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Sample records for rapid inexpensive bioassay

  1. A Simple, Rapid and Inexpensive Procedure to Distinguish Amino ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 3. A Simple, Rapid and Inexpensive Procedure to Distinguish Amino Acids and their Esters. B Ramachandra ... Author Affiliations. B Ramachandra Murty1. Department of Biochemistry PSG College of Arts and Science Coimbatore 641 014, India.

  2. A rapid bioassay system for lead using young Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, C L; Mahaffey, K R; Fox, M R

    1979-01-01

    A rapid bioassay of lead was established in young japanese quail. Each group of 10 day-old birds received deionized water and a purified diet ad libitum for 2 wk. The diet contained 0.2 microgram lead/g. Lead acetate was added to give 14.8, 34.4, 51.2, 74.4, 234, 563, or 1223 microgram total lead/g by analysis. The duodenum, kidneys, liver and tibias were assayed for lead. Consumption of a diet containing either 563 or 1223 ppm lead caused a decrease (P less than or equal to 0.05) in body weight after 1 wk and an increase in free erythrocyte protoporphyrin after 2wk. Inhibition of red blood cell delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (RBC-ALAD) activity occurred in birds consuming as little as 14.8 ppm lead. Packed cell volumes and hemoglobin concentrations were not affected by the dietary treatments. Lead concentrations in tissues from birds fed the lowest level of added lead were greater than those found in the corresponding tissues of control birds. The concentration of lead in the tibia showed the most distinguishable group means and the most nearly linear response; the highest slope was between 14.8 and 110 ppm dietary lead, using log-log transformations. The rapid bioassay is suitable for investigating high lead foods.

  3. A universal, rapid, and inexpensive method for genomic DNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MOHAMMED BAQUR SAHIB A. AL-SHUHAIB

    Abstract. There is no 'one' procedure for extracting DNA from the whole blood of both mammals and birds, since each species has a unique property that require different methods to release its own DNA. Therefore, to obtain genomic DNA, a universal, rapid, and noncostly method was developed. A very simple biological ...

  4. A universal, rapid, and inexpensive method for genomic DNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of both mammals and birds, since each species has a unique property that require different methods to release its own DNA. Therefore, to obtain genomic DNA, a universal, rapid, and noncostly method was developed. A very simple biological basis is followed in this procedure, in which, when the bloodis placed in water, ...

  5. A Rapid and Inexpensive Bioassay to Evaluate the Decontamination of Organophosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    weather natu- rally over time. Actual chemical degradation of the tox- in often relied on harsh chemicals such as calcium oxide and chlorine dioxide ...Using Chlorine Dioxide Fumigant and Liquid Oxidant Technologies. Research Triangle Park, NC: US Environmental Protection Agency; February 2008...The insects were raised in 946.4 ml canning jars on a diet of whole wheat fl our and baker’s yeast (10:1 mixture). The center of the jar lid was

  6. Rapid Bioassessment and In Situ Bioassay: Cost Effective Tools for Environmental Impact Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wike, L.D.

    2002-08-23

    Environmental impact can be difficult to assess, especially at the ecosystem level. Any impact assessment methodology that can give cost effective and timely results is highly desirable. Rapid bioassessment (RBA) is cost effective and produces timely results. Several types of RBA have been used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to assess stream conditions, including the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) based on fish community characteristics, and various techniques using aquatic macroinvertebrate species diversity and abundance. In an attempt to broaden the applicability of the RBA concept, we have also begun to develop RBA techniques for seep-fed wetlands and terrestrial habitats. These techniques will focus on vertebrate and macroinvertebrate assemblages for seep-fed wetlands and arthropod assemblages for terrestrial habitats. In situ bioassay is another technique that could be used for rapid and economical assessment of the effects of anthropogenic disturbance. We propose the development of two methods of in situ bioassay that can address bioavailability of constituents of concern. The use of caged bioassay organisms can be applied to terrestrial systems such as capped or existing waste sites using the common house cricket. Another proposed bioassay could use a resident species, such as the imported red fire ant, which is found in disturbed habitats and open areas such as waste sites. Combining in situ techniques with RBA methodologies has the potential to provide a comprehensive assessment of chemical and physical impacts to a wide range of ecosystem types.

  7. Rapid diagnosis of imazapic & imazapyr resistance by using bioassays in Clearfield Production System, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajrai F. S., M.; Ismail B., S.; Mardiana-Jansar, Khairiatul

    2015-09-01

    The resistance of weedy rice biotypes toward OnDuty™WG has been reported in Clearfield® MR 220 CL1 and MR 220 CL2 types of paddy. The purpose of this study was to adopt a rapid method to evaluate the resistance of bioassay species towards imazapic + imazapyr in different stages of plant development (seeds and seedlings). A series of OnDuty™WG concentrations from 0 to 300 g ai ha-1 were studied on the growth of rice cultivar MR263 (a susceptible species) as the bioassay species. The experiments were done in three replications with Complete Randomized Block Design (CRBD). From this study, the concentration of herbicide required to reduce coleoptiles length, root length and fresh weight in seed bioassay by 50% were 0.63, 0.33 and 3.60 g ai ha-1 respectively. Meanwhile, for seedling stage bioassay, the concentration of herbicide required to reduce coleoptiles length, root length and fresh weight by 50% were 0.03, 1.23 and 0.99 g ai ha-1 respectively. It is important to note that all growth parameters were concentration dependent and a total growth inhibition occurred in all parameters at high doses. It was proven that MR263 rice cultivar was not resistance towards imazapic + imazapyr and further experiments on other rice cultivars are recommended so that the most suitable cultivars will be selected in rice cultivation.

  8. Rapid end-point quantitation of prion seeding activity with sensitivity comparable to bioassays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Wilham

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A major problem for the effective diagnosis and management of prion diseases is the lack of rapid high-throughput assays to measure low levels of prions. Such measurements have typically required prolonged bioassays in animals. Highly sensitive, but generally non-quantitative, prion detection methods have been developed based on prions' ability to seed the conversion of normally soluble protease-sensitive forms of prion protein to protease-resistant and/or amyloid fibrillar forms. Here we describe an approach for estimating the relative amount of prions using a new prion seeding assay called real-time quaking induced conversion assay (RT-QuIC. The underlying reaction blends aspects of the previously described quaking-induced conversion (QuIC and amyloid seeding assay (ASA methods and involves prion-seeded conversion of the alpha helix-rich form of bacterially expressed recombinant PrP(C to a beta sheet-rich amyloid fibrillar form. The RT-QuIC is as sensitive as the animal bioassay, but can be accomplished in 2 days or less. Analogous to end-point dilution animal bioassays, this approach involves testing of serial dilutions of samples and statistically estimating the seeding dose (SD giving positive responses in 50% of replicate reactions (SD(50. Brain tissue from 263K scrapie-affected hamsters gave SD(50 values of 10(11-10(12/g, making the RT-QuIC similar in sensitivity to end-point dilution bioassays. Analysis of bioassay-positive nasal lavages from hamsters affected with transmissible mink encephalopathy gave SD(50 values of 10(3.5-10(5.7/ml, showing that nasal cavities release substantial prion infectivity that can be rapidly detected. Cerebral spinal fluid from 263K scrapie-affected hamsters contained prion SD(50 values of 10(2.0-10(2.9/ml. RT-QuIC assay also discriminated deer chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie brain samples from normal control samples. In principle, end-point dilution quantitation can be applied to many types of

  9. Ultrasensitive, rapid and inexpensive detection of DNA using paper based lateral flow assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauset-Rubio, Miriam; Svobodová, Markéta; Mairal, Teresa; McNeil, Calum; Keegan, Neil; Saeed, Ayman; Abbas, Mohammad Nooredeen; El-Shahawi, Mohammad S.; Bashammakh, Abdulaziz S.; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O.; O´Sullivan, Ciara K.

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive, specific, rapid, inexpensive and easy-to-use nucleic acid tests for use at the point-of-need are critical for the emerging field of personalised medicine for which companion diagnostics are essential, as well as for application in low resource settings. Here we report on the development of a point-of-care nucleic acid lateral flow test for the direct detection of isothermally amplified DNA. The recombinase polymerase amplification method is modified slightly to use tailed primers, resulting in an amplicon with a duplex flanked by two single stranded DNA tails. This tailed amplicon facilitates detection via hybridisation to a surface immobilised oligonucleotide capture probe and a gold nanoparticle labelled reporter probe. A detection limit of 1 × 10−11 M (190 amol), equivalent to 8.67 × 105 copies of DNA was achieved, with the entire assay, both amplification and detection, being completed in less than 15 minutes at a constant temperature of 37 °C. The use of the tailed primers obviates the need for hapten labelling and consequent use of capture and reporter antibodies, whilst also avoiding the need for any post-amplification processing for the generation of single stranded DNA, thus presenting an assay that can facilely find application at the point of need. PMID:27886248

  10. A rapid and high-throughput quantum dots bioassay for monitoring of perfluorooctane sulfonate in environmental water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jiong; Wan Yanjian; Li Yuanyuan; Zhang Qiongfang; Xu Shunqing [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China); Zhu Huijun [Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Kempston, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Shu Baihua, E-mail: shubaihua@hotmail.com [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Currently HPLC/MS is the state of the art tool for environmental/drinking water perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) monitoring. PFOS can bind to peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}), which forms heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs) and binds to PPAR response elements. In this bioassay free PFOS in water samples competes with immobilized PFOS in ELISA plates for a given amount of PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha}. It can be determined indirectly by immobilizing PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha}-PFOS complex to another plate coated with PPAR{alpha} antibody and subsequent measuring the level of PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha} by using biotin-modified PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha} probes-quantum dots-streptavidin detection system. The rapid and high-throughput bioassay demonstrated a detection limit of 2.5 ng L{sup -1} with linear range between 2.5 ng L{sup -1} and 75 ng L{sup -1}. Detection results of environmental water samples were highly consistent between the bioassay and HPLC/MS. - We developed a rapid and high-throughput bioassay for monitoring of PFOS in environmental water samples. - Highlights: > We developed a rapid and high-throughput bioassay for monitoring of PFOS in water. > We detected the PFOS concentration of water samples by two methods. > The bioassay is effective for evaluating PFOS contamination level.

  11. Comparison of Two Inexpensive Rapid Prototyping Methods for Manufacturing Filament Target Ultrasound Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füzesi, Krisztián; Gyöngy, Miklós

    2017-03-01

    Current use of 3-D printers to manufacture ultrasound phantoms is limited to relatively expensive photopolymer jetting printers. The present work investigates the feasibility of using two common and inexpensive 3-D printer technologies, fused deposition modeling (FDM) and digital light processing (DLP), to print custom filament target phantoms. Acoustic characteristics obtained from printed solid blocks indicated that the printing materials-acrylonitrile butadiene styrene and polylactic acid for FDM and a photopolymer for DLP printing-were appropriate for use as scatterers. A regular grid of filaments was printed to study printing accuracy. As a proof of concept of the phantom manufacturing process, a complex pattern of filament targets was placed in de-ionized water to create a phantom, which was then imaged using an ultrasound imager. The pattern was clearly identifiable, although multiple reflections were observed, which underscores the importance of future work to enhance printing resolution. This goal is deemed possible using improvement of the DLP printing setup. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A rapid bioassay for detecting saxitoxins using a Daphnia acute toxicity test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrao-Filho, Aloysio da S., E-mail: aloysio@ioc.fiocruz.b [Laboratorio de Avaliacao e Promocao da Saude Ambiental, Departamento de Biologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Av. Brasil 4365, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21045-900 (Brazil); Soares, Maria Carolina S., E-mail: mcarolsoares@gmail.co [Departamento de Engenharia Sanitaria e Ambiental Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900 (Brazil); Freitas de Magalhaes, Valeria, E-mail: valeria@biof.ufrj.b [Laboratorio de Ecofisiologia e Toxicologia de Cianobacterias, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21949-900 (Brazil); Azevedo, Sandra M.F.O., E-mail: sazevedo@biof.ufrj.b [Laboratorio de Ecofisiologia e Toxicologia de Cianobacterias, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21949-900 (Brazil)

    2010-06-15

    Bioassays using Daphnia pulex and Moina micrura were designed to detect cyanobacterial neurotoxins in raw water samples. Phytoplankton and cyanotoxins from seston were analyzed during 15 months in a eutrophic reservoir. Effective time to immobilize 50% of the exposed individuals (ET{sub 50}) was adopted as the endpoint. Paralysis of swimming movements was observed between approx0.5-3 h of exposure to lake water containing toxic cyanobacteria, followed by an almost complete recovery of the swimming activity within 24 h after being placed in control water. The same effects were observed in bioassays with a saxitoxin-producer strain of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii isolated from the reservoir. Regression analysis showed significant relationships between ET{sub 50}vs. cell density, biomass and saxitoxins content, suggesting that the paralysis of Daphnia in lake water samples was caused by saxitoxins found in C. raciborskii. Daphnia bioassay was found to be a sensitive method for detecting fast-acting neurotoxins in natural samples, with important advantages over mouse bioassays. - A new Daphnia bioassay, as an alternative to the mouse bioassay, is able to detect effects of fast-acting, potent neurotoxins in raw water.

  13. A rapid and sensitive p-benzoquinone-mediated bioassay for determination of heavy metal toxicity in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dengbin; Zhai, Junfeng; Yong, Daming; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-06-07

    Determining and monitoring toxicity of chemicals in water are very important for human health and country security. Electrochemical measurement of respiratory chain activity is a rapid and reliable screening of the toxicity towards microorganisms. Here, we report a rapid and sensitive toxicity bioassay using p-benzoquinone as the artificial electron mediator and Escherichia coli as the test organism. Four heavy metal ions, Cu(2+), Ag(+), Hg(2+) and Co(2+), are tested as the model toxicants, and the corresponding 50% respiration inhibition concentrations (IC50) are determined to be 0.95, 8.14, 11.69 and 42.76 mg L(-1), respectively. Based on the IC50 values, the descending order of toxicity is: Cu(2+) > Ag(+) > Hg(2+) > Co(2+). The presented bioassay not only provides a good foundation for further toxicity tests using E. coli, but also the potential for expanding the technique to utilize other bacteria with complementary toxicity responses, thereby allowing use of the bioassay in a wide range of applications.

  14. An inexpensive and portable microvolumeter for rapid evaluation of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, John K; Wcislo, William T

    2010-08-01

    We describe an improved microvolumeter (MVM) for rapidly measuring volumes of small biological samples, including live zooplankton, embryos, and small animals and organs. Portability and low cost make this instrument suitable for widespread use, including at remote field sites. Beginning with Archimedes' principle, which states that immersing an arbitrarily shaped sample in a fluid-filled container displaces an equivalent volume, we identified procedures that maximize measurement accuracy and repeatability across a broad range of absolute volumes. Crucial steps include matching the overall configuration to the size of the sample, using reflected light to monitor fluid levels precisely, and accounting for evaporation during measurements. The resulting precision is at least 100 times higher than in previous displacement-based methods. Volumes are obtained much faster than by traditional histological or confocal methods and without shrinkage artifacts due to fixation or dehydration. Calibrations using volume standards confirmed accurate measurements of volumes as small as 0.06 microL. We validated the feasibility of evaluating soft-tissue samples by comparing volumes of freshly dissected ant brains measured with the MVM and by confocal reconstruction.

  15. Affinity purification of Car9-tagged proteins on silica matrices: Optimization of a rapid and inexpensive protein purification technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rodríguez, Jessica; Coyle, Brandon L; Samuelson, Ariana; Aravagiri, Kannan; Baneyx, François

    2017-07-01

    Car9, a dodecapeptide identified by cell surface display for its ability to bind to the edge of carbonaceous materials, also binds to silica with high affinity. The interaction can be disrupted with l-lysine or l-arginine, enabling a broad range of technological applications. Previously, we reported that C-terminal Car9 extensions support efficient protein purification on underivatized silica. Here, we show that the Car9 tag is functional and TEV protease-excisable when fused to the N-termini of target proteins, and that it supports affinity purification under denaturing conditions, albeit with reduced yields. We further demonstrate that capture of Car9-tagged proteins is enhanced on small particle size silica gels with large pores, that the concomitant problem of nonspecific protein adsorption can be solved by lysing cells in the presence of 0.3% Tween 20, and that efficient elution is achieved at reduced l-lysine concentrations under alkaline conditions. An optimized small-scale purification kit incorporating the above features allows Car9-tagged proteins to be inexpensively recovered in minutes with better than 90% purity. The Car9 affinity purification technology should prove valuable for laboratory-scale applications requiring rapid access to milligram-quantities of proteins, and for preparative scale purification schemes where cost and productivity are important factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the Iodine Concentration in Serum and Urine of Hypothyroid Males Using an Inexpensive and Rapid Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Abbas Kandhro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to evaluate the iodine/iodide status in biological samples (serum and urine of 172 male hypothyroid patients (HPs and their supplemental effects on thyroid hormones. For comparison purpose, non-goitrous subjects (n= 220 of same age group and socioeconomic status were also studied. A simple and rapid iodide-ion selective electrode (ISE was used to measure the concentration of iodine in microwave assisted acid digested serum and urine samples. Quality control for the methodology was established with certified samples and with those obtained by conventional wet acid digestion method on the same certified reference materials (CRMs and real samples. A linear calibration curve was obtained for a reasonable concentration range of the potassium iodide solutions. The mean concentration of iodine in the serum and urine samples of the HPs was significantly reduced as compared to control male subjects (p< 0.01. The low levels of free triiodothyronine and thyroxin were found in HPs than age matched healthy control (p< 0.005 and 0.002 respectively while high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone were observed in HPs (p< 0.008. The proposed method was relatively efficient as well as cost effective by using inexpensive equipment. It was observed that iodine in biological samples of HPs can play an important role in determining the severity of the hypothyroidism.

  17. Rapid and inexpensive body fluid identification by RNA profiling-based multiplex High Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Positive identification of the nature of biological material present on evidentiary items can be crucial for understanding the circumstances surrounding a crime. However, traditional protein-based methods do not permit the identification of all body fluids and tissues, and thus molecular based strategies for the conclusive identification of all forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues need to be developed. Messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is an example of such a molecular-based approach. Current mRNA body fluid identification assays involve capillary electrophoresis (CE) or quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) platforms, each with its own limitations. Both platforms require the use of expensive fluorescently labeled primers or probes. CE-based assays require separate amplification and detection steps thus increasing the analysis time. For qRT-PCR assays, only 3-4 markers can be included in a single reaction since each requires a different fluorescent dye. To simplify mRNA profiling assays, and reduce the time and cost of analysis, we have developed single- and multiplex body fluid High Resolution Melt (HRM) assays for the identification of common forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues. The incorporated biomarkers include IL19 (vaginal secretions), IL1F7 (skin), ALAS2 (blood), MMP10 (menstrual blood), HTN3 (saliva) and TGM4 (semen).  The HRM assays require only unlabeled PCR primers and a single saturating intercalating fluorescent dye (Eva Green). Each body-fluid-specific marker can easily be identified by the presence of a distinct melt peak. Usually, HRM assays are used to detect variants or isoforms for a single gene target. However, we have uniquely developed duplex and triplex HRM assays to permit the simultaneous detection of multiple targets per reaction. Here we describe the development and initial performance evaluation of the developed HRM assays. The results demonstrate the potential use of HRM assays for rapid, and relatively inexpensive

  18. Toxicity profiling of marine surface sediments: a case study using rapid screening bioassays of exhaustive total extracts, elutriates and passive sampler extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vethaak, A.D.; Hamers, T.; Martinez-Gomez, C.; Kamstra, J.H.; de Weert, J.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Smedes, F.

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out in the framework of the ICON project (Integrated Assessment of Contaminant Impacts on the North Sea) (Hylland et al., 2015) and aimed (1) to evaluate the toxicity of marine sediments using a battery of rapid toxicity bioassays, and; (2) to explore the applicability and

  19. Rapid yeast estrogen bioassays stably expressing human estrogen receptors alpha and beta, and green fluorescent protein: a comparison of different compounds on both receptor types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Helsdingen, J.R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Keijer, J.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we described the construction of a rapid yeast bioassay stably expressing human estrogen receptor (hER) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) in response to estrogens. In the present study, the properties of this assay were further studied by testing a series of estrogenic

  20. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  1. SSR-patchwork: An optimized protocol to obtain a rapid and inexpensive SSR library using first-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maio, Antonietta; De Castro, Olga

    2013-01-01

    We have optimized a version of a microsatellite loci isolation protocol for first-generation sequencing (FGS) technologies. The protocol is optimized to reduce the cost and number of steps, and it combines some procedures from previous simple sequence repeat (SSR) protocols with several key improvements that significantly affect the final yield of the SSR library. This protocol may be accessible for laboratories with a moderate budget or for which next-generation sequencing (NGS) is not readily available. • We drew from classic protocols for library enrichment by digestion, ligation, amplification, hybridization, cloning, and sequencing. Three different systems were chosen: two with very different genome sizes (Galdieria sulphuraria, 10 Mbp; Pancratium maritimum, 30 000 Mbp), and a third with an undetermined genome size (Kochia saxicola). Moreover, we also report the optimization of the sequencing reagents. A good frequency of the obtained microsatellite loci was achieved. • The method presented here is very detailed; comparative tests with other SSR protocols are also reported. This optimized protocol is a promising tool for low-cost genetic studies and the rapid, simple construction of homemade SSR libraries for small and large genomes.

  2. A vesicular stomatitis virus replicon-based bioassay for the rapid and sensitive determination of multi-species type I interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Berger Rentsch

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN comprise a family of cytokines that signal through a common cellular receptor to induce a plethora of genes with antiviral and other activities. Recombinant IFNs are used for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection, multiple sclerosis, and certain malignancies. The capability of type I IFN to suppress virus replication and resultant cytopathic effects is frequently used to measure their bioactivity. However, these assays are time-consuming and require appropriate biosafety containment. In this study, an improved IFN assay is presented which is based on a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV replicon encoding two reporter proteins, firefly luciferase and green fluorescent protein. The vector lacks the essential envelope glycoprotein (G gene of VSV and is propagated on a G protein-expressing transgenic cell line. Several mammalian and avian cells turned out to be susceptible to infection with the complemented replicon particles. Infected cells readily expressed the reporter proteins at high levels five hours post infection. When human fibroblasts were treated with serial dilutions of human IFN-β prior to infection, reporter expression was accordingly suppressed. This method was more sensitive and faster than a classical IFN bioassay based on VSV cytopathic effects. In addition, the antiviral activity of human IFN-λ (interleukin-29, a type III IFN, was determined on Calu-3 cells. Both IFN-β and IFN-λ were acid-stable, but only IFN-β was resistant to alkaline treatment. The antiviral activities of canine, porcine, and avian type I IFN were analysed with cell lines derived from the corresponding species. This safe bioassay will be useful for the rapid and sensitive quantification of multi-species type I IFN and potentially other antiviral cytokines.

  3. Rapid screening of aquatic toxicity of several metal-based nanoparticles using the MetPLATE Trade-Mark-Sign bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, Lok R.; Silva, Thilini [Department of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Dubey, Brajesh, E-mail: bdubey@uoguelph.ca [Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); El Badawy, Amro M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tolaymat, Thabet M. [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Laboratory, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45224 (United States); Scheuerman, Phillip R. [Department of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Current understanding of potential toxicity of engineered nanomaterials to aquatic microorganisms is limited for risk assessment and management. Here we evaluate if the MetPLATE Trade-Mark-Sign test can be used as an effective and rapid screening tool to test for potential aquatic toxicity of various metal-based nanoparticles (NPs). The MetPLATE bioassay is a heavy metal sensitive test based on {beta}-galactosidase activity in Escherichia coli. Five different types of metal-based NPs were screened for toxicity: (1) citrate coated nAg (Citrate-nanosilver), (2) polyvinylpyrrolidone coated nAg (PVP-nAg), (3) uncoated nZnO, (4) uncoated nTiO{sub 2} and (5) 1-Octadecylamine coated CdSe Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs); and compared with their corresponding ionic salt toxicity. Citrate-nAg was further fractionated into clean Citrate-nAg, unclean Citrate-nAg and permeate using a tangential flow filtration (TFF) system to eliminate residual ions and impurities from the stock Citrate-nAg suspension and also to differentiate between ionic- versus nano-specific toxicity. Our results showed that nAg, nZnO and CdSe QDs were less toxic than their corresponding ionic salts tested, while nano- or ionic form of TiO{sub 2} was not toxic as high as 2.5 g L{sup -1} to the MetPLATE Trade-Mark-Sign bacteria. Although coating-dependent toxicity was noticeable between two types of Ag NPs evaluated, particle size and surface charge were not adequate to explain the observed toxicity; hence, the toxicity appeared to be material-specific. Overall, the toxicity followed the trend: CdCl{sub 2} > AgNO{sub 3} > PVP-nAg > unclean Citrate-nAg > clean Citrate-nAg > ZnSO{sub 4} > nZnO > CdSe QDs > nTiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}. These results indicate that an evaluation of {beta}-galactosidase inhibition in MetPLATE Trade-Mark-Sign E. coli can be an important consideration for rapid screening of metal-based NP toxicity, and should facilitate ecological risk assessment of these emerging contaminants. - Highlights

  4. Rapid Extraction and Identification of Maitotoxin and Ciguatoxin-Like Toxins from Caribbean and Pacific Gambierdiscus Using a New Functional Bioassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Lewis

    Full Text Available Ciguatera is a circumtropical disease produced by polyether sodium channel toxins (ciguatoxins that enter the marine food chain and accumulate in otherwise edible fish. Ciguatoxins, as well as potent water-soluble polyethers known as maitotoxins, are produced by certain dinoflagellate species in the genus Gambierdiscus and Fukuyoa spp. in the Pacific but little is known of the potential of related Caribbean species to produce these toxins.We established a simplified procedure for extracting polyether toxins from Gambierdiscus and Fukuyoa spp. based on the ciguatoxin rapid extraction method (CREM. Fractionated extracts from identified Pacific and Caribbean isolates were analysed using a functional bioassay that recorded intracellular calcium changes (Ca2+ in response to sample addition in SH-SY5Y cells. Maitotoxin directly elevated Ca2+i, while low levels of ciguatoxin-like toxins were detected using veratridine to enhance responses.We identified significant maitotoxin production in 11 of 12 isolates analysed, with 6 of 12 producing at least two forms of maitotoxin. In contrast, only 2 Caribbean isolates produced detectable levels of ciguatoxin-like activity despite a detection limit of >30 pM. Significant strain-dependent differences in the levels and types of ciguatoxins and maitotoxins produced by the same Gambierdiscus spp. were also identified.The ability to rapidly identify polyether toxins produced by Gambierdiscus spp. in culture has the potential to distinguish ciguatoxin-producing species prior to large-scale culture and in naturally occurring blooms of Gambierdiscus and Fukuyoa spp. Our results have implications for the evaluation of ciguatera risk associated with Gambierdiscus and related species.

  5. In vitro bioassays to evaluate complex chemical mixtures in recycled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ai; Escher, Beate I; Leusch, Frederic D L; Tang, Janet Y M; Prochazka, Erik; Dong, Bingfeng; Snyder, Erin M; Snyder, Shane A

    2015-09-01

    With burgeoning population and diminishing availability of freshwater resources, the world continues to expand the use of alternative water resources for drinking, and the quality of these sources has been a great concern for the public as well as public health professionals. In vitro bioassays are increasingly being used to enable rapid, relatively inexpensive toxicity screening that can be used in conjunction with analytical chemistry data to evaluate water quality and the effectiveness of water treatment. In this study, a comprehensive bioassay battery consisting of 36 bioassays covering 18 biological endpoints was applied to screen the bioactivity of waters of varying qualities with parallel treatments. Samples include wastewater effluent, ultraviolet light (UV) and/or ozone advanced oxidation processed (AOP) recycled water, and infiltrated recycled groundwater. Based on assay sensitivity and detection frequency in the samples, several endpoints were highlighted in the battery, including assays for genotoxicity, mutagenicity, estrogenic activity, glucocorticoid activity, arylhydrocarbon receptor activity, oxidative stress response, and cytotoxicity. Attenuation of bioactivity was found to be dependent on the treatment process and bioassay endpoint. For instance, ozone technology significantly removed oxidative stress activity, while UV based technologies were most efficient for the attenuation of glucocorticoid activity. Chlorination partially attenuated genotoxicity and greatly decreased herbicidal activity, while groundwater infiltration efficiently attenuated most of the evaluated bioactivity with the exception of genotoxicity. In some cases, bioactivity (e.g., mutagenicity, genotoxicity, and arylhydrocarbon receptor) increased following water treatment, indicating that transformation products of water treatment may be a concern. Furthermore, several types of bioassays with the same endpoint were compared in this study, which could help guide the selection

  6. In vitro bioassays to evaluate complex chemical mixtures in recycled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ai; Escher, Beate I.; Leusch, Frederic D.L.; Tang, Janet Y.M.; Prochazka, Erik; Dong, Bingfeng; Snyder, Erin M.; Snyder, Shane A.

    2016-01-01

    With burgeoning population and diminishing availability of freshwater resources, the world continues to expand the use of alternative water resources for drinking, and the quality of these sources has been a great concern for the public as well as public health professionals. In vitro bioassays are increasingly being used to enable rapid, relatively inexpensive toxicity screening that can be used in conjunction with analytical chemistry data to evaluate water quality and the effectiveness of water treatment. In this study, a comprehensive bioassay battery consisting of 36 bioassays covering 18 biological endpoints was applied to screen the bioactivity of waters of varying qualities with parallel treatments. Samples include wastewater effluent, ultraviolet light (UV) and/or ozone advanced oxidation processed (AOP) recycled water, and infiltrated recycled groundwater. Based on assay sensitivity and detection frequency in the samples, several endpoints were highlighted in the battery, including assays for genotoxicity, mutagenicity, estrogenic activity, glucocorticoid activity, aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity, oxidative stress response, and cytotoxicity. Attenuation of bioactivity was found to be dependent on the treatment process and bioassay endpoint. For instance, ozone technology significantly removed oxidative stress activity, while UV based technologies were most efficient for the attenuation of glucocorticoid activity. Chlorination partially attenuated genotoxicity and greatly decreased herbicidal activity, while groundwater infiltration efficiently attenuated most of the evaluated bioactivity with the exception of genotoxicity. In some cases, bioactivity (e.g., mutagenicity, genotoxicity, and arylhydrocarbon receptor) increased following water treatment, indicating that transformation products of water treatment may be a concern. Furthermore, several types of bioassays with the same endpoint were compared in this study, which could help guide the selection

  7. Rapid Assessment of Stakeholder Concerns about Public Health. An Introduction to a Fast and Inexpensive Approach Applied on Health Concerns about Intensive Animal Production Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ree, Joost; Lebret, Erik

    2017-01-01

    To effectively manage environmental health risks, stakeholders often need to act collectively. Stakeholders vary in their desire to act due to many factors, such as knowledge, risk perception, interests, and worldviews. Understanding their perceptions of the issues at stake is crucial to support the risk governance process. Even though concern assessment is a pivotal element of risk governance, few tools for rapid assessment are reported in the literature. We tested a rapid and relatively cheap approach, taking the Dutch debate on Intensive Animal Production Systems (IAPS) and health as an example. Dutch policy-oriented publications on IAPS and health and ten semi-structured in-depth interviews with a variety of stakeholders were analyzed to identify stakeholders and concerns involved in the Dutch debate about IAPS and health. Concerns were mapped and a stakeholder network was derived. Three classes of concerns were recognized in the discussions about IAPS and health: concerns related to health risks, concerns regarding the activity causing the risks (IAPS), and concerns about the process to control the risks. The notions of ‘trust’ and ‘scientific uncertainty’ appeared as important themes in the discussions. Argumentation based on concerns directly related to health risks, the activity causing the risk (IAPS), and its risk management can easily become muddled up in a societal debate, limiting the development of effective action perspectives. Acknowledging these multiple stakeholder concerns can clarify the positions taken by stakeholders and allow for more and other action perspectives to develop. PMID:29232902

  8. Establishment of a rapid, inexpensive protocol for extraction of high quality RNA from small amounts of strawberry plant tissues and other recalcitrant fruit crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Anastasis; Georgiadou, Egli C; Filippou, Panagiota; Manganaris, George A; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2014-03-01

    Strawberry plant tissues and particularly fruit material are rich in polysaccharides and polyphenolic compounds, thus rendering the isolation of nucleic acids a difficult task. This work describes the successful modification of a total RNA extraction protocol, which enables the isolation of high quantity and quality of total RNA from small amounts of strawberry leaf, root and fruit tissues. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of GAPDH housekeeping gene from isolated RNA further supports the proposed protocol efficiency and its use for downstream molecular applications. This novel procedure was also successfully followed using other fruit tissues, such as olive and kiwifruit. In addition, optional treatment with RNase A following initial nucleic acid extraction can provide sufficient quality and quality of genomic DNA for subsequent PCR analyses, as evidenced from PCR amplification of housekeeping genes using extracted genomic DNA as template. Overall, this optimized protocol allows easy, rapid and economic isolation of high quality RNA from small amounts of an important fruit crop, such as strawberry, with extended applicability to other recalcitrant fruit crops. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluorescent bioassays for toxic metals in milk and yoghurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiki Mohammad Shohel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From a human health viewpoint, contaminated milk and its products could be a source of long-term exposure to toxic metals. Simple, inexpensive, and on-site assays would enable constant monitoring of their contents. Bioassays that can measure toxic metals in milk or yoghurt might reduce the risk. For this purpose, the green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged trans factors, ArsR-GFP and CadC-GFP, together with their cis elements were used to develop such bioassays. Results ArsR-GFP or CadC-GFP, which binds either toxic metal or DNA fragment including cis element, was directly mixed with cow’s milk or yoghurt within a neutral pH range. The fluorescence of GFP, which is reflected by the association/dissociation ratio between cis element and trans factor, significantly changed with increasing externally added As (III or Cd (II whereas smaller responses to externally added Pb (II and Zn (II were found. Preparation and dilution of whey fraction at low pH were essential to intrinsic zinc quantification using CadC-GFP. Using the extraction procedure and bioassay, intrinsic Zn (II concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 4.8 mg/l for milk brands and from 1.2 to 2.9 mg/kg for yoghurt brands were determined, which correlated to those determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Conclusions GFP-tagged bacterial trans factors and cis elements can work in the neutralized whole composition and diluted whey fraction of milk and yoghurt. The feature of regulatory elements is advantageous for establishment of simple and rapid assays of toxic metals in dairy products.

  10. Fluorescent bioassays for toxic metals in milk and yoghurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Ueda, Shunsaku; Maeda, Isamu

    2012-10-25

    From a human health viewpoint, contaminated milk and its products could be a source of long-term exposure to toxic metals. Simple, inexpensive, and on-site assays would enable constant monitoring of their contents. Bioassays that can measure toxic metals in milk or yoghurt might reduce the risk. For this purpose, the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged trans factors, ArsR-GFP and CadC-GFP, together with their cis elements were used to develop such bioassays. ArsR-GFP or CadC-GFP, which binds either toxic metal or DNA fragment including cis element, was directly mixed with cow's milk or yoghurt within a neutral pH range. The fluorescence of GFP, which is reflected by the association/dissociation ratio between cis element and trans factor, significantly changed with increasing externally added As (III) or Cd (II) whereas smaller responses to externally added Pb (II) and Zn (II) were found. Preparation and dilution of whey fraction at low pH were essential to intrinsic zinc quantification using CadC-GFP. Using the extraction procedure and bioassay, intrinsic Zn (II) concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 4.8 mg/l for milk brands and from 1.2 to 2.9 mg/kg for yoghurt brands were determined, which correlated to those determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. GFP-tagged bacterial trans factors and cis elements can work in the neutralized whole composition and diluted whey fraction of milk and yoghurt. The feature of regulatory elements is advantageous for establishment of simple and rapid assays of toxic metals in dairy products.

  11. Rapid and inexpensive body fluid identification by RNA profiling-based multiplex High Resolution Melt (HRM analysis [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2hj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K. Hanson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Positive identification of the nature of biological material present on evidentiary items can be crucial for understanding the circumstances surrounding a crime. However, traditional protein-based methods do not permit the identification of all body fluids and tissues, and thus molecular based strategies for the conclusive identification of all forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues need to be developed. Messenger RNA (mRNA profiling is an example of such a molecular-based approach. Current mRNA body fluid identification assays involve capillary electrophoresis (CE or quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR platforms, each with its own limitations. Both platforms require the use of expensive fluorescently labeled primers or probes. CE-based assays require separate amplification and detection steps thus increasing the analysis time. For qRT-PCR assays, only 3-4 markers can be included in a single reaction since each requires a different fluorescent dye. To simplify mRNA profiling assays, and reduce the time and cost of analysis, we have developed single- and multiplex body fluid High Resolution Melt (HRM assays for the identification of common forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues. The incorporated biomarkers include IL19 (vaginal secretions, IL1F7 (skin, ALAS2 (blood, MMP10 (menstrual blood, HTN3 (saliva and TGM4 (semen.  The HRM assays require only unlabeled PCR primers and a single saturating intercalating fluorescent dye (Eva Green. Each body-fluid-specific marker can easily be identified by the presence of a distinct melt peak. Usually, HRM assays are used to detect variants or isoforms for a single gene target. However, we have uniquely developed duplex and triplex HRM assays to permit the simultaneous detection of multiple targets per reaction. Here we describe the development and initial performance evaluation of the developed HRM assays. The results demonstrate the potential use of HRM assays for rapid, and relatively

  12. Rapid and inexpensive body fluid identification by RNA profiling-based multiplex High Resolution Melt (HRM analysis [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/314

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K. Hanson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Positive identification of the nature of biological material present on evidentiary items can be crucial for understanding the circumstances surrounding a crime. However, traditional protein-based methods do not permit the identification of all body fluids and tissues, and thus molecular based strategies for the conclusive identification of all forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues need to be developed. Messenger RNA (mRNA profiling is an example of such a molecular-based approach. Current mRNA body fluid identification assays involve capillary electrophoresis (CE or quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR platforms, each with its own limitations. Both platforms require the use of expensive fluorescently labeled primers or probes. CE-based assays require separate amplification and detection steps thus increasing the analysis time. For qRT-PCR assays, only 3-4 markers can be included in a single reaction since each requires a different fluorescent dye. To simplify mRNA profiling assays, and reduce the time and cost of analysis, we have developed single- and multiplex body fluid High Resolution Melt (HRM assays for the identification of common forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues. The incorporated biomarkers include IL19 (vaginal secretions, IL1F7 (skin, ALAS2 (blood, MMP10 (menstrual blood, HTN3 (saliva and TGM4 (semen.  The HRM assays require only unlabeled PCR primers and a single saturating intercalating fluorescent dye (Eva Green. Each body-fluid-specific marker can easily be identified by the presence of a distinct melt peak. Usually, HRM assays are used to detect variants or isoforms for a single gene target. However, we have uniquely developed duplex and triplex HRM assays to permit the simultaneous detection of multiple targets per reaction. Here we describe the development and initial performance evaluation of the developed HRM assays. The results demonstrate the potential use of HRM assays for rapid, and relatively

  13. Development of a rapid and sensitive battery of bioassays for risk assessment of cyanobacterial microcystin-LR in drinking water of rural water treatment plants, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oberholster, Paul J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available become necessary to assess and develop additional methods that are rapid, yet realistic and cheap for the detection of cyanobacterial toxins in drinking water of rural conventional water treatment plants in South Africa. A well-known cyanobacterial...

  14. Translation-dependent bioassay for amino acid quantification using auxotrophic microbes as biocatalysts of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameya, Masafumi; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-03-01

    Bioassay for amino acid quantification is an important technology for a variety of fields, which allows for easy, inexpensive, and high-throughput analyses. Here, we describe a novel translation-dependent bioassay for the quantification of amino acids. For this, the gene encoding firefly luciferase was introduced into Lactococcus lactis auxotrophic to Glu, His, Ile, Leu, Pro, Val, and Arg. After a preculture where luciferase expression was repressed, the cells were mixed with analytes, synthetic medium, and an inducer for luciferase expression. Luminescence response to the target amino acid appeared just after mixing, and linear standard curves for these amino acids were obtained during 15-60-min incubation periods. The rapid quantification of amino acids has neither been reported in previous works on bioassays nor is it theoretically feasible with conventional methods, which require incubation times of more than 4 h to allow for the growth of the microbe used. In contrast, our assay was shown to depend on protein translation, rather than on cell growth. Furthermore, replacement of the luciferase gene with that of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or β-galactosidase allowed for fluorescent and colorimetric detection of the amino acids, respectively. Significantly, when a Gln-auxotrophic Escherichia coli mutant was created and transformed by a luciferase expression plasmid, a linear standard curve for Gln was observed in 15 min. These results demonstrate that this methodology can provide versatile bioassays by adopting various combinations of marker genes and host strains according to the analytes and experimental circumstances.

  15. Photodynamic bioassay of polycyclic air pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, S.S.; Small, M.; Koplan, J.; Mantel, N.; Falk, H.L.; Sawicki, E.

    1963-11-01

    Fifteen fractions of organic atmospheric particulates from several American cities were bioassayed for photodynamic activity using paramecium caudatum and results obtained were expressed as apparent potencies relative to an arbitrary benoz(a)pyrene standard. All six crude benzene extracts assayed showed photodynamic activity, with a correlation evident between apparent relative potencies as determined by bioassay, and benzo(a)pyrene concentrations as determined by chemical analysis. Five aliphatic fractions were photodynamically inactive. The single aromatic fraction tested had high activity. Three oxygenated fractions showed photodynamic activity, despite the absence from them of benzo(a)pyrene and other polycyclic hydrocarbons of known structure commonly found in atmospheric particulates. Such oxygenated fractions are reportedly carcinogenic. This pilot study suggests that photodynamic bioassay may provide a rapid, simple, and economical biological index of potential carcinogenic hazard attributable to polycyclic hydrocarbons. The utility of the assay for this purpose should be further evaluated. 14 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  16. An Inexpensive Digital Infrared Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive webcam to a camera specifically sensitive to the near infrared (700-1000 nm). Some experiments and practical applications are suggested and illustrated. (Contains 9 figures.)

  17. A rapid and reagent-free bioassay for the detection of dioxin-like compounds and other aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists using autobioluminescent yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Young, Anna; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven; Close, Dan

    2018-02-01

    An autonomously bioluminescent Saccharomyces cerevisiae BLYAhS bioreporter was developed in this study for the simple and rapid detection of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. This recombinant yeast reporter was based on a synthetic bacterial luciferase reporter gene cassette (lux) that can produce the luciferase as well as the enzymes capable of self-synthesizing the requisite substrates for bioluminescent production from endogenous cellular metabolites. As a result, bioluminescent signal production is generated continuously and autonomously without cell lysis or exogenous reagent addition. By linking the expression of the autobioluminescent lux reporter cassette to AhR activation via the use of a dioxin-responsive promoter, the S. cerevisiae BLYAhS bioreporter emitted a bioluminescent signal in response to DLC exposure in a dose-responsive manner. The model dioxin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), could be detected within 4 h with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of ~ 8.1 nM and a lower detection limit of 500 pM. The autobioluminescent response of BLYAhS to other AhR agonists, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF), polychlorinated bisphenyl congener 126 (PCB-126) and 169 (PCB-169), 1,2,3,6,7,8-hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (HxCDD), 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (HpCDD), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and β-naphthoflavone (bNF), were also characterized in this study. The non-destructive and reagent-free nature of the BLYAhS reporter assay facilitated near-continuous, automated signal acquisition without additional hands-on effort and cost, providing a simple and cost-effective method for rapid DLC detection.

  18. Direct immobilization of DNA probes on non-modified plastics by UV irradiation and integration in microfluidic devices for rapid bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan; Dufva, Martin; Sabourin, David; Bang, Dang Duong; Høgberg, Jonas; Wolff, Anders

    2012-01-01

    DNA microarrays have become one of the most powerful tools in the field of genomics and medical diagnosis. Recently, there has been increased interest in combining microfluidics with microarrays since this approach offers advantages in terms of portability, reduced analysis time, low consumption of reagents, and increased system integration. Polymers are widely used for microfluidic systems, but fabrication of microarrays on such materials often requires complicated chemical surface modifications, which hinders the integration of microarrays into microfluidic systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that simple UV irradiation can be used to directly immobilize poly(T)poly(C)-tagged DNA oligonucleotide probes on many different types of plastics without any surface modification. On average, five- and fourfold improvement in immobilization and hybridization efficiency have been achieved compared to surface-modified slides with aminated DNA probes. Moreover, the TC tag only costs 30% of the commonly used amino group modifications. Using this microarray fabrication technique, a portable cyclic olefin copolymer biochip containing eight individually addressable microfluidic channels was developed and used for rapid and parallel identification of Avian Influenza Virus by DNA hybridization. The one-step, cost-effective DNA-linking method on non-modified polymers significantly simplifies microarray fabrication procedures and permits great flexibility to plastic material selection, thus making it convenient to integrate microarrays into plastic microfluidic systems.

  19. Water Powered Bioassay System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    capillary micropump 27 Figure 30: Slow dripping/separation of a droplet from a capillary 4.1.5 Micro Osmotic Pumping Nano Droplet...stored and delivered fluidic pressure and, with a combination of pumps and valves, formed the basic micro fluidic processing unit. The addition of...System, Microvalve, Micro -Accumulator, Micro Dialysis Needle, Bioassay System, Water Activated, Micro Osmotic Pump 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY

  20. Water quality bioassay using selected protozoa. I. [Paramecium candatum; Amoeba proteus; Euglena gracilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    The suitability of certain species of protozoa as indicators of water quality has been determined. Experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions to standardize a bioassay procedure for water quality using either Paramecium caudatum, Amoeba proteus, or Euglena gracilis as the indicator organism. The bioassay, which consists of exposing the organisms to a known concentration of pollutant under laboratory conditions, followed by microscopic observation to establish the time of death, affords a reliable, convenient and inexpensive way to monitor for water quality.

  1. Photodynamic bioassay of polycyclic atmospheric pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, S.S.; Small, M.; Sawicki, E.; Falk, H.L.

    1965-04-01

    A photodynamic bioassay which can be conducted on one mgm amounts of organic atmospheric particulates is described, using Paramecium caudatum. The results of a pilot study on pollutants from several American cities indicate that the assay may provide a rapid, simple and economical biological index of a potential carcinogenic hazard attributable to polycyclic compounds. The utility of the assay for this purpose is under further evaluation. 15 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  2. An inexpensive sensor for noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Laura; Tatum, Marcus; Thomas, Geb; Sousan, Sinan; Koehler, Kirsten; Peters, Thomas

    2018-02-08

    Noise is a pervasive workplace hazard that varies spatially and temporally. The cost of direct-reading instruments for noise hampers their use in a network. The objectives for this work were to (1) develop an inexpensive noise sensor (noise sensors for use in an inexpensive sensor network. The inexpensive noise sensor consists of an electret condenser microphone, an amplifier circuit, and a microcontroller with a small form factor (28 mm by 47 mm by 9 mm) than can be operated as a stand-alone unit. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate 50 of the new sensors at 5 sound levels: (1) ambient sound in a quiet office; (2) a pink noise test signal from 65 to 85 dBA in 10 dBA increments; and (3) 94 dBA using a SLM calibrator. Ninety-four percent of the noise sensors (n = 46) were within ± 2 dBA of the SLM for sound levels from 65 dBA to 94 dBA. As sound level increased, bias decreased, ranging from 18.3% in the quiet office to 0.48% at 94 dBA. Overall bias of the sensors was 0.83% across the 75 dBA to 94 dBA range. These sensors are available for a variety of uses and can be customized for many applications, including incorporation into a stationary sensor network for continuous monitoring of noise in manufacturing environments.

  3. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  5. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to study 354 consumer items using the cobalt spot test. Cobalt release was assessed to obtain a risk estimate of cobalt allergy and dermatitis in consumers who would wear the jewellery. Methods: The cobalt spot test was used to assess cobalt release from all items....... Microstructural characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results: Cobalt release was found in 4 (1.1%) of 354 items. All these had a dark appearance. SEM/EDS was performed on the four dark appearing items which showed tin-cobalt plating on these....... Conclusions: This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future...

  6. Potential uses of sea urchin embryos for identifying toxic chemicals: description of a bioassay incorporating cytologic, cytogenetic and embryologic endpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hose, J.E.

    1985-08-01

    A method for evaluating pollutant genotoxicity, embryotoxicity and teratogenicity using sea urchin embryos has been developed and was tested using benzo(a)pyrene (BP). Initial results suggested that the bioassay may be a sensitive indicator of pollutant toxicity and mutagenicity since several endpoints can be simultaneously assessed. The bioassay is rapid, inexpensive and appears applicable to a variety of toxicants and delivery methods. The test is based upon the standard 48 h sea urchin development assay and incorporates cytologic-cytogenetic analysis of embryos. Following toxic exposure of gametes, fertilization success is assessed. Embryos then develop for 48 h at which time survival and teratogenesis are evaluated. A subsample of embryos is stained and dissociated into monolayers and mitotic configurations are examined using light microscopy. Embryo mitotic rates are used as an indicator of overall embryonic health. Cytotoxic effects are concomitantly evaluated. Genotoxicity is measured using two methods: (1) anaphase aberration analysis, a technique which assesses abnormalities in the chromosome configurations (such as bridges and fragments) as the groups of chromosomes move to opposite poles and (2) micronucleus formation, a procedure examining the incidence of smaller, secondary nuclei composed of whole chromosomes or chromatid fragments.

  7. An emergency bioassay method for actinides in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiongxin; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila

    2011-08-01

    A rapid bioassay method has been developed for the sequential measurements of actinides in human urine samples. The method involves actinide separation from a urine matrix by co-precipitation with hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO), followed by anion exchange and extraction chromatography column purification, and final counting by alpha spectrometry after cerium fluoride micro-precipitation. The minimal detectable activities for the method were determined to be 20 mBq L(-1) or less for plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes, with an 8-h sample turn-around time. Spike tests showed that this method would meet the requirements for actinide bioassay following a radiation emergency.

  8. Development and characterization of a green fluorescent protein-based rat cell bioassay system for detection of AH receptor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Bin; Denison, M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Proper epidemiological, risk assessment and exposure analysis of TCDD and related HAHs requires accurate measurements of these chemicals both in the species of interest and in various exposure matrices (i.e. biological, environmental, food and feed). While high-resolution instrumental analysis techniques are established for these chemicals, these procedures are very costly, time-consuming and are impractical for large scale sampling studies. Accordingly, numerous bioanalytical methods have been developed for the detection of these chemicals in extracts from a variety of matrices, the majority of which take the advantage of the ability of these chemicals to activate one or more aspects of the AhR-dependent mechanism of action. One of the most sensitive bioassay systems developed to date is the so-called CALUX (Chemically Activated Luciferase Expression) assay, which is based on novel recombinant cell lines that contain a stably transfected dioxin (AhR)-responsive firefly luciferase gene. Treatment of these cells with TCDD and related HAHs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as well as other AhR ligands, results in induction of reporter gene expression in a time-, dose-, AhR-, and chemical-specific manner. The level of reporter gene expression correlates with the total concentration of the TCDD-like AhR inducers (agonists) present in the sample. Although the firefly luciferase reporter gene contributes to the high degree of sensitivity of the assay, it also has limitations with respect to our need for a rapid and inexpensive bioassay for high-throughput screening analysis. Accordingly, we previously developed a stably transfected murine cell line containing an AhRresponsive enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene. This cell line provided us with a high-throughput cell bioassay system for identification and characterization of AhR agonists and antagonists. Here we have extended these studies and describe the development, optimization, and

  9. RESEARCH NOTE A Universal, rapid, and inexpensive method for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    very satisfactory for many researchers to prepare reagents for “all in one” ready to use method to extract gDNA from very wide range sources of blood samples. To meet these criteria, a universal and versatile DNA extraction procedure should be developedwith a minimal chemicals and equipment.On the other hand, the ...

  10. A universal, rapid, and inexpensive method for genomic DNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reagents for 'all in one' / ready to use tool to extract genomic. DNA (gDNA) from a very wide spectrum of blood samples. To meet these criteria, a universal and versatile DNA extrac- tion procedure should be developed with minimal chemicals and equipment. On the other hand, the interesting natural relation between RBCs ...

  11. Virtual screening of bioassay data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierz, Amanda C

    2009-12-22

    There are three main problems associated with the virtual screening of bioassay data. The first is access to freely-available curated data, the second is the number of false positives that occur in the physical primary screening process, and finally the data is highly-imbalanced with a low ratio of Active compounds to Inactive compounds. This paper first discusses these three problems and then a selection of Weka cost-sensitive classifiers (Naive Bayes, SVM, C4.5 and Random Forest) are applied to a variety of bioassay datasets. Pharmaceutical bioassay data is not readily available to the academic community. The data held at PubChem is not curated and there is a lack of detailed cross-referencing between Primary and Confirmatory screening assays. With regard to the number of false positives that occur in the primary screening process, the analysis carried out has been shallow due to the lack of cross-referencing mentioned above. In six cases found, the average percentage of false positives from the High-Throughput Primary screen is quite high at 64%. For the cost-sensitive classification, Weka's implementations of the Support Vector Machine and C4.5 decision tree learner have performed relatively well. It was also found, that the setting of the Weka cost matrix is dependent on the base classifier used and not solely on the ratio of class imbalance. Understandably, pharmaceutical data is hard to obtain. However, it would be beneficial to both the pharmaceutical industry and to academics for curated primary screening and corresponding confirmatory data to be provided. Two benefits could be gained by employing virtual screening techniques to bioassay data. First, by reducing the search space of compounds to be screened and secondly, by analysing the false positives that occur in the primary screening process, the technology may be improved. The number of false positives arising from primary screening leads to the issue of whether this type of data should be used for

  12. Virtual screening of bioassay data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schierz Amanda C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are three main problems associated with the virtual screening of bioassay data. The first is access to freely-available curated data, the second is the number of false positives that occur in the physical primary screening process, and finally the data is highly-imbalanced with a low ratio of Active compounds to Inactive compounds. This paper first discusses these three problems and then a selection of Weka cost-sensitive classifiers (Naive Bayes, SVM, C4.5 and Random Forest are applied to a variety of bioassay datasets. Results Pharmaceutical bioassay data is not readily available to the academic community. The data held at PubChem is not curated and there is a lack of detailed cross-referencing between Primary and Confirmatory screening assays. With regard to the number of false positives that occur in the primary screening process, the analysis carried out has been shallow due to the lack of cross-referencing mentioned above. In six cases found, the average percentage of false positives from the High-Throughput Primary screen is quite high at 64%. For the cost-sensitive classification, Weka's implementations of the Support Vector Machine and C4.5 decision tree learner have performed relatively well. It was also found, that the setting of the Weka cost matrix is dependent on the base classifier used and not solely on the ratio of class imbalance. Conclusions Understandably, pharmaceutical data is hard to obtain. However, it would be beneficial to both the pharmaceutical industry and to academics for curated primary screening and corresponding confirmatory data to be provided. Two benefits could be gained by employing virtual screening techniques to bioassay data. First, by reducing the search space of compounds to be screened and secondly, by analysing the false positives that occur in the primary screening process, the technology may be improved. The number of false positives arising from primary screening leads to

  13. The use of acute and chronic bioassays to determine the ecological risk and bioremediation efficiency of oil-polluted soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, C A; van der Waarde, J J; Derksen, J G; van der Hoek, E E; Veul, M F; Bouwens, S; Rusch, B; Kronenburg, R; Stokman, G N

    2001-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of acute and chronic bioassays for the ecological risk assessment of polluted soils, soil samples from a site with an historical mineral oil contamination (Petroleum Harbour in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, were screened for ecological effects using acute and chronic bioassays. A two-step 0.001 M Ca(NO3)2 extraction at a final solution-to-soil ratio of 1:1 was used to prepare extracts for the acute bioassays. Acute bioassays (Daphnia magna), and the Microtox test (Vibrio fischeri). Chronic bioassays (four weeks) performed on the same soil samples included tests with L. sativa, F. candida, and earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and the bait-lamina test (substrate consumption). The acute bioassays on Microtox showed a response that corresponded with the level of oil pollution. All other acute bioassays did not show such a consistent response, probably because pollutant levels were too low to cause acute effects. All chronic bioassays showed sublethal responses according to the contaminant levels (oil and in some soils also metals). This shows that chronic bioassays on soil samples are more sensitive in assessing the toxicity of mineral oil contamination in soil than acute bioassays on soil extracts. A pilot scale bioremediation study on soils taken from the two most polluted sites and a control site showed a rapid decline of oil concentrations to reach a stable level within eight weeks. Acute bioassays applied to the soils, using Microtox, algae, and D. magna, and chronic bioassays, using plants, Collembola, earthworms, and bait-lamina consumption, in all cases showed a rapid reduction of toxicity, which could be attributed to the degradation of light oil fractions.

  14. Potential uses of sea urchin embryos for identifying toxic chemicals: description of a bioassay incorporating cytologic, cytogenetic and embryologic endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hose, J E

    1985-08-01

    A method for evaluating pollutant genotoxicity, embryotoxicity and teratogenicity using sea urchin embryos has been developed and was tested using benzo(a)pyrene (BP). Initial results suggested that the bioassay may be a sensitive indicator of pollutant toxicity and mutagenicity since several endpoints can be simultaneously assessed. The bioassay is rapid, inexpensive and appears applicable to a variety of toxicants and delivery methods. The test is based upon the standard 48 h sea urchin development assay and incorporates cytologic-cytogenetic analysis of embryos. Following toxic exposure of gametes, fertilization success is assessed. Embryos then develop for 48 h at which time survival and teratogenesis are evaluated. A subsample of embryos is stained and dissociated into monolayers and mitotic configurations are examined using light microscopy. Embryo mitotic rates are used as an indicator of overall embryonic health. Cytotoxic effects are concomitantly evaluated. Genotoxicity is measured using two methods: (1) anaphase aberration analysis, a technique which assesses abnormalities in the chromosome configurations (such as bridges and fragments) as the groups of chromosomes move to opposite poles and (2) micronucleus formation, a procedure examining the incidence of smaller, secondary nuclei composed of whole chromosomes or chromatid fragments. These two measurements preclude the need to examine individual chromosomes for deletions and exchanges, a laborious process in most aquatic organisms which possess numerous relatively small chromosomes. This genotoxicity-teratogenicity test appears promising for laboratory evaluations of individual substances or of complex chemical mixtures as well as for environmental monitoring of nearshore areas. The standard development assay has been used to screen pharmaceuticals and environmental contaminants and some recent investigations have included mitotic aberration analysis. Experiments in our laboratory suggest that the

  15. Inflation Fighters: An Inexpensive Du Nuoy Tensiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sheldon H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive tensiometer, a balance consisting of a plastic drinking straw as the crossarm, a needle as a pivot, and wire loop counter balance to assure proper balance. The instrument permits the quantitative demonstration of interfacial tension and effects of various agents that modify it. (Author/JN)

  16. Two-generation saccharin bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D L

    1983-04-01

    The controversy regarding the safety of saccharin for human consumption started shortly after its discovery over 100 years ago and has yet to subside appreciably. The consumption of saccharin, particularly in North America, began to escalate when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration set new standards of identity which allowed foods containing artificial sweeteners to be promoted as "nonnutritive" or "noncaloric" sweeteners for use by the general public. In 1969, when cyclamates were banned, at least 10 single-generation feeding studies were undertaken with saccharin to more accurately assess the potential toxicological consequences resulting from the anticipated increase in its consumption. None of these studies resulted in any overt regulatory action. Subsequently, the introduction of the two-generation chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity bioassay added a new tool to the toxicologist's arsenal. Three two-generation studies using saccharin have since been conducted. The results from these studies clearly show that when rats were exposed to diets containing 5 or 7.5% sodium saccharin from the time of conception to death, an increased frequency of urinary bladder cancers was found, predominantly in the males. While some study results suggested that impurities in commercial saccharin or the presence of urinary tract calculi may have been responsible for the observed bladder tumors, it now appears that these possibilities are highly unlikely. The mechanism by which saccharin elicited the bladder tumors using the two-generation experiment has not been ascertained.

  17. High Accuracy Optical Inverse Square Law Experiment Using Inexpensive Light to Frequency Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanser, Keith H.; Mahrley, Steve; Tanner, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report on the use of two different light to frequency converters, four different light sources, three of which are novel and inexpensive, and a hand held digital multimeter with a frequency counter, suitable for making accurate and rapid determination of the optical inverse square law exponent of -2 to better than [plus or…

  18. Response Characterization of an Inexpensive Aerosol Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuula, Joel; Mäkelä, Timo; Hillamo, Risto; Timonen, Hilkka

    2017-12-15

    Inexpensive aerosol sensors have been considered as a complementary option to address the issue of expensive but low spatial coverage air quality monitoring networks. However, the accuracy and response characteristics of these sensors is poorly documented. In this study, inexpensive Shinyei PPD42NS and PPD60PV sensors were evaluated using a novel laboratory evaluation method. A continuously changing monodisperse size distribution of particles was generated using a Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator. Furthermore, the laboratory results were validated in a field experiment. The laboratory tests showed that both of the sensors responded to particulate mass (PM) concentration stimulus, rather than number concentration. The highest detection efficiency for the PPD42NS was within particle size range of 2.5-4 µm, and the respective optimal size range for the PPD60PV was 0.7-1 µm. The field test yielded high PM correlations (R² = 0.962 and R² = 0.986) for viable detection ranges of 1.6-5 and 0.3-1.6 µm, when compared to a medium cost optical dust monitor. As the size distribution of atmospheric particles tends to be bimodal, it is likely that indicatively valid results could be obtained for the PM 10-2.5 size fraction (particulate mass in size range 2.5-10 µm) with the PPD42NS sensor. Respectively, the PPD60PV could possibly be used to measure the PM 2.5 size fraction (particulate mass in size below 2.5 µm).

  19. A Colorimetric Bioassay for Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinnickel, M. L.; Smith, S.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Recognition of perchlorate (ClO4-) as a widespread contaminant across the United States and its potential adverse affects towards human health has motivated the EPA to place ClO4- on its contaminant candidate list for drinking water supplies. While a federal MCL has not yet been set, a recommended public health goal of 1 ppb (μg.L-1) was established by the US EPA in 2002. To date, methods of detection require use of sensitive ion chromatographic equipment that are expensive, time consuming, and require highly trained personnel for use. Our studies are focused on the development of a highly sensitive, simple, and robust colorimetric bioassay based on the primary enzyme involved in microbial ClO4- reduction, the perchlorate reductase (Pcr). A previously published assay used reduced methyl viologen (MV, the dye is reduced with sodium hydrosulfite) as an electron donor to demonstrate Pcr activity. The assay directly correlates the amount of MV oxidized with the amount of ClO4- reduced by assuming a transfer of four electrons. To test this assumption, we compared actual concentrations of MV oxidized to ClO4- reduced in this assay. ClO4- concentrations were determined using a Dionex ICS-500 ion chromatography system, while MV concentrations were determined using a standard curve generated at 578 nm. Comparisons between the two revealed that twelve molecules of MV were oxidized for each molecule of ClO4- reduced. The oxidation of these additional eight MV molecules is explained by the interaction of the dye with chlorite (the product of the Pcr reaction) and other contaminants that could be present in the enzyme prep. This unsettling result indicated this assay would be problematic for the detection of ClO4- in soil, which has many chemicals that could react with MV. To improve upon this assay, we have tried to reduce ClO4- using less reactive dyes and reductants. The reductants ascorbic acid, NADH, and dithiothreitol drive Pcr catalyzed ClO4- reduction, however, they

  20. Rapid bioassay to screen potential biopesticides in Tenebrio molitor larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simplified assay was devised to evaluate the response of Tenebrio molitor larvae to potential insect control products. The assay incorporates punched disks of flattened whole-grain bread placed in 96-well plates, with treatments applied topically, and neonate larvae added to each well. To evalua...

  1. Review of Bioassays for Monitoring Fate and Transport ofEstrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CGCampbell@lbl.gov

    2004-01-30

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are recognizedcontaminants threatening water quality. Despite efforts in sourceidentification, few strategies exist for characterization or treatment ofthis environmental pollution. Given that there are numerous EDCs that cannegatively affect humans and wildlife, general screening techniques likebioassays and biosensors provide an essential rapid and intensiveanalysis capacity. Commonly applied bioassays include the ELISA and YESassays, but promising technologies include ER-CALUXa, ELRA, Endotecta,RIANA, and IR-bioamplification. Two biosensors, Endotecta and RIANA, arefield portable using non-cellular biological detection strategies.Environmental management of EDCs in water requires integration ofbiosensors and bioassays for monitoring and assessment.

  2. A Simple, Inexpensive Acoustic Levitation Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schappe, R. Scott; Barbosa, Cinthya

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic levitation uses a resonant ultrasonic standing wave to suspend small objects; it is used in a variety of research disciplines, particularly in the study of phase transitions and materials susceptible to contamination, or as a stabilization mechanism in microgravity environments. The levitation equipment used for such research is quite costly; we wanted to develop a simple, inexpensive system to demonstrate this visually striking example of standing waves. A search of the literature produced only one article relevant to creating such an apparatus, but the authors' approach uses a test tube, which limits the access to the standing wave. Our apparatus, shown in Fig. 1, can levitate multiple small (1-2 mm) pieces of expanded polystyrene (Styrofoam) using components readily available to most instructors of introductory physics. Acoustic levitation occurs in small, stable equilibrium locations where the weight of the object is balanced by the acoustic radiation force created by an ultrasonic standing wave; these locations are slightly below the pressure nodes. The levitation process also creates a horizontal restoring force. Since the pressure nodes are also velocity antinodes, this transverse stability may be analogous to the effect of an upward air stream supporting a ball.

  3. Inexpensive Complex Hand Model Twenty Years Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenger, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Twenty years ago the author unveiled his inexpensive complex hand model, which reproduced every motion of the human hand. A control system programmed in the Forth language operated its actuators and sensors. Follow-on papers for this popular project were next presented in Texas, Canada and Germany. From this hand grew the author’s meter-tall robot (nicknamed ANNIE: Android With Neural Networks, Intellect and Emotions). It received machine vision, facial expressiveness, speech synthesis and speech recognition; a simian version also received a dexterous ape foot. New artificial intelligence features included op-amp neurons for OCR and simulated emotions, hormone emulation, endocannabinoid receptors, fear-trust-love mechanisms, a Grandmother Cell recognizer and artificial consciousness. Simulated illnesses included narcotic addiction, autism, PTSD, fibromyalgia and Alzheimer’s disease. The author gave 13 robotics-AI presentations at NASA in Houston since 2006. A meter-tall simian robot was proposed with gripping hand-feet for use with space vehicles and to explore distant planets and moons. Also proposed were: intelligent motorized exoskeletons for astronaut force multiplication; a cognitive prosthesis to detect and alleviate decreased crew mental performance; and a gynoid robot medic to tend astronauts in deep space missions. What began as a complex hand model evolved into an innovative robot-AI within two decades.

  4. Development by flow cytometry of bioassays based on chlorella for environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrescu C-M,

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In ecotoxicological assessments, bioassays (ecotoxicity tests or biotests are one of the main tools, defined as methods which use living cells, tissues, organism or communities to assess exposure-related effects of chemicals. The increasing complexity of environmental degradation requires an increase in the capacity of scientific approach in monitoring and notification as early as possible risks. Our own objective concerns the detection of aquatic environment pollution in Romania and particularly in the Danube basin. For assessing aquatic environment pollution degree or for assessing cytotoxicity or ecotoxicity of pollutants (heavy metals, nanoparticles, pesticides, etc. we developed news experimental bioassays based on the use of viability and apoptosis biomarkers of Chlorella cells by flow cytometry. Our proposed bioassays could be rapid and very sensitive tests for in laboratory aquatic risk assessment and biomonitoring.

  5. Shielded corneosurfametry and corneoxenometry: novel bioassays for the assessment of skin barrier products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    1998-01-01

    One of the most frequent occupational and environmental insults to the skin is linked to chronic exposure to weak irritants. There is a need for new predictive tests assessing the efficacy of barrier creams. Shielded variants of corneosurfametry and corneoxenometry are introduced as novel ex vivo bioassays applicable for comparing protection to surfactants and organic solvents. Both bioassays showed good reproducibility for each offending agent and skin-protective products. Significant differences in efficacy were indicated between the presumptive barrier products. Shielded corneosurfametry and corneoxenometry may be convenient bioassays to compare the protection afforded by topical products against specific offending compounds to the skin. They avoid animal testing and toxicological hazards in human testing. In addition, they are cheap, rapid and reproducible.

  6. Comparison of solid-phase bioassays and ecoscores to evaluate the toxicity of contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lors, Christine [Universite Lille Nord de France, 1bis rue Georges Lefevre, 59044 Lille Cedex (France); Ecole des Mines de Douai, MPE-GCE, 941 rue Charles-Bourseul, 59500 Douai (France); Centre National de Recherche sur les Sites et Sols Pollues, 930 Boulevard Lahure, BP 537, 59505 Douai Cedex (France); Ponge, Jean-Francois, E-mail: ponge@mnhn.f [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CNRS UMR 7179, 4 Avenue du Petit-Chateau, 91800 Brunoy (France); Martinez Aldaya, Maite [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CNRS UMR 7179, 4 Avenue du Petit-Chateau, 91800 Brunoy (France); Damidot, Denis [Universite Lille Nord de France, 1bis rue Georges Lefevre, 59044 Lille Cedex (France); Ecole des Mines de Douai, MPE-GCE, 941 rue Charles-Bourseul, 59500 Douai (France)

    2010-08-15

    Five bioassays (inhibition of lettuce germination and growth, earthworm mortality, inhibition of springtail population growth, avoidance by springtails) were compared, using four coke factory soils contaminated by PAHs and trace elements, before and after biotreatment. For each bioassay, several endpoints were combined in an 'ecoscore', a measure of test sensitivity. Ecoscores pooled over all tested bioassays revealed that most organisms were highly sensitive to the concentration of 3-ring PAHs. When four soils were combined, behavioural tests using the springtail Folsomia candida showed higher ecoscores, i.e. they were most sensitive to soil contamination. However, despite overall higher sensitivity of behavioural tests, which could be used for cheap and rapid assessment of soil toxicity, especially at low levels of contamination, some test endpoints were more sensitive than others, and this may differ from a soil to another, pointing to the need for a battery of bioassays when more itemized results are expected. - The avoidance test using the soil springtail Folsomia candida is globally more sensitive to PAH contamination than acute and chronic toxicity bioassays using plants and animals but a battery of tests could reveal better in detail.

  7. 7 Vascular Hydrophytes for Bioassay.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Hatakeyama S., Fukushima S., Kasai F. and. Shiraishi H. (1994). Assessment of herbicide effects on algal production in the Kokai River. (Japan) using a model stream and Selenastrum bioassay. Ecotoxicology3: 143–156. Kang J-Y. and Goulder R. (1996). Epiphytic bacteria downstream of sewage-works outfalls. Wat. Res.

  8. EVALUATION OF BIOASSAYS FOR TESTING Bt SWEETPOTATO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2013-07-24

    Jul 24, 2013 ... bioassays used were: (i) 1st instar larva in an artificial diet using root powder of transgenic events, (ii) whole root of transgenic events infested with ... On established plants, adult weevils attack leaves while the larvae feed ... the efficacy of transgenic events with genes expressing Cry toxins, which present.

  9. Ejercicio interlaboratorio de bioensayos marinos para la evaluacion de la calidad ambiental de sedimentos costeros en Espana. II Ensayo de inhibicion dela bioluminiscencia para la evaluacion rapida de la toxicidad de sedimentos = Interlaboratory assessment of marine bioassays to evaluate the environmental quality of coastal sediments in Spain. II. Bioluminescence inhibition test for rapid sediment toxicity assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casado-Martinez, M.C.; Campisi, T.; Diaz, A.; Re, Lo R.; Obispo, R.; Postma, J.F.; Riba, I.; Sneekes, A.C.; Buceta, J.L.; DelValls, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Microtox (R) bioassay was tested in an interlaboratory study to evaluate the variability when using solid-phase samples. The exercise consisted of two consecutive phases each one carried out with six sediment samples from Spanish ports. Phase I included six laboratories that reported results for

  10. Efficient and inexpensive transient expression of multispecific multivalent antibodies in Expi293 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Xiaotian T; Sehlin, Dag; Lannfelt, Lars; Syv?nen, Stina; Hultqvist, Greta

    2017-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy is a very fast expanding field within drug discovery and, hence, rapid and inexpensive expression of antibodies would be extremely valuable. Antibodies are, however, difficult to express. Multifunctional antibodies with additional binding domains further complicate the expression. Only few protocols describe the production of tetravalent bispecific antibodies and all with limited expression levels.? Methods Here, we describe a protocol that can produce functional tetr...

  11. Brine Shrimp Bioassays: A Useful Technique in Biological Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stanley A.; Maness, Ian B.

    2004-01-01

    A technique to measure the potency of leaf compounds against herbivores with the use of a bioassay is described. Bioassays are useful in classes where students have career plans like medicine in which bioassays can be used as tools for screening plants for possible medicinal potency.

  12. Zebrafish bioassay-guided natural product discovery: isolation of angiogenesis inhibitors from East African medicinal plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D Crawford

    Full Text Available Natural products represent a significant reservoir of unexplored chemical diversity for early-stage drug discovery. The identification of lead compounds of natural origin would benefit from therapeutically relevant bioassays capable of facilitating the isolation of bioactive molecules from multi-constituent extracts. Towards this end, we developed an in vivo bioassay-guided isolation approach for natural product discovery that combines bioactivity screening in zebrafish embryos with rapid fractionation by analytical thin-layer chromatography (TLC and initial structural elucidation by high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (HRESIMS. Bioactivity screening of East African medicinal plant extracts using fli-1:EGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos identified Oxygonum sinuatum and Plectranthus barbatus as inhibiting vascular development. Zebrafish bioassay-guided fractionation identified the active components of these plants as emodin, an inhibitor of the protein kinase CK2, and coleon A lactone, a rare abietane diterpenoid with no previously described bioactivity. Both emodin and coleon A lactone inhibited mammalian endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro, as well as angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM assay. These results suggest that the combination of zebrafish bioassays with analytical chromatography methods is an effective strategy for the rapid identification of bioactive natural products.

  13. Zebrafish bioassay-guided natural product discovery: isolation of angiogenesis inhibitors from East African medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Alexander D; Liekens, Sandra; Kamuhabwa, Appolinary R; Maes, Jan; Munck, Sebastian; Busson, Roger; Rozenski, Jef; Esguerra, Camila V; de Witte, Peter A M

    2011-02-17

    Natural products represent a significant reservoir of unexplored chemical diversity for early-stage drug discovery. The identification of lead compounds of natural origin would benefit from therapeutically relevant bioassays capable of facilitating the isolation of bioactive molecules from multi-constituent extracts. Towards this end, we developed an in vivo bioassay-guided isolation approach for natural product discovery that combines bioactivity screening in zebrafish embryos with rapid fractionation by analytical thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and initial structural elucidation by high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (HRESIMS). Bioactivity screening of East African medicinal plant extracts using fli-1:EGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos identified Oxygonum sinuatum and Plectranthus barbatus as inhibiting vascular development. Zebrafish bioassay-guided fractionation identified the active components of these plants as emodin, an inhibitor of the protein kinase CK2, and coleon A lactone, a rare abietane diterpenoid with no previously described bioactivity. Both emodin and coleon A lactone inhibited mammalian endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro, as well as angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. These results suggest that the combination of zebrafish bioassays with analytical chromatography methods is an effective strategy for the rapid identification of bioactive natural products.

  14. Toxicity assessment using different bioassays and microbial biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Hussein, Mohamed A M; Abskharon, Romany; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity assessment of water streams, wastewater, and contaminated sediments, is a very important part of environmental pollution monitoring. Evaluation of biological effects using a rapid, sensitive and cost effective method can indicate specific information on ecotoxicity assessment. Recently, different biological assays for toxicity assessment based on higher and lower organisms such as fish, invertebrates, plants and algal cells, and microbial bioassays have been used. This review focuses on microbial biosensors as an analytical device for environmental, food, and biomedical applications. Different techniques which are commonly used in microbial biosensing include amperometry, potentiometry, conductometry, voltammetry, microbial fuel cells, fluorescence, bioluminescence, and colorimetry. Examples of the use of different microbial biosensors in assessing a variety of environments are summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Robust and inexpensive equipment design for polymerase chain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Robust and inexpensive equipment design for polymerase chain reaction detection of sequence mutations Cystic fibrosis in a mother and 2 children analysed. L. R. Purves, R. Rubinstein, J. Maxwell, F. Leisegang, J. Ireland ...

  16. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Naftulin

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT collect three-dimensional data (3D that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM images to stereolithography (STL files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3-4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14-17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4-6 hr; printing = 9-11 hr, post-processing = <30 min. Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1-5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes.

  17. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftulin, Jason S; Kimchi, Eyal Y; Cash, Sydney S

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3-4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14-17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4-6 hr; printing = 9-11 hr, post-processing = Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1-5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes.

  18. Glycomics Approaches for the Bioassay and Structural Analysis of Heparin/Heparan Sulphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy E. Turnbull

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The glycosaminoglycan heparan sulphate (HS has a heterogeneous structure; evidence shows that specific structures may be responsible for specific functions in biological processes such as blood coagulation and regulation of growth factor signalling. This review summarises the different experimental tools and methods developed to provide more rapid methods for studying the structure and functions of HS. Rapid and sensitive methods for the facile purification of HS, from tissue and cell sources are reviewed. Data sets for the structural analysis are often complex and include multiple sample sets, therefore different software and tools have been developed for the analysis of different HS data sets. These can be readily applied to chromatographic data sets for the simplification of data (e.g., charge separation using strong anion exchange chromatography and from size separation using gel filtration techniques. Finally, following the sequencing of the human genome, research has rapidly advanced with the introduction of high throughput technologies to carry out simultaneous analyses of many samples. Microarrays to study macromolecular interactions (including glycan arrays have paved the way for bioassay technologies which utilize cell arrays to study the effects of multiple macromolecules on cells. Glycan bioassay technologies are described in which immobilisation techniques for saccharides are exploited to develop a platform to probe cell responses such as signalling pathway activation. This review aims at reviewing available techniques and tools for the purification, analysis and bioassay of HS saccharides in biological systems using “glycomics” approaches.

  19. Validation and application of a robust yeast estrogen bioassay for the screening of estrogenic activity in animal feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Bor, G.; Heskamp, H.H.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2006-01-01

    Previously we described the construction and properties of a rapid yeast bioassay stably expressing human estrogen receptor ¿ (hER¿) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP), the latter in response to estrogens. In the present study this yeast estrogen assay was validated as a

  20. A Greenhouse Bioassay for the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense x ‘Grand Naine’ (Musa, AAA, Cavendish Subgroup) Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dita Rodriguez, M.A.; Waalwijk, C.; Paiva, L.V.; Souza, M.T.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Several disease resistance screening protocols for Fusarium wilt of banana (causal agent Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense - Foc) under greenhouse conditions have been reported. Here, we report a standardised rapid and reliable greenhouse bioassay for this pathosystem. This is indispensable for

  1. Bioassays as one of the Green Chemistry tools for assessing environmental quality: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczerzak, M; Namieśnik, J; Kudłak, B

    2016-09-01

    For centuries, mankind has contributed to irreversible environmental changes, but due to the modern science of recent decades, scientists are able to assess the scale of this impact. The introduction of laws and standards to ensure environmental cleanliness requires comprehensive environmental monitoring, which should also meet the requirements of Green Chemistry. The broad spectrum of Green Chemistry principle applications should also include all of the techniques and methods of pollutant analysis and environmental monitoring. The classical methods of chemical analyses do not always match the twelve principles of Green Chemistry, and they are often expensive and employ toxic and environmentally unfriendly solvents in large quantities. These solvents can generate hazardous and toxic waste while consuming large volumes of resources. Therefore, there is a need to develop reliable techniques that would not only meet the requirements of Green Analytical Chemistry, but they could also complement and sometimes provide an alternative to conventional classical analytical methods. These alternatives may be found in bioassays. Commercially available certified bioassays often come in the form of ready-to-use toxkits, and they are easy to use and relatively inexpensive in comparison with certain conventional analytical methods. The aim of this study is to provide evidence that bioassays can be a complementary alternative to classical methods of analysis and can fulfil Green Analytical Chemistry criteria. The test organisms discussed in this work include single-celled organisms, such as cell lines, fungi (yeast), and bacteria, and multicellular organisms, such as invertebrate and vertebrate animals and plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A comparison of iron bioassay diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, J L; Day, E J; Dilworth, B C

    1976-05-01

    Two broiler chick experiments wer conducted to evaluate four basal diets for iron bioassay suitability. The test basal diets, identified according to their principal ingredients and iron content, were: (1) starch-skim milk - 15 p.p.m., (2) degerminated corn-skin milk - 18 p.p.m. (3) degermianted corn-fish meal-isolated soy - 45 p.p.m., and (4) degermianted corn-fish meal-dehulled soy - 59p.p.m. Significant differences between an iron source with known low availability (ferric oxide) and a highly available iron source (ferrous sulfate) were not detected with the degerminated corn-fish meal-isolated soy or the degerminated corn-fish meal-dehulled soy diets. Likewise, there were no significant differences found between supplemental iron levels, 10 and 20 p.p.m. The corn-skim milk and starch-skim milk diets were both found to be satisfactory for iron bioassays. However, the sample size needed to estimate the population mean was almost twice as great for the starch-skim milk fed groups, than was needed for the corn-skim milk fed groups which indicates the corn-skim milk diet obtained greater sensitivity in testing iron sources and levels. Mortality was excessively high in the starch-skim milk fed group. Ferrous sulfate was superior to ferric oxide as a source of iron.

  3. High-resolution melting analysis (HRMA): a highly sensitive inexpensive genotyping alternative for population studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B L; Lu, C-P; Alvarado Bremer, J R

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) is a highly sensitive closed-tube genotyping method used primarily in clinical studies. As the method is rapid, inexpensive and amenable to high throughput, we decided to investigate its applicability to population studies. Small amplicons and unlabelled probes were used to genotype the nuclear genes, lactate dehydrogenase-A (ldh-A), myosin light chain-2 (mlc-2), acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein P0 (ARP) and calmodulin (CaM) in populations of swordfish, Xiphias gladius. Results indicate that HRMA is a powerful genotyping tool to study wild populations. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Multi-scale magnetic nanoparticle based optomagnetic bioassay for sensitive DNA and bacteria detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Bo; Zardán Gómez De La Torre, Teresa; Donolato, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Benefiting from their rapid readout, highly flexible devices and low-cost portable systems, optomagnetic biosensors have drawn increased attention in recent years as bioassay technologies for small molecules, biomarkers, DNA, and bacteria. Herein, an optomagnetic bioassay strategy suitable...... for point-of-care diagnostics, utilizing functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (100 nm) with Brownian relaxation behavior is optimized in order to obtain higher detection sensitivity for DNA molecules and bacteria. Presence of target DNA sequences or bacteria changes the dynamic behavior of the magnetic...... to previous work, we systematically optimize the concentration of 100 nm magnetic nanoparticles to increase the assay sensitivity and lower the limit of detection. To enable biplex detection, we perform this optimization in the presence of larger 250 nm magnetic nanoparticles that do not interact...

  5. Are bioassays useful tools to assess redox processes and biodegradation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Pedersen, Philip Grinder; Ludvigsen, L.

    2002-01-01

    sensitive hydrochemical or geochemical parameters, levels of hydrogen, and redox potential. However, all these approaches have to be evaluated against TEAP-bioassays as the most direct measure. We assessed successfully ongoing microbial-mediated redox processes by TEAP-bioassays in degradation studies...... of aromatic and chlorinated aliphatic compounds in landfill leachate plumes, and of pesticides in aquifers with various redox conditions....

  6. Role of dispersion in fuel oil bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderhorst, J.R.; Gibson, C.I.; Moore, L.J.

    1976-01-01

    Three methods of oil-seawater contact were used to measure aqueous phase concentrations of No. 2 fuel oil and the resulting mortality of shrimp, PANDALUS DANAE. Oil--water entry methods included: (1) separate inflow below the water surface, (2) mixture inflow above the water surface, and (3) separate inflow above the water surface. The importance of standardizing the conditions under which oil and water are mixed prior to use in bioassay studies and the amount of dispersion that occurs during the exposure period was noted. Under the three sets of mixing conditions, identical volumes of oil and water resulted in significant differences in observed mortality and measured amounts of oil in the water column, as either total or soluble oil.

  7. Circular Bioassay Platforms for Applications in Microwave-Accelerated Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Clement, Travis C; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-12-02

    In this paper, we present the design of four different circular bioassay platforms, which are suitable for homogeneous microwave heating, using theoretical calculations (i.e., COMSOL™ multiphysics software). Circular bioassay platforms are constructed from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) for optical transparency between 400-800 nm, has multiple sample capacity (12, 16, 19 and 21 wells) and modified with silver nanoparticle films (SNFs) to be used in microwave-accelerated bioassays (MABs). In addition, a small monomode microwave cavity, which can be operated with an external microwave generator (100 W), for use with the bioassay platforms in MABs is also developed. Our design parameters for the circular bioassay platforms and monomode microwave cavity during microwave heating were: (i) temperature profiles, (ii) electric field distributions, (iii) location of the circular bioassay platforms inside the microwave cavity, and (iv) design and number of wells on the circular bioassay platforms. We have also carried out additional simulations to assess the use of circular bioassay platforms in a conventional kitchen microwave oven (e.g., 900 W). Our results show that the location of the circular bioassay platforms in the microwave cavity was predicted to have a significant effect on the homogeneous heating of these platforms. The 21-well circular bioassay platform design in our monomode microwave cavity was predicted to offer a homogeneous heating pattern, where inter-well temperature was observed to be in between 23.72-24.13°C and intra-well temperature difference was less than 0.21°C for 60 seconds of microwave heating, which was also verified experimentally.

  8. Computationally Inexpensive Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) Pansharpening

    OpenAIRE

    Hankui K. Zhang; Roy, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Pansharpening algorithms fuse higher spatial resolution panchromatic with lower spatial resolution multispectral imagery to create higher spatial resolution multispectral images. The free-availability and systematic global acquisition of Landsat 8 data indicate an expected need for global coverage and so computationally efficient Landsat 8 pansharpening. This study adapts and evaluates the established, and relatively computationally inexpensive, Brovey and context adaptive Gram Schmidt compon...

  9. Build an Inexpensive Wind Tunnel to Test CO2 Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    As part of the technology education curriculum, the author's eighth-grade students design, build, test, and race CO2 vehicles. To help them in refining their designs, they use a wind tunnel to test for aerodynamic drag. In this article, the author describes how to build a wind tunnel using inexpensive, readily available materials. (Contains 1…

  10. Design and Calibration of an Inexpensive Digital Anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Walls, R.; Rojas-Mayoral, E.; Baez-Castillo, L.; Rojas-Mayoral, B.

    2008-01-01

    An inexpensive and easily implemented device to measure wind velocity is proposed. This prototype has the advantage of being able to measure both the speed and the direction of the wind in two dimensions. The device utilizes a computational interface commonly referred to as a "mouse." The mouse proposed for this prototype contains an…

  11. Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To avoid high tooling costs in product development, a rapid prototyping process chain has been established that enables rapid manufacturing of ceramic microcomponents from functional models to small lot series within a short time. This process chain combines the fast and inexpensive supply of master models by rapid ...

  12. Detection of organic compounds with whole-cell bioluminescent bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Smartt, Abby; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Natural and manmade organic chemicals are widely deposited across a diverse range of ecosystems including air, surface water, groundwater, wastewater, soil, sediment, and marine environments. Some organic compounds, despite their industrial values, are toxic to living organisms and pose significant health risks to humans and wildlife. Detection and monitoring of these organic pollutants in environmental matrices therefore is of great interest and need for remediation and health risk assessment. Although these detections have traditionally been performed using analytical chemical approaches that offer highly sensitive and specific identification of target compounds, these methods require specialized equipment and trained operators, and fail to describe potential bioavailable effects on living organisms. Alternatively, the integration of bioluminescent systems into whole-cell bioreporters presents a new capacity for organic compound detection. These bioreporters are constructed by incorporating reporter genes into catabolic or signaling pathways that are present within living cells and emit a bioluminescent signal that can be detected upon exposure to target chemicals. Although relatively less specific compared to analytical methods, bioluminescent bioassays are more cost-effective, more rapid, can be scaled to higher throughput, and can be designed to report not only the presence but also the bioavailability of target substances. This chapter reviews available bacterial and eukaryotic whole-cell bioreporters for sensing organic pollutants and their applications in a variety of sample matrices.

  13. Development of an Inexpensive RGB Color Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen Cyanide Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenawald, Lee A; Boss, Gerry R; Snyder, Jay L; Reeder, Aaron; Bell, Suzanne

    2017-10-27

    An inexpensive red, green, blue (RGB) color sensor was developed for detecting low ppm concentrations of hydrogen cyanide gas. A piece of glass fiber filter paper containing monocyanocobinamide [CN(H2O)Cbi] was placed directly above the RGB color sensor and an on chip LED. Light reflected from the paper was monitored for RGB color change upon exposure to hydrogen cyanide at concentrations of 1.0-10.0 ppm as a function of 25%, 50%, and 85% relative humidity. A rapid color change occurred within 10 s of exposure to 5.0 ppm hydrogen cyanide gas (near the NIOSH recommended exposure limit). A more rapid color change occurred at higher humidity, suggesting a more effective reaction between hydrogen cyanide and CN(H2O)Cbi. The sensor could provide the first real time respirator end-of-service-life alert for hydrogen cyanide gas.

  14. Applicability of toxicity bioassays to ecological risk assessment in arid and semiarid ecosystems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwiese, J. T.; Ryti, R. T.; Hooten, M. M.; Michael, D. I.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Environmental Assessment; Neptune and Company, Inc.

    2001-01-01

    Substantial tracts of land in the southwestern and western U.S. are undergoing or will require ERA. Toxicity bioassays employed in baseline ERAs are, for the most part. representative of mesic systems, and highly standardized test species (e.g., lettuce, earthworm) are generally not relevant to arid system toxicity testing. Conversely, relevant test species are often poorly characterized with regard to toxicant sensitivity and culture conditions. The applicability of toxicity bioassays to ecological risk assessment in arid and semiarid ecosystems was reviewed for bacteria and fungi, plants, terrestrial invertebrates, and terrestrial vertebrates. Bacteria and fungi are critical to soil processes, and understanding their ecology is important to understanding the ecological relevance of bioassays targeting either group. Terrestrial bacteria require a water film around soil particles to be active, while soil fungi can remain active in extremely dry soils. It is therefore expected that fungi will be of greater importance to arid and semiarid systems (Whitford 1989). If microbial processes are to be measured in soils of arid environments, it is recommended that bioassays target fungi. Regardless of the taxa studied, problems are associated with the standardization and interpretability of microbial tests, and regulatory acceptance may hinder widespread incorporation of microbial toxicity bioassays in arid system risk assessments. Plant toxicity bioassays are gaining recognition as sensitive indicators of soil conditions because they can provide a cost-effective and relatively rapid assessment of soil quality for both pre- and postremediation efforts. Although the choices of suitable plant species for assessing mesic system soils are numerous, the choices for arid system soils are limited. Guidance is provided for evaluating plant species with regard to their suitability for serving as representative arid system flora. Terrestrial invertebrates can survive and flourish in

  15. Bioassays for the determination of nitrification inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunditz, Camilla

    1999-07-01

    Requirements for nitrogen reduction in wastewater treatment plants were introduced in Sweden in the early 1990's. This was a governmental move to reduce the nitrogen discharges to the Baltic and Kattegat in order to prevent eutrophication. The nitrification process in wastewater treatment plants is performed by nitrifying bacteria. These are susceptible to inhibition and it is of great importance that the influent water does not contain toxic compounds. Therefore, there is a need for assays for the determination of nitrification inhibition. This thesis describes the development and applications of such bioassays. Pure cultures of Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrobacter sp. were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. These cultures were used as test organisms in the development of bioassays for nitrification inhibition measurements. The assays are based on two different principles; cell suspensions of the bacteria, performed in test tubes, and mediated amperometric biosensors with the bacteria immobilised. Ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation are studied separately without interference from other organisms, which makes it easier to interpret the results. The cell suspension assays were applied to samples of industrial and municipal wastewater. The Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter assays showed to have different inhibition patterns. A large percentage of the Swedish municipal wastewater treatment plants were found to receive inhibitory influent water, but the inhibition level was generally low. Compared to an assay based on activated sludge, the screening method, the pure culture assays found more samples of influent water strongly inhibitory or stimulating. The highest correlation was found between the screening method and the Nitrosomonas assay. The Nitrobacter assay was found to be the most sensitive method. Assessment of toxicity of a number of chemical substances was studied using the biosensors, together with the cell suspension assays

  16. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison K. Heather

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping.

  17. In vitro androgen bioassays as a detection method for designer androgens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Elliot R; McGrath, Kristine C Y; Heather, Alison K

    2013-02-06

    Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping.

  18. Inexpensive robots used to teach dc circuits and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebottom, David L.

    2017-05-01

    This article describes inexpensive, autonomous robots, built without microprocessors, used in a college-level introductory physics laboratory course to motivate student learning of dc circuits. Detailed circuit descriptions are provided as well as a week-by-week course plan that can guide students from elementary dc circuits, through Kirchhoff's laws, and into simple analog integrated circuits with the motivational incentive of building an autonomous robot that can compete with others in a public arena.

  19. Inexpensive transparent nanoelectrode for crystalline silicon solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Qiang; Pei, Ke; Han, Bing; Li, Ruopeng; Zhou, Guofu; Liu, Jun-Ming; Kempa, Krzysztof; Gao, Jinwei

    2016-01-01

    We report an easily manufacturable and inexpensive transparent conductive electrode for crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells. It is based on a silver nanoparticle network self-forming in the valleys between the pyramids of a textured solar cell surface, transformed into a nanowire network by sintering, and subsequently ?buried? under the silicon surface by a metal-assisted chemical etching. We have successfully incorporated these steps into the conventional c-Si solar cell manufacturing pro...

  20. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. X. Geroge Xu

    2011-01-28

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  1. PubChem BioAssay: 2017 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Bryant, Stephen H.; Cheng, Tiejun; Wang, Jiyao; Gindulyte, Asta; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Thiessen, Paul A.; He, Siqian; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    PubChem's BioAssay database (https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) has served as a public repository for small-molecule and RNAi screening data since 2004 providing open access of its data content to the community. PubChem accepts data submission from worldwide researchers at academia, industry and government agencies. PubChem also collaborates with other chemical biology database stakeholders with data exchange. With over a decade's development effort, it becomes an important information resource supporting drug discovery and chemical biology research. To facilitate data discovery, PubChem is integrated with all other databases at NCBI. In this work, we provide an update for the PubChem BioAssay database describing several recent development including added sources of research data, redesigned BioAssay record page, new BioAssay classification browser and new features in the Upload system facilitating data sharing. PMID:27899599

  2. Bioassay-Directed Fractionation of Diesel and Biodiesel Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofuels are being developed as alternatives to petroleum-derived products, but published research is contradictory regarding the mutagenic activity of such emissions relative to those from petroleum diesel. We performed bioassay-directed fractionation and analyzed the polycyclic...

  3. Bioassay of Plant Growth Regulator Activity on Aquatic Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    I COPY AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM .q TECHNICAL REPORT A-90-7 >AD-A226 125 BIOASSAY OF PLANT GROWTH REGULATOR ACTIVITY ON AQUATIC PLANTS... Plant Growth Regulator Activity on Aquatic Plants 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lembi, Carole A.; Netherland, Michael D. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14...OF THIS PAGE 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continued). Aquatic plants Hydrilla Bensulfuron methyl Paclobutrazol Bioassay Plant growth regulator Eurasian

  4. A novel bioassay to monitor fungicide sensitivity in Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngando, Josué E; Rieux, Adrien; Nguidjo, Oscar; Pignolet, Luc; Dubois, Cécile; Mehl, Andreas; Zapater, Marie-Françoise; Carlier, Jean; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc

    2015-03-01

    Black leaf streak disease (BLSD) is the most important disease of bananas for export. The successful control of BLSD requires an intensive use of systemic fungicides, leading to the build-up of resistance and failure of control. Early detection of fungicide resistance is crucial to drive rational chemical strategies. Present methods relying on ascospore germination bioassays have several drawbacks that could be overcome using conidia. Generally, a single genotype is present on the conidial population derived from one lesion. Conidial germination tests with thiabendazole (5 mg L(-1)) enable a clear detection of strains resistant to methyl benzimidazole carbamates. Germination bioassays on azoxystrobin (10 mg L(-1)) enable the detection of most QoI-resistant strains, but their proportion might be underestimated with cut-off limits of germ tube length (L > 120 µm) or growth inhibition (GI banana tree, which should be considered for sampling. The ascospore germination bioassay provided more variable estimations of the level of resistance by comparison with the new conidial germination bioassay. Germination bioassays performed with conidia obtained from young lesions overcome most drawbacks encountered with ascospore germination bioassays and could be considered as a new reference method for fungicide resistance monitoring in this species. Different steps are proposed, from sampling to microscopic examinations, for the implementation of this technique. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Quantification of video-taped images in microcirculation research using inexpensive imaging software (Adobe Photoshop).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J; Krummenauer, F; Lehr, H A

    2000-04-01

    Study end-points in microcirculation research are usually video-taped images rather than numeric computer print-outs. Analysis of these video-taped images for the quantification of microcirculatory parameters usually requires computer-based image analysis systems. Most software programs for image analysis are custom-made, expensive, and limited in their applicability to selected parameters and study end-points. We demonstrate herein that an inexpensive, commercially available computer software (Adobe Photoshop), run on a Macintosh G3 computer with inbuilt graphic capture board provides versatile, easy to use tools for the quantification of digitized video images. Using images obtained by intravital fluorescence microscopy from the pre- and postischemic muscle microcirculation in the skinfold chamber model in hamsters, Photoshop allows simple and rapid quantification (i) of microvessel diameters, (ii) of the functional capillary density and (iii) of postischemic leakage of FITC-labeled high molecular weight dextran from postcapillary venules. We present evidence of the technical accuracy of the software tools and of a high degree of interobserver reliability. Inexpensive commercially available imaging programs (i.e., Adobe Photoshop) provide versatile tools for image analysis with a wide range of potential applications in microcirculation research.

  6. A cleavable silica-binding affinity tag for rapid and inexpensive protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Brandon L; Baneyx, François

    2014-10-01

    We describe a new affinity purification tag called Car9 that confers proteins to which it is fused micromolar affinity for unmodified silica. When appended to the C-terminus of GFPmut2 through a flexible linker, Car9 promotes efficient adsorption to silica gel and the fusion protein can be released from the particles by incubation with L-lysine. Using a silica gel column and the lysine elution approach in fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) mode, Car9-tagged versions of GFPmut2, mCherry and maltose binding protein (MBP) can be recovered from clarified lysates with a purity of 80-90%. Capitalizing on silica's ability to handle large pressure drops, we further show that it is possible to go from cell lysates to purified protein in less than 15 min using a fully disposable device. Finally, we demonstrate that the linker-Car9 region is susceptible to proteolysis by E. coli OmpT and take advantage of this observation to excise the C-terminal extension of GFPmut2-Car9 by incubating purified fusion protein with cells that overproduce the outer membrane protease OmpT. The set of strategies described herein, should reduce the cost of affinity purification by at least 10-fold, cut down purification times to minutes, and allow for the production of proteins with native (or nearly native) termini from their C-terminally-tagged versions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Rapid and Inexpensive Screening of Genomic Copy Number Variations Using a Novel Quantitative Fluorescent PCR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Stofanko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of human microdeletion and microduplication syndromes poses significant burden on public healthcare systems in developing countries. With genome-wide diagnostic assays frequently inaccessible, targeted low-cost PCR-based approaches are preferred. However, their reproducibility depends on equally efficient amplification using a number of target and control primers. To address this, the recently described technique called Microdeletion/Microduplication Quantitative Fluorescent PCR (MQF-PCR was shown to reliably detect four human syndromes by quantifying DNA amplification in an internally controlled PCR reaction. Here, we confirm its utility in the detection of eight human microdeletion syndromes, including the more common WAGR, Smith-Magenis, and Potocki-Lupski syndromes with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We present selection, design, and performance evaluation of detection primers using variety of approaches. We conclude that MQF-PCR is an easily adaptable method for detection of human pathological chromosomal aberrations.

  8. Rapid and inexpensive fabrication of polymeric microfluidic devices via toner transfer masking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Christopher J.; Benninger, Richard K. P.; Shaver, Jesse H.; Head, W. Steven; Piston, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary An alternative fabrication method is presented for production of masters for single- or multilayer polymeric microfluidic devices in a standard laboratory environment, precluding the need for a cleanroom. This toner transfer masking (TTM) method utilizes an office laser printer to generate a toner pattern which is thermally transferred to a metal master to serve as a mask for etching. With master fabrication times as little as one hour (depending on channel depth) using commercially-available equipment and supplies, this approach should make microfluidic technology more widely accessible to the non-expert—even the non-scientist. The cost of fabrication consumables was estimated to be < $1 per master, over an order of magnitude decrease in consumable costs compared to standard photolithography. In addition, the use of chemical etching allows accurate control over the height of raised features (i.e., channel depths), allowing the flexibility to fabricate multiple depths on a single master with little added time. Resultant devices are shown capable of pneumatic valving, three-dimensional channel formation (using layer-connecting vias), droplet fluidics, and cell imaging and staining. The multiple-depth capabilities of the method are proven useful for cellular analysis by fabrication of handheld, disposable devices used for trapping and imaging of live murine pancreatic islets. The precise fluidic control provided by the microfluidic platform allows subsequent fixing and staining of these cells without significant movement, thus spatial correlation of imaging and staining is attainable—even with rare alpha cells that constitute only ∼10% of the islet cells. PMID:19350094

  9. Parallelism in practice: approaches to parallelism in bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleetwood, Kelly; Bursa, Francis; Yellowlees, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Relative potency bioassays are used to estimate the potency of a test biological product relative to a standard or reference product. It is established practice to assess the parallelism of the dose-response curves of the products prior to calculating relative potency. This paper provides a review of parallelism testing for bioassays. In particular three common methods for parallelism testing are reviewed: two significance tests (the F-test, the χ(2)-test) and an equivalence test. Simulation is used to compare these methods. We compare the sensitivity and specificity and receiver operating characteristic curves, and find that both the χ(2)-test and the equivalence test outperform the F-test on average, unless the assay-to-assay variation is considerable. No single method is optimal in all situations. We describe how bioassay scientists and statisticians can work together to determine the best approach for each bioassay, taking into account its properties and the context in which it is applied. Bioassays are experiments that use living organisms, tissues, or cells to measure the concentration of a pharmaceutical. Typically the response of the living matter to a test sample with an unknown concentration of a pharmaceutical is compared to the response to a standard reference sample with a known concentration. An important step in the analysis of bioassays is checking that the test sample is responding like a diluted copy of the reference sample; this is known as testing for parallelism. There are three statistical methods commonly used to test for parallelism: the F-test, the χ(2)-test, and the equivalence test. This paper compares the three methods using computer simulations. We conclude that different methods are best in different situations, and we provide guidelines to help bioassay scientists and statisticians decide which method to use. © PDA, Inc. 2015.

  10. Integrated heaters for temperature control in disposable bioassay cartridges for use with portable, battery-operated instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Luis Ortiz; Negussie, Haile; Mazzola, Laura T; Laser, Daniel J; Droitcour, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Two methods for heating fluids in microliter- to milliliter-scale reaction chambers in disposable bioassay cartridges are analyzed and compared. Inductive heating requires no electrical contact between the energy source and the cartridge and uses a very inexpensive component in the cartridge. Resistive heating with a surface mount component requires electrical interconnection, but is generally conducive to low-cost off-the-shelf components. Typical power consumption for both inductive heating and resistive heating is consistent with battery-powered operation. A finite element model for heating an injection-molded plastic cartridge with a surface-mount resistor has been developed and validated through experiments on a 40 mm × 10 mm × 7.5 mm injection molded polystyrene cartridge with embedded 1 kΩ surface-mount resistors. A model of frequency-dependent heat generation in a novel inductive heating device is also presented.

  11. Bioassay-directed isolation and evaluation of Harmine from the terrestrial plant Peganum harmala L. for antibacterial activity against Flavobacterium columnare

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antibacterial activities of crude extracts obtained from the aerial portions and roots of Peganum harmala L. were evaluated against the common fish pathogenic bacteria species Edwardsiella ictaluri, Flavobacterium columnare, and Streptococcus iniae using a rapid bioassay. Enteric septicemia of c...

  12. An Inexpensive Interferometric Setup for Measuring Microscopic Displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanís, Elvio; Romero, Graciela; Martínez, Carlos; Álvarez, Liliana; Salazar, Germán

    2004-04-01

    In an interesting article published in an issue of The Physics Teacher, Reichert gives some didactic examples about static friction force between a plastic block and a wooden plane on which it rests. To explain the experiments, he uses a simple model based on a microscopic "elastic band" that connects the atoms of both surfaces. Reichert remarks that "the block moves, albeit a microscopic distance," and that it would be helpful if the student could see these displacements. In another paragraph he states that "measuring it (displacement) requires delicate and expensive optical instruments." Effectively, a measurement of such small displacements generally requires interferometric devices. At our university, we teach basic physics and we are aware of the difficulties that beginners have grasping the concepts involved in static friction force. At the same time, as our research field is related to optics metrology, we could not ignore Reichert's statement. Could we design an experimental device to measure the microscopic displacement referred to by Reichert, keeping it inexpensive and easy to implement? Incidentally, in the same issue of The Physics Teacher, Sawicki2 gives an excellent example of how, with a few common elements, a simple experiment of interferometric measurement can be put within students' reach. In this paper, we suggest the use of a simple interferometric device, built with very common and inexpensive elements, and describe an experiment on static friction force in which the instrument is applied to measure microscopic displacements.

  13. Blenderized feeding formulas with nutritious and inexpensive foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Lança BENTO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To propose an inexpensive blenderized tube feeding formula consisting of foods with standard nutritional composition that meets the nutritional requirements of individuals aged more than 51 years. Methods: The enteral diets were formulated mainly with fresh foods and tested for their physical (homogeneity, stability, osmolality, pH, and flow rate and chemical (moisture, ash, protein, lipids, energy, crude fiber, vitamin C, calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc characteristics. The cost was determined by surveying item prices in supermarkets and stores that specialize in nutritional support. Results: The blenderized tube feeding formula was stable and homogeneous, and had slightly acidic pH, hypertonic osmolality (603mOsm/kg, and flow rate comparable with gravity drip (21 minutes. Proximate composition analysis indicated appropriate levels of proteins, lipids, vitamin C, and zinc. The mean cost of 2000kcal of the standard blenderized tube feeding formula was R$ 12.3±1.4, which is 70% cheaper than the mean cost of similar commercial enteral formulas. Conclusion: The planned diet can be an excellent choice for patients using blenderized tube feeding formulas as it consisted of habitual food items, had physical and nutritional quality, and was inexpensive.

  14. Bioassay standardization for the detection of allelopathic compounds and environmental toxicants using lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Salomão Simões

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess different experimental conditions to determine a protocol for bioassays based on seed germination and early seedling growth using lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids as indicator species. This protocol aims to provide support for the standardization of assays of various chemicals such as allelochemicals and environmental toxicants. The following tests were performed: time of germination, temperature, light, solution volume and Petri dish size. For each test (except for time of germination, the influence of the conditions investigated was determined by the endpoints germination percentage, germination speed index, root length, seedling fresh weight and total dry weight. The results showed that variations in the methods altered the results. It is recommended that bioassays using L. sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids be carried out for a minimum period of four days for assessments of both germination and initial growth and that the experimental conditions include a temperature of 20°C, 90-mm Petri dishes or larger, 0.1 mL cypsela solution, and continuous light or 12-hour photoperiod.

  15. A novel laboratory screening bioassay for crop seedling allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Regina G; Hurle, Karl

    2004-01-01

    Crops that control weeds by root exudation of allelochemicals are receiving increased attention, and there are efforts to breed allelopathic cultivars in several crops. The genetic improvement of allelopathic traits is based upon parental germ plasm with high allelopathic activity. Identification of allelopathic germplasm is done in laboratory screening bioassays, but experimental protocols are limited. We developed a fast and reliable laboratory screening bioassay for grain crops that includes dose-response considerations as an integral part of the experimental design. The bioassay was conducted in hydroponic culture, and a range of experiments with 2-(3H)-benzoxazolinone (BOA), an allelochemical of several grain crops, was carried out to define the basic protocol. Because of its sensitivity to BOA, Sinapis alba L. was selected as the receiver species. BOA affected growth (fresh weight and length of shoot and root), enzyme activities (ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase, peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase), and chlorophyll fluorescence, whereby root length was the most reliable response parameter. BOA sensitivity was dependent on nutrients for all parameters measured, and, thus, no nutrients were added. A set of experiments with Secale cereale L. and Triticum aestivum L. as donor species was carried out to optimize the protocol. Light and pH were eliminated as primary causes for the observed inhibition. The proposed bioassay has several methodological advantages over current bioassays.

  16. Soil bioassays and the {sup 129}I problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Iodine-129 is a very long-lived radionuclide associated with spent nuclear fuel. Because {sup 129}I has a 10{sup 7}-year half-life, is very mobile in the environment and is a biologically essential element, it is the most limiting radionuclide affecting disposal of spent fuel. Traditionally, the potential impacts of {sup 129}I have been estimated for human receptors, with the implicit assumption that all other organisms are less at risk. Risk is the operative word, the objective for protection of humans is to protect individuals, whereas the objective for other biota is usually to protect populations. Here, {sup 129}I poses an interesting problem: the half-life is so long it is barely radioactive. Thus, the chemical toxicity may be more limiting than the radiological impact. A series of soil bioassays were employed, including a life-cycle plant (Brassica rapa) bioassay, a modified earthworm survival bioassay, a microarthropod colonization/survival bioassay, and a series of more common soil and aquatic bioassays. Chemical toxicity was indicated at soil concentrations as low as 5 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. At these levels, radiological impact on non-human biota would not be expected, and therefore the chemical toxicity effects are more critical. However, human food-chain model estimates show these levels, as pure {sup 129}I, would be unacceptable for human radiological exposure, so that for {sup 129}I, protection of the human environment should also be protective of non-human biota.

  17. [Investigation on pattern and methods of quality control for Chinese materia medica based on dao-di herbs and bioassay - bioassay for Coptis chinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2011-05-01

    Establishment of bioassay methods is the technical issues to be faced with in the bioassay of Chinese materia medica. Taking the bioassay of Coptis chinensis Franch. as an example, the establishment process and application of the bioassay methods (including bio-potency and bio-activity fingerprint) were explained from the aspects of methodology, principle of selection, experimental design, method confirmation and data analysis. The common technologies were extracted and formed with the above aspects, so as to provide technical support for constructing pattern and method of the quality control for Chinese materia medica based on the dao-di herbs and bioassay.

  18. Soil-less bioassays for early screening for resistance to imazapyr in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Tatiana; Breccia, Gabriela; Nestares, Graciela; Mayor, María Laura; Zorzoli, Roxana; Picardi, Liliana

    2009-09-01

    Rapid and efficient diagnostic tests for early screening of herbicide resistance are convenient alternatives to field screening methods. There is a need for a quick, reliable and cost-effective method for rapid diagnosis of imidazolinone resistance in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Two seed germination bioassays were developed. Seeds from three sunflower inbred lines differing in resistance to imidazolinones were germinated either on solid culture medium or placed in plastic pots filled with commercial perlite. After 8 days incubation under controlled conditions, both assays successfully distinguished susceptible genotype from the resistant and intermediate ones. The susceptible genotype showed arrested root growth at all herbicide treatments (root length sunflower populations. Copyright 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. A novel inexpensive murine model of oral chronic digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helber, Izo; Kanashiro, Rosemeire M; Alarcon, Ernesto A; Antonio, Ednei L; Tucci, Paulo J F

    2004-01-01

    A novel inexpensive murine model of oral administration of digitoxin (100 micro g/kg per day) added to routine chow is described. Serum digitoxin levels achieved after oral (n = 5; 116 +/- 14 ng/mL) and subcutaneous (n = 5; 124 +/- 11 ng/mL) administration were similar. A significant increase in the maximal left ventricular pressure rise of treated (n = 9) compared with control (n = 6) rats (dP/dt: 8956 +/- 233 vs 7980 +/- 234 mmHg/s, respectively; P = 0.01) characterized the positive inotropic action of digitoxin. In addition, no differences were observed in treated compared with control rats with regard to the electrocardiogram and systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressures.

  20. Development and validation of inexpensive, automated, dynamic flux chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Almand-Hunter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed and validated an automated, inexpensive, and continuous multiple-species gas-flux monitoring system that can provide data for a variety of relevant atmospheric pollutants, including O3, CO2, and NOx. Validation consisted of conducting concurrent gas-phase dry-deposition experiments, using both dynamic flux chambers and an eddy-covariance system, in a grassy clearing in the Duke Forest (Chapel Hill, NC. Experiments were carried out in June and September under a variety of meteorological conditions. Ozone-deposition measurements from the two methods matched very well (4–10% difference in mean flux rate when the leaf-area index (LAI inside the chambers was representative of the average LAI in the field. The dynamic flux chambers can be considered an accurate measurement system under these conditions.

  1. Inexpensive transparent nanoelectrode for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiang; Pei, Ke; Han, Bing; Li, Ruopeng; Zhou, Guofu; Liu, Jun-Ming; Kempa, Krzysztof; Gao, Jinwei

    2016-06-01

    We report an easily manufacturable and inexpensive transparent conductive electrode for crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells. It is based on a silver nanoparticle network self-forming in the valleys between the pyramids of a textured solar cell surface, transformed into a nanowire network by sintering, and subsequently "buried" under the silicon surface by a metal-assisted chemical etching. We have successfully incorporated these steps into the conventional c-Si solar cell manufacturing process, from which we have eliminated the expensive screen printing and firing steps, typically used to make the macro-electrode of conducting silver fingers. The resulting, preliminary solar cell achieved power conversion efficiency only 14 % less than the conventionally processed c-Si control cell. We expect that a cell with an optimized processing will achieve at least efficiency of the conventional commercial cell, but at significantly reduced manufacturing cost.

  2. Development of marine sediment bioassays and toxicity tests for monitoring and regulation in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thain, J.; Matthiessen, P.

    1995-12-31

    There is a need in Europe and elsewhere for a broad suite of whole-sediment bioassays and toxicity tests which can be used for routine monitoring and assessment of the marine environment and for evaluating the toxic effects of chemicals which may find their way into sediments. Until recently, few European species had been incorporated into such tests but the availability of suitable methodologies is now increasing rapidly. Perhaps the most important recent activity in this area consisted of an international ring test of acute sediment toxicity test methods which was organized by the Oslo and Paris Commissions in 1993, using up to 4 offshore chemicals as test materials. It evaluated the performance of 4 acute (5--10 day) tests involving: the sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum, the bivalve mollusc Abra alba, the amphipod crustacean Corophium volutator, and the polychaete worm Arenicola marina. The ring test concluded that the C. volutator test was the most appropriate for evaluating offshore chemicals, but all these methods are now widely used in Europe, both as toxicity tests and as bioassays. For example, the A. marina procedure (which has both lethal and sublethal endpoints), in combination with the C. volutator method, is now routinely used in the UK for monitoring the toxicity of estuarine sediments. Further activities are in progress. Perhaps the most important is the development of chronic marine sediment tests and bioassays which can be used to assess the long-term effects of the many sedimentary contaminants which are able to persist in this type of habitat and possibly cause delayed effects on the growth and reproduction, etc. of benthic fauna.

  3. Application of a lux-based bioassay to assess soil toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paton, G.I. [Macaulay Land Use Research Inst., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)]|[Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Campbell, C.D. [Macaulay Land Use Research Inst., Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Rattray, E.A.S.; Glover, L.A.; Killham, K. [Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    The expression of prokaryotic bioluminescence is linked with cell metabolism and accordingly bioassays have been developed using naturally bioluminescent bacteria to assess ecotoxicity. Advances in biotechnology have allowed the isolation of the lux genes (responsible for bioluminescence) from marine organisms and their insertion into terrestrial bacteria. This has enabled the use of ecologically relevant bacteria to assess toxicity by measuring bioluminescence response in the presence of toxins. The lux genes were inserted into Pseudomonas fluorescens and Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii as a multi-copy plasmid and also integrated into the chromosome. It was found that in aqueous solutions the plasmid constructs were more sensitive than the chromosomal constructs to a range of toxins. The order of toxicity for Ps. fluorescens was Zn = Cu > Cd > Ni > Cr > DCP and for R. trifolii Zn > Cu > Cd > DCP > Cr. The lux based bioassays were more reproducible and sensitive than ATP and dehydrogenase assays and offered greater sensitivity than Photobacterium phosphoreum assays to assess toxicity of inorganic pollutants. Extracts from 4 soil types were spiked with a range of toxins and when EC{sub 50} values were determined it was shown that toxicity was related to soil characteristics. This enabled the assay to be used to assess the Lee Valley soil experiment which represents an important international study of the effect of the application of contaminated sewage to land. High metal application rates had been shown to have serious implications for soil ecology. Chemical analysis, carried out 26 years after sewage addition confirmed that soil extracts still had increased metal concentrations. The lux-based bioassays, which proved to be rapid, reproducible and sensitive confirmed that the metals were still biologically available and hence toxic.

  4. Soil bioassays as tools for sludge compost quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domene, Xavier; Solà, Laura; Ramírez, Wilson; Alcañiz, Josep M; Andrés, Pilar

    2011-03-01

    Composting is a waste management technology that is becoming more widespread as a response to the increasing production of sewage sludge and the pressure for its reuse in soil. In this study, different bioassays (plant germination, earthworm survival, biomass and reproduction, and collembolan survival and reproduction) were assessed for their usefulness in the compost quality assessment. Compost samples, from two different composting plants, were taken along the composting process, which were characterized and submitted to bioassays (plant germination and collembolan and earthworm performance). Results from our study indicate that the noxious effects of some of the compost samples observed in bioassays are related to the low organic matter stability of composts and the enhanced release of decomposition endproducts, with the exception of earthworms, which are favored. Plant germination and collembolan reproduction inhibition was generally associated with uncomposted sludge, while earthworm total biomass and reproduction were enhanced by these materials. On the other hand, earthworm and collembolan survival were unaffected by the degree of composting of the wastes. However, this pattern was clear in one of the composting procedures assessed, but less in the other, where the release of decomposition endproducts was lower due to its higher stability, indicating the sensitivity and usefulness of bioassays for the quality assessment of composts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioassays for coastal water quality: an assessment using the larval ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although these methods are used globally, the potential of such toxicity tests has not been adequately explored for South African coastal waters. This study serves to describe a simple, cost-effective and relatively quick testing procedure using the development of Haliotis midae larvae as a bioassay of coastal water quality.

  6. Bioassays for coastal water quality: An assessment using the larval ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    2002-10-04

    Oct 4, 2002 ... species as bioassay organisms to test industrial and domestic effluent as well as coastal waters for potential toxicity. Although these ... in that it provides only an indication of the short-term, acutely toxic effects of the effluent, .... To investigate the relationship between the success with which the test end-point ...

  7. Microplate Bioassay for Determining Substrate Selectivity of "Candida rugosa" Lipase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-zhen; Fang, Bai-shan

    2012-01-01

    Substrate selectivity of "Candida rugosa" lipase was tested using "p"-nitrophenyl esters of increasing chain length (C[subscript 1], C[subscript 7], C[subscript 15]) using the high-throughput screening method. A fast and easy 96-well microplate bioassay was developed to help students learn and practice biotechnological specificity screen. The…

  8. Modified agar diffusion bioassay for better quantification of Nisaplin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lalpuria, M; Karwa, V; Anantheswaran, R.C; Floros, J.D

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of different well sizes and pre-diffusion times at 4 °C, on the sensitivity, accuracy and precision of nisin quantification by agar diffusion bioassay. Nisin solution (0.625-125 μg ml(-1...

  9. Book Review: Bioassays with Arthropods: 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The technical book "Bioassays with Arthropods: 2nd Edition" (2007. Jacqueline L. Robertson, Robert M. Russell, Haiganoush K, Preisler and N. E. Nevin, Eds. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 224 pp.) was reviewed for the scientific readership of the peer-reviewed publication Journal of Economic Entomology. ...

  10. US Army Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry: The RBD software package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K. F.; Ward, R. C.; Maddox, L. B.

    1993-01-01

    The RBD (Radiological Bioassay and Dosimetry) software package was developed for the U. S. Army Material Command, Arlington, Virginia, to demonstrate compliance with the radiation protection guidance 10 CFR Part 20 (ref. 1). Designed to be run interactively on an IBM-compatible personal computer, RBD consists of a data base module to manage bioassay data and a computational module that incorporates algorithms for estimating radionuclide intake from either acute or chronic exposures based on measurement of the worker's rate of excretion of the radionuclide or the retained activity in the body. In estimating the intake,RBD uses a separate file for each radionuclide containing parametric representations of the retention and excretion functions. These files also contain dose-per-unit-intake coefficients used to compute the committed dose equivalent. For a given nuclide, if measurements exist for more than one type of assay, an auxiliary module, REPORT, estimates the intake by applying weights assigned in the nuclide file for each assay. Bioassay data and computed results (estimates of intake and committed dose equivalent) are stored in separate data bases, and the bioassay measurements used to compute a given result can be identified. The REPORT module creates a file containing committed effective dose equivalent for each individual that can be combined with the individual's external exposure.

  11. Assessment of acrylamide toxicity using a battery of standardised bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovko, Mira; Vidaković-Cifrek, Željka; Cvetković, Želimira; Bošnir, Jasna; Šikić, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Acrylamide is a monomer widely used as an intermediate in the production of organic chemicals, e.g. polyacrylamides (PAMs). Since PAMs are low cost chemicals with applications in various industries and waste- and drinking water treatment, a certain amount of non-polymerised acrylamide is expected to end up in waterways. PAMs are non-toxic but acrylamide induces neurotoxic effects in humans and genotoxic, reproductive, and carcinogenic effects in laboratory animals. In order to evaluate the effect of acrylamide on freshwater organisms, bioassays were conducted on four species: algae Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, duckweed Lemna minor and water flea Daphnia magna according to ISO (International Organization for Standardisation) standardised methods. This approach ensures the evaluation of acrylamide toxicity on organisms with different levels of organisation and the comparability of results, and it examines the value of using a battery of low-cost standardised bioassays in the monitoring of pollution and contamination of aquatic ecosystems. These results showed that EC50 values were lower for Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata than for Daphnia magna and Lemna minor, which suggests an increased sensitivity of algae to acrylamide. According to the toxic unit approach, the values estimated by the Lemna minor and Daphnia magna bioassays, classify acrylamide as slightly toxic (TU=0-1; Class 1). The results obtained from algal bioassays (Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) revealed the toxic effect of acrylamide (TU=1-10; Class 2) on these organisms.

  12. Evaluation of bioassays for testing Bt sweetpotato events against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, this method was the most labour intensive in terms of frequent replacement of root chips for weevil development. Hence, the most appropriate method for testing Bt efficacy in sweetpotato is the small root egg-plug bioassay. Nonetheless, none of the transgenic events tested provided weevil control probably ...

  13. Bioassays for evaluation of medical products derived from bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesardic, Thea

    2012-06-01

    Bioassays play central role in evaluation of biological products and those derived from bacterial toxins often rely exclusively on in vivo models for assurance of safety and potency. This chapter reviews existing regulatory approved methods designed to provide information on potency and safety of complex biological medicines with an insight into strategies considered for alternative procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Changes in chemical composition and bioassay assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    2005-03-20

    Mar 20, 2005 ... Changes in chemical composition upon processing and bioassay assessment of nutritional potentials of almond fruit waste as an alternative feedstuff were conducted using day-old- cockerels. Proximate analyses revealed that AFW contained valuable nutrients, carbohydrate/dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ...

  15. Initial sample extract stock concentration affects in vitro bioassay-based toxicological risk characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montano, M.; Loffmann, L.; Murk, A.J.; Gutleb, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bioassays have become an alternative for sediment risk profiling, including potential compliance with sediment quality criteria (SQC). In vitro functional bioassays have evolved through standardization and validation towards a confident toxicological hazard estimate of sediments. Sample

  16. Test system stability and natural variability of a Lemna gibba L. bioassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Scherr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In ecotoxicological and environmental studies Lemna spp. are used as test organisms due to their small size, rapid predominantly vegetative reproduction, easy handling and high sensitivity to various chemicals. However, there is not much information available concerning spatial and temporal stability of experimental set-ups used for Lemna bioassays, though this is essential for interpretation and reliability of results. We therefore investigated stability and natural variability of a Lemna gibba bioassay assessing area-related and frond number-related growth rates under controlled laboratory conditions over about one year. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Lemna gibba L. was grown in beakers with Steinberg medium for one week. Area-related and frond number-related growth rates (r(area and r(num were determined with a non-destructive image processing system. To assess inter-experimental stability, 35 independent experiments were performed with 10 beakers each in the course of one year. We observed changes in growth rates by a factor of two over time. These did not correlate well with temperature or relative humidity in the growth chamber. In order to assess intra-experimental stability, we analysed six systematic negative control experiments (nontoxicant tests with 96 replicate beakers each. Evaluation showed that the chosen experimental set-up was stable and did not produce false positive results. The coefficient of variation was lower for r(area (2.99% than for r(num (4.27%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It is hypothesised that the variations in growth rates over time under controlled conditions are partly due to endogenic periodicities in Lemna gibba. The relevance of these variations for toxicity investigations should be investigated more closely. Area-related growth rate seems to be more precise as non-destructive calculation parameter than number-related growth rate. Furthermore, we propose two new validity criteria for Lemna gibba

  17. Test system stability and natural variability of a Lemna gibba L. bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Claudia; Simon, Meinhard; Spranger, Jörg; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2008-09-04

    In ecotoxicological and environmental studies Lemna spp. are used as test organisms due to their small size, rapid predominantly vegetative reproduction, easy handling and high sensitivity to various chemicals. However, there is not much information available concerning spatial and temporal stability of experimental set-ups used for Lemna bioassays, though this is essential for interpretation and reliability of results. We therefore investigated stability and natural variability of a Lemna gibba bioassay assessing area-related and frond number-related growth rates under controlled laboratory conditions over about one year. Lemna gibba L. was grown in beakers with Steinberg medium for one week. Area-related and frond number-related growth rates (r(area) and r(num)) were determined with a non-destructive image processing system. To assess inter-experimental stability, 35 independent experiments were performed with 10 beakers each in the course of one year. We observed changes in growth rates by a factor of two over time. These did not correlate well with temperature or relative humidity in the growth chamber. In order to assess intra-experimental stability, we analysed six systematic negative control experiments (nontoxicant tests) with 96 replicate beakers each. Evaluation showed that the chosen experimental set-up was stable and did not produce false positive results. The coefficient of variation was lower for r(area) (2.99%) than for r(num) (4.27%). It is hypothesised that the variations in growth rates over time under controlled conditions are partly due to endogenic periodicities in Lemna gibba. The relevance of these variations for toxicity investigations should be investigated more closely. Area-related growth rate seems to be more precise as non-destructive calculation parameter than number-related growth rate. Furthermore, we propose two new validity criteria for Lemna gibba bioassays: variability of average specific and section-by-section segmented growth

  18. Design and construction of an inexpensive homemade plant growth chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Fumiaki; Canelon-Suarez, Dario; Griffin, Kelsey; Petersen, John; Meyer, Rachel K; Siegle, Megan; Mase, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth chambers produce controlled environments, which are crucial in making reproducible observations in experimental plant biology research. Commercial plant growth chambers can provide precise controls of environmental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and light cycle, and the capability via complex programming to regulate these environmental parameters. But they are expensive. The high cost of maintaining a controlled growth environment is often a limiting factor when determining experiment size and feasibility. To overcome the limitation of commercial growth chambers, we designed and constructed an inexpensive plant growth chamber with consumer products for a material cost of $2,300. For a comparable growth space, a commercial plant growth chamber could cost $40,000 or more. Our plant growth chamber had outside dimensions of 1.5 m (W) x 1.8 m (D) x 2 m (H), providing a total growth area of 4.5 m2 with 40-cm high clearance. The dimensions of the growth area and height can be flexibly changed. Fluorescent lights with large reflectors provided a relatively spatially uniform photosynthetically active radiation intensity of 140-250 μmoles/m2/sec. A portable air conditioner provided an ample cooling capacity, and a cooling water mister acted as a powerful humidifier. Temperature, relative humidity, and light cycle inside the chamber were controlled via a z-wave home automation system, which allowed the environmental parameters to be monitored and programmed through the internet. In our setting, the temperature was tightly controlled: 22.2°C±0.8°C. The one-hour average relative humidity was maintained at 75%±7% with short spikes up to ±15%. Using the interaction between Arabidopsis and one of its bacterial pathogens as a test experimental system, we demonstrate that experimental results produced in our chamber were highly comparable to those obtained in a commercial growth chamber. In summary, our design of an inexpensive plant growth chamber

  19. Design and construction of an inexpensive homemade plant growth chamber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Katagiri

    Full Text Available Plant growth chambers produce controlled environments, which are crucial in making reproducible observations in experimental plant biology research. Commercial plant growth chambers can provide precise controls of environmental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and light cycle, and the capability via complex programming to regulate these environmental parameters. But they are expensive. The high cost of maintaining a controlled growth environment is often a limiting factor when determining experiment size and feasibility. To overcome the limitation of commercial growth chambers, we designed and constructed an inexpensive plant growth chamber with consumer products for a material cost of $2,300. For a comparable growth space, a commercial plant growth chamber could cost $40,000 or more. Our plant growth chamber had outside dimensions of 1.5 m (W x 1.8 m (D x 2 m (H, providing a total growth area of 4.5 m2 with 40-cm high clearance. The dimensions of the growth area and height can be flexibly changed. Fluorescent lights with large reflectors provided a relatively spatially uniform photosynthetically active radiation intensity of 140-250 μmoles/m2/sec. A portable air conditioner provided an ample cooling capacity, and a cooling water mister acted as a powerful humidifier. Temperature, relative humidity, and light cycle inside the chamber were controlled via a z-wave home automation system, which allowed the environmental parameters to be monitored and programmed through the internet. In our setting, the temperature was tightly controlled: 22.2°C±0.8°C. The one-hour average relative humidity was maintained at 75%±7% with short spikes up to ±15%. Using the interaction between Arabidopsis and one of its bacterial pathogens as a test experimental system, we demonstrate that experimental results produced in our chamber were highly comparable to those obtained in a commercial growth chamber. In summary, our design of an inexpensive plant

  20. Bioassay for aquatic ecosystems review and classification; Rassegna dei principali test di ecotossicologia acquatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanci, Antonella; Rosa, Silvia [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1997-09-01

    Bioassay play a crucial role in assessing the actual or potential impacts of anthropogenic agents on the natural environment. In this technical report, literature on bioassays for aquatic ecosystems has been reviewed and classified. Problems associated with the choice and application of bioassays are discussed.

  1. A lightweight, inexpensive robotic system for insect vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Chelsea; Chisholm, Robert; Petterson, Adam; Cope, Alex

    2017-09-01

    Designing hardware for miniaturized robotics which mimics the capabilities of flying insects is of interest, because they share similar constraints (i.e. small size, low weight, and low energy consumption). Research in this area aims to enable robots with similarly efficient flight and cognitive abilities. Visual processing is important to flying insects' impressive flight capabilities, but currently, embodiment of insect-like visual systems is limited by the hardware systems available. Suitable hardware is either prohibitively expensive, difficult to reproduce, cannot accurately simulate insect vision characteristics, and/or is too heavy for small robotic platforms. These limitations hamper the development of platforms for embodiment which in turn hampers the progress on understanding of how biological systems fundamentally work. To address this gap, this paper proposes an inexpensive, lightweight robotic system for modelling insect vision. The system is mounted and tested on a robotic platform for mobile applications, and then the camera and insect vision models are evaluated. We analyse the potential of the system for use in embodiment of higher-level visual processes (i.e. motion detection) and also for development of navigation based on vision for robotics in general. Optic flow from sample camera data is calculated and compared to a perfect, simulated bee world showing an excellent resemblance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Porcine sebaceous cyst model: an inexpensive, reproducible skin surgery simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Jonathan; Botting, Jonathan

    2005-08-01

    Surgical simulators are an established part of surgical training and are regularly used as part of the objective structured assessment of technical skills. Specific artificial skin models representing cutaneous pathology are available, although they are expensive when compared with pigskin. The limitations of artificial skin models include their difficulty in representing lifelike cutaneous pathology. Our aim was to devise an inexpensive, reproducible surgical simulator that provides the most lifelike representation of the sebaceous cyst. materials and methods: Pigskin, either pig's feet/trotters or pork belly, was incised, and a paintball was inserted subcutaneously and fixed with cyanoacrylic glue. This model has regularly been used in cutaneous surgical courses that we have organized. Either adding more cyanoacrylic glue or allowing more time for the paint ball to absorb fluid from surrounding tissue can also adjust the degree of difficulty. The degree of correlation with lifelike cutaneous pathology is such that we recommend that all courses involved in basic skin surgery should consider using the porcine sebaceous cyst model when teaching excision of sebaceous cysts.

  3. Inexpensive electronics and software for photon statistics and correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamari, Benjamin D; Zhang, Dianwen; Buckman, Richard E; Milas, Peker; Denker, John S; Chen, Hui; Li, Hongmin; Goldner, Lori S

    2014-07-01

    Single-molecule-sensitive microscopy and spectroscopy are transforming biophysics and materials science laboratories. Techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and single-molecule sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are now commonly available in research laboratories but are as yet infrequently available in teaching laboratories. We describe inexpensive electronics and open-source software that bridges this gap, making state-of-the-art research capabilities accessible to undergraduates interested in biophysics. We include a discussion of the intensity correlation function relevant to FCS and how it can be determined from photon arrival times. We demonstrate the system with a measurement of the hydrodynamic radius of a protein using FCS that is suitable for the undergraduate teaching laboratory. The FPGA-based electronics, which are easy to construct, are suitable for more advanced measurements as well, and several applications are described. As implemented, the system has 8 ns timing resolution, can control up to four laser sources, and can collect information from as many as four photon-counting detectors.

  4. Indigenous inexpensive practice models for skill development in neuroendoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitin Bajaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neurosurgery is a branch having a tough learning curve. Residents generally get very less hands-on exposure for advanced procedures like neuroendoscopy. With the limited number of cadavers available and ethical issues associated with animal models, practice models, and simulators are becoming the able alternative. Most of these simulators are very costly. We tried to build indigenous inexpensive practice models that can help in developing most of the skills of neuroendoscopy. Materials and Methods: Models were built for learning hand-eye coordination, dexterity, instrument manipulation, cutting, fine dissection, keyhole concept, drilling, and simulation of laminectomy and ligamentum flavum resection. These were shown in the neuroendoscopic fellowship program conducted in authors' institute, and trainees' responses were recorded. Results: Both novice and experienced neuroendoscopic surgeons validated the models. There was no significant difference between their responses (P = 0.791. Conclusion: Indigenous innovative models can be used to learn and teach neuroendoscopic skills. The presented models were reliable, valid, eco-friendly, highly cost-effective, portable, easily made and can be kept in one's chamber for practicing.

  5. Indigenous Inexpensive Practice Models for Skill Development in Neuroendoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Jitin; Yadav, Yad Ram; Pateriya, Anurag; Parihar, Vijay; Ratre, Shailendra; Dubey, Amitesh

    2017-01-01

    Neurosurgery is a branch having a tough learning curve. Residents generally get very less hands-on exposure for advanced procedures like neuroendoscopy. With the limited number of cadavers available and ethical issues associated with animal models, practice models, and simulators are becoming the able alternative. Most of these simulators are very costly. We tried to build indigenous inexpensive practice models that can help in developing most of the skills of neuroendoscopy. Models were built for learning hand-eye coordination, dexterity, instrument manipulation, cutting, fine dissection, keyhole concept, drilling, and simulation of laminectomy and ligamentum flavum resection. These were shown in the neuroendoscopic fellowship program conducted in authors' institute, and trainees' responses were recorded. Both novice and experienced neuroendoscopic surgeons validated the models. There was no significant difference between their responses (P = 0.791). Indigenous innovative models can be used to learn and teach neuroendoscopic skills. The presented models were reliable, valid, eco-friendly, highly cost-effective, portable, easily made and can be kept in one's chamber for practicing.

  6. Enhancing COSMO-DE ensemble forecasts by inexpensive techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zied Ben Bouallègue

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available COSMO-DE-EPS, a convection-permitting ensemble prediction system based on the high-resolution numerical weather prediction model COSMO-DE, is pre-operational since December 2010, providing probabilistic forecasts which cover Germany. This ensemble system comprises 20 members based on variations of the lateral boundary conditions, the physics parameterizations and the initial conditions. In order to increase the sample size in a computationally inexpensive way, COSMO-DE-EPS is combined with alternative ensemble techniques: the neighborhood method and the time-lagged approach. Their impact on the quality of the resulting probabilistic forecasts is assessed. Objective verification is performed over a six months period, scores based on the Brier score and its decomposition are shown for June 2011. The combination of the ensemble system with the alternative approaches improves probabilistic forecasts of precipitation in particular for high precipitation thresholds. Moreover, combining COSMO-DE-EPS with only the time-lagged approach improves the skill of area probabilities for precipitation and does not deteriorate the skill of 2 m-temperature and wind gusts forecasts.

  7. The use of cultivars of Raphanus sativus for cytokinin bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Kubowicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Six cultivars of radish (Raphanus sativus were tested for their usefulness in radish cytokinin bioassay by the method of Letham (1971. The best cultivar was found to be 'Sopel Lodu' which responds well to both zeatin and 2iP over a wide range of concentrations. The fresh weight of cotyledons increased at most by 71.5% (if treated with zeatin or 101.0% (if treated with 2iP compared to untreated cotyledons. This cultivar is also sensitive to the partially purified cytokinin-like fraction isolated from the pine (Pinus silvestris cambial region. The cultivar 'Sopel Lodu' is therefore proposed to be a suitable plant for cytokinin bioassays.

  8. Efficient Experimental Design Strategies in Toxicology and Bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy E. O'Brien

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Modelling in bioassay often uses linear or nonlinear logistic regression models, and relative potency is often the focus when two or more compounds are to be compared.  Estimation in these settings is typically based on likelihood methods.  Here, we focus on the 3-parameter model representation given in Finney (1978 in which the relative potency is a model parameter.  Using key matrix results and the general equivalence theorem of Kiefer & Wolfowitz (1960, this paper establishes key design properties of the optimal design for relative potency using this model.  We also highlight aspects of subset designs for the relative potency parameter and extend geometric designs to efficient design settings of bioassay.  These latter designs are thus useful for both parameter estimation and checking for goodness-of-fit.  A typical yet insightful example is provided from the field of toxicology to illustrate our findings.

  9. BioAssay templates for the semantic web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M. Clark

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Annotation of bioassay protocols using semantic web vocabulary is a way to make experiment descriptions machine-readable. Protocols are communicated using concise scientific English, which precludes most kinds of analysis by software algorithms. Given the availability of a sufficiently expressive ontology, some or all of the pertinent information can be captured by asserting a series of facts, expressed as semantic web triples (subject, predicate, object. With appropriate annotation, assays can be searched, clustered, tagged and evaluated in a multitude of ways, analogous to other segments of drug discovery informatics. The BioAssay Ontology (BAO has been previously designed for this express purpose, and provides a layered hierarchy of meaningful terms which can be linked to. Currently the biggest challenge is the issue of content creation: scientists cannot be expected to use the BAO effectively without having access to software tools that make it straightforward to use the vocabulary in a canonical way. We have sought to remove this barrier by: (1 defining a BioAssay Template (BAT data model; (2 creating a software tool for experts to create or modify templates to suit their needs; and (3 designing a common assay template (CAT to leverage the most value from the BAO terms. The CAT was carefully assembled by biologists in order to find a balance between the maximum amount of information captured vs. low degrees of freedom in order to keep the user experience as simple as possible. The data format that we use for describing templates and corresponding annotations is the native format of the semantic web (RDF triples, and we demonstrate some of the ways that generated content can be meaningfully queried using the SPARQL language. We have made all of these materials available as open source (http://github.com/cdd/bioassay-template, in order to encourage community input and use within diverse projects, including but not limited to our own

  10. Photodynamic bioassay of benzo(a)pyrene with Paramecium caudatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, S.S.; Small, M.; Koplan, J.; Mantel, N.; Hutner, S.H.

    1963-07-01

    The photodynamic toxicity of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) to Paramecium caudatum and a variety of other in vivo systems is well established. Recent improvements in the culture of P. caudatum have facilitated standardization of the photodynamic response. A simple bioassay procedure, based on this response, was developed as a preliminary to the assay for photodynamic toxicity of crude organic extracts, such as atmospheric pollutants.

  11. Novel bioassay using Bacillus megaterium to detect tetracycline in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumini, Melisa; Nagel, Orlando G; Molina, Pilar; Althaus, Rafael L

    2016-01-01

    Tetracyclines are used for the prevention and control of dairy cattle diseases. Residues of these drugs can be excreted into milk. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a microbiological method using Bacillus megaterium to detect tetracyclines (chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline and tetracycline) in milk. In order to approximate the limits of detection of the bioassay to the Maximum Residue Limit (100μg/l) for milk tetracycline, different concentrations of chloramphenicol (0, 1000, 1500 and 2000μg/l) were tested. The detection limits calculated were similar to the Maximum Residue Limits when a bioassay using B. megaterium ATCC 9885 spores (2.8×10(8)spores/ml) and chloramphenicol (2000μg/l) was utilized. This bioassay detects 105μg/l of chlortetracycline, 100μg/l of oxytetracycline and 134μg/l of tetracycline in 5h. Therefore, this method is suitable to be incorporated into a microbiological multi-residue system for the identification of tetracyclines in milk. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. ZnO as an Efficient and Inexpensive Catalyst for One Pot Synthesis of 2, 4, 5 -Triphenyl-1H - imidazole Derivatives at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babasaheb P. Bandgar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved and rapid one pot synthesis of 2,4,6-triphenyl-1H-imidazoles on condensation with benzil, aromatic aldehyde and NH4OAc has been carried out using ZnO as an efficient and inexpensive catalyst in high yield at room temperature. The short reaction time, good yields (60-93%, environmental friendly procedure, mild reaction condition and convenient operation are important advantage of these synthetic methods.

  13. The Text-mining based PubChem Bioassay neighboring analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lianyi; Suzek, Tugba O; Wang, Yanli; Bryant, Steve H

    2010-11-08

    In recent years, the number of High Throughput Screening (HTS) assays deposited in PubChem has grown quickly. As a result, the volume of both the structured information (i.e. molecular structure, bioactivities) and the unstructured information (such as descriptions of bioassay experiments), has been increasing exponentially. As a result, it has become even more demanding and challenging to efficiently assemble the bioactivity data by mining the huge amount of information to identify and interpret the relationships among the diversified bioassay experiments. In this work, we propose a text-mining based approach for bioassay neighboring analysis from the unstructured text descriptions contained in the PubChem BioAssay database. The neighboring analysis is achieved by evaluating the cosine scores of each bioassay pair and fraction of overlaps among the human-curated neighbors. Our results from the cosine score distribution analysis and assay neighbor clustering analysis on all PubChem bioassays suggest that strong correlations among the bioassays can be identified from their conceptual relevance. A comparison with other existing assay neighboring methods suggests that the text-mining based bioassay neighboring approach provides meaningful linkages among the PubChem bioassays, and complements the existing methods by identifying additional relationships among the bioassay entries. The text-mining based bioassay neighboring analysis is efficient for correlating bioassays and studying different aspects of a biological process, which are otherwise difficult to achieve by existing neighboring procedures due to the lack of specific annotations and structured information. It is suggested that the text-mining based bioassay neighboring analysis can be used as a standalone or as a complementary tool for the PubChem bioassay neighboring process to enable efficient integration of assay results and generate hypotheses for the discovery of bioactivities of the tested reagents.

  14. Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    fast and inexpensive supply for polymer master models and a ceramic shaping method that enables the replication of the RP model into multiple ceramic materials within a short time. (Knitter et al 1999). 2. Rapid prototyping process chains. The manufacturing of ceramic microparts presented here set out with the 3D-CAD ...

  15. Inexpensive Open-Source Data Logging in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickert, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    I present a general-purpose open-source field-capable data logger, which provides a mechanism to develop dense networks of inexpensive environmental sensors. This data logger was developed as a low-power variant of the Arduino open-source development system, and is named the ALog ("Arduino Logger") BottleLogger (it is slim enough to fit inside a Nalgene water bottle) version 1.0. It features an integrated high-precision real-time clock, SD card slot for high-volume data storage, and integrated power switching. The ALog can interface with sensors via six analog/digital pins, two digital pins, and one digital interrupt pin that can read event-based inputs, such as those from a tipping-bucket rain gauge. We have successfully tested the ALog BottleLogger with ultrasonic rangefinders (for water stage and snow accumulation and melt), temperature sensors, tipping-bucket rain gauges, soil moisture and water potential sensors, resistance-based tools to measure frost heave, and cameras that it triggers based on events. The source code for the ALog, including functions to interface with a a range of commercially-available sensors, is provided as an Arduino C++ library with example implementations. All schematics, circuit board layouts, and source code files are open-source and freely available under GNU GPL v3.0 and Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported licenses. Through this work, we hope to foster a community-driven movement to collect field environmental data on a budget that permits citizen-scientists and researchers from low-income countries to collect the same high-quality data as researchers in wealthy countries. These data can provide information about global change to managers, governments, scientists, and interested citizens worldwide. Watertight box with ALog BottleLogger data logger on the left and battery pack with 3 D cells on the right. Data can be collected for 3-5 years on one set of batteries.

  16. Liver Cancer Detection by a Simple, Inexpensive and Effective Immunosensor with Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congo Tak-Shing Ching

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Regular monitoring of blood α-fetoprotein (AFP and/or carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA levels is important for the routine screening of liver cancer. However, AFP and CEA have a much lower specificity than des-γ-carboxyprothrombin (DCP to detect liver cancer. Therefore, the study reported here was designed, to develop a screen-printed DCP immunosensor incorporating zinc oxide nanoparticles, for accurate determination of DCP. The designed immunosensor shows low detection limits for the detection of DCP: 0.440 ng/mL (based on impedance measurement, 0.081 ng/mL (based on real part of impedance measurement and 0.078 ng/mL (based on imaginary part of impedance measurement, within the range of 3.125 ng/mL to 2000 ng/mL. In addition, there was little interference to DCP determination by molecules such as Na+, K+, Ca2+, Cl−, glucose, urea, and uric acid. It is therefore concluded that the DCP immunosensor developed and reported here is simple, inexpensive and effective, and shows promise in the rapid screening of early-stage liver cancer at home with a point-of-care approach.

  17. Microscopic characterization of particle size and shape: an inexpensive and versatile method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, M E; Amidon, G E

    1992-07-01

    A variety of methods exists for measuring individual particle dimensions as a means of characterizing particle size, size distribution, and shape. The equipment described in this report belongs to the class of semiautomatic non-TV-interfaced analyzers. Unlike many existing image analysis systems, three-dimensional form measurements and texture data for the calculation of particle size and shape parameters can be determined easily and directly from each particle profile using this system. Essentially all data are collected directly from the particle and recorded by the computer with no intermediate steps. Much of the system consists of general-purpose and relatively inexpensive, commercially available hardware and software. Using this method, particle size, size distribution, and qualitative or quantitative shape information can easily and rapidly be obtained simultaneously. Particle length and width characterization, for example, can take less than 15 min. The equipment is versatile and flexible in measurements and calculations. The size and shape parameters to be measured are determined by the researcher and not the instrument. The ease with which this information can be obtained from small samples early in the development process makes it a valuable tool for the formulator.

  18. Efficient steam generation by inexpensive narrow gap evaporation device for solar applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morciano, Matteo; Fasano, Matteo; Salomov, Uktam; Ventola, Luigi; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro

    2017-09-20

    Technologies for solar steam generation with high performance can help solving critical societal issues such as water desalination or sterilization, especially in developing countries. Very recently, we have witnessed a rapidly growing interest in the scientific community proposing sunlight absorbers for direct conversion of liquid water into steam. While those solutions can possibly be of interest from the perspective of the involved novel materials, in this study we intend to demonstrate that efficient steam generation by solar source is mainly due to a combination of efficient solar absorption, capillary water feeding and narrow gap evaporation process, which can also be achieved through common materials. To this end, we report both numerical and experimental evidence that advanced nano-structured materials are not strictly necessary for performing sunlight driven water-to-vapor conversion at high efficiency (i.e. ≥85%) and relatively low optical concentration (≈10 suns). Coherently with the principles of frugal innovation, those results unveil that solar steam generation for desalination or sterilization purposes may be efficiently obtained by a clever selection and assembly of widespread and inexpensive materials.

  19. A simple and inexpensive technique for assessing microbial contamination during drilling operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, André; Vuillemin, Aurèle; Kallmeyer, Jens; Wagner, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    , the core was cut and the liner fluid collected. From each whole round core (WRC) that was taken for microbiological and biogeochemical analyses, small samples of 1 cc were retrieved with sterile cutoff syringes from the rim, the center and an intermediate position. After dilution and homogenization in 9 mL MilliQ water, 10 μL of the sediment slurry was transferred onto a filter membrane and particles counted via fluorescence microscopy. Additionally, particles in the liner fluid were also quantified. This allows the quantification of the amount of drilling fluid that has entered the sediment sample during drilling. The minimum detectable volume of drilling fluid was in the order of single nanoliters per cc of sediment, which is in the range of established techniques. The presented method requires only a minimum of equipment and allows rapid determination of contamination in the sediment core and an easy to handle on-site analysis at low costs. The sensitivity is in the same range as perfluorocarbon and microsphere tracer applications. Thus, it offers an inexpensive but powerful technique for contamination assessment for future drilling campaigns.

  20. Development of a rapid and sensitive battery of bioassays for risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... studies it is known that the cyclic heptapeptide, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) has a potent and specific inhibi- tory effect on animal and plant protein phosphatases type. 1 and 2A, respectively (MacKintosh et al., 1990). Incidents of fatal cyanobacterial poisoning in South Africa are not uncommon and these occur ...

  1. Rapid, Femtomolar Bioassays in Complex Matrices ComBining Microfluidics and Magnetoelectronics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mulvaney, S. P; Cole, C. L; Kniller, M. D; Malito, M; Tamanaha, C. R; Rife, J. C; Stanton, M. W; Whitman, L. J

    2007-01-01

    ...". In FFD assays, analytes captured onto a microarray surface are labeled with microbeads, and a controlled laminar flow is then used to apply microfluidic forces sufficient to preferentially remove...

  2. A rapid phospholipase A2 bioassay using 14C-oleate-labelled E. coli bacterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T; von Wichert, P; Weins, D

    1989-02-01

    Two methods of phospholipase A2 determination using 14C-labelled E. coli bacterias as substrate were compared. One method works with a filter membrane for separation of cleaved 14C-oleate from remaining phospholipids, the other uses the well-known thin-layer chromatography for lipid analysis. Some features of human serum phospholipase A2 regarding pH and Ca2+ dependency were investigated. Possible sources of errors were discussed. It was shown that either method can differentiate between normal and pathologically elevated phospholipase A2 levels, but that the filter method is superior in terms of sensitivity and workload.

  3. A miniature bioassay for testing the acute phytotoxicity of photosystem II herbicides on seagrass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Wilkinson

    Full Text Available Photosystem II (PSII herbicides have been detected in nearshore tropical waters such as those of the Great Barrier Reef and may add to the pressure posed by runoff containing sediments and nutrients to threatened seagrass habitats. There is a growing number of studies into the potential effects of herbicides on seagrass, generally using large experimental setups with potted plants. Here we describe the successful development of an acute 12-well plate phytotoxicity assay for the PSII herbicide Diuron using isolated Halophila ovalis leaves. Fluorescence images demonstrated Diuron affected the entire leaf surface evenly and responses were not influenced by isolating leaves from the plant. The optimum exposure duration was 24 h, by which time the inhibition of effective quantum yield of PSII (∆F/F(m' was highest and no deterioration of photosystems was evident in control leaves. The inhibition of ∆F/F(m' by Diuron in isolated H. ovalis leaves was identical to both potted and hydroponically grown plants (with leaves remaining attached to rhizomes, indicating similar reductions in photosynthetic activity in these acute well-plate assays. The sensitivity of the assay was not influenced by irradiance (range tested 40 to 400 μmol photons m(-2 s(-1. High irradiance, however, caused photo-oxidative stress in H. ovalis and this generally impacted in an additive or sub-additive way with Diuron to damage PSII. The bioassay using isolated leaves is more rapid, uses far less biological material and does not rely on specialised aquarium facilities in comparison with assays using potted plants. The development and validation of this sensitive bioassay will be useful to reliably screen and monitor the phytotoxicity of existing and emerging PSII herbicides and contribute to risk assessments and water quality guideline development in the future.

  4. A novel bioassay for the activity determination of therapeutic human brain natriuretic peptide (BNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP is an important peptide-based therapeutic drug indicated for the treatment of acute heart failure. Accurate determination of the potency of therapeutic rhBNP is crucial for the safety and efficacy of the drug. The current bioassay involves use of rabbit aortic strips, with experiments being complicated and time-consuming and markedly variable in results. Animal-less methods with better precision and accuracy should be explored. We have therefore developed an alternative cell-based assay, which relies on the ability of BNP to induce cGMP production in HEK293 cells expressing BNP receptor guanylyl cyclase-A. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An alternative assay based on the measurement of BNP-induced cGMP production was developed. Specifically, the bioassay employs cells engineered to express BNP receptor guanylyl cyclase-A (GCA. Upon rhBNP stimulation, the levels of the second messager cGMP in these cells drastically increased and subsequently secreted into culture supernatants. The quantity of cGMP, which corresponds to the rhBNP activity, was determined using a competitive ELISA developed by us. Compared with the traditional assay, the novel cell-based assay demonstrated better reproducibility and precision. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The optimized cell-based assay is much simpler, more rapid and precise compared with the traditional assay using animal tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a novel and viable alternative assay for rhBNP potency analysis.

  5. Restructuring the syllabus for MD Pharmacology: Retrospection of bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Mulkalwar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Career prospects in Pharmacology are witnessing a sea change due to fast and unanticipated development in the field of clinical research. Numerous openings exist now in academia, pharmaceutical industry, Clinical Research Organizations (CRO or as regulatory consultants, experimental pharmacologists, etc. In short, there are various options to choose from, depending on one′s interest. It′s high time we ponder now over the training programme for post-graduate students in Pharmacology. It needs to be revised keeping in mind the job prospects & uniqueness of the MD Pharmacology degree. Aim: To take suggestions of experienced pharmacologists on the present syllabus for MD Pharmacology and their opinion on continuation of Bioassay experiment which is currently an important part of it . Materials and Methods: A structured questionnaire was given to 30 experienced pharmacologists to seek their opinion on MD Pharmacology syllabus & continuation of Bioassay as a part of MD practical. Results: Out of 30 participants, 29 (96.6% did not use their knowledge of Bioassay during their 10 years of post MD career, whether in pharmaceutical industry or in academics. Only 5 of them (16.6% feel that experiment on bioassay should be continued in the current state. 76.7% of them wish it to be modified to a Dose Response Curve ( DRC . 6.71% feel that it should be totally scrapped. All the participants feel the need of revising current MD Pharmacology syllabus. Current syllabus is inclined more towards preparing good academicians but it lacks the proper training for creating good clinical research professionals. Medical writing, writing necessary documents for clinical trials including regulatory documents, writing an article for medical journals, marketing communication, product monograph and patient information of a clinical trial could be incorporated. They should be aware of the regulatory requirements for conducting studies on investigational drugs

  6. Simple, inexpensive technique for high-quality smartphone fundus photography in human and animal eyes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haddock, Luis J; Kim, David Y; Mukai, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We describe in detail a relatively simple technique of fundus photography in human and rabbit eyes using a smartphone, an inexpensive app for the smartphone, and instruments that are readily...

  7. Simple, Inexpensive Technique for High-Quality Smartphone Fundus Photography in Human and Animal Eyes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haddock, Luis J; Kim, David Y; Mukai, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We describe in detail a relatively simple technique of fundus photography in human and rabbit eyes using a smartphone, an inexpensive app for the smartphone, and instruments that are readily...

  8. A simple and inexpensive "cell dissociation sieve-tissue grinder" apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, K; Sundar, S

    2001-05-01

    A simple and inexpensive cell dissociation sieve-tissue grinder apparatus consisting essentially of stainless steel sieve (the one popularly used for sieving tea leaves) and a glass syringe plunger acting as pestle, is described for making single cell suspension.

  9. Zebrafish bioassay-guided microfractionation identifies anticonvulsant steroid glycosides from the Philippine medicinal plant Solanum torvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challal, Soura; Buenafe, Olivia E M; Queiroz, Emerson F; Maljevic, Snezana; Marcourt, Laurence; Bock, Merle; Kloeti, Werner; Dayrit, Fabian M; Harvey, Alan L; Lerche, Holger; Esguerra, Camila V; de Witte, Peter A M; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Crawford, Alexander D

    2014-10-15

    Medicinal plants used for the treatment of epilepsy are potentially a valuable source of novel antiepileptic small molecules. To identify anticonvulsant secondary metabolites, we performed an in vivo, zebrafish-based screen of medicinal plants used in Southeast Asia for the treatment of seizures. Solanum torvum Sw. (Solanaceae) was identified as having significant anticonvulsant activity in zebrafish larvae with seizures induced by the GABAA antagonist pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). This finding correlates well with the ethnomedical use of this plant in the Philippines, where a water decoction of S. torvum leaves is used to treat epileptic seizures. HPLC microfractionation of the bioactive crude extract, in combination with the in vivo zebrafish seizure assay, enabled the rapid localization of several bioactive compounds that were partially identified online by UHPLC-TOF-MS as steroid glycosides. Targeted isolation of the active constituents from the methanolic extract enabled the complete de novo structure identification of the six main bioactive compounds that were also present in the traditional preparation. To partially mimic the in vivo metabolism of these triterpene glycosides, their common aglycone was generated by acid hydrolysis. The isolated molecules exhibited significant anticonvulsant activity in zebrafish seizure assays. These results underscore the potential of zebrafish bioassay-guided microfractionation to rapidly identify novel bioactive small molecules of natural origin.

  10. A Computationally Inexpensive Optimal Guidance via Radial-Basis-Function Neural Network for Autonomous Soft Landing on Asteroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    Full Text Available Optimal guidance is essential for the soft landing task. However, due to its high computational complexities, it is hardly applied to the autonomous guidance. In this paper, a computationally inexpensive optimal guidance algorithm based on the radial basis function neural network (RBFNN is proposed. The optimization problem of the trajectory for soft landing on asteroids is formulated and transformed into a two-point boundary value problem (TPBVP. Combining the database of initial states with the relative initial co-states, an RBFNN is trained offline. The optimal trajectory of the soft landing is determined rapidly by applying the trained network in the online guidance. The Monte Carlo simulations of soft landing on the Eros433 are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed guidance algorithm.

  11. A Computationally Inexpensive Optimal Guidance via Radial-Basis-Function Neural Network for Autonomous Soft Landing on Asteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Keping; Zhao, Bo; Li, Yuanchun

    2015-01-01

    Optimal guidance is essential for the soft landing task. However, due to its high computational complexities, it is hardly applied to the autonomous guidance. In this paper, a computationally inexpensive optimal guidance algorithm based on the radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is proposed. The optimization problem of the trajectory for soft landing on asteroids is formulated and transformed into a two-point boundary value problem (TPBVP). Combining the database of initial states with the relative initial co-states, an RBFNN is trained offline. The optimal trajectory of the soft landing is determined rapidly by applying the trained network in the online guidance. The Monte Carlo simulations of soft landing on the Eros433 are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed guidance algorithm.

  12. The activity of the pyrrole insecticide chlorfenapyr in mosquito bioassay: towards a more rational testing and screening of non-neurotoxic insecticides for malaria vector control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxborough, Richard M; N'Guessan, Raphael; Jones, Rebecca; Kitau, Jovin; Ngufor, Corine; Malone, David; Mosha, Franklin W; Rowland, Mark W

    2015-03-24

    The rapid selection of pyrethroid resistance throughout sub-Saharan Africa is a serious threat to malaria vector control. Chlorfenapyr is a pyrrole insecticide which shows no cross resistance to insecticide classes normally used for vector control and is effective on mosquito nets under experimental hut conditions. Unlike neurotoxic insecticides, chlorfenapyr owes its toxicity to disruption of metabolic pathways in mitochondria that enable cellular respiration. A series of experiments explored whether standard World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for evaluation of long-lasting insecticidal nets, developed through testing of pyrethroid insecticides, are suitable for evaluation of non-neurotoxic insecticides. The efficacy of WHO recommended cone, cylinder and tunnel tests was compared for pyrethroids and chlorfenapyr. To establish bioassay exposure times predictive of insecticide-treated net (ITN) efficacy in experimental hut trials, standard three-minute bioassays of pyrethroid and chlorfenapyr ITNs were compared with longer exposures. Mosquito behaviour and response to chlorfenapyr ITN in bioassays conducted at night were compared to day and across a range of temperatures representative of highland and lowland transmission. Standard three-minute bioassay of chlorfenapyr produced extremely low levels of mortality compared to pyrethroids. Thirty-minute day-time bioassay produced mortality closer to hut efficacy of chlorfenapyr ITN but still fell short of the WHO threshold. Overnight tunnel test with chlorfenapyr produced 100% mortality and exceeded the WHO threshold of 80%. The endogenous circadian activity rhythm of anophelines results in inactivity by day and raised metabolism and flight activity by night. A model which explains improved toxicity of chlorfenapyr ITN when tested at night, and during the day at higher ambient temperature, is that activation of chlorfenapyr and disruption of respiratory pathways is enhanced when the insect is more metabolically

  13. Optimisation of the microplate resazurin assay for screening and bioassay-guided fractionation of phytochemical extracts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Taryn E; Li, Haoxin; Colquhoun, Caitlyn D; Johnson, John A; Webster, Duncan; Gray, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Because of increased resistance to current drugs, there is an urgent need to discover new anti-mycobacterial compounds for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs. The microplate resazurin assay (MRA) is commonly used to evaluate natural products and synthetic compounds for anti-mycobacterial activity. However, the assay can be problematic and unreliable when screening methanolic phytochemical extracts. To optimise the MRA for the screening and bioassay-guided fractionation of phytochemical extracts using Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra. The effects of varying assay duration, resazurin solution composition, solvent (dimethyl sulphoxide - DMSO) concentration and type of microtitre plate used on the results and reliability of the MRA were investigated. The optimal bioassay protocol was applied to methanolic extracts of medicinal plants that have been reported to possess anti-mycobacterial activity. The variables investigated were found to have significant effects on the results obtained with the MRA. A standardised procedure that can reliably quantify anti-mycobacterial activity of phytochemical extracts in as little as 48 h was identified. The optimised MRA uses 2% aqueous DMSO, with an indicator solution of 62.5 µg/mL resazurin in 5% aqueous Tween 80 over 96 h incubation. The study has identified an optimal procedure for the MRA when used with M. tuberculosis H37Ra that gives rapid, reliable and consistent results. The assay procedure has been used successfully for the screening and bioassay-guided fractionation of anti-mycobacterial compounds from methanol extracts of Canadian medicinal plants. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A Bioassay for Determining Resistance Levels in Tarnished Plant Bug Populations to Neonicotinoid Insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory bioassay was developed and used to test field populations of the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), for resistance development to the neonicitinoid insecticides imidacloprid (Trimax®) and thiamethoxam (Centric®). The bioassay determined LC50 values by feeding...

  15. Profiling animal toxicants by automatically mining public bioassay data: a big data approach for computational toxicology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available In vitro bioassays have been developed and are currently being evaluated as potential alternatives to traditional animal toxicity models. Already, the progress of high throughput screening techniques has resulted in an enormous amount of publicly available bioassay data having been generated for a large collection of compounds. When a compound is tested using a collection of various bioassays, all the testing results can be considered as providing a unique bio-profile for this compound, which records the responses induced when the compound interacts with different cellular systems or biological targets. Profiling compounds of environmental or pharmaceutical interest using useful toxicity bioassay data is a promising method to study complex animal toxicity. In this study, we developed an automatic virtual profiling tool to evaluate potential animal toxicants. First, we automatically acquired all PubChem bioassay data for a set of 4,841 compounds with publicly available rat acute toxicity results. Next, we developed a scoring system to evaluate the relevance between these extracted bioassays and animal acute toxicity. Finally, the top ranked bioassays were selected to profile the compounds of interest. The resulting response profiles proved to be useful to prioritize untested compounds for their animal toxicity potentials and form a potential in vitro toxicity testing panel. The protocol developed in this study could be combined with structure-activity approaches and used to explore additional publicly available bioassay datasets for modeling a broader range of animal toxicities.

  16. PubChem BioAssay: A Decade's Development toward Open High-Throughput Screening Data Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Cheng, Tiejun; Bryant, Stephen H

    2017-07-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is now routinely conducted for drug discovery by both pharmaceutical companies and screening centers at academic institutions and universities. Rapid advance in assay development, robot automation, and computer technology has led to the generation of terabytes of data in screening laboratories. Despite the technology development toward HTS productivity, fewer efforts were devoted to HTS data integration and sharing. As a result, the huge amount of HTS data was rarely made available to the public. To fill this gap, the PubChem BioAssay database ( https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pcassay/ ) was set up in 2004 to provide open access to the screening results tested on chemicals and RNAi reagents. With more than 10 years' development and contributions from the community, PubChem has now become the largest public repository for chemical structures and biological data, which provides an information platform to worldwide researchers supporting drug development, medicinal chemistry study, and chemical biology research. This work presents a review of the HTS data content in the PubChem BioAssay database and the progress of data deposition to stimulate knowledge discovery and data sharing. It also provides a description of the database's data standard and basic utilities facilitating information access and use for new users.

  17. Morton arboretum bioassays: earthworm bioassay procedures to evaluate the extent of aerially dispersed lead and cadmium in an urban arboretum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, G.S.; Simmers, J.W.; Marquenie, J.M.; Kelsey, P.D.

    1987-01-27

    Aerially dispersed heavy metals from a high-speed motorway have been shown to be entering an urban arboretum. Lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) were found as remote as 930 m from an east-west, multi-lane motorway. Both Pb and Cd were bioavailable to earthworms (Eisenia foetida) and both metals were more concentrated in surface soils than at depths of 1 meter. Seven sampling stations were established at progressive intervals along the 930 m transect. At all sampling stations, soil cores 15 cm deep and replicated four times were collected. The sod was removed from each sample except for one station 33 m away from the motorway. This was retained and tested along with some additional 1 m depth soil cores. All samples were transported to the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) where bioassay tests utilizing the earthworm (Eisenia foetida) were conducted under controlled conditions.

  18. A new PCR-based bioassay strategy for the detection of type A trichothecenes in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowens, Priscilla; Lancova, Katerina; Dip, Ramiro; Povilaityte, Vitalija; Stroka, Jörg; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2009-05-01

    Type A trichothecenes (primarily T-2 and HT-2 toxins) are common fungal metabolites found in a wide range of grains and other field crops grown in temperate climatic zones. By acting as potent inhibitors of protein synthesis, T-2 and HT-2 exert adverse effects particularly against rapidly proliferating tissues, including the bone marrow, the immune system and epithelial cells. Based on toxicity studies in laboratory and farm animals, a temporary tolerable daily intake for the sum of T-2 and HT-2 has been issued in the European Union. However, exposure assessments suggest that the combined intake of these natural compounds exceeds in many cases the proposed threshold. To further protect the consumers, it is therefore necessary to screen a large number of food samples for parts per billion levels of both T-2 and HT-2. Towards that goal, we are the first to report that these two type A trichothecenes induce fast and high-amplitude transcriptional changes in cultured human breast cancer cells. This specific response involving marker gene inductions by more than 1000-fold has been exploited to develop a real-time PCR-based screening method that displays a limit of detection of 5 ng g(-1) for T-2 and 10 ng g(-1) for HT-2. The practicability of this bioassay is demonstrated by its application to the detection of type A trichothecenes in different food matrices.

  19. Evaluation and QSAR modeling on multiple endpoints of estrogen activity based on different bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanxiang; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2008-02-01

    There is a great need for an effective means of rapidly assessing endocrine-disrupting activity, especially estrogen-simulating activity, due to the large number of chemicals that have serious adverse effects on the environment. Many approaches using a variety of biological screening assays are used to identify endocrine disrupting chemicals. The present investigation analyzes the consistency and peculiarity of information from different experimental assays collected from a literature survey, by studying the correlation of the different endpoints. In addition, the activity values of more widely used selected bioassays have been combined by principle components analysis (PCA) to build one cumulative endpoint, the estrogen activity index (EAI), for priority setting to identify chemicals most likely possessing estrogen activity for early entry into screening. This index was then modeled using only a few theoretical molecular descriptors. The constructed MLR-QSAR model has been statistically validated for its predictive power, and can be proposed as a preliminary evaluative method to screen/prioritize estrogens according to their integrated estrogen activity, just starting from molecular structure.

  20. The use of insects as a bioassay for Penaeus merguiensis densovirus (PmergDNV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fauce, Kathy A; Owens, Leigh

    2008-05-01

    The lack of available cell lines has hampered the study of viral diseases in crustaceans. This is particularly important for aquaculture which has been plagued by viral diseases since its rapid expansion to meet with the growing demand for seafood products. This study was designed to find an alternative bioassay to cell lines by investigating the use of insects as potential animal models for Penaeus merguiensis densovirus (PmergDNV). Acheta domesticus (house cricket) and Tenebrio molitor (mealworms) were challenged with approximately 1x10(6) virions of PmergDNV by inoculation. PmergDNV was detected in 20% of Tenebrio molitor and 86.6% of Acheta domesticus challenged with PmergDNV. During a subsequent time course experiment, there was a non significant increase in PmergDNV titres (10(4-5) virions), reaching a maximum peak at day 5 (10(6) copies). A threshold of PmergDNV DNA level equal to or greater than 10(3) virions was necessary for mortality in Acheta domesticus. As the inoculum increased from 10(3) DNA copies to 10(4), 10(5), 10(6), mortality increased from 20% to 60%, 80% and 100%, respectively. This is the first evidence that insects may be directly used to study viruses from crustaceans and concludes Acheta domesticus may be used as a potential model to study Penaeus merguiensis densovirus.

  1. Closed Loop Experiment Manager (CLEM—An Open and Inexpensive Solution for Multichannel Electrophysiological Recordings and Closed Loop Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananel Hazan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is growing need for multichannel electrophysiological systems that record from and interact with neuronal systems in near real-time. Such systems are needed, for example, for closed loop, multichannel electrophysiological/optogenetic experimentation in vivo and in a variety of other neuronal preparations, or for developing and testing neuro-prosthetic devices, to name a few. Furthermore, there is a need for such systems to be inexpensive, reliable, user friendly, easy to set-up, open and expandable, and possess long life cycles in face of rapidly changing computing environments. Finally, they should provide powerful, yet reasonably easy to implement facilities for developing closed-loop protocols for interacting with neuronal systems. Here, we survey commercial and open source systems that address these needs to varying degrees. We then present our own solution, which we refer to as Closed Loop Experiments Manager (CLEM. CLEM is an open source, soft real-time, Microsoft Windows desktop application that is based on a single generic personal computer (PC and an inexpensive, general-purpose data acquisition board. CLEM provides a fully functional, user-friendly graphical interface, possesses facilities for recording, presenting and logging electrophysiological data from up to 64 analog channels, and facilities for controlling external devices, such as stimulators, through digital and analog interfaces. Importantly, it includes facilities for running closed-loop protocols written in any programming language that can generate dynamic link libraries (DLLs. We describe the application, its architecture and facilities. We then demonstrate, using networks of cortical neurons growing on multielectrode arrays (MEA that despite its reliance on generic hardware, its performance is appropriate for flexible, closed-loop experimentation at the neuronal network level.

  2. Rapid and inexpensive body fluid identification by RNA profiling-based multiplex High Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2014-01-01

    .... However, traditional protein-based methods do not permit the identification of all body fluids and tissues, and thus molecular based strategies for the conclusive identification of all forensically...

  3. Rapid and inexpensive body fluid identification by RNA profiling-based multiplex High Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Erin K. Hanson; Jack Ballantyne

    2014-01-01

    Positive identification of the nature of biological material present on evidentiary items can be crucial for understanding the circumstances surrounding a crime. However, traditional protein-based methods do not permit the identification of all body fluids and tissues, and thus molecular based strategies for the conclusive identification of all forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues need to be developed. Messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is an example of such a molecular-based appro...

  4. Rapid and inexpensive body fluid identification by RNA profiling-based multiplex High Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2013-01-01

    .... However, traditional protein-based methods do not permit the identification of all body fluids and tissues, and thus molecular based strategies for the conclusive identification of all forensically...

  5. Intermatrix Synthesis as a rapid, inexpensive and reproducible methodology for the in situ functionalization of nanostructured surfaces with quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos-Arrieta, Julio, E-mail: julio.bastos@upc.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Muñoz, Jose, E-mail: josemaria.munoz@uab.cat [Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Stenbock-Fermor, Anja, E-mail: stenbock@dwi.rwth-aachen.de [DWI – Leibniz-Institut für Interaktive Materialien, Aachen 52056 (Germany); Muñoz, Maria, E-mail: Maria.Munoz@uab.cat [Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Muraviev, Dmitri N., E-mail: Dimitri.Muraviev@uab.es [Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Céspedes, Francisco, E-mail: francisco.cespedes@uab.cat [Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Tsarkova, Larisa A., E-mail: tsarkova@dwi.rwth-aachen.de [DWI – Leibniz-Institut für Interaktive Materialien, Aachen 52056 (Germany); Baeza, Mireia, E-mail: MariaDelMar.Baeza@uab.cat [Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanodiamond functionalization with CdS quantum dots. • Approach for carbon nanotube detection in water samples. • Simple functionalization of thin polymeric nanolayers with quantum dots. - Abstract: Intermatrix Synthesis (IMS) technique has proven to be a valid methodology for the in situ incorporation of quantum dots (QDs) in a wide range of nanostructured surfaces for the preparation of advanced hybrid-nanomaterials. In this sense, this communication reports the recent advances in the application of IMS for the synthesis of CdS-QDs with favourable distribution on sulfonated polyetherether ketone (SPEEK) membrane thin films (TFs), multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanodiamonds (NDs). The synthetic route takes advantage of the ion exchange functionality of the reactive surfaces for the loading of the QDs precursor and consequent QDs appearance by precipitation. The benefits of such modified nanomaterials were studied using CdS-QDs@MWCNTs hybrid-nanomaterials. CdS-QDs@MWCNTs has been used as conducting filler for the preparation of electrochemical nanocomposite sensors, which present electrocatalytic properties. Finally, the optical properties of the QDs contained on MWCNTs could allow a new procedure for the analytical detection of nanostructured carbon allotropes in water.

  6. Rapid, simple and inexpensive production of custom 3D printed equipment for large-volume fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Adam L; Hilton, Stephen T; Andreae, Laura C

    2015-10-30

    The cost of 3D printing has reduced dramatically over the last few years and is now within reach of many scientific laboratories. This work presents an example of how 3D printing can be applied to the development of custom laboratory equipment that is specifically adapted for use with the novel brain tissue clearing technique, CLARITY. A simple, freely available online software tool was used, along with consumer-grade equipment, to produce a brain slicing chamber and a combined antibody staining and imaging chamber. Using standard 3D printers we were able to produce research-grade parts in an iterative manner at a fraction of the cost of commercial equipment. 3D printing provides a reproducible, flexible, simple and cost-effective method for researchers to produce the equipment needed to quickly adopt new methods. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Establishment of a bioassay for the toxicity evaluation and quality control of Aconitum herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yi; Wang, Jia-bo; Zhao, Yan-ling; Shan, Li-mei; Li, Bao-cai; Fang, Fang; Jin, Cheng; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2012-01-15

    Currently, no bioassay is available for evaluating the toxicity of Aconitum herbs, which are well known for their lethal cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity. In this study, we established a bioassay to evaluate the toxicity of Aconitum herbs. Test sample and standard solutions were administered to rats by intravenous infusion to determine their minimum lethal doses (MLD). Toxic potency was calculated by comparing the MLD. The experimental conditions of the method were optimized and standardized to ensure the precision and reliability of the bioassay. The application of the standardized bioassay was then tested by analyzing 18 samples of Aconitum herbs. Additionally, three major toxic alkaloids (aconitine, mesaconitine, and hypaconitine) in Aconitum herbs were analyzed using a liquid chromatographic method, which is the current method of choice for evaluating the toxicity of Aconitum herbs. We found that for all Aconitum herbs, the total toxicity of the extract was greater than the toxicity of the three alkaloids. Therefore, these three alkaloids failed to account for the total toxicity of Aconitum herbs. Compared with individual chemical analysis methods, the chief advantage of the bioassay is that it characterizes the total toxicity of Aconitum herbs. An incorrect toxicity evaluation caused by quantitative analysis of the three alkaloids might be effectively avoided by performing this bioassay. This study revealed that the bioassay is a powerful method for the safety assessment of Aconitum herbs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Application of bioassay in quality control of Chinese materia medica-taking Radix Isatidis as an example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan; Ren, Yongshen; Luo, Jiaoyang; Li, Hanbing; Feng, Xue; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2010-10-01

    Bioassay, which construct the characteristics consistents with Chinese medical science, is the core mode and methods for the quality control of Chinese materia medica. Taking the bioassay of Radix Isatidis as an example, the contribution, status and application of bioassay in the quality control of Chinese materia medica were introduced in this article, and two key issue (the selection of reference and measurement methods) in the process of establishing bioassay were also explained. This article expects to provide a reference for the development and improvement of the bioassay of Chinese materia medica in a practical manipulation level.

  9. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstey, Mitchell R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Fruetel, Julia A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hayden, Carl C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Buckley, Heather L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Arnold, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves "Click" chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  10. Bioassays for the evaluation of landfill leachate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David John Lawrence; Tyrrel, Sean Ferguson; Smith, Richard; Farrow, Steve

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the application of bioassays for assessing the toxicity hazard posed by landfill leachate discharged to an aquatic environment. Landfill leachate is a complex mixture of chemicals; thus it is difficult to assess the risk posed to aquatic wildlife using standard chemical identification techniques, such as gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). From this review it is clear that toxicity testing, using species that represent the different trophic levels, is a superior way to predict the risk posed by discharge than chemical analysis. Previous studies assessed leachate toxicity using bacteria, algae, plants, invertebrates, fish, and genotoxicity. Studies showed that leachate exhibits a wide range of toxicities to the species tested. Ammonia, alkalinity, heavy metals, and recalcitrant organics were identified to be the cause of adverse responses from the test organisms. Concentrations of these chemicals were found to depend upon the types of waste landfilled. As part of this review, Slooff analysis was applied to published results to calculate the sensitivity of test species. It was concluded that Lemna minor and Thamnocephalus platyurus were the most sensitive tests and, Vibrio fischeri (Microtox) was the least sensitive test available. Little is known about the sensitivity of each species to the different types of waste that might have been landfilled. A battery of tests needed for a more accurate assessment of landfill leachate is proposed. Some of the more common tests have been replaced by more sensitive tests that produce more relevant results for the industry and regulators.

  11. Development and characteristics of an adhesion bioassay for ectocarpoid algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evariste, Emmanuelle; Gachon, Claire M M; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A

    2012-01-01

    Species of filamentous brown algae in the family Ectocarpaceae are significant members of fouling communities. However, there are few systematic studies on the influence of surface physico-chemical properties on their adhesion. In the present paper the development of a novel, laboratory-based adhesion bioassay for ectocarpoid algae, at an appropriate scale for the screening of sets of experimental samples in well-replicated and controlled experiments is described. The assays are based on the colonization of surfaces from a starting inoculum consisting of multicellular filaments obtained by blending the cultured alga Ectocarpus crouaniorum. The adhesion strength of the biomass after 14 days growth was assessed by applying a hydrodynamic shear stress. Results from adhesion tests on a set of standard surfaces showed that E. crouaniorum adhered more weakly to the amphiphilic Intersleek® 900 than to the more hydrophobic Intersleek® 700 and Silastic® T2 coatings. Adhesion to hydrophilic glass was also weak. Similar results were obtained for other cultivated species of Ectocarpus but differed from those obtained with the related ectocarpoid species Hincksia secunda. The response of the ectocarpoid algae to the surfaces was also compared to that for the green alga, Ulva.

  12. Bioassay-based risk assessment of complex mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, K.C.; Huebner, H.J. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health

    1996-12-31

    The baseline risk assessment often plays an integral role in various decision-making processes at Superfund sites. The present study reports on risk characterizations prepared for seven complex mixtures using biological and chemical analysis. Three of the samples (A, B, and C) were complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) extracted from coal tar; while four samples extracted from munitions-contaminated soil contained primarily nitroaromatic hydrocarbons. The chemical-based risk assessment ranked sample C as least toxic, while the risk associated with samples A and B was approximately equal. The microbial bioassay was in general agreement for the coal tar samples. The weighted activity of the coal tar extracts in Salmonella was 4,960 for sample C, and 162,000 and 206,000 for samples A and B, respectively. The bacterial mutagenicity of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene contaminated soils exhibited an indirect correlation with chemical-based risk assessment. The aqueous extract of sample 004 induced 1,292 net revertants in Salmonella, while the estimated risk to ingestion and dermal adsorption was 2E-9. The data indicate that the chemical-based risk assessment accurately predicted the genotoxicity of the PAHs, while the accuracy of the risk assessment for munitions contaminated soils was limited due to the presence of metabolites of TNT degradation. The biological tests used in this research provide a valuable compliment to chemical analysis for characterizing the genotoxic risk of complex mixtures.

  13. An Inexpensive and Simple Method to Demonstrate Soil Water and Nutrient Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, K. A.; Samson-Liebig, S.

    2011-01-01

    Soil quality, soil health, and soil sustainability are concepts that are being widely used but are difficult to define and illustrate, especially to a non-technical audience. The objectives of this manuscript were to develop simple and inexpensive methodologies to both qualitatively and quantitatively estimate water infiltration rates (IR),…

  14. A Simplified and Inexpensive Method for Measuring Dissolved Oxygen in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, John

    1983-01-01

    A modified Winkler method for determining dissolved oxygen in water is described. The method does not require use of a burette or starch indicator, is simple and inexpensive and can be used in the field or laboratory. Reagents/apparatus needed and specific procedures are included. (JN)

  15. An optimized inexpensive emollient mixture improves barrier repair in murine skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Man

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Since the individual ingredients in this mixture are inexpensive, this optimized mixture shows promise as a means of reducing neonatal mortality in low-income settings, but it also could be more widely used to prevent skin disorders associated with permeability and antimicrobial barrier abnormalities.

  16. An Inexpensive Family Index of Risk for Mood Issues Improves Identification of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algorta, Guillermo Perez; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Phelps, James; Jenkins, Melissa M.; Youngstrom, Jennifer Kogos; Findling, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Family history of mental illness provides important information when evaluating pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). However, such information is often challenging to gather within clinical settings. This study investigates the feasibility and utility of gathering family history information using an inexpensive method practical for outpatient…

  17. An efficient, robust, and inexpensive grinding device for herbal samples like Cinchona bark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Honoré; Holmfred, Else Skovgaard; Cornett, Claus

    2015-01-01

    An effective, robust, and inexpensive grinding device for the grinding of herb samples like bark and roots was developed by rebuilding a commercially available coffee grinder. The grinder was constructed to be able to provide various particle sizes, to be easy to clean, and to have a minimum of d...

  18. Studying an inexpensive wire discone antenna as a candidate for TVWS spectrum monitoring / sensing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lysko, AA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available discone antenna. AntennaCraft model ST4 is exampled as an inexpensive candidate for spectrum monitoring and sensing in UHF frequency band. The study was done by both simulation and measurements, with well matching results. The candidate antenna was found...

  19. Inexpensive Device for Demonstrating Rock Slope Failure and Other Collapse Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, B.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive modeling technique for demonstrating large-scale displacement phenomena in rock masses, such as slope collapse and failure of underground openings. Excavation of the model material occurs through openings made in the polyurethane foam in the correct excavation sequence. (Author/SA)

  20. Short report: evaluation of a simple and inexpensive photometric device for the measurement of hemoglobin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borrmann, Steffen; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Esser, Gilbert; Trinkle, Cordula; Issifou, Saadou; Grobusch, Martin P.; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kremsner, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated the accuracy of a simple and inexpensive photometric device (DHT) for the estimation of the blood concentration of hemoglobin by comparison with an automated, high-resolution, flow cytometry-based hematology analyzer (CellDyn 3000) and a centrifugal quantitative buffy coat

  1. A Computer-Interfaced Drop Counter as an Inexpensive Fraction Collector for Column Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Barbara T.

    2008-01-01

    A computer-interfaced drop counter is described that serves as an inexpensive alternative to a fraction collector for column chromatography experiments. Undergraduate biochemistry laboratories frequently do not have the budget to purchase fraction collectors. Protocols that call for the manual measurement of fraction volumes as well as the manual…

  2. Using a Raspberry Pi as a Versatile and Inexpensive Display Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Iglesias

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article covers the process by which a library took some unused equipment and added a cheap computing device to produce very inexpensive but effective electronic signage. Hardware and software issues as well as a step-by-step guide through the process are included.

  3. Design and evaluation of an inexpensive radiation shield for monitoring surface air temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary A. Holden; Anna E. Klene; Robert F. Keefe; Gretchen G. Moisen

    2013-01-01

    Inexpensive temperature sensors are widely used in agricultural and forestry research. This paper describes a low-cost (~3 USD) radiation shield (radshield) designed for monitoring surface air temperatures in harsh outdoor environments. We compared the performance of the radshield paired with low-cost temperature sensors at three sites in western Montana to several...

  4. Using Inexpensive Technology and Multimedia to Improve Science Education in Rural Communities of Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Sujaya

    2014-01-01

    This article explores an ongoing project that promotes science education in rural communities of western Nepal by using affordable technology. With the advent of inexpensive technology and multimedia resources, teaching materials for science education can be accessed with a much smaller budget than was previously possible. A preliminary survey…

  5. A Simple and Inexpensive Function Generator and a Four-Electrode Cell for Cyclic Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albahadily, F. N.; Mottola, Horacio A.

    1986-01-01

    Describes construction and operation of an inexpensive signal generator and a four-electrode electrochemical cell for use in voltammetric experiments. Also describes construction and operation of a four-electrode electrochemical cell used to illustrate elimination (or minimization) of background currents due to electrochemical reactions by species…

  6. Phototoxicity activity of Psoralea drupacea L. using Atremia salina bioassay system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ramezani

    2011-07-01

    Conclusion: The result showed that P. drupacea methanolic extract and chloroform fraction have phototoxicity in A. salina bioassay system and their toxic effect is related to phototoxic constituents such as psoralen.

  7. Beoordeling van gereinigde grond. IV. Toepassing van bioassays met planten en regenwormen op referentiegronden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel CAM; Dirven-van Breemen EM; Kamerman JW

    1992-01-01

    Within the framework of the project "Evaluation of decontaminated soil", the applicability of bioassays with earthworms and plants for the quality assessment of decontaminated soil is investigated. In order to establish a reference system for "normal" levels of metals in

  8. Comparative susceptibility of bemisia tabaci to imidacloprid in field- and laboratory-based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemisia tabaci biotype B is a resistance-prone pest of protected and open agriculture. Systemic uptake bioassays used in resistance monitoring programs have provided important information on susceptibility to neonicotinoid insecticides, but have remained decoupled from field performance. Simultaneou...

  9. A New In Vitro Bioassay System for the Discovery and Quantitative Evaluation of Mosquito Repellents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abbas; Cantrell, Charles L; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-09-01

    Mosquitoes vector many pathogens that cause human diseases. Repellents play a significant role in reducing the risk of these diseases by preventing mosquito bites. In this paper, we are reporting an Ali and Khan (A & K), large cage in vitro bioassay system that can effectively be used to measure repellency of compounds against mosquitoes. The system uses temperature as a landing and feeding stimulus, and collagen as a feeding substrate. The minimum effective dose (MED) of DEET (N, N-diethyl-meta-toluamide; 19.3 µg/cm2) against Aedes aegypti (L.) in a 30-cm2 treatment area from the A & K bioassay falls in the upper range of the in vivo, cloth patch bioassay (6-23 µg/cm2). Undecanoic acid and geranic acid, with MED values of 3.6 and 7.5 µg/cm2, respectively, in the A & K bioassay were active at 5.5-6.6 times lower dose than that in the in vivo bioassay. Thymol and methyl eugenol with MED values of 11.1 and 10.9 µg/cm2, respectively, were active at 3-4 times lower dose than that in the in vivo bioassay, whereas (-)-trans-p-Menthane-3,8 diol with MED value of 32.3 µg/cm2 was active at 1.3 times lower dose. Comparisons between 12-cm2 and 30-cm2 treatment areas, with similar concentration per unit area in the A & K bioassay, indicated that the MED values at 30 cm2 were 1-2 times higher. In addition to its use to identify the repellent properties of new products, the A & K bioassay can generate useful data on promising repellents to make in vivo testing and field evaluation decisions. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A Standardized Lepidopteran Bioassay to Investigate the Bioactivity of Insecticidal Proteins Produced in Transgenic Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graser, Gerson; Walters, Frederick S

    2016-01-01

    Insecticidal bioassays are the only reliable method to investigate the biological activity of an insecticidal protein and therefore provide an essential toolkit for the characterization and potency determination of these proteins. Here we present a standardized method for a lepidopteran larval bioassay, which is optimized to specifically estimate activity of insecticidal proteins produced in transgenic plants. The treatment can be either applied to the surface of the artificial diet, or blended into the diet.

  11. Rapid Prototyping of Electrically Small Spherical Wire Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2014-01-01

    It is shown how modern rapid prototyping technologies can be applied for quick and inexpensive, but still accurate, fabrication of electrically small wire antennas. A well known folded spherical helix antenna and a novel spherical zigzag antenna have been fabricated and tested, exhibiting the imp...

  12. An ion quencher operated lamp for multiplexed fluorescent bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Taiping; Sun, Huanhuan; He, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Xiaoqin; He, Dinggeng; Bu, Hongchang; Qiao, Zhenzhen; Wang, Kemin

    2017-12-26

    A novel and adjustable lamp based on competitive interaction among dsDNA-SYBR Green I (SGI), ion quencher, and analyte was designed for bioanalysis. The "filament" and switch of the lamp could be customized by employing different dsDNA and ion quencher. The poly(AT/TA) dsDNA was successfully screened as the most effective filament of the lamp. Two common ions, Hg2+ and Fe3+, were selected as the model switch, and the corresponding ligand molecules cysteine (Cys) and pyrophosphate ions (PPi) were selected as the targets. When the fluorescence-quenched dsDNA/SGI-ion complex was introduced into a target-containing system, ions could be bound by competitive molecules and separate from the complex, thereby lighting the lamp. However, no light was observed if the biomolecule could not snatch the metal ions from the complex. Under the optimal conditions, sensitive and selective detection of Cys and PPi was achieved by the lamp, with practical applications in fetal bovine serum and human urine. This ion quencher regulated lamp for fluorescent bioassays is simple in design, fast in operation, and is more convenient than other methods. Significantly, as many molecules could form stable complexes with metal ions selectively, this ion quencher operated lamp has potential for the detection of a wide spectrum of analytes. Graphical abstract A novel and adjustable lamp on the basis of competitive interaction among dsDNA-SYBR Green I, ions quencher and analyte was designed for bioanalysis. The filament and switch of lamp could be customized by employing different dsDNA and ions quencher.

  13. Pathogenicity bioassays of isolates of Beauveria bassiana on Rhynchophorus ferrugineus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Verde, Gabriella; Torta, Livio; Mondello, Vincenzo; Caldarella, Cesare G; Burruano, Santella; Caleca, Virgilio

    2015-02-01

    The control of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier), the main palm pest in the Mediterranean Basin, is problematic because of its biology and the current restrictions in many European countries on the use of chemical insecticides in urban areas. Entomopathogenic fungi have been studied as potential biological control agents, but information on their natural incidence is limited. Strains of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin were isolated from symptomatic insects collected on dead palms, and their pathogenicity against different instars of R. ferrugineus was evaluated in the laboratory. The overall percentage of infected insects found in Canary palms was 7%. In laboratory bioassays, hatching of eggs treated with three different isolates of B. bassiana was 41.2, 26.8 and 29.9%, significantly lower than the control (62.4%). Larvae and adults were treated with a single isolate in two ways: spraying each insect with a conidial suspension or feeding them with fruit portions previously immersed in the same conidial suspension. At the end of the two trials, the mortality of treated larvae was 88 and 92%, and the mean survival time was 10.4 and 11.8 days, significantly different from the control, where no insect died during the trials. Mortality and survival time recorded in either trial on adults did not significantly differ between treatment and control. This study shows that the pathogenicity of wild isolates of B. bassiana differs among the tested R. ferrugineus instars. The low mortality of treated adults supports their use as vectors of B. bassiana as a potential tool for reducing R. ferrugineus populations. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. In-lab three-dimensional printing: an inexpensive tool for experimentation and visualization for the field of organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Roland; Conlisk, Noel; Davies, Jamie A

    2012-01-01

    The development of the microscope in 1590 by Zacharias Janssenby and Hans Lippershey gave the world a new way of visualizing details of morphogenesis and development. More recent improvements in this technology including confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) have enhanced the quality of the resultant image. These technologies also allow a representation to be made of a developing tissue's three-dimensional (3-D) form. With all these techniques however, the image is delivered on a flat two-dimensional (2-D) screen. 3-D printing represents an exciting potential to reproduce the image not simply on a flat screen, but in a physical, palpable three-dimensional structure. Here we explore the scope that this holds for exploring and interacting with the structure of a developing organ in an entirely novel way. As well as being useful for visualization, 3-D printers are capable of rapidly and cost-effectively producing custom-made structures for use within the laboratory. We here describe the advantages of producing hardware for a tissue culture system using an inexpensive in-lab printer.

  15. The sensitivity of an hydroponic lettuce root elongation bioassay to metals, phenol and wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihae; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Depuydt, Stephen; Oh, Jung-Woo; Jo, Youn-Min; Kim, Kyungtae; Brown, Murray T; Han, Taejun

    2016-04-01

    The root elongation bioassay is one of the most straightforward test methods used for environmental monitoring in terms of simplicity, rapidity and economy since it merely requires filter paper, distilled water and Petri dishes. However, filter paper as a support material is known to be problematic as it can reduce the sensitivity of the test. The newly developed hydroponic method reported here differs from the conventional root elongation method (US EPA filter paper method) in that no support material is used and the exposure time is shorter (48 h in this test versus 120 h in the US EPA test). For metals, the hydroponic test method was 3.3 (for Hg) to 57 (for Cu) times more sensitive than the US EPA method with the rank orders of sensitivity, estimated from EC50 values, being Cu≥Cd>Ni≥Zn≥Hg for the former and Hg≥Cu≥Ni≥Cd≥Zn for the latter methods. For phenol, the results did not differ significantly; EC50 values were 124 mg L(-1) and 108-180 mg L(-1) for the hydroponic and filter paper methods, respectively. Lettuce was less sensitive than daphnids to wastewaters, but the root elongation response appears to be wastewater-specific and is especially sensitive for detecting the presence of fluorine. The new hydroponic test thus provides many practical advantages, especially in terms of cost and time-effectiveness requiring only a well plate, a small volume of distilled water and short exposure period; furthermore, no specialist expertise is required. The method is simpler than the conventional EPA technique in not using filter paper which can influence the sensitivity of the test. Additionally, plant seeds have a long shelf-life and require little or no maintenance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inexpensive, realtime tele-ultrasound using a commercial, web-based video streaming device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Yannis M; Thompson, Noel P

    2012-06-01

    We have devised an inexpensive, web-based tele-ultrasound system using commercially-available video streaming equipment. We examined the spatial and grey scale resolution, and the delay time of the system. The receiving PC was tested at various distances from the transmitting site, from 3.2 km to 4828 km. Standard resolution targets and echocardiography movie strips recorded on DVDs were used to assess the image quality. A qualitative assessment was made by an expert sonographer. As the distance between the transmitter and the receiver increased, the scan smoothness decreased and the delay increased. At a distance of 3.2 km the delay was 2-3 s, and at 4828 km it was 10-15 s. The delay was short enough to allow realtime guidance of the scanning technician by telephone. The system allows inexpensive, readily available, realtime tele-ultrasonography.

  17. An inexpensive spectroscopic beam monitor for hard X-ray synchrotron applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, A [Science Payload and Advanced Concepts Office, ESA/ESTEC, Postbus 299, 2200AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Andersson, S [Science Payload and Advanced Concepts Office, ESA/ESTEC, Postbus 299, 2200AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Hartog, R den [Science Payload and Advanced Concepts Office, ESA/ESTEC, Postbus 299, 2200AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Quarati, F [Science Payload and Advanced Concepts Office, ESA/ESTEC, Postbus 299, 2200AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Webb, A [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Welter, E [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    We describe an inexpensive beam monitor for hard X-ray synchrotron applications which has good spectroscopic abilities and can operate without cooling. The device is centred on an inexpensive, commercial off-the-shelf, large area (1.2 x 1.2 mm{sup 2}) Si photodiode operated in single counting mode. Measurements carried out at the HASYLAB synchrotron research facility have shown that it is fully spectroscopic across the energy range 8 keV to 100 keV with a measured energy resolution of {approx} 1.2 keV FWHM at room temperature. The measured resolutions were found to be the same under pencil-beam and full-area illumination, indicating uniform crystallinity and stoichiometry of the bulk. The low cost, simplicity and performance of the detector make it suitable for a wider range of applications, e.g., in undergraduate laboratory experiments.

  18. An inexpensive spectroscopic beam monitor for hard X-ray synchrotron applications

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, A; Den Hartog, R; Quarati, F; Webb, A; Welter, E; HASYLAB at DESY, Hamburg, Germany

    2007-01-01

    We describe an inexpensive beam monitor for hard X-ray synchrotron applications which has good spectroscopic abilities and can operate without cooling. The device is centred on an inexpensive, commercial off-the-shelf, large area (1.2 × 1.2 mm2) Si photodiode operated in single counting mode. Measurements carried out at the HASYLAB synchrotron research facility have shown that it is fully spectroscopic across the energy range 8 keV to 100 keV with a measured energy resolution of ~ 1.2 keV FWHM at room temperature. The measured resolutions were found to be the same under pencil-beam and full-area illumination, indicating uniform crystallinity and stoichiometry of the bulk. The low cost, simplicity and performance of the detector make it suitable for a wider range of applications, e.g., in undergraduate laboratory experiments.

  19. Simple and inexpensive microfluidic devices for the generation of monodisperse multiple emulsions

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2013-12-16

    Droplet-based microfluidic devices have become a preferred versatile platform for various fields in physics, chemistry and biology. Polydimethylsiloxane soft lithography, the mainstay for fabricating microfluidic devices, usually requires the usage of expensive apparatus and a complex manufacturing procedure. Here, we report the design and fabrication of simple and inexpensive microfluidic devices based on microscope glass slides and pulled glass capillaries, for generating monodisperse multiple emulsions. The advantages of our method lie in a simple manufacturing procedure, inexpensive processing equipment and flexibility in the surface modification of the designed microfluidic devices. Different types of devices have been designed and tested and the experimental results demonstrated their robustness for preparing monodisperse single, double, triple and multi-component emulsions. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  20. Using inexpensive Jell-O chips for hands-on microfluidics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng Wei T; Ouellet, Eric; Lagally, Eric T

    2010-07-01

    As the field of microfluidics continues to grow, there is an increasing demand for public education about this technology. This article presents a quick, simple, safe, and inexpensive method for teaching microfluidics to younger students and the general public. (To listen to a podcast about this article, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html .).

  1. Computationally Inexpensive Approach for Pitch Control of Offshore Wind Turbine on Barge Floating Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Shan Zuo; Song, Y. D.; Lei Wang; Qing-wang Song

    2013-01-01

    Offshore floating wind turbine (OFWT) has gained increasing attention during the past decade because of the offshore high-quality wind power and complex load environment. The control system is a tradeoff between power tracking and fatigue load reduction in the above-rated wind speed area. In allusion to the external disturbances and uncertain system parameters of OFWT due to the proximity to load centers and strong wave coupling, this paper proposes a computationally inexpensive robust adapti...

  2. Seasonal distribution of phytoplankton assemblages and nutrient-enriched bioassays as indicators of nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth in Gwangyang Bay, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung Ho; Kim, Dongseon; Son, Moonho; Yun, Suk Min; Kim, Young Ok

    2015-09-01

    To assess the effect of nutrient limitation on phytoplankton growth, and its influence on seasonal variation in phytoplankton community structure, we investigated abiotic and biotic factors in surface and bottom waters at 20 stations in inner and offshore areas of Gwangyang Bay, Korea. Algal bioassay experiments were also conducted using surface water, to assess the effects of nutrient addition on the phytoplankton assemblages. The fate of major nutrients in the bay was strongly dependent on the discharge of freshwater from the Seomjin River. River flow during the rainy season provides a high nitrogen (N) influx, pushing the system toward stoichiometric phosphorus (P) limitation. However, at some times during the rainy season there was insufficient N to maintain phytoplankton growth because it was rapidly consumed through nutrient uptake by phytoplankton under stratified environmental conditions. Diatoms made a relatively large contribution to total phytoplankton biomass. The dominant diatoms, particularly in winter and summer, were Skeletonema marinoi-dohrnii complex and Skeletonema tropicum, respectively, while Eucampia zodiacus and the cryptophyte Cryptomonas spp. dominated in spring and autumn, respectively, comprising more than 75% of the community at most stations. In the bioassay experiments the phytoplankton biomass increased by 30-600% in the +N (added nitrogen) and +NP (added nitrogen and phosphorus) treatments relative to the control and the +P (added phosphorus) treatments, indicating that phytoplankton growth can respond rapidly to pulsed nitrate loading events. Based on the algal bioassay and the field survey, the abrupt input of high nutrient levels following rainfall stimulated the growth of diatom assemblages including the Skeletonema genus. Our results demonstrate that the growth of centric diatoms was enhanced by inputs of N and Si, and that the concentrations of these nutrients may be among the most important factors controlling phytoplankton

  3. Measurement of neural signals from inexpensive, wireless and dry EEG systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummett, T S; Leibbrandt, R E; Lewis, T W; DeLosAngeles, D; Powers, D M W; Willoughby, J O; Pope, K J; Fitzgibbon, S P

    2015-07-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is challenged by high cost, immobility of equipment and the use of inconvenient conductive gels. We compared EEG recordings obtained from three systems that are inexpensive, wireless, and/or dry (no gel), against recordings made with a traditional, research-grade EEG system, in order to investigate the ability of these 'non-traditional' systems to produce recordings of comparable quality to a research-grade system. The systems compared were: Emotiv EPOC (inexpensive and wireless), B-Alert (wireless), g.Sahara (dry) and g.HIamp (research-grade). We compared the ability of the systems to demonstrate five well-studied neural phenomena: (1) enhanced alpha activity with eyes closed versus open; (2) visual steady-state response (VSSR); (3) mismatch negativity; (4) P300; and (5) event-related desynchronization/synchronization. All systems measured significant alpha augmentation with eye closure, and were able to measure VSSRs (although these were smaller with g.Sahara). The B-Alert and g.Sahara were able to measure the three time-locked phenomena equivalently to the g.HIamp. The Emotiv EPOC did not have suitably located electrodes for two of the tasks and synchronization considerations meant that data from the time-locked tasks were not assessed. The results show that inexpensive, wireless, or dry systems may be suitable for experimental studies using EEG, depending on the research paradigm, and within the constraints imposed by their limited electrode placement and number.

  4. Assessing arsenic bioavailability through the use of bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesel, E.; Nadimpalli, M.; Hull, M.; Schreiber, M. E.; Vikesland, P.

    2009-12-01

    Various methods have been used to characterize the bioavailability of a contaminant, including chemical extractions from soils, toxicity tests, bioaccumulation measurements, estimation from soil properties, in vitro/in vivo tests, and microbial biossays. Unfortunately, these tests are all unique (i.e. they measure bioavailability through different mechanisms) and it is difficult to compare measurements collected using one method to those collected from another. Additionally, there are fundamental aspects of bioavailability research that require further study. In particular, changes in bioavailability over time are not well understood, as well as what the geochemical controls are on changes in bioavailability. In addition, there are no studies aimed at the integration of bioavailability measurements and potential geochemical controls. This research project seeks to find a standard set of assays and sensors that can be used to assess arsenic bioavailability at any field site, as well as to use these tools and techniques to better understand changes in, and controls on, arsenic bioavailability. The bioassays to be utilized in this research are a bioluminescent E. coli assay and a Corbicula fluminea (Asian clam) assay. Preliminary experiments to determine the suitability of the E. coli and C. fluminea assays have been completed. The E. coli assay can be utilized to analyze As(III) and As(V) with a linear standard curve between 5 and 200 ppb for As(III) and 100 ppb and 5 ppm for As(V); no bioluminescent response above background was elicited in the presence of Roxarsone, an organoarsenical. The C. fluminea assay is capable of bioaccumulating As(III), As(V), Roxarsone, and MSMA, with As(III) being the most readily accumulated, followed by As(V), Roxarsone and MSMA, respectively. Additional research will include assessing bioavailability of various arsenic species adsorbed to natural colloidal materials (i.e. clays, iron oxides, NOM) to the E. coli and C. fluminea assays

  5. Epitrochoid Power-Law Nozzle Rapid Prototype Build/Test Project (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Power-Law Nozzle Rapid Prototype Build/Test Project Mr. Eric J. Paulson-Vehicle Analyst Rocket Propulsion Division Combustion devices Branch Systems...to build axisymmetric cold flow nozzle test articles using plastic-based inexpensive rapid additive manufacturing – Feasible to rapid prototype lobed...Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) February 2015-March 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Epitrochoid Power-Law Nozzle Rapid Prototype Build/Test

  6. Characterization of chemical waste site contamination and its extent using bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.M.; Callahan, C.A.; Cline, J.F.; Greene, J.C.; McShane, M.C.; Miller, W.E.; Peterson, S.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1984-12-01

    Bioassays were used in a three-phase research project to assess the comparative sensitivity of test organisms to known chemicals, determine if the chemical components in field soil and water samples containing unknown contaminants could be inferred from our laboratory studies using known chemicals, and to investigate kriging (a relatively new statistical mapping technique) and bioassays as methods to define the areal extent of chemical contamination. The algal assay generally was most sensitive to samples of pure chemicals, soil elutriates and water from eight sites with known chemical contamination. Bioassays of nine samples of unknown chemical composition from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) site showed that a lettuce seed soil contact phytoassay was most sensitive. In general, our bioassays can be used to broadly identify toxic components of contaminated soil. Nearly pure compounds of insecticides and herbicides were less toxic in the sensitive bioassays than were the counterpart commercial formulations. This finding indicates that chemical analysis alone may fail to correctly rate the severity of environmental toxicity. Finally, we used the lettuce seed phytoassay and kriging techniques in a field study at RMA to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping contamination to aid in cleanup decisions. 25 references, 9 figures, 9 tables.

  7. The usefulness of a sediment bioassay with the gastropod Nassarius reticulatus in tributyltin monitoring programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeiro, Filipe; Pérez, Sara; Navarro, Patricia; Carrero, José Antonio; Beiras, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    Despite the use of tributyltin (TBT) had been banned worldwide in 2008 there is still evidence of its deleterious presence in environment. We evaluate the usefulness of a 28days sediment bioassay with Nassarius reticulatus females to monitor TBT pollution, using imposex as endpoint. In addition, butyltins were determined in sediments and tissues, and, whenever posible, imposex was assessed in native N. reticulatus at the same sites where sediments were sampled. In the bioassay, a significant increase in imposex parameters was obtained with three sediments (Vi2, Vi3, and Vi4). No correlation was found between this and TBT concentrations in sediment although good correlations were obtained for TBT in tissues, putting in evidence TBT bioavailability in sediment. A significant decrease in imposex from 2008 to 2013 in native snails was only observed at sites that did not cause any effect in the bioassay. In contrast, imposex levels in 2013 were kept as high as 2008 in one of the sites where a significant imposex increase in the bioassay was observed. The bioassay proves thus to be a practical and ecological relevant tool, as: (i) it can be conducted in sites with no native populations of snails, (ii) it provides early identification of polluted sites, anticipating future imposex levels or early identification of recovering, and (iii) it yields information on the bioavailable fraction of the TBT in the sediment. Therefore, this tool can be of extreme usefulness under the scope of recent European legislative frameworks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sensitivity assessment of sea lice to chemotherapeutants: Current bioassays and best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, S L; Mancilla, J; Hausdorf, M A; Bouchard, D; Tudor, M S; Kane, F

    2017-12-18

    Traditional bioassays are still necessary to test sensitivity of sea lice species to chemotherapeutants, but the methodology applied by the different scientists has varied over time in respect to that proposed in "Sea lice resistance to chemotherapeutants: A handbook in resistance management" (2006). These divergences motivated the organization of a workshop during the Sea Lice 2016 conference "Standardization of traditional bioassay process by sharing best practices." There was an agreement by the attendants to update the handbook. The objective of this article is to provide a baseline analysis of the methodology for traditional bioassays and to identify procedures that need to be addressed to standardize the protocol. The methodology was divided into the following steps: bioassay design; material and equipment; sea lice collection, transportation and laboratory reception; preparation of dilution; parasite exposure; response evaluation; data analysis; and reporting. Information from the presentations of the workshop, and also from other studies, allowed for the identification of procedures inside a given step that need to be standardized as they were reported to be performed differently by the different working groups. Bioassay design and response evaluation were the targeted steps where more procedures need to be analysed and agreed upon. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Bioassay of organophosphate nerve agents in soil using neuronal tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, T W; Weiss, M T; D'Agostino, P A; Provost, L R; Hancock, J R

    1992-02-01

    A soil sample originating from an area of suspected chemical warfare activity was subjected to chemical analysis and bioassay. Sarin and several related compounds were confirmed in the soil by capillary column gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS); however, the binding of these compounds to the soil hindered quantitation. The chemical results were then compared to those obtained by bioassay in primary cultures of chick embryo forebrain neurons. By comparing the sample's anticholinesterase activity against those of purified standards in chick embryo neuron cultures, a reasonable agreement was found between the chemical and bioassay semi-quantitative estimates of sarin content in the soil extract. Furthermore, the in vitro system appears to offer a sensitive technique for the estimation of sarin remaining bound to the soil following solvent extraction as well as for an assessment of the potential toxicity of the contaminated soil in vivo.

  10. Toxicity Assessment of Sediments with Natural Anomalous Concentrations in Heavy Metals by the Use of Bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martín

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential toxicity in riverbed sediments was assessed with a bioassay using the bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The selected area was characterized by the presence of ultramafic rocks (peridotites, and the sediments had high values in Ni, Cr, and Co. For the toxicity bioassay with Vibrio fischeri, water-soluble forms were used. The results indicated that most of the samples had a very low degree of toxicity, with 10% of reduction in luminescence in relation to the control; meanwhile 25% of the samples had a moderate degree of toxicity with a reduction in luminescence between 13 and 21% in relation to the control. The toxicity index correlated significantly with the concentrations of Ni and Cr in the water extracts. This toxicity bioassay was proved to be a sensitive and useful tool to detect potential toxicity in solutions, even with anomalous concentrations in heavy metals of natural origin.

  11. Genotoxicity of soil from farmland irrigated with wastewater using three plant bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, G L; Rodriguez, D M

    1999-05-19

    Three well known plant bioassays, the Allium root chromosome aberration (AL-RAA) assay, the Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay, and the Tradescantia stamen hair (Trad-SHM) mutation assay were validated in 1991 by the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) under the auspices of the World Health Organization, and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). These plant bioassays have proven to be efficient tests for chemical screening and especially for in situ monitoring for genotoxicity of environmental pollutants. As a result of this validation study, standard protocols of these three plant bioassays were used by some of the 11 participating countries in the IPCS to carry on genotoxicity tests on air, water and soil as a follow up activity. In the city of Queretaro, Mexico, wastewater coming from both industrial and domestic sources and without any treatment is used to irrigate the farm crops, polluting the soil. Potentially the pollutants could reach the food chain. For the above reason, soil irrigated with wastewater was sampled and monitored for the presence of genotoxic agents using the above three bioassays. Extracts from soil samples were made using distilled water and organic solvents by shaking the sample for about 12 h under a relatively low temperature (15-20 degrees C). Plant cuttings of Tradescantia or the roots of Allium were treated by submerging them in the extracts. Three replicates of each sample were analyzed in each of the three bioassays. Extracts using DMSO, ethanol and distilled water tested positive in the three bioassays and there were no differences for the genotoxicity of the extracts with the different solvents. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. A versatile electrowetting-based digital microfluidic platform for quantitative homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergauwe, Nicolas; Witters, Daan; Ceyssens, Frederik; Vermeir, Steven; Verbruggen, Bert; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) lab-on-a-chip systems have already proven their potential within a broad range of bio-assays. Nevertheless, research on the analytical performance of those systems is limited, yet crucial for a further breakthrough in the diagnostic field. Therefore, this paper presents the intrinsic possibilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip as a versatile platform for homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays with high analytical performance. Both droplet dispensing and splitting cause variations in droplet size, thereby directly influencing the assay's performance. The extent to which they influence the performance is assessed by a theoretical sensitivity analysis, which allows the definition of a basic framework for the reduction of droplet size variability. Taking advantage of the optimized droplet manipulations, both homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays are implemented in the EWOD lab-on-a-chip to demonstrate the analytical capabilities and versatility of the device. A fully on-chip enzymatic assay is realized with high analytical performance. It demonstrates the promising capabilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip in food-related and medical applications, such as nutritional and blood analyses. Further, a magnetic bio-assay for IgE detection using superparamagnetic nanoparticles is presented whereby the nanoparticles are used as solid carriers during the bio-assay. Crucial elements are the precise manipulation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with respect to dispensing and separation. Although the principle of using nano-carriers is demonstrated for protein detection, it can be easily extended to a broader range of bio-related applications like DNA sensing. In heterogeneous bio-assays the chip surface is actively involved during the execution of the bio-assay. Through immobilization of specific biological compounds like DNA, proteins and cells a reactive chip surface is realized, which enhances the bio-assay performance. To demonstrate

  13. A Brine Shrimp Bioassay for Measuring Toxicity and Remediation of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Marya

    1999-12-01

    A bioassay using Artemia franciscana (brine shrimp) was adapted to measure the toxicity of household chemicals. One project is described in which students collect dose-response curves for seven commercial flea-killing products. Next, groups of students researched the insecticidal ingredients of the flea products. On the basis of the structures of the active ingredients, they chose remediation methods to make the flea product less toxic to brine shrimp; procedures included copper-catalyzed hydrolysis, adsorption onto activated charcoal, bleach treatment, and photodegradation. No special equipment or supplies are necessary for the bioassay other than the brine shrimp eggs, which can be obtained at any aquarium store.

  14. False-Positive Serum Botulism Bioassay in Miller-Fisher Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeylikman, Yuriy; Shah, Vishal; Shah, Umang; Mirsen, Thomas R; Campellone, Joseph V

    2015-09-01

    We describe a patient with acute progressive weakness and areflexia. Both botulism and Miller-Fisher variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome were initial diagnostic considerations, and she was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and botulinum antitoxin. A mouse bioassay was positive for botulinum toxin A, although her clinical course, electrodiagnostic studies, and cerebrospinal fluid findings supported Miller-Fisher syndrome. This patient's atypical features offer points of discussion regarding the evaluation of patients with acute neuromuscular weakness and emphasize the limitations of the botulism bioassay.

  15. Compost maturity assessment using physicochemical, solid-state spectroscopy, and plant bioassay analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D Senthil; Kumar, P Satheesh; Rajendran, N M; Anbuganapathi, G

    2013-11-27

    The vermicompost produced from flower waste inoculated with biofertilizers was subjected to compost maturity test: (i) physicochemical method (pH, OC, TN, C:N); (ii) solid state spectroscopic analysis (FTIR and (13)C CPMAS NMR); and (iii) plant bioassay (germination index). The pH of vermicompost was decreased toward neutral, C:N ratio microbes present in the gut of earthworm. Plant bioassays are considered the most conventional assessment of compost maturity analysis, and subsequently, it shows the effect of vermicompost maturity on the germination index of Vigna mungo .

  16. A Simple and Inexpensive Electrochemical Assay for the Identification of Nitrogen Containing Explosives in the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Erickson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a simple and inexpensive electrochemical assay using a custom built hand-held potentiostat for the identification of explosives. The assay is based on a wipe test and is specifically designed for use in the field. The prototype instrument designed to run the assay is capable of performing time-resolved electrochemical measurements including cyclic square wave voltammetry using an embedded microcontroller with parts costing roughly $250 USD. We generated an example library of cyclic square wave voltammograms of 12 compounds including 10 nitroaromatics, a nitramine (RDX, and a nitrate ester (nitroglycine, and designed a simple discrimination algorithm based on this library data for identification.

  17. Why flies? Inexpensive public engagement exercises to explain the value of basic biomedical research on Drosophila melanogaster

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stefan R. Pulver; Paola Cognigni; Barry Denholm; Caroline Fabre; Wendy X. W. Gu; Gerit Linneweber; Lucia Prieto-Godino; Vasja Urbančič; Maarten Zwart; Irene Miguel-Aliaga

    2011-01-01

    .... Here, we present a set of simple, inexpensive public outreach exercises aimed at explaining to the public why basic research on one particular invertebrate, the insect Drosophila melanogaster, is valuable...

  18. A quick inexpensive laboratory method in acute paracetamol poisoning could improve risk assessment, management and resource utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarathna, S.M.D.K. Ganga; Ranganathan, Shalini S.; Buckley, Nick; Soysa, S.S.S.B.D. Preethi; Fernandopulle, B. M. Rohini

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Acute paracetamol poisoning is an emerging problem in Sri Lanka. Management guidelines recommend ingested dose and serum paracetamol concentrations to assess the risk. Our aim was to determine the usefulness of the patient's history of an ingested dose of >150 mg/kg and paracetamol concentration obtained by a simple colorimetric method to assess risk in patients with acute paracetamol poisoning. Materials and Methods: Serum paracetamol concentrations were determined in 100 patients with a history of paracetamol overdose using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC); (reference method). The results were compared to those obtained with a colorimetric method. The utility of risk assessment by reported dose ingested and colorimetric analysis were compared. Results: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the history of ingested dose was 0.578 and there was no dose cut-off providing useful risk categorization. Both analytical methods had less than 5% intra- and inter-batch variation and were accurate on spiked samples. The time from blood collection to result was six times faster and ten times cheaper for colorimetry (30 minutes, US$2) than for HPLC (180 minutes, US$20). The correlation coefficient between the paracetamol levels by the two methods was 0.85. The agreement on clinical risk categorization on the standard nomogram was also good (Kappa = 0.62, sensitivity 81%, specificity 89%). Conclusions: History of dose ingested alone greatly over-estimated the number of patients who need antidotes and it was a poor predictor of risk. Paracetamol concentrations by colorimetry are rapid and inexpensive. The use of these would greatly improve the assessment of risk and greatly reduce unnecessary expenditure on antidotes. PMID:23087506

  19. Evaluating macroinvertebrate population and community level effects in outdoor microcosms: Use of in situ bioassays and multivariate analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J.L. [Zeneca Ag Products, Wilmington, DE (United States); Manning, J.P. [Zeneca Ag Products, Whitakers, NC (United States). Aquatic Biology Unit

    1996-05-01

    Evaluating toxicant effects on aquatic communities is difficult due to the ecological complexity at higher levels of organization. Two methods were assessed to improve the understanding of effects on macroinvertebrate communities in aquatic model ecosystems. First, in situ bioassay population effects were used to interpret effects at a higher organization level. Second, canonical discriminant analysis was used to investigate effects on community structure. In situ bioassays were conducted on six occasions in 17-m{sup 3} microcosms treated with copper sulfate. Macroinvertebrates occurring naturally in the microcosms were monitored. Epibenthic in situ bioassays were conducted using Caenis sp. (Ephemeroptera) and Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda) and a water column bioassay was conducted using Notonectidae (Hemiptera). Survival and growth were assessed after 3 d. Effects of copper on both notonectidae and Caenis were observed following application. However, the final Caenis epibenthic bioassays indicated that potential for recovery and survival was {ge}95%. Potential for recovery was less distinct in the water column bioassays. Copper effects also occurred on epibenthic macroinvertebrate populations and communities. Only four taxa, including Caenis, distinguished community differences among copper treatments soon after application. Later, communities showed similarities to the pretreatment bioassay. However, actual recovery was less apparent than the potential for recovery indicated by the bioassays, and community differences due to Caenis persisted.

  20. Bioassay-derived dioxin equivalent concentrations in gonads and livers of the Atlantic cod females from the Baltic Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dabrowska, H.; Murk, A.J.; Berg, van den J.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The DR-H4IIE.Luc bioassay is based on the ability of dioxin and dioxin-like contaminants to activate the AhR and its signal transduction pathway, a mechanism through which these contaminants elicit their toxic effects. The bioassay was used to examine the total dioxin-equivalent (TEQ) toxicity in

  1. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  2. Simple, Inexpensive Technique for High-Quality Smartphone Fundus Photography in Human and Animal Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Haddock

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We describe in detail a relatively simple technique of fundus photography in human and rabbit eyes using a smartphone, an inexpensive app for the smartphone, and instruments that are readily available in an ophthalmic practice. Methods. Fundus images were captured with a smartphone and a 20D lens with or without a Koeppe lens. By using the coaxial light source of the phone, this system works as an indirect ophthalmoscope that creates a digital image of the fundus. The application whose software allows for independent control of focus, exposure, and light intensity during video filming was used. With this app, we recorded high-definition videos of the fundus and subsequently extracted high-quality, still images from the video clip. Results. The described technique of smartphone fundus photography was able to capture excellent high-quality fundus images in both children under anesthesia and in awake adults. Excellent images were acquired with the 20D lens alone in the clinic, and the addition of the Koeppe lens in the operating room resulted in the best quality images. Successful photodocumentation of rabbit fundus was achieved in control and experimental eyes. Conclusion. The currently described system was able to take consistently high-quality fundus photographs in patients and in animals using readily available instruments that are portable with simple power sources. It is relatively simple to master, is relatively inexpensive, and can take advantage of the expanding mobile-telephone networks for telemedicine.

  3. Increasing the realism of a laparoscopic box trainer: a simple, inexpensive method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Louise; Kassab, Eva; Arora, Sonal; Kneebone, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Simulation-based training in medical education is increasing. Realism is an integral element of creating an engaging, effective training environment. Although physical trainers offer a low-cost alternative to expensive virtual reality (VR) simulators, many lack in realism. The aim of this research was to enhance the realism of a laparoscopic box trainer by using a simple, inexpensive method. Digital images of the abdominal cavity were captured from a VR simulator. The images were printed onto a laminated card that lined the bottom and sides of the box-trainer cavity. The standard black neoprene material that encloses the abdominal cavity was replaced with a skin-colored silicon model. The realism of the modified box trainer was assessed by surgeons, using quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Results suggest that the modified box trainer was more realistic than a standard box trainer alone. Incorporating this technique in the training of laparoscopic skills is an inexpensive means of emulating surgical reality that may enhance the engagement of the learner in simulation.

  4. Simulation training for medical emergencies in the dental setting using an inexpensive software application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, N; Mukai, N; Honda, Y; Hirata, Y; Tanaka, M; Momota, Y

    2017-11-09

    Every dental provider needs to be educated about medical emergencies to provide safe dental care. Simulation training is available with simulators such as advanced life support manikins and robot patients. However, the purchase and development costs of these simulators are high. We have developed a simulation training course on medical emergencies using an inexpensive software application. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the educational effectiveness of this course. Fifty-one dental providers participated in this study from December 2014 to March 2015. Medical simulation software was used to simulate a patient's vital signs. We evaluated participants' ability to diagnose and treat vasovagal syncope or anaphylaxis with an evaluation sheet and conducted a questionnaire before and after the scenario-based simulation training. The median evaluation sheet score for vasovagal syncope increased significantly from 7/9 before to 9/9 after simulation training. The median score for anaphylaxis also increased significantly from 8/12 to 12/12 (P simulation training. This simulation course improved participants' ability to diagnose and treat medical emergencies and improved their confidence. This course can be offered inexpensively using a software application. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Inexpensive Aerial Photogrammetry for Studies of Whales and Large Marine Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Dawson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe a simple system enabling accurate measurement of swimming marine mammals and other large vertebrates from low-altitude single-frame photogrammetry via inexpensive modifications to a “prosumer” unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV equipped with gimballed micro4/3 camera and 25 mm lens. Image scale is established via an independently powered LIDAR/GPS data-logging system recording altitude and GPS location at 1 Hz. Photogrammetric calibration of the camera and lens allowed distortion parameters to be rigorously accounted for during image analysis, via a custom-programmed Graphical User Interface (GUI running in MATLAB. The datalogger, camera calibration methods and measurement software are adaptable to a wide range of UAV platforms. Mean LIDAR accuracy, measured from 10 bridges 9–39 m above water, was 99.9%. We conducted 136 flights in New Zealand's subantarctic Auckland Islands to measure southern right whales. Mean lengths of 10 individual whales, each photographed between 7 and 15 times, had CVs (SD/mean ranging from 0.5 to 1.8% (mean = 1.2%. Repeated measurements of a floating reference target showed a mean error of c.1%. Our system is relatively inexpensive, easily put together, produces accurate, repeatable measurements from single vertical images, and hence is applicable to a wide range of ecological questions in marine and terrestrial habitats.

  6. Earthworms Dilong: Ancient, Inexpensive, Noncontroversial Models May Help Clarify Approaches to Integrated Medicine Emphasizing Neuroimmune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin L. Cooper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthworms have provided ancient cultures with food and sources of medicinal cures. Ayurveda, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, and practices in Japan, Vietnam, and Korea have focused first on earthworms as sources of food. Gradually fostering an approach to potential beneficial healing properties, there are renewed efforts through bioprospecting and evidence-based research to understand by means of rigorous investigations the mechanisms of action whether earthworms are used as food and/or as sources of potential medicinal products. Focusing on earthworms grew by serendipity from an extensive analysis of the earthworm’s innate immune system. Their immune systems are replete with leukocytes and humoral products that exert credible health benefits. Their emerging functions with respect to evolution of innate immunity have long been superseded by their well-known ecological role in soil conservation. Earthworms as inexpensive, noncontroversial animal models (without ethical concerns are not vectors of disease do not harbor parasites that threaten humans nor are they annoying pests. By recognizing their numerous ecological, environmental, and biomedical roles, substantiated by inexpensive and more comprehensive investigations, we will become more aware of their undiscovered beneficial properties.

  7. Determination of Biochemical Oxygen Demand of Area Waters: A Bioassay Procedure for Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    A graphical method for determining the 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) for a body of water is described. In this bioassay, students collect a sample of water from a designated site, transport it to the laboratory, and evaluate the amount of oxygen consumed by naturally occurring bacteria during a 5-day incubation period. An accuracy check,…

  8. Bioassay directed identification of natural aryl hydrocarbon-receptor agonists in marmalade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ede, van K.I.; Li, A.; Antunes Fernandes, E.C.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Citrus fruit and citrus fruit products, like grapefruit, lemon and marmalade were shown to contain aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, as detected with the DR CALUX® bioassay. This is of interest regarding the role of the Ah-receptor pathway in the adverse effects of dioxins, PCBs and other

  9. Cytotoxic activities of some mono and bis Mannich bases derived from acetophenone in brine shrimp bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Halise Inci; Gul, Mustafa; Hänninen, Osmo

    2002-01-01

    Some mono Mannich bases (1-phenyl-3-amino-1-propanone salts) and bis Mannich bases (1-phenyl-3-amino-2-amino-methyl-1-propanone salts) derived from acetophenone and a few representative quaternary derivatives were synthesised and their cytotoxicity was tested using the brine shrimp bioassay. This assay may serve as an intermediate test before further in vivo animal experiments in large scale, since brine shrimp nauplii as whole organisms were used in this test. Mono Mannich bases were generally more cytotoxic than their corresponding bis Mannich bases. Mannich bases synthesised were cytotoxic in both brine shrimp bioassay in this study and cell culture tests using Jurkat and Renca cells in a previous study. However, the order of the cytotoxic potency of the compounds were reverse, which may result from faster deamination of bis derivatives than optimal level, and different species and test media used in the two test systems. Faster deamination of bis derivatives might have led to elimination of active metabolites before reaching its target. The cytotoxicity of the compounds might have been altered by amino acids and proteins present in cell culture medium but not in sea water used in brine shrimp bioassay affecting their transport through the cell membrane and metabolism in the cell by binding with the compounds. With higher cytotoxic activity compared with 5-fluorouracil (CAS 51-21-8) in brine shrimp bioassay, mono Mannich base 1 and its quaternary derivative 4 and quaternary bis derivative 8 seem to be candidate compounds for further drug design.

  10. Bioassay using the water soluble fraction of a Nigerian Light Crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Summary: A 96-hour bioassay was conducted using the water soluble fraction of a Nigerian light crude oil sample on. Clarias gariepinus ... metal and total hydrocarbon contents of the water and fish were analyzed at 96 hour and 14 days which marked the end of the recovery ..... ligand model of the acute toxicity of metals. 1.

  11. Determining UV Inactivation of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts by Using Cell Culture and a Mouse Bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of UV exposure on Toxoplasma gondii oocysts has not been completely defined for use in water disinfection. This study evaluated UV irradiated oocysts by three assays: a SCID mouse bioassay, an in vitro T. gondii oocyst plaque assay (TOP-assay), and a quantitative reve...

  12. Page 1 BIO-ASSAY OF HEAVY METALS BY ASPERGILLUS NIGER ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1953-11-18

    BIO-ASSAY OF HEAVY METALS BY ASPERGILLUS. NIGER—SENSITIVITY OF A NEW STRAIN. BY (MISS) L. SARAswathi Devi i (University Botany Laboratory, Madras). Received November 18, 1953. (Communicated by Professor T. S. Sadasivan, F.A.Sc.) THE ability of some fungi to utilize minute traces of Some heavy ...

  13. A new in vitro bioassay system for discovery and quantitative evaluation of mosquito repellents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquitoes are vectors of many pathogens that cause human diseases. Although prevention and control of immature stages is the best method to control mosquitoes, repellents play a significant role in reducing the risk of these diseases by preventing mosquito bites. The In vitro K & D bioassay system ...

  14. Uncertainties analysis for the plutonium dosimetry model, doses-2005, using Mayak bioassay data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, John D; Krahenbuhl, Melinda P; Miller, Scott C; Slaughter, David M; Khokhryakov, Viktor V; Khokhryakov, Valentin F; Suslova, Klara G; Vostrotin, Vadim V

    2007-09-01

    The Doses-2005 model is a combination of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models modified using data from the Mayak Production Association cohort. Surrogate doses from inhaled plutonium can be assigned to approximately 29% of the Mayak workers using their urine bioassay measurements and other history records. The purpose of this study was to quantify and qualify the uncertainties in the estimates for radiation doses calculated with the Doses-2005 model by using Monte Carlo methods and perturbation theory. The average uncertainty in the yearly dose estimates for most organs was approximately 100% regardless of the transportability classification. The relative source of the uncertainties comes from three main sources: 45% from the urine bioassay measurements, 29% from the Doses-2005 model parameters, and 26% from the reference masses for the organs. The most significant reduction in the overall dose uncertainties would result from improved methods in bioassay measurement with additional improvements generated through further model refinement. Additional uncertainties were determined for dose estimates resulting from changes in the transportability classification and the smoking toggle. A comparison was performed to determine the effect of using the model with data from either urine bioassay or autopsy data; no direct correlation could be established. Analysis of the model using autopsy data and incorporation of results from other research efforts that have utilized plutonium ICRP models could improve the Doses-2005 model and reduce the overall uncertainty in the dose estimates.

  15. Improved sea-urchin embryo bioassay for in situ evaluation of dredged material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanca, M J; Fernández, N; Cesar, A; Antón, R; Lopez, P; Delvalls, A

    2009-11-01

    Sediments usually contain many contaminants derived from human activities. In case of dredging activities, these sediment-bound contaminants arise following the excavation and remobilization of sediments. Previous studies have used different species of clam, crabs, lugworms, etc. for the evaluation of dredged material in situ, but there are not studies that use acute bioassays for these purposes. The sea-urchin embryo bioassay has been chosen to characterize biological effects in situ in two ports of the southwest of Spain, the Port of Huelva and the Port of Cadiz. The sea-urchin embryo bioassay has been adapted for in situ evaluation of seawater quality in coastal areas, however, they are necessary for further improvements to take into account differences of temperature between sites. This temperature variation is one of the principal reasons (other than pollution) of larval mortality and the slow down in the growth rate of the urchin. In the present study a bioassay was conducted in both field and laboratory conditions, in order to compare the effects in situ with the effects under controlled conditions of temperature, salinity and oxygen dissolved. Results showed a good correlation between samples obtained in situ and in the laboratory, but in the field the percentage of normal pluteus larvae is less than under laboratory conditions.

  16. Strategies for Transferring Mixtures of Organic Contaminants from Aquatic Environments into Bioassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; Schäfer, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    and monitoring of such mixtures, a variety of cell-based in vitro and low-complexity in vivo bioassays based on algae, daphnids or fish embryos are available. A very important and sometimes unrecognized challenge is how to combine sampling, extraction and dosing to transfer the mixtures from the environment...

  17. Statistical correlations between GLC assay and smaller European elm bark beetle bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack H. Barger; Roy A. Cuthbert; Donald G. Seegrist

    1973-01-01

    American elm trees, Ulmus americana L., were sprayed with methoxychlor by helicopter or mist blower, and twig crotches were collected from sprayed trees for bioassay of Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham) and GLC assay. Correlations established between the 2 assays were dependent on method of application and amount of methoxychlor...

  18. Biological screening of selected Pacific Northwest forest plants using the brine shrimp (Artemia salina) toxicity bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvette M. Karchesy; Rick G. Kelsey; George Constantine; Joseph J. Karchesy

    2016-01-01

    The brine shrimp (Artemia salina) bioassay was used to screen 211 methanol extracts from 128 species of Pacific Northwest plants in search of general cytotoxic activity. Strong toxicity (LC50 < 100 μg/ml) was found for 17 extracts from 13 species, with highest activity observed for Angelica arguta...

  19. The Intersection of CMOS Microsystems and Upconversion Nanoparticles for Luminescence Bioimaging and Bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Wei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organic fluorophores and quantum dots are ubiquitous as contrast agents for bio-imaging and as labels in bioassays to enable the detection of biological targets and processes. Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs offer a different set of opportunities as labels in bioassays and for bioimaging. UCNPs are excited at near-infrared (NIR wavelengths where biological molecules are optically transparent, and their luminesce in the visible and ultraviolet (UV wavelength range is suitable for detection using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology. These nanoparticles provide multiple sharp emission bands, long lifetimes, tunable emission, high photostability, and low cytotoxicity, which render them particularly useful for bio-imaging applications and multiplexed bioassays. This paper surveys several key concepts surrounding upconversion nanoparticles and the systems that detect and process the corresponding luminescence signals. The principle of photon upconversion, tuning of emission wavelengths, UCNP bioassays, and UCNP time-resolved techniques are described. Electronic readout systems for signal detection and processing suitable for UCNP luminescence using CMOS technology are discussed. This includes recent progress in miniaturized detectors, integrated spectral sensing, and high-precision time-domain circuits. Emphasis is placed on the physical attributes of UCNPs that map strongly to the technical features that CMOS devices excel in delivering, exploring the interoperability between the two technologies.

  20. The intersection of CMOS microsystems and upconversion nanoparticles for luminescence bioimaging and bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liping; Doughan, Samer; Han, Yi; DaCosta, Matthew V; Krull, Ulrich J; Ho, Derek

    2014-09-10

    Organic fluorophores and quantum dots are ubiquitous as contrast agents for bio-imaging and as labels in bioassays to enable the detection of biological targets and processes. Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) offer a different set of opportunities as labels in bioassays and for bioimaging. UCNPs are excited at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths where biological molecules are optically transparent, and their luminesce in the visible and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range is suitable for detection using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. These nanoparticles provide multiple sharp emission bands, long lifetimes, tunable emission, high photostability, and low cytotoxicity, which render them particularly useful for bio-imaging applications and multiplexed bioassays. This paper surveys several key concepts surrounding upconversion nanoparticles and the systems that detect and process the corresponding luminescence signals. The principle of photon upconversion, tuning of emission wavelengths, UCNP bioassays, and UCNP time-resolved techniques are described. Electronic readout systems for signal detection and processing suitable for UCNP luminescence using CMOS technology are discussed. This includes recent progress in miniaturized detectors, integrated spectral sensing, and high-precision time-domain circuits. Emphasis is placed on the physical attributes of UCNPs that map strongly to the technical features that CMOS devices excel in delivering, exploring the interoperability between the two technologies.

  1. Toxicological profiling of sediments with in vitro mechanisms-based bioassays for endocrine disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, C.J.; Cenijn, P.H.; Hamers, T.; Lamoree, M.H.; Legler, J.; Murk, A.J.; Brouwer, A.

    2004-01-01

    In vitro bioassays are valuable tools for screening environmental samples for the presence of bioactive (e.g., endocrine-disrupting) compounds. They can be used to direct chemical analysis of active compounds in toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) approaches. In the present study, five in

  2. The use of bioassays to assess the toxicity of sediment in an acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013). Test organisms were collected from a breeding monocul- ture from the Golder Associates Research Laboratory. Sediment samples were prepared for toxicity testing as described for the. Phytotoxkit bioassay. Prior to starting the test, test vessels were filled with test sediment and reverse osmosis water (1:4) and.

  3. APPLICATION OF PLANT AND EARTHWORM BIOASSAYS TO EVALUATE REMEDIATION OF A LEAD-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earthworm acute toxicity, plant seed germination/root elongation (SG/RE) and plant genotoxicity bioassays were employed to evaluate the remediation of a lead-contaminated soil. The remediation involved removal of heavy metals by a soil washing/soil leaching treatment process. A p...

  4. Novel bioassay for the discovery of inhibitors of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP and terpenoid pathways leading to carotenoid biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Corniani

    Full Text Available The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP pathway leads to the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate in plastids. It is a major branch point providing precursors for the synthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols, plastoquinone and the phytyl chain of chlorophylls, as well as the hormones abscisic acid and gibberellins. Consequently, disruption of this pathway is harmful to plants. We developed an in vivo bioassay that can measure the carbon flow through the carotenoid pathway. Leaf cuttings are incubated in the presence of a phytoene desaturase inhibitor to induce phytoene accumulation. Any compound reducing the level of phytoene accumulation is likely to interfere with either one of the steps in the MEP pathway or the synthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate. This concept was tested with known inhibitors of steps of the MEP pathway. The specificity of this in vivo bioassay was also verified by testing representative herbicides known to target processes outside of the MEP and carotenoid pathways. This assay enables the rapid screen of new inhibitors of enzymes preceding the synthesis of phytoene, though there are some limitations related to the non-specific effect of some inhibitors on this assay.

  5. Novel bioassay for the discovery of inhibitors of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) and terpenoid pathways leading to carotenoid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corniani, Natália; Velini, Edivaldo D; Silva, Ferdinando M L; Nanayakkara, N P Dhammika; Witschel, Matthias; Dayan, Franck E

    2014-01-01

    The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway leads to the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate in plastids. It is a major branch point providing precursors for the synthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols, plastoquinone and the phytyl chain of chlorophylls, as well as the hormones abscisic acid and gibberellins. Consequently, disruption of this pathway is harmful to plants. We developed an in vivo bioassay that can measure the carbon flow through the carotenoid pathway. Leaf cuttings are incubated in the presence of a phytoene desaturase inhibitor to induce phytoene accumulation. Any compound reducing the level of phytoene accumulation is likely to interfere with either one of the steps in the MEP pathway or the synthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate. This concept was tested with known inhibitors of steps of the MEP pathway. The specificity of this in vivo bioassay was also verified by testing representative herbicides known to target processes outside of the MEP and carotenoid pathways. This assay enables the rapid screen of new inhibitors of enzymes preceding the synthesis of phytoene, though there are some limitations related to the non-specific effect of some inhibitors on this assay.

  6. Bioassay-directed fractionation and chemical identification of mutagens in bioremediated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, L R; Hughes, T J; Claxton, L D; Austern, B; Brenner, R; Kremer, F

    1998-12-01

    Soil from a Superfund site (Reilly Tar Site, St. Louis Park, Minnesota) contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from creosote was treated with several bioremediation technologies including bioslurry (BS), biopile (BP), compost (CMP), and land treatment (LT). These treatment technologies are being evaluated in pilot scale laboratory systems by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Risk Management Research Laboratory in Cincinnati, Ohio. To evaluate the genotoxicity and identify the mutagens in the soil before and after the various treatments, fractionated extracts of five soils were bioassayed for mutagenic activity with a microsuspension modification of the Salmonella histidine reversion assay. Soils were extracted by sonication using dichloromethane (DCM). The five extracts were fractionated in triplicate (two for bioassay and one for chemical analysis) by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using hexane/DCM/methanol, and the fraction for bioassay were solvent-exchanged into dimethyl sulfoxide by nitrogen evaporation. Forty HPLC fractions for each sample were bioassayed in strain YG1041 with and without exogenous liver metabolic activation. As shown in a companion paper, the mutagenicity of two treatments (BS and BP) was significantly greater than the mutagenicity of the untreated soil. Mutagenic fractions (> 500 revertants) were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). PAH analysis of the soils indicated that all treatments were effective in reducing the total PAH concentration (48-74%). Qualitative GC/MS analysis of the mutagenic fractions from the BS and BP treatments indicated that they contained azaarenes, which are mutagens. The CMP and LT processes were the most effective and least toxic bioremediation procedures based on mutagenic potency and chemical analysis. This research demonstrated that the combination of bioassays and chemical analysis provided a more accurate determination of

  7. Bioassays for the detection of chemicals that can form bioactivation-dependent reactive free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, J.T.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Wezel, A. van; Vermeulen, N.P.E. (Free Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Div. of Molecular Toxicology National Inst. for Coastal and Marine Management, Den Haag (Netherlands))

    1999-06-01

    In vitro bioassays were developed for the detection of chemicals that can be bioactivated to reactive free radical species in microsomal fractions. Two methods were deployed, a down-scaled spectrophotometric method for the detection of chemicals that can cause lipid peroxidation using the measurement of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and a fluorometric method for the detection of chemicals that can undergo redox cycling to generate superoxide radicals based on the detection of hydrogen peroxide. The response of these systems to prototypical and environmentally relevant chemicals, including tetrachloromethane and paraquat, was examined. The detection limit of the lipid peroxidation bioassay, based on the formation of TBARS, was about 1 [micro]M for tetrachloromethane; that of the bioassay for redox cyclers, based on the production of hydrogen peroxide, was about 2 [micro]M for paraquat and about 100-fold lower for the potent redox cycler 2,3,5,6-tetramethylbenzoquinone (TMBQ). Several binary mixtures of chemicals were tested for potential nonadditive effects in both in vitro systems. Some antagonistic effects among halogenated methanes were observed in the lipid peroxidation assay. In the hydrogen peroxide production assay, greater than additive effects were seen between small concentrations of paraquat and TMBQ. A number of surface water concentrates from several locations in The Netherlands, with various levels of chemical contamination, exhibited a weak response in the hydrogen peroxide production assay. Acetone was found to interfere with the response of the bioassay to redox cyclers and, therefore, the water concentrates (originally in acetone) were transferred to ethanol prior to testing. A good correlation was observed between the response of the water concentrates in the hydrogen peroxide production assay and their acute toxicity in Daphnia magna. No correlation was observed between this bioassay response and toxicity in the Microtox

  8. Bioassay based screening of steroid derivatives in animal feed and supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijk, Jeroen C W; Ashwin, Helen; van Kuijk, Sandra J A; Groot, Maria J; Heskamp, Henri H; Bovee, Toine F H; Nielen, Michel W F

    2011-08-26

    Receptor binding transcription activation bioassays are valuable tools for the screening of steroid hormones in animal feed and supplements. However, steroid derivatives often lack affinity for their cognate receptor and do not show any direct hormonal activity by themselves. These compounds are thus not detected by these kinds of bioassays and need a bioactivation step in order to become active, both in vivo and in vitro. In this study a comparison was made between different in vitro activation methods for hormone esters and hormone glycosides. Testosterone acetate and testosterone decanoate were chosen as model compounds for the hormone esters, representing the broad range of steroid esters of varying polarities, while genistin was used as a substitute model for the steroid-glycosides. Concerning bioactivation of the steroids esters, the efficiency for alkaline hydrolysis was 90-100% and much better as compared to enzymatic deconjugation by esterase. As a result 1 μg testosterone ester per gram of animal feed could easily be detected by a yeast androgen bioassay. When comparing different enzyme fractions for deglycosilation, genistin was shown to be deconjugated most efficiently by β-glucuronidase/aryl sulfatase from Helix pomatia, resulting in a significant increase of estrogenic activity as determined by a yeast estrogen bioassay. In conclusion, chemical and enzymatic deconjugation procedures for ester and glycoside conjugates respectively, resulted in a significant increase in hormonal activity as shown by the bioassay readouts and allowed effective screening of these derivatives in animal feed and feed supplements. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Responses of lone star tick (acari: ixodidae) nymphs to the repellent deet applied in acetone and ethanol solutions in vitro bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behavioral bioassays remain a standard tool in the discovery, development, and registration of repellents. Although tick repellent bioassays tend to be rather uncomplicated, several factors can influence their outcomes. Typically repellent bioassays use a solvent, such as acetone or ethanol, to disp...

  10. A Simple Inexpensive Bridgman-Stockbarger Crystal Growth System for Organic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Wang, W. S.; Metzl, R.; Bhat, K.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Frazier, Donald O.

    1996-01-01

    Direct observation of solid-liquid interface is important for the directional solidification to determine the desired interface shape by controlling the growth parameters. To grow good quality single crystals of novel organic nonlinear optical materials, a simple inexpensive Bridgman-Stockbarger (BS) crystal growth system has been designed and fabricated. Two immiscible liquids have been utilized to create two zones for this crystal growth system. Bulk single crystals of benzil derivative and n-salicylidene-aniline have been successfully grown in this system. The optimum lowering rate has been found to be 0.1 mm/h for the flat interface. Results on the crystal growth and other parameters of the grown crystals are presented.

  11. Inexpensive Monocular Pico-Projector-based Augmented Reality Display for Surgical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen; Becker, Brian C; Riviere, Cameron N

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an inexpensive pico-projector-based augmented reality (AR) display for a surgical microscope. The system is designed for use with Micron, an active handheld surgical tool that cancels hand tremor of surgeons to improve microsurgical accuracy. Using the AR display, virtual cues can be injected into the microscope view to track the movement of the tip of Micron, show the desired position, and indicate the position error. Cues can be used to maintain high performance by helping the surgeon to avoid drifting out of the workspace of the instrument. Also, boundary information such as the view range of the cameras that record surgical procedures can be displayed to tell surgeons the operation area. Furthermore, numerical, textual, or graphical information can be displayed, showing such things as tool tip depth in the work space and on/off status of the canceling function of Micron.

  12. Synthesis of high aspect ratio ZnO nanowires with an inexpensive handcrafted electrochemical setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Ali, E-mail: at1361@aut.ac.ir, E-mail: atahery@aeoi.org.ir [Nuclear Science and Technology Institute (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saramad, Shahyar; Setayeshi, Saeed [Amirkabir University of Technology, Faculty of Energy Engineering and Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this work, high aspect ratio zinc oxide nanowires are synthesized using templated one-step electrodeposition technique. Electrodeposition of the nanowires is done using a handcrafted electronic system. Nuclear track-etched polycarbonate membrane is used as a template to form the high aspect ratio nanowires. The result of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy shows that nanowires with a good crystallinity and an aspect ratio of more than 30 can be achieved in a suitable condition. The height of electrodeposited nanowires reaches to about 11 μm. Based on the obtained results, high aspect ratio ZnO nanowires can be formed using inexpensive electrodeposition setup with an acceptable quality.

  13. An Inexpensive, Fast and Sensitive Quantitative Lateral Flow Magneto-Immunoassay for Total Prostate Specific Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jacqueline M.; Wraith, Patrick; Kiely, Janice; Persad, Raj; Hurley, Katrina; Hawkins, Peter; Luxton, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We describe the detection characteristics of a device the Resonant Coil Magnetometer (RCM) to quantify paramagnetic particles (PMPs) in immunochromatographic (lateral flow) assays. Lateral flow assays were developed using PMPs for the measurement of total prostate specific antigen (PSA) in serum samples. A detection limit of 0.8 ng/mL was achieved for total PSA using the RCM and is at clinically significant concentrations. Comparison of data obtained in a pilot study from the analysis of serum samples with commercially available immunoassays shows good agreement. The development of a quantitative magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format for total PSA suggests the potential of the RCM to operate with many immunoassay formats. The RCM has the potential to be modified to quantify multiple analytes in this format. This research shows promise for the development of an inexpensive device capable of quantifying multiple analytes at the point-of-care using a magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format. PMID:25587419

  14. AN INEXPENSIVE METHOD TO MEASURE KNEE EXTENSORS' POWER IN OLDER ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Pedro Pinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Measuring knee extensors' power in elderly population is crucial but not accessible to everyone. Objective: To provide a method to calculate knee extensors' power in a conventional knee extension machine. Method: Thirteen sedentary elderly women (69.3±4.1 years performed six knee extensions as fast as possible. Kinematic data, an anthropometric model and Newtonian mechanics was used to write movement equations that allowed calculating knee extensors' power and work. The reliability was assessed by variables' coefficient of variation, intraclass correlation coefficient and standard measurement error. Results: Knee extensors' peak power and work values obtained were in agreement with the literature. We found high intraclass ICC values for both variables (93% and 97%, respectively and low normalized SEM (10.13% and 2.09%, respectively. Conclusion: We provided an inexpensive method to assess a major physical dysfunction indicator in older adults which can also be used to evaluate the progression of an intervention.

  15. An Inexpensive Radiosonde Chilled Mirror Sensor: An Old Technology With New Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The availability of an inexpensive chilled mirror dewpoint sensor has made improved atmospheric relative humidity measurements accessible. Comparisons between the chilled mirror sensor and routine radiosonde sensors have provided new information on the limitation and reliability of the routine measurements. The chilled mirror has observed detailed moisture profiles at cirrus cloud levels when cirrus was not visible, a feature that routine sensors fail to observe. Comparison measurements between the chilled mirror, the carbon resistive (hygristor) and, the capacitive sensors will be discussed. Measurements from three locations (Wallops Island; Andros Island, Bahamas; and Camborne, UK) will be highlighted. It is conceivable that the chilled mirror sensor, when its capability is fully understood, may be sufficiently reliable to serve as a reference.

  16. A new and inexpensive temperature-measuring system. Application to photovoltaic solar facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohorquez, Miguel Angel Martinez; Enrique Gomez, Juan Manuel; Andujar Marquez, Jose Manuel [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, de Sistemas Informaticos y Automatica, Universidad de Huelva, Carretera Huelva - Palos de la, Frontera S/N, 21819 Huelva (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    This article presents the design, construction and testing of a new and inexpensive digital sensor-based temperature-measuring system, whose principal characteristics are: precision, ease of connection, immunity to noise, remote operation and easy scaling, and all this at a very low cost. This new digital sensor-based measuring system overcomes the traditional problems of digital measuring sensors, offering characteristics similar to Pt100-based measuring systems, and therefore can be used in any installation where reliable temperature measurement is necessary. It is especially suitable for installations where cost is a deciding factor in the choice of measuring system. It presents a practical application of the developed instrumentation system for use in photovoltaic solar facilities. This new temperature-measuring system has been registered in the Spanish Patent and Trademark Office with the number P200803364. (author)

  17. Fabrication of Nanostructured Omniphobic and Superomniphobic Surfaces with Inexpensive CO2Laser Engraver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendurthi, Anudeep; Movafaghi, Sanli; Wang, Wei; Shadman, Soran; Yalin, Azer P; Kota, Arun K

    2017-08-09

    Superomniphobic surfaces (i.e., surfaces that are extremely repellent to both high surface tension liquids like water and low surface tension liquid like oils) can be fabricated through a combination of surface chemistry that imparts low solid surface energy with a re-entrant surface texture. Recently, surface texturing with lasers has received significant attention because laser texturing is scalable, solvent-free, and can produce a monolithic texture on virtually any material. In this work, we fabricated nanostructured omniphobic and superomniphobic surfaces with a variety of materials using a simple, inexpensive and commercially available CO 2 laser engraver. Further, we demonstrated that the nanostructured omniphobic and superomniphobic surfaces fabricated using our laser texturing technique can be used to design patterned surfaces, surfaces with discrete domains of the desired wettability, and on-surface microfluidic devices.

  18. Terbium fluorescence as a sensitive, inexpensive probe for UV-induced damage in nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Yazbi, Amira F.; Loppnow, Glen R., E-mail: glen.loppnow@ualberta.ca

    2013-07-05

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay for positive detection of DNA damage. •Recognition of undamaged DNA via hybridization to a hairpin probe. •Terbium(III) fluorescence reports the amount of damage by binding to ssDNA. •Tb/hairpin is a highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probe for DNA damage. -- Abstract: Much effort has been focused on developing methods for detecting damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multi-step procedures, are limited, require expensive instruments, or suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay that is generally applicable to nucleic acid damage and uses the enhanced luminescence due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to terbium(III) (Tb{sup 3+}). Single-stranded oligonucleotides greatly enhance the Tb{sup 3+} emission, but duplex DNA does not. With the use of a DNA hairpin probe complementary to the oligonucleotide of interest, the Tb{sup 3+}/hairpin probe is applied to detect ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage. The hairpin probe hybridizes only with the undamaged DNA. However, the damaged DNA remains single-stranded and enhances the intrinsic fluorescence of Tb{sup 3+}, producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This allows the Tb{sup 3+}/hairpin probe to be used for sensitive quantification of UV-induced DNA damage. The Tb{sup 3+}/hairpin probe showed superior selectivity to DNA damage compared to conventional molecular beacons probes (MBs) and its sensitivity is more than 2.5 times higher than MBs with a limit of detection of 4.36 ± 1.2 nM. In addition, this probe is easier to synthesize and more than eight times cheaper than MBs, which makes its use recommended for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of DNA damage.

  19. Computationally Inexpensive Incorporation of Solute Transport Physics into Pore-Network Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmani, Y.; Oostrom, M.

    2014-12-01

    Several modeling approaches have been developed in the literature for simulating solute transport at the pore scale. This includes "direct modeling" where the fundamental equations are solved directly on the actual pore-scale geometry (obtained from digital images). These methods, even though very accurate, come at a high computational cost. A pore-network representation of the pore-scale geometry is a first step in reducing the computational cost. However, the geometric simplification is typically accompanied by a secondary simplification of the physics of the problem (contributing to their inaccuracy). This is seen in the widely-used "mixed-cell method" which has simplifications in two key components: 1) intra-pore mixing, and 2) inter-pore rate expressions. Nevertheless, the method is popular because it is computationally inexpensive, allowing for examining larger and more representative computational domains. In this work, we explore two novel methods for circumventing the aforementioned limitations of the mixed-cell method (intra-pore mixing and inter-pore rate expressions); all while making an effort to keep the computational cost low. We show that while intra-pore mixing can be accurately taken into account, correcting for the inter-pore rate expressions has fundamental implications on the applicability of Eulerian pore-network models and the interpretation of the results obtained therefrom. Despite recent important progress in the development of accurate and robust direct modeling tools, there is a need in the literature for simple, accurate, and inexpensive models both from a scientific as well as a practical point of view.

  20. Development of a bioassay to screen for chemicals mimicking the anti-aging effects of calorie restriction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Takuya, E-mail: takuya@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Investigative Pathology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Tomoshi [Division of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8501 (Japan); Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Mori, Ryoichi; Hayashi, Hiroko [Department of Investigative Pathology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Shimano, Hitoshi [Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Spindler, Stephen R. [Department of Biochemistry, Room 5478, Boyce Hall, University of California - Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Shimokawa, Isao [Department of Investigative Pathology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    suggest that because of its rapidity, ease of use, and specificity, our bioassay will be more useful than the systems currently employed to screen for CR mimetics, which mimic the beneficial effects of CR. Our system will be particularly useful for high-throughput screening of natural and synthetic candidate molecules.

  1. Toxicity bioassays for water from black-odor rivers in Wenzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFu, He; RuiRui, Chen; EnHui, Zhu; Na, Chen; Bo, Yang; HuaHong, Shi; MinSheng, Huang

    2015-02-01

    Following urbanization, a large number of urban rivers were contaminated and turned to black-odor rivers. The traditional approach for detecting water quality is based on chemical or physical analysis. However, biological toxicity of black-odor water has been less addressed. As two typical black-odor rivers, Jiushanwai River (JS) and Shanxia River (SX) are tributaries of Wen-Rui Tang River in Wenzhou (south of China). The eco-safety of the urban rivers was evaluated by bioassay for water toxicity in this study. Ten and 5 sampling sites were respectively set along JS and SX. Water samples were collected monthly from October 2010 to October 2011. The general physical and chemical parameters of river water were monitored. In order to investigate the ecotoxicological effects of black-odor water, the following bioassays were used: (1) Fish acute toxicity test (Danio rerio, comprehensive toxicity), (2) luminescent bacteria bioassay (Qinghaiensis vibrio, toxicity to bacteria), and (3) tropical claw embryo assay (Xenopus tropicalis, embryo toxicity). Biotoxicity of black-odor rivers water was demonstrated by D. rerio, Q. vibrio, and X. tropicalis embryos. Toxicological effects of black-odor water were respectively shown by mortality of zebrafish, and by the relative inhibitory light rate of luminescent bacteria. However, luminescent bacteria were more sensitive to inspect biotoxicity than zebrafish. In X. tropicalis embryos test, toxicological effects of black-odor water were mostly shown by embryos' survival rate and teratogenic rate. Bioassay results showed that toxicity of SX water was higher than that of JS water, especially in summer. Statistical analysis of luminescent bacteria toxicity test showed that biotoxicity of SX and JS was high in summer, but low in winter and spring. The seasonal changes of water toxicity of the black-odor river were positively correlative with changes of water temperature (p water. Typical black-odor river water displays different

  2. Evaluating the efficacy of biological and conventional insecticides with the new 'MCD bottle' bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Eleanore D; Waite, Jessica L; Thomas, Matthew B

    2014-12-16

    Control of mosquitoes requires the ability to evaluate new insecticides and to monitor resistance to existing insecticides. Monitoring tools should be flexible and low cost so that they can be deployed in remote, resource poor areas. Ideally, a bioassay should be able to simulate transient contact between mosquitoes and insecticides, and it should allow for excito-repellency and avoidance behaviour in mosquitoes. Presented here is a new bioassay, which has been designed to meet these criteria. This bioassay was developed as part of the Mosquito Contamination Device (MCD) project and, therefore, is referred to as the MCD bottle bioassay. Presented here are two experiments that serve as a proof-of-concept for the MCD bottle bioassay. The experiments used four insecticide products, ranging from fast-acting, permethrin-treated, long-lasting insecticide nets (LLINs) that are already widely used for malaria vector control, to the slower acting entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana, that is currently being evaluated as a prospective biological insecticide. The first experiment used the MCD bottle to test the effect of four different insecticides on Anopheles stephensi with a range of exposure times (1 minute, 3 minutes, 1 hour). The second experiment is a direct comparison of the MCD bottle and World Health Organization (WHO) cone bioassay that tests a subset of the insecticides (a piece of LLIN and a piece of netting coated with B. bassiana spores) and a further reduced exposure time (5 seconds) against both An. stephensi and Anopheles gambiae. Immediate knockdown and mortality after 24 hours were assessed using logistic regression and daily survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards models. Across both experiments, fungus performed much more consistently than the chemical insecticides but measuring the effect of fungus required monitoring of mosquito mortality over several days to a week. Qualitatively, the MCD bottle and WHO cone performed comparably

  3. Bacterial and enzymatic bioassays for toxicity testing in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, G; Koopman, B

    1992-01-01

    Microbioassays using bacteria or enzymes are increasingly applied to measure chemical toxicity in the environment. Attractive features of these assays may include low cost, rapid response to toxicants, high sample throughput, modest laboratory equipment and space requirements, low sample volume, portability, and reproducible responses. Enzymatic tests rely on measurement of either enzyme activity or enzyme biosynthesis. Dehydrogenases are the enzymes most used in toxicity testing. Assay of dehydrogenase activity is conveniently carried out using oxidoreduction dyes such as tetrazolium salts. Other enzyme activity tests utilize ATPases, esterases, phosphatases, urease, luciferase, beta-galactosidase, protease, amylase, or beta-glucosidase. Recently, the inhibition of enzyme (beta-galactosidase, tryptophanase, alpha-glucosidase) biosynthesis has been explored as a basis for toxicity testing. Enzyme biosynthesis was found to be generally more sensitive to organic chemicals than enzyme activity. Bacterial toxicity tests are based on bioluminescence, motility, growth, viability, ATP, oxygen uptake, nitrification, or heat production. An important aspect of bacterial tests is the permeability of cells to environmental toxicants, particularly organic chemicals of hydrophobic nature. Physical, chemical, and genetic alterations of the outer membrane of E. coli have been found to affect test sensitivity to organic toxicants. Several microbioassays are now commercially available. The names of the assays and their basis are: Microtox (bioluminescence), Polytox (respiration), ECHA Biocide Monitor (dehydrogenase activity), Toxi-Chromotest (enzyme biosynthesis), and MetPAD (enzyme activity). An important feature common to these tests is the provision of standardized cultures of bacteria in freeze-dried form. Two of the more recent applications of microbioassays are in sediment toxicity testing and toxicity reduction evaluation. Sediment pore water may be assayed directly or

  4. [Investigation on pattern of quality control for Chinese materia medica based on famous-region drug and bioassay--the work reference].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2011-05-01

    Selection and standardization of the work reference are the technical issues to be faced with in the bioassay of Chinese materia medica. Taking the bioassay of Coptis chinensis. as an example, the manufacture process of the famous-region drugs extraction was explained from the aspects of original identification, routine examination, component analysis and bioassay. The common technologies were extracted, and the selection and standardization procedures of the work reference for the bioassay of Chinese materia medica were drawn up, so as to provide technical support for constructing a new mode and method of the quality control of Chinese materia medica based on the famous-region drugs and bioassay.

  5. Comparison of laboratory and in situ sediment bioassays using Corophium volutator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kater, B J; Postma, J F; Dubbeldam, M; Prins, J T

    2001-06-01

    Bioassays with the marine amphipod Corophium volutator were performed simultaneously in situ and in the laboratory using sediments sampled from the in situ locations. In most cases, the in situ response was significantly higher compared to the laboratory response. This difference was not caused by direct influence of the use of the field chamber on Corophium sp., nor was the difference caused by the overlying water used. Experiments showed homogenization can affect the toxicity of a sediment, but not in such a way that it can completely explain the difference between the response in situ and in the laboratory. Possible explanatory factors are harbor activity, storms, and temperature. To reduce the influence of some of these factors, the best period of the year to perform in situ bioassays with C. volutator is May, June, or September.

  6. Regional differences in stratum corneum reactivity to surfactants. Quantitative assessment using the corneosurfametry bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, F; Goffin, V; Maibach, H I; Piérard, G E

    1997-12-01

    The skin does not react similarly to the presence of xenobiotics over all anatomic sites. Distinct regional differences have been described for irritancy and percutaneous absorption. The present study assesses the regional variation of stratum corneum reactivity to surfactants using the corneosurfametry bioassay. Stratum corneum was harvested from 6 body sites in 20 young adults. Corneosurfametry was performed using water, 1% SLS and a 5% soap solution. Data show that the best variable to assess regional variability in irritancy is the overall difference in corneosurfametry (ODC), comparing the effect of a given surfactant with water. The dorsal hand and volar forearm were the least reactive, the neck, forehead, back and dorsal foot the most reactive, sites. It is concluded that the corneosurfametry bioassay, through the ODC variable, is a practically noninvasive tool for the evaluation of regional variation in irritancy at the level of the stratum corneum.

  7. Genotoxicity of SPL (spent pot lining) as measured by Tradescantia bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Vieira, L F; Davide, L C; Gedraite, L S; Campos, J M S; Azevedo, H

    2011-10-01

    Spent Pot Liner (SPL) is a solid waste product generated in the process of aluminum production. Tradescantia micronuclei (Trad-MN) and stamen hair mutation (Trad-SHM) bioassays are very useful tests to assess genotoxicity of environmental pollutants. In the present study, we intended to investigate the genotoxicity of this waste with Tradescantia bioassays using leachates of SPL simulating the natural leachability of SPL in soil. The formation of micronuclei (MN) was found to be concentration dependent. MN frequency enhanced significantly with SPL treatment. In addition, SPL also appeared to increase the percentage of dyads and triads. Trad-SHM assay showed that SPL increases pink mutation events as SPL concentration increases. These results demonstrated that SPL is a cytogenotoxic agent that affects different genetic end-points (induction of micronuclei and point mutations) even at low concentration (2% and 3%). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genotoxic evaluation of an industrial effluent from an oil refinery using plant and animal bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Postalli Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are genotoxic chemicals commonly found in effluents from oil refineries. Bioassays using plants and cells cultures can be employed for assessing environmental safety and potential genotoxicity. In this study, the genotoxic potential of an oil refinery effluent was analyzed by means of micronucleus (MN testing of Alium cepa, which revealed no effect after 24 h of treatment. On the other hand, primary lesions in the DNA of rat (Rattus norvegicus hepatoma cells (HTC were observed through comet assaying after only 2 h of exposure. On considering the capacity to detect DNA damage of a different nature and of these cells to metabolize xenobiotics, we suggest the association of the two bioassays with these cell types, plant (Allium cepa and mammal (HTC cells, for more accurately assessing genotoxicity in environmental samples.

  9. Bioassay using blocking temperature: Interparticle interactions between biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with biotargets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. Y.; Yang, T. W.; Shen, D.; Chen, K. L.; Chen, J. M.; Liao, S. H.; Chieh, J. J.; Yang, H. C.; Wang, L. M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports a bioassay of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) concentration achieved via the measurement of blocking temperature (TB). Biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs) consisting of anti-alpha-fetoprotein coated onto dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles composed of Fe3O4 were prepared and then conjugated with AFP biotargets. It was found that both the saturation magnetization and value of TB increased with the concentration of the associated AFP. Furthermore, the dependence of TB of the samples on magnetic field agreed with the interparticle interaction model. Thus, this study demonstrated a platform to detect biomarkers by characterizing TB with a sensitivity limit of 20 ppb of AFP. The promising results obtained for this bioassay can be attributed to the interparticle interactions and Néel motions of magnetic moments in the BMNs.

  10. Development of a chick bioassay for determination of infectivity of viral pathogens in poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A F M F; Walkden-Brown, S W; Groves, P J; Wells, B

    2013-01-01

    To develop a chicken bioassay to detect infective viral pathogens in poultry litter and to determine the effects of type of chicken and age of exposure, as well as the effect of simulated litter transportation, on the level of viral infectivity detected. A 5 × 2 × 2 factorial design, plus negative controls. Five chicken litters, including two with deliberate contamination (one transported and one not), two chicken types (specific-pathogen-free (SPF) Leghorns and Cobb broilers) and two ages at initial exposure (days 1 and 8). Two replicates of each treatment combination. The 10 chickens in each of 22 isolators were either exposed (20 isolators) or not (2 isolators) to 8 L of previously used or deliberately contaminated poultry litter in two deep scratch trays. At day 35 post-exposure, sera were assayed for antibodies against chicken anaemia virus (CAV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and fowl adenovirus (FAV). Spleen samples were tested for Marek's disease virus (MDV) using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The bioassay detected CAV, IBDV and FAV, but not NDV, IBV or MDV, in chickens exposed to infected litters. Infection in SPF chickens was detected with greater sensitivity than in the broiler chickens. Sensitivity increased with age at exposure in broiler but not SPF chickens. Simulated transportation for 24 h had little effect on pathogen detection. A bioassay based on the exposure of day-old SPF chickens to poultry litter and measurement of seroconversion at day 35 post-exposure is a useful semi-quantitative assay for viral infectivity in poultry litter, with overnight transportation of litter having little effect on the level of viral infectivity detected. This bioassay has applications in research on litter treatment protocols. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2013 Australian Veterinary Association.

  11. Pharmacodynamics of TRPV1 Agonists in a Bioassay Using Human PC-3 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Alvarez-Berdugo; Marcel Jiménez; Pere Clavé; Laia Rofes

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. TRPV1 is a multimodal channel mainly expressed in sensory neurons. We aimed to explore the pharmacodynamics of the TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin, natural capsaicinoids, and piperine in an in vitro bioassay using human PC-3 cells and to examine desensitization and the effect of the specific antagonist SB366791. Methods. PC-3 cells expressing TRPV1 were incubated with Fluo-4. Fluorescence emission changes following exposition to agonists with and without preincubation with antagonists were...

  12. The technique and clinical application of the cytochemical section bioassay for gastrin-like activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoile, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    The technique and validation of the cytochemical section bioassay for gastrin-like activity are described. This assay utilises the measurement of hormone-induced changes of carbonic anhydrase activity in guinea-pig gastric parietal cells. The clinical use of the assay as identified elevated levels of fasting gastrin-like biological activity in the plasma of patients with duodenal ulcer and has also demonstrated discrepancies between radioimmunoreactive gastrin levels, biological activity, and...

  13. Human In-Vivo Bioassay for the Tissue-Specific Measurement of Nociceptive and Inflammatory Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Angst, Martin S; Tingle, Martha; Schmelz, Martin; Carvalho, Brendan; Yeomans, David C

    2008-01-01

    This in-vivo human bioassay can be used to study human volunteers and patients. Samples are collected from pertinent tissue sites such as the skin via aseptically inserted microdialysis catheters (Dermal Dialysis, Erlangen, Germany). Illustrated in this example is the collection of interstitial fluid from experimentally inflamed skin in human volunteers. Sample collection can be combined with other experimental tests. For example, the simultaneous assessment of locally released biochemicals a...

  14. Evaluation of Toxorhynchites Splendens as a Bioassay Host for Dengue Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    EVALUATION OF TOXORHYNCHITES SPLENDENS AS A BIOASSAY HOST FOR O--ETC(U) JAN 81 0 M WATTS. B A HARRISON, A NISALAK UNC LASSSIFEOi NL SECURITY C... Toxorhynchites .~s a rbthissay Host for Dengue ViruSe Interim 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 1. AUTHOR(a) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(&) Watts, D.M...DECLASSIFICA*ION! DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE S16. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of this Report) -~urlW Approved for public release - distribution unlimited 17

  15. Considerations in Selecting Bioassay Organisms for Determining the Potential Environmental Impact of Dredged Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    EICD, EL; and under the general super- vision of Dr. Robert M. Engler, Contract Manager, EL; Mr. Charles C. Calhoun, DOTS Program Manager; and Dr. John...Preliminary Report, Aug 1978, Naval Station, San Diego, Calif. 12. Jones, Edmunds and Associates, "Bioassay Results of Cape Canaveral Harbor and San...Angeles District, CA 213-688-5421 Bradley, Paul Mobile District, AL 205-690-2723 Carroll, Mike New England Division, MA 617-894-2400 Cullen , Mike St

  16. Recombinant Streptomyces clavuligerus strain including cas2 gene production and analysis its antibiotic overproduction by bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Hojati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptomyces clavuligerus is one of the most important strain that produce clavulanic acid that wildly used in combination of strong but sensitive to β-lactamase antibiotics in clinics. The cas2 is one of the important genes in the biosynthesis pathway of clavulanic acid. Materials and Methods: The recombinant construct pMTcas2 which contain cas2 gene is obtained from Isfahan University. Recombinant plasmid extracts from streptomyces lividans and confirm by enzyme digestion. The streptomyces clavuligerus protoplast was prepared and transformation was done by using polyethylene glycol. Transformation was confirmed by plasmid extraction and PCR using cas2 specific primers. Finally, bioassay method was used to survey the effect of extra copy of cas2 on clavulanic acid production. Result: Plasmid extraction was initially carried out and the structure of plasmid was confirmed by digestion. The typical white colony was seen on protoplast recovery culture containing thiostrepton antibiotic and gray spores were detected after one week. Plasmid extraction was done from transformed strain and transformation was confirmed by PCR. The results of the bioassay show that amplification of the cas2 gene in multicopy plasmids resulted in a 4.1 fold increase in clavulanic acid production. Conclusion: The bioassay was done and the diameters of zone of inhibition in control and sample were compared. The results of the bioassay show that amplification of the cas2 gene in multicopy plasmids resulted in a 4.1 fold increase in clavulanic acid production. Overproduction of clavulanic acid decreases the cost of its dependent drug production.

  17. Menthol-enhanced cytotoxicity of cigarette smoke demonstrated in two bioassay models

    OpenAIRE

    Noriyasu, Atsuko; Konishi, Tadashi; Mochizuki, Shinichi; Sakurai, Kazuo; Tanaike, Yutaka; Matsuyama, Ken; Uezu, Kazuya; Kawano, Tomonori

    2013-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoke is harmful to human health at both cellular and genetic levels. Recently, a unique bioassay for smoke cytotoxicity using air pollution-sensitive plant cells (tobacco) has been proposed. Methods Model plant cells (tobacco Bel-W3 cells) and human cells (alveolar epithelial A549 cells) suspended in fresh culture media were exposed to cigarette smoke sampled after lighting the tip of cigarettes (with vs. without menthol capsules) which were attached to a glass pipe conn...

  18. Bioassays with terrestrial and aquatic species as monitoring tools of hydrocarbon degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Bori Dols, Jaume; Valles Malet, Bettina; Ortega, Lina; Riva Juan, Mª del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    In this study chemical analyses and ecotoxicity tests were applied for the assessment of a heavily hydrocarbon-contaminated soil prior and after the application of a remediation procedure that consisted in the stimulation of soil autochthonous populations of hydrocarbon degraders in static-ventilated biopiles. Terrestrial bioassays were applied in mixtures of test soils and artificial control soil and studied the survival and reproduction of Eisenia fetida and the avoidance response of E. fet...

  19. Bioassays with terrestrial and aquatic species as monitoring tools of hydrocarbon degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bori, Jaume; Vallès, Bettina; Ortega, Lina; Riva, Maria Carme

    2016-09-01

    In this study chemical analyses and ecotoxicity tests were applied for the assessment of a heavily hydrocarbon-contaminated soil prior and after the application of a remediation procedure that consisted in the stimulation of soil autochthonous populations of hydrocarbon degraders in static-ventilated biopiles. Terrestrial bioassays were applied in mixtures of test soils and artificial control soil and studied the survival and reproduction of Eisenia fetida and the avoidance response of E. fetida and Folsomia candida. Effects on aquatic organisms were studied by means of acute tests with Vibrio fischeri, Raphidocelis subcapitata, and Daphnia magna performed on aqueous elutriates from test soils. The bioremediation procedure led to a significant reduction in the concentration of hydrocarbons (from 34264 to 3074 mg kg(-1), i.e., 91 % decrease) and toxicity although bioassays were not able to report a percentage decrease of toxicity as high as the percentage reduction. Sublethal tests proved the most sensitive terrestrial bioassays and avoidance tests with earthworms and springtails showed potential as monitoring tools of hydrocarbon remediation due to their high sensitivity and short duration. The concentrations of hydrocarbons in water extracts from test soils were 130 and 100 μg L(-1) before and after remediation, respectively. Similarly to terrestrial tests, most aquatic bioassays detected a significant reduction in toxicity, which was almost negligible at the end of the treatment. D. magna survival was the most affected by soil elutriates although toxicity to the crustacean was associated to the salinity of the samples rather than to the concentration of hydrocarbons. Ecotoxicity tests with aqueous soil elutriates proved less relevant in the assessment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils due to the low hydrosolubility of hydrocarbons and the influence of the physicochemical parameters of the aquatic medium.

  20. In vitro and in vivo protocols of antimicrobial bioassay of medicinal herbal extracts: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Najeeb Ullah; Abida Parveen; Rahat Bano; Iqra Zulfiqar; Mukharma Maryam; Sadia Jabeen; Amna Liaqat; Sohail Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing against pathogenic microorganisms is the most significant task of clinical microbiology laboratory. The present study was therefore designed to review the in vitro and in vivo protocols of antimicrobial bioassays of various medicinal herbal extracts against a diversity of pathogenic microorganisms. Plants have a broad variety of antimicrobial agents which are extensively used as herbal drugs against different microbes. The review covers the ...

  1. Bioassay approaches to assessing behavioral responses of plum curculio adults (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to host fruit odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopy, R J; Cooley, S S; Phelan, P L

    1995-08-01

    We evaluated several approaches to developing a simple, sensitive, and reliable laboratory bioassay of responses of overwintered adult plum curculios (PCs),Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), to host fruit odor or its attractive components. A high proportion of assayed PCs responded positively to odor of wild plums under no-choice, moving-air conditions in a wind tunnel and under dual-choice, still-air conditions in enclosed Petri dishes. Positive response to controls lacking host odor, however, was much greater in the wind tunnel, arguing in favor of bioassays under dual-choice conditions in still air to provide greater PC discrimination. Response to host odor (from wild plums or hexane extract of wild plums or Liberty apples) in Petri dish bioassay chambers proved greatest: (1) during the scotophase of PCs under total dark or dim red light conditions, (2) when Petri dishes were completely enclosed, (3) when PCs were starved for 24 or 48 hr, and (4) when PCs were tested within seven weeks after apple tree petal fall. Neither the sex of a PC nor the direction in which a PC was obliged to move to find the source of host odor (upward through a port in the Petri dish lid or downward through a port in the base) had a substantial effect on level of response to host odor or discrimination of host odor from a nonodorous control. We conclude that an enclosed Petri dish bioassay chamber of the type described here should be a valuable asset in the process of chemically identifying components of host fruit odor attractive to PCs.

  2. Efficacy of hand held, inexpensive UV light sources on Acanthamoeba, causative organism in amoebic keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Cometa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ivan Cometa1, Andrew Rogerson1, Scott Schatz21Department of Biology, California State University Fresno, Fresno, CA, USA; 2Arizona College of Optometry, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ, USAAbstract: Multipurpose lens cleaning solutions (MPS fail to consistently kill or inactivate Acanthamoeba cysts and UV irradiation, while effective at high doses, can damage contact lenses. The present study considered synergy of action between MPS and hand-held inexpensive (ie, relatively weak UV irradiation units. Regardless of disinfection method recently formed cysts (<10 days were far more susceptible to treatment than mature cysts (>14 days. This has important implications for future protocols on testing methods for killing amoebae. The study also showed that cysts of different strains (two tested, FLA2 and P120 are variable in their response to MPS, presumably reflecting differences in cyst wall structure and thus permeability to the disinfectant. On the other hand, the effect of UV irradiation was not wall structure dependent. A 6-hour treatment with MPS alone killed trophic amoebae but failed to kill any mature cysts. Cysts of strain FLA2 were killed after 24 hours with MPS but cysts of strain P120 survived. UV irradiation with the larger 4 W unit killed all cysts after 7 minutes and was more effective than the smaller battery-powered unit (after 10 minutes about 50% of cysts were killed. When the larger unit was used with the MPS disinfection, all trophozoites were killed using UV for 3 minutes and MPS for 1 hour. The resistant P120 cysts remained a challenge but a 2- to 4-minute UV treatment followed by MPS for 3 or 6 hours reduced mature cyst survival by about 50%. The small unit in combination with MPS was less effective but did reduce the time required to kill trophic amoebae in MPS (6 hours MPS alone versus 3 hours MPS with a 1-minute UV treatment. In short, inexpensive UV units do enhance MPS disinfection and future lens cleaning systems

  3. Inexpensive, Low Power, Open-Source Data Logging in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, C. T.; Wickert, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    Collecting a robust data set of environmental conditions with commercial equipment is often cost prohibitive. I present the ALog, a general-purpose, inexpensive, low-power, open-source data logger that has proven its durability on long-term deployments in the harsh conditions of high altitude glaciers and humid river deltas. The ALog was developed to fill the need for a capable, rugged, easy-to-use, inexpensive, open-source hardware targeted at long-term remote deployment in nearly any environment. Building on the popular Arduino platform, the hardware features a high-precision clock, full size SD card slot for high-volume data storage, screw terminals, six analog inputs, two digital inputs, one digital interrupt, 3.3V and 5V power outputs, and SPI and I2C communication capability. The design is focused on extremely low power consumption allowing the Alog to be deployed for years on a single set of common alkaline batteries. The power efficiency of the Alog eliminates the difficulties associated with field power collection including additional hardware and installation costs, dependence on weather conditions, possible equipment failure, and the transport of bulky/heavy equipment to a remote site. Battery power increases suitable data collection sites (too shaded for photovoltaics) and allows for low profile installation options (including underground). The ALog has gone through continuous development with over four years of successful data collection in hydrologic field research. Over this time, software support for a wide range of sensors has been made available such as ultrasonic rangefinders (for water level, snow accumulation and glacial melt), temperature sensors (air and groundwater), humidity sensors, pyranometers, inclinometers, rain gauges, soil moisture and water potential sensors, resistance-based tools to measure frost heave, and cameras that trigger on events. The software developed for use with the ALog allows simple integration of established

  4. Assessing the genotoxicity of urban air pollutants using two in situ plant bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarini, M.; Fatigoni, C.; Dominici, L.; Maestri, S. [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy); Ederli, L.; Pasqualini, S. [Department of Applied Biology, University of Perugia, I-06121 (Italy); Monarca, S. [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy); Moretti, M., E-mail: massimo.moretti@unipg.i [Department of Medical-Surgical Specialties and Public Health, University of Perugia, I-06126 (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Genotoxicity of urban air has been analysed almost exclusively in airborne particulates. We monitored the genotoxic effects of airborne pollutants in the urban air of Perugia (Central Italy). Two plant bioindicators with different genetic endpoints were used: micronuclei in meiotic pollen mother cells using Tradescantia-micronucleus bioassay (Trad-MCN) and DNA damage in nuclei of Nicotiana tabacum leaves using comet assay (Nicotiana-comet). Buds of Tradescantia clone no. 4430 and young N. tabacum cv. Xanthi plants were exposed for 24 h at three sites with different pollution levels. One control site (indoor control) was also used. The two bioassays showed different sensitivities toward urban pollutants: Trad-MCN assay was the most sensitive, but DNA damage in N. tabacum showed a better correlation with the pollutant concentrations. In situ biomonitoring of airborne genotoxins using higher plants combined with chemical analysis is thus recommended for characterizing genotoxicity of urban air. - Plant bioassays used to explore in situ the correlation between air pollution and genotoxicity.

  5. Comparative sensitivity of sea urchin sperm bioassays to metals and pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnel, P A; Link, J M; Stober, Q J; Letourneau, M W; Roberts, W E

    1989-09-01

    A simple sperm/fertilization bioassay, primarily using sea urchin gametes, has been developed and used by a variety of laboratories. This assay was recently refined into a standard test and is now being used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others for toxicity testing in marine waters. One factor that has lagged behind the development of this assay is the comparison of its sensitivity to various common toxicants as compared to other bioassay systems and life stages of other marine organisms. The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivity of a standardized sea urchin sperm/fertilization assay to the responses of embryo, larval, and adult marine organisms to metals (Ag, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) and pesticides (DDT, Dieldrin, Endrin, Endosulfan) added to natural seawater. The results, although highly variable, generally showed that sperm/fertilization and embryo assays were quite sensitive to the metals tested, but that the larval and adult assays were more sensitive to the pesticides. These comparative data, together with other studies of complex effluents, show that the standardized sperm/fertilization bioassay is an especially quick and useful tool for biomonitoring of marine waters.

  6. Experimental and Computational Characterization of Biological Liquid Crystals: A Review of Single-Molecule Bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungsoo Na

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative understanding of the mechanical behavior of biological liquid crystals such as proteins is essential for gaining insight into their biological functions, since some proteins perform notable mechanical functions. Recently, single-molecule experiments have allowed not only the quantitative characterization of the mechanical behavior of proteins such as protein unfolding mechanics, but also the exploration of the free energy landscape for protein folding. In this work, we have reviewed the current state-of-art in single-molecule bioassays that enable quantitative studies on protein unfolding mechanics and/or various molecular interactions. Specifically, single-molecule pulling experiments based on atomic force microscopy (AFM have been overviewed. In addition, the computational simulations on single-molecule pulling experiments have been reviewed. We have also reviewed the AFM cantilever-based bioassay that provides insight into various molecular interactions. Our review highlights the AFM-based single-molecule bioassay for quantitative characterization of biological liquid crystals such as proteins.

  7. Pt-Decorated Magnetic Nanozymes for Facile and Sensitive Point-of-Care Bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Su; Kweon, Soon Ho; Cho, Seongyeon; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Moon Il; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Jinwoo

    2017-10-11

    Development of facile and sensitive bioassays is important for many point-of-care applications. In this study, we fulfilled such demand by synthesizing Pt-decorated magnetic nanozymes and developing a bioassay based on unique properties of the newly synthesized nanozymes. Fe3O4-Pt/core-shell nanoparticles (MPt/CS NPs) with various compositions were synthesized and characterized. Fe3O4 NP itself is a good nanozyme with catalytic activity superior to that of natural enzymes, but catalytic activity can be further improved by incorporating Pt to the outer layers of the Fe3O4 NPs and building heterogeneous nanostructures. Magnetic properties of MPt/CS NPs enable magnetic enrichment of liquid samples, whereas catalytic properties of MPt/CS NPs allow signal amplification by enzyme-like reactions. By integrating MPt/CS NPs in lateral flow immunoassay strips, one of the widely used point-of-care bioassay devices, and harnessing magnetic and enzyme-like properties of MPt/CS NPs, an increase in sensitivity of two orders of magnitude was achieved compared to the sensitivity of conventional lateral flow immunoassay based on Au nanoparticles.

  8. An assessment of the checkpoint bioassay concept for full scale wastewater UV reactor validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maka, P P; Lawryshyn, Y A

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to help policy makers and manufacturers understand the impact of parameter uncertainties on UV reactor performance, a numerical bioassay model was developed by integrating a UV reactor model based on computational fluid dynamics with a Monte Carlo model developed to account for parameter uncertainty. For the model implemented, it was determined that reactor performance uncertainty was less than 6%. The integrated model was used to evaluate several checkpoint bioassay criteria including one currently used by the California Department of Public Health. The model showed that these criteria failed to take into account the fact that in an ideal case, a full scale reactor will pass a single checkpoint test 50% of the time. In reality, differences in equipment measurement errors between the system validation and checkpoint bioassay, and limitations of the power law form of the dose monitoring equation in accurately representing system validation data will result in poorer than expected performance. It was suggested that such checkpoint criteria be modified by crediting the inherent over-sizing of full scale reactors.

  9. A Chemo Attractant in Onion Root Exudates Recognized by Ditylenchus dipsaci in Laboratory Bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Y; Burrows, P M; Bar-Eyal, M

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT A quantitative bioassay that translates preferences of axenically cultured and field population of Ditylenchus dipsaci, observed in vitro, into relative attractiveness of sterile root exudates preparations and their components is described. Onion (Allium cepa cv. White Lisbon) root exudates (ORE) are consistently and significantly much more attractive than the buffer control in all these assays. Exudates from oat cv. Lodi, mustard cv. Albatross and tomato cv. Rehovot 13 are significantly more attractive than the buffer but less attractive than ORE; Arabidopsis sp. cv. Landsberg erecta, oil seed rape cv. Cetes and wheat cv. Bet Hashita are as attractive as the buffer, but canary grass and clover exudates are less attractive than the buffer and, therefore, are classified as repellent. No significant differences in relative attractiveness were detected among exudates from other two cultivars of onion (Texas Grano 502 and Granex Hybrid) and one cultivar of leek (Large American Flag), but exudates from one onion (cv. Evergreen Long White Bunching) and one leek (cv. Broad London) were less attractive than ORE. Relative attractiveness is linear in relation to dilution exponent and therefore log-linear in relation to ORE concentration. Host (onion) penetration study reveals that penetration preferences by D. dipsaci follow the same pattern as those predicted by relative attractiveness coefficients estimated in the bio-assays. Preliminary characterization of the chemo attractant from ORE, using the behavioral bioassay, demonstrated that it was stable to heat and to proteolytic enzymes, nonvolatile and water soluble with a molecular mass <700 kDa.

  10. Development of diagnostic concentrations for insecticide resistance monitoring in soybean looper (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae using an artificial diet overlay bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, R N; Boethel, D J

    2000-06-01

    Diagnostic concentrations for several standard and experimental insecticides were determined for a laboratory reference strain of soybean looper, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker), using an insecticide diet overlay bioassay to evaluate the relative susceptibility of field (P) and F1 generations of four field-collected strains of third-, fourth-, and fifth-instar soybean loopers in 1996 and 1997. Diagnostic concentrations were defined as concentrations that killed 90-95% of the susceptible individuals and were 5 ppm for permethrin, 1,300 ppm for thiodicarb, 60 ppm for chlorfenapyr, 5 ppm for emamectin benzoate, and 60 ppm for spinosad. Field strains exhibited significantly greater percentage survival than the laboratory reference strain in the permethrin bioassays in 1996 and 1997 in both the P and F1 generation bioassays and in the thiodicarb bioassays in 1997. Larvae exposed to diagnostic concentrations of the experimental insecticides chlorfenapyr, emamectin benzoate, and spinosad usually did not exhibit significantly higher percentage survival than the reference strain.

  11. Laboratory bioassay for assessing the effects of sludge supernatant on plant growth and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, K.S.; Liberta, A.E.

    1982-12-01

    A laboratory bioassay is described for assessing the effects of sludge supernatant on juvenile corn growth and the ability of vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi, indigenous to coal spoil, to form mycorrhizae. The bioassay demonstrated that application rates can be identified that have the potential to promote increased plant dry weight without suppressing the formation of VA mycorrhizae in a plant's root system.

  12. Furuncular myiasis: a simple and rapid method for extraction of intact Dermatobia hominis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggild, Andrea K; Keystone, Jay S; Kain, Kevin C

    2002-08-01

    We report a case of furuncular myiasis complicated by Staphylococcus aureus infection and beta-hemolytic streptococcal cellulitis. The Dermatobia hominis larva that caused this lesion could not be extracted using standard methods, including suffocation and application of lateral pressure, and surgery was contraindicated because of cellulitis. The botfly maggot was completely and rapidly extracted with an inexpensive, disposable, commercial venom extractor.

  13. Inexpensive designer antigen for anti-HIV antibody detection with high sensitivity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Sheikh M; Salminen, Teppo; Chugh, Deepti A; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Soukka, Tero; Pettersson, Kim; Khanna, Navin

    2010-03-01

    A novel recombinant multiepitope protein (MEP) has been designed that consists of four linear, immunodominant, and phylogenetically conserved epitopes, taken from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-encoded antigens that are used in many third-generation immunoassay kits. This HIV-MEP has been evaluated for its diagnostic potential in the detection of anti-HIV antibodies in human sera. A synthetic MEP gene encoding these epitopes, joined by flexible peptide linkers in a single open reading frame, was designed and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant HIV-MEP was purified using a single affinity step, yielding >20 mg pure protein/liter culture, and used as the coating antigen in an in-house immunoassay. Bound anti-HIV antibodies were detected by highly sensitive time-resolved fluorometry, using europium(III) chelate-labeled anti-human antibody. The sensitivity and specificity of the HIV-MEP were evaluated using Boston Biomedica worldwide HIV performance, HIV seroconversion, and viral coinfection panels and were found to be comparable with those of commercially available anti-HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kits. The careful choice of epitopes, high epitope density, and an E. coli-based expression system, coupled with a simple purification protocol and the use of europium(III) chelate-labeled tracer, provide the capability for the development of an inexpensive diagnostic test with high degrees of sensitivity and specificity.

  14. Laying Waste to Mercury: Inexpensive Sorbents Made from Sulfur and Recycled Cooking Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Max J H; Kucera, Renata L; Albuquerque, Inês S; Gibson, Christopher T; Sibley, Alexander; Slattery, Ashley D; Campbell, Jonathan A; Alboaiji, Salah F K; Muller, Katherine A; Young, Jason; Adamson, Nick; Gascooke, Jason R; Jampaiah, Deshetti; Sabri, Ylias M; Bhargava, Suresh K; Ippolito, Samuel J; Lewis, David A; Quinton, Jamie S; Ellis, Amanda V; Johs, Alexander; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Chalker, Justin M

    2017-08-01

    Mercury pollution threatens the environment and human health across the globe. This neurotoxic substance is encountered in artisanal gold mining, coal combustion, oil and gas refining, waste incineration, chloralkali plant operation, metallurgy, and areas of agriculture in which mercury-rich fungicides are used. Thousands of tonnes of mercury are emitted annually through these activities. With the Minamata Convention on Mercury entering force this year, increasing regulation of mercury pollution is imminent. It is therefore critical to provide inexpensive and scalable mercury sorbents. The research herein addresses this need by introducing low-cost mercury sorbents made solely from sulfur and unsaturated cooking oils. A porous version of the polymer was prepared by simply synthesising the polymer in the presence of a sodium chloride porogen. The resulting material is a rubber that captures liquid mercury metal, mercury vapour, inorganic mercury bound to organic matter, and highly toxic alkylmercury compounds. Mercury removal from air, water and soil was demonstrated. Because sulfur is a by-product of petroleum refining and spent cooking oils from the food industry are suitable starting materials, these mercury-capturing polymers can be synthesised entirely from waste and supplied on multi-kilogram scales. This study is therefore an advance in waste valorisation and environmental chemistry. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  15. A stable and inexpensive wavelength reference for precise wavelength calibration of radial velocity spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feger, Tobias; Ireland, Michael J.; Bento, Joao; Bacigalupo, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    We present a stable, inexpensive wavelength reference, based on a white-light interferometer for the use on current and future (arrays of) diffraction-limited radial velocity (RV) spectrographs. The primary aim of using an interferometer is to obtain a dense sinusoidal wavelength reference with spectral coverage between 450-650 nm. Its basic setup consists of an unbalanced fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (FMZI) that creates an interference pattern in the spectral domain due to superposition of phase delayed light, set by a fixed optical path-length difference (OPD). To achieve long-term stability, the interferometer is actively locked to a stable atomic line. The system operates in closed-loop using a thermo-optic modulator as the phase feedback component. We conducted stability measurements by superimposing the wavelength reference with thorium-argon (ThAr) emission lines and found the differential RMS shift to be ~5 m s-1 within 30 minute bins in an experiment lasting 5 hours.

  16. Novel sulI binary vectors enable an inexpensive foliar selection method in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Jamison

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfonamide resistance is conferred by the sulI gene found on many Enterobacteriaceae R plasmids and Tn21 type transposons. The sulI gene encodes a sulfonamide insensitive dihydropteroate synthase enzyme required for folate biosynthesis. Transformation of tobacco, potato or Arabidopsis using sulI as a selectable marker generates sulfadiazine-resistant plants. Typically sulI-based selection of transgenic plants is performed on tissue culture media under sterile conditions. Findings A set of novel binary vectors containing a sulI selectable marker expression cassette were constructed and used to generate transgenic Arabidopsis. We demonstrate that the sulI selectable marker can be utilized for direct selection of plants grown in soil with a simple foliar spray application procedure. A highly effective and inexpensive high throughput screening strategy to identify transgenic Arabidopsis without use of tissue culture was developed. Conclusion Novel sulI-containing Agrobacterium binary vectors designed to over-express a gene of interest or to characterize a test promoter in transgenic plants have been constructed. These new vector tools combined with the various beneficial attributes of sulfonamide selection and the simple foliar screening strategy provide an advantageous alternative for plant biotechnology researchers. The set of binary vectors is freely available upon request.

  17. Evaluation and Recommendations for Improving the Accuracy of an Inexpensive Water Temperature Logger

    KAUST Repository

    Lentz, S. J.

    2013-07-01

    Onset\\'s HOBO U22 Water Temp Pros are small, reliable, relatively inexpensive, self-contained temperature loggers that are widely used in studies of oceans, lakes, and streams. An in-house temperature bath calibration of 158 Temp Pros indicated root-mean-square (RMS) errors ranging from 0.01° to 0.14°C, with one value of 0.23°C, consistent with the factory specifications. Application of a quadratic calibration correction substantially reduced the RMS error to less than 0.009°C in all cases. The primary correction was a bias error typically between -0.1° and 0.15°C. Comparison of water temperature measurements from Temp Pros and more accurate temperature loggers during two oceanographic studies indicates that calibrated Temp Pros have an RMSerror of~0.02°C throughout the water column at night and beneath the surface layer influenced by penetrating solar radiation during the day. Larger RMS errors (up to 0.08°C) are observed near the surface during the day due to solar heating of the black Temp Pro housing. Errors due to solar heating are significantly reduced by wrapping the housing with white electrical tape. © 2013 American Meteorological Society.

  18. An Inexpensive, Fast and Sensitive Quantitative Lateral Flow Magneto-Immunoassay for Total Prostate Specific Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M. Barnett

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe the detection characteristics of a device the Resonant Coil Magnetometer (RCM to quantify paramagnetic particles (PMPs in immunochromatographic (lateral flow assays. Lateral flow assays were developed using PMPs for the measurement of total prostate specific antigen (PSA in serum samples. A detection limit of 0.8 ng/mL was achieved for total PSA using the RCM and is at clinically significant concentrations. Comparison of data obtained in a pilot study from the analysis of serum samples with commercially available immunoassays shows good agreement. The development of a quantitative magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format for total PSA suggests the potential of the RCM to operate with many immunoassay formats. The RCM has the potential to be modified to quantify multiple analytes in this format. This research shows promise for the development of an inexpensive device capable of quantifying multiple analytes at the point-of-care using a magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format.

  19. Sustainable Electrochemically-Mediated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization with Inexpensive Non-Platinum Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantin, Marco; Lorandi, Francesca; Isse, Abdirisak A; Gennaro, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemically-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (eATRP) of oligo(ethylene oxide) methyl ether methacrylate in water is investigated on glassy carbon, Au, Ti, Ni, NiCr and SS304. eATRPs are performed both in divided and undivided electrochemical cells operating under either potentiostatic or galvanostatic mode. The reaction is fast, reaching high conversions in ≈4 h, and yields polymers with dispersity <1.2 and molecular weights close to the theoretical values. Most importantly, eATRP in a highly simplified setup (undivided cell under galvanostatic mode) with inexpensive nonnoble metals, such as NiCr and SS304, as cathode is well-controlled. Additionally, these electrodes neither release harmful ions in solution nor react directly with the CX chain end and can be reused several times. It is demonstrated that Pt can be replaced with cheaper, and more readily available materials without negatively affecting eATRP performance. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Sustainable Hypersaline Microbial Fuel Cells: Inexpensive Recyclable Polymer Supports for Carbon Nanotube Conductive Paint Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattieri, Matteo; Shivel, Nelson D; Sifat, Iram; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Minteer, Shelley D

    2017-05-09

    Microbial fuel cells are an emerging technology for wastewater treatment, but to be commercially viable and sustainable, the electrode materials must be inexpensive, recyclable, and reliable. In this study, recyclable polymeric supports were explored for the development of anode electrodes to be applied in single-chamber microbial fuel cells operated in field under hypersaline conditions. The support was covered with a carbon nanotube (CNT) based conductive paint, and biofilms were able to colonize the electrodes. The single-chamber microbial fuel cells with Pt-free cathodes delivered a reproducible power output after 15 days of operation to achieve 12±1 mW m -2 at a current density of 69±7 mA m -2 . The decrease of the performance in long-term experiments was mostly related to inorganic precipitates on the cathode electrode and did not affect the performance of the anode, as shown by experiments in which the cathode was replaced and the fuel cell performance was regenerated. The results of these studies show the feasibility of polymeric supports coated with CNT-based paint for microbial fuel cell applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. An Inexpensive Way of Teaching Uncertainty and Mineral Exploration Drilling in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation is all about inexpensive ways of teaching uncertainty and mineral exploration drilling in the classroom. These labs were developed as an off-shoot of my years of mineral industry experience before I transitioned to geoscience education. I have developed several classroom lab exercises that relate to the role of modeling, uncertainty and prediction in mineral exploration. These lessons are mostly less expensive ($construct several geologic sections that will "model" the shape of the hidden orebody. Using bamboo skewers as their drilling equipment, students then commence their drilling and along the way learn the importance of drill spacing in decreasing uncertainty or increasing confidence. Lastly, the mineral separation lab gives them an opportunity to design another experiment that mimics mineral processing and learns a valuable lesson on the difficulties in recovery and how it relates to entropy (no such thing as 100% recoverability). The last two labs can be further enhanced with economic analysis through incorporation of drilling and processing costs. Students further appreciate the world of of mineral exploration with several YouTube videos on the use of 3D and 4D GIS mine modeling softwares. However at the same time, I forewarn them about the dangers on the dependence to these visually attractive computer-generated products without field verification or the fidelity to the ground-based and drillcore-based observations.

  2. Design of an inexpensive integrating sphere student laboratory setup for the optical characterization of light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leloup, Frédéric B.; Leyre, Sven; Bauwens, Eva; Van den Abeele, Toon; Hanselaer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the design of an inexpensive integrating sphere setup is presented, enabling students to perform optical characterization of light sources with reasonable accuracy, in a student laboratory context. Instead of using an expensive sphere with magnesium oxide or barium sulfate coating, a cheap polystyrene sphere is employed. In combination with a low-cost USB spectroradiometer, the system enables the direct measurement of the spectral radiant power of a light source. In addition to the radiant power, the luminous flux, luminous efficacy, and distinctive colorimetric quantities (colour coordinates, colour temperature, and colour rendering index) can be determined. Besides a description of the equipment used, the experimental measurement procedure and some typical measurement results are presented. A comparison between the data and the results obtained with scientific metrology instrumentation indicates reasonable accuracy. As a result, it can be concluded that the purpose of the presented experiments, being that students become acquainted with applications of radiometry and photometry, and with data collection and data analysis as in a professional context, is fully achieved with the described test setup.

  3. Short report: evaluation of a simple and inexpensive photometric device for the measurement of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrmann, Steffen; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Esser, Gilbert; Trinkle, Cordula; Issifou, Saadou; Grobusch, Martin P; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kremsner, Peter G

    2004-11-01

    We have evaluated the accuracy of a simple and inexpensive photometric device (DHT) for the estimation of the blood concentration of hemoglobin by comparison with an automated, high-resolution, flow cytometry-based hematology analyzer (CellDyn 3000) and a centrifugal quantitative buffy coat hematology system (QBC I). We have analyzed the hemoglobin values of 163 individual blood samples. Bland-Altman analysis showed that the methods agreed only poorly: mean differences were 1.0 g/dL with limits of agreement (LOA) of -1.2 g/dL to 3.2 g/dL for the comparison of DHT and CellDyn measurements, 0.5 g/dL with LOA of -2.0 g/dL to 3.0 g/dL for the comparison of DHT with QBC measurements, and 0.5 g/dL with LOA of -1.1 g/dL to 2.1 g/dL for the comparison of QBC with CellDyn measurements. We conclude that the poor agreement of the DHT with the CellDyn does not permit the use of the DHT for critical hemoglobin measurements, particularly in transfusion services.

  4. A Simple, Inexpensive and Safe Method for DNA Extraction of Frigid and Clotted Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Mohammadi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extraction of blood genomicDNAis one of the main approaches for clinical and molecular biology studies. Although several methods have been developed for extraction of blood genomic DNA, most of these methods consume long time and use expensive chemicals such as proteinase K and toxic organic solvent such as phenol and chloroform. The objective of this study was to developed easy and safe method forDNAextraction from clotted and frozen whole blood. This method has many advantages: time reducing, using inexpensive materials, without phenol and chloroform, achieving of high molecular weight and good quality genomicDNA.Materials and Methods: DNA extraction was performed by two methods (new and phenol-chloroform method. Then quantity and quality parameters were evaluated by 1% agarose gel electrophoresis, Nano drop analysis and efficiency of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR.Results: Extracted DNA from 500μL of blood samples were 457.7ng/μl and 212ng/μL and their purity (OD260/OD280 were 1.8 and 1.81 for new recommended and phenol–chloroform methods respectively. The PCR results indicated that D16S539 and CSF1PO loci were amplified.Conclusion: These results shown that this method is simple, fast, safe and most economical.

  5. A Portable, Inexpensive, Nonmydriatic Fundus Camera Based on the Raspberry Pi® Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bailey Y; Mukai, Shizuo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Nonmydriatic fundus cameras allow retinal photography without pharmacologic dilation of the pupil. However, currently available nonmydriatic fundus cameras are bulky, not portable, and expensive. Taking advantage of recent advances in mobile technology, we sought to create a nonmydriatic fundus camera that was affordable and could be carried in a white coat pocket. Methods. We built a point-and-shoot prototype camera using a Raspberry Pi computer, an infrared-sensitive camera board, a dual infrared and white light light-emitting diode, a battery, a 5-inch touchscreen liquid crystal display, and a disposable 20-diopter condensing lens. Our prototype camera was based on indirect ophthalmoscopy with both infrared and white lights. Results. The prototype camera measured 133mm × 91mm × 45mm and weighed 386 grams. The total cost of the components, including the disposable lens, was $185.20. The camera was able to obtain good-quality fundus images without pharmacologic dilation of the pupils. Conclusion. A fully functional, inexpensive, handheld, nonmydriatic fundus camera can be easily assembled from a relatively small number of components. With modest improvements, such a camera could be useful for a variety of healthcare professionals, particularly those who work in settings where a traditional table-mounted nonmydriatic fundus camera would be inconvenient.

  6. A Portable, Inexpensive, Nonmydriatic Fundus Camera Based on the Raspberry Pi® Computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Y. Shen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Nonmydriatic fundus cameras allow retinal photography without pharmacologic dilation of the pupil. However, currently available nonmydriatic fundus cameras are bulky, not portable, and expensive. Taking advantage of recent advances in mobile technology, we sought to create a nonmydriatic fundus camera that was affordable and could be carried in a white coat pocket. Methods. We built a point-and-shoot prototype camera using a Raspberry Pi computer, an infrared-sensitive camera board, a dual infrared and white light light-emitting diode, a battery, a 5-inch touchscreen liquid crystal display, and a disposable 20-diopter condensing lens. Our prototype camera was based on indirect ophthalmoscopy with both infrared and white lights. Results. The prototype camera measured 133mm×91mm×45mm and weighed 386 grams. The total cost of the components, including the disposable lens, was $185.20. The camera was able to obtain good-quality fundus images without pharmacologic dilation of the pupils. Conclusion. A fully functional, inexpensive, handheld, nonmydriatic fundus camera can be easily assembled from a relatively small number of components. With modest improvements, such a camera could be useful for a variety of healthcare professionals, particularly those who work in settings where a traditional table-mounted nonmydriatic fundus camera would be inconvenient.

  7. Tools for physiology labs: an inexpensive high-performance amplifier and electrode for extracellular recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, B R; Wyttenbach, R A; Johnson, B R

    2001-03-30

    The cost of electronic equipment can be a critical barrier to including neurophysiology exercises in biology teaching programs. We describe the construction of a simple and inexpensive AC preamplifier with performance comparable to that of commercial products. The amplifier consists of two integrated circuits in five stages: differential input, fixed gain, variable gain (100 or 1000), low-pass filter (5 or 20 kHz), and 50 or 60 Hz notch filter. We compared our amplifier with two commercial units, the A-M Systems Model 1700 and the Grass P15. The quality of extracellular recording from a typical student preparation (spontaneously active crayfish motor nerve) was the same for all three amplifiers, although our amplifier has slightly higher internal noise than the P15 and slightly lower common-mode rejection than the 1700 and P15. In addition, we describe a simple suction electrode for extracellular nerve recording. It is easily constructed from readily available materials and uses a disposable plastic pipette tip, instead of the traditional glass tip, to contact the nerve. This tip is easily replaced if broken or clogged, and can be adapted to different recording conditions by selecting a different tip size or stretching the plastic. Development of this equipment is part of an ongoing project to promote neuroscience education by expanding the neurophysiology options available to laboratory instructors.

  8. Effective, Safe, and Inexpensive Microscale Ultrasonic Setup for Teaching and Research Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaña, Angel M.; Grima, Pedro M.

    2000-06-01

    Ultrasound has been used as a source of energy in chemical reactions to increase both reaction rate and product yield. Ultrasonic horns can be used for this purpose on the laboratory scale. A homemade, safe, effective, and inexpensive reactor for ultrasonic horns with applications in microscale experiments in teaching and research laboratories is presented here. The vessel has two side necks for the insertion of either a flexible temperature probe, an inert-gas line adapter, or a septum to take samples from the reaction mixture. The reactor design allows work with small volumes (2-3 mL) optimal for microscale reactions. The tip of the sonication probe easily reaches the bottom of the vessel, producing vigorous agitation throughout the reaction medium. The design also facilitates temperature modulation with an external cooling bath, allowing reactions at low temperatures. This homemade reactor vessel for ultrasonic horns has only one-sixth the cost of the standard commercial reactors. The microscale sonication setup is safer than larger units because of its robust single-piece construction and easy placement in a protection shield cabinet, and the reduced hazards inherent in running reactions on a small scale. An experimental procedure is included to illustrate the applicability of the system.

  9. REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING LOCALLY AVAILABLE INEXPENSIVE TARO AND WATER HYACINTH AS BIOSORBENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahjalal Khandaker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, locally available and inexpensive Taro and Water Hyacinth were used as biosorbents to remove chromium from synthetic wastewater. The removal of this metal ion from water in the batch and column method have been studied and discussed. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherm studies were also carried out. The material exhibits good adsorption capacity and the data follow both Freundlich and Langmuir models. Scanning Electronic Microscopic image was also used to understand the surface characteristics of biosorbent before and after biosorption studies. Effects of various factors such as pH, adsorbent dose, adsorbate initial concentration, particle size etc. were analyzed. The initial concentrations of chromium were considered 5-30mgL-1 in batch method and only 4mgL-1 in column method. The maximum chromium adsorbed was 1.64 mgg-1 and 4.44 mgg-1 in Batch method and 1.15 mgg-1 and 0.75 mgg-1 in Column method. Batch and Column desorption and regeneration studies were conducted. Column desorption studies indicated that both of these biosorbents could be reused for removing heavy metals. Results of the laboratory experiments show that the performance of Taro and Water Hyacinth prove that they can effectively be used as low cost biosorbents for the removal of chromium from wastewater.KEYWORDS:   adsorption; chromium removal; Taro; water hyacinth; batch method; column studies

  10. An inexpensive Arduino-based LED stimulator system for vision research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teikari, Petteri; Najjar, Raymond P; Malkki, Hemi; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Dumortier, Dominique; Gronfier, Claude; Cooper, Howard M

    2012-11-15

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are being used increasingly as light sources in life sciences applications such as in vision research, fluorescence microscopy and in brain-computer interfacing. Here we present an inexpensive but effective visual stimulator based on light emitting diodes (LEDs) and open-source Arduino microcontroller prototyping platform. The main design goal of our system was to use off-the-shelf and open-source components as much as possible, and to reduce design complexity allowing use of the system to end-users without advanced electronics skills. The main core of the system is a USB-connected Arduino microcontroller platform designed initially with a specific emphasis on the ease-of-use creating interactive physical computing environments. The pulse-width modulation (PWM) signal of Arduino was used to drive LEDs allowing linear light intensity control. The visual stimulator was demonstrated in applications such as murine pupillometry, rodent models for cognitive research, and heterochromatic flicker photometry in human psychophysics. These examples illustrate some of the possible applications that can be easily implemented and that are advantageous for students, educational purposes and universities with limited resources. The LED stimulator system was developed as an open-source project. Software interface was developed using Python with simplified examples provided for Matlab and LabVIEW. Source code and hardware information are distributed under the GNU General Public Licence (GPL, version 3). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Computationally Inexpensive Approach for Pitch Control of Offshore Wind Turbine on Barge Floating Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Zuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Offshore floating wind turbine (OFWT has gained increasing attention during the past decade because of the offshore high-quality wind power and complex load environment. The control system is a tradeoff between power tracking and fatigue load reduction in the above-rated wind speed area. In allusion to the external disturbances and uncertain system parameters of OFWT due to the proximity to load centers and strong wave coupling, this paper proposes a computationally inexpensive robust adaptive control approach with memory-based compensation for blade pitch control. The method is tested and compared with a baseline controller and a conventional individual blade pitch controller with the “NREL offshore 5 MW baseline wind turbine” being mounted on a barge platform run on FAST and Matlab/Simulink, operating in the above-rated condition. It is shown that the advanced control approach is not only robust to complex wind and wave disturbances but adaptive to varying and uncertain system parameters as well. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method performs better in reducing power fluctuations, fatigue loads and platform vibration as compared to the conventional individual blade pitch control.

  12. Computationally inexpensive approach for pitch control of offshore wind turbine on barge floating platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Shan; Song, Y D; Wang, Lei; Song, Qing-wang

    2013-01-01

    Offshore floating wind turbine (OFWT) has gained increasing attention during the past decade because of the offshore high-quality wind power and complex load environment. The control system is a tradeoff between power tracking and fatigue load reduction in the above-rated wind speed area. In allusion to the external disturbances and uncertain system parameters of OFWT due to the proximity to load centers and strong wave coupling, this paper proposes a computationally inexpensive robust adaptive control approach with memory-based compensation for blade pitch control. The method is tested and compared with a baseline controller and a conventional individual blade pitch controller with the "NREL offshore 5 MW baseline wind turbine" being mounted on a barge platform run on FAST and Matlab/Simulink, operating in the above-rated condition. It is shown that the advanced control approach is not only robust to complex wind and wave disturbances but adaptive to varying and uncertain system parameters as well. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method performs better in reducing power fluctuations, fatigue loads and platform vibration as compared to the conventional individual blade pitch control.

  13. The suitcase simulation: an effective and inexpensive psychiatric nursing teaching activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Joan C; Kane, Mary Frances; Pike, Mary Ellen

    2014-08-01

    A tabletop simulation was developed as a patient safety activity that involved checking in a patient admitted to a psychiatric care unit. Students were second-degree (n = 79) and traditional (n = 53) BSN students. They were given suitcases or backpacks containing various items, and following a fictional hospital policy, they had to decide whether to give the items to the patient, place them in a secured area, or send them to the pharmacy or security personnel. The activity was evaluated using the Simulation Effectiveness Tool (SET) and two open-ended questions. Students reported that they found the simulation to be enjoyable and a good learning experience. Checking in a patient's belongings is not an activity students typically perform, but the simulation can help prepare them for situations they will experience in the workplace. This inexpensive activity can easily be adapted for staff orientation and competencies. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(8), 39-44.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Development of an inexpensive optical method for studies of dental erosion process in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, A. M. T.; Noerjanto, B.; Triwanto, L.

    2008-09-01

    Teeth have important roles in digestion of food, supporting the facial-structure, as well as in articulation of speech. Abnormality in teeth structure can be initiated by an erosion process due to diet or beverages consumption that lead to destruction which affect their functionality. Research to study the erosion processes that lead to teeth's abnormality is important in order to be used as a care and prevention purpose. Accurate measurement methods would be necessary as a research tool, in order to be capable for quantifying dental destruction's degree. In this work an inexpensive optical method as tool to study dental erosion process is developed. It is based on extraction the parameters from the 3D dental visual information. The 3D visual image is obtained from reconstruction of multiple lateral projection of 2D images that captured from many angles. Using a simple motor stepper and a pocket digital camera, sequence of multi-projection 2D images of premolar tooth is obtained. This images are then reconstructed to produce a 3D image, which is useful for quantifying related dental erosion parameters. The quantification process is obtained from the shrinkage of dental volume as well as surface properties due to erosion process. Results of quantification is correlated to the ones of dissolved calcium atom which released from the tooth using atomic absorption spectrometry. This proposed method would be useful as visualization tool in many engineering, dentistry, and medical research. It would be useful also for the educational purposes.

  15. Inexpensive Method of Testing Ambient and Thermally Elevated Resistive and Piezoresistive Thin-Film Pressure Gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Christopher; Rae, Philip; Heatwole, Eric; Tasker, Douglas; Los Alamos National Labortatory Team

    2017-06-01

    Manganin is an alloy that changes resistance when subjected to high-pressure, but is insensitive to temperature changes. Resistance curves as a function of pressure for these gauges have been established. Another commonly used piezoresistive pressure sensor are thin-film carbon gauges, which are more pressure sensitive than manganin gauges. Carbon gauge response in high temperature is not well quantified. The current research is focused on verifying these established resistance curves as well as verifying this specific experimental configuration. In this research the carbon gauges' resistance change is measured for thermally elevated gauges. In this setup a 20 mm caliber gun drove planar copper projectiles at the gauge, which was embedded in a copper anvil. The Hugoniot relationship allows for a comparison between observed and theoretical pressure over a pressure range 5 to 20 GPa for manganin gauges and 1 to 5 GPa for carbon gauges. The comparison between the data obtained in this research and that of others shows that the pressure-resistance curve of manganin does to not vary between lots of manganin. Additionally, the data shows that this setup is a relatively inexpensive quick means of testing gauge response to high-pressure shocks and is suitable for elevated temperature.

  16. Computationally Inexpensive Approach for Pitch Control of Offshore Wind Turbine on Barge Floating Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Shan; Song, Y. D.; Wang, Lei; Song, Qing-wang

    2013-01-01

    Offshore floating wind turbine (OFWT) has gained increasing attention during the past decade because of the offshore high-quality wind power and complex load environment. The control system is a tradeoff between power tracking and fatigue load reduction in the above-rated wind speed area. In allusion to the external disturbances and uncertain system parameters of OFWT due to the proximity to load centers and strong wave coupling, this paper proposes a computationally inexpensive robust adaptive control approach with memory-based compensation for blade pitch control. The method is tested and compared with a baseline controller and a conventional individual blade pitch controller with the “NREL offshore 5 MW baseline wind turbine” being mounted on a barge platform run on FAST and Matlab/Simulink, operating in the above-rated condition. It is shown that the advanced control approach is not only robust to complex wind and wave disturbances but adaptive to varying and uncertain system parameters as well. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method performs better in reducing power fluctuations, fatigue loads and platform vibration as compared to the conventional individual blade pitch control. PMID:24453834

  17. Non-Destructive Detection and Separation of Radiation Damaged Cells in Miniaturized, Inexpensive Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a clear and well-identified need for rapid, efficient, non-destructive detection and isolation of radiation damaged cells. Available commercial technologies...

  18. RAPID ANALYSIS OF EMERGENCY URINE AND WATER SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S

    2007-02-26

    There is a need for fast, reliable methods for the determination of actinides and Sr-89/90 analysis on environmental and bioassay samples in response to an emergency radiological incident. The SRS (Savannah River Site) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory participated in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Radiochemistry Intercomparison Program (NRIP-06) and analyzed water and urine samples within 8 hours of receipt. The SRS Environmental Laboratory was the only lab that participated in the program that analyzed these samples for both actinides and Sr-89/90 within the requested 8 hour turnaround time. A new, rapid actinide and strontium 89/90 separation method was used for both urine and water samples. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and Sr-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U), and americium (Am), curium (Cm) and thorium (Th) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. By using vacuum box cartridge technology and stacked cartridges with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time was minimized. This paper discusses the technology and conditions employed for both water and urine samples and presents the SRS performance data on the NRIP-06 samples.

  19. Simple and Inexpensive 3D Printed Filter Fluorometer Designs: User-Friendly Instrument Models for Laboratory Learning and Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Lon A., Jr.; Chapman, Cole A.; Alaniz, Jacob A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a versatile and user-friendly selection of stereolithography (STL) files and computer-aided design (CAD) models are shared to assist educators and students in the production of simple and inexpensive 3D printed filter fluorometer instruments. These devices are effective resources for supporting active learners in the exploration of…

  20. Conditioned withdrawal in goldfish: a simple and inexpensive preparation for the study of classical fear conditioning in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barela, Peter B

    2012-02-01

    Summary.-A preparation for the study of classical fear conditioning in vertebrates is described. Its unique features are that it is inexpensive and easy to construct and operate. The following classical conditioning phenomena are demonstrated using this preparation: excitatory conditioning, extinction, contextual conditioning, blocking, a conditioned inhibition discrimination, and latent inhibition.

  1. Why Flies? Inexpensive Public Engagement Exercises to Explain the Value of Basic Biomedical Research on "Drosophila melanogaster"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulver, Stefan R.; Cognigni, Paola; Denholm, Barry; Fabre, Caroline; Gu, Wendy X. W.; Linneweber, Gerit; Prieto-Godino, Lucia; Urbancic, Vasja; Zwart, Maarten; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate model organisms are powerful systems for uncovering conserved principles of animal biology. Despite widespread use in scientific communities, invertebrate research is often severely undervalued by laypeople. Here, we present a set of simple, inexpensive public outreach exercises aimed at explaining to the public why basic research on…

  2. Stats on the Cheap: Using Free and Inexpensive Internet Resources to Enhance the Teaching of Statistics and Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01

    The present article describes four free or inexpensive Internet-based activities that can be used to supplement statistics/research methods/general psychology classes. Each activity and subsequent homework assessment is described, as well as homework performance outcome and student opinion data for each activity. (Contains 1 table.)

  3. RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN EMERGENCY MILK SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-07-17

    A new rapid separation method for radiostrontium in emergency milk samples was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that will allow rapid separation and measurement of Sr-90 within 8 hours. The new method uses calcium phosphate precipitation, nitric acid dissolution of the precipitate to coagulate residual fat/proteins and a rapid strontium separation using Sr Resin (Eichrom Technologies, Darien, IL, USA) with vacuum-assisted flow rates. The method is much faster than previous method that use calcination or cation exchange pretreatment, has excellent chemical recovery, and effectively removes beta interferences. When a 100 ml sample aliquot is used, the method has a detection limit of 0.5 Bq/L, well below generic emergency action levels.

  4. Rapid typing of Coxiella burnetii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidie M Hornstra

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii has the potential to cause serious disease and is highly prevalent in the environment. Despite this, epidemiological data are sparse and isolate collections are typically small, rare, and difficult to share among laboratories as this pathogen is governed by select agent rules and fastidious to culture. With the advent of whole genome sequencing, some of this knowledge gap has been overcome by the development of genotyping schemes, however many of these methods are cumbersome and not readily transferable between institutions. As comparisons of the few existing collections can dramatically increase our knowledge of the evolution and phylogeography of the species, we aimed to facilitate such comparisons by extracting SNP signatures from past genotyping efforts and then incorporated these signatures into assays that quickly and easily define genotypes and phylogenetic groups. We found 91 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels among multispacer sequence typing (MST loci and designed 14 SNP-based assays that could be used to type samples based on previously established phylogenetic groups. These assays are rapid, inexpensive, real-time PCR assays whose results are unambiguous. Data from these assays allowed us to assign 43 previously untyped isolates to established genotypes and genomic groups. Furthermore, genotyping results based on assays from the signatures provided here are easily transferred between institutions, readily interpreted phylogenetically and simple to adapt to new genotyping technologies.

  5. An inexpensive underwater mine countermeasures simulator with real-time 3D after action review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Stone

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a concept capability demonstration pilot study, the aim of which was to investigate how inexpensive gaming software and hardware technologies could be exploited in the development and evaluation of a simulator prototype for training Royal Navy mine clearance divers, specifically focusing on the detection and accurate reporting of the location and condition of underwater ordnance. The simulator was constructed using the Blender open source 3D modelling toolkit and game engine, and featured not only an interactive 3D editor for underwater scenario generation by instructors, but also a real-time, 3D After Action Review (AAR system for formative assessment and feedback. The simulated scenarios and AAR architecture were based on early human factors observations and briefings conducted at the UK's Defence Diving School (DDS, an organisation that provides basic military diving training for all Royal Navy and Army (Royal Engineers divers. An experimental pilot study was undertaken to determine whether or not basic navigational and mine detection components of diver performance could be improved as a result of exposing participants to the AAR system, delivered between simulated diving scenarios. The results suggest that the provision of AAR was accompanied by significant performance improvements in the positive identification of simulated underwater ordnance (in contrast to non-ordnance objects and on participants' description of their location, their immediate in-water or seabed context and their structural condition. Only marginal improvements were found with participants' navigational performance in terms of their deviation accuracies from a pre-programmed expert search path. Overall, this project contributes to the growing corpus of evidence supporting the development of simulators that demonstrate the value of exploiting open source gaming software and the significance of adopting established games design

  6. Continued Development Of An Inexpensive Simulator Based CT Scanner For Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschmann, K. R.; Parker, D. L.; Smith, V.

    1982-11-01

    An abundant number of different CT scanner models has been developed in the past ten years, meeting increasing standards of performance. From the beginning they remained a comparatively expensive piece of equipment. This is due not only to their technical complexity but is also due to the difficulties involved in assessing "true" specifications (avoiding "overde-sign"). Our aim has been to provide, for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning, a low cost CT scanner system featuring large freedom in patient positioning. We have taken advantage of the concurrent tremendously increased amount of knowledge and experience in the technical area of CT1 . By way of extensive computer simulations we gained confidence that an inexpensive C-arm simulator gantry and a simple one phase-two pulse generator in connection with a standard x-ray tube could be used, without sacrificing image quality. These components have been complemented by a commercial high precision shaft encoder, a simple and effective fan beam collimator, a high precision, high efficiency, luminescence crystal-silicon photodiode detector with 256 channels, low noise electronic preamplifier and sampling filter stages, a simplified data aquisition system furnished by Toshiba/ Analogic and an LSI 11/23 microcomputer plus data storage disk as well as various smaller interfaces linking the electrical components. The quality of CT scan pictures of phantoms,performed by the end of last year confirmed that this simple approach is working well. As a next step we intend to upgrade this system with an array processor in order to shorten recon-struction time to one minute per slice. We estimate that the system including this processor could be manufactured for a selling price of $210,000.

  7. Development and testing of a multiwell plates absorbance reader for clinical analysis using inexpensive webcam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jimmy; Gutierrez, Hector; Vitta, Yosmery; Martinez, Mauro; Fernandez, Alberto

    2007-09-01

    Biochemical analysis and clinical tests like glucose, hemoglobin, cholesterol, iron, etc. are crucial for early illness diagnosis like diabetes, anemia and coronary deceases. These tests usually are done in state of the art instruments in well equipped laboratories in health centers. In some cases, these instruments are not portable, so they are not recommended for clinical field studies in remote areas. The present work shows a portable low-cost prototype of multi-well plates reader designed for clinical analysis. A Light Emission Diodes (LEDs) array is used as excitation source and an inexpensive webcam as detector. The light source illuminates the 96 well plates and the webcam take the image with 640x480 pixels. The data is acquired and processed by using a portable computer. 96 samples can be read including blanks and calibration standards simultaneously. Light absorption data are processed using a MatLab software designed in our laboratory to obtain calibration curves, standards lectures and samples concentration. The system was evaluated using different analytes series solutions: Neutral Red, Cooper (II) Ammonia Complex and Methyl Orange. The results shows that it is possible to measure few micro liters of solutions with adequate exactitude and precision of less than 3%. As possible analytical clinical application, iron determination was performed using Fe(III) Thiocyanate complex. This method is usually applied in serum samples analysis. The sensibility achieved with the proposed instrumentation configurations allows the analysis of iron in serum samples in the references values normal range (0.75 - 1.5 mg/L) in human.

  8. Bioprinted chitosan-gelatin thermosensitive hydrogels using an inexpensive 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehm, Kevin D; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2017-10-30

    The primary bottleneck in bioprinting cell-laden structures with carefully controlled spatial relation is a lack of biocompatible inks and printing conditions. In this regard, we explored using thermogelling chitosan-gelatin (CG) hydrogel as a novel bioprinting ink; CG hydrogels is unique in that it undergoes a spontaneous phase change at physiological temperature, and does not need post-processing. In addition, we used a low cost (<$800) compact 3D printer, and modified with a new extruder to print using disposable syringes and hypodermic needles. We investigated i) the effect of concentration of CG on gelation characteristics, ii) solution preparation steps (centrifugation, mixing, and degassing) on printability and fiber formation, iii) the print bed temperature profiles via IR imaging and grid-based assessment using thermocouples, iv) the effect of feed rate (10 to 480 cm/min), flow rate (15 to 60 L/min) and needle height (70 to 280m) on fiber size and characteristics, and v) the distribution of neuroblastoma cells in printed fibers, and the viability after five days in culture. We used agarose gel to create uniform print surfaces to maintain a constant gap with the needle tip. These results showed that degassing the solution, and precooling the solution was necessary for obtaining continuous fibers. Fiber size decreased from 760µm, to 243µm as the feed rate increased from 10cm/min to 100cm/min. Bed temperature played the greatest role in fiber size, followed by feed rate. Increased needle height initially decreased fiber size but then increased showing an optimum. Cells were well distributed within the fibers and exhibited excellent viability and no contamination after 5 days. Overall we printed 3D, sterile, cell laden structures with an inexpensive bioprinter and a novel ink, without post-processing. The bioprinter described here and the novel CG hydrogels have significant potential as an ink for bioprinitng various cell-laden structures. © 2017 IOP

  9. SEMAT — The Next Generation of Inexpensive Marine Environmental Monitoring and Measurement Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Stevens

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need for environmental measurement systems to further science and thereby lead to improved policies for sustainable management. Marine environments are particularly hostile and extremely difficult for deploying sensitive measurement systems. As a consequence the need for data is greatest in marine environments, particularly in the developing economies/regions. Expense is typically the most significant limiting factor in the number of measurement systems that can be deployed, although technical complexity and the consequent high level of technical skill required for deployment and servicing runs a close second. This paper describes the Smart Environmental Monitoring and Analysis Technologies (SEMAT project and the present development of the SEMAT technology. SEMAT is a “smart” wireless sensor network that uses a commodity-based approach for selecting technologies most appropriate to the scientifically driven marine research and monitoring domain/field. This approach allows for significantly cheaper environmental observation systems that cover a larger geographical area and can therefore collect more representative data. We describe SEMAT’s goals, which include: (1 The ability to adapt and evolve; (2 Underwater wireless communications; (3 Short-range wireless power transmission; (4 Plug and play components; (5 Minimal deployment expertise; (6 Near real-time analysis tools; and (7 Intelligent sensors. This paper illustrates how the capacity of the system has been improved over three iterations towards realising these goals. The result is an inexpensive and flexible system that is ideal for short-term deployments in shallow coastal and other aquatic environments.

  10. Leukocyte count in peripheral arterial disease: A simple, reliable, inexpensive approach to cardiovascular risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Giuseppe; Brevetti, Gregorio; Lanero, Simona; Schiano, Vittorio; Laurenzano, Eugenio; Chiariello, Massimo

    2010-05-01

    An elevated leukocyte count is widely proven to predict cardiovascular risk in healthy subjects and coronary patients, but its prognostic role in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has received scarce attention. To assess the impact of leukocyte count on the incidence of major cardiovascular events in PAD, and verify whether it adds to the prognostic power of the ankle/brachial index (ABI). The occurrence of myocardial infarction and stroke was prospectively assessed in 259 consecutive PAD patients. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis and the bootstrap approach were used to identify the best cut-offs to predict the outcome, and hazard ratios (HRs) and c-statistics to assess the ability to classify risk. During a median follow-up of 30.0 months, 28 patients had an event. Adjusted Cox analyses performed on total and differential leukocyte counts, showed that only total leukocyte count (TLC) and neutrophil count (NC), considered as continuous variables, were associated with increased cardiovascular risk (HR=1.35, p7.7 x10(9)/L or NC>4.6 x 10(9)/L had a higher risk of about 5-fold vs patients with ABI>0.63 plus TLC< or =7.7 x 10(9)/L (p<0.01) or NC < or = 4.6 x 10(9)/L (p<0.01). The c-statistic for ABI was 0.61, similar to those for TLC (0.63) and NC (0.66). However, it significantly increased to 0.70 and 0.69 for the models incorporating ABI and TLC or ABI and NC, respectively (p<0.05 for both vs ABI alone). TLC and NC, which are inexpensive and reliable tests, predict major cardiovascular events in PAD, and add to the prognostic power of ABI, currently the most powerful prognostic indicator in these patients. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Time Resolved Thermal Diffusivity of Seasonal Snow Determined from Inexpensive, Easily-Implemented Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, H. J.; Higgins, C. W.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Parlange, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Thermal diffusivity of snow is an important physical property associated with key hydrological phenomena such as snow melt and heat and water vapor exchange with the atmosphere. These phenomena have broad implications in studies of climate and heat and water budgets on many scales. However, direct measurements of snow thermal diffusivity require coupled point measurements of thermal conductivity and density, which are nonstationary due to snow metamorphism. Furthermore, thermal conductivity measurements are typically obtained with specialized heating probes or plates and snow density measurements require digging snow pits. Therefore, direct measurements are difficult to obtain with high enough temporal resolution such that direct comparisons with atmospheric conditions can be made. This study uses highly resolved (7.5 to 10 cm for depth and 1min for time) temperature measurements from the Plaine Morte glacier in Switzerland as initial and boundary conditions to numerically solve the 1D heat equation and iteratively optimize for thermal diffusivity. The method uses flux boundary conditions to constrain thermal diffusivity such that spuriously high values in thermal diffusivity are eliminated. Additionally, a t-test ensuring statistical significance between solutions of varied thermal diffusivity result in further constraints on thermal diffusivity that eliminate spuriously low values. The results show that time resolved (1 minute) thermal diffusivity can be determined from easily implemented and inexpensive temperature measurements of seasonal snow with good agreement to widely used parameterizations based on snow density. This high time resolution further affords the ability to explore possible turbulence-induced enhancements to heat and mass transfer in the snow.

  12. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, N. [New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine

    1989-03-15

    A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations (such as organ partition coefficients and excretion fractions), were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrificed at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man. A thorough review of the Po urinalysis procedure showed that significant recovery losses resulted when metabolized {sup 210}Po was deposited out of raw urine. Polonium-210 was found throughout the soft tissues of the baboon but not with the partition coefficients for liver, kidneys, and spleen that are predicted by the ICRP 30 metabolic model. A fractional distribution of 0.29 for liver, 0.07 for kidneys, and 0.006 for spleen was determined. Retention times for {sup 210}Po in tissues are described by single exponential functions with biological half-times ranging from 15 to 50 days.

  13. Miniature-dispenser-based bioassay to evaluate the compatibility of powder formulations used in an entomovectoring approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommaerts, Veerle; Put, Kurt; Vandeven, Jessica; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-06-01

    Entomovectoring as a plant protection strategy demands the design of an appropriate bioassay to assess the risks of potential side effects of the powder formulations in the dispenser towards the vectoring insect. This study reports on the development of a laboratory miniature-dispenser-based bioassay. This bioassay system was used to investigate the compatibility of five model products, Prestop-Mix, Signum, kaolin, wheat flour and cellulose, with the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris L. The laboratory one-way miniature-dispenser bioassay showed that the fungicides and the carrier/diluent kaolin caused a worker mortality of > 70% after 5 weeks of exposure, while worker loss with wheat flour and cellulose was no higher than in the blank control (i.e. empty miniature dispenser) (dispenser bioassay comprised separated passageways and demonstrated that only kaolin was toxic (89 ± 11%). These results were also confirmed in a flight-cage experiment. In addition, a negative effect was observed against reproduction/colony development when nests were exposed to kaolin (P dispenser and flight-cage bioassays. In the context of entomovectoring technology, the developed laboratory two-way miniature-dispenser bioassay gives a reliable prediction of the hazards associated with powder products. Additionally, the present data indicate the possibility of using cellulose and kaolin as respective negative and positive control carriers/diluents in future risk assessment experiments. Overall, the results show that, apart from kaolin, the tested fungicides and carriers/diluents are safe to be used with B. terrestris. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Modified hydra bioassay to evaluate the toxicity of multiple mycotoxins and predict the detoxification efficacy of a clay-based sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K A; Mays, T; Romoser, A; Marroquin-Cardona, A; Mitchell, N J; Elmore, S E; Phillips, T D

    2014-01-01

    Food shortages and a lack of food supply regulation in developing countries often leads to chronic exposure of vulnerable populations to hazardous mixtures of mycotoxins, including aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) and fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)). A refined calcium montmorillonite clay [i.e. uniform particle size NovaSil (UPSN)] has been reported to tightly bind these toxins, thereby decreasing bioavailability in humans and animals. Hence, our objectives in the present study were to examine the ability of UPSN to bind mixtures of AFB(1) and FB(1) at gastrointestinally relevant pH in vitro, and to utilize a rapid in vivo bioassay to evaluate AFB(1) and FB(1) toxicity and UPSN efficacy. Isothermal sorption data indicated tight AFB(1) binding to UPSN surfaces at both pH 2.0 and 6.5, but substantially more FB(1) bound at pH 2.0 than 6.5. Site-specific competition occurred between the toxins when exposed to UPSN in combination. Importantly, treatment with UPSN resulted in significant protection to mycotoxin-exposed hydra maintained at pH 6.9-7.0. Hydra were exposed to FB(1), AFB(1) and FB(1) /AFB(1) combinations with and without UPSN. A toxic response over 92 h was rated based on morphology and mortality. Hydra assay results indicated a minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 20 µg ml(-1) for AFB(1), whereas the MEC for FB(1) was not reached. The MEC for co-exposure was 400 µg ml(-1) FB(1) + 10 µg ml(-1) AFB(1). This study demonstrates that UPSN sorbs both mycotoxins tightly at physiologically relevant pH levels, resulting in decreased bioavailability, and that a modified hydra bioassay can be used as an initial screen in vivo to predict efficacy of toxin-binding agents. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. A low volume method for the analysis of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in serum and whole blood using BDS' DR CALUX {sup registered} bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouwer, B.; Sonneveld, E.; Botschuijver, S.; Besselink, H.; Burg, B. van der [BioDetection Systems BV (BDS), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-09-15

    Biodetection Systems BV's (BDS) DR CALUX {sup registered} bioassay is a cost-effective and rapid method to measure low levels of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in various matrices. For the analysis of human serum/plasma samples, existing methods for extraction, clean-up and DR CALUX {sup registered} bioanalysis require 10 ml of serum/plasma to obtain a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 20 pg DR CALUX {sup registered} TEQ/g fat. This low LOQ value is necessary to be able to measure the lower concentration range of the dioxin and dioxin-like compounds found in human serum and plasma. In many epidemiological studies however, the amount of serum/plasma available for dioxin analysis is limited. Therefore, it is desirable to develop an analysis method that requires a lower volume of serum/plasma for dioxins and dioxin-like compounds determination. In some cases only whole blood is available for analysis. Extraction procedures for whole-blood have been described. However these have been reported to result in an overestimation of dioxin content, most likely due to the co-extraction of AhR interacting compounds like porphyrins that contribute to the detected DR CALUX {sup registered} TEQs. To tackle both problems we developed improved extraction procedures for both matrices. To ensure continued reliability of the new extract methods in the DR CALUX {sup registered} bioassay, extraction and clean-up methods for reduced serum volumes and whole-blood were evaluated, selected and validated. In this paper we present method development and validation set-up of this validation study.

  16. Discovering Inexpensive, Effective Catalysts for Solar Energy Conversion: An Authentic Research Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Sarah E.; Hooker, Paul D.; Nickel, Anne-Marie; Leichtfuss, Amanda R.; Adams, Carissa S.; de la Cerda, Dionisia; She, Yuqi; Gerken, James B.; Pokhrel, Ravi; Ambrose, Nicholas J.; Khaliqi, David; Stahl, Shannon S.; Schuttlefield Christus, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical water oxidation is a major focus of solar energy conversion efforts. A new laboratory experiment has been developed that utilizes real-time, hands-on research to discover catalysts for solar energy conversion. The HARPOON, or Heterogeneous Anodes Rapidly Perused for Oxygen Overpotential Neutralization, experiment allows an array of…

  17. A novel method for standardized application of fungal spore coatings for mosquito exposure bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knols Bart GJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in the use of fungal entomopathogens against malaria vectors is growing. Fungal spores infect insects via the cuticle and can be applied directly on the insect to evaluate infectivity. For flying insects such as mosquitoes, however, application of fungal suspensions on resting surfaces is more realistic and representative of field settings. For this type of exposure, it is essential to apply specific amounts of fungal spores homogeneously over a surface for testing the effects of fungal dose and exposure time. Contemporary methods such as spraying or brushing spore suspensions onto substrates do not produce the uniformity and consistency that standardized laboratory assays require. Two novel fungus application methods using equipment developed in the paint industry are presented and compared. Methods Wired, stainless steel K-bars were tested and optimized for coating fungal spore suspensions onto paper substrates. Different solvents and substrates were evaluated. Two types of coating techniques were compared, i.e. manual and automated coating. A standardized bioassay set-up was designed for testing coated spores against malaria mosquitoes. Results K-bar coating provided consistent applications of spore layers onto paper substrates. Viscous Ondina oil formulations were not suitable and significantly reduced spore infectivity. Evaporative Shellsol T solvent dried quickly and resulted in high spore infectivity to mosquitoes. Smooth proofing papers were the most effective substrate and showed higher infectivity than cardboard substrates. Manually and mechanically applied spore coatings showed similar and reproducible effects on mosquito survival. The standardized mosquito exposure bioassay was effective and consistent in measuring effects of fungal dose and exposure time. Conclusions K-bar coating is a simple and consistent method for applying fungal spore suspensions onto paper substrates and can produce coating layers

  18. Detection of anabolic androgenic steroid abuse in doping control using mammalian reporter gene bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtman, Corine J; Sterk, Saskia S; van de Heijning, Monique P M; Brouwer, Abraham; Stephany, Rainer W; van der Burg, Bart; Sonneveld, Edwin

    2009-04-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are a class of steroid hormones related to the male hormone testosterone. They are frequently detected as drugs in sport doping control. Being similar to or derived from natural male hormones, AAS share the activation of the androgen receptor (AR) as common mechanism of action. The mammalian androgen responsive reporter gene assay (AR CALUX bioassay), measuring compounds interacting with the AR can be used for the analysis of AAS without the necessity of knowing their chemical structure beforehand, whereas current chemical-analytical approaches may have difficulty in detecting compounds with unknown structures, such as designer steroids. This study demonstrated that AAS prohibited in sports and potential designer AAS can be detected with this AR reporter gene assay, but that also additional steroid activities of AAS could be found using additional mammalian bioassays for other types of steroid hormones. Mixtures of AAS were found to behave additively in the AR reporter gene assay showing that it is possible to use this method for complex mixtures as are found in doping control samples, including mixtures that are a result of multi drug use. To test if mammalian reporter gene assays could be used for the detection of AAS in urine samples, background steroidal activities were measured. AAS-spiked urine samples, mimicking doping positive samples, showed significantly higher androgenic activities than unspiked samples. GC-MS analysis of endogenous androgens and AR reporter gene assay analysis of urine samples showed how a combined chemical-analytical and bioassay approach can be used to identify samples containing AAS. The results indicate that the AR reporter gene assay, in addition to chemical-analytical methods, can be a valuable tool for the analysis of AAS for doping control purposes.

  19. Guidance document for prepermit bioassay testing of low-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.L.; Harrison, F.L.

    1990-11-01

    In response to the mandate of Public Law 92-532, the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) of 1972, as amended, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a program to promulgate regulations and criteria to control the ocean disposal of radioactive wastes. The EPA seeks to understand the mechanisms for biological response of marine organisms to the low levels of radioactivity that may arise from the release of these wastes as a result of ocean-disposal practices. Such information will play an important role in determining the adequacy of environmental assessments provided to the EPA in support of any disposal permit application. Although the EPA requires packaging of low-level radioactive waste to prevent release during radiodecay of the materials, some release of radioactive material into the deep-sea environment may occur when a package deteriorates. Therefore, methods for evaluating the impact on biota are being evaluated. Mortality and phenotypic responses are not anticipated at the expected low environmental levels that might occur if radioactive materials were released from the low-level waste packages. Therefore, traditional bioassay systems are unsuitable for assessing sublethal effects on biota in the marine environment. The EPA Office of Radiation Programs (ORP) has had an ongoing program to examine sublethal responses to radiation at the cellular level, using cytogenetic end points. This technical guidance report represents prepermit bioassay procedures that potentially may be applicable to the assessment of effects from a mixture of radionuclides that could be released from a point source at the ocean bottom. Methodologies along with rationale and a discussion of uncertainty are presented for the sediment benthic bioassay protocols identified in this report.

  20. Comparative Toxicity of Selected Aviation Fuels as Measured by Insect Bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    fly ( Drosophila melanogaster ). Rice weevils were cultured in 5 L cylinders or plastic one gallon jars with wheat as a food source. Flour beetles were...can be maintained in a single laboratory. A large number of insect diets have been defined and many are simple and inexpensive (Singh, 1977). Insects...31 cm aluminum screened insect cage filled with straw to act as a substrate. The artificial diet consisted of equal parts of alfalfa flour and sucrose

  1. Toxicity of Single and Mixed Contaminants in Seawater Measured with Acute Toxicity Bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Fernandez-Alba

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of organic pollutants commonly detected in seawater have been evaluated by acute toxicity bioassays. Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, and Selenastrum capricornotum were selected to test toxic effects of individual compounds and mixtures of these compounds, obtaining EC50 values in the range of 0.001 to 28.9 mg/l. In the case of mixtures, synergistic toxic responses were seen for a clear majority of the cases (>60%. Mixtures containing methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE exhibit accelerated processes that result in a change in concentration required to produce a toxic effect; for example, in the case of mixtures containing MTBE and Diuron and Dichlofluanid.

  2. Bioassay-guided isolation of apigenin with GABA-benzodiazepine activity from Tanacetum parthenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, A K; Krydsfeldt, K; Rasmussen, H B

    2009-11-01

    Extracts of Tanacetum parthenium are used in the prophylactic treatment of migraine and have also been used in Danish folk medicine for the treatment of epilepsy. An ethanol extract of T. parthenium showed high affinity for the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine site. An ethanol extract of T. parthenium was fractionated by VLC on silica and preparative C18 HPLC. Each step was monitored with the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine bioassay. The fractionation led to the isolation of apigenin, which may be responsible for CNS-effects of T. parthenium extracts.

  3. Biotesting of radioactively contaminated forest soils using barley-based bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikova, T. V.; Polyakova, L. P.; Oudalova, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Findings from radioactivity and phytotoxicity study are presented for soils from nine study-sites of the Klintsovsky Forestry located in the Bryansk region that were radioactively contaminated after the Chernobyl accident. According to the bioassay based on barley as test-species, stimulating effect of the soils analyzed is revealed for biological indexes of the length of barley roots and sprouts. From data on 137Cs specific activities in soils and plant biomass, the migration potential of radionuclide in the "soil-plant" system is assessed as a transfer factor. With correlation analysis, an impact of 137Cs in soil on the biological characteristics of barley is estimated.

  4. Bioassay-guided isolation and identification of an antibacterial compound from Ferula persica var. persica roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad-Reza Shahverdi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activities of the chloroform and water extracts of Ferula persica var. persica (Apiaceaeroots were studied by the disk diffusion method. While the chloroform extract of F. persica roots showed antibacterial activity, the water extract of the roots at the concentrations that tested did not show any activity. By bioassay-guided fractionation of the chloroform extract of the roots by preparative thin layer chromatography (PTLC a compound was found which was active against some bacteria. By conventional spectroscopy methods the active fraction was identified as umbelliprenin. This coumarin was mostly active against B. subtillis, B. cereus, E. coli, K. ponumoniae, S. typhi, S. aureus, and S. epidermilis.

  5. Sensitive bioassay for detection of PPAR{alpha} potentially hazardous ligands with gold nanoparticle probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Wei; Wan, Yan-Jian [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China); Wang, Xianliang [Division of Environmental Pollution and Human Health, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Yuan-yuan; Yang, Wen-Jie; Wang, Chun-Xiang [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China); Xu, Shun-qing, E-mail: shunqing@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Minister of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} We develop a sensitive and high throughput method to screen PPAR{alpha} ligands. {yields} This method is based on the ligand-receptor interaction on microplate. {yields} The sensitivity is increased through sliver enhancement on captured gold nanoparticle probes. {yields} There is a significant correlation between the bioassay and LC-MS for water spiked samples. - Abstract: There are so many kinds of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) ligands with hazardous effect for human health in the environment, such as certain herbicides, plasticizers and drugs. Among these agonists, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) are mostly investigated due to their persistence and accumulation in environment and their potential toxicity via PPAR{alpha}. This investigation aims at developing a bioassay method to detect PPAR{alpha} ligands based on the ligand-receptor interaction on microplate. PPAR{alpha}, which formed heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-{alpha} (RXR{alpha}), were activated by PPAR{alpha} ligands to form ligands-PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha} complexes. Then the complexes were transferred into a microplate and captured via monoclonal anti-PPAR{alpha} antibody. The PPAR{alpha} responsive elements (PPRE) modified-gold nanoparticle probes were captured by the ligand-PPAR{alpha}-RXR{alpha} complexes immobilized on the microplate, and then could be quantified through measuring the optical density after silver enhancement. The results showed that PFOS was quantified with a linear range from 100 pM to 1 {mu}M and the detection limit was 10 pM. In addition to PFOS, PFOA and MEHP were also quantified within a proper range through the proposed bioassay. This bioassay was compared with that of liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for water spiked samples with a significant correlation (r = 0.9893). This study provides a high-throughput detection

  6. Rapid PCR Detection of Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 398 by Targeting the Restriction-Modification System Carrying sau1-hsdS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegger, M.; Lindsay, J.A.; Moodley, A.; Skov, R.; Broens, E.M.; Guardabassi, L.

    2011-01-01

    A PCR targeting sau1-hsdS1 was developed for rapid detection of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 (CC398). High sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%) were shown by evaluating the test on a large strain collection (n = 1,307). We recommend this test for accurate, rapid, and inexpensive

  7. Area 2: Inexpensive Monitoring and Uncertainty Assessment of CO2 Plume Migration using Injection Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Sanjay [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-09-30

    In-depth understanding of the long-term fate of CO₂ in the subsurface requires study and analysis of the reservoir formation, the overlaying caprock formation, and adjacent faults. Because there is significant uncertainty in predicting the location and extent of geologic heterogeneity that can impact the future migration of CO₂ in the subsurface, there is a need to develop algorithms that can reliably quantify this uncertainty in plume migration. This project is focused on the development of a model selection algorithm that refines an initial suite of subsurface models representing the prior uncertainty to create a posterior set of subsurface models that reflect injection performance consistent with that observed. Such posterior models can be used to represent uncertainty in the future migration of the CO₂ plume. Because only injection data is required, the method provides a very inexpensive method to map the migration of the plume and the associated uncertainty in migration paths. The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly consists of assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, grouping the models on the basis of their expected dynamic response, selecting the subgroup of models that most closely yield dynamic response closest to the observed dynamic data, and finally quantifying the uncertainty in plume migration using the selected subset of models. The main accomplishment of the project is the development of a software module within the SGEMS earth modeling software package that implements the model selection methodology. This software module was subsequently applied to analyze CO₂ plume migration in two field projects – the In Salah CO₂ Injection project in Algeria and CO₂ injection into the Utsira formation in Norway. These applications of the software revealed that the proxies developed in this project for quickly assessing the dynamic characteristics of the reservoir were

  8. Microbial fuel cells for inexpensive continuous in-situ monitoring of groundwater quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez-Orta, S B; Werner, D; Varia, J C; Mgana, S

    2017-06-15

    Online monitoring of groundwater quality in shallow wells to detect faecal or organic pollution could dramatically improve understanding of health risks in unplanned peri-urban settlements. Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are devices able to generate electricity from the organic matter content in faecal pollution making them suitable as biosensors. In this work, we evaluate the suitability of four microbial fuel cell systems placed in different regions of a groundwater well for the low-cost monitoring of a faecal pollution event. Concepts created include the use of a sediment/bulk liquid MFC (SED/BL), a sediment/sediment MFC (SED/SED), a bulk liquid/air MFC (BL/Air), and a bulk liquid/bulk liquid MFC (BL/BL). MFC electrodes assembly aimed to use inexpensive, durable, materials, which would produce a signal after a contamination event without external energy or chemical inputs. All MFC configurations were responsive to a contamination event, however SED/SED and BL/Air MFC concepts failed to deliver a reproducible output within the tested period of time. BL/BL MFC and SED/BL MFCs presented an increase in the average current after contamination from -0.75 ± 0.35 μA to -0.66 ± 0.41 μA, and 0.07 ± 0.2 mA to 0.11 ± 0.03 mA, respectively. Currents produced by the SED/BL MFC (SMFC) were considerably higher than for the BL/BL MFCs, making them more responsive, readable and graphically visible. A factorial design of experiments (DOE) was applied to evaluate which environmental and design factors had the greatest effect on current response in a contamination event. Within the ranges of variables tested, salinity, temperature and external resistance, only temperature presented a statistically significant effect (p = 0.045). This showed that the biosensor response would be sensitive to fluctuations in temperature but not to changes in salinity, or external resistances produced from placing electrodes at different distances within a groundwater well. Copyright

  9. Single-core magnetic markers in rotating magnetic field based homogeneous bioassays and the law of mass action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieckhoff, Jan, E-mail: j.dieckhoff@tu-bs.de [Institut fuer Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Schrittwieser, Stefan; Schotter, Joerg [Molecular Diagnostics, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Remmer, Hilke; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank [Institut fuer Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    In this work, we report on the effect of the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) concentration on the quantitative detection of proteins in solution with a rotating magnetic field (RMF) based homogeneous bioassay. Here, the phase lag between 30 nm iron oxide single-core particles and the RMF is analyzed with a fluxgate-based measurement system. As a test analyte anti-human IgG is applied which binds to the protein G functionalized MNP shell and causes a change of the phase lag. The measured phase lag changes for a fixed MNP and a varying analyte concentration are modeled with logistic functions. A change of the MNP concentration results in a nonlinear shift of the logistic function with the analyte concentration. This effect results from the law of mass action. Furthermore, the bioassay results are used to determine the association constant of the binding reaction. - Highlights: • A rotating magnetic field based homogeneous bioassay concept was presented. • Here, single-core iron oxide nanoparticles are applied as markers. • The impact of the particle concentration on the bioassay results is investigated. • The relation between particle concentration and bioassay sensitivity is nonlinear. • This finding can be reasonably explained by the law of mass action.

  10. Design of a digital interactive configuration, flexible and inexpensive, for monitoring the movements of people in real time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We aim to introduce here the idea and the first results of a still ongoing research regarding the setup of a flexible and inexpensive digital interactive configuration, which has the goal of tracking the position and routes of a certain amount of subjects inside a medium or large closed space. The configuration appears to be adequate especially for the monitoring of museums spaces, exhibitions and showrooms.

  11. A Readily Available, Inexpensive, and Reusable Simulation Model for Teaching Ultrasound-Guided Abscess Identification and Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augenstein, Julie A; Yoshida, Hiromi; Lo, Mark D; Solari, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    The use of point-of-care ultrasonography as a noninvasive diagnostic tool for soft tissue infections has been shown to be superior to clinical judgment alone in determining the presence or absence of an occult abscess. As ultrasound-guided procedures become standard of care, there is an increasing demand to develop better and inexpensive simulation models to educate trainees. To date, there are no low-cost models for abscess simulation that can be constructed with minimal preparation time, be reused, and withstand multiple procedural attempts. To create an inexpensive, readily available, and reusable homemade ultrasound phantom that simulates a superficial soft tissue abscess and can be easily constructed. We experimented with precooked polenta to create a model that would appear similar to human soft tissue under ultrasound examination. Paintballs were embedded in the polenta and evaluated at different depths until a sonographically satisfactory phantom abscess model was obtained. The use of a precooked commercial polenta phantom and commercial paintballs required minimal preparation and closely replicated a superficial soft tissue abscess on ultrasonographic examination. Various paintball brands and sizes were evaluated to confirm ease of reproducibility. The polenta can be reshaped easily and the model may be punctured or incised multiple times. A homemade high-fidelity simulation phantom that simulates an abscess in superficial soft tissue can be made inexpensively in <5 min and reused for numerous trainees. This model allows for training for procedures such as ultrasound-guided abscess drainage. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Efficiency of an inexpensive liquid-based cytology performed by cytocentrifugations: a comparative study using the histology as reference standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garbar Christian

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although liquid-based cytology (LBC is now recommended for cervical cancer screening, it requires expensive automated devices and materials. To evaluate the efficiency of inexpensive LBC methods relying on an inexpensive fixative liquid, Easyfix®, we compared the results obtained by the liquid-based cytology (LBC diagnoses performed by cytocentrifugations (Papspin® and Turbitec® with those obtained by histology. Furthermore, we evaluated the efficiency of the fixative liquid, Easyfix®, to preserve HPV DNA in the collected samples. Method 266 LBC were compared with 174 colposcopies and 91 Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP. Among the LBC, 51 were performed using the Papspin® system and 215 were performed using the Turbitec® system. To control the quality of the preservation liquid, Easyfix®, we correlated the results of HCII assays with those of HPV PCR. Results For Papspin® and Turbitec® systems, the sensitivities were respectively 82.6% (95% CI: 61.2–95.0%, p Conclusion LBC performed by cytocentrifugations are inexpensive, reduce inadequate smears, show excellent efficiency and allow HPV detection by molecular biology.

  13. Evaluation of marine phytoplankton toxicity by application of marine invertebrate bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Aylagas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum and the haptophyte Prymnesium parvum are well known for their toxin production and negative effects in marine coastal environments. A. minutum produces toxins which cause paralytic shellfish poisoning in humans and can affect copepods, shellfish and other marine organisms. Toxins of P. parvum are associated with massive fish mortalities resulting in negative impacts on the marine ecosystem and large economic losses in commercial aquaculture. The aim of this work is to improve our knowledge about the reliability of the use of marine invertebrate bioassays to detect microalgae toxicity, by performing: (i a 24- to 48-h test with the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana; (ii a 48-hour embryo-larval toxicity test with the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus; and (iii a 72-h test with the amphipod Corophium multisetosum. The results indicate that A. franciscana and P. lividus larvae are sensitive to the toxicity of A. minutum and P. parvum. LC50 comparison analysis between the tested organisms reveals that A. franciscana is the most sensitive organism for A. minutum. These findings suggest that the use of different organizational biological level bioassays appears to be a suitable tool for A. minutum and P. parvum toxicity assessment.

  14. Ammonium toxicity at high pH in a marine bioassay using Corophium volutator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kater, Belinda J; Dubbeldam, Marco; Postma, Jaap F

    2006-10-01

    Two forms of ammonium exist in water: un-ionized ammonia NH3 and ionized ammonium NH4+. The toxicity to many aquatic organisms is primarily attributed to the NH3 (un-ionized) species, with the NH4+ ion (ionized) species being relatively less toxic. The pH level influences the degree of ionization. It is therefore very important that quality criteria be derived for total ammonium levels at several pH values in order to allow correct interpretation of the sediment bioassay with Corophium volutator. The responses of Corophium to total ammonium were studied in a series of pH-controlled experiments. The LC50 of total ammonium showed a significant decrease with increasing pH, in both water-only and sediment experiments. The results indicated a combined NH4+ and NH3 toxicity at pH levels less than 8.3. The results can be used to set pH-dependent water quality criteria for total ammonium in overlying water in a 10-day sediment bioassay with Corophium volutator.

  15. Identification and characterization of antifungal compounds using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae reporter bioassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Tebbets

    Full Text Available New antifungal drugs are urgently needed due to the currently limited selection, the emergence of drug resistance, and the toxicity of several commonly used drugs. To identify drug leads, we screened small molecules using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae reporter bioassay in which S. cerevisiae heterologously expresses Hik1, a group III hybrid histidine kinase (HHK from Magnaporthe grisea. Group III HHKs are integral in fungal cell physiology, and highly conserved throughout this kingdom; they are absent in mammals, making them an attractive drug target. Our screen identified compounds 13 and 33, which showed robust activity against numerous fungal genera including Candida spp., Cryptococcus spp. and molds such as Aspergillus fumigatus and Rhizopus oryzae. Drug-resistant Candida albicans from patients were also highly susceptible to compounds 13 and 33. While the compounds do not act directly on HHKs, microarray analysis showed that compound 13 induced transcripts associated with oxidative stress, and compound 33, transcripts linked with heavy metal stress. Both compounds were highly active against C. albicans biofilm, in vitro and in vivo, and exerted synergy with fluconazole, which was inactive alone. Thus, we identified potent, broad-spectrum antifungal drug leads from a small molecule screen using a high-throughput, S. cerevisiae reporter bioassay.

  16. On-chip bioassay using immobilized sensing bacteria in three-dimensional microfluidic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hirofumi; Maehana, Koji; Kamidate, Tamio

    2007-01-01

    An on-chip whole-cell bioassay has been carried out using Escherichia coli tester strains for genotoxicity. In this assay format, the mutagen-responsive bioluminescence (BL) strains are immobilized in a chip assembly in which a silicon chip is placed between two poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) chips. In the chip assembly, microchannels fabricated on the two separate PDMS layers are connected via perforated microwells on the Si chip, and thus a three-dimensional microfluidic network is constructed. The strains mixed with agarose are loaded from the channels on one of the two PDMS layers into the wells on Si chip, followed by gelation. Induction of the expression of firefly luciferase in the tester strains and BL reaction are successively carried out by filling the channels on another PDMS layer with samples containing inducer (genotoxic substance) and then adenosine triphosphate/luciferin mixture, respectively. BL emission from each of the wells can be monitored by using a charge-coupled device camera to obtain an overall picture of the chip. The on-chip format based on a three-dimensional microfluidic network provides a combinatorial bioassay for multiple samples with multiple tester strains in a simple chip assembly. Thus, the presented method could be applied not only to various microbial sensing applications but also to other (bio)chemical analyses.

  17. The Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea active bioassay for water monitoring: evaluating and comparing methodological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Betânia Brizola Cassanego

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea cuttings with flower buds are utilized in bioassays to diagnose genotoxic effects of water. The literature describes different substances used to adapt and recover the cuttings before and after exposure to water samples and also describes the effects of different exposure times. This study evaluated and compared the micronuclei (MCN frequencies in T. pallida when cuttings with flower buds were submitted to different methodological conditions. The bioassay was then applied bimonthly during seven months to assess the genotoxic potential of a site located on the Sinos River in Campo Bom, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Micronuclei frequencies in buds of cuttings adapted and recovered in distilled water and in Hoagland solution were 3.0 and 2.9, respectively, for cuttings exposed to river water, and 1.19 and 1.23 in controls. No significant differences among MCN frequencies were observed when cuttings were exposed for 8, 24 or 32 hours to river water (from 3.07 to 4.73 and in controls (from 1.13 to 2.00 in all samplings during a year. Adaptation and recovery of cuttings in distilled water or Hoagland solution and exposure for different times did not influence the response of T. pallida, indicating that all the conditions tested are viable for biomonitoring of water genotoxicity. Water samples from the Sinos River presented genotoxicity during the period monitored, evidenced by the MCN frequencies recorded which were significantly higher than the frequencies of the controls.

  18. Pharmacodynamics of TRPV1 Agonists in a Bioassay Using Human PC-3 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Marcel; Clavé, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. TRPV1 is a multimodal channel mainly expressed in sensory neurons. We aimed to explore the pharmacodynamics of the TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin, natural capsaicinoids, and piperine in an in vitro bioassay using human PC-3 cells and to examine desensitization and the effect of the specific antagonist SB366791. Methods. PC-3 cells expressing TRPV1 were incubated with Fluo-4. Fluorescence emission changes following exposition to agonists with and without preincubation with antagonists were assessed and referred to maximal fluorescence following the addition of ionomycin. Concentration-response curves were fitted to the Hill equation. Results. Capsaicin and piperine had similar pharmacodynamics (E max 204.8 ± 184.3% piperine versus 176.6 ± 35.83% capsaicin, P = 0.8814, Hill coefficient 0.70 ± 0.50 piperine versus 1.59 ± 0.86 capsaicin, P = 0.3752). In contrast, capsaicinoids had lower E max (40.99 ± 6.14% capsaicinoids versus 176.6 ± 35.83% capsaicin, P capsaicinoids. These agonists present desensitization and their effect is significantly reduced by a TRPV1-specific antagonist. In addition, PC-3 cell bioassays proved useful in the study of TRPV1 pharmacodynamics. PMID:24688365

  19. Pharmacodynamics of TRPV1 Agonists in a Bioassay Using Human PC-3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alvarez-Berdugo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. TRPV1 is a multimodal channel mainly expressed in sensory neurons. We aimed to explore the pharmacodynamics of the TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin, natural capsaicinoids, and piperine in an in vitro bioassay using human PC-3 cells and to examine desensitization and the effect of the specific antagonist SB366791. Methods. PC-3 cells expressing TRPV1 were incubated with Fluo-4. Fluorescence emission changes following exposition to agonists with and without preincubation with antagonists were assessed and referred to maximal fluorescence following the addition of ionomycin. Concentration-response curves were fitted to the Hill equation. Results. Capsaicin and piperine had similar pharmacodynamics (Emax 204.8 ± 184.3% piperine versus 176.6 ± 35.83% capsaicin, P=0.8814, Hill coefficient 0.70 ± 0.50 piperine versus 1.59 ± 0.86 capsaicin, P=0.3752. In contrast, capsaicinoids had lower Emax (40.99 ± 6.14% capsaicinoids versus 176.6 ± 35.83% capsaicin, P<0.001. All the TRPV1 agonists showed significant desensitization after the second exposition and their effects were strongly inhibited by SB366791. Conclusion. TRPV1 receptor is successfully stimulated by capsaicin, piperine, and natural capsaicinoids. These agonists present desensitization and their effect is significantly reduced by a TRPV1-specific antagonist. In addition, PC-3 cell bioassays proved useful in the study of TRPV1 pharmacodynamics.

  20. Pharmacodynamics of TRPV1 agonists in a bioassay using human PC-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Berdugo, Daniel; Jiménez, Marcel; Clavé, Pere; Rofes, Laia

    2014-01-01

    TRPV1 is a multimodal channel mainly expressed in sensory neurons. We aimed to explore the pharmacodynamics of the TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin, natural capsaicinoids, and piperine in an in vitro bioassay using human PC-3 cells and to examine desensitization and the effect of the specific antagonist SB366791. PC-3 cells expressing TRPV1 were incubated with Fluo-4. Fluorescence emission changes following exposition to agonists with and without preincubation with antagonists were assessed and referred to maximal fluorescence following the addition of ionomycin. Concentration-response curves were fitted to the Hill equation. Capsaicin and piperine had similar pharmacodynamics (E max 204.8 ± 184.3% piperine versus 176.6 ± 35.83% capsaicin, P = 0.8814, Hill coefficient 0.70 ± 0.50 piperine versus 1.59 ± 0.86 capsaicin, P = 0.3752). In contrast, capsaicinoids had lower E max (40.99 ± 6.14% capsaicinoids versus 176.6 ± 35.83% capsaicin, P capsaicinoids. These agonists present desensitization and their effect is significantly reduced by a TRPV1-specific antagonist. In addition, PC-3 cell bioassays proved useful in the study of TRPV1 pharmacodynamics.

  1. Bioassay of Lake Onego bottom sediments toxicity based on their chemical composition and deepwater macrozoobenthos state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinkina Nataliya Michailovna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The bioassay of the toxicity of bottom sediments sampled in different areas of Lake Onega was carried out by crustaceans biotesting (Ceriodaphnia affinis Lillijeborg. It was shown that in the most areas of Lake Onega there are non-toxic bottom sediments. Toxic bottom sediments were found in Kondopogskaya Bay, intensively polluted with pulp-and-paper mill wastewaters. For the first time in the deep central part of Lake Onega the area was revealed where the toxic bottom sediments contain a high content of iron, manganese and other trace elements typical for the central areas of the lake. The mapping of the bottom of Lake Onega was accomplished, and three zones were identified based on the analysis of the data concerning the chemical composition of bottom sediments, bioassay toxicity data and the results of the deepwater macrozoobenthos assessment. For each zone the parameters of the main groups of benthos (Amphipoda, Oligochaeta, Chironomidae were defined. The first zone is located in the area of intensive anthropogenic influence (Kondopogskaya Bay, Petrozavodskaya Bay, Povenets Bay, Kizhi Skerries. The second zone is located mostly in the deep part of Petrozavodskaya Bay, where the most intensive development of amphipods is observed. The third area is identified for the first time: it is located in the central deep part of Lake Onega, where the communities of macrozoobenthos are limited by a natural toxic factor.

  2. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a thymol-deprived hydrophilic thyme extract and its antispasmodic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbertz, Jonas; Lechtenberg, Matthias; Studt, Lena; Hensel, Andreas; Verspohl, Eugen J

    2012-06-14

    Extracts from Thymus vulgaris L. and Thymus zygis L. are traditionally used for bronchitis, catarrhs of the respiratory tract and supportive treatment of pertussis. A potential spasmolytic effect is thought to be due to the presence of the monoterpenoid phenols thymol and carvacrol in the extract. Based on previous data the present investigation aimed to clarify if thymol-deprived thyme extracts (as been in use within German drug market) have antispasmodic activity. Additionally compounds responsible for this effect had to be identified. Thyme fluid extract was subsequently fractionated by FCPC, LPLC, and HPLC and compounds isolated were identified by spectroscopic methods. Bioassay testing was done by quantification of antispasmodic activity in the preconstricted rat smooth muscle trachea model against papaverin as positive control. Thymol-deprived spissum extract (SE) had good antispasmodic activity (-37%, related to the maximum contraction). Bioassay-guided fractionation indicated that rosmarinic acid and apigenin do not contribute to this effect. Luteolin contributed significantly to the antispasmodic activity (-9%). Thyme extracts have antispasmodic activity, which is at least due to synergistic effects of phenolic volatile oil compounds and the flavone luteolin. Specifications of thyme-containing preparations should refer to this flavone in addition to focusing on the volatile phenols. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bioassay chamber for angiogenesis with perfused explanted arteries and electrospun scaffolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, David; Han, Dong; Goldgraben, Sara; El-Gendi, Hebah; Gouma, Pelagia-Irene; Frame, Mary D

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that explanted perfused arteries can serve as the initial endothelial cell culture source to evaluate the onset of angiogenesis in a cellulose acetate electrospun scaffold. Electrospun scaffolds with fiber diameters roughly controlled in three broad ranges: 0.01 to 0.2, 0.2 to 1, and 1 to 5 microm (Nanomed Nanotechnol Biol Med 2:37-41, 2006), were used in cell culture to determine which provides the best culture topology. This scaffold was then tested in a bioassay chamber whose cellular source was an explanted abdominal aorta from donated euthanized mice. Scaffolds were draped over a cannulated vessel perfused for 24 h. Cell viability, density, and morphology were quantified. The largest fiber diameter group provided the best culture topology for human umbilical vein endothelial cells, showing high cell viability and density, and enhanced elongated cell morphology. Addition of single-walled carbon nanotubes decreased cell density significantly but chitosan heightened cell density and promoted spontaneous capillary tube like structure. Viability of endothelial cells increased with higher flow in the bioassay chamber. Endothelial cells showed a growth preference towards larger diameter fibers. Addition of chitosan improved culture conditions. Thus, this study provides a proof of principle for the possibility of co-culturing tissue engineered vascular networks from a perfused explant.

  4. Estimation of cytotoxic potency by brine shrimp lethality bioassay application of Clerodendrum infortunatum Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talukdar Muhammad Waliullah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To learn a scientific and systematic knowledge of anticancer, antimicrobial and pharmacological activities of natural products and estimate cytotoxic potency by using ethanol and chloroform extracts of root, leaf and stem of Clerodendrum infortunatum (Verbenaceae due to its random use in customary and traditional medicine to cure common ailments such as intestinal disorder, diarrhea, tuberculosis and respiratory problems etc. Methods: The in vitro application was carried out with the bench-top bioassay method by using brine shrimp lethality bioassay. Results: All of the crude extracts were found to be lethal and effective. The LC50 value of ethyl alcohol fraction of root was 20.845 mg/L compared to the standard drug tetracycline of 14.675 mg/L to brine shrimp nauplii, indicating that the extracts were biologically active. Conclusions: The cytotoxic study of LC50 value showed that a good correlation with the antibiotic tetracycline. From the comparative correlation error bars and percentage, we understood that ethyl alcohol fraction of root extract was very effective. This study serves as a basis for further research to lead compounds to be isolated so that it may be as a template for the implications of these results for bioactivity and drug discovery potential of herbal products.

  5. Screening the Toxicity of Selected Personal Care Products Using Embryo Bioassays: 4-MBC, Propylparaben and Triclocarban

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Torres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several emerging pollutants, including Personal Care Products (PCPs, have been detected in aquatic ecosystems, in the ng/L or µg/L range. Available toxicological data is limited, and, for certain PCPs, evidence indicates a potential risk for the environment. Hence, there is an urgent need to gather ecotoxicological data on PCPs as a proxy to improve risk assessment. Here, the toxicity of three different PCPs (4-Methylbenzylidene Camphor (4-MBC, propylparaben and triclocarban was tested using embryo bioassays with Danio rerio (zebrafish and Paracentrotus lividus (sea urchin. The No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC for triclocarban was 0.256 µg/L for sea urchin and 100 µg/L for zebrafish, whereas NOEC for 4-MBC was 0.32 µg/L for sea urchin and 50 µg/L for zebrafish. Both PCPs impacted embryo development at environmentally relevant concentrations. In comparison with triclocarban and 4-MBC, propylparaben was less toxic for both sea urchin (NOEC = 160 µg/L and zebrafish (NOEC = 1000 µg/L. Overall, this study further demonstrates the sensitivity of embryo bioassays as a high-throughput approach for testing the toxicity of emerging pollutants.

  6. Use of a germination bioassay to test compost maturity in Tekelan Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktiawan Wiharyanto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Livestock waste from cattle farms in Tekelan village, Getasan Subdistrict, Semarang Regency can be grouped into three types, namely solid waste, slurry and waste water. Solid waste (cow dung was processed into compost, while slurry and waste water were used to make liquid fertilizer. This compost was used as a component of planting media in horticultural crops and potted plants production. We evaluated the toxicity (phytochemical and ecotoxicological test of compost by using germination index (GI. Vigna radiata seeds are sown on filter paper dampened with compost extract for different times. GI was calculated by relative germination (G and relative radical length (L. The germination index (GI = G / G0 x L / L0 x 100, where G0 and L0 are values obtained by distilled water as a control. The results showed that germination bioassay and radical length using aquades and groundwater in Tekelan village did not affect the radical length of Vigna radiata . Technically, groundwater in Tekelan village can be used as a germination bioassay control. The cow dung compost substrate appears to have a major influence on compost toxicity. Mature compost was produced on day 14 with a GI of 104.03.

  7. Mimicking Daphnia magna bioassay performance by an electronic tongue for urban water quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsanov, Dmitry, E-mail: d.kirsanov@gmail.com [Laboratory of Chemical Sensors, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Artificial Sensor Systems, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Legin, Evgeny [Laboratory of Artificial Sensor Systems, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sensor Systems LLC, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zagrebin, Anatoly; Ignatieva, Natalia; Rybakin, Vladimir [Institute of Limnology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Legin, Andrey [Laboratory of Chemical Sensors, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Artificial Sensor Systems, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • -Daphnia magna bioassay can be simulated with multisensor system. • Urban water toxicity can be predicted from potentiometric ET data. • Independent test set validation confirms statistical significance of the results. - Abstract: Toxicity is one of the key parameters of water quality in environmental monitoring. However, being evaluated as a response of living beings (as their mobility, fertility, death rate, etc.) to water quality, toxicity can only be assessed with the help of these living beings. This imposes certain restrictions on toxicity bioassay as an analytical method: biotest organisms must be properly bred, fed and kept under strictly regulated conditions and duration of tests can be quite long (up to several days), thus making the whole procedure the prerogative of the limited number of highly specialized laboratories. This report describes an original application of potentiometric multisensor system (electronic tongue) when the set of electrochemical sensors was calibrated against Daphnia magna death rate in order to perform toxicity assessment of urban waters without immediate involvement of living creatures. PRM (partial robust M) and PLS (projections on latent structures) regression models based on the data from this multisensor system allowed for prediction of toxicity of unknown water samples in terms of biotests but in the fast and simple instrumental way. Typical errors of water toxicity predictions were below 20% in terms of Daphnia death rate which can be considered as a good result taking into account the complexity of the task.

  8. Antimicrobial Activity and Brine Shrimp Lethality Bioassay of the Leaves Extract of Dillenia indica Linn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apu, AS; Muhit, MA; Tareq, SM; Pathan, AH; Jamaluddin, ATM; Ahmed, M

    2010-01-01

    The crude methanolic extract of Dillenia indica Linn. (Dilleniaceae) leaves has been investigated for the evaluation of antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. Organic solvent (n-hexane, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform) fractions of methanolic extract and methanolic fraction (aqueous) were screened for their antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion method. Besides, the fractions were screened for cytotoxic activity using brine shrimp (Artemia salina) lethality bioassay. Among the four fractions tested, n-hexane, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform fractions showed moderate antibacterial and antifungal activity compared to standard antibiotic, kanamycin. The average zone of inhibition was ranged from 6 to 8 mm at a concentration of 400 µg/disc. But the aqueous fraction was found to be insensitive to microbial growth. Compared to vincristine sulfate (with LC50 of 0.52 µg/ ml), n-hexane and chloroform fractions demonstrated a significant cytotoxic activity (having LC50 of 1.94 µg/ml and 2.13 µg/ml, respectively). The LC50 values of the carbon tetrachloride and aqueous fraction were 4.46 µg/ml and 5.13 µg/ ml, respectively. The study confirms the moderate antimicrobial and potent cytotoxic activities of Dillenia indica leaves extract and therefore demands the isolation of active principles and thorough bioassay. PMID:21331191

  9. Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) bioassay on clastogenicity of wastewater and in situ monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, E F; Rabago, V M; Lecona, S U; Perez, A B; Ma, T H

    1992-11-01

    The Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) bioassay was used to determine the clastogenicity of wastewater samples collected from the Arena canal which contains effluent from the industrial district Benito Juarez of the city of Queretaro, Mexico. Fifteen wastewater samples which were collected, in most cases, at bi-weekly intervals beginning in September 1986 through February 1988, after a 3-fold dilution were used to treat Tradescantia plant cuttings. The clastogenicity expressed in terms of micronucleus frequencies of treated groups (30 h of treatment without recovery time) was significantly (0.01) higher than that of the tapwater control groups. The Trad-MCN bioassay was also used for in situ monitoring of air pollutants for the clastogenicity at 3 sites near the industrial and residential areas (Flores Magon, Conalep and Bellas Artes) of the city of Queretaro. Fourteen monitoring trips were made to each of the 3 sites at monthly intervals beginning in May 1988 through June 1990. Seasonal variation of micronucleus frequencies was exhibited with the peak clastogenicities shown in May and June 1988, June 1989 and April 1990 at the three sites. Micronucleus frequencies of all the exposed groups at the Conalep site, a predominantly industrial area, were markedly higher than that of the laboratory control groups throughout the 2-year period.

  10. Effect of organic solvents on normal human stratum corneum: evaluation by the corneoxenometry bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Letawe, C; Piérard, G E

    1997-01-01

    Organic solvents alter the stratum corneum structure and barrier function. To measure the effect of various solvents upon human stratum corneum using the ex vivo corneoxenometry bioassay which is a variant of corneosurfametry. Corneoxenometry entails collection of human stratum corneum by cyanoacrylate. The material is immersed in organic solvents for periods ranging from 1 to 120 min. After staining the samples with a toluidine blue-basic fuchsin solution, the color is measured using reflectance colorimetry. Solvent aggressivity to the stratum corneum correlates with the color darkening of the samples. The least aggressive solvent was hexane, followed by ethanol, methanol, hexane-ethanol, chloroform, chloroform-methanol and hexane-methanol. The influence of contact time between solvents and the stratum corneum showed a logarithmic pattern which varied according to the solvent. Data are in line with previous experiments conducted in vivo and in vitro, thus indicating the predictive value of corneoxenometry. Such a bioassay may avoid hazards of some in vivo human testings.

  11. Sediment bioassay with sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus), a submersed aquatic macrophyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, W.J. [NBS, Raleigh, NC (United States); Siesko, M.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Ailstock, M.S. [Anne Arundel Community College, Arnold, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Sago pondweed explants produced in tissue culture were grown for 6 weeks in sediments from Baltimore Harbor, MD. Although sediments contained up to 9,800 ppm Al, 7.5 ppm Cd, 3,090 ppm Cr, 397 ppm Pb, 530 Cu, 1,320 Sn, 2,040 ppm Zn, and 82,900 ppm oil and grease (all expressed as dry wt.) stepwise linear regression of log transformed contaminant data showed no linkage of reduced plant growth to the contaminants measured. Plant growth was negatively correlated with particle size and particle size was negatively correlated with most contaminant concentrations. In a second study, 17 estuarine sediments, representing a range of low to very high toxicity in Microtox and Hyalella azteca bioassays, were selected for study. Selected sediments contained up to 10 ppm Cd, 135 ppm Cr, 21 ppm Cu, 105 ppm Pb, 15 ppm Ni, and 190 ppm Zn (all expressed as dry wt.). Sago pondweed explants were planted into these sediments and grown for 4 weeks. Biomass production differed significantly among sediments tested. Phytotoxicity of sediments did not correlate well with the toxicity results of the Microtox and Hyalella azteca bioassays nor the metal content of sediments.

  12. Sea-urchin Embryo Bioassay for in situ Evaluation of the Biological Quality of Coastal Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiras, R.; Vázquez, E.; Bellas, J.; Lorenzo, J. I.; Fernández, N.; Macho, G.; Mariño, J. C.; Casas, L.

    2001-01-01

    The Paracentrotus lividus sea-urchin embryo bioassay, consisting of incubation of fertilized eggs in test water and measurement of the percentage of four-armed plutei larvae developed after the incubation period (2-3 days), has been adapted for in situ evaluation of seawater quality in coastal areas. Mature sea-urchins are dissected in situ and fertilization is performed in the field; fertilized eggs are delivered into screw lid 50-ml cylinders with 20 μm nylon mesh in both ends filled with sieved local seawater. The cylinders, tied to 60-cm ropes with weights on one end and buoys in the other one, are placed by scuba divers in the test sites at subtidal level and recovered after the incubation period. The contents of each cylinder are then transferred into a vial, fixed with formalin and observed directly under an inverted microscope to record the percentage ( N=100) and size (length, N=25) of four-arm pluteus larvae. Our results show that the bioassay can discriminate between well known polluted and unpolluted sites, but further improvement is needed in order to: (1) take into account differences of temperature between sites; (2) minimize larval mortality due to reasons other than pollution.

  13. Does everything "cause" cancer: an alternative interpretation of the "carcinogenesis" bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsburg, D

    1989-10-01

    R. S. Chhabra, J. Haseman, A. Hall, and C. Baskin (Fundam. Appl. Toxicol. 11, 685-690, 1988) have raised the question of whether the apparent antitumorigenic effect of 4-hexylresorcinol suggests its possible use as an antineoplastic agent. In response to that paper, it is noted that over 20% of the compounds subjected to the "carcinogenesis" bioassay of the NCI/NTP program show apparent antitumorigenic effects of a similar sort. A thought experiment is proposed that shows that any compound subjected to these test conditions should produce a shift in patterns of tumors, regardless of whether the compound is a true "carcinogen" or a true "antineoplastic" agent. This thesis is illustrated with an alternative statistical analysis of six AZO dye studies that were conducted in the same lab during the same period, and the existence of apparent effects for three other other relatively innocuous substances is noted. Short-term experiments are proposed to test this thesis. Finally, the implications of this thesis on the interpretation of "carcinogenesis" bioassays is examined.

  14. Bioavailability of iron from spinach using an in vitro/human Caco-2 cell bioassay model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutzke, Corinne J.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Rutzke, Michael A.; Welch, Ross M.; Langhans, Robert W.; Albright, Louis D.; Combs, Gerald F Jr; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cv Whitney was tested for iron bioavailabilty using an in vitro human intestinal cell culture ferritin bioassay technique previously developed. Spinach was cultured in a growth chamber for 33 days, harvested, and freeze-dried. Total iron in the samples was an average of 71 micrograms/g dry weight. Spinach was digested in vitro (pepsin and 0.1 M HCl followed by pancreatin and 0.1 M NaHCO3) with and without the addition of supplemental ascorbic acid. Caco-2 cell cultures were used to determine iron bioavailability from the spinach mixtures. Production of the iron-binding protein ferritin in the Caco-2 cells showed the supplemental ascorbic acid doubled bioavailability of iron from spinach. The data show fresh spinach is a poor source of iron, and emphasize the importance of evaluation of whole meals rather than single food items. The data support the usefulness of the in vitro/Caco-2 cell ferritin bioassay model for prescreening of space flight diets for bioavailable iron.

  15. Nerve growth factor in mouse and rat serum: correlation between bioassay and radioimmunoassay determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suda, K.; Barde, Y.A.; Thoenen, H.

    1978-08-01

    High levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) determined by competition radioimmunoassay do not agree with values obtained by bioassay. This discrepancy is illustrated here with rat and mouse serum as examples in which values up to 1000 mg/ml have been found by using competition radioimmunoassays. An explanation for the discordant results is presented: serum components bind NGF with an intermediate affinity (K/sub d/ = 10/sup -7/ M) but with a very large capacity (up to 0.5 mg of NGF per ml of rat serum). The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled NGF to serum components competes with the binding to the solid-phase antibodies (K/sub d/ = 10/sup -9/ M) present in limiting amounts, according to the principle of competition radioimmunoassays. Thus, less radioactivity is recovered bound to the antibodies and this gives the erroneous impression that NGF is present. To overcome this difficulty, a two-site radioimmunoassay has been developed which utilizes nonlimiting numbers of antibody binding sites. This assay provides a reliable determination of NGF levels in serum and it can be shown that in rat and mouse serum (either sex) there is less than 5 ng of NGF per ml, in agreement with the results of the bioassay.

  16. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A specific cell-based potency assay to replace the mouse bioassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Fernández-Salas

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A, a potent therapeutic used to treat various disorders, inhibits vesicular neurotransmitter exocytosis by cleaving SNAP25. Development of cell-based potency assays (CBPAs to assess the biological function of BoNT/A have been challenging because of its potency. CBPAs can evaluate the key steps of BoNT action: receptor binding, internalization-translocation, and catalytic activity; and therefore could replace the current mouse bioassay. Primary neurons possess appropriate sensitivity to develop potential replacement assays but those potency assays are difficult to perform and validate. This report describes a CBPA utilizing differentiated human neuroblastoma SiMa cells and a sandwich ELISA that measures BoNT/A-dependent intracellular increase of cleaved SNAP25. Assay sensitivity is similar to the mouse bioassay and measures neurotoxin biological activity in bulk drug substance and BOTOX® product (onabotulinumtoxinA. Validation of a version of this CBPA in a Quality Control laboratory has led to FDA, Health Canada, and European Union approval for potency testing of BOTOX®, BOTOX® Cosmetic, and Vistabel®. Moreover, we also developed and optimized a BoNT/A CBPA screening assay that can be used for the discovery of novel BoNT/A inhibitors to treat human disease.

  17. Metal toxicity and biodiversity in serpentine soils: application of bioassay tests and microarthropod index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visioli, Giovanna; Menta, Cristina; Gardi, Ciro; Conti, Federica Delia

    2013-01-01

    Eco-toxicological or bioassay tests have been intensively discussed as tools for the evaluation of soil quality. Tests using soil organisms, including microarthropods and plants, allow direct estimates to be made of important soil characteristics and functions. In this study we compared the results obtained by two in vitro standard bioassays following ISO or OECD guidelines: (i) the short term-chronic phytotoxicity germination and root elongation test using three different plant species Cucumis sativus L. (Cucurbitaceae), Lepidium sativum L. (Brassicaceae), and Medicago sativa L. (Fabaceae) and (ii) the inhibition of reproduction of Folsomia candida (Collembola) by soil pollutants to investigate the toxicity of a serpentine soil present in the Italian Apennines, rich in heavy metals such as Ni, Cr, and Co. In addition, microarthropod communities were characterised to evaluate the effects of metal contents on the soil fauna in natural conditions. Abundances, Acari/Collembola ratio, biodiversity indices and the QBS-ar index were calculated. Our results demonstrate that the two in vitro tests distinguish differences correlated with metal and organic matter contents in four sub-sites within the serpentinite. Soil fauna characterisation, not previously performed on serpentine soils, revealed differences in the most vulnerable and adapted groups of microarthropods to soil among the four sub-sites: the microarthropod community was found to be rich in term of biodiversity in the sub-site characterised by a lower metal content and a higher organic matter content and vegetation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bioassay-guided purification and identification of PPARalpha/gamma agonists from Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Huang, Chien-Fu; Lien, Tzu-Wen; Chen, Xin; Su, Ih-Jen; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Hsu, John Tsu-An

    2008-05-01

    This study isolated agonists of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) from the green algae Chlorella sorokiniana, using a bioassay-guided purification strategy. PPARs are widely recognized as the molecular drug targets for many diseases including hyperglycemia, diabetes, obesity and cancer. Two independent bioassays were developed. The first is the scintillation proximity assay, a ligand binding assay. The other is the cell-based transcriptional activation assay which uses the Dual-Luciferase reporter system as the reporter gene under the control of the PPAR response element. Using these two assays, a PPARgamma-active fraction, CE 3-3, was obtained from C. sorokiniana extracts, which was also able to activate PPARalphamediated gene expression. To elucidate the active ingredients in the CE 3-3 fraction, GC-MS analysis was employed. The results showed that the CE 3-3 fraction consisted of at least ten fatty acids (FAs). The bioactivities of several of the individual FAs were evaluated for their PPARgamma activity and the results showed that linolenic acid and linoleic acid were the most potent FAs tested. Our studies indicate that Chlorella sorokiniana could have potential health benefits through the dual activation of PPARalpha/gamma via its unique FA constituents.

  19. In vitro and in vivo protocols of antimicrobial bioassay of medicinal herbal extracts: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Ullah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial susceptibility testing against pathogenic microorganisms is the most significant task of clinical microbiology laboratory. The present study was therefore designed to review the in vitro and in vivo protocols of antimicrobial bioassays of various medicinal herbal extracts against a diversity of pathogenic microorganisms. Plants have a broad variety of antimicrobial agents which are extensively used as herbal drugs against different microbes. The review covers the antimicrobial techniques and antimicrobial bioassays of medicinal herbal extracts against different bacterial and fungal strains from 2000 onward. Plants have diverse concentrations of bioactive constituents such as alkaloids, saponins, tannins, terpenoids, steroids, carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. These phytochemicals are used against an extensive range of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium pervum, Bordetella pertusis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, viruses (simian-virus, retrovirus and fungi (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium solani. A variety of antibiotics (tetracycline, terramycin, ampicillin has also been isolated from different medicinal plants. This review was therefore intended to explore the techniques used for antimicrobial activities of herbal medicinal extracts.

  20. Relative proportions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons differ between accumulation bioassays and chemical methods to predict bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Eyles, Jose L., E-mail: j.l.gomezeyles@reading.ac.u [University of Reading, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, Department of Soil Science, Reading RG6 6DW, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Collins, Chris D.; Hodson, Mark E. [University of Reading, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, Department of Soil Science, Reading RG6 6DW, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Chemical methods to predict the bioavailable fraction of organic contaminants are usually validated in the literature by comparison with established bioassays. A soil spiked with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was aged over six months and subjected to butanol, cyclodextrin and tenax extractions as well as an exhaustive extraction to determine total PAH concentrations at several time points. Earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and rye grass root (Lolium multiflorum) accumulation bioassays were conducted in parallel. Butanol extractions gave the best relationship with earthworm accumulation (r{sup 2} <= 0.54, p <= 0.01); cyclodextrin, butanol and acetone-hexane extractions all gave good predictions of accumulation in rye grass roots (r{sup 2} <= 0.86, p <= 0.01). However, the profile of the PAHs extracted by the different chemical methods was significantly different (p < 0.01) to that accumulated in the organisms. Biota accumulated a higher proportion of the heavier 4-ringed PAHs. It is concluded that bioaccumulation is a complex process that cannot be predicted by measuring the bioavailable fraction alone. - The ability of chemical methods to predict PAH accumulation in Eisenia fetida and Lolium multiflorum was hindered by the varied metabolic fate of the different PAHs within the organisms.

  1. Environmental effects of dredging: Upland animal bioassays of dredged material. Technical notes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, E.A.; Edwards, C.A.

    1988-02-01

    Earthworms have great potential for use as bioassay/biomonitor organisms in studies of contaminant uptake and possess many characteristics that make them ideally suited for this purpose (Ma 1982). Studies have demonstrated that native species of earthworms, collected at contaminated sites, can be used to indicate biologically available levels of these contaminants (Helmke et al. 1979, Ireland 1983, Pietz et al. 1984). However, it is the species Eisenia foetida (which does not naturally colonize these sites) which has been recommended for use in the laboratory for the ecotoxicological testing of agricultural and industrial chemicals (European Economic Community (EEC) 1984), proposed as a bioassay species for assessing contaminant availability in waste materials, and used to determine the bioavallability of contaminants in dredged material (Marquenie and Simmers 1984). Correlations between total and OTPA-extractable metal concentrations in contaminated substrates and the concentrations in the tissues of earthworms exposed to these substrates over a 28-day period may be used to establish their potential as biomonitor organisms.

  2. Sensitivity of different aquatic bioassays in the assessment of a new natural formicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burga-Perez, Karen F; Toumi, Hela; Cotelle, Sylvie; Ferard, Jean-François; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2013-01-01

    Agrochemicals have the potential to cause deleterious effects on living organisms and therefore they must be subjected to various (eco)toxicological studies and monitoring programs in order to protect human health and the environment. The aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicity of a new natural formicide with a battery of three classical and three ecotox-kit tests. The former tests were performed with Aliivibrio fischeri bacteria (Lumistox test), the cladoceran Daphnia magna and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata algae, and the latter with Thamnotoxkit F(TM) (Thamnocephalus platyurus), Ostracodtoxkit F® (Heterocypris incongruens) and LuminoTox (photosynthetic enzyme complexes). In the range of formicide concentrations tested (from 0.06 to 2.0 g L(-1)), the measurement endpoint values varied from 0.79 g L(-1) for the algal test to > 2 g L(-1) for the LuminoTox and Ostracodtoxkit F® tests. Hierarchical sensitivity ranking based on the no-observed effect concentration (NOEC) values established to assess the formicide ecotoxicity was as follows: algal growth inhibition test ≈ daphnid immobilization test ≈ bacterial luminescence inhibition test > Thamnotoxkit F™ > LuminoTox > Ostracodtoxkit F®. Overall, results from the battery of bioassays showed that this formicide preparation presents low ecotoxicity as compared to the aquatic ecotoxicity of presently commercialized formicides. In conclusion, classical aquatic bioassays are more sensitive than ecotox-kit tests in the assessment and monitoring of the new natural formicide.

  3. Rapid and inexpensive detection of common HBB gene mutations in Tunisian population by high-resolution melting analysis: implication for molecular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouragini, Houyem; Haddad, Faten; Darragi, Imen; Abbes, Salem

    2014-03-01

    In Tunisia, β-thalassemia is a common hereditary disease with a carrying rate of 2.21%. Up to now, detection of responsible mutations was made by laborious, expensive, and/or time consuming methods. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a specific assay for detection of the two most frequent mutations in Tunisian population, the IVS-I-110 (G → A) and Cd39 (C → T) mutations. In this study, we optimize high resolution melting analysis (HRMA) conditions for these mutations, using control DNAs. Then, we evaluate the strength of this methodology by screening a cohort of patients with β-thalassemia. All examined reference DNA samples were unambiguously distinguished from each other. For the blinded test, the results were completely compatible with direct sequencing, performed after the HRMA. As HRMA represents a highly sensitive and high-throughput gene scanning method, it can provide timely diagnosis at low cost for effective clinical management of β-thalassemia.

  4. Development and application of a rapid, user-friendly, and inexpensive method to detect Dehalococcoides sp. reductive dehalogenase genes from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitkar, Yogendra H; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Hatzinger, Paul B; Hashsham, Syed A; Cupples, Alison M

    2017-06-01

    TaqMan probe-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) specific to the biomarker reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes is a widely accepted molecular biological tool (MBT) for determining the abundance of Dehalococcoides sp. in groundwater samples from chlorinated solvent-contaminated sites. However, there are significant costs associated with this MBT. In this study, we describe an approach that requires only low-cost laboratory equipment (a bench top centrifuge and a water bath) and requires less time and resources compared to qPCR. The method involves the concentration of biomass from groundwater, without DNA extraction, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of the cell templates. The amplification products are detected by a simple visual color change (orange/green). The detection limits of the assay were determined using groundwater from a contaminated site. In addition, the assay was tested with groundwater from three additional contaminated sites. The final approach to detect RDase genes, without DNA extraction or a thermal cycler, was successful to 1.8 × 10(5) gene copies per L for vcrA and 1.3 × 10(5) gene copies per L for tceA. Both values are below the threshold recommended for effective in situ dechlorination.

  5. An economic approach for L-(+) lactic acid fermentation by Lactobacillus amylophilus GV6 using inexpensive carbon and nitrogen sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaf, Md; Venkateshwar, M; Srijana, M; Reddy, G

    2007-08-01

    Development of cost-effective production medium by applying statistical designs for single-step fermentation of starch (corn flour - CF) to L-(+) lactic acid, using inexpensive nitrogen sources as substitutes for peptone and yeast extract in MRS medium by amylolytic Lactobacillus amylophilus GV6. A two-level Plackett-Burman design was employed for screening various available crude starches (flours) for L-(+) lactic acid production by Lact. amylophilus GV6 using red lentil flour (RL) and bakers yeast cells (YC) as substitutes for commercial peptone and yeast extract in MRS medium in anaerobic submerged fermentation. Of all the tested flours, CF was found to be the most significant. Central composite rotatable design was employed to determine maximum production of L-(+) lactic acid at optimum values of process variables, CF, RL, YC, CaCO(3) and incubation period (IP). minitab analyses showed that lactic acid production was significantly affected by the linear terms CF, RL, CaCO(3) and IP. The interactions of CF-RL, CF-YC, CF-CaCO(3), RL-YC and RL-CaCO(3) and the square terms CF and IP were significant. The maximum lactic acid production of 29 g/37 g of starch present in 50 g of CF was obtained at optimized concentrations of CF 5%, RL 0.7%, YC 0.8%, CaCO(3) 0.8% and IP 2.9 days. Successful application of Plackett-Burman design helped in identifying CF as the best carbon source among the tested flours for L-(+) lactic acid production using inexpensive nitrogen sources. Further optimization of the process variables by response surface methods (RSMs) led to maximum production of lactic acid (29 g lactic acid from 37 g of starch present in 50 g of flour). Lactobacillus amylophilus GV6 showed 78.4% lactic acid production efficiency (g lactic acid produced/g starch taken) and 96% lactic acid yield efficiency (g lactic acid produced/g starch utilized). Information from the present studies provides a better understanding on production of L-(+) lactic acid on fermentation of

  6. Combining ability in maize for fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer resistance based on a laboratory bioassay for larval growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W P; Buckley, P M; Davis, F M

    1995-02-01

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), and southwestern corn borer, Diatraea grandiosella Dyar, are major insect pests of maize, Zea mays L., in the southern USA. Both insects feed extensively on leaves of plants in the whorl stage of growth. A diallel cross of seven inbred lines with different levels of susceptibility to leaf feeding damage in the field was evaluated in a laboratory bioassay for fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer larval growth. Diets were prepared from lyophilized leaf tissue of field-grown plants of the inbred lines and their 21 F1 hybrids. One inbred line, Tx601, exhibited heavy leaf damage in field tests but showed moderate resistance in the laboratory bioassay. Both general and specific combining ability were highly significant sources of variation in the inheritance of fall armyworm and south-western corn borer larval growth in the laboratory bioassay. Tx601 showed excellent general combining ability for reduced larval growth of both species.

  7. Inexpensive CO2 Thickening Agents for Improved Mobility Control of CO2 Floods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Enick; Eric Beckman; Andrew Hamilton

    2005-08-31

    The objective of this research was the design, synthesis and evaluation of inexpensive, non-fluorous carbon dioxide thickening agents. We followed the same strategy employed in the design of fluorinated CO{sub 2} polymeric thickeners. First, a highly CO{sub 2}-philic, hydrocarbon-based monomer was to be identified. Polymers or oligomers of this monomer were then synthesized. The second step was to design a CO{sub 2}-thickener based on these CO{sub 2}-philic polymers. Two types of thickeners were considered. The first was a copolymer in which the CO{sub 2}-philic monomer was combined with a small proportion of CO{sub 2}-phobic associating groups that could cause viscosity-enhancing intermolecular interactions to occur. The second was a small hydrogen-bonding compound with urea groups in the core to promote intermolecular interactions that would cause the molecules to 'stack' in solution while the arms were composed of the CO{sub 2}-philic oligomers. Although we were not able to develop a viable thickener that exhibited high enough CO{sub 2} solubility at EOR MMP conditions to induce a viscosity increase, we made significant progress in our understanding of CO{sub 2}-soluble compounds that can be used in subsequent studies to design CO{sub 2}-soluble thickeners or CO{sub 2}-soluble surfactant-based foaming agents. These findings are detailed in this final report. In summary, we assessed many polymers and verified that the most CO{sub 2}-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon polymer is poly(vinyl acetate), PVAc. This is primarily due to the presence of both ether and carbonyl oxygens associated with acetate-rich compounds. In addition to polymers, we also made small acetate-rich molecules that were also capable of associating in solution via the inclusion of hydrogen-bonding groups in hopes of forming viscosity-enhancing macromolecules. Despite the presence of multiple acetate groups in these compounds, which can impart incredible CO{sub 2}-solubility to many

  8. In vivo genotoxicity of furan in F344 rats at cancer bioassay doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Wei, E-mail: Wei.Ding@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Petibone, Dayton M. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Latendresse, John R. [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Pearce, Mason G. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Muskhelishvili, Levan; White, Gene A. [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Chang, Ching-Wei [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Mittelstaedt, Roberta A.; Shaddock, Joseph G.; McDaniel, Lea P. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Doerge, Daniel R. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Morris, Suzanne M.; Bishop, Michelle E.; Manjanatha, Mugimane G.; Aidoo, Anane; Heflich, Robert H. [Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, US FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Furan, a potent rodent liver carcinogen, is found in many cooked food items and thus represents a human cancer risk. Mechanisms for furan carcinogenicity were investigated in male F344 rats using the in vivo Comet and micronucleus assays, combined with analysis of histopathological and gene expression changes. In addition, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III (EndoIII)-sensitive DNA damage was monitored as a measure of oxidative DNA damage. Rats were treated by gavage on four consecutive days with 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg bw furan, doses that were tumorigenic in 2-year cancer bioassays, and with two higher doses, 12 and 16 mg/kg. Rats were killed 3 h after the last dose, a time established as producing maximum levels of DNA damage in livers of furan-treated rats. Liver Comet assays indicated that both DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines and pyrimidines increased in a near-linear dose-responsive fashion, with statistically significant increases detected at cancer bioassay doses. No DNA damage was detected in bone marrow, a non-target tissue for cancer, and peripheral blood micronucleus assays were negative. Histopathological evaluation of liver from furan-exposed animals produced evidence of inflammation, single-cell necrosis, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. In addition, genes related to apoptosis, cell-cycle checkpoints, and DNA-repair were expressed at a slightly lower level in the furan-treated livers. Although a mixed mode of action involving direct DNA binding cannot be ruled out, the data suggest that furan induces cancer in rat livers mainly through a secondary genotoxic mechanism involving oxidative stress, accompanied by inflammation, cell proliferation, and toxicity. -- Highlights: ► Furan is a potent rodent liver carcinogen and represents a human cancer risk. ► Furan induces DNA damage in rat liver at cancer bioassay doses. ► Furan induces oxidative stress, inflammation and cell proliferation in rat liver. ► Expression of

  9. Trigger values for investigation of hormonal activity in drinking water and its sources using CALUX bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Walter; de Jongh, Cindy M; van der Linden, Sander C; Mennes, Wim; Puijker, Leo M; van Leeuwen, Cornelis J; van Wezel, Annemarie P; Schriks, Merijn; Heringa, Minne B

    2013-05-01

    To screen for hormonal activity in water samples, highly sensitive in vitro CALUX bioassays are available which allow detection of estrogenic (ERα), androgenic (AR), progestagenic (PR), and glucocorticoid (GR) activities. This paper presents trigger values for the ERα, AR, PR, and GR CALUX bioassays for agonistic hormonal activities in (drinking) water, which define a level above which human health risk cannot be waived a priori and additional examination of specific endocrine activity may be warranted. The trigger values are based on 1) acceptable or tolerable daily intake (ADI/TDI) values of specific compounds, 2) pharmacokinetic factors defining their bioavailability, 3) estimations of the bioavailability of unknown compounds with equivalent hormonal activity, 4) relative endocrine potencies, and 5) physiological, and drinking water allocation factors. As a result, trigger values of 3.8ng 17β-estradiol (E2)-equivalents (eq)/L, 11ng dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-eq/L, 21ng dexamethasone (DEX)-eq/L, and 333ng Org2058-eq/L were derived. Benchmark Quotient (BQ) values were derived by dividing hormonal activity in water samples by the derived trigger using the highest concentrations detected in a recent, limited screening of Dutch water samples, and were in the order of (value) AR (0.41)>ERα (0.13)>GR (0.06)>PR (0.04). The application of trigger values derived in the present study can help to judge measured agonistic hormonal activities in water samples using the CALUX bioassays and help to decide whether further examination of specific endocrine activity followed by a subsequent safety evaluation may be warranted, or whether concentrations of such activity are of low priority with respect to health concerns in the human population. For instance, at one specific drinking water production site ERα and AR (but no GR and PR) activities were detected in drinking water, however, these levels are at least a factor 83 smaller than the respective trigger values, and

  10. Methods for Rapid Screening in Woody Plant Herbicide Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Stanley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Methods for woody plant herbicide screening were assayed with the goal of reducing resources and time required to conduct preliminary screenings for new products. Rapid screening methods tested included greenhouse seedling screening, germinal screening, and seed screening. Triclopyr and eight experimental herbicides from Dow AgroSciences (DAS 313, 402, 534, 548, 602, 729, 779, and 896 were tested on black locust, loblolly pine, red maple, sweetgum, and water oak. Screening results detected differences in herbicide and species in all experiments in much less time (days to weeks than traditional field screenings and consumed significantly less resources (<500 mg acid equivalent per herbicide per screening. Using regression analysis, various rapid screening methods were linked into a system capable of rapidly and inexpensively assessing herbicide efficacy and spectrum of activity. Implementation of such a system could streamline early-stage herbicide development leading to field trials, potentially freeing resources for use in development of beneficial new herbicide products.

  11. Contaminated sediments and bioassay responses of three macroinvertebrates, the midge larva Chironomus riparius, the water louse Asellus aquaticus and the mayfly nymph Ephoron virgo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, de H.J.; Haas, de E.M.; Maas, H.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Bioassays are widely used to estimate ecological risks of contaminated sediments. We compared the results of three whole sediment bioassays, using the midge larva Chironomus riparius, the water louse Asellus aquaticus, and the mayfly nymph Ephoron virgo. We used sediments from sixteen locations in

  12. Response of the braconid parasitoid Cotesia (= Apanteles) glomerata to volatile infochemicals: effects of bioassay set-up, parasitoid age and experience and barometric flux.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinberg, S.; Dicke, M.; Vet, L.E.M.; Wanningen, R.

    1992-01-01

    Upon initiating a research project on the role of volatile infochemicals in the tritrophic system Cotesia (= Apanteles) glomerata (L.)-Pieris brassicae (L.)-cabbage, a bioassay was developed to investigate the response of C. glomerata. The bioassay should be effective in terms of high responsiveness

  13. Light-driven organocatalysis using inexpensive, nontoxic Bi2O3 as the photocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riente, Paola; Matas Adams, Alba; Albero, Josep; Palomares, Emilio; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2014-09-01

    The development of enantioselective catalytic processes that make use of sunlight as the energy source and nontoxic, affordable materials as catalysts represents one of the new and rapidly evolving areas in chemical research. The direct asymmetric α-alkylation of aldehydes with α-bromocarbonyl compounds can be successfully achieved by combining bismuth-based materials as low-band-gap photocatalysts with the second-generation MacMillan imidazolidinone as the chiral catalyst and simulated sunlight as a low-cost and clean energy source. This reaction also proceeded with high efficiency when the reaction vial was exposed to the morning sunlight on a clear September day in Tarragona, Spain. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Open LED Illuminator: A Simple and Inexpensive LED Illuminator for Fast Multicolor Particle Tracking in Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Jens B.; Tanneti, Nikhila S.; Hogue, Ian B.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-color live cell fluorescence microscopy of fast intracellular trafficking processes, such as axonal transport, requires rapid switching of illumination channels. Typical broad-spectrum sources necessitate the use of mechanical filter switching, which introduces delays between acquisition of different fluorescence channels, impeding the interpretation and quantification of highly dynamic processes. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), however, allow modulation of excitation light in microseconds. Here we provide a step-by-step protocol to enable any scientist to build a research-grade LED illuminator for live cell microscopy, even without prior experience with electronics or optics. We quantify and compare components, discuss our design considerations, and demonstrate the performance of our LED illuminator by imaging axonal transport of herpes virus particles with high temporal resolution. PMID:26600461

  15. Hemozoin detection may provide an inexpensive, sensitive, 1-minute malaria test that could revolutionize malaria screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Brian T; Grimberg, Kerry O

    2016-10-01

    Malaria remains widespread throughout the tropics and is a burden to the estimated 3.5 billion people who are exposed annually. The lack of a fast and accurate diagnostic method contributes to preventable malaria deaths and its continued transmission. In many areas diagnosis is made solely based on clinical presentation. Current methods for malaria diagnosis take more than 20 minutes from the time blood is drawn and are frequently inaccurate. The introduction of an accurate malaria diagnostic that can provide a result in less than 1 minute would allow for widespread screening and treatment of endemic populations, and enable regions that have gained a foothold against malaria to prevent its return. Using malaria parasites' waste product, hemozoin, as a biomarker for the presence of malaria could be the tool needed to develop this rapid test.

  16. In-store marketing of inexpensive foods with good nutritional quality in disadvantaged neighborhoods: increased awareness, understanding, and purchasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamburzew, Axel; Darcel, Nicolas; Gazan, Rozenn; Dubois, Christophe; Maillot, Matthieu; Tomé, Daniel; Raffin, Sandrine; Darmon, Nicole

    2016-09-27

    Consumers often do not understand nutrition labels or do not perceive their usefulness. In addition, price can be a barrier to healthy food choices, especially for socio-economically disadvantaged individuals. A 6-month intervention combined shelf labeling and marketing strategies (signage, prime placement, taste testing) to draw attention to inexpensive foods with good nutritional quality in two stores located in a disadvantaged neighborhood in Marseille (France). The inexpensive foods with good nutritional quality were identified based on their nutrient profile and their price. Their contribution to customers' spending on food was assessed in the two intervention stores and in two control stores during the intervention, as well as in the year preceding the intervention (n = 6625). Exit survey (n = 259) and in-depth survey (n = 116) were used to assess customers' awareness of and perceived usefulness of the program, knowledge of nutrition, understanding of the labeling system, as well as placement-, taste- and preparation-related attractiveness of promoted products. Matched purchasing data were used to assess the contribution of promoted products to total food spending for each customer who participated in the in-depth survey. The contribution of inexpensive foods with good nutritional quality to customers' total food spending increased between 2013 and 2014 for both the control stores and the intervention stores. This increase was significantly higher in the intervention stores than in the control stores for fruits and vegetables (p = 0.001) and for starches (p = 0.011). The exit survey revealed that 31 % of customers had seen the intervention materials; this percentage increased significantly at the end of the intervention (p good nutritional quality may improve food purchasing behaviors in disadvantaged neighborhoods.

  17. Comment and Completion: Implementation of Parallelism Testing for Four-Parameter Logistic Model in Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondag, Perceval; Joie, Raphael; Yang, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Parallelism testing between two four-parameter logistic curves has been widely discussed over the last decade. Current tests available in common statistical software used in laboratories have been shown to be highly flawed. In 2012, Yang et al. showed an easy way to implement an intersection union test based on confidence intervals on ratios of parameters of both curves. The method was automated using a fully good manufacturing practice-compliant software package. Although the rationale is correct and efficient, a small mistake appears in the computation of the confidence intervals in the paper and may lead to error when implementing the intersection union test in a software package. Because parallelism testing is both a prerequisite for the determination of relative potency of bioassays and a regulatory requirement, it is important to rectify this mistake. In this paper, we show the actual formulas to be used to compute confidence interval on ratios of parameters. © PDA, Inc. 2015.

  18. Toxicity Appraisal of Untreated Dyeing Industry Wastewater Based on Chemical Characterization and Short Term Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Javeed, Aqeel; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra; Khan, Abdul Muqeet; Altaf, Imran

    2016-04-01

    Characterizing wastewaters only on a chemical basis may be insufficient owing to their complex nature. The purpose of this study was to assess toxicity of textile dyeing wastewater based on analytical techniques and short term toxicity based bioassays. In this study, screening of the fractionated wastewater through GC-MS showed the presence of phenols, phthalic acid derivatives and chlorpyrifos. Metal analysis revealed that chromium, arsenic and mercury were present in amounts higher than the wastewater discharge limits. Textile dyeing wastewater was found to be highly mutagenic in the Ames test. DNA damage in sheep lymphocytes decreased linearly with an increase in the dilution of wastewater. MTT assay showed that 8.3 percent v/v wastewater decreased cell survival percentage to 50 %. It can be concluded from this study that short term toxicity tests such as Ames test, in vitro comet assay, and cytotoxicity assays may serve as useful indicators of wastewater pollution along with their organic and inorganic chemical characterizations.

  19. Effects of injection speed of test samples on the mouse bioassay for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodaka Suzuki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The mouse bioassay has been used as the official method for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins detection in Japan since 1980. However, differences in the results of this assay, when performed by different investigators, have been noted despite the use of the same sample. This study was performed to examine the effect of the injection speed, a hypothetical cause of such differences, on the death time of mice. Speed-controlled injection of the toxin (at 12, 6, 3, and 1.5 mL/min into mice was performed using a syringe pump, and the death times of mice were measured. No statistically significant differences were found among the groups, even between fast injection (5 s and very slow injection (40 s, indicating that the injection speed may not be the crucial factor for this assay.

  20. Luciferase-Specific Coelenterazine Analogues for Optical Contamination-Free Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Ryo; Abe, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Shigeru; Citterio, Daniel; Suzuki, Koji; Kim, Sung Bae

    2017-04-19

    Spectral overlaps among the multiple optical readouts commonly cause optical contamination in fluorescence and bioluminescence. To tackle this issue, we created five-different lineages of coelenterazine (CTZ) analogues designed to selectively illuminate a specific luciferase with unique luciferase selectivity. In the attempt, we found that CTZ analogues with ethynyl or styryl groups display dramatically biased bioluminescence to specific luciferases and pHs by modifying the functional groups at the C-2 and C-6 positions of the imidazopyradinone backbone of CTZ. The optical contamination-free feature was exemplified with the luciferase-specific CTZ analogues, which illuminated anti-estrogenic and rapamycin activities in a mixture of optical probes. This unique bioluminescence platform has great potential for specific and high throughput imaging of multiple optical readouts in bioassays without optical contamination.

  1. Stability of the intra- and extracellular toxins of Prymnesium parvum using a microalgal bioassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blossom, Hannah Eva; Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Rasmussen, Silas Anselm

    2014-01-01

    Prymnesium parvum produces a variety of toxic compounds, which affect other algae, grazers and organisms at higher trophic levels. Here we provide the method for development of a sensitive algal bioassay using a microalgal target, Teleaulax acuta, to measure strain variability in P. parvum toxicity......, as well as the temporal stability of both the intracellular and the extracellular lytic compounds of P. parvum. We show high strain variation in toxicities after 3h incubation with LC50s ranging from 24 to 223×103cellsml−1. Most importantly we prove the necessity of testing physico-chemical properties...... of how to handle and store the toxins from P. parvum so as to maintain biologically relevant toxicity....

  2. Robust Discrimination between Single Gold Nanoparticles and Their Dimers in Aqueous Solution for Ultrasensitive Homogeneous Bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Kobayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a robust method to distinguish isolated single gold nanoparticles (AuNP monomers and their dimers under Brownian motion, a key for ultrasensitive homogeneous bioassays, including AuNP sandwich assays. To detect dimers and distinguish them from a larger number of monomers in aqueous solution, single-particle polarization microscopy was performed. For the accurate detection of individual particles, the optical anisotropy and rotational diffusion time are measured because a dimer is much more anisotropic than the nearly spherical monomer and the rotational diffusion time of a dimer is four times that of a monomer. By employing an autocorrelation analysis, we defined a measure of distinguishing that simultaneously enables high detection probability and low error probability. The detection platform offers homogeneous DNA hybridization assays and immunoassays at the subpicomolar level.

  3. Enumeration of Antibacterial Activity of Few Medicinal Plants by Bioassay Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Uma Reddy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to investigate the antibacterial activity of some common locally available plants, in order to estimate the biological potential of these herbs. The alcoholic extract of Tagetes erecta L (Asteraceae, Argemone mexicana L (Papavaraceae, Datura stramonium L. (Solanaceae and Tylophora indica (Burm.f. Merr. (Asclepiadaceae were evaluated for antibacterial activity using broth dilution bioassay method. It is clear from the results that, the extracts of these plants acts as a good source of antibiotics against various bacterial pathogens tested and exhibited broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. These plant extracts were shown to be moderate to maximum inhibitory effect against different bacterial forms such as Salmonella typhii, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, where as, mild to moderate activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus. The results of these studies revealed most valuable information and also support the continued sustainable use of these plants in traditional systems of medicine.

  4. Symposium on Short-Term Genetic Bioassays in the Evaluation of Complex Environmental Mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Sandhu, Shahbeg; Lewtas, Joellen; Claxton, Larry; Strauss, Gary; Nesnow, Stephen

    1985-01-01

    With this proceedings of the fourth symposium on complex mixtures, we continue to revise and extend our knowledge of genetic methods for the evaluation of chemical mixtures in the environment. The early chapters of this volume are devoted to new bioassay techniques that are directly applicable to the monitoring of environments contaminated with genotoxic chemicals. Microbiological methods have been further refined to meet the special needs of atmospheric monitoring so that very small samples may now be efficiently tested. New in situ methods utilizing green plants actually avoid many of the usual difficulties of sample collection and preparation and offer special advantages in monitoring wastewater, sludges, and hazardous wastes. Insects also are being employed very effectively in the evaluation of gaseous air pollutants in controlled laboratory investigations. Increased emphasis has been placed on a comprehensive assessment of the potential of complex mixtures t9 cause various kinds of genetic damage. New as...

  5. Comparison of the results obtained by CALUX bioassay and GC-HRMS for different matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonnelle, S.; Loco, J. van; Overmeire, I. van; Windal, I.; Wouwe, N. van; Goeyens, L. [Scientific Institute of Public Health, Brussels (Belgium); Cleuvenbergen, R. van [VITO, Mol (Belgium); Leeuwen, S. van [Netherlands Institute for Fisheries Research, Ijmuiden (Netherlands). Animal Science Group

    2004-09-15

    The reference method used to analyse polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorodibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) is chromatography with high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). It is interesting to check the suitability of screening methods that are faster and less expensive. Different matrices (milk, fish oil, chicken compound feed, pork tissue, chicken tissue, sepiolitic clay, whole egg and herring tissue) were analysed in the frame of the European project DIFFERENCE1. One of the aims of this project is to optimise screening methods. The CALUX bio-assay was one of the screening techniques used. This paper presents the extraction and purification methods used for the analyses. The CALUX results for dioxins and for dl-PCBs were compared to the corresponding GC-HRMS results.

  6. Environmental effects of dredging: Upland animal bioassays of dredged materials. Technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmers, J.W.; Rhett, R.G.; Lee, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Clean Water Act in the United States requires that the environmental evaluation of dredged material prior to discharge or impacting the waters of the United States include the effects of disposal on concentrations of contaminants through biological processes. This results in a need for Corps of Engineers districts to be able to predict the contamination of animals that may be associated with potential disposal alternatives: open-water disposal, upland disposal, and wetland creation. The following is a summary of the results of bioassay procedures using the earthworm Eisenia foetida to evaluate the potential contaminant mobility into soil-dwelling animals. These tests were derived from proposed Organization for European Common Development (OECD) and European Economics Commission (EEC) test procedures (evaluating the effects of new chemicals) and modified to consider accumulation and sublethal effects rather than toxicity.

  7. Submicron polyacrolein particles in situ embedded with upconversion nanoparticles for bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalova, A. N.; Kochneva, I. K.; Khaydukov, E. V.; Semchishen, V. A.; Guller, A. E.; Nechaev, A. V.; Shekhter, A. B.; Zubov, V. P.; Zvyagin, A. V.; Deyev, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new surface modification approach of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) structured as inorganic hosts NaYF4 codoped with Yb3+ and Er3+ based on their encapsulation in a two-stage process of precipitation polymerization of acrolein under alkaline conditions in the presence of UCNPs. The use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide both as an initiator of acrolein polymerization and as an agent for UCNP hydrophilization made it possible to increase the polyacrolein yield up to 90%. This approach enabled the facile, lossless embedment of UCNPs into the polymer particles suitable for bioassay. These particles are readily dispersible in aqueous and physiological buffers, exhibiting excellent photoluminescence properties, chemical stability, and also allow the control of particle diameters. The feasibility of the as-produced photoluminescent polymer particles mean-sized 260 nm for in vivo optical whole-animal imaging was also demonstrated using a home-built epi-luminescence imaging system.We report a new surface modification approach of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) structured as inorganic hosts NaYF4 codoped with Yb3+ and Er3+ based on their encapsulation in a two-stage process of precipitation polymerization of acrolein under alkaline conditions in the presence of UCNPs. The use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide both as an initiator of acrolein polymerization and as an agent for UCNP hydrophilization made it possible to increase the polyacrolein yield up to 90%. This approach enabled the facile, lossless embedment of UCNPs into the polymer particles suitable for bioassay. These particles are readily dispersible in aqueous and physiological buffers, exhibiting excellent photoluminescence properties, chemical stability, and also allow the control of particle diameters. The feasibility of the as-produced photoluminescent polymer particles mean-sized 260 nm for in vivo optical whole-animal imaging was also demonstrated using a home-built epi-luminescence imaging

  8. Implementation of parallelism testing for four-parameter logistic model in bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Harry; Kim, Hyun Jun; Zhang, Lanju; Strouse, Robert J; Schenerman, Mark; Jiang, Xu-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Parallelism is a prerequisite for the determination of relative potency in bioactivity assays. It involves the testing of similarity between a pair of dose-response curves of reference standard and test sample. The evaluation of parallelism is a requirement listed by both the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) and European Pharmacopeia (EP). The revised USP Chapters 〈1032〉 and 〈1034〉 suggest testing parallelism using an equivalence method. However, implementation of this method can be challenging for laboratories that lack experience in statistical analysis and software development. In this paper we present a customized assay analysis template that is developed based on a fully good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant software package. The template allows for automation of the USP-recommended equivalence parallelism testing method for 4PLmodel in bioassays. It makes the implementation of the USP guidance both practical and feasible. Use of the analysis template is illustrated through a practical example. Parallelism is a prerequisite for the determination of relative potency in bioactivity assays. It involves the testing of similarity between a pair of dose-response curves of reference standard and test sample. The evaluation of parallelism is a requirement listed by both the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) and European Pharmacopeia (EP). The revised USP Chapters 〈1032〉 and 〈1034〉 suggest testing parallelism using an equivalence method. However, implementation of this method can be challenging for laboratories that lack experience in statistical analysis and software development. In this paper we present a customized assay analysis template that is developed based on a fully good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant software package. The template allows for automation of the USP-recommended equivalence parallelism testing method for 4-parameter logistic model in bioassays. It makes the implementation of the USP guidance both practical and

  9. Bioassay-guided isolation of antioxidant agents with analgesic properties from flowers of Tagetes patula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizi, Shaheen; Dar, Ahsana; Siddiqi, Humaira; Naqvi, Sabira; Naz, Aneela; Bano, Samina; Lubna

    2011-05-01

    Tagetes patula L. is one of the French marigold group of the Asteraceae family. It is recognized in folklore for its medicinal and pesticidal properties. In search of more effective, but non-toxic compounds with antioxidative potential led to the bioassay guided isolation studies on the extracts of T. patula. The bioassay on Tagetes patula flowers were carried out guided by in vitro antioxidant activity using DPPH assay. A minor but proven plant constituent methyl protocatechuate (1) was isolated by column chromatography, while patuletin (2) and patulitrin (3) obtained in bulk by employing solvent partition of methanol extract. Derivatization of patuletin into benzoyl, cinnamoyl and methyl was conducted to establish the structure activity relationship (SAR). Analgesic activity of compound 2 was evaluated using acetic acid-induced writhing test and hot-plate test in mice. The toxicity of methanol extract and compound 2 were also determined. Polar extracts, fractions and phases demonstrated better antioxidant activity. The synthetic methyl protocatechuate (1) showed IC(50) value of 2.8 ± 0.2 μg/mL, whereas patuletin (2) (IC(50) = 4.3 ± 0.25 µg/mL) was comparable to quercetin and rutin but significantly better than patulitrin (3) (IC(50) = 10.17 ± 1.16 µg/mL). Toxicity test for the methanol extract and compound 2 did not elicit any behavioral changes or cause mortality in mice. Compound 2 also demonstrated mild analgesic property. These findings demonstrate that the plant polar extracts and fractions possess significant antioxidant property with non-toxic effect. Compound 1 is a genuine plant constituent of T. patula.

  10. Analytical methods in bioassay-directed investigations of mutagenicity of air particulate material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Christopher H; Hewitt, L Mark

    2007-01-01

    The combination of short-term bioassays and analytical chemical techniques has been successfully used in the identification of a variety of mutagenic compounds in complex mixtures. Much of the early work in the field of bioassay-directed fractionation resulted from the development of a short-term bacterial assay employing Salmonella typhimurium; this assay is commonly known as the Ames assay. Ideally, analytical methods for assessment of mutagenicity of any environmental matrix should exhibit characteristics including high capacity, good selectivity, good analytical resolution, non-destructiveness, and reproducibility. A variety of extraction solvents have been employed in investigations of mutagenicity of air particulate; sequential combination of dichloromethane followed by methanol is most popular. Soxhlet extraction has been the most common extraction method, followed by sonication. Attempts at initial fractionation using different extraction solvents have met with limited success and highlight the need for fractionation schemes applicable to moderately polar and polar mutagenic compounds. Fractionation methods reported in the literature are reviewed according to three general schemas: (i) acid/base/neutral partitioning followed by fractionation using open-column chromatography and/or HPLC; (ii) fractionation based on normal-phase (NP) HPLC using a cyanopropyl or chemically similar stationary phase; and (iii) fractionation by open-column chromatography followed by NP-HPLC. The HPLC methods may be preparative, semi-preparative, or analytical scale. Variations based on acid/base/neutral partitioning followed by a chromatographic separation have also been employed. Other lesser-used approaches involve fractionation based on ion-exchange and thin-layer chromatographies. Although some of the methodologies used in contemporary studies of mutagenicity of air particulate do not represent significant advances in technology over the past 30 years, their simplicity, low

  11. Synthetic grape volatiles attract mated Lobesia botrana females in laboratory and field bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfora, Gianfranco; Tasin, Marco; De Cristofaro, Antonio; Ioriatti, Claudio; Lucchi, Andrea

    2009-09-01

    In laboratory experiments, we identified and quantified volatiles emitted by inflorescences and berries of two grape varieties (Trebbiano and Sangiovese) and examined the effects of the volatiles on oviposition by the grapevine moth Lobesia botrana. Compared to Trebbiano, Sangiovese is relatively more susceptible to L. botrana infestations under natural conditions. Chemical and electrophysiological analysis indicated only quantitative differences between the volatiles released by the two varieties. In a dual-choice oviposition bioassay based only on volatile cues, females did not show any preference between the two varieties. The six major components of the odor profiles that were GC-EAD-active to female antennae included: limonene, 4,8-dimethyl-1,(E)-3,7-nonatriene, (+/-)-linalool, (E)-caryophyllene, (E,E)-alpha-farnesene, and methyl salicylate. At the beginning of the berry touch phenological stage, their proportions were about 10:0.6:0.4:0.5:0.9:0.6 in Trebbiano and 10:1:0.4:1.5:0.4:0.3 in Sangiovese. A six-component synthetic lure (with the proportion 10:1:1:1:1:1, which approximated the ratio of components released by both varieties) was used in further laboratory oviposition bioassays. Depending on its dosage, the synthetic lure either attracted or repelled oviposition. L. botrana females laid significantly more eggs in the presence of either the grape bunches or the synthetic lure at the attractive dosage. In a release-capture experiment conducted in a field cage that covered two grapevine rows, the synthetic lure was more attractive than a grape cluster or a blank control, and it stimulated oviposition on the vegetation near the lure. The results indicate that L. botrana uses olfactory cues to select oviposition sites and that an artificial lure, containing the major volatiles released by two grape varieties, may be useful in monitoring female activity in the field.

  12. In situ and laboratory bioassays to evaluate the impact of effluent discharges on receiving aquatic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolders, R. [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp (RUCA), Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)]. E-mail: roel.smolders@ua.ac.be; Bervoets, L. [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp (RUCA), Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Blust, R. [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp (RUCA), Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2004-11-01

    Effluents are a main source of direct and often continuous input of pollutants into aquatic ecosystems with long-term implications on ecosystem functioning. Therefore, the study of the effects of effluent exposure on organisms, populations or communities within the framework of impact assessment has a high ecological relevance. The aim of this study was to assess the toxicological impact of two effluents, one household wastewater treatment effluent (Effluent 1) and one industrial effluent (Effluent 2), on the receiving aquatic ecosystem using two test species under both in situ and laboratory conditions. Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed under laboratory conditions in an online monitoring flow-through system (receiving different concentrations of Effluent 2) and under in situ conditions along the pollution gradient established by these two effluent discharges. Bioassays focussed on growth and condition related endpoints (i.e. condition, growth, lipid budget), since these are key functional processes within organisms and populations. Under laboratory conditions, increasing concentrations of the industrial effluent (Effluent 2) had a negative effect on both zebra mussel and carp energy reserves and condition. Under in situ conditions, the same negative impact of Effluent 2 was observed for zebra mussels, while Effluent 1 had no apparent effect on exposed zebra mussels. Carp growth and condition, on the other hand, were significantly increased at the discharge sites of both effluents when compared to the reference site, probably due to differences in food availability. The results indicate that a combination of in situ and laboratory exposures can illustrate how ecological processes influence bioassay studies. The incorporation of indirect, ecological effects, like changes in food availability, provides considerable benefit in understanding and predicting effects of effluents on selected species under realistic exposure

  13. Bioassay of nitric oxide released upon stimulation of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic nerves in the canine ileocolonic junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Pelckmans, P. A.; Ruytjens, I. F.; Bult, H.; de Man, J. G.; Herman, A. G.; van Maercke, Y. M.

    1991-01-01

    1. The release and the nature of the inhibitory non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) neurotransmitter was studied in the canine ileocolonic junction. A circular muscle strip of the canine ileocolonic junction served as donor tissue in a superfusion bioassay in which rings of rabbit aorta with the

  14. Long-distance signaling in bypass1 mutants: bioassay development reveals the bps signal to be a metabolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Emma; Lee, Dong-Keun; Giavalisco, Patrick; Sieburth, Leslie E

    2013-01-01

    Root-to-shoot signaling is used by plants to coordinate shoot development with the conditions experienced by the roots. A mobile and biologically active compound, the bps signal, is over-produced in roots of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant called bypass1 (bps1), and might also be a normally produced signaling molecule in wild-type plants. Our goal is to identify the bps signal chemically, which will then allow us to assess its production in normal plants. To identify any signaling molecule, a bioassay is required, and here we describe the development of a robust, simple, and quantitative bioassay for the bps signal. The developed bioassay follows the growth-reducing activity of the bps signal using the pCYCB1;1::GUS cell cycle marker. Wild-type plants carrying this marker, and provided the bps signal through either grafts or metabolite extracts, showed reduced cell division. By contrast, control grafts and treatment with control extracts showed no change in pCYCB1;1::GUS expression. To determine the chemical nature of the bps signal, extracts were treated with RNase A, Proteinase K, or heat. None of these treatments diminished the activity of bps1 extracts, suggesting that the active molecule might be a metabolite. This bioassay will be useful for future biochemical fractionation and analysis directed toward bps signal identification.

  15. Responses in sediment bioassays used in the Netherlands: can observed toxicity be explained by routinely monitored priority pollutants?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahr, J.; Maas-Diepeveen, J.L.; Stuijfzand, S.C.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Drueke, J.M.; Luecker, S.; Espeldoorn, A.

    2003-01-01

    In order to identify the cause of toxicity in sediments and suspended matter, a large number of samples with different degrees of contamination was taken at various locations in The Netherlands. Standard acute bioassays were carried out with the bacterium Vibrio fischeri, the rotifer Brachionus

  16. Evaluation of bioassays versus contaminant concentrations in explaining the macroinvertebrate community structure in the Rhine-Meuse delta, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Dewitte, A.; Koelmans, A.A.; Velden, van der J.A.; Besten, den P.J.

    2001-01-01

    It is often assumed that bioassays are better descriptors of sediment toxicity than toxicant concentrations and that ecological factors are more important than toxicants in structuring macroinvertebrate communities. In the period 1992 to 1995, data were collected in the enclosed Rhine-Meuse delta,

  17. Development of a feeding behavioural bioassay using the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex and the Multispecies Freshwater Biomonitor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, A.; Lange, de H.J.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study reports the development of a feeding behavioural bioassay using the Multispecies Freshwater Biomonitor (MFB). This device is based on the quadruple impedance conversion technique to record online different behaviours of animals. Animal movements in the water generate specific

  18. Evaluation of the toxic effects of arsenite, chromate, cadmium, and copper using a battery of four bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kyung-Seok; Lee, Pyeong-Koo [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Geologic Environment Div.; Kong, In Chul [Yeungnam Univ., Kyungbuk (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    2012-09-15

    The sensitivities of four different kinds of bioassays to the toxicities of arsenite, chromate, cadmium, and copper were compared. The different bioassays exhibited different sensitivities, i.e., they responded to different levels of toxicity of each of the different metals. However, with the exception of the {alpha}-glucosidase enzyme activity, arsenite was the most toxic compound towards all the tested organisms, exhibiting the highest toxic effect on the seeds of Lactuca, with an EC{sub 50} value of 0.63 mg/L. The sensitivities of Lactuca and Raphanus were greater than the sensitivities of two other kinds of seeds tested. Therefore, these were the seeds appropriate for use in a seed germination assay. A high revertant mutagenic ratio (5:1) of Salmonella typhimurium was observed with an arsenite concentration of 0.1 {mu}g/plate, indicative of a high possibility of mutagenicity. These different results suggested that a battery of bioassays, rather than one bioassay alone, is needed as a more accurate and better tool for the bioassessment of environmental pollutants. (orig.)

  19. Sensitivity bioassays of the Cnesterodon decemmaculatus and Pimephales promelasin a series of samples of effluent and reference toxicant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Saona

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the toxicological sensitivity quantified by the 50% lethal dose of acute toxicity bioassays of Cnesterodon decemmaculatusand Pimephales promelasin benchmark exposure to toxic industrial effluents, wastewater effluents and reference toxicants. At the same time, the toxicological sensitivity of C. decemmaculatusrelated to the size was assayed. Both species were analyzed with 16 bioassays mated by the same substance or compound and a good agreement rL= 0.75 was observed. No significant differences in the overall analysis for effluents and potassium dichromate appeared in toxicological analysis of sensitivity to size. In contrast, significant difference in sensitivity was observed in assays with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Previous studies of the acute bioassays of C. decemmaculatusas well as the results obtained in this work accredit the use of this species in the ecotoxicological evaluation.This work contributes to generate specific ecotoxicological tools employing a native species (C. decemmaculatus and provides comparative information with an internationally accepted species used in reference bioassays (P. promelas. Progress of these studies as a priority research area will contribute to consolidate analytical tools, to develop professional skills and to strengthen institutions that manage the water resources in Uruguay.

  20. Sediment toxicity assessment in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) using Paracentrotus lividus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) fertilization and embryo bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi Ghirardini, A; Arizzi Novelli, A; Tagliapietra, D

    2005-09-01

    The capacity of two toxicity bioassays (fertilization and embryo toxicity tests) to discriminate sediment toxicity using the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus was tested in five stations with different levels of pollution in the Lagoon of Venice. Two stations were located in estuarine sites, two in the industrial zone, and one in a site at the top of our quality gradient (reference). Elutriate was chosen as sediment matrix to assess the potential effects of bioavailable pollutants in the water column as a consequence of sediment resuspension (dredging and dumping, fishing gear, etc.). An experimental design based on Quality Assurance/Quality Control procedures (QA/QC) was adopted in order to set the methodological basis for an effective use of these bioassays in monitoring programs. Results revealed both higher embriotoxicity than spermiotoxicity in all stations and the efficacy of combined use of both toxicity bioassays in discriminating differing pollution/bioavailability between stations and periods. The good representativeness of the integrated sampling scheme and the standardization of all experimental phases yielded high precision of results. Clear Toxicity Fingerprints were evidenced for the investigated sites through the combined use of both bioassays. A good fit between ecotoxicological data and chemical contamination levels was found, except for unnatural sediment texture.

  1. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT AUXILIARY...

  2. Interpretation of bioassays in the study of interactions between soil organisms and plants: involvement of nutrient factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troelstra, S.R.; Wagenaar, R.; Smant, W.; Peters, B.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Increased plant growth in sterilized soil is usually ascribed to the elimination of (often unidentified) soil-borne pathogens. Plant-soil bioassays are reported here for three dune soils and two plant species (Ammophila arenaria and Carer arenaria). Dynamics of plant growth, availability and uptake

  3. USE OF PLANT AND EARTHWORM BIOASSAYS TO EVALUATE REMEDIATION OF SOIL FROM A SITE CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil from a site heavily contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was treated with a pilot-scale, solvent extraction technology. Bioassays in earthworms and plants were used to examine the efficacy of the remediation process for reducing the toxicity of the soil. The ...

  4. Integrating bioassays and analytical chemistry as an improved approach to support safety assessment of food contact materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrand, Julien; Marin-Kuan, Maricel; Bezencon, Claudine; Frank, Nancy; Guérin, Violaine; Koster, Sander; Latado, Hélia; Mollergues, Julie; Patin, Amaury; Piguet, Dominique; Serrant, Patrick; Varela, Jesus; Schilter, Benoît

    2017-10-01

    Food contact materials (FCM) contain chemicals which can migrate into food and result in human exposure. Although it is mandatory to ensure that migration does not endanger human health, there is still no consensus on how to pragmatically assess the safety of FCM since traditional approaches would require extensive toxicological and analytical testing which are expensive and time consuming. Recently, the combination of bioassays, analytical chemistry and risk assessment has been promoted as a new paradigm to identify toxicologically relevant molecules and address safety issues. However, there has been debate on the actual value of bioassays in that framework. In the present work, a FCM anticipated to release the endocrine active chemical 4-nonyphenol (4NP) was used as a model. In a migration study, the leaching of 4NP was confirmed by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS. This was correlated with an increase in both estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities as measured with bioassays. A standard risk assessment indicated that according to the food intake scenario applied, the level of 4NP measured was lower, close or slightly above the acceptable daily intake. Altogether these results show that bioassays could reveal the presence of an endocrine active chemical in a real-case FCM migration study. The levels reported were relevant for safety assessment. In addition, this work also highlighted that bioactivity measured in migrate does not necessarily represent a safety issue. In conclusion, together with analytics, bioassays contribute to identify toxicologically relevant molecules leaching from FCM and enable improved safety assessment.

  5. Investigation of independence in inter-animal tumor-type occurrences within the NTP rodent-bioassay database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, K.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Seilkop, S. [Analytical Sciences, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Statistically significant elevation in tumor incidence at multiple histologically distinct sites is occasionally observed among rodent bioassays of chemically induced carcinogenesis. If such data are to be relied on (as they have, e.g., by the US EPA) for quantitative cancer potency assessment, their proper analysis requires a knowledge of the extent to which multiple tumor-type occurrences are independent or uncorrelated within individual bioassay animals. Although difficult to assess in a statistically rigorous fashion, a few significant associations among tumor-type occurrences in rodent bioassays have been reported. However, no comprehensive studies of animal-specific tumor-type occurrences at death or sacrifice have been conducted using the extensive set of available NTP rodent-bioassay data, on which most cancer-potency assessment for environmental chemicals is currently based. This report presents the results of such an analysis conducted on behalf of the National Research Council`s Committee on Risk Assessment for Hazardous Air Pollutants. Tumor-type associations among individual animals were examined for {approximately}2500 to 3000 control and {approximately}200 to 600 treated animals using pathology data from 62 B6C3F1 mouse studies and 61 F/344N rat studies obtained from a readily available subset of the NTP carcinogenesis bioassay database. No evidence was found for any large correlation in either the onset probability or the prevalence-at-death or sacrifice of any tumor-type pair investigated in control and treated rats and niece, although a few of the small correlations present were statistically significant. Tumor-type occurrences were in most cases nearly independent, and departures from independence, where they did occur, were small. This finding is qualified in that tumor-type onset correlations were measured only indirectly, given the limited nature of the data analyzed.

  6. A Simple, Reliable, and Inexpensive Intraoperative External Expansion System for Enhanced Autologous Structural Fat Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo M. Oranges

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available External volume expansion of the recipient site by suction has been proposed as a way of improving fat graft survival. The objective of this study was to present an innovative and simple intraoperative external expansion system to enhance small-volume autologous fat grafting (40–80 mL and to discuss its background and its mechanism of action. In this system, expansion is performed using a complete vacuum delivery system known as the Kiwi VAC-6000M with a PalmPump (Clinical Innovations. The recipient site is rapidly expanded intraoperatively 10 times for 30 seconds each with a negative pressure of up to 550 mm Hg before autologous fat injection. During this repetitive stimulation, the tissues become grossly expanded, developing macroscopic swelling that regresses slowly over the course of hours following the cessation of the stimulus. The system sets various mechanisms in motion, including scar release, mechanical stimulation, edema, ischemia, and inflammation, which provide an environment conducive for cell proliferation and angiogenesis. In order to maintain the graft construct in its expansive state, all patients are encouraged postoperatively to use the Kiwi three times daily for one minute per session over the course of three days. The handling of this system is simple for both the patients and the surgeon. Satisfactory clinical outcomes have been achieved without significant complications.

  7. Step-by-step guide to building an inexpensive 3D printed motorized positioning stage for automated high-content screening microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneidereit, Dominik; Kraus, Larissa; Meier, Jochen C; Friedrich, Oliver; Gilbert, Daniel F

    2017-06-15

    High-content screening microscopy relies on automation infrastructure that is typically proprietary, non-customizable, costly and requires a high level of skill to use and maintain. The increasing availability of rapid prototyping technology makes it possible to quickly engineer alternatives to conventional automation infrastructure that are low-cost and user-friendly. Here, we describe a 3D printed inexpensive open source and scalable motorized positioning stage for automated high-content screening microscopy and provide detailed step-by-step instructions to re-building the device, including a comprehensive parts list, 3D design files in STEP (Standard for the Exchange of Product model data) and STL (Standard Tessellation Language) format, electronic circuits and wiring diagrams as well as software code. System assembly including 3D printing requires approx. 30h. The fully assembled device is light-weight (1.1kg), small (33×20×8cm) and extremely low-cost (approx. EUR 250). We describe positioning characteristics of the stage, including spatial resolution, accuracy and repeatability, compare imaging data generated with our device to data obtained using a commercially available microplate reader, demonstrate its suitability to high-content microscopy in 96-well high-throughput screening format and validate its applicability to automated functional Cl(-)- and Ca(2+)-imaging with recombinant HEK293 cells as a model system. A time-lapse video of the stage during operation and as part of a custom assembled screening robot can be found at https://vimeo.com/158813199. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid determination of cytokinins and auxin in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Anwar; Krischke, Markus; Roitsch, Thomas; Hasnain, Shahida

    2010-11-01

    Five cyanobacterial strains, Anabaena sp. Ck1, Oscillatoria sp. Ck2, Phormidium sp. Ck3, Chroococcidiopsis sp. Ck4, and Synechosystis sp. Ck5 were selected for their positive cytokinins-like activity using cucumber cotyledon bioassay and GUS assay in Arabidopsis ARR5::GUS. Classical cucumber cotyledon bioassay was modified for direct screening of cyanobacteria avoiding need for extraction and purification. Cytokinins from cyanobacteria were absorbed onto filter paper which was then assayed for cytokinins-like activity. A rapid chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of cytokinins and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Cyanobacterial biomass (50-100 mg) and cell-free culture filtrate were extracted in Bieleski buffer and purified by solid-phase extraction. The extract was used to determine phytohormones by ultra performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry in positive and negative modes, respectively, with multiple reactions monitoring. Stable isotope-labeled cytokinins and IAA standards were added in the samples to follow recovery of the compounds and method validation. Five cytokinins determined in the selected strains were Zeatin (cis and trans isomers), Zeatin riboside, Dihydrozeatin riboside, and zeatin-o-glucoside. The strains were shown to accumulate as well as release the phytohormones.

  9. Using Modern And Inexpensive Tools In the Classroom To Teach Spectroscopy And To Do Exciting Citizen Science On Astronomical Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, T.

    2014-12-01

    Spectroscopy is a key tool used in modern astronomical research. But, it's always been a difficult topic to teach or practice because the expense and complexity of the available tools. Over the past few years, there's been somewhat of a revolution in this field as new technologies have applied. In this presentation we'll review some new spectroscopy tools that enable educators, students and citizen scientists to do exciting spectroscopic work. With the addition of a simple, inexpensive grating, it's now possible to capture scientifically significant spectra of astronomical objects with small (6") telescopes and even just a DSLR. See the tools that citizen scientists are using to contribute data to pro-am collaborations around the world. We'll also examine a simple, surprisingly inexpensive, tripod-mounted spectrometer that can be used in the classroom for demonstrations and hands-on labs with gas tubes and other light sources. Both of the above instruments use a software program named RSpec, which is state of the art software suite that is easy to learn and easy to use. In this presentation we'll see these devices in operation and discuss how they can be used by educators to dramatically improve their teaching of this topic. You'll see how these tools can eliminate the frustration of hand-held rainbow foil and plastic spectrometers. And we'll review some exciting examples of astronomical spectra being collected by amateurs and educators.

  10. Inexpensive antimony nanocrystals and their composites with red phosphorus as high-performance anode materials for Na-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Marc; Erni, Rolf; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2015-02-12

    Sodium-ion batteries increasingly become of immense research interest as a potential inexpensive alternative to Lithium-ion batteries. Development of high-energy-density negative electrodes (anodes) remains to be a great challenge, especially because of significant differences between lithium and sodium chemistries. Two Na-ion anode materials - antimony (Sb) and phosphorus (P) - have been recently shown to offer excellent cycling stability (Sb) and highest known Na-ion charge storage capacity (P). In this work we report on the synergistic Na-ion storage in a P/Sb/Cu-nanocomposite, produced by mixing inexpensive colloidal Sb nanocrystals with red P and with copper (Cu) nanowires. In comparison to electrodes composed of only phosphorus, such P/Sb/Cu-composite shows much greater cycling stability providing a capacity of above 1100 mAh g(-1) after 50 charge/discharge cycles at a current density of 125 mA g(-1). Furthermore, P/Sb/Cu-composite also exhibits excellent rate-capability, with capacity of more than 900 mAh g(-1) at a high charge/discharge current density of 2000 mA g(-1).

  11. A compact, inexpensive infrared laser system for continuous-wave optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, William C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2014-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) has been commonly performed in the laboratory using high-power, pulsed, infrared (IR) lasers including Holmium:YAG, diode, and Thulium fiber lasers. However, the relatively high cost of these lasers in comparison with conventional electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) equipment may represent a significant barrier to widespread adoption of ONS. Optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves (CN's) has recently been reported using lower cost, continuous-wave (CW), all-fiber-based diode lasers. This preliminary study describes further miniaturization and cost reduction of the ONS system in the form of a compact, lightweight, cordless, and inexpensive IR laser. A 140-mW, 1560-nm diode laser was integrated with a green aiming beam and delivery optics into a compact ONS system. Surface and subsurface ONS was performed in a total of 5 rats, in vivo, with measurement of an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response during CW laser irradiation for 30 s with a spot diameter of 0.7 mm. Short-term, CW ONS of the prostate CN's is feasible using a compact, inexpensive, batterypowered IR laser diode system. This ONS system may represent an alternative to ENS for laboratory studies, and with further development, a handheld option for ONS in the clinic to identify and preserve the CN's during prostate cancer surgery.

  12. Rapid Column-Free Enrichment of Mononuclear Cells from Solid Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, Steven D.; Keller, Karen A.; Cheng, Stephanie; Zhang, Michael; Zhang, Xiaoli; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Freud, Aharon G.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a rapid negative selection method to enrich rare mononuclear cells from human tissues. Unwanted and antibody-tethered cells are selectively depleted during a Ficoll separation step, and there is no need for magnetic-based reagents and equipment. The new method is fast, customizable, inexpensive, remarkably efficient, and easy to perform, and per sample the overall cost is less than one-tenth the cost associated with a magnetic column-based method. PMID:26223896

  13. Improved out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival through the inexpensive optimization of an existing defibrillation program: OPALS study phase II. Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Field, B J; Spaite, D W; De Maio, V J; Ward, R; Munkley, D P; Lyver, M B; Luinstra, L G; Campeau, T; Maloney, J; Dagnone, E

    1999-04-07

    .5%; Pdefibrillation program and US $2400 per life saved annually for maintaining the program. An inexpensive, multifaceted system optimization approach to rapid defibrillation can lead to significant improvements in survival after cardiac arrest in a large BLS-D EMS system.

  14. Use of Bioassay test for the environmental evaluation of mining residues and their leachates: the singular case of the Portman Bay (SE, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, Maria Jose; García-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Molina, Jose; Tudela, Maria Luz; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2010-05-01

    conductivity was 8.4 ds m-1. Mean heavy metal content in leachates from Portman Bay was 6.8 ppm for Pb, 0.1 ppm for Zn, 17 ppb for Cd, 5.6 ppb for Cu, 3.7 ppb for As and 0.6 ppm for Fe. The bioassays showed different sensitivities to the target metals. The Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition assay showed less sensitivity to the toxicants in the sediments than phytotoxicity assay. According to our results it is highly advisable to complement chemical analyses with environmental toxicity testing to characterise the risks presented by contaminated soils. Finally, these methods satisfy the requirements of environmental toxicology in their reliability, sensitivity, reproducibility, rapidity and low cost.

  15. Real time three-dimensional space video rate sensors for millimeter waves imaging based very inexpensive plasma LED lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanon, Assaf; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Kopeika, Natan S.; Rozban, Daniel; Abramovich, Amir

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, much effort has been invested to develop inexpensive but sensitive Millimeter Wave (MMW) detectors that can be used in focal plane arrays (FPAs), in order to implement real time MMW imaging. Real time MMW imaging systems are required for many varied applications in many fields as homeland security, medicine, communications, military products and space technology. It is mainly because this radiation has high penetration and good navigability through dust storm, fog, heavy rain, dielectric materials, biological tissue, and diverse materials. Moreover, the atmospheric attenuation in this range of the spectrum is relatively low and the scattering is also low compared to NIR and VIS. The lack of inexpensive room temperature imaging systems makes it difficult to provide a suitable MMW system for many of the above applications. In last few years we advanced in research and development of sensors using very inexpensive (30-50 cents) Glow Discharge Detector (GDD) plasma indicator lamps as MMW detectors. This paper presents three kinds of GDD sensor based lamp Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). Those three kinds of cameras are different in the number of detectors, scanning operation, and detection method. The 1st and 2nd generations are 8 × 8 pixel array and an 18 × 2 mono-rail scanner array respectively, both of them for direct detection and limited to fixed imaging. The last designed sensor is a multiplexing frame rate of 16x16 GDD FPA. It permits real time video rate imaging of 30 frames/ sec and comprehensive 3D MMW imaging. The principle of detection in this sensor is a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) system while each of the 16 GDD pixel lines is sampled simultaneously. Direct detection is also possible and can be done with a friendly user interface. This FPA sensor is built over 256 commercial GDD lamps with 3 mm diameter International Light, Inc., Peabody, MA model 527 Ne indicator lamps as pixel detectors. All three sensors are fully supported

  16. Preliminary study on sediment bioassays with Mediterranean amphipod Corophium orientale; Studio preliminare per l`utilizzo dell`anfipode mediterraneo Corophium orientale nei saggi biologici su sedimenti marini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigongiari, N.; Giuliani, S. [CIBM, Centro Interuniversitario di Biologia Marina, Livorno (Italy); Pellegrini, D. [ICRAM, Istituto Centrale per la -ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica Applicata al Mare, Rome (Italy); Meschini, P. [Acquario Comunale, Livorno (Italy)

    1998-01-01

    The amphipods are widely considered to be the most appropriate indicator organisms for sediment bioassay. Actually none Mediterranean species is considered for testing sediment by scientific literature. The aim of this work was to evaluate the fitness thresholds of Corophium orientale at different chemical-physical conditions (salinity and granulometry) and to propose this species in Mediterranean sediment bioassay. The results show a good sensitivity at the reference toxicant (Cd Cl{sub 2}) and an excellent adaptation at the different laboratory conditions. These preliminary results and the easy collection of the organisms make C. orientale a suitable organism for bioassay.

  17. Polymer Hybrid Photovoltaics for Inexpensive Electricity Generation: Final Technical Report, 1 September 2001--30 April 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, S. A.

    2006-07-01

    The project goal is to understand the operating mechanisms underlying the performance of polymer hybrid photovoltaics to enable the development of a photovoltaic with a maximum power conversion efficiency over cost ratio that is significantly greater than current PV technologies. Plastic or polymer-based photovoltaics can have significant cost advantages over conventional technologies in that they are compatible with liquid-based plastic processing and can be assembled onto plastic under atmospheric conditions (ambient temperature and pressure) using standard printing technologies, such as reel-to-reel and screen printing. Moreover, polymer-based PVs are lightweight, flexible, and largely unbreakable, which make shipping, installation, and maintenance simpler. Furthermore, a numerical simulation program was developed (in collaboration with IBM) to fully simulate the performance of multicomponent polymer photovoltaic devices, and a manufacturing method was developed (in collaboration with Add-vision) to inexpensively manufacture larger-area devices.

  18. INEXPENSIVE CO{sub 2} THICKENING AGENTS FOR IMPROVED MOBILITY CONTROL OF CO{sub 2} FLOODS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Enick; Eric J. Beckman; Andrew Hamilton

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this research was the design, synthesis and evaluation of inexpensive, nonfluorous carbon dioxide thickening agents. We followed the same strategy employed in the design of fluorinated CO{sub 2} polymeric thickeners. First, a highly CO{sub 2}-philic, hydrocarbon-based monomer was to be identified. Polymers or oligomers of this monomer were then synthesized. The second step was to be completed only when a CO{sub 2}-soluble polymer that was soluble in CO{sub 2} at pressures comparable to the MMP was identified. In the second step, viscosity-enhancing associating groups were to be incorporated into the polymer to make it a viable thickener that exhibited high CO{sub 2} solubility at EOR MMP conditions. This final report documents the CO{sub 2} solubility of a series of commercial and novel polymers composed of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and, in some cases, nitrogen.

  19. A simple and inexpensive way to document simple husbandry in animal care facilities using QR code scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Tyler; Smith, Terry; Hodges, Richard; Fry, W Mark

    2017-12-01

    Record keeping within research animal care facilities is a key part of the guidelines set forth by national regulatory bodies and mandated by federal laws. Research facilities must maintain records of animal health issues, procedures and usage. Facilities are also required to maintain records regarding regular husbandry such as general animal checks, feeding and watering. The level of record keeping has the potential to generate excessive amounts of paper which must be retained in a fashion as to be accessible. In addition it is preferable not to retain within administrative areas any paper records which may have been in contact with animal rooms. Here, we present a flexible, simple and inexpensive process for the generation and storage of electronic animal husbandry records using smartphone technology over a WiFi or cellular network.

  20. Teaching an Old Material New Tricks: Easy and Inexpensive Focused Ion Beam (FIB) Sample Protection Using Conductive Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillon, Joshua A; Ray, Valery; Salamanca-Riba, Lourdes G

    2017-08-01

    This letter describes an innovative spin-coating system, built from off-the-shelf components, that can easily and inexpensively be integrated into any laboratory environment. Combined with a liquid suspension of conductive polymer, such a "rotary coater" enables simple coating of planar samples to create a physical protective barrier on the sample surface. This barrier aids in charge dissipation during scanning electron microscope and focused ion beam (FIB) imaging and provides wide-scale protection of the sample surface from ion bombardment during FIB imaging and gas-assisted deposition. This polymer layer replaces the localized and time-consuming electron beam deposition step typically performed during transmission electron microscopy lamella preparation. After observation, the coating can be easily removed, if desired. The described spin-coating procedure has minimal cost while providing repeatable positive results, without the need for expensive commercial coating instrumentation.

  1. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  2. A simple and rapid method for determining transgenic cotton plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baohong; Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Fang; Wang, Qinglian

    2013-01-01

    Determining transgenic events is a critical step for obtaining transgenic plants as well as the later stage of application. Traditional methods, such as Northern blotting and qRT-PCR, for determining transgenic events either require radioactively labeled substrates, expensive instruments, or long-time commitments, which result in lab and time-consuming as well as expensive costs. These methods also require destroying the transgenic events. In this chapter, we present a simple and rapid method for determining transgenic cotton plants in both laboratory and field conditions. This method is based on the sensitivity of transgenic and non-transgenic plants to a specific chemical, such as antibiotics or herbicides. This method will facilitate the screening of transgenic events, save time, reduce cost, and speed up the application of transgenic technology on cotton breeding and production. More important, this is a nondestructive bioassay method; the transgenic plants can be transferred into greenhouse or field for the later study after the detection process.

  3. Methotrexate intercalated layered double hydroxides with the mediation of surfactants: Mechanism exploration and bioassay study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Chao-Fan; Tian, De-Ying; Li, Shu-Ping, E-mail: lishuping@njnu.edu.cn; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2015-12-01

    Methotrexatum intercalated layered double hydroxides (MTX/LDHs) hybrids were synthesized by the co-precipitation method and three kinds of nonionic surfactants with different hydrocarbon chain lengths were used. The resulting hybrids were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD and FTIR investigations manifest the successful intercalation of MTX anions into the interlayer of LDHs. TEM graphs indicate that the morphology of the hybrids changes with the variation of the chain length of the surfactants, i.e., the particles synthesized using polyethylene glycol (PEG-7) present regular disc morphology with good monodispersity, while samples with the mediation of alkyl polyglycoside (APG-14) are heavily aggregated and samples with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-10) exhibit irregular branches. Furthermore, the release and bioassay experiments show that monodisperse MTX/LDHs present good controlled-release and are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells. - Highlights: • Surfactants could be used to modify the dispersing state of MTX/LDHs hybrids. • Surfactants have great effect on the morphology of MTX/LDHs hybrids. • MTX/LDHs with good monodisperse degree are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells.

  4. Application of NCRP 156 Wound Models for the Analysis of Bioassay Data from Plutonium Wound Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Deepesh; Guilmette, Raymond A; Klumpp, John A; Bertelli, Luiz; Waters, Tom L

    2017-09-01

    The NCRP 156 wound model was heavily based on data from animal experiments. The authors of the report acknowledged this limitation and encouraged validation of the models using data from human wound exposures. The objective of this paper was to apply the NCRP 156 wound models to the bioassay data from four plutonium-contaminated wound cases reported in the literature. Because a wide variety of forms of plutonium can be expected at a nuclear facility, a combination of the wound models-rather than a single model-was used to successfully explain both the urinary excretion data and wound retention data in three cases. The data for the fourth case could not be explained by any combination of the default wound models. While this may possibly be attributed to the existence of a category of plutonium whose solubility and chemistry are different than those described by the NCRP 156 default categories, the differences may also be the result of differences in systemic biokinetics. The concept of using a combination of biokinetic models may be extended to inhalation exposures as well, where more than one form of radionuclide-particles of different solubility or different sizes-may exist in a workplace.

  5. Lanthanide-Containing Polymer Microspheres by Multiple-Stage Dispersion Polymerization for Highly Multiplexed Bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Ahmed I.; Dai, Sheng; Thickett, Stuart C.; Ornatsky, Olga; Bandura, Dmitry; Baranov, Vladimir; Winnik, Mitchell A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of metal-encoded polystyrene microspheres by multiple-stage dispersion polymerization with diameters on the order of 2 µm and a very narrow size distribution. Different lanthanides were loaded into these microspheres through the addition of a mixture of LnCl3 salts and excess acrylic acid or acetoacetylethyl methacrylate (AAEM) dissolved in ethanol to the reaction after about 10% conversion of styrene, i.e., well after the particle nucleation stage was complete. Individual microspheres contain ca. 106 – 108 chelated lanthanide ions, of either a single element or a mixture of elements. These microspheres were characterized one-by-one utilizing a novel mass cytometer with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry detection. Microspheres containing a range of different metals at different levels of concentration were synthesized to meet the requirements of binary encoding and enumeration encoding protocols. With four different metals at five levels of concentration, we could achieve a variability of 624, and the strategy we report should allow one to obtain much larger variability. To demonstrate the usefulness of element-encoded beads for highly multiplexed immunoassays, we carried out a proof-of-principle model bioassay involving conjugation of mouse IgG to the surface of La and Tm containing particles, and its detection by an anti-mouse IgG bearing a metal-chelating polymer with Pr. PMID:19807075

  6. Engineered bakers yeast as a sensitive bioassay indicator organism for the trichothecene toxin deoxynivalenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolmaali, Shamsozoha; Mitterbauer, Rudolf; Spadiut, Oliver; Peruci, Michaela; Weindorfer, Hanna; Lucyshyn, Doris; Ellersdorfer, Günther; Lemmens, Marc; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Adam, Gerhard

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae towards trichothecene toxins, in particular to deoxynivalenol (DON), in order to improve the utility of this yeast as a bioassay indicator organism. We report the construction of a strain with inactivated genes (PDR5, PDR10, PDR15) encoding ABC transporter proteins with specificity for the trichothecene deoxynivalenol, with inactivated AYT1 (encoding a trichothecene-3-O-acetyltransferase), and inactivated UBI4 and UBP6 genes. Inactivation of the stress inducible polyubiquitin gene UBI4 or the ubiquitin protease UBP6 increased DON sensitivity, the inactivation of both genes had a synergistic effect. The resulting pdr5 pdr10 pdr15 ayt1 ubp6 ubi4 mutant strain showed 50% growth inhibition at a DON concentration of 5 mg/l under optimal conditions. The development of a simple two step assay for microbial DON degradation in 96 well microtiter format and its testing with the DON detoxifying bacterium BBSH 797 is reported.

  7. Isolation of antibacterial compounds from Quercus dilatata L. through bioassay guided fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Maryam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Four medicinal plants (Chrozophora hierosolymitana Spreng, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum L., Ephedra gerardiana Wall. ex Stapf, and Quercus dilatata L. used by indigenous healers to treat various infectious diseases were selected for the present study. The major objective of the present study was isolation and characterization of antimicrobial components from the crude plant extracts using bioassay guided fractionation. Methods Seven methanolic extracts of the four plants were screened to identify any antimicrobial agents present in them. The active crude plant extract was fractionated first by solvent partitioning and then by HPLC. Characterization of the active fractions was done by using spectrophotometer. Results All the seven methanolic extracts showed low antifungal activity, however, when these extracts were tested for antibacterial activity, significant activity was exhibited by two extracts. The extract of aerial parts of Q. dilatata was most active and therefore, was selected for further analysis. Initially fractionation was done by solvent-solvent partitioning and out of six partitioned fractions, ethanol fraction was selected on the basis of results of antibacterial activity and phytochemical analysis. Further, fractionation was carried out by RP- HPLC and purified active subfractions were characterized by comparing their absorption spectra with that of the known natural products isolated from the plants of Quercus genus. Discussion and conclusion The results suggest that this is the first report of the isolated antibacterial compounds from this genus.

  8. Human in-vivo bioassay for the tissue-specific measurement of nociceptive and inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Martin S; Tingle, Martha; Schmelz, Martin; Carvalho, Brendan; Yeomans, David C

    2008-12-01

    This in-vivo human bioassay can be used to study human volunteers and patients. Samples are collected from pertinent tissue sites such as the skin via aseptically inserted microdialysis catheters (Dermal Dialysis, Erlangen, Germany). Illustrated in this example is the collection of interstitial fluid from experimentally inflamed skin in human volunteers. Sample collection can be combined with other experimental tests. For example, the simultaneous assessment of locally released biochemicals and subjective sensitivity to painful stimuli in experimentally inflamed skin provides the critical biochemical-behavioral link to identify biomarkers of pain and inflammation. Presented assay in the living human organism allows for mechanistic insight into tissue-specific processes underlying pain and/or inflammation. The method is also well suited to examine the effectiveness of existing or novel interventions--such as new drug candidates - targeting the treatment of painful and/or inflammatory conditions. This article will provide a detailed description on the use of microdialysis techniques for collecting interstitial fluid from experimentally inflamed skin lesion of human study subjects. Interstitial fluid samples are typically processed with aid of multiplex bead array immunoassays allowing assaying up to 100 analytes in samples as small in volume as 50 microliters.

  9. Lanthanide upconversion nanoparticles and applications in bioassays and bioimaging: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DaCosta, Matthew V.; Doughan, Samer; Han, Yi; Krull, Ulrich J., E-mail: aca-krull@rogers.com

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • UCNP synthesis and surface modifications, and UC mechanisms and theory are discussed. • Examples of UCNPs as passive labels and as donors in LRET based assays are described. • Optical multiplexing capacity of UCNPs for diagnostics and imaging is considered. • UCNPs are described for use as in vivo biomarkers for multi-modal imaging and theranostics. - Abstract: Through the process of photon upconversion, trivalent lanthanide doped nanocrystals convert long-wavelength excitation radiation in the infrared or near infrared region to higher energy emission radiation from ultraviolet to infrared. Such materials offer potential for numerous advantages in analytical applications in comparison to molecular fluorophores and quantum dots. The use of IR radiation as an excitation source reduces autofluorescence and scattering of excitation radiation, which leads to a reduction of background in optical experiments. The upconverting nanocrystals offer excellent photostability and are composed of materials that are not particularly toxic to biological organisms. Excitation at long wavelengths also minimizes damage to biological materials. In this review, the different mechanisms responsible for the upconversion process, and methods that are used to synthesize and decorate upconverting nanoparticles are presented to indicate how absorption and emission can be tuned. Examples of recent applications of upconverting nanoparticles in bioassays for the detection of proteins, nucleic acids, metabolites and metal ions offer indications of analytical advantages in the development of methods of analysis. Examples include multi-color and multi-modal imaging, and the use of upconverting nanoparticles in theranostics.

  10. Development of a bioassay to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments to pike (Esox lucius)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Yuan, H.; Tumber, V.; Parrott, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Raine, J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Pike (Esox lucius) are a commercially sought fish species that inhabit the Athabasca River, which flows through the Athabasca oil sands. The fish are exposed to natural sources of bitumen from the McMurray formation. This study was conducted to design and implement a daily-renewal bioassay to assess the toxicity of oil sands to this fish species and to obtain information regarding the development of pike exposed to bitumen. Eggs were collected and fertilized with milt from spawning wild pike captured from Lake Diefenbaker in Saskatchewan. The fertilized eggs were exposed to different concentrations of sediments or culture water only (negative controls) until complete yolk absorption of control fish, approximately 15 days post-hatch. For the rest of the experiment, brine shrimp were fed to the walleye embryos every day after hatching. The developing fish were examined for morphological deformities, survival, hatching success, and changes in weight and length. The research findings indicated that pike is less sensitive than walleye and fathead minnow to the toxicity of oil sands sediments.

  11. Development of a bioassay using walleye (Sander vitreus) to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Yuan, H.; Tumber, V.; Parrott, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Raine, J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the effects of sediments from the Athabasca oil sands area on fish development and survival. Walleye (Sander vitreus) which inhabit the Athabasca River are exposed to natural sources of bitumen eroding from the McMurray formation. This study described the design and implementation of a daily-renewal bioassay to evaluate the potential effects of toxicants on walleye development. Eggs were collected and fertilized with milt from spawning wild walleye captured from Lake Diefenbaker in Saskatchewan. The fertilized eggs were exposed to different concentrations of sediments or culture water only (negative controls) until complete yolk absorption of control fish. The walleye embryos were fed brine shrimp daily after hatching and the developing fish were examined for morphological deformities, survival, hatching success, and changes in weight and length between treatments. Organics concentrations in fish tissues and water were measured when possible. Fathead minnows and northern pikes will also be exposed to the same sediments in order to compare the relative sensitivity of the three species.

  12. Lanthanide-containing polymer microspheres by multiple-stage dispersion polymerization for highly multiplexed bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Ahmed I; Dai, Sheng; Thickett, Stuart C; Ornatsky, Olga; Bandura, Dmitry; Baranov, Vladimir; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2009-10-28

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of metal-encoded polystyrene microspheres by multiple-stage dispersion polymerization with diameters on the order of 2 mum and a very narrow size distribution. Different lanthanides were loaded into these microspheres through the addition of a mixture of lanthanide salts (LnCl(3)) and excess acrylic acid (AA) or acetoacetylethyl methacrylate (AAEM) dissolved in ethanol to the reaction after about 10% conversion of styrene, that is, well after the particle nucleation stage was complete. Individual microspheres contain ca. 10(6)-10(8) chelated lanthanide ions, of either a single element or a mixture of elements. These microspheres were characterized one-by-one utilizing a novel mass cytometer with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry detection. Microspheres containing a range of different metals at different levels of concentration were synthesized to meet the requirements of binary encoding and enumeration encoding protocols. With four different metals at five levels of concentration, we could achieve a variability of 624, and the strategy we report should allow one to obtain much larger variability. To demonstrate the usefulness of element-encoded beads for highly multiplexed immunoassays, we carried out a proof-of-principle model bioassay involving conjugation of mouse IgG to the surface of La and Tm containing particles and its detection by an antimouse IgG bearing a metal-chelating polymer with Pr.

  13. Bioassays guided fractionation of Coronopus didymus for its antifungal activity against Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Drakshan; Javaid, Arshad

    2012-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. is a pathogen of about 500 plant species. In a laboratory screening bioassay, methanolic extracts of 15 mg mL⁻¹ concentrations of different parts of Coronopus didymus (L.) Sm. (Brassicaceae) namely leaf, stem, inflorescence and root reduced the biomass of S. rolfsii by 67%, 26%, 40% and 58%, respectively. Methanolic root extract was successively fractionated with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol. All the concentrations (3.125-200 mg mL⁻¹) of ethyl acetate fraction completely inhibited the target fungal growth. Two compounds A and B were separated from this fraction by Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC). TLC fraction A was found highly effective against S. rolfsii with MIC value 15.62 µg mL⁻¹ as compared to MIC value 7.81 µg mL⁻¹ of the commercial fungicide mencozeb. This compound may be used for the synthesis of natural product based fungicide for the control of S. rolfsii.

  14. Synthesis of nanostructured methotrexate/hydroxyapatite: Morphology control, growth mechanism, and bioassay explore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chao-Fan; Li, Shu-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a new structure of methotrexate/hydroxyapatite (MTX/HAp) nanorods via a facile hydrothermal route was reported. The as-synthesized samples were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. In order to explore the formation mechanism, the effects of reaction time, MTX concentrations and addition of ethylene glycol (PEG) were emphatically examined. The results indicated that, with the increase in reaction time, the fibrous nanoparticles turned to needle-like and then to rod-like. Our study also proved that reaction time of 12h was enough for the full-growth of the nanostructure. Drug-loading capacities (AIn) rose dramatically in the first 12h and reached a plateau afterwards. Importantly, MTX played a critical role in the longitudinal growth of MTX/HAp nanostructure and polyethylene glyco (PEG) was a good dispersing agent to improve the monodispersity. As expected, the functional agent of MTX was served as both the target anticancer drug loaded in HAp and effective complex agents to modify and control the morphologies of MTX/HAp. Lastly, in vitro bioassay tests gave us evidence that obvious tumor inhibition can be achieved when MTX was hybridized with HAp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Field bioassay to evaluate contact and residual toxicities of insecticides to carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floate, K D; Elliott, R H; Doane, J F; Gillott, C

    1989-12-01

    A 2-yr field study evaluated the effects of selected insecticides on Bembidion obscurellum Motschulsky and Bembidion quadrimaculatum L., carabid predators of the wheat midge, Sitodiplosis mosellana (Géhin). A bioassay method using caged beetles indicated that insecticides differed significantly in their contact and residual toxicities when applied at maximum recommended field rates. Deltamethrin, the least toxic insecticide, caused approximately 30% mortality in both beetle species, but its residual toxicity on the soil remained constant for 1 wk. Dimethoate was initially more toxic (73% mortality) than deltamethrin but less toxic after 1 wk (12% mortality). Carbofuran and chlorpyrifos, the most toxic contact sprays, caused 83 to 100% mortality. After 1 wk, the residual toxicity of carbofuran had declined markedly (5% mortality) whereas the toxicity of chlorpyrifos remained high (82% mortality). Pitfall trapping was an inconclusive method of evaluating the toxicity of insecticidal sprays to carabid adults. In plots treated with carbofuran, pitfall catches of Bembidion species were not significantly different from those in control plots during a 6-wk period after spraying. In plots treated with chlorpyrifos, catches of Bembidion species were significantly lower than those in control plots 3-16 d after spraying, but not thereafter. Results suggested that adult immigration and residual toxicity influence pitfall catches and recovery of carabid populations after spraying.

  16. Menthol-enhanced cytotoxicity of cigarette smoke demonstrated in two bioassay models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriyasu, Atsuko; Konishi, Tadashi; Mochizuki, Shinichi; Sakurai, Kazuo; Tanaike, Yutaka; Matsuyama, Ken; Uezu, Kazuya; Kawano, Tomonori

    2013-08-30

    Cigarette smoke is harmful to human health at both cellular and genetic levels. Recently, a unique bioassay for smoke cytotoxicity using air pollution-sensitive plant cells (tobacco) has been proposed. Model plant cells (tobacco Bel-W3 cells) and human cells (alveolar epithelial A549 cells) suspended in fresh culture media were exposed to cigarette smoke sampled after lighting the tip of cigarettes (with vs. without menthol capsules) which were attached to a glass pipe connected to the cell-containing plastic tubes. Control cultures were also assessed. After exposing tobacco plant cells to cigarette smoke, cell death occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Cell death was significantly enhanced by mentholated smoke, while menthol alone was shown to be inert suggesting that menthol synergistically contributes to the enhancement of cell death, initiated by smoke-associated compounds. The enhanced toxicity of mentholated smoke was confirmed in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells. Cigarette smoke cytotoxicity leading to cell death assessed in plant and human model cells was enhanced by menthol. Further research into these findings is encouraged.

  17. Towards the development of an embryotoxicity bioassay with terrestrial snails: Screening approach for cadmium and pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druart, Coline; Scheifler, Renaud [Department of Chrono-Environment, University of Franche-Comte, UMR UFC/CNRS 6249 usc INRA, Place Leclerc, F-25030 Besancon Cedex (France); Vaufleury, Annette de, E-mail: annette.devaufleury@univ-fcomte.fr [Department of Chrono-Environment, University of Franche-Comte, UMR UFC/CNRS 6249 usc INRA, Place Leclerc, F-25030 Besancon Cedex (France)

    2010-12-15

    Currently no bioassays are available to assess the embryotoxicity of chemicals with terrestrial soil invertebrates. We therefore presented a new method for embryotoxicity testing with snail eggs: a relevant biological material that incubates in soil and that can be exposed to contaminants from leachates and soil solution. The effects of aqueous solutions of two herbicide formulations, Reglone (active ingredient (a.i.), diquat) and Roundup or its a.i., glyphosate, of a surfactant (Agral 90, a.i., nonylphenol polyethoxylates) and of cadmium (Cd) were studied. Endpoints were the hatching success and observations of embryo abnormalities after exposure. Roundup was found to be more toxic than its a.i. alone (EC50{sub a.i.} = 18 mg/l and about 1300 mg/l, respectively). Reglone (EC50{sub a.i.} = 0.72 mg/l) and Agral (EC50{sub a.i.} {approx} 50 mg/l) were also tested together, revealing that Reglone accounted for more than 99% of the mixture's toxicity. An antagonistic interaction between the two substances was found. For Cd (EC50 = 3.9 mg/l), a significant transfer from exposure medium to eggs was emphasized, particularly affecting the albumen. Abnormalities of embryogenesis in non-hatched embryos depended on the substance and the concentration considered.

  18. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  19. Bed rest suppresses bioassayable growth hormone release in response to muscle activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, G. E.; Goulet, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Hodgson, J. A.; Bigbee, A. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    Hormonal responses to muscle activity were studied in eight men before (-13 or -12 and -8 or -7 days), during (2 or 3, 8 or 9, and 13 or 14 days) and after (+2 or +3 and +10 or +11 days) 17 days of bed rest. Muscle activity consisted of a series of unilateral isometric plantar flexions, including 4 maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), 48 contractions at 30% MVC, and 12 contractions at 80% MVC, all performed at a 4:1-s work-to-rest ratio. Blood was collected before and immediately after muscle activity to measure plasma growth hormone by radioimmunoassay (IGH) and by bioassay (BGH) of tibia epiphyseal cartilage growth in hypophysectomized rats. Plasma IGH was unchanged by muscle activity before, during, or after bed rest. Before bed rest, muscle activity increased (P muscle activity, a pattern that persisted through 8 or 9 days of bed rest. However, after 13 or 14 days of bed rest, plasma concentration of BGH was significantly lower after than before muscle activity (2,594 +/- 211 to 2,085 +/- 109 microg/l). After completion of bed rest, muscle activity increased BGH by 31% at 2 or 3 days (1,807 +/- 117 to 2,379 +/- 473 microg/l; P muscle activity.

  20. Ecotoxicological screening of reclaimed disinfected wastewater by Vibrio fischeri bioassay after a chlorination-dechlorination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayo, Javier; Angosto, José M; Gómez-López, M Dolores

    2009-12-15

    It is well known that different substances can react with chlorine in a water disinfection process to produce disinfection by-products (DBPs). Some of these substances have proven to be carcinogenic in humans and animals. Because it is not possible to detect all DBPs produced in chlorinated wastewater, toxicity tests have been proposed as a useful tool for screening toxic chemicals in treated wastewater. In this study, the Microtox bioassay with Vibrio fischeri was used to evaluate the formation of toxic by-products in wastewater, after a chlorination-dechlorination disinfection treatment. All the variables were found to be normally distributed, so analysis of variance could be directly applied without transformation of variables. Significant correlations were obtained between toxicity values and total carbon, total inorganic carbon, total nitrogen, chlorine, and pH. In contrast, total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, electrical conductivity and turbidity had no effect on toxicity formation. Toxicity increased with the Cl2:NH4+ ratio at a higher chlorine concentration released from combined chlorine. Regression models provided a good fit for effective concentration (EC50) as a function of total carbon and total nitrogen, after 5, 10, and 15 min of exposure. These models had greater multiple determination coefficients than previously reported for similar studies, without autocorrelation in the residuals as indicated by the Durbin-Watson statistic test. The measured and predicted ecotoxicity values were strongly correlated.

  1. Application of bioassay technique to determine onduty herbicide resistance in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, F. A. A.; Ismail, B. S.; Bajrai, F. S. M.

    2016-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine the resistance of OnDuty herbicide in paddy soil with different concentrations by using a broadleaf plant, Brassica juncea. The herbicide was used in the Clearfield® Production System that was adopted in Malaysia to overcome problems mainly caused by weedy rice. Evaluation of herbicide half-life was based on bioassay technique with different concentrations, i.e 0% (control), 50% (half dose), 100% (recommended dose) and 200% (double dose). The study was done in three replicates and followed the Complete Randomized Block Design (CRBD). Results showed that there was a correlation between the amount of herbicide doses and degradation period. The highest half-life value was shown by root inhibition in the double dose concentration of 33 days half-life, followed by the recommended dose with 23 days half-life. Meanwhile, the half dose treatment indicated a half-life value of 17 days for root and 11 days for shoot. Therefore, application of herbicides should follow the recommended dose as the degradation period will not be too long, hence providing maximum effectiveness of the herbicide to overcome weed infestation problems.

  2. Lanthanide upconversion nanoparticles and applications in bioassays and bioimaging: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaCosta, Matthew V; Doughan, Samer; Han, Yi; Krull, Ulrich J

    2014-06-17

    Through the process of photon upconversion, trivalent lanthanide doped nanocrystals convert long-wavelength excitation radiation in the infrared or near infrared region to higher energy emission radiation from ultraviolet to infrared. Such materials offer potential for numerous advantages in analytical applications in comparison to molecular fluorophores and quantum dots. The use of IR radiation as an excitation source reduces autofluorescence and scattering of excitation radiation, which leads to a reduction of background in optical experiments. The upconverting nanocrystals offer excellent photostability and are composed of materials that are not particularly toxic to biological organisms. Excitation at long wavelengths also minimizes damage to biological materials. In this review, the different mechanisms responsible for the upconversion process, and methods that are used to synthesize and decorate upconverting nanoparticles are presented to indicate how absorption and emission can be tuned. Examples of recent applications of upconverting nanoparticles in bioassays for the detection of proteins, nucleic acids, metabolites and metal ions offer indications of analytical advantages in the development of methods of analysis. Examples include multi-color and multi-modal imaging, and the use of upconverting nanoparticles in theranostics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Effects of Jatropha curcas oil in Lactuca sativa root tip bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Vieira, Larissa F; Botelho, Carolina M; Laviola, Bruno G; Palmieri, Marcel J; Praça-Fontes, Milene M

    2014-03-01

    Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) is important for biofuel production and as a feed ingredient for animal. However, the presence of phorbol esters in the oil and cake renders the seeds toxic. The toxicity of J. curcas oil is currently assessed by testing in animals, leading to their death. The identification of toxic and nontoxic improved varieties is important for the safe use of J. curcas seeds and byproducts to avoid their environmental toxicity. Hence, the aim of this study was to propose a short-term bioassay using a plant as a model to screen the toxicity of J. curcas oil without the need to sacrifice any animals. The toxicity of J. curcas oil was evident in germination, root elongation and chromosomal aberration tests in Lactuca sativa. It was demonstrated that J. curcas seeds contain natural compounds that exert phyto-, cyto- and genotoxic effects on lettuce, and that phorbol esters act as aneugenic agents, leading to the formation of sticky chromosomes and c-metaphase cells. In conclusion, the tests applied have shown reproducibility, which is important to verify the extent of detoxification and to determine toxic doses, thus reducing the numbers of animals that would be used for toxicity tests.

  4. Effects of Jatropha curcas oil in Lactuca sativa root tip bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LARISSA F. ANDRADE-VIEIRA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae is important for biofuel production and as a feed ingredient for animal. However, the presence of phorbol esters in the oil and cake renders the seeds toxic. The toxicity of J. curcas oil is currently assessed by testing in animals, leading to their death. The identification of toxic and nontoxic improved varieties is important for the safe use of J. curcas seeds and byproducts to avoid their environmental toxicity. Hence, the aim of this study was to propose a short-term bioassay using a plant as a model to screen the toxicity of J. curcas oil without the need to sacrifice any animals. The toxicity of J. curcas oil was evident in germination, root elongation and chromosomal aberration tests in Lactuca sativa. It was demonstrated that J. curcas seeds contain natural compounds that exert phyto-, cyto- and genotoxic effects on lettuce, and that phorbol esters act as aneugenic agents, leading to the formation of sticky chromosomes and c-metaphase cells. In conclusion, the tests applied have shown reproducibility, which is important to verify the extent of detoxification and to determine toxic doses, thus reducing the numbers of animals that would be used for toxicity tests.

  5. Multiple linear and principal component regressions for modelling ecotoxicity bioassay response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana I; Pires, José C M; Figueiredo, Sónia A; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2014-01-01

    The ecotoxicological response of the living organisms in an aquatic system depends on the physical, chemical and bacteriological variables, as well as the interactions between them. An important challenge to scientists is to understand the interaction and behaviour of factors involved in a multidimensional process such as the ecotoxicological response. With this aim, multiple linear regression (MLR) and principal component regression were applied to the ecotoxicity bioassay response of Chlorella vulgaris and Vibrio fischeri in water collected at seven sites of Leça river during five monitoring campaigns (February, May, June, August and September of 2006). The river water characterization included the analysis of 22 physicochemical and 3 microbiological parameters. The model that best fitted the data was MLR, which shows: (i) a negative correlation with dissolved organic carbon, zinc and manganese, and a positive one with turbidity and arsenic, regarding C. vulgaris toxic response; (ii) a negative correlation with conductivity and turbidity and a positive one with phosphorus, hardness, iron, mercury, arsenic and faecal coliforms, concerning V. fischeri toxic response. This integrated assessment may allow the evaluation of the effect of future pollution abatement measures over the water quality of Leça River.

  6. The lifetime feeding study in mice and rats--an examination of its validity as a bioassay for human carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsburg, D

    1983-01-01

    Currently used designs for carcinogenic bioassay (lifetime feeding studies in mice or rats using maximum tolerated doses of the test compound) are examined to see if they meet the requirements of a bioassay, using the results of 170 compounds reported on as of June, 1980, by the National Cancer Institute. It is concluded that the lifetime feeding study has never been subjected to proper validation as an assay for human carcinogens. When an attempt is made to validate it on the basis of these reported studies and those in the literature, it appears to lack acceptable specificity and sensitivity. It is suggested that a drastically different design is needed and that such redesigning of the assay will require proper validation.

  7. Addressing the recovery of feeding rates in post-exposure feeding bioassays: Cyathura carinata as a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pais-Costa, Antonia Juliana [IMAR—Institute of Marine Research, MARE—Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Acevedo, Pelayo [SaBio IREC, Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (UCLM-CSIC-JCCM), Ciudad Real 13005 (Spain); Marques, João Carlos [IMAR—Institute of Marine Research, MARE—Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Martinez-Haro, Mónica, E-mail: monica.martinezharo@gmail.com [IMAR—Institute of Marine Research, MARE—Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-02-15

    Post-exposure bioassays are used in environmental assessment as a cost-effective tool, but the effects of organism's recovery after exposure to pollutant has not yet been addressed in detail. The recoveries of post-exposure feeding rates after being exposed to two sublethal concentrations of cadmium during two different exposure periods (48 h and 96 h) were evaluated under laboratory conditions using the estuarine isopod Cyathura carinata. Results showed that feeding depression was a stable endpoint up to 24 h after cadmium exposure, which is useful for ecotoxicological bioassays. - Highlights: • We studied recovery of post-exposure feeding rates 48–96 h after cadmium exposure. • The assay is based on the isopod Cyathura carinata. • Post-exposure feeding inhibition is a stable sublethal endpoint.

  8. Phytochemical and toxicity evaluation of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff. Boerl by MCF-7 cell line and brine shrimp lethality bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul Kalam Azad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the cytotoxicity of Phaleria macrocarpa fruits extracts. Methods: The cytotoxicity test was carried out by in vitro MCF-7 cell line and in vivo brine shrimp lethality bioassay. Results: The preliminary phytochemical test showed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrate, glycosides, saponin, terpene, steroids, phenols and flavonoids. The MTT-assay results showed that the highest percentage of cell viability was 106.23% at concentration of 1.25 µL and the lowest percentage was 13.04% at concentration of 10 µL. Conclusions: The MTT-assay and brine shrimp lethality bioassay results showed that the extract was non-toxic and it would be consumable as a herbal remedy.

  9. Bioassay of estrogenic compounds in transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying a recombinant human estrogen receptor gene and a GFP reporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Hideaki; Chua, Nam-Hai; Ohkawa, Hideo

    2009-12-01

    Transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying a recombinant human estrogen receptor gene and a green fluorescent protein reporter gene were used to bioassay estrogenic compounds. We constructed four recombinant human estrogen receptor genes by combining the DNA-binding domain of LexA, a synthetic nuclear localization signal, a ligand-binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, and a transactivation domain of VP16 in different orders; the XEV plants were the most sensitive, and were able to detect 0.001 ng ml(-1) of 17ss-estradiol (E(2)). The transgenic plants absorbed E(2) and 4-nonylphenol present in the nutrient solution, whereas most of the other compounds seemed to be retained in, or on, the roots. Estrone, methoxychlor, bisphenol A, 4-nonylphenol, and 4-t-octylphenol in the medium were clearly detected by RT-PCR and PCR of the genomic DNA. The transgenic Arabidopsis XEV plants thus have potential for the bioassay of estrogenic compounds.

  10. Assessment of a cricket, Acheta domesticus, bioassay for Chequa Iflavirus and bunya-like virus from redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuna, Kitikarn; Elliman, Jennifer; Owens, Leigh

    2017-11-01

    Chequa iflavirus and a bunya-like virus infect redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) and they may cause mortality reaching 20-40% after about three weeks after a stress event. To complete River's postulates for viruses, virus-free animals are needed. Due to a lack of chequa iflavirus and bunya-like virus-free crayfish (testing shows>85% infection rate) coupled with the facts that iflavirus and bunyaviruses are found in insects and that crickets had been successful alternate hosts for crustacean viruses before, Acheta domesticus was trialled asa bioassay animal. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in mortality rates between uninfected control crickets and infected crickets. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for both viruses failed to find any trace of the RNA viruses in fed or inoculated crickets after 30days. The search for an alternative bioassay host will have to be widened. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multiple Applications of Alamar Blue as an Indicator of Metabolic Function and Cellular Health in Cell Viability Bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampersad, Sephra N.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the adverse effects of test compounds on living systems, detection of toxic thresholds, and expansion of experimental data sets to include multiple toxicity end-point analysis are required for any robust screening regime. Alamar Blue is an important redox indicator that is used to evaluate metabolic function and cellular health. The Alamar Blue bioassay has been utilized over the past 50 years to assess cell viability and cytotoxicity in a range of biological and environmental systems and in a number of cell types including bacteria, yeast, fungi, protozoa and cultured mammalian and piscine cells. It offers several advantages over other metabolic indicators and other cytotoxicity assays. However, as with any bioassay, suitability must be determined for each application and cell model. This review seeks to highlight many of the important considerations involved in assay use and design in addition to the potential pitfalls. PMID:23112716

  12. Single-core magnetic markers in rotating magnetic field based homogeneous bioassays and the law of mass action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckhoff, Jan; Schrittwieser, Stefan; Schotter, Joerg; Remmer, Hilke; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we report on the effect of the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) concentration on the quantitative detection of proteins in solution with a rotating magnetic field (RMF) based homogeneous bioassay. Here, the phase lag between 30 nm iron oxide single-core particles and the RMF is analyzed with a fluxgate-based measurement system. As a test analyte anti-human IgG is applied which binds to the protein G functionalized MNP shell and causes a change of the phase lag. The measured phase lag changes for a fixed MNP and a varying analyte concentration are modeled with logistic functions. A change of the MNP concentration results in a nonlinear shift of the logistic function with the analyte concentration. This effect results from the law of mass action. Furthermore, the bioassay results are used to determine the association constant of the binding reaction.

  13. Rapid Antemortem Detection of CWD Prions in Deer Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Nicholas J.; Denkers, Nathaniel D.; Nalls, Amy V.; Mathiason, Candace K.; Caughey, Byron; Hoover, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an efficiently transmitted prion disease of cervids, now identified in 22 United States, 2 Canadian provinces and Korea. One hallmark of CWD is the shedding of infectious prions in saliva, as demonstrated by bioassay in deer. It is also clear that the concentration of prions in saliva, blood, urine and feces is much lower than in the nervous system or lymphoid tissues. Rapid in vitro detection of CWD (and other) prions in body fluids and excreta has been problematic due to the sensitivity limits of direct assays (western blotting, ELISA) and the presence of inhibitors in these complex biological materials that hamper detection. Here we use real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC) to demonstrate CWD prions in both diluted and prion-enriched saliva samples from asymptomatic and symptomatic white-tailed deer. CWD prions were detected in 14 of 24 (58.3%) diluted saliva samples from CWD-exposed white-tailed deer, including 9 of 14 asymptomatic animals (64.2%). In addition, a phosphotungstic acid enrichment enhanced the RT-QuIC assay sensitivity, enabling detection in 19 of 24 (79.1%) of the above saliva samples. Bioassay in Tg[CerPrP] mice confirmed the presence of infectious prions in 2 of 2 RT-QuIC-positive saliva samples so examined. The modified RT-QuIC analysis described represents a non-invasive, rapid ante-mortem detection of prions in complex biologic fluids, excreta, or environmental samples as well as a tool for exploring prion trafficking, peripheralization, and dissemination. PMID:24040235

  14. Rapid antemortem detection of CWD prions in deer saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davin M Henderson

    Full Text Available Chronic wasting disease (CWD is an efficiently transmitted prion disease of cervids, now identified in 22 United States, 2 Canadian provinces and Korea. One hallmark of CWD is the shedding of infectious prions in saliva, as demonstrated by bioassay in deer. It is also clear that the concentration of prions in saliva, blood, urine and feces is much lower than in the nervous system or lymphoid tissues. Rapid in vitro detection of CWD (and other prions in body fluids and excreta has been problematic due to the sensitivity limits of direct assays (western blotting, ELISA and the presence of inhibitors in these complex biological materials that hamper detection. Here we use real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC to demonstrate CWD prions in both diluted and prion-enriched saliva samples from asymptomatic and symptomatic white-tailed deer. CWD prions were detected in 14 of 24 (58.3% diluted saliva samples from CWD-exposed white-tailed deer, including 9 of 14 asymptomatic animals (64.2%. In addition, a phosphotungstic acid enrichment enhanced the RT-QuIC assay sensitivity, enabling detection in 19 of 24 (79.1% of the above saliva samples. Bioassay in Tg[CerPrP] mice confirmed the presence of infectious prions in 2 of 2 RT-QuIC-positive saliva samples so examined. The modified RT-QuIC analysis described represents a non-invasive, rapid ante-mortem detection of prions in complex biologic fluids, excreta, or environmental samples as well as a tool for exploring prion trafficking, peripheralization, and dissemination.

  15. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR EMERGENCY WATER AND URINE SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-08-27

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Bioassay Lab participated in the 2008 NRIP Emergency Response program administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in May, 2008. A new rapid column separation method was used for analysis of actinides and {sup 90}Sr the NRIP 2008 emergency water and urine samples. Significant method improvements were applied to reduce analytical times. As a result, much faster analysis times were achieved, less than 3 hours for determination of {sup 90}Sr and 3-4 hours for actinides. This represents a 25%-33% improvement in analysis times from NRIP 2007 and a {approx}100% improvement compared to NRIP 2006 report times. Column flow rates were increased by a factor of two, with no significant adverse impact on the method performance. Larger sample aliquots, shorter count times, faster cerium fluoride microprecipitation and streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation were also employed. Based on initial feedback from NIST, the SRS Environmental Bioassay Lab had the most rapid analysis times for actinides and {sup 90}Sr analyses for NRIP 2008 emergency urine samples. High levels of potential matrix interferences may be present in emergency samples and rugged methods are essential. Extremely high levels of {sup 210}Po were found to have an adverse effect on the uranium results for the NRIP-08 urine samples, while uranium results for NRIP-08 water samples were not affected. This problem, which was not observed for NRIP-06 or NRIP-07 urine samples, was resolved by using an enhanced {sup 210}Po removal step, which will be described.

  16. All-plastic miniature fluorescence microscope for point-of-care readout of bead-based bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcucci, Alessandra; Pawlowski, Michal Emanuel; Crannell, Zachary; Pavlova, Ina; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2015-10-01

    A number of new platforms have been developed for multiplexed bioassays that rely on imaging targeted fluorescent beads labeled with different fluorescent dyes. We developed a compact, low-cost three-dimensional printed fluorescence microscope that can be used as a detector for mutiplexed, bead-based assays to support point-of-care applications. Images obtained with the microscope were analyzed to differentiate multiple analytes in a single sample with a comparable limit of detection to commercially available macroscopic assay platforms.

  17. Monitoring resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in the field by performing bioassays with each Cry toxin separately

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Tetreau

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti is increasingly used worldwide for mosquito control and is the only larvicide used in the French Rhône-Alpes region since decades. The artificial selection of mosquitoes with field-persistent Bti collected in breeding sites from this region led to a moderate level of resistance to Bti, but to relatively high levels of resistance to individual Bti Cry toxins. Based on this observation, we developed a bioassay procedure using each Bti Cry toxin separately to detect cryptic Bti-resistance evolving in field mosquito populations. Although no resistance to Bti was detected in none of the three mosquito species tested (Aedes rusticus, Aedes sticticus and Aedes vexans, an increased tolerance to Cry4Aa (3.5-fold and Cry11Aa toxins (8-fold was found in one Ae. sticticus population compared to other populations of the same species, suggesting that resistance to Bti may be arising in this population. This study confirms previous works showing a lack of Bti resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with this bioinsecticide. It also provides a first panorama of their susceptibility status to individual Bti Cry toxins. In combination with bioassays with Bti, bioassays with separate Cry toxins allow a more sensitive monitoring of Bti-resistance in the field.

  18. Bioassays with caged hyalella azteca to determine in situ toxicity downstream of two Saskatchewan, Canada, uranium operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Erin L; Liber, Karsten

    2007-11-01

    The main objectives of this in situ study were to evaluate the usefulness of an in situ bioassay to determine if downstream water bodies at the Key Lake and Rabbit Lake uranium operations (Saskatchewan, Canada) were toxic to Hyalella azteca and, if toxicity was observed, to differentiate between the contribution of surface water and sediment contamination to in situ toxicity. These objectives were achieved by performing 4-d in situ bioassays with laboratory-reared H. azteca confined in specially designed, paired, surface water and sediment exposure chambers. Results from the in situ bioassays revealed significant mortality, relative to the respective reference site, at the exposure sites at both Key Lake (p azteca at both operations, although this relationship was stronger at Key Lake. At Key Lake, the primary cause of aquatic toxicity to H. azteca did not appear to be correlated with the variables measured in this study, but most likely with a pulse of organic mill-process chemicals released during the time of the in situ study-a transient event that was caused by a problem with the mill's solvent extraction process. The suspected cause of in situ toxicity to H. azteca at Rabbit Lake was high levels of uranium in surface water, sediment, and pore water.

  19. Biological testing of sediment for the Olympia Harbor Navigation Improvement Project, 1988: Geoduck, amphipod, and echinoderm bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Antrim, L.D.

    1989-05-01

    The Olympia Harbor Navigation Improvement Project requires the dredging of approximately 330,000 cubic yards (cy) of sediment from the harbor entrance channel and 205,185 cy from the turning basin. Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA) partial characterization studies were used to plan a full sediment characterization in which chemical analyses and biological testing of sediments evaluated the suitability of the dredged material for unconfined, open-water disposal. The US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), Seattle District, contracted with NOAA/NMFS, Environmental Conservation Division, to perform the chemical analysis and Microtox bioassay tests, and with the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) in Sequim to perform flow-through solid-phase bioassays utilizing juvenile (8 to 10 mm) geoduck clams, Panopea generosa, and static solid phase bioassays using the phoxocephalid amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius, developing embryos and gametes of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and the larvae of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. When the results of the biological tests were evaluated under PSDDA guidelines, it was found that all the tested sediment treatments from Olympia Harbor are suitable for unconfined open-water disposal. 14 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Application of the yeast-based reporter gene bioassay for the assessment of estrogenic activity in cow's milk from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypuła-Trębas, Sylwia; Minta, Maria; Radko, Lidia; Żmudzki, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Milk contain compounds acting through the estrogen receptor signaling. The still open question whether such estrogens pose a risk for human health, encouraged us to measure the overall estrogenic activity of cow's milk in the in vitro yeast reporter bioassay. First, we assessed the ability of the bioassay to detect estrogens frequently detected in milk. The relative potencies of 16 compounds descended in the order: 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), 17α-ethinylestradiol, diethylstilbestrol, dienestrol, 17α-E2, estrone, zearalenone, estriol, equol, genistein, 17β-E2 glucuronide, bisphenol A, apigenin, daidzein. Flavone, 4-n-nonylphenol and 4-t-octylphenol shown no activity in the bioassay.The estrogenic activities of milk samples without hydrolysis were below the detection limit, whereas in 50% of the deconjugated samples they varied between 0.29 and 0.49 ng EEQ mL(-1). We also compared the estrogenic activity in raw cow's milk collected from rural and industrial locations in Poland. In our pilot study we did not observe statistically significant difference in estrogenic activities in milk collected from the two locations. We found that the daily intake of estrogens with milk may be higher than estrogen levels in human serum. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the significance of milk and dairy as a source of estrogens for humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.