newly initiated subduction zones, and hence they record fore-arc processes operating following subduction initiation. They are frequently underlain by a metamorphic sole formed at the top

  2. Initiation of a Multidisciplinary, Rapid Response Team to Massive and Submassive Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Brett J; Pemberton, Heather; Bauer, Kenneth A; Chu, Louis M; Weinstein, Jeffrey L; Levarge, Barbara L; Pinto, Duane S

    2017-10-15

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) can result in rapid clinical decompensation in many patients. With increasing patient complexity and advanced treatment options for PE, multidisciplinary, rapid response teams can optimize risk stratification and expedite management strategies. The Massive And Submassive Clot On-call Team (MASCOT) was created at our institution, which comprised specialists from cardiology, pulmonology, hematology, interventional radiology, and cardiac surgery. MASCOT offers rapid consultation 24 hours a day with a web-based conference call to review patient data and discuss management of patients with high-risk PE. We reviewed patient data collected from MASCOT's registry to analyze patient clinical characteristics and outcomes and describe the composition and operation of the team. Between August 2015 and September 2016, MASCOT evaluated 72 patients. Seventy of the 72 patients were admitted to our institution, accounting for 32% of all patients discharged with a primary diagnosis of PE. Average age was 62 ± 17 years with a female predominance (63%). Active malignancy (31%), recent surgery or trauma (21%), and recent hospitalization (24%) were common. PE clinical severity was massive in 16% and submassive in 83%. Patients were managed with anticoagulation alone in 65% (n = 46), systemic fibrinolysis in 11% (n = 8), catheter-directed therapy in 18% (n = 13), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in 3% (n = 2), and an inferior vena cava filter was placed in 15% (n = 11). Thirteen percent (n = 9) experienced a major bleed with no intracranial hemorrhage. Survival to discharge was 89% (64% with massive PE and 93% with submassive PE). In conclusion, multidisciplinary, rapid response PE teams offer a unique coordinated approach to patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Susan; John-Stewart, Grace; Egessa, John J; Mubezi, Sezi; Kusemererwa, Sylvia; Bii, Dennis K; Bulya, Nulu; Mugume, Francis; Campbell, James D; Wangisi, Jonathan; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2015-01-01

    During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  4. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Morrison

    Full Text Available During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART, despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  5. Rapidly Progressive Encephalopathy: Initial Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease in an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Afonso Mendes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a rare, incurable and fatal condition that can only be confirmed through neuropathological investigation, such as brain biopsy or post-mortem study. However, a probable diagnosis can be made using clinical criteria. CJD manifests as rapidly progressive dementia with myoclonus and to a lesser extent visual impairment and cerebellar and pyramidal/extrapyramidal signs. We report the case of a previously independent adult male that met all the clinical criteria. Taken together, the investigation results suggested probable CJD.

  6. Sewage sludge as an initial fertility driver for rapid improvement of mudflat salt-soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanchao; Zang, Caiyun; Gu, Minjing; Gu, Chuanhui; Shao, Hongbo; Guan, Yongxiang; Wang, Xukui; Zhou, Xiaojian; Shan, Yuhua; Feng, Ke

    2017-02-01

    Sewage sludge is by-product in the process of centralized wastewater treatment. Land application of sewage sludge is one of the important disposal alternatives. Mudflats in the interaction zone between land and sea can be important alternative sources for arable lands if amended by large amount of organic fertilizers. Rich in organic matter and other nutrients, sewage sludge has been considered as the economic choice for an initial fertility driver. However, sewage sludge amendment has been greatly hampered due to availability of potential toxic metals. Using sewage sludge in compliance with the national standards for agricultural usage could avoid the accumulation of heavy metals. Nevertheless, it is not clear whether massive input of sewage sludge would increase heavy metals concentration in crops. The objective of this study was to investigate impact of sewage sludge amendment (SSA) as an initial fertility driver by one-time input, with the rates of 0, 30, 75, 150, and 300tha -1 , on biomass of green manures, soil chemical properties, and growth and heavy metals uptake of maize (Zea mays L.) grown in mudflat soil. Results showed that one-time sewage sludge amendment promoted an initial fertility for infertile mudflat soil, supported growth of ryegrass as the first season green manure. By tilled ryegrass, it modified the chemical properties of mudflat soil by increasing soil organic carbon, total and available N and P, and decreasing soil salinity and pH, which promoted subsequent growth of two green manures for sesbania and ryegrass. The sewage sludge as an initial fertility driver combined with planting and tilling green manures, increased dry matter of the aerial part and grain yield of maize grown in mudflat soil. Cd and Ni concentrations in grain of maize were positively correlated with sewage sludge amendment rates. Importantly, heavy metal concentrations in grain of maize at all SSA rates did not exceed the safety standard for food in China (GB 2762

  7. Search for Charmonium States Decaying to J/psi gamma gamma Using Initial-State Radiation Events

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, Y K; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We study the processes e+e- -> (J/psi gamma gamma) gamma and e+e- -> (J/psi pi- pi+) gamma where the hard photon radiated from an initial e+e- collision with center-of-mass (CM) energy near 10.58 GeV is detected. In the final state J/psi gamma gamma we consider J/psi pi0, J/psi eta, chi_{c1} gamma, and chi_{c2} gamma candidates. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e+e- CM energy in each event, so these data can be compared with direct e+e- measurements. We report 90% CL upper limits for the integrated cross section times branching fractions of the J/psi gamma gamma channels in the Y(4260) mass region.

  8. RAPID OPTIMAL SPH PARTICLE DISTRIBUTIONS IN SPHERICAL GEOMETRIES FOR CREATING ASTROPHYSICAL INITIAL CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raskin, Cody; Owen, J. Michael [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-038, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Creating spherical initial conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that are spherically conformal is a difficult task. Here, we describe two algorithmic methods for evenly distributing points on surfaces that when paired can be used to build three-dimensional spherical objects with optimal equipartition of volume between particles, commensurate with an arbitrary radial density function. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method against stretched lattice arrangements on the metrics of hydrodynamic stability, spherical conformity, and the harmonic power distribution of gravitational settling oscillations. We further demonstrate how our method is highly optimized for simulating multi-material spheres, such as planets with core–mantle boundaries.

  9. NIAAA's Rapid Response to College Drinking Problems Initiative: Reinforcing the Use of Evidence-Based Approaches in College Alcohol Prevention*

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, William; Larimer, Mary E.; Wood, Mark D.; Hartman, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) created the Rapid Response to College Drinking Problems initiative so that senior college administrators facing an alcohol-related crisis could get assistance from well-established alcohol researchers and NIAAA staff. Method: Based on a competitive grant process, NIAAA selected five teams of research scientists with expertise in college drinking research. NIAAA then invited college administrators to propose interventions to address a recently experienced alcohol-related problem. Between September 2004 and September 2005, NIAAA selected 15 sites and paired each recipient college with a scientific team. Together, each program development/evaluation team, working closely with NIAAA scientific staff, jointly designed, implemented, and evaluated a Rapid Response project. Results: This supplement reports the results of several Rapid Response projects, plus other findings of interest that emerged from that research. Eight articles present evaluation findings for prevention and treatment interventions, which can be grouped by the individual, group/interpersonal, institutional, and community levels of the social ecological framework. Additional studies provide further insights that can inform prevention and treatment programs designed to reduce alcohol-related problems among college students. This article provides an overview of these findings, placing them in the context of the college drinking intervention literature. Conclusions: College drinking remains a daunting problem on many campuses, but evidence-based strategies—such as those described in this supplement—provide hope that more effective solutions can be found. The Rapid Response initiative has helped solidify the necessary link between research and practice in college alcohol prevention and treatment. PMID:19538907

  10. Overcoming challenges to initiating cell therapy clinical trials in rapidly developing countries: India as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Sowmya; Rao, Mahendra; Keating, Armand; Srivastava, Alok

    2013-08-01

    Increasingly, a number of rapidly developing countries, including India, China, Brazil, and others, are becoming global hot spots for the development of regenerative medicine applications, including stem cell-based therapies. Identifying and overcoming regulatory and translational research challenges and promoting scientific and ethical clinical trials with cells will help curb the growth of stem cell tourism for unproven therapies. It will also enable academic investigators, local regulators, and national and international biotechnology and biopharmaceutical companies to accelerate stem cell-based clinical research that could lead to effective innovative treatments in these regions. Using India as a model system and obtaining input from regulators, clinicians, academics, and industry representatives across the stem cell field in India, we reviewed the role of key agencies and processes involved in this field. We have identified areas that need attention and here provide solutions from other established and functioning models in the world to streamline and unify the regulatory and ethics approval processes for cell-based therapies. We also make recommendations to check the growth and functioning of clinics offering unproven treatments. Addressing these issues will remove considerable hurdles to both local and international investigators, accelerate the pace of research and development, and create a quality environment for reliable products to emerge. By doing so, these countries would have taken one important step to move to the forefront of stem cell-based therapeutics.

  11. Search for Charmonium States Decaying to J/\\psi\\gamma \\gamma $ Using Initial-State Radiation Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano,; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL,

    2006-11-30

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma}){gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}){gamma} where the hard photon radiated from an initial e{sup +}e{sup -} collision with center-of-mass (CM) energy near 10.58 GeV is detected. In the final state J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} we consider J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}, J/{psi}{eta}, {chi}{sub c1}{gamma}, and {chi}c{sub 2}{gamma} candidates. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} CM energy in each event, so these data can be compared with direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements. We report 90% CL upper limits for the integrated cross section times branching fractions of the J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} channels in the Y (4260) mass region.

  12. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  13. A simulation study of the electromyographic volley at initiation of rapid isometric contractions in the first dorsal interosseous muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Y; Suzuki, M; Ohkuwa, T; Itoh, H

    1997-01-01

    Monopolar surface electromyograms (EMGs) of rapid isometric abduction of the first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) were initiated from an EMG volley that was characterized by a negative potential lasting over several tens of milliseconds. An EMG model was developed to study how the EMG volley was generated. EMGs were defined as the linear summations of surface-recorded action potential trains originating from single motor units (MUs). All action potential trains had the same discharge pattern but different recruitment thresholds, depending on the potential amplitude. Real action potentials in single MUs in FDI were recorded with a monopolar surface electrode, one of which was used as a prototype wave in simulation. The model predicted an initial negative potential comparable to that of the EMG volley observed in rapid contractions of FDI. Results from our simulation studies suggest that the EMG volley is caused by at least two independent factors: (1) the negative phase of the action potential is greater in area than the positive one, in which the effect is enhanced by the high discharge rate of many MUs; (2) many MUs are recruited within a short time in an orderly fashion starting from those with small action potentials to those with large ones.

  14. DES14X3taz: A TYPE I SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA SHOWING A LUMINOUS, RAPIDLY COOLING INITIAL PRE-PEAK BUMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Castander, F. J.; Casas, R.; Prajs, S.; Papadopoulos, A.; Nichol, R. C.; Karpenka, N. V.; Bernard, S. R.; Brown, P.; Cartier, R.; Cooke, J.; Curtin, C.; Davis, T. M.; Finley, D. A.; Foley, R. J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Goldstein, D. A.; González-Gaitán, S.; Gupta, R. R.; Howell, D. A.; Inserra, C.; Kessler, R.; Lidman, C.; Marriner, J.; Nugent, P.; Pritchard, T. A.; Sako, M.; Smartt, S.; Smith, R. C.; Spinka, H.; Thomas, R. C.; Wolf, R. C.; Zenteno, A.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; Costa, L. N. da; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.

    2016-02-03

    We present DES14X3taz, a new hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN-I) discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova program, with additional photometric data provided by the Survey Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae. Spectra obtained using Optical System for Imaging and low-Intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy on the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS show DES14X3taz is an SLSN-I at z = 0.608. Multi-color photometry reveals a double-peaked light curve: a blue and relatively bright initial peak that fades rapidly prior to the slower rise of the main light curve. Our multi-color photometry allows us, for the first time, to show that the initial peak cools from 22,000 to 8000 K over 15 rest-frame days, and is faster and brighter than any published core-collapse supernova, reaching 30% of the bolometric luminosity of the main peak. No physical Ni-56-powered model can fit this initial peak. We show that a shock-cooling model followed by a magnetar driving the second phase of the light curve can adequately explain the entire light curve of DES14X3taz. Models involving the shock-cooling of extended circumstellar material at a distance of similar or equal to 400 R-circle dot are preferred over the cooling of shock-heated surface layers of a stellar envelope. We compare DES14X3taz to the few double-peaked SLSN-I events in the literature. Although the rise. times and characteristics of these initial peaks differ, there exists the tantalizing possibility that they can be explained by one physical interpretation

  15. Production of muons from heavy flavor decays at forward rapidity in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=2.76  TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B; Adam, J; Adamová, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agocs, A G; Agostinelli, A; Aguilar Salazar, S; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahmad, N; Ahn, S A; Ahn, S U; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Almaráz Aviña, E; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Anson, C; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Äystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldini Ferroli, R; Baldisseri, A; Baldit, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Bán, J; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; 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    2012-09-14

    The ALICE Collaboration has measured the inclusive production of muons from heavy-flavor decays at forward rapidity, 2.5decays in pp collisions is compared to perturbative QCD calculations. The nuclear modification factor is studied as a function of p(t) and collision centrality. A weak suppression is measured in peripheral collisions. In the most central collisions, a suppression of a factor of about 3-4 is observed in 6

  16. Rapid turnover of DnaA at replication origin regions contributes to initiation control of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Katrin; Hervás, Ana B; Rösch, Thomas C; Eisemann, Marc; Schmitt, Bernhard A; Dahlke, Stephan; Kleine-Borgmann, Luise; Murray, Seán M; Graumann, Peter L

    2017-02-01

    DnaA is a conserved key regulator of replication initiation in bacteria, and is homologous to ORC proteins in archaea and in eukaryotic cells. The ATPase binds to several high affinity binding sites at the origin region and upon an unknown molecular trigger, spreads to several adjacent sites, inducing the formation of a helical super structure leading to initiation of replication. Using FRAP analysis of a functional YFP-DnaA allele in Bacillus subtilis, we show that DnaA is bound to oriC with a half-time of 2.5 seconds. DnaA shows similarly high turnover at the replication machinery, where DnaA is bound to DNA polymerase via YabA. The absence of YabA increases the half time binding of DnaA at oriC, showing that YabA plays a dual role in the regulation of DnaA, as a tether at the replication forks, and as a chaser at origin regions. Likewise, a deletion of soj (encoding a ParA protein) leads to an increase in residence time and to overinitiation, while a mutation in DnaA that leads to lowered initiation frequency, due to a reduced ATPase activity, shows a decreased residence time on binding sites. Finally, our single molecule tracking experiments show that DnaA rapidly moves between chromosomal binding sites, and does not arrest for more than few hundreds of milliseconds. In Escherichia coli, DnaA also shows low residence times in the range of 200 ms and oscillates between spatially opposite chromosome regions in a time frame of one to two seconds, independently of ongoing transcription. Thus, DnaA shows extremely rapid binding turnover on the chromosome including oriC regions in two bacterial species, which is influenced by Soj and YabA proteins in B. subtilis, and is crucial for balanced initiation control, likely preventing fatal premature multimerization and strand opening of DnaA at oriC.

  17. Rapid screening test for gestational diabetes: public health need, market requirement, initial product design, and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Zwisler, Greg; Peck, Roger; Abu-Haydar, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Gestational diabetes is a global epidemic where many urban areas in Southeast Asia have found prevalence rates as high as 20%, exceeding the highest prevalence rates in the developed world. It can have serious and life-threatening consequences for mothers and babies. We are developing two variants of a new, simple, low-cost rapid test for screening for gestational diabetes mellitus for use primarily in low-resource settings. The pair of assays, both semiquantitative rapid diagnostic strip tests for glycated albumin, require neither fasting nor an oral glucose challenge test. One variant is an extremely simple strip test to estimate the level of total glycated albumin in blood. The other, which is slightly more complex and expensive, is a test that determines the ratio of glycated albumin to total albumin. The screening results can be used to refer women to receive additional care during delivery to avoid birth complications as well as counseling on diet and exercise during and after pregnancy. Results with the latter test may also be used to start treatment with glucose-lowering drugs. Both assays will be read visually. We present initial results of a preliminary cost-performance comparison model evaluating the proposed test versus existing alternatives. We also evaluated user needs and schematic paper microfluidics-based designs aimed at overcoming the challenge of visualizing relatively narrow differences between normal and elevated levels of glycated albumin in blood.

  18. Angular coefficients of Z bosons produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and decaying to $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity

    CERN Document Server

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Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Tziaferi, Eirini; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Magnani, Alice; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Mazza, Giovanni; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Kim, Jae Yool; Moon, Dong Ho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Korenkov, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Mitsyn, Valeri Valentinovitch; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Tikhonenko, Elena; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Scarborough, Tara; Wu, Zhenbin; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Krohn, Michael; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Ratnikov, Fedor; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Malik, Sudhir; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Primavera, Federica; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Korjenevski, Sergey; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of the five most significant angular coefficients, $A_{0}$ through $A_{4}$, for Z bosons produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and decaying to $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ are presented as a function of the transverse momentum and rapidity of Z boson. The integrated luminosity of the dataset collected with the CMS detector at the LHC corresponds to 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. These measurements provide comprehensive information about Z boson production mechanisms, and are compared to QCD predictions at leading order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbation theory.

  19. Convivial Decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohn, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    maintenance may reach the limits of repair and shift from repair-as-sustaining into a mode of repair- into-decay, actively working towards the end-of-life. What this reveals is that, rather than infrastructural decay being a natural by-product of time’s passing, there is active work that goes into producing...

  20. Elliptic flow of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at mid-rapidity in Pb–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}= 2.76$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Balasubramanian, Supraja; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; 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    2016-09-06

    The elliptic flow of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at mid-rapidity ($|y| < 0.7$) is measured in Pb–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}= 2.76$ TeV with ALICE at the LHC. The particle azimuthal distribution with respect to the reaction plane can be parametrized with a Fourier expansion, where the second coefficient ($v_2$) represents the elliptic flow. The $v_2$ coefficient of inclusive electrons is measured in three centrality classes (0–10%, 10–20% and 20–40%) with the event plane and the scalar product methods in the transverse momentum ($p_{\\rm T}$) intervals 0.5-13 GeV/$c$ and 0.5-8 GeV/$c$, respectively. After subtracting the background, mainly from photon conversions and Dalitz decays of neutral mesons, a positive $v_2$ of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays is observed in all centrality classes, with a maximum significance of $5.9\\sigma$ in the interval $2 < p_{\\rm T} < 2.5$ GeV/$c$ in semicentral collisions (20–40%). The value of $v_2$ decreases towards more centr...

  1. The event generator DECAY4 for simulation of double beta processes and decay of radioactive nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ponkratenko, O A; Zdesenko, Y G; Zdesenko, Yu.G.

    2000-01-01

    The computer code DECAY4 is developed to generate initial energy, time and angular distributions of particles emitted in radioactive decays of nuclides and nuclear (atomic) deexcitations. Data for description of nuclear and atomic decay schemes are taken from the ENSDF and EADL database libraries. The examples of use of the DECAY4 code in several underground experiments are described.

  2. The event generator DECAY4 for simulation of double beta processes and decay of radioactive nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Ponkratenko, O. A.; Tretyak, V I; Zdesenko, Yu. G.

    2001-01-01

    The computer code DECAY4 is developed to generate initial energy, time and angular distributions of particles emitted in radioactive decays of nuclides and nuclear (atomic) deexcitations. Data for description of nuclear and atomic decay schemes are taken from the ENSDF and EADL database libraries. The examples of use of the DECAY4 code in several underground experiments are described.

  3. Rare Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    1998-04-01

    Fifty years after the discovery of the strange quark and the first search for lepton flavor violation in muon decay, extraordinary experimental progress continues to be made on measurements and searches for rare kaon and muon decays. Several important new rare kaon decay channels, including the second order weak flavor-changing-neutral-current process K^+arrowπ^+ν\\overlineν, have been reported recently, and further significant advances are anticipated. Although only null results have been found so far in the quest for lepton flavor violation, there are promising prospects for additional gains in sensitivity of orders of magnitude on such processes as μ→ e γ, nuclear μ → e conversion, K^0_Larrowμ e and Karrowπμ^+e^-. In this presentation, the status of experiments on selected rare decays of kaons and muons will be reviewed.

  4. Initial Accuracy of HIV Rapid Test Kits Stored in Suboptimal Conditions and Validity of Delayed Reading of Oral Fluid Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choko, Augustine T; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; MacPherson, Peter; Cocker, Derek; Khundi, McEwen; Thindwa, Deus; Sambakunsi, Rodrick S; Kumwenda, Moses K; Chiumya, Kondwani; Malema, Owen; Makombe, Simon D; Webb, Emily L; Corbett, Elizabeth L

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of storing commonly used rapid diagnostic tests above manufacturer-recommended temperature (at 37°C), and the accuracy of delayed reading of oral fluid kits with relevance to HIV self-testing programmes. A quality assurance study of OraQuick (OraSure), Determine HIV 1/2™ (Alere) and Uni-Gold™ (Recombigen®). Consecutive adults (≥18y) attending Ndirande Health Centre in urban Blantyre, Malawi in January to April 2012 underwent HIV testing with two of each of the three rapid diagnostic test kits stored for 28 days at either 18°C (optimally-stored) or at 37°C (pre-incubated). Used OraQuick test kits were stored in a laboratory for delayed day 1 and subsequent monthly re-reading was undertaken for one year. Of 378 individuals who underwent parallel testing, 5 (1.3%) were dropped from the final analysis due to discordant or missing reference standard results (optimally-stored Determine and Uni-Gold). Compared to the diagnostic reference standard, OraQuick had a sensitivity of 97.2% (95% CI: 93.6-99.6). There were 7 false negative results among all test kits stored at 37°C and three false negatives among optimally stored kits. Excellent agreement between pre-incubated tests and optimally-stored tests with Kappa values of 1.00 for Determine and Uni-Gold; and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95; 1.00) for OraQuick were observed. There was high visual stability on re-reading of OraQuick, with only 1/375 pre-incubated and 1/371 optimally-stored OraQuick kits changing from the initial result over 12 months. Erroneous results observed during HIV testing in low income settings are likely to be due to factors other than suboptimal storage conditions. Re-reading returned OraQuick kits may offer a convenient and accurate quality assurance approach, including in HIV self-testing programmes.

  5. Decay characteristics and erosion-related transport of glyphosate in Chinese loess soil under field conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, X.; Wang, Fei; Martins Bento, Celia; Meng, L.; Dam, van, R.C.J.; Mol, J.G.J.; Liu, Guobin; Ritsema, C.J.; Geissen, V.

    2015-01-01

    The decay characteristics and erosion-related transport of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were monitored for 35 d at different slope gradients and rates of application in plots with loess soil on the Loess Plateau, China. The initial glyphosate decayed rapidly (half-life of 3.5 d) in the upper 2 cm of soil following a first-order rate of decay. AMPA content in the 0–2 cm soil layer correspondingly peaked 3 d after glyphosate application and then gradually decreased. The resi...

  6. Elevated tropospheric CO2 and O3 may not alter initial wood decomposition rate or wood-decaying fungal community composition of Northern hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel Ebanyenle; Andrew J. Burton; Andrew J. Storer; Dana L. Richter; Jessie A. Glaeser

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of elevated CO2 and/or O3 on the wood-decaying basidiomycete fungal community and wood decomposition rates at the Aspen Free-Air CO2 and O3 Enrichment (Aspen FACE) project. Mass loss rates were determined after one year of log decomposition on the soil...

  7. Attention decay in science

    CERN Document Server

    Parolo, Pietro Della Briotta; Ghosh, Rumi; Huberman, Bernardo A; Kaski, Kimmo; Fortunato, Santo

    2015-01-01

    The exponential growth in the number of scientific papers makes it increasingly difficult for researchers to keep track of all the publications relevant to their work. Consequently, the attention that can be devoted to individual papers, measured by their citation counts, is bound to decay rapidly. In this work we make a thorough study of the life-cycle of papers in different disciplines. Typically, the citation rate of a paper increases up to a few years after its publication, reaches a peak and then decreases rapidly. This decay can be described by an exponential or a power law behavior, as in ultradiffusive processes, with exponential fitting better than power law for the majority of cases. The decay is also becoming faster over the years, signaling that nowadays papers are forgotten more quickly. However, when time is counted in terms of the number of published papers, the rate of decay of citations is fairly independent of the period considered. This indicates that the attention of scholars depends on th...

  8. Measurement of the initial population and decay rate of the ($\\mu ^{4}He)_{2S}^{+}$ system in a helium target at 50 atm

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin, A; Gorini, G; Pitzurra, O; Polacco, E; Torelli, G; Vitale, A; Zavattini, E

    1974-01-01

    The fraction ( epsilon /sub 25/) of negative muons captured by the 2S level of He atoms and the lifetime tau /sub 2S/ of the muons at this level has been observed with pure helium gas at 50 'atm' and 293K. epsilon /sub 2S/, with no Stark effect, =(4.3+or-0.6)*10/sup -2/, for max. Stark effect, =(3.5+or-0.5)*10/sup -2/ and is insignificantly pressure dependent. tau /sub 2S/=(1.43+or-0.15) mu sec. X-rays from a 2S level two-photon decay and the delayed muon decay electron were observed. (7 refs).

  9. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1992-01-01

    The study of b quarks has now reached a stage where it is useful to review what has been learned so far and also to look at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - measurement of the "B" lifetime, B 0 - B 0 mixing, and the observation of b? u transitions, as well as more mundane results on hadronic and semileptonic transitions - are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. S

  10. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    This book reviews the study of b quarks and also looks at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - including measurement of the ""B"" lifetime and observations of b -> u transitions - as well as the more mundane results of hadronic and semileptonic transitions are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. Synthesizing the experimental and theoretical information, the authors d

  11. Elliptic flow of muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at forward rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=2.76$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Zhang, Chunhui; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lehas, Fatiha; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Masui, Hiroshi; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Pant, Divyash; Papcun, Peter; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-02-10

    The elliptic flow, $v_{2}$, of muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at forward rapidity ($2.5 < y < 4$) is measured in Pb--Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC. The scalar product, two- and four-particle $Q$ cumulants and Lee-Yang zeros methods are used. The dependence of the $v_2$ of muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays on the collision centrality, in the range 0--40%, and on transverse momentum, $p_{\\rm T}$, is studied in the interval $3 < p_{\\rm T} < 10$ GeV/$c$. A positive $v_2$ is observed with the scalar product and two-particle $Q$ cumulants in semi-central collisions (10--20% and 20--40% centrality classes) for the $p_{\\rm T}$ interval from 3 to about 5 GeV/$c$. The $v_2$ magnitude tends to decrease towards more central collisions and with increasing $p_{\\rm T}$. It becomes compatible with zero in the interval $6 < p_{\\rm T} < 10{\\rm GeV/}c$. The results are compared to models describing the interaction of heavy quarks and open heavy-...

  12. Elliptic flow of muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at forward rapidity in Pb–Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Adam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The elliptic flow, v2, of muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at forward rapidity (2.5decays on the collision centrality, in the range 0–40%, and on transverse momentum, pT, is studied in the interval 3

  13. Magnesium and chromium isotope evidence for initial melting by radioactive decay of 26Al and late stage impact-melting of the ureilite parent body

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooten, Elishevah M. M. E.; Schiller, Martin; Bizzarro, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Polymict ureilites are meteoritic breccias that provide insights into the differentiation history of the ureilite parent body. We have sampled a total of 24 clasts from the polymict ureilite Dar al Gani 319, representing a variety of lithologies such as mantle residues, cumulates and crustal fragments that are genetically related to monomict ureilites. In addition, we sampled four non-indigenous dark clasts and two chondrule-containing clasts from the same meteorite. We report on the petrology and the bulk mass-dependent and mass-independent magnesium and chromium isotope systematics of these clasts. The DaG 319 polymict ureilite consists predominantly of clasts related to Main Group ureilite residues (MG clasts) with varying Mg#s (0.74-0.91), as well as a significant fraction of olivine-orthopyroxene clasts related to Hughes Type ureilites (HT clasts) with consistently high Mg#s (∼0.89). In addition, DaG 319 contains less abundant feldspathic clasts that are thought to represent melts derived from the ureilite mantle. A significant mass-dependent Mg-isotope fractionation totaling Δμ25 Mg = ∼450 ppm was found between isotopically light feldspathic clasts (μ25 Mg = -305 ± 25 to 15 ± 12 ppm), MG clasts (μ25 Mg = -23 ± 51 ppm) and HT clasts (μ25 Mg = 157 ± 21 ppm). We suggest that this isotopic offset is the result of equilibrium isotope fractionation during melting in the presence of an isotopically light magnesite component. We propose Mg-carbonates to be stable in the upper ureilite mantle, and pure carbon phases such as graphite to be stable at higher pressures. This is consistent with HT clasts lacking carbon-related phases, whereas MG clasts contain abundant carbon. The timing of differentiation events for the ureilitic clasts are constrained by high precision 53Mn-53Cr systematics and 26Al-26Mg model ages. We show that a dichotomy of ages exist between the differentiation of main group ureilite residues and HT cumulates rapidly after CAI formation

  14. Is nitrification the only cause of microbiologically induced chloramine decay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawade, Emma; Monis, Paul; Cook, David; Drikas, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia degradation was investigated in three batch reactors with differing initial concentrations of bacteria present in the same filtered water source based on pre-treatment filtration techniques. The potential for the bacterial community to degrade the ammonia present was determined in the absence of monochloramine, simulating a distribution system where a loss of disinfectant residual has occurred. Nitrification was observed in only one of the three batch reactors, whereas rapid microbiologically induced chloramine decay was present in two reactors. Results suggest that the microbial decay factor is not a valid tool for indication of nitrification, but may be used as an indicator of the occurrence of rapid monochloramine decay. Intact bacterial cell numbers did not to correlate with changes in ammonia, nitrite or nitrate concentrations and hence did not correlate with the nitrification observed. Neither use of the microbial decay factor or monitoring of ammonia oxidising prokaryotes provided an early indication for the occurrence of nitrification. Hence, monitoring of ammonia and nitrite would still be the most suitable tool for indicating nitrification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs.

  16. Imaging of acute pulmonary embolism using a dual energy CT system with rapid kVp switching: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyer, Lucas L., E-mail: Lucas.Geyer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Scherr, Michael, E-mail: michael.scherr@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Körner, Markus, E-mail: markus.koerner@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Wirth, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.wirth@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Deak, Paul, E-mail: paul.deak@ge.com [GE Healthcare, Oskar-Schlemmer-Straße 11, 80807 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F., E-mail: maximilian.reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Linsenmaier, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.linsenmaier@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is considered as clinical gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism (PE). Whereas conventional CTPA only offers anatomic information, dual energy CT (DECT) provides functional information on blood volume as surrogate of perfusion by assessing the pulmonary iodine distribution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of lung perfusion imaging using a single-tube DECT scanner with rapid kVp switching. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with suspicion of acute PE underwent DECT. Two experienced radiologists assessed the CTPA images and lung perfusion maps regarding the presence of PE. The image quality was rated using a semi-quantitative 5-point scale: 1 (=excellent) to 5 (=non-diagnostic). Iodine concentrations were quantified by a ROI analysis. Results: Seventy perfusion defects were identified in 266 lung segments: 13 (19%) were rated as consistent with PE. Five patients had signs of PE at CTPA. All patients with occlusive clots were correctly identified by DECT perfusion maps. On a per patient basis the sensitivity and specificity were 80.0% and 88.9%, respectively, while on a per segment basis it was 40.0% and 97.6%, respectively. None of the patients with a homogeneous perfusion map had an abnormal CTPA. The overall image quality of the perfusion maps was rated with a mean score of 2.6 ± 0.6. There was a significant ventrodorsal gradient of the median iodine concentrations (1.1 mg/cm{sup 3} vs. 1.7 mg/cm{sup 3}). Conclusion: Lung perfusion imaging on a DE CT-system with fast kVp-switching is feasible. DECT might be a helpful adjunct to assess the clinical severity of PE.

  17. Rapid rise and decay in petition signing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yasseri, Taha; Hale, Scott A; Margetts, Helen Z

    2017-01-01

    .... Petition signing is an example of collective action which has gained in popularity with rising use of social media and provides such data for the whole population of petition signatories for a given platform...

  18. Rapid "one-pot" preparation of polymeric monolith via photo-initiated thiol-acrylate polymerization for capillary liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jingyao; Wang, Hongwei; Ou, Junjie; Liu, Zhongshan; Shen, Yehua; Zou, Hanfa

    2016-06-21

    A facile approach was exploited for fast preparation of polymer-based monoliths in UV-transparent fused-silica capillaries via "one-pot" photo-initiated thiol-acrylate polymerization reaction of dipentaerythritolpenta-/hexaacrylate (DPEPA) and 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) in the presence of porogenic solvents (1-butanol and ethylene glycol). Due to relative insensitivity of oxygen inhibition in thiol-ene free-radical polymerization, the polymerization could be performed within 5 min. The effects of composition of prepolymerization solution on the morphology and permeability of poly(ODT-co-DPEPA) monoliths were investigated in detail by adjusting the content of monomer and binary porogen ratio. The physical properties of poly(ODT-co-DPEPA) monoliths were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurement. The evaluation of chromatographic performance was carried out by capillary liquid chromatography (cLC). The results indicated that the poly(ODT-co-DPEPA) monolith was homogeneous and permeable, and also possessed a typical reversed-phase retention mechanism in cLC with high efficiency (∼75,000 N m(-1)) for separation of alkylbenzenes. Eventually, the further separation of tryptic digest of proteins by cLC tandem mass spectrometry (cLC-MS/MS) demonstrated its potential in the analysis of biological samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Tritium decay helium-3 effects in tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shimada

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tritium (T implanted by plasmas diffuses into bulk material, especially rapidly at elevated temperatures, and becomes trapped in neutron radiation-induced defects in materials that act as trapping sites for the tritium. The trapped tritium atoms will decay to produce helium-3 (3He atoms at a half-life of 12.3 years. 3He has a large cross section for absorbing thermal neutrons, which after absorbing a neutron produces hydrogen (H and tritium ions with a combined kinetic energy of 0.76 MeV through the 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the 3He produced in tungsten by tritium decay compared to the neutron-induced helium-4 (4He produced in tungsten. This is important given the fact that helium in materials not only creates microstructural damage in the bulk of the material but alters surface morphology of the material effecting plasma-surface interaction process (e.g. material evolution, erosion and tritium behavior of plasma-facing component materials. Effects of tritium decay 3He in tungsten are investigated here with a simple model that predicts quantity of 3He produced in a fusion DEMO FW based on a neutron energy spectrum found in literature. This study reveals that: (1 helium-3 concentration was equilibrated to ∼6% of initial/trapped tritium concentration, (2 tritium concentration remained approximately constant (94% of initial tritium concentration, and (3 displacement damage from 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction became >1 dpa/year in DEMO FW.

  20. Semileptonic Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  1. Turbulent transport of a passive contaminant in an initially anisotropic turbulence subjected to rapid rotation: an analytical study using linear theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bach, A.; Salhi, A.; Cambon, Claude

    2008-04-01

    The linear effect of rapid rotation is studied on the transport by homogeneous turbulence of a passive scalar with vertical mean scalar gradient. Connection with one-particle diffusion studied by Cambon et al. [C. Cambon, F.S. Godeferd, F. Nicolleau, J.C. Vassilicos, Turbulent diffusion in rapidly rotating turbulence with and without stable stratification, J. Fluid Mech. 499 (2004) 231-255] is discussed. The input of the initial anisotropy of the velocity field is then investigated in the axisymmetric case, using a general and systematic way to construct axisymmetric initial data: a classical expansion in terms of scalar spherical harmonics for the 3D spectral density of kinetic energy and a modified expansion for the polarization anisotropy. The scalar variance exhibits a quadratic evolution (∝t) for short times and a linear one (∝t) for larger times. The long-time behaviour looks similar to the classical 'Brownian' evolution but it has a very different origin: a linear impact of dispersive inertial waves via phase-mixing instead of a nonlinearly-induced random walk. It is shown that this trend is not altered by the polarization anisotropy. The vertical scalar flux varies linearly with time for short times and tends to a plateau for larger times. To cite this article: A. El Bach et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  2. Nonexponential Quantum Decay under Environmental Decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beau, M.; Kiukas, J.; Egusquiza, I. L.; del Campo, A.

    2017-09-01

    A system prepared in an unstable quantum state generally decays following an exponential law, as environmental decoherence is expected to prevent the decay products from recombining to reconstruct the initial state. Here we show the existence of deviations from exponential decay in open quantum systems under very general conditions. Our results are illustrated with the exact dynamics under quantum Brownian motion and suggest an explanation of recent experimental observations.

  3. Measuring and Improving Value of Care in Oncology Practices: ASCO Programs from Quality Oncology Practice Initiative to the Rapid Learning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Joseph O; Neuss, Michael N; Hauser, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Rising cancer care costs are no longer sustainable. Medical oncologists must focus on providing the maximum value to their patients; improving short-term, intermediate and long-term outcomes; and managing overall costs. Accurate measurement of outcomes and overall cost is essential to informing providers and institutions and in the quest for continuous improvement in value. The ASCO Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) is an excellent tool for sampling processes of care in medical oncology practices. To achieve the larger goal of improving the value of cancer care, ASCO is investing in the development of a Rapid Learning System, which will leverage emerging information technologies to more accurately measure outcomes (including those reported by the patient) and costs, resulting in highly efficient, effective, and safe cancer care.

  4. Rapid, non-destructive and non-contact inspection of solid foods by means of photothermal radiometry; thermal effusivity and initial heating coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbertsen, A.; Bicanic, D.; Gielen, J. L. W.; Chirtoc, M.

    2004-03-01

    CO 2-laser photothermal radiometry (PTR) was demonstrated to be suitable for the non-destructive and non-contact characterization (both optical and thermal) of solid phase agricultural commodities (fresh vegetables, fruits) and confectionery products (candy). Proper interpretation of PTR signals enable one to calculate two parameters, i.e. the well known thermal effusivity e ( e= λρc p, where λ and ρcp are the thermal conductivity and the volume specific heat, respectively) and a newly introduced physical quantity termed 'initial heating coefficient' chi ( χ= β/( ρcp), β is the absorption coefficient). Obtained values for e are in a good agreement with data reported in the literature. PTR enables one to rapidly determine e via a single measurement. As opposed to this, the knowledge of two out of three thermophysical parameters (thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and volume specific heat) is a condition sine qua non for determining effusivity in the conventional manner.

  5. Development of a Rapid Cartilage Damage Quantification Method for the Lateral Tibiofemoral Compartment Using Magnetic Resonance Images: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to expand and validate the cartilage damage index (CDI to detect cartilage damage in the lateral tibiofemoral compartment. We used an iterative 3-step process to develop and validate the lateral CDI: development (100 knees, testing (80 knees, and validation (100 knees. The validation set included 100 knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative that was enriched to include all grades of lateral joint space narrowing (JSN, 0–3. Measurement of the CDI was rapid at 7.4 (s.d. 0.73 minutes per knee pair (baseline and follow-up of one knee. The intratester reliability is good (intraclass correlation coefficient (3, 1 model = 0.86 to 0.98. At baseline, knees with greater KL grade and lateral JSN had a lower mean CDI (i.e., greater cartilage damage. Baseline lateral CDI is associated with both lateral JSW (r=0.81 to 0.85, p<0.01 and HKA (r=-0.30 to −0.33, p<0.05. The SRM is good (lateral femur SRM = −0.76; lateral tibia SRM = −0.73; lateral tibiofemoral total SRM = −0.87. The lateral tibiofemoral CDI quantification allows for rapid evaluation and is reliable and responsive, with good construct validity. It may be an efficient method to measure lateral tibiofemoral articular cartilage in large clinical and epidemiologic studies.

  6. Decay characteristics and erosion-related transport of glyphosate in Chinese loess soil under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaomei; Wang, Fei; Bento, Célia P M; Meng, Lei; van Dam, Ruud; Mol, Hans; Liu, Guobin; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2015-10-15

    The decay characteristics and erosion-related transport of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were monitored for 35 d at different slope gradients and rates of application in plots with loess soil on the Loess Plateau, China. The initial glyphosate decayed rapidly (half-life of 3.5d) in the upper 2 cm of soil following a first-order rate of decay. AMPA content in the 0-2 cm soil layer correspondingly peaked 3d after glyphosate application and then gradually decreased. The residues of glyphosate and AMPA decreased significantly with soil depth (pglyphosate initially applied was transported from plots after one erosive rain 2d after the application. Glyphosate and AMPA concentrations in runoff were low while the contents in the sediment were much higher than in the upper 2 cm of the soil. Although the rate of glyphosate decay is rapid in Chinese loess soil, the risks of glyphosate and AMPA need to be taken into account especially in the area with highly erosive rainfall. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Economic and clinical effects of evaluating rapid viral response to peginterferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin for the initial treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, John B; Davis, Gary L; McHutchison, John G; Manns, Michael P; Albrecht, Janice K

    2003-11-01

    Evaluation of 12-wk viral response to initial antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C has been recommended to minimize antiviral-associated morbidity and costs. The aim of this study was to examine the economic and clinical effects of evaluating rapid viral response during antiviral therapy for treatment naive chronic hepatitis C patients. We applied viral response and drug dosage from an international randomized clinical trial of ribavirin plus peginterferon alfa-2b or ribavirin plus interferon alfa-2b to a previously published computer cohort simulation to project lifelong clinical and economic outcomes. Natural history and economic estimates were based on published literature, expert panel estimates, and actual variable and reimbursement cost data. The assessment of 12-wk rapid viral response reduced antiviral treatment duration by 40-44% and antiviral costs by 44-45% (savings of $15,116-16,268 for peginterferon plus ribavirin and $8300 for interferon plus ribavirin) compared to full 48-wk dosing. With the 12-wk evaluation, the marginal cost-effectiveness of peginterferon plus ribavirin versus interferon plus ribavirin was $13,600-22,800 compared with $14,600-25,000 per discounted quality adjusted life-year gained with the 24-wk evaluation. For genotype 1, hepatitis C infected patients, 12-wk testing for peginterferon plus ribavirin remaining preferred and cost-effective compared with interferon plus ribavirin. For genotype 2 or 3, hepatitis C infected patients, 12-wk testing yielded similar results to those of 24-wk treatment. Assessment of 12-wk viral response in genotype 1, hepatitis C infected patients should reduce peginterferon plus ribavirin morbidity and costs and improve its cost-effectiveness; however, for genotype 2 and 3, hepatitis C infected patients, 12-wk testing and 24-wk treatment have similar outcomes. Decisions regarding continuation of antiviral treatment should also consider the variability in the accuracy of quantitative viral assays as

  8. Assimilation of GOES satellite-based convective initiation and cloud growth observations into the Rapid Refresh and HRRR systems to improve aviation forecast guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecikalski, John; Smith, Tracy; Weygandt, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Latent heating profiles derived from GOES satellite-based cloud-top cooling rates are being assimilated into a retrospective version of the Rapid Refresh system (RAP) being run at the Global Systems Division. Assimilation of these data may help reduce the time lag for convection initiation (CI) in both the RAP model forecasts and in 3-km High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model runs that are initialized off of the RAP model grids. These data may also improve both the location and organization of developing convective storm clusters, especially in the nested HRRR runs. These types of improvements are critical for providing better convective storm guidance around busy hub airports and aviation corridor routes, especially in the highly congested Ohio Valley - Northeast - Mid-Atlantic region. Additional work is focusing on assimilating GOES-R CI algorithm cloud-top cooling-based latent heating profiles directly into the HRRR model. Because of the small-scale nature of the convective phenomena depicted in the cloud-top cooling rate data (on the order of 1-4 km scale), direct assimilation of these data in the HRRR may be more effective than assimilation in the RAP. The RAP is an hourly assimilation system developed at NOAA/ESRL and was implemented at NCEP as a NOAA operational model in May 2012. The 3-km HRRR runs hourly out to 15 hours as a nest within the ESRL real-time experimental RAP. The RAP and HRRR both use the WRF ARW model core, and the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) is used within an hourly cycle to assimilate a wide variety of observations (including radar data) to initialize the RAP. Within this modeling framework, the cloud-top cooling rate-based latent heating profiles are applied as prescribed heating during the diabatic forward model integration part of the RAP digital filter initialization (DFI). No digital filtering is applied on the 3-km HRRR grid, but similar forward model integration with prescribed heating is used to assimilate

  9. Tooth decay - early childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottle mouth; Bottle carries; Baby bottle tooth decay; Early childhood caries (ECC) ... inside of your baby's mouth healthy and prevents tooth decay. If you are bottle-feeding your baby: Give babies, ages newborn to ...

  10. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  11. Towards Elimination of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV: The Impact of a Rapid Results Initiative in Nyanza Province, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa L. Dillabaugh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many HIV-positive pregnant women and infants are still not receiving optimal services, preventing the goal of eliminating mother-to-child transmission (MTCT and improving maternal child health overall. A Rapid Results Initiative (RRI approach was utilized to address key challenges in delivery of prevention of MTCT (PMTCT services including highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART uptake for women and infants. The RRI was conducted between April and June 2011 at 119 health facilities in five districts in Nyanza Province, Kenya. Aggregated site-level data were compared at baseline before the RRI (Oct 2010–Jan 2011, during the RRI, and post-RRI (Jul–Sep 2011 using pre-post cohort analysis. HAART uptake amongst all HIV-positive pregnant women increased by 40% (RR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2–1.7 and continued to improve post-RRI (RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.4–1.8. HAART uptake in HIV-positive infants remained stable (RR 1.1, 95% CI 0.9–1.4 during the RRI and improved by 30% (RR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0–1.6 post-RRI. Significant improvement in PMTCT services can be achieved through introduction of an RRI, which appears to lead to sustained benefits for pregnant HIV-infected women and their infants.

  12. MODEL RADIOACTIVE RADON DECAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I. Parovik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In a model of radioactive decay of radon in the sample (222Rn. The model assumes that the probability of the decay of radon and its half-life depends on the fractal properties of the geological environment. The dependencies of the decay parameters of the fractal dimension of the medium.

  13. Rare Decays at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sam

    2014-04-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons provide an effective method of testing the Standard Model and probing possible new physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment has published a variety of interesting results in this field, some of which are presented here. In particular the measurements of the branching fractions of B(s)0 → μ+μ- which, in combination with CMS, resulted in the first observation of the Bs0 → μ+μ- decay. Other topics include searches for the rare decay D0 → μ+μ-, the lepton flavour violating decays B(s)0 → e±μ∓, and the observation of the ψ(4160) resonance in the region of low recoil in B+ → K+μ+μ- decay. New results on the angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0μ+μ- with form factor independent observables are also shown.

  14. Rare Decays at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Sam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons provide an effective method of testing the Standard Model and probing possible new physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment has published a variety of interesting results in this field, some of which are presented here. In particular the measurements of the branching fractions of B(s0 → μ+μ− which, in combination with CMS, resulted in the first observation of the Bs0 → μ+μ− decay. Other topics include searches for the rare decay D0 → μ+μ−, the lepton flavour violating decays B(s0 → e±μ∓, and the observation of the ψ(4160 resonance in the region of low recoil in B+ → K+μ+μ− decay. New results on the angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0μ+μ− with form factor independent observables are also shown.

  15. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Lucia [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria,Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR) CONICET, UNMDP, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2016-08-15

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width. (orig.)

  16. Acidity decay of above-drainage underground mines in West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, B; McDonald, L M; Skousen, J

    2010-01-01

    Acidity of water from abandoned underground mines decreases over time, and the rate of decrease can help formulate remediation approaches and treatment system designs. The objective of this study was to determine an overall acidity decay rate for above-drainage underground mines in northern West Virginia from a large data set of mines that were closed 50 to 70 yr ago. Water quality data were obtained from 30 Upper Freeport and 7 Pittsburgh coal seam mines in 1968, 1980, 2000, and 2006, and acidity decay curves were calculated. The mean decay constant, k, for Upper Freeport mines was 2.73 x 10(-2) yr(-1), with a 95% confidence interval of +/- 0.0052, whereas the k value for Pittsburgh mines was not significantly different at 4.26 x 10(-2) yr(-1) +/- 0.017. Acidity from the T&T mine, which was closed 12 yr ago, showed a k value of 11.25 x 10(-2) yr(-1). This higher decay rate was likely due to initial flushing of accumulated metal salts on reaction surfaces in the mine, rapid changes in mine hydrology after closure, and treatment. Although each site showed a specific decay rate (varying from 0.04 x 10(-2) yr(-1) to 13.1 x 10(-2) yr(-1)), the decay constants of 2.7 x 10(-2) yr(-1) to 4.3 x 10(-2) yr(-1) are useful for predicting water quality trends and overall improvements across a wide spectrum of abandoned underground mines. We found first-order decay models improve long-term prediction of acidity declines from above-drainage mines compared with linear or percent annual decrease models. These predictions can help to select water treatment plans and evaluate costs for these treatments over time.

  17. Rapid elimination kinetics of free PSA or human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 after initiation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-antagonist treatment of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulmert, David; Vickers, Andrew J; Scher, Howard I

    2012-01-01

    The utility of conventional prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements in blood for monitoring rapid responses to treatment for prostate cancer is limited because of its slow elimination rate. Prior studies have shown that free PSA (fPSA), intact PSA (iPSA) and human kallikrein-related peptidase...... of tPSA, fPSA, iPSA and hK2 after rapid induction of castration with degarelix (Firmagon(®)), a novel GnRH antagonist....

  18. Decay property of Timoshenko system in thermoelasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2011-12-30

    We investigate the decay property of a Timoshenko system of thermoelasticity in the whole space for both Fourier and Cattaneo laws of heat conduction. We point out that although the paradox of infinite propagation speed inherent in the Fourier law is removed by changing to the Cattaneo law, the latter always leads to a solution with the decay property of the regularity-loss type. The main tool used to prove our results is the energy method in the Fourier space together with some integral estimates. We derive L 2 decay estimates of solutions and observe that for the Fourier law the decay structure of solutions is of the regularity-loss type if the wave speeds of the first and the second equations in the system are different. For the Cattaneo law, decay property of the regularity-loss type occurs no matter what the wave speeds are. In addition, by restricting the initial data to U 0∈H s(R)∩L 1,γ(R) with a suitably large s and γ ∈ [0,1], we can derive faster decay estimates with the decay rate improvement by a factor of t -γ/2. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Accelerated detection of brown-rot decay : comparison of soil block test, chemical analysis, mechanical properties, and immunodetection

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. A. Clausen; S. N. Kartal

    2003-01-01

    Early detection of wood decay is critical because decay fungi can cause rapid structural failure. The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different methods purported to detect brown-rot decay in the early stages of development. The immunodiagnostic wood decay (IWD)test, soil block test/cake pan test, mechanical property tests, and chemical...

  20. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  1. Light stop decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeber, Ramona [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Muehlleitner, Margarete; Wlotzka, Alexander [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Wolfgang-Gaede Str. 1, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Popenda, Eva [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5323 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    We investigate scenarios in the MSSM with a stop being the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle and a neutralino as lightest supersymmetric particle, where the difference between the stop mass and the neutralino mass is less than the top quark mass. Depending on this mass difference the stop can undergo either a three-body decay into a neutralino, a W boson and a bottom quark, or a four-body decay into a neutralino, a bottom quark and two light fermions, or the stop can decay via flavor-changing neutral currents into an up/charm quark and a neutralino. We improve the calculations of the branching ratios (BRs) of these decay modes by including next-to-leading order corrections for the flavor changing decays and by taking into account the mass of the bottom quark and the tau lepton in the four-body decay. Moreover, flavor effects are incorporated in both the three- and the four-body decay and threshold effects at the W boson threshold are correctly taken into account. We find that the BRs can deviate significantly from one, leading to weaker stop exclusion limits.

  2. Charm Decays at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, M.

    2004-10-04

    The results of several studies of charmed mesons and baryons at BABAR are presented. First, searches for the rare decays D{sup 0} {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented and new upper limits on these processes are established. Second, a measurement of the branching fraction of the isospin-violating hadronic decay D*{sub s}(2112){sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} relative to the radiative decay D*{sub s}(2112){sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma} is made. Third, the decays of D*{sub sJ}(2317){sup +} and D{sub sJ}(2460){sup +} mesons are studied and ratios of branching fractions are measured. Fourth, Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} are examined and their branching fractions measured relative to Cabibbo-allowed modes. Fifth, the {Chi}{sub c}{sup 0} is studied through its decays to {Chi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Omega}{sup -}K{sup +}; in addition to measuring the ratio of branching fractions for {Chi}{sub c}{sup 0} produced from the c{bar c} continuum, the uncorrected momentum spectrum is measured, providing clear confirmation of {Chi}{sub c}{sup 0} production in B decays.

  3. CHLORINE DECAY AND BIOFILM STUDIES IN A PILOT SCALE DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION DEAD END PIPE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorine decay experiments using a pilot-scale water distribution dead end pipe system were conducted to define relationships between chlorine decay and environmental factors. These included flow rate, biomass concentration and biofilm density, and initial chlorine concentrations...

  4. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Deadlines Grant Application Forms Application Receipt Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write ... before they decay will also save time and money in the long run by avoiding fillings, crowns, ...

  5. Radiative decays at LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubega, L. E., E-mail: lavinia-elena.giubega@cern.ch [Horia Hulubei Institute for R& D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) (Romania); Collaboration: LHCb Collaboration

    2016-12-15

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ and B{sub s} → ϕγ, the direct CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B{sup ±} → K{sup ±}π{sup ∓}π{sup ±}γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb{sup –1} of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb{sup –1} of data, respectively.

  6. Decay ring design

    CERN Document Server

    Chancé, A; Bouquerel, E; Hancock, S; Jensen, E

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pureand very intense fluxes of high energy, well collimated neutrinos with a welldetermined energy spectrum. A dedicated machine seems to be necessarynowadays to reach the required flux. A new concept based on the β-decayof radioactive ions which were accelerated in an accelerator chain was thenproposed. After ion production, stripping, bunching and acceleration, the unstableions are then stored in a racetrack-shaped superconducting decay ring.Finally, the ions are accumulated in the decay ring until being lost. The incomingbeam is merged to the stored beam by using a specific RF system, whichwill be presented here.We propose here to study some aspects of the decay ring, such as its opticalproperties, its RF system or the management of the losses which occur in thering (mainly by decay or by collimation).

  7. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  8. Hyperon decays and QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Gaillard, J M; Gastmans, Raymond; Jacob, Maurice René Michel; Speiser, D; Weyers, J

    1980-01-01

    In an experiment in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) charged hyperon beam, 2400 Omega /sup -/ decays have been collected. The analysis of the Omega /sup -/ sample has given an accurate measurement of the Omega /sup -/ lifetime ( tau ( Omega /sup -/)=(0.822+or-0.028) *10/sup -10/ s) and the first determination of the Omega /sup -/ decay branching ratios. In particular the measured ratio Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup 0/ pi /sup -/)/ Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/) is 2.94+or-0.35, while a pure Delta I=1/2 amplitude would have given 2.03. A ratio of about 3 between those two decay modes had in fact been predicted by Finjord using the QCD framework. The author discusses briefly what QCD has to say about hyperon decays, then describes the Omega /sup -/ experiment and the analysis results. (8 refs).

  9. Aspects of B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven

    2011-03-04

    B-meson decays are a good probe for testing the flavour sector of the standard model of particle physics. The standard model describes at present all experimental data satisfactorily, although some ''tensions'' exist, i.e. two to three sigma deviations from the predictions, in particular in B decays. The arguments against the standard model are thus purely theoretical. These tensions between experimental data and theoretical predictions provide an extension of the standard model by new physics contributions. Within the flavour sector main theoretical uncertainties are related to the hadronic matrix elements. For exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays QCD sum rule techniques, which are suitable for studying hadronic matrix elements, however, with substantial, but estimable hadronic uncertainties, are used. The exploration of new physics effects in B-meson decays is done in an twofold way. In exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays the effect of additional right-handed vector as well as left- and right-handed scalar and tensor hadronic current structures in the decay rates and the form factors are studied at the non-recoil point. As a second approach one studied the non-leptonic B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}J/{psi}{phi} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S,L} decays discussing CP violating effects in the time-dependent decay amplitudes by considering new physics phase in the B{sup 0}- anti B{sup 0} mixing phase. (orig.)

  10. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  11. Leptonic Charm Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, Bo

    2011-01-01

    We review the recent experimental results on D and Ds meson leptonic decays from CLEO-c, Belle, and BABAR, which results in the decay constants f_D= (206.7 +- 8.9) MeV and f_Ds= (257.3 +- 5.3) MeV. The latter is an average obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG). Comparisons with Lattice QCD (LQCD) calculations are discussed.

  12. Demkov-Kunike models with decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmoe, M. B.; Tchapda, A. B.; Fai, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    Exact analytical solutions to the dissipative time-dependent Schrödinger equation are obtained for a decaying two-state system with decay rates Γ1 and Γ2 for the levels with extremal spin projections. The system is coherently driven with a pulse whose detuning is made up of two parts: a time-dependent part (chirp) of hyperbolic-tangent shape and a static part with real and imaginary terms. This gives us a wide range of possibilities to arbitrarily select the interaction terms. We considered two versions which led to decaying Demkov-Kunike (DK) models; the version in which the Rabi frequency (interaction) is a time-dependent hyperbolic-secant function (called decaying DK1 model) and the case when it is constant in time and never turns off (decaying DK2 model). Our analytical solutions account for all possible initial moments instead of only t0 = 0 or t0 = - ∞ as for non-decaying models and may be useful for the experiments on level crossings. Two complementary limits of the pulse detuning are considered and explored: the limit of fast (i) and slow rise (ii). In the case (i), the coupling between level positions in the first DK model collapses, while the second DK model reduces to a Rabi model (constant Hamiltonian), in the case (ii), both DK models reduce to the LZ model. In both cases (i) and (ii), analytical approximated solutions which conveniently approach the exact solutions are derived.

  13. Double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.; Picciotto, C.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of double beta decay is reviewed with emphasis on its relevance to lepton number conservation. Recently, the ratio of the double beta-decay half-lives of /sup 128/Te and /sup 130/Te has been measured in a geological experiment and a limit for the ratio of the neutrinoless rate to the total rate for /sup 82/Se decay has been obtained from a direct-detection experiment. For the first time, these results show conclusively that double beta decay is not primarily a lepton-number-violating neutrinoless process. However, they also do not agree with calculations which assume that only lepton-number-conserving two-neutrino double beta decay occurs. The conclusion that lepton number conservation is violated is suggested by limited experimental information. By considering contributions to the total rate from both the two-neutrino and the neutrinoless channels, we obtain data which are consistent with a lepton nonconservation parameter of order eta=3.5 x 10/sup -5/. Roughly the same value of eta is obtained by assuming that the decay occurs either via lepton emission from two nucleons or via emission from a resonance in the nucleus.

  14. Optic neuritis and rapidly progressive necrotizing retinitis as the initial signs of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: a case report with clinical and histopathologic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oray, Merih; Tuncer, Samuray; Kir, Nur; Karacorlu, Murat; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) presenting first with optic neuritis and rapidly progressive necrotizing retinitis at the posterior pole. We reviewed the clinical, laboratory, photographic, angiographic, and histopathologic records of a patient with SSPE. A 15-year-old girl was referred after rapid loss of vision due to optic neuritis and macular necrosis in the right eye. She had a history of cardiac valve surgery, but had no systemic symptoms and extensive work-up was unrewarding. Contralateral involvement with rapidly progressive optic neuritis and macular necrotizing retinitis prompted retinochoroidal biopsy of the right eye, which revealed necrosis of inner retinal layers and perivascular lymphoplasmocytic infiltration with intact choroid and outer retina without any findings of inclusion bodies, microorganisms, or atypical cells. The diagnosis was based on histopathologic findings consistent with SSPE, and detection of elevated measles antibody titers in cerebrospinal fluid and serum. It was further confirmed by development of typical electroencephalography pattern at 6 months and neurological symptoms at 4-year follow-up. Clinicians need to be aware that optic neuritis and necrotizing retinitis at the posterior pole may be the presenting features of SSPE.

  15. Exponential decay for solutions to semilinear damped wave equation

    KAUST Repository

    Gerbi, Stéphane

    2011-10-01

    This paper is concerned with decay estimate of solutions to the semilinear wave equation with strong damping in a bounded domain. Intro- ducing an appropriate Lyapunov function, we prove that when the damping is linear, we can find initial data, for which the solution decays exponentially. This result improves an early one in [4].

  16. Improvement of the decay heat removal characteristics of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor; Amelioration des caracteristiques de la dissipation de la chaleur de decroissance pour les reacteurs a neutrons rapides de quatrieme generation refroidi au gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epiney, A.S.

    2010-09-07

    The main drawback of the GFR is the difficulty to evacuate decay heat following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) due to the low thermal inertia of the core, as well as to the low coolant density. The present doctoral research focuses on the improvement of decay heat removal (DHR) for the Generation-IV GFR. The reference GFR system design considered in the thesis is the 2006 CEA concept, with a power of 2400 MWth. The CEA 2006 DHR strategy foresees, in all accidental cases (independent of the system pressure), that the reactor is shut down. For high pressure events, dedicated DHR loops with blowers and heat exchangers are designed to operate when the power conversion system cannot be used to provide acceptable core temperatures under natural convection conditions. For de-pressurized events, the strategy relies on a dedicated small containment (called the guard containment) providing an intermediate back-up pressure. The DHR blowers, designed to work under these pressure conditions, need to be powered either by the power grid or by batteries for at least 24 hours. The specific contributions of the present research - aimed at achieving enhanced passivity of the DHR system for the GFR - are design and analysis related to (1) the injection of heavy gas into the primary circuit after a LOCA, to enable natural convection cooling at an intermediate-pressure level, and (2) an autonomous Brayton loop to evacuate decay heat at low primary pressure in case of a loss of the guard containment pressure. Both these developments reduce the dependence on blower power availability considerably. First, the thermal-hydraulic codes used in the study - TRACE and CATHARE - are validated for gas cooling. The validation includes benchmark comparisons between the codes, serving to identify the sensitivity of the results to the different modeling assumptions. The parameters found to be the most sensitive in this analysis, such as heat transfer and friction models, are then validated via a

  17. CP violation in B decay

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2001-01-01

    We review the physics of CP violation in B decays. After introducing the CKM matrix and how it causes CP violation, we cover three types of CP violation that can occur in B decays: CP violation in mixing, CP violation by mixing-decay interference, and CP violation in decay.

  18. Two-jet decay of particles with heavy quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1981-04-01

    We examine the possibility that heavy quarks may have significant two-jet decays resulting from the process h..-->..l+gluon with h (l) being the initial (final) heavy (light) quark in addition to the usual three-jet decay process h..-->..qq-barq. The process h..-->..l+g is found to occur with a branching ratio approx. =10% for b-quark decay and approx. =1% for t-quark decay (for m/sub t/approx. =25 GeV).

  19. Decay dynamics of nascent acetonitrile and nitromethane dipole-bound anions produced by intracluster charge-transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yandell, Margaret A.; King, Sarah B. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neumark, Daniel M., E-mail: dneumark@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    Decay dynamics of nascent dipole bound states of acetonitrile and nitromethane are examined using time-resolved photoelectron imaging of iodide-acetonitrile (I{sup −}·CH{sub 3}CN) and iodide-nitromethane (I{sup −}·CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}) complexes. Dipole-bound anions are created by UV-initiated electron transfer to the molecule of interest from the associated iodide ion at energies just below the vertical detachment energy of the halide-molecule complex. The acetonitrile anion is observed to decay biexponentially with time constants in the range of 4–900 ps. In contrast, the dipole bound state of nitromethane decays rapidly over 400 fs to form the valence bound anion. The nitromethane valence anion species then decays biexponentially with time constants of 2 ps and 1200 ps. The biexponential decay dynamics in acetonitrile are interpreted as iodine atom loss and autodetachment from the excited dipole-bound anion, followed by slower autodetachment of the relaxed metastable ion, while the dynamics of the nitromethane system suggest that a dipole-bound anion to valence anion transition proceeds via intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution to nitro group modes in the vicinity of the iodine atom.

  20. Flavor Violating Higgs Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnik, Roni [Fermilab; Kopp, Joachim [Fermilab; Zupan, Jure [Cincinnati U.

    2013-03-05

    We study a class of nonstandard interactions of the newly discovered 125 GeV Higgs-like resonance that are especially interesting probes of new physics: flavor violating Higgs couplings to leptons and quarks. These interaction can arise in many frameworks of new physics at the electroweak scale such as two Higgs doublet models, extra dimensions, or models of compositeness. We rederive constraints on flavor violating Higgs couplings using data on rare decays, electric and magnetic dipole moments, and meson oscillations. We confirm that flavor violating Higgs boson decays to leptons can be sizeable with, e.g., h → τμ and h → τe branching ratios of (10%) perfectly allowed by low energy constraints. We estimate the current LHC limits on h → τμ and h → τe decays by recasting existing searches for the SM Higgs in the ττ channel and find that these bounds are already stronger than those from rare tau decays. We also show that these limits can be improved significantly with dedicated searches and we outline a possible search strategy. Flavor violating Higgs decays therefore present an opportunity for discovery of new physics which in some cases may be easier to access experimentally than flavor conserving deviations from the Standard Model Higgs framework.

  1. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  2. Beta and muon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, A.; Pascual, P.

    1967-07-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  3. Monitoring decay of black gum wood (Nyssa sylvatica) during growth of the shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes) using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, Christopher H

    2003-05-01

    Abstract diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT) and elemental analysis were employed to monitor biodegradation of black gum wood (Nyssa sylvatica) during growth of the shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes). Black gum was decayed for up to 4.3 years by L. edodes, during which time it was sampled at 19, 31, and 52 months. Biodegraded woods displayed increased % O (w/w) and decreased % C (w/w) relative to the undecayed control. The DRIFT spectra of decayed black gum showed a decrease in relative intensity of absorption bands at 1735 cm(-1) assigned to carboxyl functional groups from xylans and an increase in the absorption band at 1640 cm(-1) assigned to conjugated carbonyl groups originating from lignin. Xylan decay was rapid initially but slowed after 19 months; however, oxidative decay of the lignin side chains occurred throughout the 52-month decay period. Overall elemental and DRIFT data show that both polysaccharides and lignin were decayed during cultivation of the edible white-rot fungus.

  4. Supersymmetric Exotic Decays of the 125 GeV Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jinrui [Los Alamos; Liu, Tao [Hong Kong U. Sci. Tech.; Wang, Lian-Tao [Chicago U., KICP; Yu, Felix [Fermilab

    2014-06-04

    We reveal a set of novel decay topologies for the 125 GeV Higgs boson in supersymmetry which are initiated by its decay into a pair of neutralinos, and discuss their collider search strategies. This category of exotic Higgs decays are characterized by the collider signature: visible objects + $\\mbox{${\

  5. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  6. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  7. Monosegment ALPPS: A new variant of the techniques for rapid hepatic regeneration. Critical review of the initial results of our series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvá Orón, Eva María; Maupoey Ibáñez, Javier; Bañuelos Carrillo, Rómulo; Boscà Robledo, Andrea; Orbis Castellanos, Juan Francisco; Moya Herraiz, Ángel; Ballester Vallés, Carmen; Pérez Rojas, Judith; Aparicio Urtasun, Jorge; López-Andújar, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) is a novel surgical technique that provides fast and effective growth of liver remnant volume, allowing surgical resection of hepatic lesions initially considered unresectable. Short and long-term results and the convenience of carrying out this technique are issues that still remain under debate while waiting for the final outcomes of the multicenter registries with larger number of cases. The aim of this paper is to describe, from a critical point of view, the outcomes of the cases performed at our center (n=8). On the other hand, it is possible to leave only one hepatic segment as a liver remnant and we illustrate this new surgical procedure (ALPPS monosegment) performed in one patient. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-06

    Oct 6, 2012 ... The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given. Keywords. Double beta ...

  9. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Abstract. The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given.

  10. $\\tau$ decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Sobie, Randall J

    1997-01-01

    The measurements of the properties of the tau lepton are becoming increasingly more precise. We show that these results can be used to test the Standard Model. In addition, we illustrate how the hadronic decays of the tau can be used to study the strong interaction. (12 refs).

  11. Teleportation via decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We present a rare example of a decay mechanism playing a constructive role in quantum information processing. We show how the state of an atom trapped in a cavity can be teleported to a second atom trapped in a distant cavity by the joint detection of photon leakage from the cavities. The scheme, which is ...

  12. Rare Decays With LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Mancinelli, Giampiero

    2012-01-01

    Rare decays involving leptons or photons in the final states are studied using 1.0 fb^{-1} of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s}=7TeV collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011. We present results of measurements of branching ratios, angular distributions, and isospin asymmetries obtained using this data sample.

  13. Discoloration & decay in oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex L. Shigo

    1971-01-01

    Diseases that result in discoloration and decay of wood are major problems affecting all species of oak. Wounds often start the processes that can lead to these diseases. The type and severity of the wound, the vigor of the tree, the environment, and the aggressiveness of microorganisms that infect are some of the most important factors that determine the nature of the...

  14. Rare Kaon Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    2010-06-01

    The prospects for measuring the ultra-rare decays K^ + -> π ^ + ν /line ν and KL0 -> π 0 ν /line ν are discussed. Several new experiments are being constructed or have been proposed at existing facilities and ideas for reaching very high precision experiments at a future high intensity proton source like Project X ICD2 are under discussion.

  15. Fine root decay rates vary widely among lowland tropical tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich, James W; Russell, Ann E; Valverde-Barrantes, Oscar

    2009-08-01

    Prolific fine root growth coupled with small accumulations of dead fine roots indicate rapid rates of fine root production, mortality and decay in young tree plantations in lowland Costa Rica. However, published studies indicate that fine roots decay relatively slowly in tropical forests. To resolve this discrepancy, we used the intact-core technique to quantify first-year decay rates of fine roots in four single-species plantations of native tree species. We tested three hypotheses: first, that fine roots from different tree species would decay at different rates; second, that species having rapid fine root growth rates would also have rapid rates of fine root decay; and third, that differences in fine root decay among species could be explained by fine root chemistry variables previously identified as influencing decay rates. Fine roots in Virola koschnyi plantations decayed very slowly (k = 0.29 +/- 0.15 year(-1)); those of Vochysia guatemalensis decayed seven times faster (k = 2.00 +/- 0.13 year(-1)). Decay rates of the remaining two species, Hieronyma alchorneoides and Pentaclethra macroloba, were 1.36 and 1.28 year(-1), respectively. We found a positive, marginally significant correlation between fine root decay rates and the relative growth rates of live fine roots (R = 0.93, n = 4, P = 0.072). There was a highly significant negative correlation between fine root decay and fine root lignin:N (R = 0.99, P = 0.01), which supports the use of lignin:N as a decay-controlling factor within terrestrial ecosystem models. The decay rates that we observed in this single study location encompassed the entire range of fine root decay rates previously observed in moist tropical forests, and thus suggest great potential for individual tree species to alter belowground organic matter and nutrient dynamics within a biotically rich rainforest environment.

  16. Woody debris volume depletion through decay: implications for biomass and carbon accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraver, Shawn; Milo, Amy M.; Bradford, John B.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Kenefic, Laura; Palik, Brian J.; Woodall, Christopher W.; Brissette, John

    2013-01-01

    Woody debris decay rates have recently received much attention because of the need to quantify temporal changes in forest carbon stocks. Published decay rates, available for many species, are commonly used to characterize deadwood biomass and carbon depletion. However, decay rates are often derived from reductions in wood density through time, which when used to model biomass and carbon depletion are known to underestimate rate loss because they fail to account for volume reduction (changes in log shape) as decay progresses. We present a method for estimating changes in log volume through time and illustrate the method using a chronosequence approach. The method is based on the observation, confirmed herein, that decaying logs have a collapse ratio (cross-sectional height/width) that can serve as a surrogate for the volume remaining. Combining the resulting volume loss with concurrent changes in wood density from the same logs then allowed us to quantify biomass and carbon depletion for three study species. Results show that volume, density, and biomass follow distinct depletion curves during decomposition. Volume showed an initial lag period (log dimensions remained unchanged), even while wood density was being reduced. However, once volume depletion began, biomass loss (the product of density and volume depletion) occurred much more rapidly than density alone. At the temporal limit of our data, the proportion of the biomass remaining was roughly half that of the density remaining. Accounting for log volume depletion, as demonstrated in this study, provides a comprehensive characterization of deadwood decomposition, thereby improving biomass-loss and carbon-accounting models.

  17. Rare B decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kluit, P M

    2001-01-01

    The results of the LEP experiments for rare B decays will be reviewed, covering hadronic final states, radiative and other rare decays and results for the inclusive charmless branching ratio. (8 refs).

  18. Visible neutrino decay at DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma, Pilar [Fermilab; Peres, Orlando G. [ICTP, Trieste

    2017-05-09

    If the heaviest neutrino mass eigenstate is unstable, its decay modes could include lighter neutrino eigenstates. In this case part of the decay products could be visible, as they would interact at neutrino detectors via mixing. At neutrino oscillation experiments, a characteristic signature of such \\emph{visible neutrino decay} would be an apparent excess of events at low energies. We focus on a simple phenomenological model in which the heaviest neutrino decays as $\

  19. Electroweak penguin B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Nikodem, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Flavour Changing Neutral Currents (FCNC) are sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), so-called New Physics. An example of a FCNC is the $b \\to s$ quark transition described by the electroweak penguin Feynman diagram shown in Figure 1. In the SM such FCNC are only allowed with a loop structure (as e:g: shown in the figure) and not by tree level processes. In the loops heavy particles appear virtually and do not need to be on shell. Therefore also not yet discovered heavy particles with up to a mass $\\mathcal{O}$(TeV) could virtually contribute significantly to observables. Several recent measurements of electroweak penguin B decays exhibit interesting tensions with SM predictions, most prominently in the angular observable $P'_5$ 5 of the decay $B^0 \\to K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^1$[1], which triggered a lot of discussion in the theory community [2]-[14].

  20. Fast proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianjun; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Walker, Joel W.

    2010-10-01

    We consider proton decay in the testable flipped SU(5)×U(1)X models with TeV-scale vector-like particles which can be realized in free fermionic string constructions and F-theory model building. We significantly improve upon the determination of light threshold effects from prior studies, and perform a fresh calculation of the second loop for the process p→eπ from the heavy gauge boson exchange. The cumulative result is comparatively fast proton decay, with a majority of the most plausible parameter space within reach of the future Hyper-Kamiokande and DUSEL experiments. Because the TeV-scale vector-like particles can be produced at the LHC, we predict a strong correlation between the most exciting particle physics experiments of the coming decade.

  1. Charmless B decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martens Aurélien

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During 2011, LHCb has collected an integrated luminosity of 1.1 fb−1, giving rise to a large variety of measurements. Amongst these, measurements of CP violation in B decays play a central role. In particular CP violation measurements in charmless transitions of B mesons are of interest since they provide new or improved constraints on new physics contributions. These proceedings concentrate on LHCb results made publicin the first half of the year 2012.

  2. Decays of s neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Barradas, J E

    2003-01-01

    Based on the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), we discussed possible two body decay modes for the s neutrino v, one charged and other neutral: v -> l sub x sub 1 sup + sup - and v -> vx sub 1 sup 0 , respectively. Exploring a range of possible values for its mass, and for the chargino x sub i sup + sup - and neutralino x sub j sup 0 masses as well. We present the specific calculation for branching ratios, which are analyzed numerically. (Author)

  3. Radioactive decay data tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  4. Rare kaon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances spanning several orders of magnitude in sensitivity are anticipated in the current round of experiments with rare kaon decays. Observations of allowed processes, like /Kappa//sup +/ /yields/ /pi//sup +/ /nu//nu/-bar and /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu//sup +//mu//sup -/, shed light on detailed aspects of the standard model. New sources of T or CP violation could be manifested by measurements of muon polarization in /Kappa/ /yields/ /delta//mu//nu//sub /mu// and /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu//sup +//mu//sup -/ decays and by studies of reactions like /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /pi//sup 0/e/sup +/e/sup -/. Evidence for new particlews and new interactions could appear in advanced efforts to observe /Kappa/ /yields/ /pi/chichi' and /Kappa/ /yields/ /pi/chi decays, where chi and chi' represent hypothethetical neutral particles, and in searches for lepton flavor violating processes /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu/e and /Kappa//sup +/ /yields/ /pi//sup +/ /mu/e. The experiments are reviewed and their theoretical context is discussed.

  5. Influence of noise on decay predictions in standing trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visalga, G.; Rupšys, P.; Petrauskas, E.

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, the stochastic process, termed the Vasicek, have been implemented to analyze propagation velocity data of stress wave that diffuses through the wood of decayed and sound stems in standing trees. Stochastic processes offer the possibility of capturing important distributional differences between stress wave velocity datasets of decayed and sound trees and make the detecting rule flexible to internal decay in standing trees. It is shown that the Vasicek type stochastic process is a possible candidate for statistical classification of waveforms. Rigorous quantile regression analysis is based on the conditional probability density functions whose are fitted for stress wave velocity datasets of sound and decayed trees. New developed detector rules derived from stochastic differential equations may be used as an initial tool for detecting internal decay in standing trees.

  6. Column: Factors Affecting Data Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fairbanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear physics, the phrase decay rate is used to denote the rate that atoms and other particles spontaneously decompose. Uranium-235 famously decays into a variety of daughter isotopes including Thorium and Neptunium, which themselves decay to others. Decay rates are widely observed and wildly different depending on many factors, both internal and external. U-235 has a half-life of 703,800,000 years, for example, while free neutrons have a half-life of 611 seconds and neutrons in an atomic nucleus are stable.We posit that data in computer systems also experiences some kind of statistical decay process and thus also has a discernible decay rate. Like atomic decay, data decay fluctuates wildly. But unlike atomic decay, data decay rates are the result of so many different interplaying processes that we currently do not understand them well enough to come up with quantifiable numbers. Nevertheless, we believe that it is useful to discuss some of the factors that impact the data decay rate, for these factors frequently determine whether useful data about a subject can be recovered by forensic investigation.(see PDF for full column

  7. Rare B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Rare decays are flavour changing neutral current processes that allow sensitive searches for phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SM). In the SM, rare decays are loop-suppressed and new particles in SM extensions can give significant contributions. The very rare decay $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in addition helicity suppressed and constitutes a powerful probe for new (pseudo) scalar particles. Of particular interest are furthermore tests of lepton universality in rare $b\\to s\\ell^+\\ell^-$ decays. The LHCb experiment is designed for the study of b-hadron decays and ideally suited for the analysis of rare decays due to its high trigger efficiency, as well as excellent tracking and particle identification performance. Recent results from the LHCb experiment in the area of rare decays are presented, including tests of lepton universality and searches for lepton flavour violation.

  8. Heavy flavor studies at forward and backward rapidities in Cu+Au collisions with PHENIX detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cesar; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetric Cu+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV performed at RHIC in 2012 open an opportunity to study particle yields in the presence of different mixtures of initial and final state nuclear effects by using probes measured from negative to positive rapidity regions. Heavy flavor yields may be affected by initial state effects on gluons and energy loss in the final state hot medium. The 2012 run was the first where the Forward Vertex Detector (FVTX) was operating. This detector allows the identification of D and B mesons from displaced vertex measurements. Results on B-meson nuclear modification through its J/ ψ decay channel will be presented along with the status of the analysis of semi-leptonic decays of charm and bottom yields.

  9. Memory decay and susceptibility to amnesia dissociate punishment- from relief-learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegelmann, Sören; Preuschoff, Stephan; Appel, Mirjam; Niewalda, Thomas; Gerber, Bertram; Yarali, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    Painful events shape future behaviour in two ways: stimuli associated with pain onset subsequently support learned avoidance (i.e. punishment-learning) because they signal future, upcoming pain. Stimuli associated with pain offset in turn signal relief and later on support learned approach (i.e. relief-learning). The relative strengths of such punishment- and relief-learning can be crucial for the adaptive organization of behaviour in the aftermath of painful events. Using Drosophila, we compare punishment- and relief-memories in terms of their temporal decay and sensitivity to retrograde amnesia. During the first 75 min following training, relief-memory is stable, whereas punishment-memory decays to half of the initial score. By 24 h after training, however, relief-memory is lost, whereas a third of punishment-memory scores still remain. In accordance with such rapid temporal decay from 75 min on, retrograde amnesia erases relief-memory but leaves a half of punishment-memory scores intact. These findings suggest differential mechanistic bases for punishment- and relief-memory, thus offering possibilities for separately interfering with either of them. PMID:23658002

  10. The decay of wake vortices in the convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzaepfel, F.; Gerz, T.; Frech, M.; Doernbrack, A.

    2000-03-01

    The decay of three wake vortex pairs of B-747 aircraft in a convectively driven atmospheric boundary layer is investigated by means of large-eddy simulations (LES). This situation is considered as being hazardous as the updraft velocities of a thermal may compensate the induced descent speed of the vortex pair resulting in vortices stalled in the flight path. The LES results, however, illustrate that (i) the primary rectilinear vortices are rapidly deformed on the scale of the alternating updraft and downdraft regions; (ii) parts of the vortices stay on flight level but are quickly eroded by the enhanced turbulence of an updraft; (iii) longest living sections of the vortices are found in regions of relatively calm downdraft flow which augments their descent. Strip theory calculations are used to illustrate the temporal and spatial development of lift and rolling moments experienced by a following medium weight class B-737 aircraft. Characteristics of the respective distributions are analysed. Initially, the maximum rolling moments slightly exceed the available roll control of the B-737. After 60 seconds the probability of rolling moments exceeding 50% of the roll control, a value which is considered as a threshold for acceptable rolling moments, has decreased to 1% of its initial probability. (orig.)

  11. Decay properties of linear thermoelastic plates: Cattaneo versus Fourier law

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2013-02-01

    In this article, we investigate the decay properties of the linear thermoelastic plate equations in the whole space for both Fourier and Cattaneo\\'s laws of heat conduction. We point out that while the paradox of infinite propagation speed inherent in Fourier\\'s law is removed by changing to the Cattaneo law, the latter always leads to a loss of regularity of the solution. The main tool used to prove our results is the energy method in the Fourier space together with some integral estimates. We prove the decay estimates for initial data U0 ∈ Hs(ℝ) ∩ L1(ℝ). In addition, by restricting the initial data to U0 ∈ Hs(ℝ) ∩ L1,γ(ℝ) and γ ∈ [0, 1], we can derive faster decay estimates with the decay rate improvement by a factor of t-γ/2. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  12. Decay of isotropic flow and anisotropic flow with rotation or magnetic field or both in a weakly nonlinear regime

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2016-01-01

    We investigate numerically the decay of isotropic, rotating, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), and rotating MHD flows in a periodic box. The Reynolds number $Re$ defined with the box size and the initial velocity is $100$ at which the flows are in a weakly nonlinear regime, i.e. not laminar but far away from the fully turbulent state. The decay of isotropic flow has two stages, the first stage for the development of small scales and the second stage for the viscous dissipation. In the rapidly rotating flow, fast rotation induces the inertial wave and causes the large-scale structure to inhibit the development of the first stage and retard the flow decay. In the MHD flow, the imposed field also causes the large-scale structure but facilitates the flow decay in the first stage because of the energy conversion from flow to magnetic field. Magnetic Reynolds number $Rm$ is important for the dynamics of the MHD flow, namely a high $Rm$ induces the Alfv\\'en wave but a low $Rm$ cannot. In the rotating MHD flow, slower rotat...

  13. Sensitivity Increases for the TITAN Decay Spectroscopy Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach K.G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The TITAN facility at TRIUMF has recently initiated a program of performing decay spectroscopy measurements in an electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT. The unique environment of the EBIT provides backingfree storage of the radioactive ions, while guiding charged decay particles from the trap centre via the strong magnetic field. This measurement technique is able to provide a significant increase in detection sensitivity for photons which result from radioactive decay. A brief overview of this device is presented, along with methods of improving the signal-to-background ratio for photon detection by reducing Compton scattered events, and eliminating vibrational noise.

  14. Semileptonic kaon decays

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, J; Gasser, J

    1992-01-01

    We present the matrix elements for the semileptonic kaon decays $K_{l2\\gamma}$, $K_{l2l^+l^-}$, $K_{l2l'^+l'^-}$, $K_{l3}$, $K_{l3\\gamma}$ and $K_{l4}$ at next-to-leading order in chiral perturbation theory and compare the predictions with experimental data. Monte Carlo event generators are used to calculate the corresponding rates at DAFNE. We discuss the possibilities to improve our knowledge of the low-energy structure of the Standard Model at this and similar machines.

  15. The Rapid Field Initiative Business Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goerger, Simon R; Crino, Scott T; McCarthy, Daniel J; Griffin, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    .... It is a process that costs the Army time money and a great deal of effort to execute. This case study examines the RFI supply chain and makes recommendations to improve the current inventory management system (IMS...

  16. SUSY decays of Higgs particles

    CERN Document Server

    Djouadi, Abdelhak; Kalinowski, Jan; Zerwas, Peter M

    1996-01-01

    Among the possible decay modes of Higgs particles into supersymmetric states, neutralino and chargino decays play a prominent rôle. The experimental opportunities of observing such decay modes at LEP2 and at future $\\ee$ linear colliders are analyzed within the frame of the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. For heavy Higgs particles, the chargino/neutralino decay modes can be very important, while only a small window is open for the lightest CP--even Higgs particle. If charginos/neutralinos are found at LEP2, such decay modes can be searched for in a small area of the parameter space, and invisible decays may reduce the exclusion limits of the lightest CP-even Higgs particle slightly; if charginos/neutralinos are not found at LEP2 in direct searches, the Higgs search will not be affected by the SUSY particle sector.

  17. Critical ignition in rapidly expanding self-similar flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Maxwell, Brian M.

    2010-06-01

    The generic problem of ignition of a particle undergoing an expansion given by a power law rate of decay behind a decaying shock is addressed in the present study. It is demonstrated, using a one-step Arrhenius irreversible reaction, that a sufficiently strong expansion wave can quench the reaction. The critical conditions for extinction are obtained in closed form in terms of the time scale for the expansion process and the thermochemical properties of the gas, yielding a critical Damkohler number, i.e., the ratio of the expansion time scale to the homogeneous ignition time scale, given by (γ -1)(Ea/RT)-1/n, where n is the power law exponent of the self-similar expansion. The critical ignition criteria, which are valid in the asymptotic limit n(γ -1)(Ea/RT)=O(1), were found in excellent agreement with numerical results. The applicability of the results obtained are discussed for ignition in rapidly expanding flows which occur behind decaying shock waves, as encountered in problems of detonation initiation by a Taylor-Sedov blast wave, and reacting jet startup, and for reactions in steady hypersonic flows around projectiles.

  18. Rare beauty and charm decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, T.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Rare beauty and charm decays can provide powerful probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. These proceedings summarise the latest measurements of rare beauty and charm decays from the LHCb experiment at the end of Run 1 of the LHC. Whilst the majority of the measurements are consistent with SM predictions, small differences are seen in the rate and angular distribution of ℓ- decay processes.

  19. Supersymmetric cascade decays at NLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popenda, Eva; Muehlleitner, Margarete; Hangst, Christian [KIT, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany); Kraemer, Michael [RWTH Aachen University, Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie (Germany); Spira, Michael [Paul Scherrer Institut, Theory Group LTP (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The search for supersymmetric particles and determination of their properties is a major task at the LHC and is based on the analysis of the cascade decay chains in which SUSY particles are produced. This project aims at improving predictions for SUSY cascade decays through the inclusion of higher-order corrections in the production and decay processes and by embedding them in a fully flexible Monte Carlo program. In this talk we report on the progress of the implementation of squark pair production followed by the decay into a quark and the lightest neutralino including supersymmetric QCD corrections at next-to-leading order in a completely differential form.

  20. JENDL decay data file 2015

    OpenAIRE

    片倉 純一; 湊 太志

    2016-01-01

    JENDL Decay Data File 2015 (JENDL/DDF-2015) has been produced. The decay data of nuclides with mass numbers from 1 to 260 are included. The nuclides with unknown gamma- and/or beta-emission are also included in order to keep decay chains. The data of 1,284 fission product nuclides with mass from 66 to 172 remain unchanged from JENDL/FPD-2011 except several corrections which had been claimed by users, and those of the newly added 1,953 nuclides are taken from ENSDF. Finally, the decay data of ...

  1. Decay of oscillating universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Audrey Todhunter

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested by Ellis et al that the universe could be eternal in the past, without beginning. In their model, the "emergent universe'' exists forever in the past, in an "eternal'' phase before inflation begins. We will show that in general, such an "eternal'' phase is not possible, because of an instability due to quantum tunneling. One candidate model, the "simple harmonic universe'' has been shown by Graham et al to be perturbatively stable; we find that it is unstable with respect to quantum tunneling. We also investigate the stability of a distinct oscillating model in loop quantum cosmology with respect to small perturbations and to quantum collapse. We find that the model has perturbatively stable and unstable solutions, with both types of solutions occupying significant regions of the parameter space. All solutions are unstable with respect to collapse by quantum tunneling to zero size. In addition, we investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and the Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. Finally, we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe. Although the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence in canonical quantum cosmology, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. Here, we apply this approach to the simple harmonic universe, by extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field φ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock''.

  2. Polarization in heavy quark decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimujiang, K.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis I concentrate on the angular correlations in top quark decays and their next.to.leading order (NLO) QCD corrections. I also discuss the leading.order (LO) angular correlations in unpolarized and polarized hyperon decays. In the first part of the thesis I calculate the angular correlation between the top quark spin and the momentum of decay products in the rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark in Two-Higgs-Doublet-Models: t({up_arrow}) {yields} b + H{sup +}. I provide closed form formulae for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized and the polar correlation functions for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the second part I concentrate on the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a bottom quark and a lepton pair: t({up_arrow}){yields}X{sub b}+l{sup +}+{nu}{sub l}. I present closed form expressions for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized part and the polar and azimuthal correlations for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the last part I turn to the angular distribution in semileptonic hyperon decays. Using the helicity method I derive complete formulas for the leading order joint angular decay distributions occurring in semileptonic hyperon decays including lepton mass and polarization effects. (orig.)

  3. Beauty hadron decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Poluektov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In these proceedings, I will report the recent results on properties, production and decays of beauty baryons, as well as measurements of B + c meson decays, based on data collected by the LHCb collaboration at the LHC collider in 2011–2012.

  4. Status of rare decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    Some results are given for rare muon decay experiments currently running. Also, plans are discussed for rare kaon decay experiments. Some of the events sought come from processes which violate lepton flavor conservation. Several apparatuses used in the search are described. 35 references. (LEW)

  5. Relativistic 2-body Bottomonium decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barducci Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculate some radiative decays of Bottomonium in a covariant scheme for two interacting fermions. We present their branching ratios and their absolute widths. A comparison with experimental data shows a good agreement with our results. Some decays for which data are not available are compared with other theoretical previsions.

  6. Welding the CNGS decay tube

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    3.6 km of welds were required for the 1 km long CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) decay tube, in which particles produced in the collision with a proton and a graphite target will decay into muons and muon neutrinos. Four highly skilled welders performed this delicate task.

  7. Measurement of electrons from charm and beauty-hadron decays in p-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 5.02 TeV with ALICE at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Jan [Research Division and ExtreMe Matter Institute (EMMI), Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Electrons from inclusive semileptonic heavy-flavor hadron decays are used to measure charm and beauty production. Because of their large masses, heavy quarks are mostly produced in initial hard partonic interactions and thus can be used to probe the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), a deconfined state of strongly-interacting matter created in heavy-ion collisions. In addition to the QGP, the presence of cold nuclear matter in the initial state may affect the production of heavy-flavour hadrons through shadowing/saturation effects. A contribution to the suppression observed in Pb-Pb collisions is investigated by analyzing p-Pb collisions. The p{sub T}-differential production cross section of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays and beauty-hadron decays in the rapidity range -1.06 < y{sub cms} < 0.14 in p-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 5.02 TeV has been measured with ALICE. The cross section of electrons from beauty-hadron decays, isolated based on their larger average displacement from the interaction vertex, are presented as well as the nuclear modification factor R{sub pPb} of inclusive heavy-flavour and beauty-hadron decay electrons. Theoretical predictions including the effects due to the nuclear modification of the parton distribution functions are discussed with the results.

  8. Baryon helicity in B decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mahiko [Department of Physics and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The unexpectedly large transverse polarization measured in the decay B {yields} {phi}K* poses the question whether it is accounted for as a strong interaction effect or possibly points to a hidden nonstandard weak interaction. We extend here the perturbative argument to the helicity structure of the two-body baryonic decay and discuss qualitatively on how the baryonic B decay modes might help us in understanding the issue raised by B {yields} {phi}K*. We find among others that the helicity +1/2 amplitude dominates the leading order in the B(b-barq) decay and that unlike the B {yields} VV decay the dominant amplitude is sensitive to the right-handed b {yields} s current, if any, in the penguin interaction.

  9. Radioactive Decays in Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauf, Steffen; Kuster, Markus; Batič, Matej; Bell, Zane W.; Hoffmann, Dieter H. H.; Lang, Philipp M.; Neff, Stephan; Pia, Maria Grazia; Weidenspointner, Georg; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    The simulation of radioactive decays is a common task in Monte-Carlo systems such as Geant4. Usually, a system either uses an approach focusing on the simulations of every individual decay or an approach which simulates a large number of decays with a focus on correct overall statistics. The radioactive decay package presented in this work permits, for the first time, the use of both methods within the same simulation framework - Geant4. The accuracy of the statistical approach in our new package, RDM-extended, and that of the existing Geant4 per-decay implementation (original RDM), which has also been refactored, are verified against the ENSDF database. The new verified package is beneficial for a wide range of experimental scenarios, as it enables researchers to choose the most appropriate approach for their Geant4-based application.

  10. Radioactive Decays in Geant4

    CERN Document Server

    Hauf, Steffen; Batič, Matej; Bell, Zane W; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Lang, Philipp M; Neff, Stephan; Pia, Maria Grazia; Weidenspointner, Georg; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The simulation of radioactive decays is a common task in Monte-Carlo systems such as Geant4. Usually, a system either uses an approach focusing on the simulations of every individual decay or an approach which simulates a large number of decays with a focus on correct overall statistics. The radioactive decay package presented in this work permits, for the first time, the use of both methods within the same simulation framework - Geant4. The accuracy of the statistical approach in our new package, RDM-extended, and that of the existing Geant4 per-decay implementation (original RDM), which has also been refactored, are verified against the ENSDF database. The new verified package is beneficial for a wide range of experimental scenarios, as it enables researchers to choose the most appropriate approach for their Geant4-based application.

  11. Semileptonic B Decays at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenegger, U

    2004-02-17

    We present results on semileptonic B decays obtained with the BABAR detector. The large data set accumulated at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-Factory allows a new measurement technique, where the hadronic decay of one B meson is fully reconstructed and the semileptonic decay of the recoiling B meson is studied. Traditional analysis techniques of inclusive and exclusive B decays complement this approach with very high statistics data samples. These measurements play an important role in the tests of the description of CP violation in the Standard Model: The determinations of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| provide constraints on the unitarity of the CKM triangle. Furthermore, the experimental measurement of parameters of Heavy Quark Effective Theory test the consistency of the theoretical description of semileptonic B decays.

  12. B, D and K Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; Asner, D.M.; Ball, P.; Baracchini, E.; Bell, G.; Beneke, M.; Berryhill, J.; Bevan, A.; Bigi, I.I.; Blanke, M.; Bobeth, Ch.; Bona, M.; Borzumati, F.; Browder, T.; Buanes, T.; Buchalla, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Buras, A.J.; Burdin, S.; Cassel, D.G.; Cavanaugh, R.; /Syracuse U. /Carleton U. /Durham U., IPPP /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Karlsruhe U. /RWTH Aachen U. /Fermilab /Queen Mary, U. of London /Notre Dame U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Dortmund U. /Annecy, LAPP /ICTP, Trieste /Taiwan, Natl. Central U. /Hawaii U. /Bergen U. /Munich U. /CERN /Liverpool U.

    2008-03-07

    The present report documents the results of Working Group 2: B, D and K decays, of the workshop on Flavor in the Era of the LHC, held at CERN from November 2005 through March 2007. With the advent of the LHC, we will be able to probe New Physics (NP) up to energy scales almost one order of magnitude larger than it has been possible with present accelerator facilities. While direct detection of new particles will be the main avenue to establish the presence of NP at the LHC, indirect searches will provide precious complementary information, since most probably it will not be possible to measure the full spectrum of new particles and their couplings through direct production. In particular, precision measurements and computations in the realm of flavor physics are expected to play a key role in constraining the unknown parameters of the Lagrangian of any NP model emerging from direct searches at the LHC. The aim of Working Group 2 was twofold: on one hand, to provide a coherent, up-to-date picture of the status of flavor physics before the start of the LHC; on the other hand, to initiate activities on the path towards integrating information on NP from high-p{sub T} and flavor data. This report is organized as follows. In Sec. 1, we give an overview of NP models, focusing on a few examples that have been discussed in some detail during the workshop, with a short description of the available computational tools for flavor observables in NP models. Sec. 2 contains a concise discussion of the main theoretical problem in flavor physics: the evaluation of the relevant hadronic matrix elements for weak decays. Sec. 3 contains a detailed discussion of NP effects in a set of flavor observables that we identified as 'benchmark channels' for NP searches. The experimental prospects for flavor physics at future facilities are discussed in Sec. 4. Finally, Sec. 5 contains some assessments on the work done at the workshop and the prospects for future developments.

  13. FREELY DECAYING TURBULENCE IN FORCE-FREE ELECTRODYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Freely decaying, relativistic force-free turbulence is studied for the first time. We initiate the magnetic field at a short wavelength and simulate its relaxation toward equilibrium on two- and three-dimensional periodic domains in both helical and nonhelical settings. Force-free turbulent relaxation is found to exhibit an inverse cascade in all settings and in three dimensions to have a magnetic energy spectrum consistent with the Kolmogorov 5/3 power law. Three-dimensional relaxations also obey the Taylor hypothesis; they settle promptly into the lowest-energy configuration allowed by conservation of the total magnetic helicity. However, in two dimensions, the relaxed state is a force-free equilibrium whose energy greatly exceeds the Taylor minimum and that contains persistent force-free current layers and isolated flux tubes. We explain this behavior in terms of additional topological invariants that exist only in two dimensions, namely the helicity enclosed within each level surface of the magnetic potential function. The speed and completeness of turbulent magnetic free-energy discharge could help account for rapidly variable gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula, gamma-ray bursts, blazars, and radio galaxies.

  14. Finite difference computing with exponential decay models

    CERN Document Server

    Langtangen, Hans Petter

    2016-01-01

    This text provides a very simple, initial introduction to the complete scientific computing pipeline: models, discretization, algorithms, programming, verification, and visualization. The pedagogical strategy is to use one case study – an ordinary differential equation describing exponential decay processes – to illustrate fundamental concepts in mathematics and computer science. The book is easy to read and only requires a command of one-variable calculus and some very basic knowledge about computer programming. Contrary to similar texts on numerical methods and programming, this text has a much stronger focus on implementation and teaches testing and software engineering in particular. .

  15. MIRD radionuclide data and decay schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2007-01-01

    For all physicians, scientists, and physicists working in the nuclear medicine field, the MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes updated edition is an essential sourcebook for radiation dosimetry and understanding the properties of radionuclides. Includes CD Table of Contents Decay schemes listed by atomic number Radioactive decay processes Serial decay schemes Decay schemes and decay tables This essential reference for nuclear medicine physicians, scientists and physicists also includes a CD with tabulations of the radionuclide data necessary for dosimetry calculations.

  16. Molecular initiating events of the intersex phenotype: Low-dose exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol rapidly regulates molecular networks associated with gonad differentiation in the adult fathead minnow testis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feswick, April; Loughery, Jennifer R.; Isaacs, Meghan A.; Munkittrick, Kelly R.; Martyniuk, Christopher J., E-mail: cmartyni@yahoo.ca

    2016-12-15

    testis, despite the fact that dmrt1 itself was not different in expression from control males. Transcriptional networks involving forkhead box L2 (foxl2) (transcript involved in ovarian follicle development) were increased in expression in the testis. Noteworthy was that a gene network associated to granulosa cell development was increased over 100%, suggesting that this transcriptome network may be important for monitoring estrogenic exposures. Other cell processes rapidly downregulated by EE2 at the transcript level included glucose homeostasis, response to heavy metal, amino acid catabolism, and the cyclooxygenase pathway. Conversely, lymphocyte chemotaxis, intermediate filament polymerization, glucocorticoid metabolism, carbohydrate utilization, and anterior/posterior axis specification were increased. These data provide new insight into the transcriptional responses that are perturbed prior to gonadal remodeling and intersex following exposure to estrogens. These data demonstrate that low concentrations of EE2 (1) rapidly suppresses male hormone production, (2) down-regulate molecular networks related to male sex differentiation, and (3) induce transcriptional networks related to granulosa cell development in the adult testis. These responses are hypothesized to be key molecular initiating events that occur prior to the development of the intersex phenotype following estrogenic exposures.

  17. Higgs decay to fermions (CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena Pooja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A search for high mass Higgs boson of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model decaying into two fermions using the first 2015 data at 13 TeV is presented. The four final decay channels of μτh, eτh, τhτh and eμ is used. The limits on production cross section times branching ratio has been set. Other results from Run1 and different searches and measurements involving Higgs decays fermions will also be reviewed.

  18. Charm counting in b decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z → b overlineb decays has been measured from the yield of D0, D+, Ds+ and Λc+ decays in a sample of q overlineq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be nc = 1.230 ± 0.036 ± 0.038 ± 0.053, where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  19. Charm counting in b decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Carrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Walsh, J; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z -> bb decays has been measured from the yield of D^0, D^+, D^+_s and Lambda_{c}^+ decays in a sample of qq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be n_c = 1.230 \\pm 0.036 \\pm 0.038 \\pm 0.053 where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  20. Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A simplified, yet rigorous treatment of scattering theory methods and their applications Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory provides thorough, easy-to-understand guidance on the application of scattering theory methods to modern problems in mathematics, quantum physics, and mathematical physics. Introducing spectral methods with applications to dispersion time-decay and scattering theory, this book presents, for the first time, the Agmon-Jensen-Kato spectral theory for the Schr?dinger equation, extending the theory to the Klein-Gordon equation. The dispersion decay plays a crucial role i

  1. Local energy decay for linear wave equations with variable coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Ryo

    2005-06-01

    A uniform local energy decay result is derived to the linear wave equation with spatial variable coefficients. We deal with this equation in an exterior domain with a star-shaped complement. Our advantage is that we do not assume any compactness of the support on the initial data, and its proof is quite simple. This generalizes a previous famous result due to Morawetz [The decay of solutions of the exterior initial-boundary value problem for the wave equation, Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 14 (1961) 561-568]. In order to prove local energy decay, we mainly apply two types of ideas due to Ikehata-Matsuyama [L2-behaviour of solutions to the linear heat and wave equations in exterior domains, Sci. Math. Japon. 55 (2002) 33-42] and Todorova-Yordanov [Critical exponent for a nonlinear wave equation with damping, J. Differential Equations 174 (2001) 464-489].

  2. Overexpression of the c-myc oncogene inhibits nonsense-mediated RNA decay in B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ding; Wengrod, Jordan; Gardner, Lawrence B

    2011-11-18

    The Myc transcription factor plays a vital role in both normal cellular physiology and in many human cancers. We have recently demonstrated that nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD), a mechanism that rapidly degrades select mRNAs, is inhibited by the stress-induced phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α, and this inhibition stabilizes many transcripts necessary for tumorigenesis. Here, we demonstrate that NMD is inhibited by high Myc expression. We show that the phosphorylation of eIF2α, likely due to the ability of Myc to generate reactive oxygen species and augment endoplasmic reticulum stress, is necessary for the inhibition of NMD by Myc. The inhibition of NMD both stabilizes and up-regulates multiple Myc targets, suggesting that the inhibition of NMD may play an important role in the dynamic regulation of genes by Myc.

  3. RARE DECAYS INCLUDING PENGUINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigen, G

    2003-12-04

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of the exclusive charmless semileptonic B decays, B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}, and the extraction of the CKM parameters V{sub ub}. IN a data sample of 55 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.44{sub stat} {+-} 0.52{sub sys} {+-} 0.60{sub th}) x 10{sup -4} yielding |V{sub ub}| = (3.69 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys -0.59th}{sup +0.40}) x 10{sup -3}. Next, they report on a preliminary study of the radiative penguin modes B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}. In a data sample of 84 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they observe a significant signal (4.4{sigma}) in B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, yielding a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.20-0.18}{sup +0.24+0.11}) x 10{sup -6}. In B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} the observed yield is not yet significant (2.8{sigma}), yielding an upper limit of the branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) 3.0 x 10{sup -6} {at} 90% confidence level. Finally, they summarize preliminary results of searches for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  4. Decay of Hoyle state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-02

    Nov 2, 2014 ... The initial 'Big Bang' nucleosynthesis which lasted for a few minutes after the 'Big Bang', has been responsible for the creation of most of the mass of the Universe as we see today, ..... In this context, the current measurement, at highest statistics till date, assumes significance and the determination.

  5. The decay of hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  6. Weak Decays of Charmed Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Marc Gilles [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    1986-05-01

    The lifetimes of charmed particles produced in interactions of high energy neutrinos with nucleons have been measured using a combination of a very high resolution emulsion-based vertex detector and a spectrometer allowing full kinematical reconstruction of the decays.

  7. Hadronic {tau} decays and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davier, M

    1999-12-01

    Hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton provide a clean source to study hadron dynamics in an energy regime dominated by resonances, with the interesting information captured in the spectral functions. Recent results on exclusive channels are reviewed. Inclusive spectral functions are the basis for QCD analyses, delivering an accurate determination of the strong coupling constant and quantitative information on nonperturbative contributions. Strange decays yield a determination of the strange quark mass. (author)

  8. The Role of Chemical Transport in the Decay Resistance of Modified Wood. In: M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecka Ringman; Annica Pulgard; Emil Engelund Thybring; Joseph E. Jakes; Klaus Richter

    2015-01-01

    A 2014 review by Ringman et al. examined established theories addressing why modified wood has increased decay resistance and concluded that the most probable cause of inhibition and/or delay of the initiation of brown rot decay is lowering the equilibrium moisture content for given environmental conditions. A 2013 paper by Jakes et al...

  9. Litter decay rates are determined by lignin chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer M. Talbot; Daniel J. Yelle; James Nowick; Kathleen K. Treseder

    2011-01-01

    Litter decay rates are often correlated with the initial lignin:N or lignin:cellulose content of litter, suggesting that interactions between lignin and more labile compounds are important controls over litter decomposition. The chemical composition of lignin may influence these interactions, if lignin physically or chemically protects labile components from microbial...

  10. Model decay in the Australia-Antarctic basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weijer, Wilbert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gille, Sarah T [UCSD; Vivier, Frederic [LOCEAN-IPSL

    2008-01-01

    The barotropic intraseasonal variability in the Australia-Antarctic Basin (AAB) is studied in terms of the excitation and decay of topographically-trapped barotropic modes. The main objective is to reconcile two widely differing estimates of the decay rate of SSH anomalies in the AAB that are assumed to be related to barotropic modes. First, an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis is applied to almost 15 years of altimeter data. The analysis suggests that several modes are involved in the variability of the AAB, each related to distinct areas with (almost) closed contours of potential vorticity. Second, the dominant normal modes of the AAB are determined in a barotropic shallow-water (SW) model. These stationary modes are confined by the closed contours of potential vorticity that surround the eastern AAB, and the crest of the Southeast Indian Ridge. For reasonable values of horizontal eddy viscosity and bottom friction, their decay time scale is of the order of several weeks. Third, the SW model is forced with realistic winds and integrated for several years. Projection of the modal velocity patterns onto the output fields shows that the barotropic modes are indeed excited in the model, and that they decay slowly on the frictional O(3 weeks) time scale. However, the SSH anomalies in the modal areas display rapid O(4 days) decay. Additional analysis shows that this rapid decay reflects the adjustment of unbalanced flow components through the emission of Rossby waves. Resonant excitation of the dominant free modes accounts for about 20% of the SSH variability in the forced model run. Other mechanisms are suggested to explain the region of high SSH variability in the AAB.

  11. Photon-initiated homolysis of peroxynitrous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturzbecher-Höhne, Manuel; Nauser, Thomas; Kissner, Reinhard; Koppenol, Willem H

    2009-08-03

    Laser flash photolysis of ONOOH at 355 nm and a pH of 4.0-5.5 causes homolysis of ONOOH nearly exclusively at the N-O bond rather than at the O-O bond (HO(2)(*)/HO(*) > 25:1). All of the NO(*) and HO(2)(*) radicals formed by photolysis subsequently recombine with a rate constant of (1.2 +/- 0.2) x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) via second-order kinetics, as demonstrated by the return of the UV/vis absorbance to initial levels. Excitation at 266 nm also yields HO(2)(*) and NO(*), but after recombination, the absorbance levels are lower than initial values, possibly because HO(*) produced by the photolysis of water reacts with ONOOH. When NO(3)(-), the product of the ONOOH isomerization, is photolyzed, the ONOO(-) formed is rapidly protonated with a second-order rate constant of (1.7 +/- 0.8) x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). The ONOOH decays to the starting material, NO(3)(-), with a first-order rate constant of 1.2 s(-1). The quantum yield for the photon-initiated homolysis is 15% for both ONOOH and ONOO(-). We conclude that the ON-OOH and ON-OO(-) bond dissociation energies are similar.

  12. Random mutagenesis of bacterial luciferase: critical role of Glu175 in the control of luminescence decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial luciferases (LuxAB) can be readily classed as slow or fast decay luciferases based on their rates of luminescence decay in a single turnover assay. Luciferases from Vibrio harveyi and Xenorhabdus (Photorhabdus) luminescens have slow decay rates, and those from the Photobacterium genus, such as Photobacterium fisheri, P. phosphoreum and P. leiognathi, have rapid decay rates. By substitution of a 67-amino-acid stretch of P. phosphoreum LuxA in the central region of the LuxA subunit, the ‘slow’ X. luminescens luciferase was converted into a chimaeric luciferase with a significantly more rapid decay rate [Valkova, Szittner and Meighen (1999) Biochemistry 38, 13820–13828]. To understand better the role of specific residues in the classification of luciferases as slow and fast decay, we have conducted random mutagenesis on this region. One of the mutants generated by a single mutation on LuxA at position 175 [E175G (Glu175→Gly)] resulted in the ‘slow decay’ X. luminescens luciferase being converted into a luciferase with a significantly more rapid decay rate. These results indicate the importance of Glu175 in LuxA as a critical residue for differentiating between ‘slow’ and ‘fast’ luciferases and show that this distinction is primarily due to differences in aldehyde affinity and in the decomposition of the luciferase–flavin–oxygen intermediate. PMID:15352872

  13. On the spread and decay of wind turbine wakes in ambient turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. B.; Jonsson, C.; Achilleos, S.; Eames, I.

    2014-12-01

    The decay of the downstream wake of a wind turbine plays an important role in the performance of wind farms. The spread and decay of a wake depend both on wake meandering (advection of the wake as a whole) and wake diffusion (widening of the wake within its meandering frame of reference). Both of these effects depend strongly on the intensity of the ambient turbulence relative to the velocity deficit in the wake, and on the integral length scale of the turbulence relative to the wake width. Recent theory, which we review here, shows how intense large-scale turbulence can lead to a rapid x-2 decay in the time-averaged centreline velocity deficit, as compared to a x-1 decay for smaller scale turbulence, where x is distance downstream. We emphasise in this paper that common wind farm models do not predict this rapid decay. We present new experimental measurements of the velocity deficit downstream of a porous disc in relatively large-scale ambient turbulence which corroborate predictions of a x-2 decay, and we show theoretically that the commonly used k-epsilon model does not capture this effect. We further show that a commercial CFD package, configured to match our experiments and employing the k-epsilon model, fails to predict such rapid decay. We conclude that steady simulations of wind turbine wake dynamics are insufficient for informing wind farm layout optimisation.

  14. Velocity and stress autocorrelation decay in isothermal dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, Anuj; Lukes, Jennifer R

    2010-02-01

    The velocity and stress autocorrelation decay in a dissipative particle dynamics ideal fluid model is analyzed in this paper. The autocorrelation functions are calculated at three different friction parameters and three different time steps using the well-known Groot/Warren algorithm and newer algorithms including self-consistent leap-frog, self-consistent velocity Verlet and Shardlow first and second order integrators. At low friction values, the velocity autocorrelation function decays exponentially at short times, shows slower-than exponential decay at intermediate times, and approaches zero at long times for all five integrators. As friction value increases, the deviation from exponential behavior occurs earlier and is more pronounced. At small time steps, all the integrators give identical decay profiles. As time step increases, there are qualitative and quantitative differences between the integrators. The stress correlation behavior is markedly different for the algorithms. The self-consistent velocity Verlet and the Shardlow algorithms show very similar stress autocorrelation decay with change in friction parameter, whereas the Groot/Warren and leap-frog schemes show variations at higher friction factors. Diffusion coefficients and shear viscosities are calculated using Green-Kubo integration of the velocity and stress autocorrelation functions. The diffusion coefficients match well-known theoretical results at low friction limits. Although the stress autocorrelation function is different for each integrator, fluctuates rapidly, and gives poor statistics for most of the cases, the calculated shear viscosities still fall within range of theoretical predictions and nonequilibrium studies.

  15. Capacity Decay Mitigation by Asymmetric Positive/Negative Electrolyte Volumes in Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Ho; Park, Jung Jin; Park, O Ok; Yang, Jung Hoon

    2016-11-23

    Capacity decay in vanadium redox flow batteries during charge-discharge cycling has become an important issue because it lowers the practical energy density of the battery. The battery capacity tends to drop rapidly within the first tens of cycles and then drops more gradually over subsequent cycles during long-term operation. This paper analyzes and discusses the reasons for this early capacity decay. The imbalanced crossover rate of vanadium species was found to remain high until the total difference in vanadium concentration between the positive and negative electrolytes reached almost 1 mol dm(-3) . To minimize the initial crossover imbalance, we introduced an asymmetric volume ratio between the positive and negative electrolytes during cell operation. Changing this ratio significantly reduced the capacity fading rate of the battery during the early cycles and improved its capacity retention at steady state. As an example, the practical energy density of the battery increased from 15.5 to 25.2 Wh L(-1) simply after reduction of the positive volume by 25 %. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. In-trap decay spectroscopy for {beta}{beta} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from {beta} decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and {beta} detection with almost no {beta}-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in {beta}{beta} decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10{sup -5} and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating {beta} background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge

  17. Measurements of heavy-flavour decay leptons with ALICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of electrons and muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at central and forward rapidity performed by the ALICE Collaboration in p–Pb (√sNN = 5.02 TeV and Pb–Pb collisions (√sNN = 2.76 TeV. Electrons are reconstructed using several detectors of the ALICE central barrel. Muons are reconstructed using the muon spectrometer at forward rapidity (2.5 < y < 4. The nuclear modification factors in Pb–Pb (RAA and in p–Pb (RpPb collisions, and the azimuthal anisotropy (v2 in Pb– Pb collisions will be discussed. Theoretical predictions are compared with the data. In addition, the measurement of the azimuthal correlation between electrons from heavyflavour hadron decays and charged hadrons in p–Pb collisions will be shown.

  18. Fractal Weyl laws and wave decay for general trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyatlov, Semyon; Galkowski, Jeffrey

    2017-12-01

    We prove a Weyl upper bound on the number of scattering resonances in strips for manifolds with Euclidean infinite ends. In contrast with previous results, we do not make any strong structural assumptions on the geodesic flow on the trapped set (such as hyperbolicity) and instead use propagation statements up to the Ehrenfest time. By a similar method we prove a decay statement with high probability for linear waves with random initial data. The latter statement is related heuristically to the Weyl upper bound. For geodesic flows with positive escape rate, we obtain a power improvement over the trivial Weyl bound and exponential decay up to twice the Ehrenfest time.

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faessler, Amand; Simkovic, Fedor

    1998-12-01

    We review the recent developments in the field of nuclear double beta decay, which is presently an important topic in both nuclear and particle physics. The mechanism of lepton number violation within the neutrinoless double beta decay (0954-3899/24/12/001/img5-decay) is discussed in the context of the problem of neutrino mixing and the R-parity violating supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. The problem of reliable determination of the nuclear matrix elements governing both two-neutrino and neutrinoless modes of the double beta decay is addressed. The validity of different approximation schemes in the considered nuclear structure studies is analysed and the role of the Pauli exclusion principle for a correct treatment of nuclear matrix elements is emphasized. The constraints on different lepton-number violating parameters such as effective electron neutrino mass, effective right-handed weak interaction parameters, effective Majoron coupling constant and R-parity violating SUSY parameters are derived from the best presently available experimental limits on the half-life of 0954-3899/24/12/001/img5-decay.

  20. Beta decay heat following U-235, U-238 and Pu-239 neutron fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengjie

    1997-09-01

    This is an experimental study of beta-particle decay heat from 235U, 239Pu and 238U aggregate fission products over delay times 0.4-40,000 seconds. The experimental results below 2s for 235U and 239Pu, and below 20s for 238U, are the first such results reported. The experiments were conducted at the UMASS Lowell 5.5-MV Van de Graaff accelerator and 1-MW swimming-pool research reactor. Thermalized neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction induced fission in 238U and 239Pu, and fast neutrons produced in the reactor initiated fission in 238U. A helium-jet/tape-transport system rapidly transferred fission fragments from a fission chamber to a low background counting area. Delay times after fission were selected by varying the tape speed or the position of the spray point relative to the beta spectrometer that employed a thin-scintillator-disk gating technique to separate beta-particles from accompanying gamma-rays. Beta and gamma sources were both used in energy calibration. Based on low-energy(<1 MeV) internal-conversion electron studies, a set of trial responses for the spectrometer was established and spanned electron energies 0-10 MeV. Measured beta spectra were unfolded for their energy distributions by the program FERD, and then compared to other measurements and summation calculations based on ENDF/B-VI fission-product data performed on the LANL Cray computer. Measurements of the beta activity as a function of decay time furnished a relative normalization. Results for the beta decay heat are presented and compared with other experimental data and the summation calculations.

  1. A cylindrical drift chamber for the measurement of k. -->. pi nu nu. -bar decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cresswell, J.V.; Ahmad, S.; Blackmore, E.W.; Bryman, D.A.; Khan, N.; Kuno, Y.; Numao, T.

    1988-02-01

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been constructed for the study of the rare kaon decay K/sup +/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..nu nu..-bar. Data from two prototype chambers and initial results from the final chamber are presented.

  2. Enhanced chlorine dioxide decay in the presence of metal oxides: Relevance to drinking water distribution systems

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chao

    2013-07-19

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) decay in the presence of typical metal oxides occurring in distribution systems was investigated. Metal oxides generally enhanced ClO2 decay in a second-order process via three pathways: (1) catalytic disproportionation with equimolar formation of chlorite and chlorate, (2) reaction to chlorite and oxygen, and (3) oxidation of a metal in a reduced form (e.g., cuprous oxide) to a higher oxidation state. Cupric oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) showed significantly stronger abilities than goethite (α-FeOOH) to catalyze the ClO2 disproportionation (pathway 1), which predominated at higher initial ClO2 concentrations (56-81 μM). At lower initial ClO2 concentrations (13-31 μM), pathway 2 also contributed. The CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay is a base-assisted reaction with a third-order rate constant of 1.5 × 10 6 M-2 s-1 in the presence of 0.1 g L -1 CuO at 21 ± 1 C, which is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than in the absence of CuO. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) significantly enhanced the formation of chlorite and decreased the ClO 2 disproportionation in the CuO-ClO2 system, probably because of a higher reactivity of CuO-activated ClO2 with NOM. Furthermore, a kinetic model was developed to simulate CuO-enhanced ClO 2 decay at various pH values. Model simulations that agree well with the experimental data include a pre-equilibrium step with the rapid formation of a complex, namely, CuO-activated Cl2O4. The reaction of this complex with OH- is the rate-limiting and pH-dependent step for the overall reaction, producing chlorite and an intermediate that further forms chlorate and oxygen in parallel. These novel findings suggest that the possible ClO2 loss and the formation of chlorite/chlorate should be carefully considered in drinking water distribution systems containing copper pipes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. A new decay heat standard proposition based on a technical specifications guide for computation codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laugier, Frederic; Garzenne, Claude [EDF R and D SINETICS, 1 av. du Gal de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Diop, Cheikh [CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ebalard, Sylvie [AREVA, 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Sargeni, Antonio [IRSN, B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2008-07-01

    The existing ISO international decay heat standard provides the basis for calculating the decay heat power of non-recycled nuclear fuel of light water reactors. Computing decay heat with this standard can be really efficient for standard uranium fuels. Though, for Mixed Oxide fuels, high Burn-Up uranium fuels or for non standard irradiation sequences, decay heat can only be estimated by more complex decay heat computation codes. Therefore, a new ISO international standard, a 'Technical specifications guide for decay heat computation' has been proposed to reflect the international way to compute decay heat in light water reactors. The aim of this article is to give the justifications for the methods that lead to simplified modelization of the decay heat and that will be put into this standard. These methods are useful for rapid and precise determination of reaction rates and for nuclide chains simplifications. We propose also a simple method to evaluate the sensitivity of decay heat computations with respect to nuclear data. (authors)

  4. The Decay Data Evaluation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, E.

    1999-10-01

    Nuclear scientists from France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States have joined their efforts to evaluate decay data for radionuclides specifically used in applied research and detector calibrations. The purpose of this collaboration, the Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP), is to produce recommended values, and to suggest new measurements for data that are unsatisfactory. Uniformity and reproducibility are features of importance for this work. These features, as well as the general scope of this project and its relation to the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) will be presented and illustrated with examples. This work is presented on behalf of the Decay Data Evaluation Project. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under contract number DEAC03-76SF00098.

  5. Decay spectroscopy of $^{178}$Au

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B

    In this thesis, the neutron-deficient nucleus $^{178}$Au is investigated through decay spectroscopy. Si and HPGe detectors were used to analyse the decay radiation of $^{178}$Au and its daughter nuclei. Previous studies have been unable to distinguish decay radiation from different isomeric states of this nucleus. This thesis represents the first time such isomeric discrimination has been achieved, and presents tentative spin assignments of both the ground state and an isomer. The neutron-deficient gold isotopes are an area of interest for the study of shape coexistence. This is the phenomenon exhibited by nuclei able to exist at a number of close lying energy minima, each reflecting a distinct type of deformation. It is hoped that studies such as this can help identify the evolution of nuclear deformation in this region of the nuclear chart.

  6. Skills Decay in Military Medical Training: A Meta-synthesis of Research Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Amber S; Caridha, Jona; Kunkler, Kevin J

    2018-01-01

    In fiscal year 2012, the Medical Simulation and Information Sciences Research Program released two Skills Decay (SD) research program announcements (PAs) under the Medical Readiness Initiative entitled "Medical Practice Initiative Breadth of Medical Practice & Disease Frequency Exposure (MPI-BMP)" and the "Medical Practice Initiative Procedural Skill Decay and Maintenance (MPI-PSD)." The Office of Naval Research also released a PA entitled "Medical Modeling and Simulation (MM&S) for Military Training and Education." A total investment of $12 M was made. This article provides a meta-synthesis of the Skills Decay research conducted under these efforts. The MSIRRP Medical Simulation Portfolio collected, reviewed, and analyzed the final reports of the Skills Decay research efforts from the three PAs. This paper provides a meta-synthesis of the outcomes of those studies. Focus of this study was to determine if the anticipated goals of the Skills Decay PAs were met as well as to provide a summary of lessons learned to the research community. Fourteen research questions posed by the PAs were structured into four main goals: (1) Skills Decay identification, (2) creation/validity of Skills Decay tools and feasibility and viability of data extraction project, (3) refreshment training to prevent or alleviate Skills Decay project, and (4) Skills Decay education content. Using a combination of training styles, choosing variables known to have Skills Decay predication value, and developing better ways of mining available data that can, in turn, provide feedback to training needs, it is possible for accurate Skills Decay models to be developed. These technologies have the ability not only capture the learner's reaction during the simulation, but to capture the simulation outcomes to predict a medical professional's level of experience and background. Lessons learned from the investments made by the government are extremely important in order to ensure that the outcomes of the

  7. Beauty production in pp collisions at s=2.76 TeV measured via semi-electronic decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anticic, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielcík, J.; Bielcíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A R; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J. Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, O.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H S Y; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L D; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravcáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X. G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paic, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petrácek, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Ploskon, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L M; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H O; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J. P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafarík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J M; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A P; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J M; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C S; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I. K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration at the LHC reports measurement of the inclusive production cross section of electrons from semi-leptonic decays of beauty hadrons with rapidity |y|<0.8 and transverse momentum 1decay

  8. Decays of the vector glueball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacosa, Francesco; Sammet, Julia; Janowski, Stanislaus

    2017-06-01

    We calculate two- and three-body decays of the (lightest) vector glueball into (pseudo)scalar, (axial-)vector, as well as pseudovector and excited vector mesons in the framework of a model of QCD. While absolute values of widths cannot be predicted because the corresponding coupling constants are unknown, some interesting branching ratios can be evaluated by setting the mass of the yet hypothetical vector glueball to 3.8 GeV as predicted by quenched lattice QCD. We find that the decay mode ω π π should be one of the largest (both through the decay chain O →b1π →ω π π and through the direct coupling O →ω π π ). Similarly, the (direct and indirect) decay into π K K*(892 ) is sizable. Moreover, the decays into ρ π and K*(892 )K are, although subleading, possible and could play a role in explaining the ρ π puzzle of the charmonium state ψ (2 S ) thanks to a (small) mixing with the vector glueball. The vector glueball can be directly formed at the ongoing BESIII experiment as well as at the future PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. If the width is sufficiently small (≲100 MeV ) it should not escape future detection. It should be stressed that the employed model is based on some inputs and simplifying assumptions: the value of glueball mass (at present, the quenched lattice value is used), the lack of mixing of the glueball with other quarkonium states, and the use of few interaction terms. It then represents a first step toward the identification of the main decay channels of the vector glueball, but shall be improved when corresponding experimental candidates and/or new lattice results will be available.

  9. Resonant Auger decay driving intermolecular Coulombic decay in molecular dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinter, F; Schöffler, M S; Kim, H-K; Sturm, F P; Cole, K; Neumann, N; Vredenborg, A; Williams, J; Bocharova, I; Guillemin, R; Simon, M; Belkacem, A; Landers, A L; Weber, Th; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Dörner, R; Jahnke, T

    2014-01-30

    In 1997, it was predicted that an electronically excited atom or molecule placed in a loosely bound chemical system (such as a hydrogen-bonded or van-der-Waals-bonded cluster) could efficiently decay by transferring its excess energy to a neighbouring species that would then emit a low-energy electron. This intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) process has since been shown to be a common phenomenon, raising questions about its role in DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, in which low-energy electrons are known to play an important part. It was recently suggested that ICD can be triggered efficiently and site-selectively by resonantly core-exciting a target atom, which then transforms through Auger decay into an ionic species with sufficiently high excitation energy to permit ICD to occur. Here we show experimentally that resonant Auger decay can indeed trigger ICD in dimers of both molecular nitrogen and carbon monoxide. By using ion and electron momentum spectroscopy to measure simultaneously the charged species created in the resonant-Auger-driven ICD cascade, we find that ICD occurs in less time than the 20 femtoseconds it would take for individual molecules to undergo dissociation. Our experimental confirmation of this process and its efficiency may trigger renewed efforts to develop resonant X-ray excitation schemes for more localized and targeted cancer radiation therapy.

  10. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  11. Decay of Magnetic Field in Black Widow Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, C. M.; Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-10-01

    A small fraction of the binary relativistic systems display the "black widow" effect: the companion is being ablated by the (recycled) pulsar wind. In these binary systems the evolution of the companion star (of the solar-type) reaches the point of filling its Roche lobe, thus initiating the process of mass accretion onto the pulsar. Accretion is generally believed to result in magnetic field decay, while isolated neutron star fields decay very slowly, if at all. We shall show that the very long evolution of the "black widow" system, starting from a solar-type star and lasting > 5 Gyr to reach the observed position in the plane, allows us to conclude that the magnetic field does not decay below the bottom value , extending the previous conclusions drawn from younger systems. In addition, the masses of the "black widow" pulsars are naturally predicted to be > 2 Mo due to the accretion history, in full agreement with recent measurements.

  12. Report on the Charged Decay Products Identification Possibilities in WASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, M.; Bargholtz, C.; Bogoslawsky, D.; Bondar, A.; Calén, H.; Cappellaro, F.; Clement, H.; Comfort, J.; Demirörs, L.; Dorochkevitch, E.; Ekström, C.; Fransson, K.; Fridén, C. J.; Chernyshev, B.; Gerén, L.; Grebenev, V.; Greiff, J.; Gurov, Y.; Gustafsson, L.; Höistad, B.; Ivanov, G.; Koch, I.; Jiganov, E.; Johansson, A.; Johansson, T.; Keleta, S.; Kilian, K.; Kimura, N.; Kullander, S.; Kupść, A.; Kurdadze, L.; Kuzmin, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Lindberg, K.; Marciniewski, P.; Martemyanov, B.; Meier, R.; Morosov, B.; Nawrot, A.; Nefkens, B. M. K.; Oelert, W.; Oreshkin, S.; Pauly, C.; Pawlowski, Z.; Petukhov, Y.; Povtorejko, A.; Pätzold, J.; Reistad, D.; Ruber, R. J. M. Y.; Sandukovsky, V.; Scobel, W.; Sefzick, T.; Shafigullin, R.; Shepkin, M.; Sidorov, V.; Schwartz, B.; Skorodko, T.; Sopov, V.; Starostin, A.; Stepaniak, J.; Sukhanov, A.; Tchernychev, V.; Tegnér, P.-E.; Thörngren Engblom, P.; Tikhomirov, V.; Turowiecki, A.; Wagner, G.; Wiedner, U.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamaoka, H.; Zabierowski, J.; Zlomańczuk, J.

    The WASA detector located at the CELSIUS storage ring of the The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala has recently finished its commissioning phase and is in full operation. An unique internal pellet-target system together with a detector covering a solid angle close to 4π steradians gives opportunities to study the rare decays of the π0 and the eta; meson in high-luminosity experiments. Another unique feature of the WASA setup is the thin-walled superconducting solenoid which provides the magnetic field for a mini drift chamber allowing highly efficient measurements of charged particles and minimal interference for particles entering the external electromagnetic calorimeter. The WASA setup is presented in this report with an emphasis on the ability to detect charged decay products. The results from the first experiments and performance of the detector are discussed together with the initial physics programme for charged decays of η mesons.

  13. Testing alternative temporal aftershock decay functions in an ETAS framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainzl, S.; Christophersen, A.

    2017-08-01

    Earthquake clustering can be well described by the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence model (ETAS), where each earthquake potentially triggers its own aftershocks. The temporal decay of aftershocks is most commonly modelled with a power law, the so-called Omori-Utsu law. However, new results suggest that alternative decay functions may be more appropriate. One recent study found that a version of the ETAS model fitted the data better when the Omori-Utsu law was truncated in time. A finite triggering time is consistent with the rate-state model that expects an exponential roll-off after a finite time following the initial power law decay. Another recent study compared a power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential and found that the stretched exponential described the overall decay of aftershocks best. Our aim is to find the best temporal aftershock decay function within the ETAS model framework. We investigate six decay functions; three power laws and three exponential decays. The power laws are an unlimited Omori-Utsu law, a sharply truncated Omori-Utsu law, and an exponential roll-off consistent with the rate-state friction model. The exponential decay functions are the pure exponential, stretched exponential and a modified stretched exponential. We fit model parameters for each decay function to 326 individual earthquake sequences from four regional and one global earthquake catalogue. The three models that fit most of the sequences the best are the truncated Omori-Utsu law (32 per cent of sequences), the power law based on the rate-state friction model (26 per cent) and the unlimited Omori-Utsu law (23 per cent). When the parameters are not fitted individually but the median model parameters are used for each function, the modified stretched exponential function fits most (28 per cent) sequences the best, followed by the unlimited Omori-Utsu law (22 per cent) and the stretched exponential (18 per cent). However, the majority of sequences (53 per cent

  14. Improved decay rates for solutions for a multidimensional generalized Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the decay rates of solutions for the generalized Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation in multi-dimensional space. For initial data in some L1-weighted spaces, we prove faster decay rates of the solutions. More precisely, using the Fourier transform and the energy method, we show the global existence and the convergence rates of the solutions under the smallness assumption on the initial data and we give better decay rates of the solutions. This result improves early works in J. Differential Equations 158(2) (1999), 314-340 and Nonlinear Anal. 75(7) (2012), 3385-3392. © 2014-IOS Press.

  15. Measurement of charm and beauty production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA using semi-leptonic decays into muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindi, Marcello

    2008-10-15

    In this thesis the experimental study of the process ep{yields}ec anti cX at HERA is described. The differential cross sections in dependence on the transverse momentum and rapidity of the decay muon are presented. (HSI)

  16. Neutrinoless double beta decay search with SNO+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozza V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The SNO+ experiment is the follow up of SNO. The detector is located 2 km underground in the Vale Canada Ltd.’s Creighton Mine near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The active volume of the detector consists of 780 tonnes of Linear Alkyl Benzene (LAB in an acrylic vessel of 12 m diameter, surrounded by about 9500 PMTs. The main goal of the SNO+ experiment is the search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te. With an initial loading of 0.3% of natural tellurium (nearly 800 kg of 130Te, it is expected to reach a sensitivity on the effective Majorana neutrino mass of about 100 meV after several years of data taking. Designed as a general purpose neutrino experiment, other exciting physical goals can be explored, like the measurement of reactor neutrino oscillations and geo-neutrinos in a geologically-interesting location, watch of supernova neutrinos and studies of solar neutrinos. A first commissioning phase with water filled detector will start at the end of 2013, while the double beta decay phase will start in 2015.

  17. Neutrinoless double beta decay search with SNO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozza, V.

    2014-01-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the follow up of SNO. The detector is located 2 km underground in the Vale Canada Ltd.'s Creighton Mine near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The active volume of the detector consists of 780 tonnes of Linear Alkyl Benzene (LAB) in an acrylic vessel of 12 m diameter, surrounded by about 9500 PMTs. The main goal of the SNO+ experiment is the search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te. With an initial loading of 0.3% of natural tellurium (nearly 800 kg of 130Te), it is expected to reach a sensitivity on the effective Majorana neutrino mass of about 100 meV after several years of data taking. Designed as a general purpose neutrino experiment, other exciting physical goals can be explored, like the measurement of reactor neutrino oscillations and geo-neutrinos in a geologically-interesting location, watch of supernova neutrinos and studies of solar neutrinos. A first commissioning phase with water filled detector will start at the end of 2013, while the double beta decay phase will start in 2015.

  18. Open heavy-flavour and electroweak boson measurements via the (di-)muonic decay channel with ALICE at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Senosi, Kgotlaesele; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    Heavy flavours (charm and beauty) and electroweak bosons (W and Z) are produced in initial hard partonic scatterings. The former interact strongly with the medium formed in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions throughout its evolution, thus making them well suited to investigate its properties. Furthermore, heavy-flavour measurements in proton-nucleus collisions can be used to investigate initial-state effects whereas in proton-proton (pp) collisions they are considered an important test for perturbative Quantum ChromoDynamics (pQCD) predictions. In addition, open heavy-flavour measurements in pp collisions are used as a reference for proton-lead (p-Pb) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions. On the other hand, electroweak bosons and their leptonic decay products only interact weakly with the QCD matter and thus are suitable probes to test the validity of binary-collision scaling of hard processes. Moreover, their measurements in p-Pb collisions could help to constrain nuclear parton distribution functions. The ALICE muon spectrometer allows the measurement of open heavy flavour, W- and Z-boson production at forward rapidity (-4.0 < η < -2.5) exploiting their (di)muonic decay channel. In this talk the results obtained with the LHC Run I data in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions will be discussed and compared with theoretical predictions.

  19. Superheavy elements and decay properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-04

    Aug 4, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 85; Issue 3. Superheavy elements and decay properties. K P Santhosh. Volume 85 Issue 3 ... Author Affiliations. K P Santhosh1. School of Pure and Applied Physics, Kannur University, Swami Anandatheertha Campus, Payyanur 670 327, India ...

  20. Observations of offshore bar decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart; Greenwood, Brian

    2010-01-01

    the upper shoreface, and finally a stage of decaying bar form through loss of sediment volume at the outer boundary of the upper shoreface. The phenomenon has been previously documented in the Netherlands, the USA, the Canadian Great Lakes, and in New Zealand, but our present understanding...

  1. Superheavy elements and decay properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S) are the one-dimensional slab-on-slab function. 3. Results and discussions. The Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN) was used to evaluate the α decay properties of the isotopes of the SHN with Z = 115, ...

  2. Rare decays of b hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Koppenburg, Patrick; Smizanska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Rare decays of b hadrons provide a powerful way of identifying contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular from new hypothetical particles too heavy to be produced at colliders. The most relevant experimental measurements are reviewed and possible interpretations are briefly discussed.

  3. Rare pion and kaon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.

    1984-05-01

    Some rare pion and kaon decays, which provide clues to the generation puzzle, are discussed. The ..pi.. ..-->.. e ..nu../..pi.. ..-->.. ..mu nu.. branching ratio test of universality and the status of searches for K/sup +/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..nu..nu-bar are reviewed.

  4. Rare pion and kaon decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    1984-05-01

    Some rare pion and kaon decays, which provide clues to the generation puzzle, are discussed. The π → e ν/π → μν branching ratio test of universality and the status of searches for K+ → π+νν¯ are reviewed.

  5. Rare B decays at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrington, Sinead M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-10-01

    The confidence level limits of the CDF search for the B{sub s}{sup 0} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} rare decays and the branching ratio measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +} D{sub s}{sup -} are presented.

  6. Salt decay of Morley limestone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Salt weathering is one of the main causes of decay of natural stone, and by consequence a major problem to the conservation of cultural heritage. In the present case, the performance of Morley limestone from the Département Meuse, France, as a replacement stone under saltloaded conditions is

  7. Hadronic decays of $W$ bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, III, Richard Paul [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We present evidence for hadronic W decays in t$\\bar{t}$ → lepton + neutrino + ≥ 4 jet events using a 109 pb -1 data sample of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF).

  8. Be, Li, He and H decay half-lives at low excitation energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bonilla, C

    2003-01-01

    The Be, Li, He and H decay half-lives of slightly excited nuclei have been determined within a tunneling process through a potential barrier calculated from a generalized liquid drop model and quasimolecular shapes. Analytic formulae allowing to obtain rapidly these different partial half-lives are proposed. For a given decay they depend only on the mass and charge numbers of the emitter, the Q value and the excitation energy. (author)

  9. Novel T-Violation observable open to any pair of decay channels at meson factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabéu, José, E-mail: Jose.Bernabeu@uv.es; Botella, Francisco J., E-mail: Francisco.J.Botella@uv.es; Nebot, Miguel, E-mail: Miguel.Nebot@uv.es

    2014-01-20

    Quantum entanglement between the two neutral mesons produced in meson factories has allowed the first indisputable direct observation of Time Reversal Violation in the time evolution of the neutral meson between the two decays. The exceptional meson transitions are directly connected to semileptonic and CP eigenstate decay channels. The possibility of extending the observable asymmetries to more decay channels confronts the problem of the “orthogonality condition”, which can be stated with this tongue-twister: Given a decay channel f, which is the decay channel f{sup ′} such that the meson state not decaying to f{sup ′} is orthogonal to the meson state not decaying to f? In this Letter we propose an alternative T-Violation asymmetry at meson factories which allows its opening to any pair of decay channels. Instead of searching which is the pair of decay channels associated to the T-reverse meson transition, we build an asymmetry which tags the initial states of both the Reference and the T-reverse meson transitions. This observable filters the appropriate final states by means of two measurable survival probabilities. We discuss the methodology to be followed in the analysis of the new observable and the results expected in specific examples.

  10. Novel T-Violation observable open to any pair of decay channels at meson factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabéu, José; Botella, Francisco J.; Nebot, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Quantum entanglement between the two neutral mesons produced in meson factories has allowed the first indisputable direct observation of Time Reversal Violation in the time evolution of the neutral meson between the two decays. The exceptional meson transitions are directly connected to semileptonic and CP eigenstate decay channels. The possibility of extending the observable asymmetries to more decay channels confronts the problem of the “orthogonality condition”, which can be stated with this tongue-twister: Given a decay channel f, which is the decay channel f‧ such that the meson state not decaying to f‧ is orthogonal to the meson state not decaying to f? In this Letter we propose an alternative T-Violation asymmetry at meson factories which allows its opening to any pair of decay channels. Instead of searching which is the pair of decay channels associated to the T-reverse meson transition, we build an asymmetry which tags the initial states of both the Reference and the T-reverse meson transitions. This observable filters the appropriate final states by means of two measurable survival probabilities. We discuss the methodology to be followed in the analysis of the new observable and the results expected in specific examples.

  11. Rapid transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamrin, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Solar energy programs are entering a critical transitional period as we move from the initial marketing of solar technologies into a phase of widespread commercialization. We face the dual challenge of trying to get enough solar systems in place fast enough to prove solar is a viable alternative, while trying to ensure the systems are designed and installed properly, proving the energy savings as promised. This is a period of both great opportunity and high risk as the field becomes crowded with new solar cheerleaders and supporters but seldom enough competent players. The status of existing and proposed programs for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy in California is described.

  12. Neutron Beta Decay Studies with Nab

    CERN Document Server

    Baeßler, S.; Alonzi, L.P.; Balascuta, S.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Bowman, J.D.; Bychkov, M.A.; Byrne, J.; Calarco, J.R.; Chupp, T.; Cianciolo, T.V.; Crawford, C.; Frlež, E.; Gericke, M.T.; Glück, F.; Greene, G.L.; Grzywacz, R.K.; Gudkov, V.; Harrison, D.; Hersman, F.W.; Ito, T.; Makela, M.; Martin, J.; McGaughey, P.L.; McGovern, S.; Page, S.; Penttilä, S.I.; Počanić, D.; Rykaczewski, K.P.; Salas-Bacci, A.; Tompkins, Z.; Wagner, D.; Wilburn, W.S.; Young, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Precision measurements in neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay and allow for several stringent tests of the standard model. This paper discusses the design and the expected performance of the Nab spectrometer.

  13. Wood decay in desert riverine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Douglas; Stricker, Craig A.; Nelson, S. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Floodplain forests and the woody debris they produce are major components of riverine ecosystems in many arid and semiarid regions (drylands). We monitored breakdown and nitrogen dynamics in wood and bark from a native riparian tree, Fremont cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. wislizeni), along four North American desert streams. We placed locally-obtained, fresh, coarse material [disks or cylinders (∼500–2000 cm3)] along two cold-desert and two warm-desert rivers in the Colorado River Basin. Material was placed in both floodplain and aquatic environments, and left in situ for up to 12 years. We tested the hypothesis that breakdown would be fastest in relatively warm and moist aerobic environments by comparing the time required for 50% loss of initial ash-free dry matter (T50) calculated using exponential decay models incorporating a lag term. In cold-desert sites (Green and Yampa rivers, Colorado), disks of wood with bark attached exposed for up to 12 years in locations rarely inundated lost mass at a slower rate (T50 = 34 yr) than in locations inundated during most spring floods (T50 = 12 yr). At the latter locations, bark alone loss mass at a rate initially similar to whole disks (T50 = 13 yr), but which subsequently slowed. In warm-desert sites monitored for 3 years, cylinders of wood with bark removed lost mass very slowly (T50 = 60 yr) at a location never inundated (Bill Williams River, Arizona), whereas decay rate varied among aquatic locations (T50 = 20 yr in Bill Williams River; T50 = 3 yr in Las Vegas Wash, an effluent-dominated stream warmed by treated wastewater inflows). Invertebrates had a minor role in wood breakdown except at in-stream locations in Las Vegas Wash. The presence and form of change in nitrogen content during exposure varied among riverine environments. Our results suggest woody debris breakdown in desert riverine ecosystems is primarily a microbial process with rates determined by landscape position

  14. Power Spectrum Analyses of Nuclear Decay Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Javorsek, D.; Sturrock, P. A.; Lasenby, R. N.; Lasenby, A. N.; Buncher, J. B.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Hoft, A. W.; Horan, T. J.; Jenkins, J. H.; Kerford, J. L.; Lee, R.H.; Longman, A.; Mattes, J. J.; Morreale, B. L.

    2010-01-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: Si-32 and (CI)-C-36 decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Mn-56 decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and Ra-226 decay reported...

  15. Nonexponential sound decay in concert halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents acoustic measurement results for two concert halls in which nonexponential sound decay is observed. Quantitative estimates are given for how the obtained decay laws differ from exponential. Problems are discussed that arise when using reverberation time to assess the quality of room acoustics with nonexponential sound decay.

  16. CP-violations in B decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recent results on CP-violation measurements in decays from energy asymmetric -factory experiments are reported. Thanks to large accumulated data samples, CP-violations in decays in mixing-decay interference and direct CP-violation are now firmly established. The measurements of three angles of the unitarity ...

  17. Decay of eigenfunctions of elliptic PDE's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Ira; Skibsted, Erik

    We study exponential decay of eigenfunctions of self-adjoint higher order elliptic operators on Rd. We show that the possible critical decay rates are determined algebraically. In addition we show absence of super-exponentially decaying eigenfunctions and a refined exponential upper bound....

  18. Decay data evaluation project (DDEP): updated evaluations of the 233Th and 241Am decay characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechev, Valery P; Kuzmenko, Nikolay K

    2010-01-01

    The results of new decay data evaluations are presented for (233)Th (beta(-)) decay to nuclear levels in (233)Pa and (241)Am (alpha) decay to nuclear levels in (237)Np. These evaluated data have been obtained within the Decay Data Evaluation Project using information published up to 2009. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Decay of Ultralight Axion Condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eby, Joshua; Ma, Michael; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C.R.

    2017-05-15

    Axion particles can form macroscopic condensates, whose size can be galactic in scale for models with very small axion masses $m\\sim10^{-22}$ eV, and which are sometimes referred to under the name of Fuzzy Dark Matter. Many analyses of these condensates are done in the non-interacting limit, due to the weakness of the self-interaction coupling of axions. We investigate here how certain results change upon inclusion of these interactions, finding a decreased maximum mass and a modified mass-radius relationship. Further, these condensates are, in general, unstable to decay through number-changing interactions. We analyze the stability of galaxy-sized condensates of axion-like particles, and sketch the parameter space of stable configurations as a function of a binding energy parameter. We find a strong lower bound on the size of Fuzzy Dark Matter condensates which are stable to decay, with lifetimes longer than the age of the universe.

  20. $\\tau$ decays with neutral kaons

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    The branching ratio of the tau lepton to a neutral K meson is measured from a sample of approximately 200,000 tau decays recorded by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies near the Z0 resonance. The measurement is based on two samples which identify one-prong tau decays with KL and KS mesons. The combined branching ratios are measured to be B(tau- -->pi- K0bar nutau) = (9.33+-0.68+-0.49)x10^-3 B(tau- -->pi- K0bar [>=1pi0] nutau) = (3.24+-0.74+-0.66)x10^-3 B(tau- -->K- K0bar [>=0pi0] nutau) = (3.30+-0.55+-0.39)x10^-3 where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  1. Rare B decays at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Linwei

    2017-01-01

    The flavour changing neutral current decays can be interesting probes for searching for New Physics. Angular distributions of the decay $\\mathrm{B}^0 \\to \\mathrm{K}^{*0} \\mu^ +\\mu^-$ are studied using a sample of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $20.5~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. An angular analysis is performed to determine $P_1$ and $P_5'$, where $P_5'$ is of particular interest due to recent measurements that indicate a potential discrepancy with the standard model. Based on a sample of 1397 signal events, $P_1$ and $P_5'$ angular parameters are determined as a function of the dimuon invariant mass squared. The measurements are in agreement with standard model predictions.

  2. Genuine Correlations of Like-Sign Particles in Hadronic $Z^0$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Couchman, J.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Stumpf, L.; Surrow, B.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2001-01-01

    Correlations among hadrons with the same electric charge produced in Z0 decays are studied using the high statistics data collected from 1991 through 1995 with the OPAL detector at LEP. Normalized factorial cumulants up to fourth order are used to measure genuine particle correlations as a function of the size of phase space domains in rapidity, azimuthal angle and transverse momentum. Both all-charge and like-sign particle combinations show strong positive genuine correlations. One-dimensional cumulants initially increase rapidly with decreasing size of the phase space cells but saturate quickly. In contrast, cumulants in two- and three-dimensional domains continue to increase. The strong rise of the cumulants for all-charge multiplets is increasingly driven by that of like-sign multiplets. This points to the likely influence of Bose-Einstein correlations. Some of the recently proposed algorithms to simulate Bose-Einstein effects, implemented in the Monte Carlo model PYTHIA, are found to reproduce reasonably...

  3. Turbulence, selective decay, and merging in the SSX plasma wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Tim; Brown, Michael; Flanagan, Ken; Werth, Alexandra; Lukin, V.

    2012-10-01

    A helical, relaxed plasma state has been observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder has dimensions L = 1 m and R = 0.08 m. The cylinder is long enough so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v >=50 km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. Typical plasma parameters are Ti= 25 eV, ne>=10^15 cm-3, and B = 0.25 T. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1--2 axial Alfv'en times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data is favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibits broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement to the minimum energy eigenstate of ∇xB = λB. While the global structure roughly corresponds to the minimum energy eigenstate for the wind tunnel geometry, the plasma is high beta (β= 0.5) and does not have a flat λ profile. Merging of two plasmoids in this configuration results in noticeably more dynamic activity compared to a single plasmoid. These episodes of activity exhibit s

  4. Digging the CNGS decay tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Products of the collision between a proton beam and a graphite target will pass through a horn containing an electric field that will produce a focused beam. These particles will decay into muon neutrinos within the tunnel that is being constructed in these images. The neutrinos will then travel 730 km to Gran Sasso in Italy where huge detectors will observe the beam to study a process called neutrino oscillation.

  5. Improved β Decay Branching Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, J. C.; Golovko, V.

    2008-04-01

    The work we report here aims at increasing the precision possible in the measurement of branching ratios for superallowed β^+decays. Such highly accurate values are essential in generating precise ft-values for 0^+->0^+decays, which can then be used to test the Standard Model via the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix [1]. The required precision is ˜0.1% or better. While this limit was already achieved in the case of ^34Ar [2], it would have been very difficult, if not impossible, to achieve it for other β^+-decays without an upgrade to our acquisition and data-reduction systems. We have thus improved the controls over all the key elements in our experimental set-up: we now have direct control over the dead-time for the singles and coincidence channels and <0.1 mm control over the source-detector distance. In addition, we have extensively studied the efficiency of the β-detector with source-measurements tested against various Monte Carlo programs [3]. We have tested our new acquisition set-up on ^60Co and ^22Na (β^- and β^+ emitters respectively) to validate our new methods. Preliminary results on the two sources are statistically consistent with the expected values. An ^34Ar decay experiment using the new experimental configuration has already been performed and is currently analyzed. [1] J.C. Hardy and I.S. Towner, PRC 71, 055501 (2005) [2] V. Iacob et al., BAPS 52(3)B16; BAPS 52(9)HF3 [3] V. Golovko et al., BAPS 52(9)DH4; this BAPS

  6. LHCb: Rare Decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Teodorescu, E

    2011-01-01

    The decay modes $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$ and $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ are promising laboratories for the search of New Physics effects, their properties being particularly sensitive to the presence of new heavy particles that may propagate virtually within the one-loop process involved in penguin diagrams. The penguin $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ decay has been observed by Belle with rather poor precision, $\\mathcal{B}$($B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$) = 57$^{+22}_{-19}$ x 10$^{-6}$, therefore, additional measurements are expected for this channel. With a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ~36 pb$^{-1}$ collected in 2010, a clear and promising signal has been observed for the $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$. The mass resolution is dominated by the electromagnetic calorimeter energy resolution (ECAL is inter-calibrated at the ~2% level). A first hint of the $B_s \\to \\Phi \\gamma$  decay has also been observed. Given this preliminary results and the theory predictions, we expect that, with the data we will record in 2011, th...

  7. Charmless B Decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Carson, L

    2010-01-01

    The potential of the LHCb experiment to test the Standard Model and probe New Physics effects by making precision measurements using decays of $B$ hadrons to charmless hadronic final states is explored. The CKM angle $\\gamma$ can be measured using NP-sensitive decays involving penguin amplitudes. A U-spin analysis of the time-dependent CP asymmetries in the decays $B_d \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B_s\\rightarrow K^{-}K^{+}$ is expected to give a total uncertainty on $\\gamma$ of $\\simeq$ 7° with one nominal year of data. A similar sensitivity is achievable via a Dalitz analysis of $B^{+} \\rightarrow K^{+} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $B_d \\rightarrow K_S \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$. With relatively small amounts of data, discoveries of the rare modes $B_d\\rightarrow K^{+} K^{-}, B_s \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B_d \\rightarrow p\\bar{p}$ are expected. The ultra-rare modes $B^{+} \\rightarrow K^{-}\\pi ^{+}\\pi^{+}$ and $B^{+} \\rightarrow K^{+} K^{+}\\pi^{-}$ may be observed if their branching ratios are significantly enhance...

  8. Constraints on hadronically decaying dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Tran, David [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). School of Physics and Astronomy

    2012-05-15

    We present general constraints on dark matter stability in hadronic decay channels derived from measurements of cosmic-ray antiprotons.We analyze various hadronic decay modes in a model-independent manner by examining the lowest-order decays allowed by gauge and Lorentz invariance for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles and present the corresponding lower bounds on the partial decay lifetimes in those channels. We also investigate the complementarity between hadronic and gamma-ray constraints derived from searches for monochromatic lines in the sky, which can be produced at the quantum level if the dark matter decays into quark-antiquark pairs at leading order.

  9. Three-body charmless B decays workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Haim, E.; Chauveau, J.; Hartfiel, B.; Ocariz, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE), 75 - Paris (France); Charles, J. [LPT, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this workshop was multifarious: -) to present and discuss the current experimental perspectives based on the full expected statistics from B-factories by 2008, -) to share and further develop analysis methods, -) to present and discuss the theoretical work on the subject, -) to discuss the future of B-factories, and -) to establish a work plan until 2009. The contributions have focused on 3 body charmless B decays and mostly 3 body hadronic charmless B decays, they have also dealt with semileptonic decays, radiative decays, charm and charmonium decays, and scattering processes. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  10. On final states of two-dimensional decaying turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Z.

    2004-12-01

    Numerical and analytical studies of final states of two-dimensional (2D) decaying turbulence are carried out. The first part of this work is trying to give a definition for final states of 2D decaying turbulence. The functional relation of ω-ψ, which is frequently adopted as the characterization of those final states, is merely a sufficient but not necessary condition; moreover, it is not proper to use it as the definition. It is found that the method through the value of the effective area S covered by the scatter ω-ψ plot, initially suggested by Read, Rhines, and White ["Geostrophic scatter diagrams and potential vorticity dynamics," J. Atmos. Sci. 43, 3226 (1986)] is more general and suitable for the definition. Based on this concept, a definition is presented, which covers all existing results in late states of decaying 2D flows (including some previous unexplainable weird double-valued ω-ψ scatter plots). The remaining part of the paper is trying to further study 2D decaying turbulence with the assistance of this definition. Some numerical results, leading to "bar" final states and further verifying the predictive ability of statistical mechanics [Yin, Montgomery, and Clercx, "Alternative statistical-mechanical descriptions of decaying two-dimensional turbulence in terms of patches and points," Phys. Fluids 15, 1937 (2003)], are reported. It is realized that some simulations with narrow-band energy spectral initial conditions result in some final states that cannot be very well interpreted by the statistical theory (meanwhile, those final states are still in the scope of the definition).

  11. An Accelerated Radioactive Decay (ARD) Model for Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Bert W.; Leventhal, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In 1975, Leventhal and McCall [Nature, 255, 690-692] presented a radioactive decay model 56N i --> 56Co --> 56Fe for the post-peak luminosity decay of Type I supernovae light curves, in which the two decay rates are both accelerated by a common factor. In 1976, Rust, Leventhal and McCall [Nature, 262, 118-120] used sums of exponentials fitting to confirm the acceleration hypothesis, but their result was nevertheless rejected by the astronomical community. Here, we model Type Ia light curves with a system of ODEs (describing the nuclear decays) forced by a Ni-deposition pulse modelled by a 3-parameter Weibull pdf, with all of this occuring in the center of a pre-existing, optically thick, spherical shell which thermalizes the emitted gamma rays. Fitting this model to observed light curves routinely gives fits which account for 99.9+% of the total variance in the observed record. The accelerated decay rates are so stable, for such a long time, that they must occur in an almost unchanging environment -- not it a turbulent expanding atmosphere. The amplitude of the Ni-deposition pulse indicates that its source is the fusion of hydrogen. Carbon and oxygen could not supply the large energy/nucleon that is observed. The secondary peak in the infrared light curve can be easily modelled as a light echo from dust in the back side of the pre-existing shell, and the separation between the peaks indicates a radius of ≈15 light days for the shell. The long-term stability of the acceleration suggests that it is a kinematic effect arising because the nuclear reactions occur either on the surface of a very rapidly rotating condensed object, or in a very tight orbit around such an object, like the fusion pulse in a tokomak reactor.

  12. Decay property of regularity-loss type for solutions in elastic solids with voids

    KAUST Repository

    Djouamai, Leila

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the Cauchy problem for a system of elastic solids with voids. First, we show that a linear porous dissipation leads to decay rates of regularity-loss type of the solution. We show some decay estimates for initial data in Hs(R)∩L1(R). Furthermore, we prove that by restricting the initial data to be in Hs(R)∩L1,γ(R) and γ. ∈. [0, 1], we can derive faster decay estimates of the solution. Second, we show that by adding a viscoelastic damping term, then we gain the regularity of the solution and obtain the optimal decay rate. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Effects of jet decay rate on jet induced loads on a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Warcup, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental modelling of the interaction between a jet and an aircraft wing or fuselage in VTOL aircraft was undertaken using a cold jet exiting perpendicular to a flat plate in a uniform cross-flow. Effects of jet decay rate and jet-to-cross-flow velocity ratio, R, on the induced load distribution were investigated. Jet decay rate was increased by using cylindrical centerbodies submerged in the jet nozzle, which caused nonuniform initial jet velocity profiles. Quicker jet decay rate, corresponding to the presence of a centerbody, resulted in as much as 50% reduction in the induced pressure loads on the plate. This has implications in interpretation of results from earlier VTOL model studies of jet induced loads, where the jets have often had relatively slow decay rates due to uniform initial velocity profiles

  14. Decay property of regularity-loss type of solutions in elastic solids with voids

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we consider two porous systems of nonclassical thermoelasticity in the whole real line. We discuss the long-time behaviour of the solutions in the presence of a strong damping acting, together with the heat effect, on the elastic equation and establish several decay results. Those decay results are shown to be very slow and of regularity-loss type. Some improvements of the decay rates have also been given, provided that the initial data belong to some weighted spaces. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  15. The decay widths, the decay constants, and the branching fractions of a resonant state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrid, Rafael de la, E-mail: rafael.delamadrid@lamar.edu

    2015-08-15

    We introduce the differential and the total decay widths of a resonant (Gamow) state decaying into a continuum of stable states. When the resonance has several decay modes, we introduce the corresponding partial decay widths and branching fractions. In the approximation that the resonance is sharp, the expressions for the differential, partial and total decay widths of a resonant state bear a close resemblance with the Golden Rule. In such approximation, the branching fractions of a resonant state are the same as the standard branching fractions obtained by way of the Golden Rule. We also introduce dimensionless decay constants along with their associated differential decay constants, and we express experimentally measurable quantities such as the branching fractions and the energy distributions of decay events in terms of those dimensionless decay constants.

  16. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Johannes

    2013-05-01

    Rare heavy flavor decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. The LHCb experiment, a dedicated heavy flavour experiment at the LHC at CERN. It has recorded the worlds largest sample of heavy meson and lepton decays. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1 fb-1 of √s = 7 TeV and 1.1 fb-1 of √s = 8 TeV of pp-collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of B0 → K*0μ+μ- and B+ → K+μ+μ- decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in B → K(*)μ+μ- decays. The first evidence for the very rare decay Bs0 → µ+µ- is presented together with the most stringent upper exclusion limits on the branching fraction of decays of B0, D0 and Ks0 mesons into two muons. This note finishes with the discussion of searches for lepton number and lepton flavor violating τ decays.

  17. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Johannes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rare heavy flavor decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. The LHCb experiment, a dedicated heavy flavour experiment at the LHC at CERN. It has recorded the worlds largest sample of heavy meson and lepton decays. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1 fb−1 of √s = 7 TeV and 1.1 fb−1 of √s = 8 TeV of pp–collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of B0 → K*0μ+μ− and B+ → K+μ+μ− decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in B → K(*μ+μ− decays. The first evidence for the very rare decay Bs0 → µ+µ− is presented together with the most stringent upper exclusion limits on the branching fraction of decays of B0, D0 and Ks0 mesons into two muons. This note finishes with the discussion of searches for lepton number and lepton flavor violating τ decays.

  18. JENDL FP decay data file 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katakura, Jun-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Yoshida, Tadashi [Musashi Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan); Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro [Aichi Shukutoku Univ., Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Tachibana, Takahiro [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A decay data file of fission product (FP) nuclides has been developed for the use in nuclear technology field as one of special purpose files of JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) in the format of ENDF/B and it is called JENDL FP Decay Data File 2000. The file includes the decay data for 1229 fission product nuclides: 142 stable and 1087 unstable nuclides. The data included for a nuclide are decay modes, their Q values and branching ratios, average decay energy values of beta-rays, gamma-rays and alpha-particles and their spectral data. The primary source of the decay data is ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File), which is the internationally recognized data file of nuclear structure properties. The data in ENSDF, however, cover only measured ones. The data of the short-lived nuclides needed for the application fields such as decay heat prediction are often incomplete or not measured because of their short half-lives. For such nuclides a theoretical model calculation is applied to derive the needed data such as average decay energies and spectral data. The data in JENDL FP Decay Data File 2000 have been tested by summation calculation comparing its results with measured data of decay heat values and aggregate fission product spectra of various fissioning nuclei. The comparison showed good agreement between the calculated results and the measured values. (author)

  19. Experiments on double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busto, J. [Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The Double Beta Decay, and especially ({beta}{beta}){sub 0{nu}} mode, is an excellent test of Standard Model as well as of neutrino physics. From experimental point of view, a very large number of different techniques are or have been used increasing the sensitivity of this experiments quite a lot (the factor of 10{sup 4} in the last 20 years). In future, in spite of several difficulties, the sensitivity would be increased further, keeping the interest of this very important process. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs.

  20. Charm lifetimes and semileptonic decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianco, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1995-12-01

    The study of lifetimes and semileptonic (SL) decays of charmed mesons and baryons is currently the goal of several experiments all around the world. This paper is focussed on giving an overview of current status and open questions, and on reviewing new results by E687 and CLEO presented as contributed papers at the 1995 international europhysics conference on high energy physics, held at Brussel (Belgium), July 27-August 2, 1995. A wealth of detailed reviews exists on both charm lifetime up-to-date, which the reader can refer to for details.

  1. Formation and decay of the inner electron radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y. J.; Selesnick, R.

    2016-12-01

    The inner electron radiation belt was found, early in the space age, to be highly variable with rapid injections followed by slower decay. Highly structured energy spectra were also observed (now known in energy-time spectrograms as "zebra stripes"). Inner belt formation was explained by inward diffusion. However, even the fastest diffusion is expected to require a period of many days, while observations show frequent rapid injections across the entire inner belt (as low as L=1.2) during periods of belt. In this presentation, we will explain the rapid injections, slow decay, and structured energy spectra, as observed from Van Allen Probes for electrons with energies of 100-400 keV, by the action of large-scale electric fields. In addition, a case study of a non-diffusive fast injection event that occurred on March 17, 2013, is simulated by a test particle code which demonstrates the sensitivity of electron intensity to the selected electric field model.

  2. Orbital Decay in Binaries with Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Arras, Phil; Weinberg, Nevin N.; Troup, Nicholas; Majewski, Steven R.

    2018-01-01

    Two mechanisms are often invoked to explain tidal friction in binary systems. The ``dynamical tide” is the resonant excitation of internal gravity waves by the tide, and their subsequent damping by nonlinear fluid processes or thermal diffusion. The ``equilibrium tide” refers to non-resonant excitation of fluid motion in the star’s convection zone, with damping by interaction with the turbulent eddies. There have been numerous studies of these processes in main sequence stars, but less so on the subgiant and red giant branches. Motivated by the newly discovered close binary systems in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1), we have performed calculations of both the dynamical and equilibrium tide processes for stars over a range of mass as the star’s cease core hydrogen burning and evolve to shell burning. Even for stars which had a radiative core on the main sequence, the dynamical tide may have very large amplitude in the newly radiative core in post-main sequence, giving rise to wave breaking. The resulting large dynamical tide dissipation rate is compared to the equilibrium tide, and the range of secondary masses and orbital periods over which rapid orbital decay may occur will be discussed, as well as applications to close APOGEE binaries.

  3. Seasonal determinations of algal virus decay rates reveal overwintering in a temperate freshwater pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Andrew M; Short, Steven M

    2016-07-01

    To address questions about algal virus persistence (i.e., continued existence) in the environment, rates of decay of infectivity for two viruses that infect Chlorella-like algae, ATCV-1 and CVM-1, and a virus that infects the prymnesiophyte Chrysochromulina parva, CpV-BQ1, were estimated from in situ incubations in a temperate, seasonally frozen pond. A series of experiments were conducted to estimate rates of decay of infectivity in all four seasons with incubations lasting 21 days in spring, summer and autumn, and 126 days in winter. Decay rates observed across this study were relatively low compared with previous estimates obtained for other algal viruses, and ranged from 0.012 to 11% h(-1). Overall, the virus CpV-BQ1 decayed most rapidly whereas ATCV-1 decayed most slowly, but for all viruses the highest decay rates were observed during the summer and the lowest were observed during the winter. Furthermore, the winter incubations revealed the ability of each virus to overwinter under ice as ATCV-1, CVM-1 and CpV-BQ1 retained up to 48%, 19% and 9% of their infectivity after 126 days, respectively. The observed resilience of algal viruses in a seasonally frozen freshwater pond provides a mechanism that can support the maintenance of viral seed banks in nature. However, the high rates of decay observed in the summer demonstrate that virus survival and therefore environmental persistence can be subject to seasonal bottlenecks.

  4. Sequential Decay of 26F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrick, Hayden; Frank, Nathan; Kuchera, Anthony; Sword, Caleb; Brett, Jaclyn; Deyoung, Paul; Thoennessen, Michael; Mona Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Unstable neutron rich nuclides show interesting characteristics including multi-neutron emission. By using Jacobi coordinates, multi-neutron emissions from unstable nuclides may be characterized. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory experiment, a 101.3 MeV/u 27Ne ion beam hit a liquid deuterium target, causing reactions which produced several nuclides. Many of these nuclides decayed, resulting in a charged fragment and one or more neutrons. A superconducting dipole magnet bent the path of the fragments into a series of charged-particle detectors. Neutrons from these decays were measured as they interacted with arrays of scintillating plastic bars called the MoNA-LISA. The four-momentum vectors of the charged particle and neutron(s) were used to reconstruct the invariant mass. 26F was formed by 1-proton stripping from the 27Ne beam, which resulted in either one or two neutrons emission. A GEANT4 simulation comparison to the experimental data shows that sequential neutron emission resulted from some of the 26F produced. The results of these comparisons will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1404236.

  5. Challenges in Double Beta Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliviero Cremonesi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past ten years, neutrino oscillation experiments have provided the incontrovertible evidence that neutrinos mix and have finite masses. These results represent the strongest demonstration that the electroweak Standard Model is incomplete and that new Physics beyond it must exist. In this scenario, a unique role is played by the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay searches which can probe lepton number conservation and investigate the Dirac/Majorana nature of the neutrinos and their absolute mass scale (hierarchy problem with unprecedented sensitivity. Today Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay faces a new era where large-scale experiments with a sensitivity approaching the so-called degenerate-hierarchy region are nearly ready to start and where the challenge for the next future is the construction of detectors characterized by a tonne-scale size and an incredibly low background. A number of new proposed projects took up this challenge. These are based either on large expansions of the present experiments or on new ideas to improve the technical performance and/or reduce the background contributions. In this paper, a review of the most relevant ongoing experiments is given. The most relevant parameters contributing to the experimental sensitivity are discussed and a critical comparison of the future projects is proposed.

  6. Decay heat curve evaluation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, M.; Doda, K.; Ida, T.; Hashidura, H.; Oka, M.; Yasu, N.

    1981-03-01

    Fission-product decay energy release rates were measured for fast neutron fissions of U-235, Pu-239, U-238, Th-232 and natural uranium for gamma-ray, and U-235 and Pu-239 for beta-ray. Gamma-ray energy spectra were measured using a NaI scintillation detector and beta ray energy spectra were obtained using a plastic scintillation detector combined with a transmission type proportional counter to eliminate gamma-ray effects. The measuremens were made covering times following irradiations from 19 to 24,000 seconds. The spectra data were integrated to provide total energy release rates as a function of time after fission. The present data of beta ray energy release rates are preliminary due to current carrying out of the data analyses. Typical uncertainties in the present data are approximately 5 percent (1 sigma) except for Th-232, and approximately 8 percent for Th-232. The present results were compared with the results of summation calculations using the TASAKA, ENDF/B-IV and JNDC decay data files.

  7. Suppressed B decays at CDF

    CERN Document Server

    Rescigno, M

    2011-01-01

    We present two recent results obtained by the CDF collaboration at the Tevatron collider. New Cabibbo suppresed B_s decay modes have been observed using 5.9 inverse fb of data: B_s-> J/psi Ks and B_s->J/psi K*0. We report also on masurement of the ratios of the branching ratios (BR) of the new modes to those of the B^0-meson to the same final states: BR(B_s->J/psi K*0)/BR(B^0->J/psi K*0) = 0.062 \\pm 0.009 (stat.) \\pm 0.025 (sys.) \\pm 0.008 (frag.) and BR(B_s->J/psi Ks)/BR(B^0->J/psi Ks) = 0.041 \\pm 0.007 (stat.) \\pm 0.004 (sys.) \\pm 0.005 (frag.). Then we discuss the first polarization measurement in a charmless B_s decay in two light vector mesons, B_s->phi phi, using 2.9 \\inverse fb of data. An angular analysis of the final state particles allows CDF to determine a longitudinal polarization fraction f_L = 0.348 \\pm 0.041 (stat.) \\pm 0.021 (syst.), which is inconsistent with na\\"{\\i}ve expectations based on the V-A nature of weak currents and confirms the pattern of lower than expected longitudinal polarizat...

  8. LHCb: Radiative Decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Orlandea, M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present a measurement of the ratio of the branching fraction of the radiative decays $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma$ and $B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma$ using 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of data taken with the LHCb detector. The value obtained is \\begin{equation} \\frac{B\\left(B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma\\right)}{B\\left(B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma\\right)}=1.23\\pm0.06(stat.)\\pm0.04(syst.)\\pm0.10\\left(f_s/f_d\\right) \\end{equation} Using the world average value $B\\left(B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma\\right)=\\left(4.33\\pm0.15\\right)\\times10^{-5}$ branching fraction is determined to be $B\\left(B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma\\right)=3.5\\pm0.4\\times10^{-5}$. A measurement of the direct CP asymmetry of the decay $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma$ is also presented. Both measurements are the most precise to date and are in agreement with the previous experimental results and theoretical expectations.

  9. Heavy neutrino decay at SHALON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinitsyna V.Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The SHALON Cherenkov telescope has recorded over 2 × 106 extensive air showers during the past 17 years. The analysis of the signal at different zenith angles has included observations from the sub-horizontal direction Θ = 97° This inclination defines an Earth skimming trajectory with 7 km of air and around 1000 km of rock in front of the telescope. During a period of 324 hours of observation, after a cut of shower-like events that may be caused by chaotic sky flashes or reflections on the snow of vertical showers, we have detected 5 air showers of TeV energies. We argue that these events may be caused by the decay of a long-lived penetrating particle entering the atmosphere from the ground and decaying in front of the telescope. We show that this particle can it not be a muon or a tau lepton. As a possible explanation, we discuss two scenarios with an unstable neutrino of mass m ≈ 0.5 GeV and cτ ≈ 30 m. Remarkably, one of these models has been recently proposed to explain an excess of electron-like neutrino events at MiniBooNE.

  10. Charmless B-decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Eklund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings summarise three recent papers from the LHCb Collaboration in the area of charmless b-decays. The branching fraction for the decay $\\text{B}_{s}^{0}\\rightarrow \\phi \\phi$ is measured and a search for the highly suppressed decay $\\text{B}^{0}\\rightarrow \\phi \\phi$ is performed. The decay $\\text{B}_{s}^{0}\\rightarrow {\\eta}'{\\eta}'$ is observed for the first time and the CP asymmetries in the decays $\\text{B}^{+}\\rightarrow {\\eta}'\\text{K}^{+}$ and $\\text{B}^{+}\\rightarrow \\phi \\text{K}^{+}$ are measured. Finally, the decay $\\text{B}^{0}\\rightarrow \\rho^{0}\\rho^{0}$ is observed for the first time and its longitudinal polarisation is measured.

  11. Power Spectrum Analyses of Nuclear Decay Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Javorsek, D; Lasenby, R N; Lasenby, A N; Buncher, J B; Fischbach, E; Gruenwald, J T; Hoft, A W; Horan, T J; Jenkins, J H; Kerford, J L; Lee, R H; Longman, A; Mattes, J J; Morreale, B L; Morris, D B; Mudry, R N; Newport, J R; O'Keefe, D; Petrelli, M A; Silver, M A; Stewart, C A; Terry, B; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2010.06.011

    2010-01-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are n...

  12. Gravitational Waves in Decaying Vacuum Cosmologies

    OpenAIRE

    David Alejandro Tamayo Ramirez

    2015-01-01

    In the present monograph we study in detail the primordial gravitational waves in cosmologies with a decaying vacuum. The decaying vacuum models are an alternative to solve the cosmological constant problem attributing a dynamic to the vacuum energy. The problem of primordial gravitational waves is discussed in the framework of an expanding, flat, spatially homogeneous and isotropic FLRW Universe described by General Relativity theory with decaying vacuum energy density of the type $\\\\Lambda ...

  13. Bs mesons: semileptonic and nonleptonic decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertus C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we compute some nonleptonic and semileptonic decay widths of Bs mesons, working in the context of constituent quark models [1, 2]. For the case of semileptonic decays we consider reactions leading to kaons or different Jπ Ds mesons. The study of nonleptonic decays has been done in the factorisation approximation and includes the final states enclosed in Table 2.

  14. $K^{0}_{S}$ production in $\\tau$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Etienne, F; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    From a sample of about 160k $\\mbox{Z}\\!\\!\\to\\!\\!\\tau^+\\tau^-$ candidates collected with the ALEPH detector at LEP between 1991 and 1995, $\\tau$ lepton decays involving $K^0_S\\!\\to\\!\\pi^+\\pi^-$ are studied. The $K^0_SK^0_L$ associated production in $\\tau$ decays is also investigated. The branching ratios are measured for the inclusive decay $B(\\tau^-\\!\\!\\to\\!\\!K^0_SX^-\

  15. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Rare heavy flavor decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. The LHCb experiment, a dedicated heavy flavour experiment at the LHC at CERN. It has recorded the worlds largest sample of heavy meson and lepton decays. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1\\,fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt s = 7\\,$TeV and 1.1\\,fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt s = 8\\,$TeV of $pp$--collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of $B^0\\rightarrow K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $B^+\\rightarrow K^{+} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in $B\\rightarrow K^{(*)} \\mu^+ \\mu^-}$ decays. The first evidence for the very rare decay $B^0_s \\rightarrow \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ is presented together with the most stringent upper exclusion limits on the branching fraction of decays of $B^0$, $D^0$ and $K^0_s$ mesons into two muons. This note f...

  16. Charmless Hadronic Beauty Decays at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A summary of six LHCb results on the topic of charmless hadronic b-hadron decays is presented. These are comprised of: a search for the decay Bs0→Ks0K+K− and updated branching fraction measurements of B(s0→Ks0h+h′− decays (h=K,π [1]; the first observation of the decays B0→pp¯π+π−,  Bs0→pp¯K+K−,Bs0→pp¯K+π− and strong evidence for the decay B0→pp¯K+K− [2]; the first observation of the decay Bs0→pΛ¯K− [3]; a search for the decay Bs0→φη′ [4]; the first observation of the decay Ξb−→pK−K− [5] and evidence for CP-violation in Λb0→pπ−π+π− decays [6].

  17. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, Dirk [Lund University, Sweden; Forsberg, U. [Lund University, Sweden; Golubev, P. [Lund University, Sweden; Sarmiento, L. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Yakushev, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Andersson, L.-L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Duehllmann, Ch. E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Gates, J. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gregorich, K. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Hessberger, F. P. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Herzberg, R.-D [University of Liverpool; Khuyagbaatar, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Kratz, J. V. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Schaedel, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Aberg, S. [Lund University, Sweden; Ackermann, D. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Block, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Brand, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Carlsson, B. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Cox, D. [University of Liverpool; Derkx, X. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Eberhardt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Even, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Fahlander, C. [Lund University, Sweden; Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Jaeger, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kindler, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Krier, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kojouharov, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kurz, N. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Lommel, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mistry, A. [University of Liverpool; Mokry, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Omtvedt, J. P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Papadakis, P. [University of Liverpool; Ragnarsson, I. [Lund University, Sweden; Runke, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schaffner, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schausten, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Thoerle-Pospiech, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Torres, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Traut, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Trautmann, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Tuerler, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Ward, A. [University of Liverpool; Ward, D. E. [Lund University, Sweden; Wiehl, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution a, X-ray and -ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fu r Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated a-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z = 115. The data includes first candidates of fingerprinting the decay step Mt --> Bh with characteristic X rays. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z > 112. Comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  18. Heavy Flavour Production and Decay at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, RWL; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS is taking advantage of its large integrated luminosity band sophisticated muon and dimuon triggers to make competitive measurements of heavy flavour production and decay. Inclusive production and heavy flavour jet production is discussed before turning to charm and onium production. The production and decay of individual B hadron species is then addressed, including the current best measurement of the Λb lifetime. A much improved analysis of CP related quantities in Bs decays is presented, before turning to recent results and prospects for rare B decays.

  19. Observation of charge ordering in particle production in hadronic $Z^0$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Geryukov, L; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chernyaev, E; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Yi, J; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of the rapidity structure of charge correlations in hadronic events from $Z^0$ decays gives evidence for chain-like charge-ordering of particle production along the thrust axis, as predicted by `QCD-motivated' string-like fragmentation models.

  20. PKA distributions: Contributions from transmutation products and from radioactive decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Gilbert

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The neutrons generated in fusion plasmas interact with materials via nuclear reactions. The resulting transmutations and atomic displacements have life-limiting consequences for fusion reactor components. A detailed understanding of the production, evolution and material consequences of the damage created by cascades of atomic displacements requires, as a vital primary input, a complete description of the energy-spectrum of initial (prompt atomic displacement events (the primary knock on atoms or PKAs produced by direct neutron nuclear interactions. There is also the possibility that the radionuclides produced under transmutation will create further PKAs as they decay, and so the rate of these must also be quantified. This paper presents the latest results from the analysis of PKA spectra under neutron irradiation, focussing particularly on the variation in PKA distributions due to changes in composition under transmutation, but also on the PKA contributions from radioactive decay of materials that become activated under irradiation.

  1. Experimental observations on the decay of environmental DNA from bighead and silver carps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Richard F.; Klymus, Katy E.; Richter, Cathy; Guan, Xin; Farrington, Heather L.; Carr, Matthew R.; Thompson, Nathan; Chapman, Duane C.; Baerwaldt, Kelly L.

    2017-01-01

    Interest in the field of environmental DNA (eDNA) is growing rapidly and eDNA surveys are becoming an important consideration for aquatic resource managers dealing with invasive species. However, in order for eDNA monitoring to mature as a research and management tool, there are several critical knowledge gaps that must be filled. One such gap is the fate of eDNA materials in the aquatic environment. Understanding the environmental factors that influence the decay of eDNA and how these factors impact detection probabilities over time and space could have significant implications for eDNA survey design and data interpretation. Here we experimentally explore decay of eDNA associated with bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) biological waste collected from an aquaculture filtration system and with sperm collected from captive silver carp (H. molitrix), and how decay may be influenced by differing levels of water turbulence, temperature, microbial load, and pH. We found that the decay patterns of eDNA associated with both H. nobilis biological waste and H. molitrix milt significantly fit monophasic exponential decay curves. Secondly, we observed that the highest temperature we tested resulted in a decay half-life as much as 5.5× more rapid than the lowest temperature we tested. When we suppressed microbial loads in eDNA samples, we observed that overall losses of eDNA were reduced by about 2.5×. When we amended eDNA samples with pond water the half-life of eDNA was reduced by about 2.25×, despite relatively little apparent increase in the overall microbial load. This pattern indicated that species constituency of the microbial community, in addition to microbial load, might play a critical role in eDNA degradation. A shift in pH from 6.5 to 8.0 in the samples resulted in a 1.6× reduction in eDNA halflife. Water turbulence in our study had no apparent effect on eDNA decay. When we combined different temperature, pH, and microbial load treatments to create a

  2. Biocontrol of postharvest Rhizopus decay of peaches with Pichia caribbica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baitian; Zhang, Hongyin; Chen, Keping; Xu, Qin; Yao, Yao; Gao, Hui

    2013-08-01

    A new yeast antagonist, Pichia caribbica, isolated in our laboratory from the soil collected from unsprayed orchards, was evaluated for its biocontrol capability against Rhizopus stolonifer on peaches and the possible mechanisms involved. The decay incidence and lesion diameter of Rhizopus decay of peaches treated by P. caribbica were significantly reduced compared with the control fruits, and the higher the concentration of P. caribbica, the better the efficacy of the biocontrol. Rapid colonization of the yeast in peach wounds stored at 25 °C was observed. In peaches, the activities of peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) were significantly induced by P. caribbica treatment compared to those of the control fruits. All these results indicated that P. caribbica has a great potential for the development of commercial formulations to control postharvest Rhizopus decay of peaches. Its modes of action were based on competition for space and nutrients with pathogens, inducement of activities of defense-related enzymes such as POD, CAT, and PAL of peaches.

  3. Biomass decay rates and tissue nutrient loss in bloom and non-bloom-forming macroalgal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Jessie; Green, Lindsay A.; Thornber, Carol S.

    2016-09-01

    Macroalgal blooms occur in shallow, low-wave energy environments and are generally dominated by fast-growing ephemeral macroalgae. When macroalgal mats undergo senescence and decompose they can cause oxygen depletion and release nutrients into the surrounding water. There are relatively few studies that examine macroalgal decomposition rates in areas impacted by macroalgal blooms. Understanding the rate of macroalgal bloom decomposition is essential to understanding the impacts of macroalgal blooms following senescence. Here, we examined the biomass, organic content, nitrogen decay rates and δ15N values for five macroalgal species (the bloom-forming Agardhiella subulata, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, Ulva compressa, and Ulva rigida and the non-bloom-forming Fucus vesiculosus) in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, U.S.A. using a litterbag design. Bloom-forming macroalgae had similar biomass decay rates (0.34-0.51 k d-1) and decayed significantly faster than non-bloom-forming macroalgae (0.09 k d-1). Biomass decay rates also varied temporally, with a significant positive correlation between biomass decay rate and water temperature for U. rigida. Tissue organic content decreased over time in all species, although A. subulata and G. vermiculophylla displayed significantly higher rates of organic content decay than U. compressa, U. rigida, and F. vesiculosus. Agardhiella subulata had a significantly higher rate of tissue nitrogen decay (0.35 k d-1) than all other species. By contrast, only the δ15N of F. vesiculosus changed significantly over the decay period. Overall, our results indicate that bloom-forming macroalgal species decay more rapidly than non-bloom-forming species.

  4. $\\beta$ decay of $^{47}$Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Weissman, L; Bergmann, U C; Brown, B A; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Dillmann, I; Hallmann, O; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Gaudefroy, L; Köster, U; Kratz, K L; Pfeiffer, B; Sorlin, O; 10.1103/PhysRevC.70.024304

    2004-01-01

    Information on beta -decay properties of neutron-rich /sup 47/Ar was obtained at the ISOLDE facility at CERN using isobaric selectivity. This was achieved by a combination of a plasma-ion source with a cooled transfer line and subsequent mass separation. A doubly charged beam was used in order to improve the signal-to-background ratio associated with multi-charged noble gas fission products. The identification of the /sup 47/Ar gamma -ray transitions was performed by comparing the spectra obtained from direct proton bombardment of the target and of the neutron converter. New excited levels in the daughter /sup 47/K nucleus corresponding to the negative-parity states were observed. The obtained data are compared to the result of large-scale shell model calculations and quasiparticle random-phase approximation predictions. (29 refs).

  5. Precise α from τ Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaescu, B.

    2009-01-01

    An updated measurement of α(mτ2) from ALEPH τ hadronic spectral functions is presented. We report a study of the perturbative prediction(s) showing that the fixed-order perturbation theory manifests convergence or principle problems not presented in the contour-improved calculation. Potential systematic effects from quark-hadron duality violations are estimated to be within the quoted systematic errors. The fit result is α(mτ2)=0.344±0.005±0.007, where the first error is experimental and the second theoretical. After evolution, the α(mZ2) determined from τ data is one of the most precise to date, in agreement with the corresponding NLO value derived from Z decays.

  6. To decay or not to decay - or both ! quantum mechanics of spontaneous emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Lodahl, Peter; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    We discuss calculations of spontaneous emission from quantum dots in photonic crystals and show how the decay depends on the intrinsic properties of the emitter as well as the position. A number of fundamentally different types of spontaneous decay dynamics are shown to be possible, including...... counter intuitive situations in which the quantum dot decays only partially....

  7. Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP): Evaluation of the main {sup 233}Pa decay characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechev, Valery P. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, 28 Second Murinsky Ave., St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: chechev@atom.nw.ru; Kuzmenko, Nikolay K. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, 28 Second Murinsky Ave., St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2006-10-15

    The results of a decay data evaluation are presented for {sup 233}Pa ({beta} {sup -}) decay to nuclear levels in {sup 233}U. These evaluated data have been obtained within the Decay Data Evaluation Project using information published up to 2005.

  8. Phasor plots of luminescence decay functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberan-Santos, Mário N., E-mail: berberan@tecnico.ulisboa.pt

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • First complete study of the phasor plots of a sum of two exponentials (2E). • The existence of a 2E limiting curve (outer boundary) is demonstrated. • A generalization of the lever rule is presented. • Virtual phasor concept. • Study of several decay laws displaying a diversity of patterns. - Abstract: Luminescence decay functions describe the time dependence of the intensity of radiation emitted by electronically excited species. Decay phasor plots (plots of the Fourier sine transform vs. the Fourier cosine transform, for one or several angular frequencies) are being increasingly used in fluorescence, namely in lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this work, a detailed study of the sum of two exponentials decay function is carried out revealing that sub-exponential, super-exponential and unimodal decays have different phasor signatures. A generalization of the lever rule is obtained, and the existence of an outermost phasor curve corresponding to intermediate-like decays is demonstrated. A study of the behavior of more complex decay functions (sum of three exponentials, stretched and compressed exponentials, phosphorescence with reabsorption and triplet–triplet annihilation, fluorescence with quantum beats) allows concluding that a rich diversity of phasor plot patterns exists. In particular, super-exponential decays can present complex shapes, spiraling at high frequencies. The concept of virtual phasor is also introduced.

  9. Hadronic b decays and $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067638

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is ideally suited to the study of decays involving b quarks to fully hadronic final states. In these proceedings I summarise the status of the LHCb $\\gamma$ combination and present several recent analyses involving beauty baryon and meson decays.

  10. Neutrinoless double beta decay and nuclear environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimkovic, F.; Krivoruchenko, M. I.; Kovalenko, S.

    2017-09-01

    We show that the presence in the nuclear medium of lepton number violating four-fermion interactions of neutrinos with quarks from a decaying nucleus could account for an apparent incompatibility among the 0 νββ searches in the laboratory, the direct neutrino mass measurement with the nuclear β-decay and cosmological data.

  11. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  12. Radiative B Decays -- an Experimental Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Thorndike, Edward H.

    2002-01-01

    An informal review is given of the status and direction of experiments on radiative B decays -- b -> s gamma and b -> d gamma. Branching fractions for exclusive and inclusive b -> s gamma decays, CP asymmetry limits, the photon energy spectrum, and limits on the b -> d gamma exclusive branching fractions are covered, and implications of the measurements discussed.

  13. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  14. Rare B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, M

    2005-03-14

    The authors present recent results on rare B meson decays based on data taken by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Included in this report are measurements of branching fractions and other quantities of interest for several hadronic, radiative, electroweak, and purely leptonic decays of B mesons.

  15. Wood decay and the cleanup crew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Jessie A. Glaeser

    2017-01-01

    Arborists are encouraged to recognize the wood-decay process as an important factor in tree health and public safety. Technical experts who develop training materials to recognize wood-decay processes in living trees are frequently forest pathologists. Much of the history of forest pathology was to support production of sound, high-quality timber. That heritage is...

  16. Radioactive decays at limits of nuclear stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfützner, M.; Karny, M.; Grigorenko, L. V.

    2012-01-01

    , and their relative probabilities. When approaching limits of nuclear stability, new decay modes set in. First, beta decays are accompanied by emission of nucleons from highly excited states of daughter nuclei. Second, when the nucleon separation energy becomes negative, nucleons start being emitted from the ground...

  17. Limiting conditions for decay in wood systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul I. Morris; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2002-01-01

    Hygrothermal models can predict temperature and moisture conditions in wall components subjected to real weather data, but specific data and a fundamental understanding of how temperature and wood moisture content dictate the progression of decay under these conditions is required for modellers to predict consequences of decay on building performance. It is well...

  18. QCD in heavy quark production and decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiss, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The author discusses how QCD is used to understand the physics of heavy quark production and decay dynamics. His discussion of production dynamics primarily concentrates on charm photoproduction data which are compared to perturbative QCD calculations which incorporate fragmentation effects. He begins his discussion of heavy quark decay by reviewing data on charm and beauty lifetimes. Present data on fully leptonic and semileptonic charm decay are then reviewed. Measurements of the hadronic weak current form factors are compared to the nonperturbative QCD-based predictions of Lattice Gauge Theories. He next discusses polarization phenomena present in charmed baryon decay. Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicts that the daughter baryon will recoil from the charmed parent with nearly 100% left-handed polarization, which is in excellent agreement with present data. He concludes by discussing nonleptonic charm decay which is traditionally analyzed in a factorization framework applicable to two-body and quasi-two-body nonleptonic decays. This discussion emphasizes the important role of final state interactions in influencing both the observed decay width of various two-body final states as well as modifying the interference between interfering resonance channels which contribute to specific multibody decays. 50 refs., 77 figs.

  19. Measurement of electrons from heavy-flavor decays from $p$+$p$, $d$+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions in the PHENIX experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Sanghoon

    2014-01-01

    Charm and bottom quarks are formed predominantly by gluon fusion in the initial hard scatterings at RHIC, making them good probes of the full medium evolution. Previous measurements at RHIC have shown large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of open heavy-flavor hadrons in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200~{\\rm GeV}$. Explaining the simultaneously large suppression and flow of heavy quarks has been challenging. To further understand the heavy-flavor transport in the hot and dense medium, it is imperative to also measure cold nuclear matter effects which affect the initial distribution of heavy quarks as well as the system size dependence of the final state suppression. In this talk, new measurements by the PHENIX collaboration of electrons from heavy-flavor decays in $p$+$p$, $d$+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200~{\\rm GeV}$ are presented. In particular, a surprising enhancement of intermediate transverse momentum heavy-flavor decay leptons in $d$+Au at mid and backward rapidity are also se...

  20. Decay heat uncertainty quantification of MYRRHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorito Luca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MYRRHA is a lead-bismuth cooled MOX-fueled accelerator driven system (ADS currently in the design phase at SCK·CEN in Belgium. The correct evaluation of the decay heat and of its uncertainty level is very important for the safety demonstration of the reactor. In the first part of this work we assessed the decay heat released by the MYRRHA core using the ALEPH-2 burnup code. The second part of the study focused on the nuclear data uncertainty and covariance propagation to the MYRRHA decay heat. Radioactive decay data, independent fission yield and cross section uncertainties/covariances were propagated using two nuclear data sampling codes, namely NUDUNA and SANDY. According to the results, 238U cross sections and fission yield data are the largest contributors to the MYRRHA decay heat uncertainty. The calculated uncertainty values are deemed acceptable from the safety point of view as they are well within the available regulatory limits.

  1. Radioactive decays of highly-charged ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Access to stored and cooled highly-charged radionuclides offers unprecedented opportunities to perform high-precision investigations of their decays. Since the few-electron ions, e.g. hydrogen- or helium-like ions, are quantum mechanical systems with clear electronic ground state configurations, the decay studies of such ions are performed under well-defined conditions and allow for addressing fundamental aspects of the decay process. Presented here is a compact review of the relevant experiments conducted at the Experimental Storage Ring ESR of GSI. A particular emphasis is given to the investigations of the two-body beta decay, namely the bound-state β-decay and its time-mirrored counterpart, orbital electron-capture.

  2. Observation of charmless hadronic B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Four candidates for charmless hadronic B decay are observed in a data sample of four million hadronic Z decays recorded by the {\\sc aleph} detector at {\\sc lep} . The probability that these events come from background sources is estimated to b e less than $10^{-6}$. The average branching ratio of weakly decaying B hadrons (a mixture of $\\bd$, $\\bs$ and $\\lb$ weighted by their production cross sections and lifetimes , here denoted B) into two long-lived charged hadrons (pions, kaons or protons) is measured to be $\\Br(\\btohh) = \\resultBR$. The relative branching fraction $\\rratio$, where $\\rs$ is the ratio of $\\bs$ to $\\bd$ decays in the sample, is measured to be $\\resultR$. %Branching ratio upper limits are also obtained for a variety In addition, branching ratio upper limits are obtained for a variety of exclusive charmless hadronic two-body decays of B hadrons.

  3. Decay heat uncertainty quantification of MYRRHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorito, Luca; Buss, Oliver; Hoefer, Axel; Stankovskiy, Alexey; Eynde, Gert Van den

    2017-09-01

    MYRRHA is a lead-bismuth cooled MOX-fueled accelerator driven system (ADS) currently in the design phase at SCK·CEN in Belgium. The correct evaluation of the decay heat and of its uncertainty level is very important for the safety demonstration of the reactor. In the first part of this work we assessed the decay heat released by the MYRRHA core using the ALEPH-2 burnup code. The second part of the study focused on the nuclear data uncertainty and covariance propagation to the MYRRHA decay heat. Radioactive decay data, independent fission yield and cross section uncertainties/covariances were propagated using two nuclear data sampling codes, namely NUDUNA and SANDY. According to the results, 238U cross sections and fission yield data are the largest contributors to the MYRRHA decay heat uncertainty. The calculated uncertainty values are deemed acceptable from the safety point of view as they are well within the available regulatory limits.

  4. Search for new mechanism of CP violation through tau decay and semileptonic decay at hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yung Su

    1996-11-01

    If CP is violated in any decay process involving leptons it will signify the existence of a new force (called the X boson) responsible for CP violation that may be the key to understanding matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. The author discusses the signatures of CP violation in (1) the decay of tau lepton, and (2) the semileptonic decay of {pi}, K, D, B and t particles by measuring the polarization of the charged lepton in the decay. The author discusses how the coupling constants and their phases of the coupling of the X boson to 9 quark vertices and 3 lepton vertices can be obtained through 12 decay processes.

  5. Quarkonia production at forward rapidity in Pb+ Pb collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muons from the decay of charmonium resonances are detected in ALICE experiment in + and Pb + Pb collisions with a muon spectrometer, covering the forward rapidity region (2.5 < < 4). The analysis of the inclusive / production in the first Pb + Pb data collected in the fall of 2010 at a centre of mass energy of s N ...

  6. Composites by rapid prototyping technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available powder is a fiber, problems of manufacturing occur. The method has also been used to make Metal Matrix Composite (MMC), e.g Fe and graphite [17], WC-Co [18,19], WC-Co and Cu [20,21], Fe, Ni and TiC [22] etc and Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) e.g. Si... of various materials used. Key words: : Rapid Prototyping (RP), Laser, Composites 1 Introduction Rapid Prototyping (RP) initially focussed on polymers. These were later re- placed/supplemented by ceramics, metals and composites. Composites are used in RP...

  7. Forest type affects the influence of harvest on annual and cumulative litter decay in forest and wetland sites across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Thompson, E.; Cameron, A.; Pare, D.; Lavigne, M.; Flanagan, L.; Moore, T.; Amiro, B.; Smyth, C.

    2007-12-01

    A litter decomposition study was established in 16 sites at 7 stations of the Fluxnet Canada Research Network. These sites included paired mature and clearcut forest sites at 5 upland stations (BC, SK, ON, QC, NB) as well as one site at each of two wetland stations (AW, QW) . All sites are instrumented for in situ measurements of soil moisture and temperature. Litterbags were prepared using one of four standard material types (aspen leaves - AL, black spruce needles BS, Douglas fir needles DF and birch wood sticks BW). Six replicate plots were located at each site, each plot contained sufficient numbers of surface litterbags of each material type to allow for four annual collections (2004 - 2007). As well unconfined birch chopsticks were placed at three depths down the soil profile (surface, 5cm, 15cm) and replaced annually to examine the effects of interannual variability on decay. Cumulative litter decay after three years litters rank by % mass remaining had ALdecay more rapidly in clearcut than forests, other than birchwood at one site (QC). Decay of surface birch sticks were similar and interannual variability was less than variability down the soil profile. The effects of clearcut varied with forest site type, on wetter sites surface BW decayed faster in clearcuts than closed forest, however this was reversed in drier forest site types. At lower soil depths on drier sites, decay was more rapid in clearcuts than closed forest. Work is continuing to relate insitu microclimates to decay rates.

  8. The contribution of RNA decay quantitative trait loci to inter-individual variation in steady-state gene expression levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athma A Pai

    Full Text Available Recent gene expression QTL (eQTL mapping studies have provided considerable insight into the genetic basis for inter-individual regulatory variation. However, a limitation of all eQTL studies to date, which have used measurements of steady-state gene expression levels, is the inability to directly distinguish between variation in transcription and decay rates. To address this gap, we performed a genome-wide study of variation in gene-specific mRNA decay rates across individuals. Using a time-course study design, we estimated mRNA decay rates for over 16,000 genes in 70 Yoruban HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, for which extensive genotyping data are available. Considering mRNA decay rates across genes, we found that: (i as expected, highly expressed genes are generally associated with lower mRNA decay rates, (ii genes with rapid mRNA decay rates are enriched with putative binding sites for miRNA and RNA binding proteins, and (iii genes with similar functional roles tend to exhibit correlated rates of mRNA decay. Focusing on variation in mRNA decay across individuals, we estimate that steady-state expression levels are significantly correlated with variation in decay rates in 10% of genes. Somewhat counter-intuitively, for about half of these genes, higher expression is associated with faster decay rates, possibly due to a coupling of mRNA decay with transcriptional processes in genes involved in rapid cellular responses. Finally, we used these data to map genetic variation that is specifically associated with variation in mRNA decay rates across individuals. We found 195 such loci, which we named RNA decay quantitative trait loci ("rdQTLs". All the observed rdQTLs are located near the regulated genes and therefore are assumed to act in cis. By analyzing our data within the context of known steady-state eQTLs, we estimate that a substantial fraction of eQTLs are associated with inter-individual variation in mRNA decay rates.

  9. Cold keV dark matter from decays and scatterings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeck, Julian; Teresi, Daniele

    2017-08-01

    We explore ways of creating cold keV-scale dark matter by means of decays and scatterings. The main observation is that certain thermal freeze-in processes can lead to a cold dark matter distribution in regions with a small available phase space. In this way the free-streaming length of keV particles can be suppressed without decoupling them too much from the Standard Model. In all cases, dark matter needs to be produced together with a heavy particle that carries away most of the initial momentum. For decays, this simply requires an off-diagonal dark matter (DM) coupling to two heavy particles; for scatterings, the coupling of soft DM to two heavy particles needs to be diagonal, in particular in spin space. Decays can thus lead to cold light DM of any spin, while scatterings only work for bosons with specific couplings. We explore a number of simple models and also comment on the connection to the tentative 3.5 keV line.

  10. A theoretical overview of hypernuclear weak decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumillas, C. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garbarino, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino, I-10125 Torino (Italy)], E-mail: garbarin@to.infn.it; Parreno, A.; Ramos, A. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-05-15

    The physics of the weak decay of hypernuclei is briefly reviewed from a theoretical point of view. Special regard is devoted to the recent progress concerning the determination of the non-mesonic decay widths and the asymmetry parameters. Convincing evidence has been achieved for a solution of the long-standing puzzle on the ratio {gamma}{sub n}/{gamma}{sub p}. Very recently, it has been shown that the exchange of a {pi}{pi} pair in the weak mechanism plays a crucial role in explaining the discrepancies between theory and experiment on the decay asymmetries.

  11. Gamma ray constraints on decaying dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirelli, M.; Moulin, E.; Panci, P.

    2012-01-01

    We derive new bounds on decaying dark matter from the gamma ray measurements of (i) the isotropic residual (extragalactic) background by Fermi and (ii) the Fornax galaxy cluster by H.E.S.S. We find that those from (i) are among the most stringent constraints currently available, for a large range...... of dark matter masses and a variety of decay modes, excluding half-lives up to similar to 10(26) to few 10(27) seconds. In particular, they rule out the interpretation in terms of decaying dark matter of the e(+/-) spectral features in PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S., unless very conservative choices...

  12. The theory of beta-decay

    CERN Document Server

    Strachan, Charles

    1969-01-01

    The Theory of Beta-Decay covers the formulas, theories, probabilities, and spectra of beta-decay. This book is divided into 2 parts compassing 12 chapters, and starts with the introduction to the neutrino and the quantum theoretical background, explaining the basic phenomenon of beta-decay and the emission of electrons. The subsequent chapters deal with the interaction and the transition probability, as well as formulas of solutions. These topics are followed by discussions on the developments in the non-conservation of parity and helicity, the two-component theory of the neutrino, possible i

  13. Hadronic B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP

    2007-04-18

    By means of hadronic B decays, the BABAR experiment aims to constrain the CKM matrix performing CP parameter measurements. It also seeks to test QCD factorization predictions and other models for B structure and decay mechanisms. We will present some of the on-going CP related analyses in the first section, while the second section will be dedicated to report on the conducted investigations on subjects as diverse as probing the gluon component in the B meson wave function, new physics and final state interactions in annihilation processes, intrinsic charm searches and first observation of strange charmed baryon production in B decays.

  14. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, D; Forsberg, U; Golubev, P; Sarmiento, L G; Yakushev, A; Andersson, L-L; Di Nitto, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Gates, J M; Gregorich, K E; Gross, C J; Heßberger, F P; Herzberg, R-D; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kratz, J V; Rykaczewski, K; Schädel, M; Åberg, S; Ackermann, D; Block, M; Brand, H; Carlsson, B G; Cox, D; Derkx, X; Eberhardt, K; Even, J; Fahlander, C; Gerl, J; Jäger, E; Kindler, B; Krier, J; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Mistry, A; Mokry, C; Nitsche, H; Omtvedt, J P; Papadakis, P; Ragnarsson, I; Runke, J; Schaffner, H; Schausten, B; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Torres, T; Traut, T; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Ward, A; Ward, D E; Wiehl, N

    2013-09-13

    A high-resolution α, x-ray, and γ-ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated α-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z=115. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z>112. Comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  15. Searching for supersymmetry in Z’ decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corcella Gennaro

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available I investigate production and decay of heavy neutral gauge bosons Z’ in GUT-inspired U(1’ groups and in the Sequential Standard Model. In particular, decays into supersymmetric particles, such as slepton, chargino and neutralino pairs, as predicted in the MSSM, are accounted for, with a special interest in final states with leptons and missing energy. For a representative point of the parameter space, it is found that the inclusion of supersymmetric decay modes has an impact of 200-300 GeV on the Z’ mass exclusion limits.

  16. Exclusive B Decays to Charmonium Final States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-10-13

    We report on exclusive decays of B mesons into final states containing charmonium using data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. The charmonium states considered here are J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), and {chi}{sub c1}. Branching fractions for several exclusive final states, a measurement of the decay amplitudes for the B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K* decay, and measurements of the B{sup 0} and B{sup +} masses are presented. All of the results we present here are preliminary.

  17. The fully differential top decay distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Granada (Spain); Boudreau, J.; Mueller, J. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Escobar, C. [CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Paterna (Spain)

    2017-03-15

    We write down the four-dimensional fully differential decay distribution for the top quark decay t → Wb → lνb. We discuss how its eight physical parameters can be measured, either with a global fit or with the use of selected one-dimensional distributions and asymmetries. We give expressions for the top decay amplitudes for a general tbW interaction, and show how the untangled measurement of the two components of the fraction of longitudinal W bosons - those with b quark helicities of 1/2 and -1/2, respectively - could improve the precision of a global fit to the tbW vertex. (orig.)

  18. $\\beta$-decay study of $^{77}$Cu

    CERN Document Server

    Patronis, N; Górska, M; Huyse, M; Kruglov, K; Pauwels, D; Van de Vel, K; Van Duppen, P; Van Roosbroeck, J; Thomas, J-C; Franchoo, S; Cederkäll, J; Fedosseev, V; Fynbo, H; Georg, U; Jonsson, O; Köster, U; Materna, T; Mathieu, L; Serot, O; Weissman, L; Müller, W F; Mishin, V I; Fedorov, D

    2009-01-01

    A beta-decay study of Cu-77 has been performed at the ISOLDE mass separator with the aim to deduce its beta-decay properties and to obtain spectroscopic information on Zn-77. Neutron-rich copper isotopes were produced by means of proton- or neutron-induced fission reactions on U-238. After the production, Cu-77 was selectively laser ionized, mass separated and sent to different detection systems where beta-gamma and beta-n coincidence data were collected. We report on the deduced half-live, decay scheme, and possible spin assignment of 77Cu.

  19. Rare kaon, muon, and pion decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.

    1998-12-01

    The author discusses the status of and prospects for the study of rare decays of kaons, muons, and pions. Studies of rare kaon decays are entering an interesting new phase wherein they can deliver important short-distance information. It should be possible to construct an alternative unitarity triangle to that determined in the B sector, and thus perform a critical check of the Standard Model by comparing the two. Rare muon decays are beginning to constrain supersymmetric models in a significant way, and future experiments should reach sensitivities which this kind of model must show effects, or become far less appealing.

  20. Rare decays at the kaon factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). TRIUMF Facility)

    1990-04-01

    Extensive experimental work on rare kaon decays is currently being performed at BNL, KEK and FNAL to search for exotic physics and to examine standard model predictions in unique detail. The Kaon Factory at TRIUMF will produce beams with a hundred-fold increase in intensity over existing machines in the 30 GeV region and will allow even higher precision and higher sensitivity experiments on rare decays to be done. A sample of kaon decay experiments and CP and T violating studies which might benefit from intense kaon factory beams is discussed. (orig.).

  1. Rare kaon decay: challenges and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    I review rare kaon decays. I introduce the flavor problem and p ossible solutions. Very rare kaon decays like K → π ν ̄ ν are very important to this purpose but also K → π l + l − . A new interesting channel is K → π π ee . Chiral dynamics is important to disentangle short distanc e effects. We discuss also the decays K 0 → μ + μ − , which have received recently some attention due to the measurement by LHCB.therefore we will study also K L → π 0 e + e − , K + → π + π 0 γ , K + → π + π 0 e + e − and related channels

  2. Searches for rare charm decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Mitzel, Dominik Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Rare and forbidden charm decays are unique probes for hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. The LHCb collaboration has made significant contributions to the field over the last years. This report presents results of the search for the lepton-flavour violating decay $D^0 \\to e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp$ and the first observations of the rare four body decays $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-, D^0 \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ ans $D^0 \\to K^+ K^- \\mu^+ \\mu^-$.

  3. Photoproduction and Decay of Light Mesons in CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaryan, Moskov Jamalovich [Old Dominion University

    2013-08-01

    We present preliminary experimental results on photoproduction and decay of light mesons measured with CLAS setup at JLAB . This include Dalitz decay of pseudoscalar and vector mesons, radiative decay of pseudoscalar mesons as well hadronic decays of pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The collected high statistics in some of decay channels exceeds the world data by an order of magnitude and some other decay modes are observed for the first time. It is shown how the CLAS data will improve the world data on transition form factors of light mesons, Dalitz plot analyses, branching ratios of rare decay modes and other fundamental properties potentially accessible through the light meson decays.

  4. Initial Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    increased. In the initial study presented here, the time it takes to pass an intersection is studied in details. Two major signal-controlled four-way intersections in the center of the city Aalborg are studied in details to estimate the congestion levels in these intersections, based on the time it takes...

  5. Short term memory bowing effect is consistent with presentation rate dependent decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnow, Eugen

    2010-12-01

    I reanalyze the free recall data of Murdock, J Exp Psychol 64(5):482-488 (1962) and Murdock and Okada, J Verbal Learn and Verbal Behav 86:263-267 (1970) which show the famous bowing effect in which initial and recent items are recalled better than intermediate items (primacy and recency effects). Recent item recall probabilities follow a logarithmic decay with time of recall consistent with the tagging/retagging theory. The slope of the decay increases with increasing presentation rate. The initial items, with an effectively low presentation rate, decay with the slowest logarithmic slope, explaining the primacy effect. The finding that presentation rate limits the duration of short term memory suggests a basis for memory loss in busy adults, for the importance of slow music practice, for long term memory deficiencies for people with attention deficits who may be artificially increasing the presentation rates of their surroundings. A well-defined, quantitative measure of the primacy effect is introduced.

  6. A study of w boson decay charge asymmetry using hadronic tau decays in proton - anti-proton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuns, Edward William [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This dissertation presents a measurement of the tau charge asymmetry in events where the taus are produced by W decays. This charge asymmetry appears as different rapidity distributions for positive and negative taus. Two competing effects generate tau charge asymmetry. The production mechanism for the W gauge boson generates a charge asymmetry which is a function of the ratio of parton distribution functions, d(x)=u(x), measured at x ~ MW/√s. This is the dominant effect for tau charge asymmetry at small rapidity. At higher rapidity, however, the competing charge asymmetry from parity violation in W decay to taus becomes dominant. This tau asymmetry measurement is consistent with the Standard Model with a x2 per degree of freedom equal to 2.5 for 4 degrees of freedom when the asymmetry measurement is folded about y = 0, taking advantage of the CP symmetry of the underlying physics, and 8.9 for 8 degrees of freedom when it is not. This measurement introduces some methods and variables of interest to future analyses using hadronic decay modes of taus. This work was done using the CDF detector in $\\bar{p}$p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator.

  7. Rare decays at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00392110

    2015-01-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons offer a rich playground to make precise tests of the Standard Model and look for New Physics at the level of quantum corrections. A review of recent LHCb results will be presented.

  8. Rare Decays at the LHCb Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatore, L.

    2015-06-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons offer a rich playground to make precise tests of the Standard Model and look for New Physics at the level of quantum corrections. A review of recent LHCb results will be presented.

  9. Three-Phased Wake Vortex Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.; Switzer, George S.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed parametric study is conducted that examines vortex decay within turbulent and stratified atmospheres. The study uses a large eddy simulation model to simulate the out-of-ground effect behavior of wake vortices due to their interaction with atmospheric turbulence and thermal stratification. This paper presents results from a parametric investigation and suggests improvements for existing fast-time wake prediction models. This paper also describes a three-phased decay for wake vortices. The third phase is characterized by a relatively slow rate of circulation decay, and is associated with the ringvortex stage that occurs following vortex linking. The three-phased decay is most prevalent for wakes imbedded within environments having low-turbulence and near-neutral stratification.

  10. Evaluation of 235U decay data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolong, Huang; Baosong, Wang

    2009-09-01

    Evaluation of the complete decay scheme and data for (235)U including new measurements are presented in this report; literature data available up to June 2008 are included. The half-life is determined to be (7.04+/-0.01) x 10(8) yr. All known measured gamma-ray absolute intensities have been examined; the gamma-ray emission probability of the reference gamma-ray line of 185.72 keV is recommended to be 57.0+/-0.3%. The calculated internal conversion coefficients and their uncertainties have been used to obtain the complete decay intensity balance. The other decay characteristics are calculated using the ENSDF analysis program. Finally the new decay scheme for (235)U is presented.

  11. Evaluation of 233Pa decay data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolong, Huang; Ping, Liu; Baosong, Wang

    2005-05-01

    An evaluation of the complete scheme and data for (233)Pa decay, including results of the recent measurements, is presented. Several data evaluation procedures were used in the analysis of the half-life data. The half-life has been determined to be 26.971+/-0.013 days. All the gamma-ray emission probabilities ever published have been examined, and the gamma-ray emission probability for the reference 312-keV gamma line is recommended as 38.35+/-0.28%. The calculated internal conversion coefficients and their uncertainties have been used to obtain the complete decay intensity balance. Other decay characteristics have been calculated using the ENSDF analysis program. Finally, a new (233)Pa decay scheme has been built.

  12. Evaluation of 225Ac decay data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolong, Huang; Baosong, Wang

    2007-06-01

    Evaluation of the complete decay scheme and data for (225)Ac including new measurements are presented in this report; literature data available up to March 2006 are included. The half-life is determined to be 10.0+/-0.1 days. All known measured gamma-ray relative intensities have been examined; the gamma-ray emission probability of the reference gamma-ray line of 150.04 keV is recommended to be 0.693+/-0.012%. The calculated internal conversion coefficients and their uncertainties have been used to obtain the complete decay intensity balance. The other decay characteristics are calculated using the ENSDF analysis program. Finally, the new decay scheme for (225)Ac is presented.

  13. Search for resonant two-bodies decays

    CERN Document Server

    Radogna, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Two-bodies decays are very common signatures for New Physics. Several results from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at p $\\sqrt s$= 13 TeV are summarized, including results from diboson, dijet and diphoton searches.

  14. CP Violation and Rare Kaon Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buchalla, Gerhard

    2000-01-01

    We summarize both the study of CP violation with $K$ and $B$ mesons, as wellas rare decays of kaons, emphasizing recent developments. The topics discussedinclude the unitarity triangle, $\\epsilon'/\\epsilon$, $K\\to\\pi\

  15. Decay Law of Moving Unstable Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Shirokov, M I

    2004-01-01

    Quantum relativistic decay law of moving unstable particle is analytically calculated in the model case of the Breit-Wigner mass distribution. It turns out that Einstein time dilation of the moving particle decay holds approximately at times when the decay is exponential. The related correction is calculated analytically. Being very small at these times it is practically unobservable. It is shown that Einstein dilation fails for large times t when decay is not exponential. An unstable system of the kind of K_0 meson (which is the superposition of K_s and K_l) is also considered. In this case, the violation of Einstein dilation is shown to be appreciable at all times under some condition.

  16. The BNL rare kaon decay program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.

    1996-12-31

    The rare kaon decay program at Brookhaven National Laboratory is reviewed. Results from the last round of experiments are briefly discussed. The three experiments currently collecting data are described. Prospects for future experiments are discussed.

  17. 7 CFR 51.490 - Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States... fermentation of the flesh or rind of the cantaloup caused by bacteria or fungi; except that dry type decays...

  18. Reparametrization invariance of B decay amplitudes and implications for new physics searches in B decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, F. J.; Silva, João P.

    2005-05-01

    When studying B decays within the standard model (SM), it is customary to use the unitarity of the CKM matrix in order to write the decay amplitudes in terms of only two of the three weak phases which appear in the various diagrams. Occasionally, it is mentioned that those two weak phases can be used in order to describe any decay amplitude, even beyond the standard model. Here we point out that, when describing a generic decay amplitude, the two weak phases can be chosen completely at will, and we study the behavior of the decay amplitudes under changes in the two weak phases chosen as a basis. Of course, physical observables cannot depend on such reparametrizations. This has an impact on discussions of the SM and on attempts to parametrize new physics effects in the decay amplitudes. We illustrate these issues by looking at B→ψKS and the isospin analysis in B→ππ.

  19. Search for pentaquarks states in Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Schael, S; Brunelière, R; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Pacheco, A; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Barklow, T; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kado, M; Mato, P; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Sguazzoni, G; Teubert, F; Valassi, A; Videau, I; Badaud, F; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, E; Vayaki, A; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bossi, F; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Kennedy, J; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Thompson, A S; Wasserbaech, S R; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Girone, M; Marinelli, N; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Smizanska, M; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaître, V; Blumenschein, U; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Bonissent, A; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Payre, P; Tilquin, A; Ragusa, F; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, R; Villegas, M; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Litke, A M; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, C; Hess, J; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Borean, C; Giannini, G; He, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Berkelman, K; Cranmer, K; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Pan Yi Bin; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wiedenmann, W; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G; Dissertori, G

    2004-01-01

    Exotic hadrons made of five quarks (pentaquarks) are searched for in hadronic Z decays collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. No significant signal is observed. At 95% C.L., upper limits are set on the production rates N of such particles and their charge-conjugate state per Z decay: N Theta(1535)+ . BR(Theta(1535)^+ -> pK0s xi^- pi^-) Xi^-pi^+ D*-p) D^-p) < 31 x 10^-4.

  20. Leptonic Decays of Charged Pseudoscalar Mesons - 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosner, Jonathan L. [Chicago U., EFI; Stone, Sheldon [Syracuse U.; Van de Water, Ruth S. [Fermilab

    2015-09-07

    We review the physics of purely leptonic decays of $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ pseudoscalar mesons. The measured decay rates are related to the product of the relevant weak-interaction-based CKM matrix element of the constituent quarks and a strong interaction parameter related to the overlap of the quark and antiquark wave-functions in the meson, called the decay constant $f_P$. The leptonic decay constants for $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ mesons can be obtained with controlled theoretical uncertainties and high precision from {\\it ab initio} lattice-QCD simulations. The combination of experimental leptonic decay-rate measurements and theoretical decay-constant calculations enables the determination of several elements of the CKM matrix within the standard model. These determinations are competitive with those obtained from semileptonic decays, and also complementary because they are sensitive to different quark flavor-changing currents. They can also be used to test the unitarity of the first and second rows of the CKM matrix. Conversely, taking the CKM elements predicted by unitarity, one can infer "experimental" values for $f_P$ that can be compared with theory. These provide tests of lattice-QCD methods, provided new-physics contributions to leptonic decays are negligible at the current level of precision. This review is the basis of the article in the Particle Data Group's 2016 edition, updating the versions in Refs. [1-3].

  1. Tables of double beta decay data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretyak, V.I. [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine)]|[Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Centre de Recherches Nucleaires; Zdesenko, Y.G. [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1995-12-31

    A compilation of experimental data on double beta decay is presented. The tables contain the most stringent known experimental limits or positive results of 2{beta} transitions of 69 natural nuclides to ground and excited states of daughter nuclei for different channels (2{beta}{sup -}; 2{beta}{sup +}; {epsilon}{beta}{sup +}; 2{epsilon}) and modes (0{nu}; 2{nu}; 0{nu}M) of decay. (authors). 189 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Cosmic string catalysis of skyrmion decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Ruth; Davis, Anne-Christine; Brandenberger, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The Callan-Witten picture is developed for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay in order to analyze the corresponding cosmic string scenario. It is discovered that cosmic strings (both ordinary and superconducting) can catalyze proton decay, but that this catalysis only occurs on the scale of the core of the string. In order to do this we have to develop a vortex model for the superconducting string. An argument is also given for the difference in the enhancement factors for monopoles and strings.

  3. Cosmic strings and baryon decay catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Ruth; Perkins, W. B.; Davis, A.-C.; Brandenberger, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Cosmic strings, like monopoles, can catalyze proton decay. For integer charged fermions, the cross section for catalysis is not amplified, unlike in the case of monopoles. The catalysis processes are reviewed both in the free quark and skyrmion pictures and the implications for baryogenesis are discussed. A computation of the cross section for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay is presented using classical physics. Also discussed are some effects which can screen catalysis processes.

  4. Decay π0-->μe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    1982-11-01

    An upper limit for the branching ratio of the decay π0-->μe is determined from existing experimental data to be Γ(π0-->μe)Γ(π0-->all)μe decay to the presence of Higgs particles responsible for muon-number violation is found to be considerably lower than for muon-electron conversion in the field of a nucleus.

  5. Special relativity in decays of hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Glazek, Stanislaw D.; Narebski, Jakub

    2005-01-01

    A decay of a heavy hybrid is expected to produce light mesons flying out with speeds comparable to the speed of light and phenomenological models of the decay must respect symmetries of special relativity. We study consequences of this requirement in a class of simple constituent models with spin. Our models respect boost symmetry because they conform to the rules of a boost-invariant renormalization group procedure for effective particles in light-front QCD. But rotational symmetry of the de...

  6. ATLAS Heavy Flavor productions and decay properties

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Lidia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    First measurements of non-prompt J/psi fraction in pp collisions at √s = 13 TeV and new results from RUN 1 data analysis are presented for heavy flavor production and decays. RUN 1 results include observation and measurement of Z + J/Ψ associated production, fs/fd measurements and the branching ratio measurement for Λb decays to Ψ(2S) + Λ and J/Ψ + Λ.

  7. Decaying Dark Matter at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a few scenarios with decaying Dark Matter and their prospect for detection at the LHC. First we present a simple minimal scenario, where Dark Matter is produced from the decay of a heavier colored or EW charged scalar via the FIMP or SuperWIMP mechanisms, then we discuss supersymmetric scenarios with RPV and gravitino DM, in particular a scenario allowing for simultaneous generation of DM and baryogenesis at a (relatively) low scale.

  8. Detection and Assessment of Wood Decay in Glulam Beams Using a Decay Rate Approach: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Adam Senalik

    2013-01-01

    A glulam beam is subjected to X-ray computer tomography and acousto-ultrasonic measurements to detect and assess wood decay. A glulam beam without visible indications of wood decay was taken from field use. A modified impulse-echo technique is employed as an inspection method requiring access to only one side of the beam. It is observed that decay-rate analysis of the...

  9. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CORONAL MAGNETIC DECAY INDEX AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SPEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yan; Liu Chang; Jing Ju; Wang Haimin, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Numerical simulations suggest that kink and torus instabilities are two potential contributors to the initiation and prorogation of eruptive events. A magnetic parameter called the decay index (i.e., the coronal magnetic gradient of the overlying fields above the eruptive flux ropes) could play an important role in controlling the kinematics of eruptions. Previous studies have identified a threshold range of the decay index that distinguishes between eruptive and confined configurations. Here we advance the study by investigating if there is a clear correlation between the decay index and coronal mass ejection (CME) speed. Thirty-eight CMEs associated with filament eruptions and/or two-ribbon flares are selected using the H{alpha} data from the Global H{alpha} Network. The filaments and flare ribbons observed in H{alpha} associated with the CMEs help to locate the magnetic polarity inversion line, along which the decay index is calculated based on the potential field extrapolation using Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms as boundary conditions. The speeds of CMEs are obtained from the LASCO C2 CME catalog available online. We find that the mean decay index increases with CME speed for those CMEs with a speed below 1000 km s{sup -1} and stays flat around 2.2 for the CMEs with higher speeds. In addition, we present a case study of a partial filament eruption, in which the decay indices show different values above the erupted/non-erupted part.

  10. Effectiveness of breakpoint chlorination to reduce accelerated chemical chloramine decay in severely nitrified bulk waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal Krishna, K C; Sathasivan, Arumugam; Kastl, George

    2014-12-01

    Rectifying the accelerated chloramine decay after the onset of nitrification is a major challenge for water utilities that employ chloramine as a disinfectant. Recently, the evidence of soluble microbial products (SMPs) accelerating chloramine decay beyond traditionally known means was reported. After the onset of nitrification, with an intention to inactivate nitrifying bacteria and thus maintaining disinfectant residuals, breakpoint chlorination followed by re-chloramination is usually practiced by water utilities. However, what actually breakpoint chlorination does beyond known effects is not known, especially in light of the new finding of SMPs. In this study, experiments were conducted using severely nitrified chloraminated water samples (chloramine residuals 0.1 mg N L−1 and an order of magnitude higher chloramine decay rate compared to normal decay) obtained from two laboratory scale systems operated by feeding natural organic matter (NOM) containing and NOM free waters. Results showed that the accelerated decay of chloramine as a result of SMPs can be eliminated by spiking higher free chlorine residuals (about 0.92 ± 0.03 to 1.16 ± 0.12 mg Cl2 L−1) than the stoichiometric requirement for breakpoint chlorination and nitrite oxidation. Further, accelerated initial chlorine decay showed chlorine preferentially reacts with nitrite and ammonia before destroying SMPs. This study, clearly demonstrated there is an additional demand from SMPs that needs to be satisfied to effectively recover disinfection residuals in subsequent re-chloramination.

  11. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00261996

    2012-01-01

    New results are presented using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of $∼ 1 fb^{−1}$ collected in 2011 with the LHCb detector. The B → $µ^+ µ^−$ and $D^0 → µ^+ µ^−$ results have been presented at a previous conference. The angular distributions and (partial) branching fractions of selected radiative penguin decays are studied using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of ∼ 1$fb^{−1}$ collected in 2011 with the LHCb detector. The partial branching fraction and theoretically clean observables of the decay $B^0 → K^{∗0} µ^+ µ^−$ have been extracted as a function of the dimuon invariant mass. The partial branching fraction of the decay $B^0_s$ → $φµ^+ µ^−$ has also been extracted as a function of the dimuon invariant mass. The branching fraction and first observation of the decay $B^+$ → $π^+ µ^+ µ^−$ is reported. New limits were set on the decay $B → µ^+ µ^− µ^+ µ^−$. Improved limits on the decays $B → µ^+ µ^−$ and $D^0 → µ^+ µ^−$ are...

  12. Evaluation the decay data of (153)Gd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolong, Huang

    2010-01-01

    (153)Gd decays to the excited states of (153)Eu through the electron capture decay mode. The evaluation of the complete decay scheme and data of (153)Gd including the recent new measurements are presented in this report. The limitation of relative statistical weight method (LRSW) was applied to average numbers throughout the evaluation. The uncertainty assigned to the average value was always greater than or equal to the smallest uncertainty of the values used to calculate the average. The half-life is determined to be 239.47+/-0.07 days. All known measured gamma-ray relative emission probabilities have been examined. And the gamma-ray emission probability of the reference gamma line of 97.431keV is recommended to be 29.5+/-0.5%. The calculated internal conversion coefficients and their uncertainties have been used to obtain the complete decay intensity balance. The other decay characteristics are calculated using the ENSDF analysis program. Finally the new (153)Gd decay scheme was re-built.

  13. Preventing Tooth Decay: A Guide for Implementing Self-Applied Fluoride in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Dental Research (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This guidebook was developed to assist citizens in initiating programs to prevent tooth decay in young children through the use of fluoridation. It contains outlines for determining the needs of the school and community for fluoride in drinking water, and presents the various steps and activities that are necessary for developing and implementing…

  14. Life stages of wall-bounded decay of Taylor-Couette turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Zhu, Xiaojue; Arza, Vamsi Spandan; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-01-01

    The decay of Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e., the flow between two coaxial and independently rotating cylinders, is numerically studied by instantaneously stopping the forcing from an initially statistically stationary flow field at a Reynolds number of Re=3.5×104. The effect of wall friction is

  15. Savings Memory Is Accompanied by Transcriptional Changes That Persist beyond the Decay of Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Leticia; Patel, Ushma; Rivota, Marissa; Calin-Jageman, Irina E.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.

    2018-01-01

    Most long-term memories are forgotten. What happens, then, to the changes in neuronal gene expression that were initially required to encode and maintain the memory? Here we show that the decay of recall for long-term sensitization memory in "Aplysia" is accompanied both by a form of savings memory (easier relearning) and by persistent…

  16. Production of low kinetic energy electrons and energetic ion pairs by Intermolecular Coulombic Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2012-12-01

    The paper gives an introduction into Interatomic and Intermolecular Coulombic Decay (ICD). ICD is an autoionization process, which contrary to Auger decay involves neighbouring sites of the initial vacancy as an integral part of the decay transition. As a result of ICD, slow electrons are produced which generally are known to be active in radiation damage. The author summarizes the properties of ICD and reviews a number of important experiments performed in recent years. Intermolecular Coulombic Decay can generally take place in weakly bonded aggregates in the presence of ionizing particles or ionizing radiation. Examples collected here mostly use soft X-rays produced by synchrotron radiation to ionize, and use rare-gas clusters, water clusters or solutes in a liquid jet to observe ICD after irradiation. Intermolecular Coulombic Decay is initiated by single ionization into an excited state. The subsequent relaxation proceeds via an ultra-fast energy transfer to a neighbouring site, where a second ionization occurs. Secondary electrons from ICD have clearly been identified in numerous systems. ICD can take place after primary ionization, as the second step of a decay cascade which also involves Auger decay, or after resonant excitation with an energy which exceeds the ionization potential of the system. ICD is expected to play a role whenever particles or radiation with photon energies above the ionization energies for inner valence electrons are present in weakly bonded matter, e.g., biological tissue. The process produces at the same time a slow electron and two charged atomic or molecular fragments, which will lead to structural changes around the ionized site.

  17. Fast decay of solutions for linear wave equations with dissipation localized near infinity in an exterior domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryo, Ikehata

    Uniform energy and L2 decay of solutions for linear wave equations with localized dissipation will be given. In order to derive the L2-decay property of the solution, a useful device whose idea comes from Ikehata-Matsuyama (Sci. Math. Japon. 55 (2002) 33) is used. In fact, we shall show that the L2-norm and the total energy of solutions, respectively, decay like O(1/ t) and O(1/ t2) as t→+∞ for a kind of the weighted initial data.

  18. Behavior of radon and its decay products in physical media; Comportamiento de radon y sus productos en medios fisicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez B, A

    1990-06-15

    This study was carried out to know the radon behavior, it shows some of its decay products of short life, the same as the equations that describe the growth of the activity of each decay product in a source that initially is radon. The study threw results that they are applicable in geology, uranium prospecting, as well as in radiological safety. The use of membranes to filter the decay products of radon and the use of these for protection of the detector, it has opened a new line in the study of the radon. (Author)

  19. Searches for rare and exotic Higgs decays with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Marjanovic, Marija; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Some theories predict Lepton Flavour Violating decays of the Higgs boson, while other predict enhanced decay rates into new light pseudoscalar bosons "a" or invisible particles. Also enhanced rates in rare decay modes like Phi-photon are considered. In this presentation the latest ATLAS results on searches for such non-standard and rare decays will be discussed.

  20. Chapter 4: Genetic Identification of Fungi Involved in Wood Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant Kirker

    2014-01-01

    Wood decay is a complex process that involves contributions from molds, bacteria, decay fungi, and often insects. The first step in the accurate diagnosis of decay is identification of the causal agents, but wood decay in the strictest sense (white and brown rot) is caused by cryptic fungal species that are very difficult to identify using traditional methods. Genetic...

  1. Decay properties of heavier nuclei and mass formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, Masahiro [Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The stabilities of heavy nuclei, including super-heavy elements, are governed by alpha decay and fission. Some exotic types of decay, such as heavy cluster decay, which does not occur so frequently as to govern stability, have been also reported. The half-time estimations of various types of decay are reviewed. And the possibility of decay, mainly in case of heavy cluster decay, is discussed with Q-value obtained from mass formulae as well. Some topics concerning other types of exotic decay are presented. Recent trends in the research on mass formula are reviewed from the historical point of view, to get perspectives of future development. (Yamamoto, A.)

  2. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: β-decay rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mumpower

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of isotopic abundances produced in rapid neutron capture, or r-process, nucleosynthesis is sensitive to the nuclear physics properties of thousands of unstable neutron-rich nuclear species that participate in the process. It has long been recognized that the some of the most influential pieces of nuclear data for r-process simulations are β-decay lifetimes. In light of experimental advances that have pushed measurement capabilities closer to the classic r-process path, we revisit the role of individual β-decay rates in the r process. We perform β-decay rate sensitivity studies for a main (A > 120 r process in a range of potential astrophysical scenarios. We study the influence of individual rates during (n, γ-(γ, n equilibrium and during the post-equilibrium phase where material moves back toward stability. We confirm the widely accepted view that the most important lifetimes are those of nuclei along the r-process path for each astrophysical scenario considered. However, we find in addition that individual β-decay rates continue to shape the final abundance pattern through the post-equilibrium phase, for as long as neutron capture competes with β decay. Many of the lifetimes important for this phase of the r process are within current or near future experimental reach.

  3. Elliptic flow measurement of heavy-flavour decay electrons in Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV with ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rascanu, Theodor [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    In heavy-ion collisions, charm and beauty quarks are produced in initial hard scattering processes. They then propagate and interact strongly with the created medium, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), and thus allow to probe its properties. One way to measure heavy-quarks is via electrons from the semileptonic decays of open charm and beauty hadrons. At low transverse momentum, the level of thermalization of heavy quarks can be studied via the azimuthal anisotropy of the heavy flavour electron emission in the transverse plane, the elliptic flow v{sub 2}. At high p{sub T}, v{sub 2} provides insight on the path length dependence of parton energy-loss. In this talk we present v{sub 2} measurements of electrons from heavy flavour decays with the central barrel of ALICE at mid rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV as function of the centrality of the collision. The electrons are identified using the Inner Tracking System, the Time-Of-Flight detector and Time Projection Chamber at low momenta, as well as the Electromagnetic Calorimeter at higher momenta. We report on the performance of the electron identification and explain how the non-heavy flavour electron background is subtracted. Finally the results are compared to different theoretical models.

  4. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondev, Filip G.; International Nuclear Structure; Decay Data Network

    2006-03-01

    The nuclear structure databases provide physicists around the world with a useful collection of reliable and well documented datasets. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) database, produced by the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network (NSDD) under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), contains evaluated experimental information for all known nuclei. The bibliographical database Nuclear Science References (NSR) provides references to published data in the field of Nuclear Physics. The Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List (XUNDL) provides a method for rapid access to formatted (compiled) data from recently published articles. Detailed information regarding these databases, as well as other products and services, can be found at the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) and IAEA web portals.

  5. Software for physics of tau lepton decay in LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Przedzinski, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    Software development in high energy physics experiments offers unique experience with rapidly changing environment and variety of different standards and frameworks that software must be adapted to. As such, regular methods of software development are hard to use as they do not take into account how greatly some of these changes influence the whole structure. The following thesis summarizes development of TAUOLA C++ Interface introducing tau decays to new event record standard. Documentation of the program is already published. That is why it is not recalled here again. We focus on the development cycle and methodology used in the project, starting from the definition of the expectations through planning and designing the abstract model and concluding with the implementation. In the last part of the paper we present installation of the software within different experiments surrounding Large Hadron Collider and the problems that emerged during this process.

  6. Decay data evaluation project (DDEP): Updated evaluations of the {sup 233}Th and {sup 241}Am decay characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechev, Valery P., E-mail: chechev@khlopin.r [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, 28 Second Murinsky Ave., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Kuzmenko, Nikolay K. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, 28 Second Murinsky Ave., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15

    The results of new decay data evaluations are presented for {sup 233}Th ({beta}{sup -}) decay to nuclear levels in {sup 233}Pa and {sup 241}Am ({alpha}) decay to nuclear levels in {sup 237}Np. These evaluated data have been obtained within the Decay Data Evaluation Project using information published up to 2009.

  7. Alpha decay and cluster decay of some neutron-rich actinide nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-09

    Feb 9, 2017 ... effects lower the half-life values and it is also found that the neutron-rich parent nuclei slow down the cluster decay process. Geiger–Nuttal plots for various clusters are found to be linear and most of the emitted clusters are α-like nuclei. Keywords. Alpha decay; cluster radioactivity; spontaneous fission.

  8. Laser-induced synthesis and decay of Tritium under exposure of solid targets in heavy water

    CERN Document Server

    Barmina, E V; Timashev, S F; Shafeev, G A

    2013-01-01

    The processes of laser-assisted synthesis of Tritium nuclei and their laser-induced decay in cold plasma in the vicinity of solid targets (Au, Ti, Se, etc.) immersed into heavy water are experimentally realized at peak laser intensity of 10E10-10E13 Watts per square centimeter. Initial stages of Tritium synthesis and their laser-induced beta-decay are interpreted on the basis of non-elastic interaction of plasma electrons having kinetic energy of 5-10 eV with nuclei of Deuterium and Tritium, respectively.

  9. Search for massive neutrinos in {π }+{→ }e+{ν }e decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; Bruch, D. vom; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Kettell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Numao, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.

    2017-11-01

    The PIENU experiment aims to measure the branching ratio of the charged pion decay with precision of < 0.1 %. This measurement is much sensitive to search for massive neutrinos coupled to electrons in {π }+{→ }e+{ν }e decay. The initial analysis was completed and the upper limit on the neutrino mixing parameter | U e i |2 in the neutrino mass range of 0 to 55 MeV/ c 2 was improved by a factor of 1.5, and the sensitivity for the mass range of 68 to 129 MeV/ c 2 was improve by a factor of up to 4.

  10. Synaptic Plasticity and Translation Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, Eric; Antion, Marcia D.; Banko, Jessica L.; Hou, Lingfei

    2004-01-01

    It is widely accepted that protein synthesis, including local protein synthesis at synapses, is required for several forms of synaptic plasticity. Local protein synthesis enables synapses to control synaptic strength independent of the cell body via rapid protein production from pre-existing mRNA. Therefore, regulation of translation initiation is…

  11. Light stop decays: implications for LHC searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeber, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Muehlleitner, M.M.; Wlotzka, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); Popenda, E. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    We investigate the flavour-changing neutral current decay of the lightest stop into a charm quark and the lightest neutralino and its four-body decay into the lightest neutralino, a down-type quark and a fermion pair. These are the relevant stop search channels in the low-mass region. The SUSY-QCD corrections to the two-body decay have been calculated for the first time and turn out to be sizeable. In the four-body decay both the contributions from diagrams with flavour-changing neutral current couplings and the mass effects of final state bottom quarks and τ leptons have been taken into account, which are not available in the literature so far. The resulting branching ratios are investigated in detail. We find that in either of the decay channels the branching ratios can deviate significantly from 1 in large parts of the allowed parameter range. Taking this into account, the experimental exclusion limits on the stop, which are based on the assumption of branching ratios equal to 1, are considerably weakened. This should be taken into account in future searches for light stops at the next run of the LHC, where the probed low stop mass region will be extended. (orig.)

  12. Precision measurements of rare kaon decays

    CERN Document Server

    Marinova, Evelina

    2009-01-01

    We report the latest results on rare kaon decays from the NA48/2 experiment. Samples of about 7200 reconstructed K+- -> pi+- e+ e-, and more than 3000 K+- -> pi+- mu+ mu- events, with very small background contamination, have been collected. The latter is exceeding the total existing statistics by a factor of five. A precise measurement of the branching fractions and the form factors of the rare decays K+- -> pi+- l+ l- has been performed using different theoretical models. The precise measurement of direct photon emission (DE) in the decay K+- -> pi+- pi0 gamma and its interference (INT), with the INT amplitude being observed for the first time, has been finalized. This study is based on the full NA48/2 data set with about 600k reconstructed K+- -> pi+- pi0 gamma decays which is factor of 30 larger than for previous experiments. We report the results on the CP violating asymmetry between K+ and K- obtained from rare kaon decays

  13. CP asymmetries in Strange Baryon Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, I. I.; Kang, Xian-Wei; Li, Hai-Bo

    2018-01-01

    While indirect and direct CP violation (CPV) has been established in the decays of strange and beauty mesons, no CPV has yet been found for baryons. There are different paths to finding CP asymmetry in the decays of strange baryons; they are all highly non-trivial. The HyperCP Collaboration has probed CPV in the decays of single Ξ and Λ [1]. We discuss future lessons from {{{e}}}+{{{e}}}- collisions at BESIII/BEPCII: probing decays of pairs of strange baryons, namely Λ, Σ and Ξ. Realistic goals are to learn about non-perturbative QCD. One can hope to find CPV in the decays of strange baryons; one can also dream of finding the impact of New Dynamics. We point out that an important new era will start with the BESIII/BEPCII data accumulated by the end of 2018. This also supports new ideas to trigger {{J}}/{{\\psi }}\\to \\bar{{{Λ }}}{{Λ }} at the LHCb collaboration. Supported by National Science Foundation (PHY-1520966), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11335009, 11125525), Joint Large-Scale Scientific Facility Funds of the NSFC and CAS (U1532257), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences, CAS, (QYZDJ-SSW-SLH003), XWK’s work is also supported by MOST (Taiwan) (104-2112-M-001-022)

  14. Study on planar blast waves initiated by gaseous detonations. I. Estimation of initiation energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyagi, S.; Yoshihashi, T.; Harigaya, Y.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study has been made of the initiation of planar blast waves by gaseous detonations. A gaseous detonation initiated by a DDT process is submitted into a long tube filled with air at various initial pressures. The measurement of the decay process of a produced shock wave indicates that it can be treated as a plane source blast wave, although there exists a secondary shock wave, which may be a detonation wave reflected on an end wall of a driver tube, behind the blast wave front. As a result, the decay of a propagation Mach number and a peak overpressure of the wave front as a function of a distance from the initiation source and the initial pressure of the medium are described by the quasi-similar theory of the idealized plane source blast wave. Comparing the experimental results with the theory leads to the estimation of an initiation energy of the blast wave. The initiation energies of oxyhydrogen detonations for three different mixture strengths, three different initial pressures, and two different sizes of the driver tube are estimated to show that about 30-40 percent of the chemical energy contained initially in the driver tube is used to initiate the blast wave. 9 references.

  15. Developmental evolution facilitates rapid adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Travisano, Michael

    2017-11-21

    Developmental evolution has frequently been identified as a mode for rapid adaptation, but direct observations of the selective benefits and associated mechanisms of developmental evolution are necessarily challenging to obtain. Here we show rapid evolution of greatly increased rates of dispersal by developmental changes when populations experience stringent selection. Replicate populations of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma citrinoviride underwent 85 serial transfers, under conditions initially favoring growth but not dispersal. T. citrinoviride populations shifted away from multicellular growth toward increased dispersal by producing one thousand times more single-celled asexual conidial spores, three times sooner than the ancestral genotype. Conidia of selected lines also germinated fifty percent faster. Gene expression changed substantially between the ancestral and selected fungi, especially for spore production and growth, demonstrating rapid evolution of tight regulatory control for down-regulation of growth and up-regulation of conidia production between 18 and 24 hours of growth. These changes involved both developmentally fixed and plastic changes in gene expression, showing that complex developmental changes can serve as a mechanism for rapid adaptation.

  16. Portable Diagnostics and Rapid Germination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Zachary Spencer [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In the Bioenergy and Defense Department of Sandia National Laboratories, characterization of the BaDx (Bacillus anthracis diagnostic cartridge) was performed and rapid germination chemistry was investigated. BaDx was tested with complex sample matrixes inoculated with Bacillus anthracis, and the trials proved that BaDx will detect Bacillus anthracis in a variety of the medium, such as dirt, serum, blood, milk, and horse fluids. The dimensions of the device were altered to accommodate an E. coli or Listeria lateral flow immunoassay, and using a laser printer, BaDx devices were manufactured to identify E. coli and Listeria. Initial testing with E. coli versions of BaDx indicate that the device will be viable as a portable diagnostic cartridge. The device would be more effective with faster bacteria germination; hence studies were performed the use of rapid germination chemistry. Trials with calcium dipicolinic acid displayed increased cell germination, as shown by control studies using a microplate reader. Upon lyophilization the rapid germination chemistry failed to change growth patterns, indicating that the calcium dipicolinic acid was not solubilized under the conditions tested. Although incompatible with the portable diagnostic device, the experiments proved that the rapid germination chemistry was effective in increasing cell germination.

  17. Observation of W decay in 500 GeV p+p collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, Kensuke

    2010-01-01

    W boson production is observed in $\\sqrt{s}=500$ GeV proton proton collisions at RHIC-PHENIX experiment. The single longitudinal spin asymmetry $A_L(\\overrightarrow{p}p\\rightarrow W^+X)$ is measured via decay positrons in the mid rapidity region. The asymmetry $-0.83\\pm0.31\\pm(11%$ scale uncertainty) is consistent with calculations from various polarized parton distribution functions.

  18. The apparent decay of pulsar magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukov, A.; Astashenok, A.; Karpov, S.; Beskin, G.

    2017-12-01

    Neutron stars are extremely strong cosmic magnets which fields are expected to decay with time. Here we report on the simple test of this process. Adopting a novel approach, we have estimated surface magnetic fields B for 76 radiopulsars (the most numerous subclass of the known isolated neutron stars) which ages t are known independently. Focusing on the accurate evaluation of the precision of both quantities, we determined a significant power-law trend B(t) ∝ t ‑β with index β = 0.19 - 0.06 + 0.05 at 95% C.L. The effects of the observational selection turn this value into the upper limit for the intrinsic field decay rate. If so, then neutron star crusts are close to the “impurity-free crystals”, which results in a relatively slow magnetic fields decay.

  19. Factorization in B to V gamma Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, T

    2005-03-28

    The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/mb using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resume perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

  20. Rare FCNC top, beauty and charm decays

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, T

    2014-01-01

    Rare flavour changing neutral current (FCNC) decays of top, beauty and charm quarks can provide a powerful probe for as yet unobserved particles. Recent results on FCNC $b \\to s$, $c \\to u$ and $t$ transitions from the LHC experiments are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the angular distribution of the $B^{0} \\to K^{*0} \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ decay, where a measurement performed by LHCb shows a local discrepancy of 3.7 standard deviations with respect to the SM prediction. Using the decay $B^{+} K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}\\gamma$, LHCb have also been able to demonstrate the polarisation of photons produced in $b \\to s \\gamma$ transitions. More work is needed both experimentally and theoretically to understand if the Standard Model description of these rare FCNC processes is correct.

  1. Rare FCNC top, beauty and charm decays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00261950

    2014-01-01

    Rare flavour changing neutral current (FCNC) decays of top, beauty and charm quarks can provide a powerful probe for as yet unobserved particles. Recent results on FCNC $b \\to s$, $c \\to u$ and $t$ transitions from the LHC experiments are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the angular distribution of the $B^{0} \\to K^{*0} \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$ decay, where a measurement performed by LHCb shows a local discrepancy of 3.7 standard deviations with respect to the SM prediction. Using the decay $B^{+} \\to K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}\\gamma$, LHCb have also been able to demonstrate the polarisation of photons produced in $b \\to s\\gamma$ transitions. More work is needed both experimentally and theoretically to understand if the Standard Model description of these rare FCNC processes is correct.

  2. Decay modes of the excited pseudoscalar glueball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraim, Walaa I.; Schramm, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We study three different chiral Lagrangians that describe the two- and three-body decays of an excited pseudoscalar glueball, JP C=0*-+ , into light mesons and charmonium states as well as into a scalar and pseudoscalar glueball. We compute the decay channels for an excited pseudoscalar glueball with a mass of 3.7 GeV and consider a ground-state pseudoscalar glueball of mass 2.6 GeV, following predictions from lattice QCD simulations. These states and channels are in reach of the ongoing BESIII experiment and the PANDA experiments at the upcoming FAIR facility experiment. We present the resulting decay branching ratios with a parameter-free prediction.

  3. Neutrinoless double beta decay from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Amy; Cheng, Chia; Berkowitz, Evan; Rinaldi, Enrico; Walker-Loud, Andre; Vranas, Pavlos; Kurth, Thorsten; Clark, M. A.; Garron, Nicolas; Tiburzi, Brian; Monge-Camacho, Henry; Brantley, David; Joo, Balint; Callat Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Lepton number-violating neutrinoless double beta decay is a natural consequence of Majorana neutrinos and many BSM theories, and, if observed, could potentially explain the observed matter/anti-matter asymmetry in the universe. Several experimental searches for these processes using nuclear sources are planned and/or underway worldwide, and understanding quantitatively how neutrinoless double beta decay would manifest in nuclear environments is key for interpreting any observed signals. While long-range, light neutrino exchange is the most common mechanism studied, short-range interactions involving heavy mediator exchange may also contribute. In this talk I will give an overview of the microscopic observables relevant for experimental searches for neutrinoless double beta decay which may be calculated directly from QCD using lattice methods, and present results for short-range matrix elements contributing to pion exchange diagrams between nucleons.

  4. Early childhood tooth decay. Pediatric interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, J R; Druyan, M E; Hagen, J C

    1992-12-01

    Pediatricians in the greater Chicago area were surveyed to probe their awareness and approaches to management of dental caries in early childhood. A total of 298 pediatricians (21% of those surveyed) responded to the questionnaire. Ninety-five percent of the respondents stated they examined their patients' teeth; 85% considered dental examinations part of their responsibility for children under 3 years of age. However, our data suggest that many pediatricians are unaware of the decay and the dietary patterns associated with tooth decay in early childhood. Although 96% of the respondents referred patients to a dentist when decay was diagnosed, analysis of diet and dietary counseling were performed by only 61% and 65% of the respondents, respectively. Recommendations for preventive measures that can be adopted by pediatricians are offered.

  5. QCD Aspects of Exclusive B Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2001-04-04

    Exclusive B decays can be factorized as convolutions of hard scattering amplitudes involving the weak interaction with universal hadron distribution amplitudes, thus providing a new QCD-based phenomenology. In addition, semi-leptonic decay amplitudes can be computed exactly in terms of the diagonal and off-diagonal {Delta} = 2 overlap of hadronic light-cone wavefunctions. I review these formalisms and the essential QCD ingredients. A canonical form of the light-cone wavefunctions, valid at low values of the transverse momenta, is presented. The existence of intrinsic charm Fock states in the B meson wavefunction can enhance the production of final states of B-decay with three charmed quarks, such as B {yields} J/{psi}D, as well as lead to the breakdown of the CKM hierarchy.

  6. Electron spectra from decay of fission products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, J K

    1982-09-01

    Electron spectra following decay of individual fission products (72 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 162) are obtained from the nuclear data given in the compilation using a listed and documented computer subroutine. Data are given for more than 500 radionuclides created during or after fission. The data include transition energies, absolute intensities, and shape parameters when known. An average beta-ray energy is given for fission products lacking experimental information on transition energies and intensities. For fission products having partial or incomplete decay information, the available data are utilized to provide best estimates of otherwise unknown decay schemes. This compilation is completely referenced and includes data available in the reviewed literature up to January 1982.

  7. Rare decays experimental summary and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.

    1996-12-31

    I review the status and future prospects of searches for forbidden and highly kaon suppressed decays. This workshop comes as we are poised at the threshold of a new generation of rare K decay experiments. There are new experiments running or about to run at KEK, BNL, FNAL, and CERN. In another year or so these will be joined by the KLOE experiment at DA{Phi}NE. The good news is that it`s a very exciting time. The bad news, at least for a reviewer, is that there aren`t too many new results. Thus I`ll be giving a little more attention than usual to what the experimenters expect to do. My discussion of rare K decays covers processes that are forbidden in the Standard Model, those that highly suppressed and to a smaller extent, those that are merely discouraged.

  8. Reaction-diffusion with stochastic decay rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeyre, G John; Dentz, Marco

    2017-07-26

    Understanding anomalous transport and reaction kinetics due to microscopic physical and chemical disorder is a long-standing goal in many fields including geophysics, biology, and engineering. We consider reaction-diffusion characterized by fluctuations in both transport times and decay rates. We introduce and analyze a model framework that explicitly connects microscopic fluctuations with the mescoscopic description. For broad distributions of transport and reaction time scales we compute the particle density and derive the equations governing its evolution, finding power-law decay of the survival probability, and spatially varying decay that leads to subdiffusion and an asymptotically stationary surviving-particle density. These anomalies are clearly attributable to non-Markovian effects that couple transport and chemical properties in both reaction and diffusion terms.

  9. Leptogenesis and gravity: Baryon asymmetry without decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.I. McDonald

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A popular class of theories attributes the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe to CP-violating decays of super-heavy BSM particles in the Early Universe. Recently, we discovered a new source of leptogenesis in these models, namely that the same Yukawa phases which provide the CP violation for decays, combined with curved-spacetime loop effects, lead to an entirely new gravitational mechanism for generating an asymmetry, driven by the expansion of the Universe and independent of the departure of the heavy particles from equilibrium. In this Letter, we build on previous work by analysing the full Boltzmann equation, exploring the full parameter space of the theory and studying the time-evolution of the asymmetry. Remarkably, we find regions of parameter space where decays play no part at all, and where the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is determined solely by gravitational effects.

  10. Leptogenesis and gravity: Baryon asymmetry without decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.I., E-mail: pymcdonald@swansea.ac.uk; Shore, G.M., E-mail: g.m.shore@swansea.ac.uk

    2017-03-10

    A popular class of theories attributes the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe to CP-violating decays of super-heavy BSM particles in the Early Universe. Recently, we discovered a new source of leptogenesis in these models, namely that the same Yukawa phases which provide the CP violation for decays, combined with curved-spacetime loop effects, lead to an entirely new gravitational mechanism for generating an asymmetry, driven by the expansion of the Universe and independent of the departure of the heavy particles from equilibrium. In this Letter, we build on previous work by analysing the full Boltzmann equation, exploring the full parameter space of the theory and studying the time-evolution of the asymmetry. Remarkably, we find regions of parameter space where decays play no part at all, and where the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is determined solely by gravitational effects.

  11. Openness initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  12. Transcriptome and secretome analyses of the wood decay fungus Wolfiporia cocos support alternative mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jill Gaskell; Robert A. Blanchette; Philip E. Stewart; Sandra Splinter BonDurant; Marie Adams; Grzegorz Sabat; Philip Kersten; Daniel Cullen

    2016-01-01

    Certain wood decay basidiomycetes, collectively referred to as brown rot fungi, rapidly depolymerize cellulose while leaving behind the bulk of cell wall lignin as a modified residue. The mechanism(s) employed is unclear, but considerable evidence implicates the involvement of diffusible oxidants generated via Fenton-like chemistry. Toward a better understanding of...

  13. Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus Postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Martinez; Jean Challacombe; Ingo Morgenstern; David Hibbett; Monika Schmoll; Christian P. Kubicek; Patricia Ferreira; Francisco J. Ruiz-Duenas; Angel T. Martinez; Philip J. Kersten; Kenneth E. Hammel; Jill A. Gaskell; Daniel Cullen

    2009-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome,...

  14. Decay Of Bacterial Pathogens, Fecal Indicators, And Real-Time Quantitative PCR Genetic Markers In Manure-Amended Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manure-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green...

  15. Decay Of Bacterial Pathogen, Fecal Indicators, And Real-Time Quantitative PCR Genetic Markers In Manure Amended Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria, and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manre-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green fluore...

  16. Characterization of wood decay enzymes by MALDI-MS for post-translational modification and gene identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorus H. de Koker; Philip J. Kersten

    2002-01-01

    The recent sequencing of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium genome presents many opportunities, including the possibility of rapidly correlating specific wood decay proteins of the fungus with the corresponding gene sequences. Here we compare mass fragments of trypsin digests, determined by MALDI-MS (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry), with...

  17. On nonleptonic decays of charmed baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Voloshin, M B; Okun, Lev Borisovich

    1975-01-01

    Nonleptonic decays of charmed baryons provide many possibilities of testing various selection rules imposed on the weak interaction Hamiltonian by the Weinberg-Salam model. Relations for the dominating ( approximately cos/sup 2/ theta /sub c/) two-particle nonleptonic decays of the charm-one baryons are obtained that result from the selection rules Delta T=1, Delta U=1, Delta V=1,0, as well as from a stronger rule Delta V=0. A simple relation between the masses of the charmed baryons and masses of the known particles is presented. (5 refs).

  18. Rare kaon decays at LAMPF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-06-01

    At LAMPF II, intense beams of kaons will be available that will enable the rare kaon-decay processes to be investigated. This note explores some of the possibilities, which divide into two classes: (1) those that test the standard model of Weinberg and Salam and (2) those that are sensitive to new interactions. For both classes, experiments have been limited not by systematic errors but rather by statistical ones. LAMPF II with its intense flux of kaons thus will enable the frontier of rare kaon decay to be realistically probed.

  19. Decay. pi. /sup 0/. --> mu. e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.

    1982-11-01

    An upper limit for the branching ratio of the decay ..pi../sup 0/..--> mu..e is determined from existing experimental data to be GAMMA(..pi../sup 0/..--> mu..e)/GAMMA(..pi../sup 0/..-->..all) < 7 x 10/sup -8/(90% C.L.). Phenomenological implications are discussed. The sensitivity of ..pi../sup 0/..--> mu..e decay to the presence of Higgs particles responsible for muon-number violation is found to be considerably lower than for muon-electron conversion in the field of a nucleus.

  20. Search for the decay B0-->gammagamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; Laplace, S; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; De Silva, A; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Weidemann, A W; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-12-10

    We present a limit on the branching fraction for the decay B0-->gammagamma using data collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e+e- collider. Based on the observation of one event in the signal region, out of a sample of 21.3x10(6) e+e--->Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays, we establish an upper limit on the branching fraction of B(B0-->gammagamma)<1.7x10(-6) at the 90% confidence level. This result substantially improves upon existing limits.

  1. Fitting the Luminosity Decay in the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    McCrory, Elliott; Slaughter, Anna Jean; Xiao, Aimin

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the various ways in which the decay of the luminosity in the Tevatron have been fit. The standard assumptions of a fixed-lifetime exponential decay are only appropriate for very short time intervals. A "1/time" funcional form fits rather well, and is supported by analytical derivations. A more complex form, assuming a time-varying lifetime, produces excellent results. Changes in the luminosity can be factored into two phenomena: The luminosity burn-off rate, and the burn-off rate from non-luminosity effects. The luminous and the non-luminous burn rate are shown for stores in the Tevatron.

  2. Re-ionization and decaying dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, Scott; Jubas, Jay M.

    1991-01-01

    Gunn-Peterson tests suggest that the Universe was reionized after the standard recombination epoch. A systematic treatment is presented of the ionization process by deriving the Boltzmann equations appropriate to this regime. A compact solution for the photon spectrum is found in terms of the ionization ratio. These equations are then solved numerically for the Decaying Dark Matter scenario, wherein neutrinos with mass of order 30 eV radiatively decay producing photons which ionize the intergalactic medium. It was found that the neutrino mass and lifetime are severely constrained by Gunn-Peterson tests, observations of the diffuse photon spectrum in the ultraviolet regime, and the Hubble parameter.

  3. Return probability: Exponential versus Gaussian decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izrailev, F.M. [Instituto de Fisica, BUAP, Apdo. Postal J-48, 72570 Puebla (Mexico)]. E-mail: izrailev@sirio.ifuap.buap.mx; Castaneda-Mendoza, A. [Instituto de Fisica, BUAP, Apdo. Postal J-48, 72570 Puebla (Mexico)

    2006-02-13

    We analyze, both analytically and numerically, the time-dependence of the return probability in closed systems of interacting particles. Main attention is paid to the interplay between two regimes, one of which is characterized by the Gaussian decay of the return probability, and another one is the well-known regime of the exponential decay. Our analytical estimates are confirmed by the numerical data obtained for two models with random interaction. In view of these results, we also briefly discuss the dynamical model which was recently proposed for the implementation of a quantum computation.

  4. Novel T-violation observable open to any decay channel at meson factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabeu, José; Botella, Francisco J.; Nebot, Miguel

    2015-07-01

    Two genuine Quantum phenomena: Entanglement and Filtering Measurement are at the origin of the first direct observation of Time-Reversal-Violation in the time evolution of the B neutral meson system by BaBar. The used meson transitions are directly connected to semileptonic and CP-eigenstate decay channels. We analyse the possibility of extending the observable asymmetries to more decay channels. We propose an alternative T-Violation Asymmetry in the meson factories which allows its opening to any pair of decay channels. The new asymmetry needs also the measurement of the time dependent total survival probability of the initial tagged states. By combining several asymmetries these total survival probabilities can be avoided. We analyse carefully the channels that can be used and the sufficient condition in order the proposed asymmetry be a genuine T violation measurement.

  5. Nested sampling applied in Bayesian room-acoustics decay analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasa, Tomislav; Xiang, Ning

    2012-11-01

    Room-acoustic energy decays often exhibit single-rate or multiple-rate characteristics in a wide variety of rooms/halls. Both the energy decay order and decay parameter estimation are of practical significance in architectural acoustics applications, representing two different levels of Bayesian probabilistic inference. This paper discusses a model-based sound energy decay analysis within a Bayesian framework utilizing the nested sampling algorithm. The nested sampling algorithm is specifically developed to evaluate the Bayesian evidence required for determining the energy decay order with decay parameter estimates as a secondary result. Taking the energy decay analysis in architectural acoustics as an example, this paper demonstrates that two different levels of inference, decay model-selection and decay parameter estimation, can be cohesively accomplished by the nested sampling algorithm.

  6. Semileptonic decays of strange beauty mesons at Belle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oswald, Christian

    2015-06-19

    Semileptonic decays of b-flavoured mesons are an important tool for the determination of the CKM matrix element vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke. In this thesis, measurements of semileptonic B{sub s} meson decays are presented. They provide complementary information to the precision measurements of B meson decays and serve as a test of QCD-calculations predicting SU(3) flavour symmetry for the partial decay widths and form factors. The semi-inclusive and inclusive analyses of semileptonic B{sub s} decays are based on the 121.4 fb{sup -1} dataset collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider in Tsukuba, Japan. The sample recorded at a centre-of-mass energy √(s)=10.86 GeV, which corresponds to the Y(5S) resonance, contains (7.1±1.3) million B{sub s} pair events. To measure the semi-inclusive B{sub s} → D{sub s}Xlν and B{sub s} → D{sub s}{sup *}Xlν branching fractions, D{sub s} and D{sub s}{sup *} candidates are reconstructed and are paired with an oppositely charged lepton, l{sup +}=e{sup +},μ{sup +}. The yields of correctly reconstructed D{sub s} and D{sub s}{sup *} mesons are determined by fits to their respective invariant mass distributions. The signal yield and the yields of the remaining backgrounds are extracted using kinematic distributions of the reconstructed decay products and the constraint from the known initial state of the e{sup +}e{sup -} collision. The measured branching fractions are: B(B{sub s} → D{sub s}Xlν)=(8.2±0.2(stat)±0.6(syst)±1.4(ext)) % and B(B{sub s} → D{sub s}{sup *}lν)=(5.4±0.4(stat)±0.4(syst)±0.9 (ext)) %, where the first two uncertainties are the statistical and systematic uncertainties of the measurement and the last uncertainty is due to external parameters. Making an assumption about the B{sub s} → D{sub s}Xlν branching fraction, the measurement of the B{sub s} → D{sub s}Xlν yield is also used to obtain the current best estimate of the B{sub s} pair

  7. Spatio-temporal decay 'hot spots' of stranded wrack in a Baltic sandy coastal system. Part I. Comparative study of the pattern: 1 type of wrack vs 3 beach sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin F. Jędrzejczak

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The significance of distance along the beach-dune transectand different moisture conditions as regards the decay ofZostera marina leaf litter was investigated in simple fieldexperiments in three temperate, medium- to fine-quartz-sediment,sandy beaches of the Gulf of Gdansk in Poland. 1800 replicatelitterbags of freshly stranded Zostera marina leaves wereplaced in beach sediments at different strata and levels on eachof the beaches. The litterbags were sampled after 5, 10, 50, 100and 150 days in the field and the remaining material was thendried and weighed. Under similar conditions of sediment composition,salinity and wave inundation, ANOVA tests revealed significantdifferences in breakdown through time and site. Thus there weresome differences in the decay process between the low and high beach.In the former, degradation proceeded rapidly in the initial stagesand then stabilised, while in the latter it remained linearthroughout the study period. Matter loss in each stratum was alsoseasonally dependent. This may, however, be more closely linkedto successional changes in the chemistry and/or microflora of thebeach wrack than to its physical breakdown. Differences betweenorganic matter degradation in the high and low beaches may beexplained by differences in the moisture regime and nutrient status,and not by differences in the decay processes themselves. Therefore,two decay centres were found in the beach-dune system: the lowbeach together with the strandline (wrack consumption 12-21% day-1in the warm season, and 4-10% day-1 in the cold season and the dune(active consumption 2-6% day-1 in the warm season only.

  8. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  9. Microdrill Initiative - Initial Market Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears & Associates, Inc

    2003-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a major research and development initiative to create a small, fast, inexpensive and environmentally friendly rig for drilling 5000 feet boreholes to investigate potential oil and gas reservoirs. DOE wishes to get input from petroleum industry operators, service companies and equipment suppliers on the operation and application of this coiled-tubing-based drilling unit. To that end, DOE has asked Spears & Associates, Inc. (SAI) to prepare a special state-of-the-market report and assist during a DOE-sponsored project-scoping workshop in Albuquerque near the end of April 2003. The scope of the project is four-fold: (1) Evaluate the history, status and future of demand for very small bore-hole drilling; (2) Measure the market for coiled tubing drilling and describe the state-of-the-art; (3) Identify companies and individuals who should have an interest in micro drilling and invite them to the DOE workshop; and (4) Participate in 3 concurrent workshop sessions, record and evaluate participant comments and report workshop conclusions.

  10. The Exponential Decay Law, Bell's Inequality, and Nonlinear Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHarris, Wm. C.

    2002-10-01

    What do the exponential decay law and Bell's inequality have in common? And with nonlinear dynamics? Simply that they both are among the puzzles at the heart of quantum mechanics, puzzles which can have parallel explanations in terms of chaos or nonlinear dynamics. The statistical nature of the exponential decay law, which at first glance is incompatible with the quantum mechanical concept of indistinguishabe particles, can be mocked up by the extreme sensitivity of chaotic systems to initial conditions. In accord with Ockham's Razor, iteration of a simple unimodal (e.g., quadratic) map in its chaotic region and keeping track of the number of iterations required for a trajectory starting from a point chosen at random within a small interval to escape into another small small interval reproduces the observed exponential behavior. Similarly, Bell's inequality derived using classical mechanics (with an underlying assumption of classical statistics) places an upper limit on numbers derived from measurements on entangled states, whereas quantum mechanics implies that this upper limit no longer holds. Experiments have shown the inequality to be violated, upholding quantum mechanics. However, nonlinear dynamics, with its correlated statistics, can yield results overlapping with the quantum mechanical predictions. Whether or not the experiments rule out "local realism" is thus a moot point. Nonlinear determinism just might exist within quantum mechanics.

  11. Entropy, baryon asymmetry and dark matter from heavy neutrino decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, W.; Schmitz, K.; Vertongen, G.

    2011-04-15

    The origin of the hot phase of the early universe remains so far an unsolved puzzle. A viable option is entropy production through the decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos whose lifetimes determine the initial temperature. We show that baryogenesis and the production of dark matter are natural by-products of this mechanism. As is well known, the cosmological baryon asymmetry can be accounted for by lepto- genesis for characteristic neutrino mass parameters. We nd that thermal gravitino production then automatically yields the observed amount of dark matter, for the gravitino as the lightest superparticle and typical gluino masses. As an example, we consider the production of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the course of tachyonic preheating associated with spontaneous B-L breaking. A quantitative analysis leads to contraints on the superparticle masses in terms of neutrino masses: For a light neutrino mass of 10{sup -5} eV the gravitino mass can be as small as 200 MeV, whereas a lower neutrino mass bound of 0.01 eV implies a lower bound of 9 GeV on the gravitino mass. The measurement of a light neutrino mass of 0.1 eV would rule out heavy neutrino decays as the origin of entropy, visible and dark matter. (orig.)

  12. Dark Matter Decay between Phase Transitions at the Weak Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael J.; Kopp, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    We propose a new alternative to the weakly interacting massive particle paradigm for dark matter. Rather than being determined by thermal freeze-out, the dark matter abundance in this scenario is set by dark matter decay, which is allowed for a limited amount of time just before the electroweak phase transition. More specifically, we consider fermionic singlet dark matter particles coupled weakly to a scalar mediator S3 and to auxiliary dark sector fields, charged under the standard model gauge groups. Dark matter freezes out while still relativistic, so its abundance is initially very large. As the Universe cools down, the scalar mediator develops a vacuum expectation value (VEV), which breaks the symmetry that stabilizes dark matter. This allows dark matter to mix with charged fermions and decay. During this epoch, the dark matter abundance is reduced to give the value observed today. Later, the SM Higgs field also develops a VEV, which feeds back into the S3 potential and restores the dark sector symmetry. In a concrete model we show that this "VEV flip-flop" scenario is phenomenologically successful in the most interesting regions of its parameter space. We also comment on detection prospects at the LHC and elsewhere.

  13. Observation of electron-transfer-mediated decay in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Isaak; Seidel, Robert; Thürmer, Stephan; Pohl, Marvin N.; Aziz, Emad F.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Muchová, Eva; Slavíček, Petr; Winter, Bernd; Kryzhevoi, Nikolai V.

    2017-07-01

    Photoionization is at the heart of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which gives access to important information on a sample's local chemical environment. Local and non-local electronic decay after photoionization—in which the refilling of core holes results in electron emission from either the initially ionized species or a neighbour, respectively—have been well studied. However, electron-transfer-mediated decay (ETMD), which involves the refilling of a core hole by an electron from a neighbouring species, has not yet been observed in condensed phase. Here we report the experimental observation of ETMD in an aqueous LiCl solution by detecting characteristic secondary low-energy electrons using liquid-microjet soft XPS. Experimental results are interpreted using molecular dynamics and high-level ab initio calculations. We show that both solvent molecules and counterions participate in the ETMD processes, and different ion associations have distinctive spectral fingerprints. Furthermore, ETMD spectra are sensitive to coordination numbers, ion-solvent distances and solvent arrangement.

  14. Dark Matter Decay between Phase Transitions at the Weak Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael J; Kopp, Joachim

    2017-08-11

    We propose a new alternative to the weakly interacting massive particle paradigm for dark matter. Rather than being determined by thermal freeze-out, the dark matter abundance in this scenario is set by dark matter decay, which is allowed for a limited amount of time just before the electroweak phase transition. More specifically, we consider fermionic singlet dark matter particles coupled weakly to a scalar mediator S_{3} and to auxiliary dark sector fields, charged under the standard model gauge groups. Dark matter freezes out while still relativistic, so its abundance is initially very large. As the Universe cools down, the scalar mediator develops a vacuum expectation value (VEV), which breaks the symmetry that stabilizes dark matter. This allows dark matter to mix with charged fermions and decay. During this epoch, the dark matter abundance is reduced to give the value observed today. Later, the SM Higgs field also develops a VEV, which feeds back into the S_{3} potential and restores the dark sector symmetry. In a concrete model we show that this "VEV flip-flop" scenario is phenomenologically successful in the most interesting regions of its parameter space. We also comment on detection prospects at the LHC and elsewhere.

  15. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND β-DECAY RATES FOR sd-SHELL NUCLEI IN STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS RELEVANT TO HIGH-DENSITY O–NE–MG CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshio [Department of Physics and Graduate School of Integrated Basic Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Toki, Hiroshi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken’ichi, E-mail: suzuki@phys.chs.nihon-u.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8–10 M{sub ⊙}. Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O–Ne–Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O–Ne–Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C–O cores of lower-mass stars.

  16. ATLAS: Black hole production and decay

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in 2008. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was produced in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.

  17. Stabilizing oscillating universes against quantum decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Audrey T.; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. However, stability may be achieved for some specially fine-tuned non-vacuum states.

  18. Decay of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-27

    Mar 27, 2014 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 4. Decay of heavy and superheavy nuclei. K P Santhosh. Volume 82 Issue 4 April 2014 ... Author Affiliations. K P Santhosh1. School of Pure and Applied Physics, Kannur University, Swami Anandatheertha Campus, Payyanur 670 327, India ...

  19. Asymptotic time decay in quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Marchetti, Domingos H U

    2013-01-01

    Time decays form the basis of a multitude of important and interesting phenomena in quantum physics that range from spectral properties, resonances, return and approach to equilibrium, to quantum mixing, dynamical stability properties and irreversibility and the "arrow of time". This monograph is devoted to a clear and precise, yet pedagogical account of the associated concepts and methods.

  20. Rare decays and search for new physics

    CERN Document Server

    Koppenburg, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In absence of direct signs of new physics at the LHC, rare decays of heavy flavoured particles provide an ideal laboratory to look for deviations from the Standard Model and explore an energy regime beyond the LHC reach. Here, new results from the LHC and the $B$ factories are presented, with a particular focus on electroweak penguin-mediated $b\\rightarrow s$ transitions

  1. Reactor antineutrino spectra and forbidden beta decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefánik, Dušan; Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2017-10-01

    The exact relativistic shape factors, associated with the nuclear matrix elements governing the first forbidden beta decays, are presented. It is expected that their consideration can allow a more accurate theoretical description of antineutrino fluxes from the power reactor. A qualitative analysis of the uncertainty of reactor antineutrino flux from 235U within the electron spectrum conversion method is performed.

  2. Stabilizing oscillating universes against quantum decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mithani, Audrey T.; Vilenkin, Alexander [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy,Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2015-07-07

    We investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. However, stability may be achieved for some specially fine-tuned non-vacuum states.

  3. Unified approach to alpha decay calculations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-05-02

    May 2, 2014 ... a small error in E can cause a much bigger error in τ. Due to this reason, in many analyses of α decay one uses experimentally measured E rather than the theoretically calculated one, even though a more satisfactory theoretical approach should generate both E and τ within a unified framework. Further ...

  4. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Richard G.

    1998-10-01

    Earlier this year, the U. S. Nuclear Data Program was reorganized; it now consists of a Coordinating Committee and three working groups. The Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Working Group consists of the persons at several U. S. laboratories and McMaster University who prepare the evaluated experimental structure and decay data that make up the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), which is maintain at the National Nuclear Data Center. This Working Group is responsible for coordinating the work of the evaluators and approving improvements in the ENSDF format and data evaluation methodology. In this period of decreasing manpower, the Working Group helps set priorities for future work. While working to maintain the quality and currency of ENSDF, there is a need to be responsive to research ares of high current interest, such as data for astrophysics and high-spin levels. In support of astrophysics, the status of the decay data for atoms of interest is being determined and modifications of the ENSDF format will allow inclusion of data for the decay of ionized atoms. A compilation of published and unpublished data for high-spin levels is being created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by D. Radford. The ENSDF evaluators may be able to make use of this compilation to improve the currency of ENSDF in this research area. For the case of super-deformed bands, a special publication of these data already exists and it is up-dated annually.

  5. beta-decay of O-13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knudsen, HH; Fynbo, HOU; Borge, MJG; Boutami, R; Dendooven, P; Diget, CA; Eronen, T; Fox, S; Fraile, LM; Fulton, B; Huikary, J; Jeppesen, HB; Jokinen, AS; Jonson, B; Kankainen, A; Moore, [No Value; Nieminen, A; Nyman, G; Penttila, H; Riisager, K; Rinta-Antila, S; Tengblad, O; Wang, Y; Wilhelmsen, K; Aysto, J

    2005-01-01

    The beta decay of O-13 has been studied at the IGISOL facility of the Jyvaskyla accelerator centre (Finland). By developing a low-energy isotope-separated beam of O-13 and using a modern segmented charged-particle detector array an improved measurement of the delayed proton spectrum was possible.

  6. New results on muon radiative decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocanic, Dinko

    2012-10-01

    The PIBETA and PEN experiments, a series of precise measurements of rare pion and muon decays at PSI, have acquired a substantial set of &+circ;->e^+ νν γ, radiative muon decay (RMD), events. The measurements were made using a stopped pion beam decaying in an active target, and positron and photon detection in a segmented spherical pure-CsI electromagnetic shower calorimeter covering δφ˜3π sr, with MWPC central tracking and particle identification. The present RMD study has resulted in approximately 30-fold improvement in the precision of the decay branching ratio for (Eγ> 10 MeV, and θγ-e> 30^o), compared to previous work. Our 1% result is in excellent agreement with standard model theoretical predictions. Focusing on a narrower range of phase space, we were able to improve significantly the upper limit on the Michel paramter η, which is sensitive to non-(V-A) admixtures in the weak lagrangian.

  7. SU(3) breaking in hyperon beta decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, M. (Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of High Energy Physics)

    1990-08-23

    The symmetry breaking in the hyperon semi-leptonic decays is analyzed with the constraint that vertical strokeV{sub us}vertical stroke is given by K{sub e3}. The mechanism of symmetry breaking of Donoghue, Holstein and Klimt and the one-loop corrected vector form factors of Krause are compared with data. (orig.).

  8. SU(3) breaking in hyperon beta decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, M.

    1990-08-01

    The symmetry breaking in the hyperon semi-leptonic decays is analyzed with the constraint the | us| is given by K e3. The mechanisms of symmetry breaking of Donoghue, Holstein and Klimt and the one-loop corrected vector form factors of Krause are compared with data.

  9. Observation of charmless hadronic B decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Four candidates for charmless hadronic B decay are observed in a data sample of four million hadronic Z decays recorded by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The probability that these events come from background sources is estimated to be less than 10 -6. The average branching ratio of weakly decaying B hadrons (a mixture of B d0, B s0 and Λb weighted by their production cross sections and lifetimes, here denoted B) into two long-lived charged hadrons (pions, kaons or protons) is measured to be Br(B → h +h -) = (1.7 -0.7+1.0 ± 0.2) × 10 -5. The relative branching fraction {Br( B d(s)0 → π +π -(K -)) }/{Br( B d(s)0 → h +h -) } is measured to be 1.0 -0.3 -0.1+0.0 +0.0. In addition, branching ratio upper limits are obtained for a variety of exclusive charmless hadronic two-body decays of B hadrons.

  10. New physics effects from meson decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this talk, we point out some of the present and future possible signatures of physics beyond the Standard Model from -meson decays, taking -parity conserving and violating supersymmetry as illustrative examples. An expanded version is available on hep-ph archive.

  11. Pion decay constants in dense skyrmion matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H.-J.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available According to the QCD, the hadronic matter can have various phases with matter density and temperature. In general, when there is phase transition in a matter, it is known that a symmetry in the matter changes. In case of the hadronic matter, the chiral symmetry in the matter is expected to be restored when the matter density (or temperature increases. The actual order parameter with respect to the chiral symmetry in the hadronic matter is known as the quark condensate from the QCD, but the pion decay constant, corresponding to the radius of the chiral circle, plays the role of the order parameter in an effective field theoretical approach to the QCD. In this paper, by using the skyrmion model which is an effective theory to the QCD, we construct the skyrmion matter as a model of the hadronic matter (nuclear matter and calculate the pion decay constant in the matter. Because of presence of the matter, the pion decay constant is split into the two components, the temporal component and the spatial component. We discuss the phase transition in the skyrmion matter and behavior of the two components of the decay constant for massless pion with density of the skyrmion matter.

  12. Study of B-> phi phi K Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Y T; Chang, P; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Belous, K S; Bitenc, U; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Brako, M; Browder, T E; Chao, cY; Chen, A; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Gabyshev, N; Golob, B; Hayasaka, K; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W S; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kang, J H; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kim, H J; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Krian, P; Krokovny, zP; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kwon, Y J; Lee, J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Moloney, G R; Nakao, M; Natkaniec, Z; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, H; Park, K S; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sasao, N; Schneider, O; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Shiu, J G; Somov, A; Stani, S; Stari, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tamai, ccK; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Teramoto, Y; Tsuboyama, T; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wicht, J; Won, E; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zupanc, A

    2008-01-01

    We report an observation of the decay B^\\pm -> \\phi \\phi K^\\pm and evidence for B^0 -> \\phi \\phi K^0. These results are based on a 414 fb^{-1} data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^+e^- collider operating at the \\Upsilon(4S) resonance. The branching fractions for these decay modes are measured to be Br(B^{\\pm} -> \\phi \\phi K^\\pm) = (3.2^{+0.6}_{-0.5} +- 0.3) * 10^{-6} and Br(B^{0} \\to \\phi \\phi K^{0}) = (2.3^{+1.0}_{-0.7} +- 0.2) * 10^{-6} for \\phi \\phi invariant mass below 2.85 GeV/c^2. The corresponding partial rate asymmetry for the charged B mode is measured to be A_{CP}(B^\\pm -> \\phi \\phi K^\\pm) = 0.01^{+0.19}_{-0.16} +- 0.02. We also study the decays B^\\pm -> J/\\psi K^\\pm and B^\\pm -> \\eta_c K^\\pm, where the J/\\psi and \\eta_c decay to final states with four charged kaons. We find A_{CP}(B^\\pm -> \\phi \\phi K^\\pm) with the \\phi\\phi candidates within the \\eta_c mass region is 0.15^{+0.16}_{-0.17} +- 0.02, consistent with no asymmetry.

  13. Constraining decaying dark matter with neutron stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ángeles Pérez-García

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The amount of decaying dark matter, accumulated in the central regions in neutron stars together with the energy deposition rate from decays, may set a limit on the neutron star survival rate against transitions to more compact objects provided nuclear matter is not the ultimate stable state of matter and that dark matter indeed is unstable. More generally, this limit sets constraints on the dark matter particle decay time, τχ. We find that in the range of uncertainties intrinsic to such a scenario, masses (mχ/TeV≳9×10−4 or (mχ/TeV≳5×10−2 and lifetimes τχ≲1055 s and τχ≲1053 s can be excluded in the bosonic or fermionic decay cases, respectively, in an optimistic estimate, while more conservatively, it decreases τχ by a factor ≳1020. We discuss the validity under which these results may improve with other current constraints.

  14. Interatomic Coulombic decay in helium nanodroplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shcherbinin, Mykola; Laforge, Aaron; Sharma, Vandana

    2017-01-01

    Interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) is induced in helium nanodroplets by photoexciting the n=2 excited state of He+ using XUV synchrotron radiation. By recording multiple-coincidence electron and ion images we find that ICD occurs in various locations at the droplet surface, inside the surface region...

  15. CP violation in neutral kaon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchalla, G.

    1997-05-01

    A brief review of the theoretical status of CP violation in decays of neutral kaons is presented. We focus on three important topics: {epsilon}, {epsilon}`/{epsilon} and K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{anti {nu}}.

  16. Evidence against Decay in Verbal Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberauer, Klaus; Lewandowsky, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The article tests the assumption that forgetting in working memory for verbal materials is caused by time-based decay, using the complex-span paradigm. Participants encoded 6 letters for serial recall; each letter was preceded and followed by a processing period comprising 4 trials of difficult visual search. Processing duration, during which…

  17. Rare B → baryon decays from CLEO

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thayer, Jana B

    2004-01-01

    ... at the Υ(4S) with the CLEO detector. We find no evidence for such decays, and set a 90% confidence level upper limit of ${\\cal B} (B \\rightarrow X_s \\gamma, X_s ~{\\it containing~baryons}) _{E_\\gamma > 2.0 \\rm{~GeV}} 5...

  18. Study of Charm Production in Z Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Riu, I.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Greening, T.C.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Spagnolo, P.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Marinelli, N.; Sciaba, A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, N.A.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Etienne, F.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Schune, M.H.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foa, L.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Johnson, R.P.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Koob, C.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S.R.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    The production rates of D*+-, Ds*+-, D+-, D0 / D0bar, Ds+, and Lambda_c in Z to ccbar decays are measured using the LEP I data sample recorded by the ALEPH detector. The fractional energy spectrum of the D*+- is well described as the sum of three contributions: charm hadronisation, b hadron decays and gluon splitting into a pair of heavy quarks. The probability for a c quark to hadronise into a D*+ is found to be f(c to D*+) = 0.233 +- 0.010 (stat.) +- 0.011 (syst.). The average fraction of the beam energy carried by D*+- mesons in Z to cc events is measured to be _cc = 0.4878 +- 0.0046 (stat.) +- 0.0061 (syst.). The D*+- energy and the hemisphere mass imbalance distributions are simultaneously used to measure the fraction of hadronic Z decays in which a gluon splits to a cc pair: n_{gluon to cc} = (3.23 +- 0.48 (stat.) +- 0.53 (syst.) %. The ratio of the Vector/(Vector+Pseudoscalar) production rates in charmed mesons is found to be P_V = 0.595 +- 0.045. The fractional decay width of the Z into cc pairs is de...

  19. CPV tests with rare kaon decays

    CERN Document Server

    Marinova, E

    2011-01-01

    The K_S \\to pi+/- e+ e- decay mode has been investigated using the data collected in 2002 by the NA48/1 collaboration. With about 23k signal events and 59k K_L \\to pi+ pi- pi0_D normalization decays, the K_S \\to pi+ pi- e+ e- branching ratio was determined. This result is also used to set an upper limit on the presence of E1 direct emission in the decay amplitude. The CP-violating asymmetry has been also measured. We report on measurements of the rare decays K +/- \\to pi+/- e+ e- and K+/- \\to pi+/- mu+ mu- . The full NA48/2 data set was analyzed, leading to more than 7200 reconstructed events in the electronic and more than 3000 events in the muonic channel, the latter exceeding the total existing statistics by a factor of four. For both channels the selected events are almost background-free. From these events, we have determined the branching fraction and form factors of K+/- \\to pi+/- e+ e- using different theoretical models. Our results improve the existing world averages significantly. In addition, we me...

  20. CPV tests with rare kaon decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova, E.; NA48/1 Collaboration; NA48/2 Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The K→ππee decay mode has been investigated using the data collected in 2002 by the NA48/1 collaboration. With about 23k signal events and 59k K→πππD0 normalization decays, the K→ππee branching ratio was determined. This result is also used to set an upper limit on the presence of E1 direct emission in the decay amplitude. The CP-violating asymmetry has been also measured. We report on measurements of the rare decays K→πee and K→πμμ. The full NA48/2 data set was analyzed, leading to more than 7200 reconstructed events in the electronic and more than 3000 events in the muonic channel, the latter exceeding the total existing statistics by a factor of four. For both channels the selected events are almost background-free. From these events, we have determined the branching fraction and form factors of K→πee using different theoretical models. Our results improve the existing world averages significantly. In addition, we measured the CP violating asymmetry between K and K in this channel to be less than a few percent.

  1. Exotic muon decay. mu -->. e+x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.A.; Clifford, E.T.H.

    1986-12-01

    Upper limits for the branching ratio of the decay ..mu -->..ex where x is a massive particle in the range 0 to 104 MeV have been determined. Over most of the accessible region GAMMA(..mu -->..ex)/GAMMA(..mu -->..e..nu..nu-bar)approx. <3 x 10/sup -4/ (90%).

  2. Exotic muon decay μ-->e+x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, D. A.; Clifford, E. T. H.

    1986-12-01

    Upper limits for the branching ratio of the decay μ-->ex where x is a massive particle in the range 0 to 104 MeV have been determined. Over most of the accessible region Γ(μ-->ex)/Γ(μ-->eνν¯)<~3×10-4 (90%).

  3. Recent results from rare kaon decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.

    1990-04-01

    An updated review of recent experimental results involving rare kaon decays is presented. The current round of experiments has already resulted in increased detection sensitivity ranging from one to two orders of magnitude. Further advances are anticipated. 44 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Constraining New Physics with D meson decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranco, J.; Delepine, D.; Gonzalez Macias, V. [Departamento de Física, División de Ciencias e Ingeniería, Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus León, León 37150 (Mexico); Lopez-Lozano, L. [Departamento de Física, División de Ciencias e Ingeniería, Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus León, León 37150 (Mexico); Área Académica de Matemáticas y Física, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Carr. Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, C.P. 42184, Pachuca, HGO (Mexico)

    2014-04-04

    Latest Lattice results on D form factors evaluation from first principles show that the Standard Model (SM) branching ratios prediction for the leptonic D{sub s}→ℓν{sub ℓ} decays and the semileptonic SM branching ratios of the D{sup 0} and D{sup +} meson decays are in good agreement with the world average experimental measurements. It is possible to disprove New Physics hypothesis or find bounds over several models beyond the SM. Using the observed leptonic and semileptonic branching ratios for the D meson decays, we performed a combined analysis to constrain non-standard interactions which mediate the cs{sup ¯}→lν{sup ¯} transition. This is done either by a model-independent way through the corresponding Wilson coefficients or in a model-dependent way by finding the respective bounds over the relevant parameters for some models beyond the Standard Model. In particular, we obtain bounds for the Two Higgs Doublet Model Type-II and Type III, the Left–Right model, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with explicit R-parity violation and Leptoquarks. Finally, we estimate the transverse polarization of the lepton in the D{sup 0} decay and we found it can be as high as P{sub T}=0.23.

  5. ATLAS results on Higgs decays to bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Rosati, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurements, by the ATLAS collaboration, of the Higgs boson properties in the decays to bosons will be presented. The measurements are based on the analysis of 36.1 fb-1 at sqrt(s)=13 TeV, collected in 2015 and 2016 for the Run-2 of LHC.

  6. Bottomonia: open bottom strong decays and spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santopinto E.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present our results for the bottomonium spectrum with self energy corrections. The bare masses used in the calculation are computed within Godfrey and Isgur’s relativized quark model. We also discuss our results for the open bottom strong decay widths of higher bottomonia in the 3P0 pair-creation model.

  7. Unified approach to alpha decay calculations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-05-02

    May 2, 2014 ... We describe the analytic -matrix (SM) method which gives a procedure for the calculation of decay energy and mean life in an integrated way by evaluating the resonance pole of the -matrix in the complex momentum or energy plane. We make an illustrative comparative study of WKB and -matrix ...

  8. Decay and Resonance of Coherent States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkering, T.P.; van Groesen, E.; Schiehlen, Werner O.

    1990-01-01

    We describe examples of two phenomena: the decay of a nonlinear coherent state under the influence of friction and the resonance of such a state due to a time periodic external forcing. In the latter case a period doubling transition to chaotic motion can be found as function of a parameter in the

  9. Rare meson decays into very light neutralinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreiner, H.K.; Grab, S. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics und Physikalisches Inst.; Koschade, D. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; London Univ. (United Kingdom). Centre for Reserach in String Theory; Kraemer, M.; O' Leary, B. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Langenfeld, U. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the bounds on the mass of the lightest neutralino from rare meson decays within the MSSM with and without minimal flavor violation. We present explicit formulae for the two-body decays of mesons into light neutralinos and perform the first complete calculation of the loop-induced decays of kaons to pions and light neutralinos and B mesons to kaons and light neutralinos. We find that the supersymmetric branching ratios are strongly suppressed within the MSSM with minimal flavor violation, and that no bounds on the neutralino mass can be inferred from experimental data, i.e. a massless neutralino is allowed. The branching ratios for kaon and B meson decays into light neutralinos may, however, be enhanced when one allows for non-minimal flavor violation. We find new constraints on the MSSM parameter space for such scenarios and discuss prospects for future kaon and B meson experiments. Finally, we comment on the search for light neutralinos in monojet signatures at the Tevatron and at the LHC. (orig.)

  10. Oxalate analysis methodology for decayed wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; William Kenealy; Patricia K. Lebow

    2008-01-01

    Oxalate from partially decayed southern pine wood was analyzed by HPLC or colorimetric assay. Oxalate extraction efficiency, assessed by comparing analysis of whole wood cubes with ground wood, showed that both wood geometries could be extracted with comparable efficiency. To differentiate soluble oxalate from total oxalate, three extraction methods were assessed,...

  11. Persistence and photochemical decay of springtime total ozone anomalies in the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tegtmeier

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistence and decay of springtime total ozone anomalies over the entire extratropics (midlatitudes plus polar regions is analysed using results from the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM, a comprehensive chemistry-climate model. As in the observations, interannual anomalies established through winter and spring persist with very high correlation coefficients (above 0.8 through summer until early autumn, while decaying in amplitude as a result of photochemical relaxation in the quiescent summertime stratosphere. The persistence and decay of the ozone anomalies in CMAM agrees extremely well with observations, even in the southern hemisphere when the model is run without heterogeneous chemistry (in which case there is no ozone hole and the seasonal cycle of ozone is quite different from observations. However in a version of CMAM with strong vertical diffusion, the northern hemisphere anomalies decay far too rapidly compared to observations. This shows that ozone anomaly persistence and decay does not depend on how the springtime anomalies are created or on their magnitude, but reflects the transport and photochemical decay in the model. The seasonality of the long-term trends over the entire extratropics is found to be explained by the persistence of the interannual anomalies, as in the observations, demonstrating that summertime ozone trends reflect winter/spring trends rather than any change in summertime ozone chemistry. However this mechanism fails in the northern hemisphere midlatitudes because of the relatively large impact, compared to observations, of the CMAM polar anomalies. As in the southern hemisphere, the influence of polar ozone loss in CMAM increases the midlatitude summertime loss, leading to a relatively weak seasonal dependence of ozone loss in the Northern Hemisphere compared to the observations.

  12. Developing a chloramine decay index to understand nitrification: A case study of two chloraminated drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Sina; Liu, Sanly; Chow, Christopher W K; van Leeuwen, John; Cook, David; Drikas, Mary; Amal, Rose

    2017-07-01

    The management of chloramine decay and the prevention of nitrification are some of the critical issues faced by water utilities that use chloramine as a disinfectant. In this study, potential association between high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) data obtained with multiple wavelength Ultraviolet (UV) detection from two drinking water distribution systems in Australia and nitrification occurrence was investigated. An increase in the absorbance signal of HPSEC profiles with UV detection at λ=230nm between apparent molecular weights of 200 to 1000Da was observed at sampling sites that experienced rapid chloramine decay and nitrification while its absorbance signal at λ=254nm decreased. A chloramine decay index (C.D.I) defined as the ratio of area beneath the HPSEC spectra at two different wavelengths of 230 and 254nm, was used in assessing chloramine decay occurrences. The C.D.Is of waters at locations that experienced nitrification were consistently higher than locations not experiencing nitrification. A simulated laboratory study showed that the formation of nitrite/nitrate and/or soluble microbial products and/or the release of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) during nitrification may contribute to the C.D.I. increase. These findings suggest that C.D.I derived from HPSEC with multiple wavelength UV detection could be an informative index to track the occurrence of rapid chloramine decay and nitrification. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The Development of a Mechanism to Model the Formation and Decay of Nitrated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhihua

    1995-01-01

    The overall purpose of this work is to develop a mechanism to model the formation and degradation of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAH) in the atmosphere. This work developed the processes relevant to the formation and degradation of NPAH, specially for fluoranthene (FL), pyrene (PY), and their derivatives, such as 1-nitropyrene (1NP), 2-nitrofluoranthene (2NF). Photostability of particle associated NPAH was investigated under sunlight on diesel exhaust or wood smoke particles in our 190 m^3 outdoor smog chamber in cold and warm temperatures. Rapid degradation of deuterated and native NPAH was observed in sunlight, even in cold temperatures (temperatures ranged between rm-18.6^circ C and -5.6^circ C). The photolysis rate of NPAH was referenced to the NO_2 photolysis rate in order to relate the observed decay of NPAH to the changing solar radiation. Based on the known chemistry of PAH and NPAH, a reaction mechanism for PAH and NPAH in the gas and particle phase in the atmosphere was proposed. The mechanism was evaluated with outdoor smog chamber experiments with diluted diesel exhaust under different initial photochemical conditions. Simulations for FL and PY in both gas and particle phase were close to chamber observations. Formation of 2NF was observed in the chamber, but 2NP degraded rapidly under photochemical conditions. Mono- nitro-pyrenes (NPs) and nitro-fluoranthenes (NFs) were almost exclusively found in particle associated extracts. This implied that no or non-detectable 2NF or 2NP were distributed in the gas phase and that they were deposited on particles immediately after formation in the gas phase by the photochemical processes. To model the decay of NPAH on diesel particles, a rate Of k _{rm NPAH} = (0.04+/-0.01)times k_{NO2} was used for the decay of NPs, and a rate of rm k_{NPAH } = (0.025+/-0.005)times k_{NO2 } was needed to model the behavior of NFs. A higher rate, rm k_{NPAH} = (0.050+/-0.005)times k_{NO2} was needed to model NFs and

  14. β decay studies of n-rich Cs isotopes with the ISOLDE Decay Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lică, R.; Benzoni, G.; Morales, A. I.; Borge, M. J. G.; Fraile, L. M.; Mach, H.; Madurga, M.; Sotty, C.; Vedia, V.; De Witte, H.; Benito, J.; Berry, T.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Charviakova, V.; Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Costache, C.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Creswell, J.; Fernández-Martínez, G.; Fynbo, H.; Greenlees, P.; Homm, I.; Huyse, M.; Jolie, J.; Karayonchev, V.; Köster, U.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Lazarus, I.; Leoni, S.; Lund, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Mihai, R.; Negret, A.; Orduz, A.; Patyk, Z.; Pascu, S.; Pucknell, V.; Rahkila, P.; Regis, J. M.; Rotaru, F.; Saed-Sami, N.; Sánchez-Tembleque, V.; Stanoiu, M.; Tengblad, O.; Thuerauf, M.; Turturica, A.; Van Duppen, P.; Warr, N.

    2017-05-01

    Neutron-rich Ba isotopes are expected to exhibit octupolar correlations, reaching their maximum in isotopes around mass A = 146. The odd-A neutron-rich members of this isotopic chain show typical patterns related to non-axially symmetric shapes, which are however less marked compared to even-A ones, pointing to a major contribution from vibrations. In the present paper we present results from a recent study focused on 148-150Cs β-decay performed at the ISOLDE Decay Station equipped with fast-timing detectors. A detailed analysis of the measured decay half-lives and decay scheme of 149Ba is presented, giving a first insight in the structure of this neutron-rich nucleus.

  15. Dissemination and visualisation of reference decay data from Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulieu, Christophe; Kellett, Mark A.; Mougeot, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    As a primary laboratory in the field of ionising radiation metrology, the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB), CEA Saclay, is involved in measurements, evaluations and dissemination of radioactive decay data. Data measurements undertaken by various laboratories are evaluated by an international commission of experts (Decay Data Evaluation Project) coordinated by LNHB staff in order to establish a set of recommended decay scheme data. New nuclide evaluations are regularly added to our website, the Nucléide database, published in the BIPM-5 Monographie series and uploaded to our web application Laraweb, a dedicated tool for alpha and gamma spectrometry. The Mini Table of Radionuclides is produced from time-to-time with data extracted from our database. Various publications are described, along with new search criteria and decay scheme visualisation in Laraweb. Note to the reader: the pdf file has been changed on September 22, 2017.

  16. Decay of the standard model Higgs field after inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Figueroa, Daniel G; Torrenti, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    We study the nonperturbative dynamics of the Standard Model (SM) after inflation, in the regime where the SM is decoupled from (or weakly coupled to) the inflationary sector. We use classical lattice simulations in an expanding box in (3+1) dimensions, modeling the SM gauge interactions with both global and Abelian-Higgs analogue scenarios. We consider different post-inflationary expansion rates. During inflation, the Higgs forms a condensate, which starts oscillating soon after inflation ends. Via nonperturbative effects, the oscillations lead to a fast decay of the Higgs into the SM species, transferring most of the energy into $Z$ and $W^{\\pm}$ bosons. All species are initially excited far away from equilibrium, but their interactions lead them into a stationary stage, with exact equipartition among the different energy components. From there on the system eventually reaches equilibrium. We have characterized in detail, in the different expansion histories considered, the evolution of the Higgs and of its ...

  17. On the large time asymptotics of decaying Burgers turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tribe, R; Tribe, Roger; Zaboronski, Oleg

    2000-01-01

    The decay of Burgers turbulence with compactly supported Gaussian "white noise" initial conditions is studied in the limit of vanishing viscosity and large time. Probability distribution functions and moments for both velocities and velocity differences are computed exactly, together with the "time-like" structure functions . The analysis of the answers reveals both well known features of Burgers turbulence, such as the presence of dissipative anomaly, the extreme anomalous scaling of the velocity structure functions and self similarity of the statistics of the velocity field, and new features such as the extreme anomalous scaling of the "time-like" structure functions and the non-existence of a global inertial scale due to multiscaling of the Burgers velocity field. We also observe that all the results can be recovered using the one point probability distribution function of the shock strength and discuss the implications of this fact for Burgers turbulence in general.

  18. Materials Genome Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John

    2015-01-01

    The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) project element is a cross-Center effort that is focused on the integration of computational tools to simulate manufacturing processes and materials behavior. These computational simulations will be utilized to gain understanding of processes and materials behavior to accelerate process development and certification to more efficiently integrate new materials in existing NASA projects and to lead to the design of new materials for improved performance. This NASA effort looks to collaborate with efforts at other government agencies and universities working under the national MGI. MGI plans to develop integrated computational/experimental/ processing methodologies for accelerating discovery and insertion of materials to satisfy NASA's unique mission demands. The challenges include validated design tools that incorporate materials properties, processes, and design requirements; and materials process control to rapidly mature emerging manufacturing methods and develop certified manufacturing processes

  19. T1rho-prepared balanced gradient echo for rapid 3D T1rho MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witschey, Walter R T; Borthakur, Arijitt; Elliott, Mark A; Fenty, Matthew; Sochor, Matthew A; Wang, Chenyang; Reddy, Ravinder

    2008-09-01

    To develop a T1rho-prepared, balanced gradient echo (b-GRE) pulse sequence for rapid three-dimensional (3D) T1rho relaxation mapping within the time constraints of a clinical exam (prepared, fat saturation, T1rho-preparation, and b-GRE image acquisition was used to obtain 3D volume coverage of the patellofemoral and tibiofemoral cartilage and lower lumbar spine. Multiple T1rho-weighted images at various contrast times (spin-lock pulse duration [TSL]) were used to construct a T1rho relaxation map in both phantoms and in the knee joint and spine in vivo. The transient signal decay during b-GRE image acquisition was corrected using a k-space filter. The T1rho-prepared b-GRE sequence was compared to a standard T1rho-prepared spin echo (SE) sequence and pulse sequence parameters were optimized numerically using the Bloch equations. The b-GRE transient signal decay was found to depend on the initial T1rho-preparation and the corresponding T1rho map was altered by variations in the point spread function with TSL. In a two compartment phantom, the steady state response was found to elevate T1rho from 91.4+/-6.5 to 293.8+/-31 and 66.9+/-3.5 to 661+/-207 with no change in the goodness-of-fit parameter R2. Phase encoding along the longest cartilage dimension and a transient signal decay k-space filter retained T1rho contrast. Measurement of T1rho using the T1rho-prepared b-GRE sequence matches standard T1rho-prepared SE in the medial patellar and lateral patellar cartilage compartments. T1rho-preparedb-GRE T1rho was found to have low interscan variability between four separate scans. Mean patellar cartilage T1rho was elevated compared to femoral and tibial cartilage T1rho. The T1rho-prepared b-GRE acquisition rapidly and reliably accelerates T1rho quantification of tissues offset partially by a TSL-dependent point spread function. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Rapidly Developing Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Oline Barrios Poulsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe cutaneous reactions with potentially fatal outcomes can have many different causes. The Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN are rare. They are characterized by a low incidence but high mortality, and drugs are most commonly implicated. Urgent active therapy is required. Prompt recognition and withdrawal of suspect drug and rapid intervention can result in favourable outcome. No further international guidelines for treatment exist, and much of the treatment relies on old or experimental concepts with no scientific evidence. We report on a 54-year-old man experiencing rapidly developing drug-induced severe TEN and presented multiorgan failure involving the respiratory and circulatory system, coagulopathy, and renal insufficiency. Detachment counted 30% of total body surface area (TBSA. SCORTEN = 5, indicating a mortality rate >90%. The patient was sedated and mechanically ventilated, supported with fluids and inotropes to maintain a stable circulation. Component therapy was guided by thromboelastography (TEG. The patient received plasmapheresis, and shock reversal treatment was initiated. He was transferred to a specialized intensive care burn unit within 24 hours from admittance. The initial care was continued, and hemodialysis was started. Pulmonary, circulatory, and renal sequelae resolved with intensive care, and re-epithelialization progressed slowly. The patient was discharged home on hospital day 19.

  1. Electrons from decays of open charm and beauty hadrons in p-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=5.02 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Jan

    2016-10-17

    Charm and beauty quarks serve as a probe to study the deconfined medium of a quark-gluon plasma observed in A-A collisions. Due to their large mass they are produced in the first moments of the collision and interact with the expanding medium. Cold nuclear matter effects such as the modification of the nuclear Parton Distribution Functions in the Pb nuclei, parton momentum (k{sub T}) broadening from soft scattering processes and initial- and final-state parton energy loss play a role in nuclear collisions. These effects can be studied by a reference measurement in p-A collisions, where an extended medium is not believed to be formed. In this work the measurement of the production of electrons from semi-leptonic decays of heavy-flavor hadrons as function of the transverse momentum in p-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=5.02 TeV with ALICE at the LHC is presented. The measurement of electrons from heavy-flavor hadron decays requires a precise determination of the electron background. For the first time in this kind of measurement with ALICE the main contribution to the electron background is estimated by tagging electrons from e{sup +}e{sup -}γ Dalitz decays and γ-conversions, leading to a substantial reduction of the relative systematic uncertainties compared to previous measurements in pp collisions. A reference measurement for pp collisions at √(s)=5.02 TeV was interpolated from measurements in pp collisions at √(s)=2.76 TeV and √(s)=7 TeV. The determined nuclear modification factor of electrons measured in the p{sub T}-range 0.5rapidity range -1.065decays in agreement with predictions from different model calculations. An investigation of the multiplicity dependence of heavy-flavor production leads to linear increase of the

  2. Method of predicting mechanical properties of decayed wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Stephen S.

    2003-07-15

    A method for determining the mechanical properties of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms, comprising: a) illuminating a surface of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms with wavelengths from visible and near infrared (VIS-NIR) spectra; b) analyzing the surface of the decayed wood using a spectrometric method, the method generating a first spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra region; and c) using a multivariate analysis to predict mechanical properties of decayed wood by comparing the first spectral data with a calibration model, the calibration model comprising a second spectrometric method of spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra obtained from a reference decay wood, the second spectral data being correlated with a known mechanical property analytical result obtained from the reference decayed wood.

  3. Neutrino masses and neutrinoless double-beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavan, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Milano, Bicocca and sezioneINFN di Milano Bicocca (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    The potentials of Double Beta Decay experiments in the field of neutrino study are here discussed. Sensitivity and results are compared with the information coming from oscillation, cosmology and beta decay measurements. (Author)

  4. Development of JENDL Decay and Fission Yield Data Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakura, J.

    2014-04-01

    Decay and fission yield data of fission products have been developed for decay heat calculations to constitute one of the special purpose files of JENDL (Japanese Nuclear Data Library). The decay data in the previous JENDL decay data file have been updated based on the data extracted from ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) and those by Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (TAGS) measurements reported recently. Fission yield data have also been updated in order to maintain consistency between the decay and yield data files. Decay heat calculations were performed using the updated decay and yield data, and the results were compared with measured decay heat data to demonstrate their applicability. The uncertainties of the calculated results were obtained by sensitivity analyses. The resulting JENDL calculations and their uncertainty were compared with those from the ENDF and JEFF evaluated files.

  5. PyDecay/GraphPhys: A Unified Language and Storage System for Particle Decay Process Descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunietz, Jesse N.; /MIT /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    To ease the tasks of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and event reconstruction (i.e. inferring particle-decay events from experimental data) for long-term BaBar data preservation and analysis, the following software components have been designed: a language ('GraphPhys') for specifying decay processes, common to both simulation and data analysis, allowing arbitrary parameters on particles, decays, and entire processes; an automated visualization tool to show graphically what decays have been specified; and a searchable database storage mechanism for decay specifications. Unlike HepML, a proposed XML standard for HEP metadata, the specification language is designed not for data interchange between computer systems, but rather for direct manipulation by human beings as well as computers. The components are interoperable: the information parsed from files in the specification language can easily be rendered as an image by the visualization package, and conversion between decay representations was implemented. Several proof-of-concept command-line tools were built based on this framework. Applications include building easier and more efficient interfaces to existing analysis tools for current projects (e.g. BaBar/BESII), providing a framework for analyses in future experimental settings (e.g. LHC/SuperB), and outreach programs that involve giving students access to BaBar data and analysis tools to give them a hands-on feel for scientific analysis.

  6. Search for Invisibly Decaying Higgs Bosons with Large Decay Width Using the OPAL Detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostu, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Bailari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batly, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A., Jr.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; shen, B.C.; sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a topological search for an invisibly decaying Higgs boson,H, produced via the Bjorken process (e+e- -> HZ). The analysis is based on data recorded using the OPAL detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 629pb-1. In the analysis only hadronic decays of the Z boson are considered. A scan over Higgs boson masses from 1 to 120 GeV and decay widths from 1 to 3000 GeV revealed no indication for a signal in the data. From a likelihood ratio of expected signal and Standard Model background we determine upper limits on cross-section times branching ratio to an invisible final state. For moderate Higgs boson decay widths, these range from about 0.07pb Mh = 60GeV) to 0.57pb (Mh = 114GeV). For decay widths above 200GeV the upper limits are of the order of 0.15pb. The results can be interpreted in general scenarios predicting a large invisible decay width of the Higgs boson. As an example we interpret the results in the so-called...

  7. Decay rate of reindeer pellet-groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Skarin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Counting of animal faecal pellet groups to estimate habitat use and population densities is a well known method in wildlife research. Using pellet-group counts often require knowledge about the decay rate of the faeces. The decay rate of a faecal pellet group may be different depending on e.g. substrate, size of the pellet group and species. Pellet-group decay rates has been estimated for a number of wildlife species but never before for reindeer (Rangifer tarandus. During 2001 to 2005 a field experiment estimating the decay rate of reindeer pellet groups was performed in the Swedish mountains close to Ammarnäs. In total the decay rate of 382 pellet groups in three different habitat types (alpine heath, birch forest and spruce forest was estimated. The slowest decay rate was found in alpine heath and there the pellet groups persisted for at least four years. If decay was assumed to take place only during the bare ground season, the estimated exponential decay rate was -0.027 pellet groups/week in the same habitat. In the forest, the decay was faster and the pellet groups did not persist more than two years. Performing pellet group counts to estimate habitat use in dry habitats, such as alpine heath, I will recommend using the faecal standing crop method. Using this method makes it possible to catch the animals’ general habitat use over several years. Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning:Nedbrytningshastighet av renspillningInom viltforskningen har spillningsinventeringar använts under flera årtionden för att uppskatta habitatval och populationstäthet hos olika djurslag. För att kunna använda data från spillningsinventeringar krävs ofta att man vet hur lång tid det tar för spillningen att brytas ner. Nedbrytningshastigheten är olika beroende på marktyp och djurslag. Nedbrytningshastighet på spillning har studerats för bland annat olika typer av hjortdjur, men det har inte studerats på ren (Rangifer tarandus tidigare. I omr

  8. Rapidity resummation for B-meson wave functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Yue-Long

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transverse-momentum dependent (TMD hadronic wave functions develop light-cone divergences under QCD corrections, which are commonly regularized by the rapidity ζ of gauge vector defining the non-light-like Wilson lines. The yielding rapidity logarithms from infrared enhancement need to be resummed for both hadronic wave functions and short-distance functions, to achieve scheme-independent calculations of physical quantities. We briefly review the recent progress on the rapidity resummation for B-meson wave functions which are the key ingredients of TMD factorization formulae for radiative-leptonic, semi-leptonic and non-leptonic B-meson decays. The crucial observation is that rapidity resummation induces a strong suppression of B-meson wave functions at small light-quark momentum, strengthening the applicability of TMD factorization in exclusive B-meson decays. The phenomenological consequence of rapidity-resummation improved B-meson wave functions is further discussed in the context of B → π transition form factors at large hadronic recoil.

  9. Growth Arrest on Inhibition of Nonsense-Mediated Decay Is Mediated by Noncoding RNA GAS5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Mourtada-Maarabouni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsense-mediated decay is a key RNA surveillance mechanism responsible for the rapid degradation of mRNAs containing premature termination codons and hence prevents the synthesis of truncated proteins. More recently, it has been shown that nonsense-mediated decay also has broader significance in controlling the expression of a significant proportion of the transcriptome. The importance of this mechanism to the mammalian cell is demonstrated by the observation that its inhibition causes growth arrest. The noncoding RNA growth arrest specific transcript 5 (GAS5 has recently been shown to play a key role in growth arrest induced by several mechanisms, including serum withdrawal and treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Here we show that inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay in several human lymphocyte cell lines causes growth arrest, and siRNA-mediated downregulation of GAS5 in these cells significantly alleviates the inhibitory effects observed. These observations hold true for inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay both through RNA interference and through pharmacological inhibition by aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamycin and G418. These studies have important implications for ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity caused by gentamycin and for the proposed use of NMD inhibition in treating genetic disease. This report further demonstrates the critical role played by GAS5 in the growth arrest of mammalian cells.

  10. Growth Arrest on Inhibition of Nonsense-Mediated Decay Is Mediated by Noncoding RNA GAS5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Williams, Gwyn T.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay is a key RNA surveillance mechanism responsible for the rapid degradation of mRNAs containing premature termination codons and hence prevents the synthesis of truncated proteins. More recently, it has been shown that nonsense-mediated decay also has broader significance in controlling the expression of a significant proportion of the transcriptome. The importance of this mechanism to the mammalian cell is demonstrated by the observation that its inhibition causes growth arrest. The noncoding RNA growth arrest specific transcript 5 (GAS5) has recently been shown to play a key role in growth arrest induced by several mechanisms, including serum withdrawal and treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Here we show that inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay in several human lymphocyte cell lines causes growth arrest, and siRNA-mediated downregulation of GAS5 in these cells significantly alleviates the inhibitory effects observed. These observations hold true for inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay both through RNA interference and through pharmacological inhibition by aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamycin and G418. These studies have important implications for ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity caused by gentamycin