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Sample records for rapid hispanic population

  1. High false-positive rate of human immunodeficiency virus rapid serum screening in a predominantly hispanic prenatal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Nikolaos M; Athanassaki, Ioanna D; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Gardner, Michael O

    2004-12-01

    To identify the characteristics of the gravidas delivering at our birthing center that place them at risk for false-positive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The medical records of all rapid HIV-ELISA-positive gravidas that delivered at our hospital between January 2000 and October 2001 were retrieved, and information was gathered regarding maternal demographics. The results of the Western blot tests were also retrieved and correlated to the ELISA results, across varying maternal characteristics. chi(2), Student's t-test and multivariate analysis were performed, as appropriate, using the SAS software; statistical significance was denoted by ppositive rapid HIV-ELISA out of 9,781 deliveries. Of those, 26 were confirmed as HIV infected by Western blot (overall HIV prevalence: 0.27%, ELISA-positive predictive value: 37.7%). The subgroup prevalence of HIV and positive predictive value of ELISA were 1.53 and 75% among Caucasians; 2.43 and 82.6% among African-Americans; and 0.05 and 9.8% among Hispanics, respectively (p or =5 lifetime) sexual partners was elicited in the majority of HIV-infected patients. The positive predictive value of rapid HIV-ELISA during pregnancy varies widely, depending on maternal race/ethnicity and sexual behavior. The routine disclosure of rapid intrapartum HIV serum screening results prior to Western blot confirmation should be avoided in very low-risk populations.

  2. Hispanic Population Growth and Rural Income Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, Emilio A.; Kandel, William A.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between Hispanic population growth and changes in U.S. rural income inequality from 1990 through 2000. Applying comparative approaches used for urban areas we disentangle Hispanic population growth's contribution to inequality by comparing and statistically modeling changes in the family income Gini coefficient across…

  3. Demographic Changes of Hispanic Populations and Hispanic Student Enrollment in Texas Community Colleges: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jack; Slate, John R.; Joyner, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    In this literature review, Hispanic demographic changes in the United States and in Texas are examined. Hispanics have accounted for large changes in population, population change, and proportion of population. Accordingly, the literature was reviewed regarding Hispanic immigrants, both authorized and non-authorized immigrants. The issue of…

  4. Mental status testing in elderly Hispanic populations: special concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahurin, R K; Espino, D V; Holifield, E B

    1992-01-01

    The rapid growth of the older Hispanic population highlights the importance of accurately assessing the mental status of these individuals. Although several community surveys have reported relatively higher rates of cognitive impairment among older Hispanics, closer analysis has revealed excessive false positives and the underestimation of cognitive functioning. Problems inherent in the mental status testing of this group include the lack of appropriately translated and culturally sensitive instrumentation, the diversity of the population, differences in their educational experiences, and bias in the test-taking situation. Commonly used neuropsychological test batteries have generally been neither translated nor normed for Hispanic subjects. To minimize cultural differences, cross-cultural tests have used nonverbal content; however, nonverbal testing does not, in itself, remove cultural bias. Alternative methods of testing that may reduce bias include performance-based assessment of everyday living skills and measurement of basic psychophysiological responses.

  5. Assessment of Acculturation in Hispanic Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Richard H.

    1996-01-01

    Describes acculturation measures for Hispanic Americans: Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans, Cultural Life Style Inventory, Bicultural/Multicultural Experience Inventory, Measure of Acculturation, and Bicultural Involvement Questionnaire. Discusses acculturation assessment issues: direct versus indirect measurement, potential…

  6. FastStats: Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or Alaska Native Population Health of Asian or Pacific Islander Population Health of Hispanic or Latino Population Health of Mexican American Population Health of White non-Hispanic Population ...

  7. Hispanic Women's Health Issues: Understanding A Mosaic Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G.; Cousins, Jennifer C.

    According to recent research, Hispanic women are a "mosaic" population, being characterized not only according to subethnic group (Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Spanish speakers from other countries) and social dimension (educational attainment, linguistic facilities, cultural and ethnic self-identification), but also…

  8. Epidemiology of hypertension from childhood to young adulthood in black, white, and Hispanic population samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Berenson, G. S.; Wattigney, W A; Webber, L. S.

    1996-01-01

    RESEARCHERS RECORDED BLOOD PRESSURE LEVELS of children and adolescents in the Bogalusa Heart Study (black and white populations) and in the Brooks Country Study (Hispanic population). Hispanic children had smaller stature, while whites and Hispanics tended to be fatter than blacks in childhood. In Bogalusa, black boys showed higher blood pressure levels. Hispanic girls showed lower systolic blood pressure than the other ethnic groups. In cultures with a high prevalence of hypertension, such a...

  9. Cancer risk disparities between hispanic and non-hispanic white populations: the role of exposure to indoor air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hun, Diana E; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Morandi, Maria T; Stock, Thomas H; Corsi, Richard L

    2009-12-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in the United States; however, minimal information is available on their cancer risks from exposures to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and how these risks compare to risks to non-Hispanic whites. We estimated the personal exposure and cancer risk of Hispanic and white adults who participated in the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study. We evaluated 12 of the sampled volatile organic compounds and carbonyls and identified the HAPs of most concern and their possible sources. Furthermore, we examined sociodemographic factors and building characteristics. Cumulative cancer risks (CCRs) estimated for Hispanics (median = 519 x 10(-6), 90th percentile = 3,968 x 10(-6)) and for whites (median = 443 x 10(-6), 90th percentile = 751 x 10(-6)) were much greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) benchmark of 10(-6). Cumulative risks were dominated by formaldehyde and p-dichlorobenzene (p-DCB) and, to a lesser extent, by acetaldehyde, chloroform, and benzene. Exposure to all of these compounds except benzene was primarily due to indoor residential sources. Hispanics had statistically higher CCRs than did whites (p whites. Cancer risks for pollutants emitted indoors increased in houses with lower ventilation rates. Hispanics appear to be disproportionately affected by certain HAPs from indoor and outdoor sources. Policies that aim to reduce risk from exposure to HAPs for the entire population and population subgroups should consider indoor air pollution.

  10. A genomewide admixture mapping panel for Hispanic/Latino populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xianyun; Bigham, Abigail W; Mei, Rui; Gutierrez, Gerardo; Weiss, Ken M; Brutsaert, Tom D; Leon-Velarde, Fabiola; Moore, Lorna G; Vargas, Enrique; McKeigue, Paul M; Shriver, Mark D; Parra, Esteban J

    2007-06-01

    Admixture mapping (AM) is a promising method for the identification of genetic risk factors for complex traits and diseases showing prevalence differences among populations. Efficient application of this method requires the use of a genomewide panel of ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) to infer the population of origin of chromosomal regions in admixed individuals. Genomewide AM panels with markers showing high frequency differences between West African and European populations are already available for disease-gene discovery in African Americans. However, no such a map is yet available for Hispanic/Latino populations, which are the result of two-way admixture between Native American and European populations or of three-way admixture of Native American, European, and West African populations. Here, we report a genomewide AM panel with 2,120 AIMs showing high frequency differences between Native American and European populations. The average intermarker genetic distance is ~1.7 cM. The panel was identified by genotyping, with the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K array, a population sample with European ancestry, a Mesoamerican sample comprising Maya and Nahua from Mexico, and a South American sample comprising Aymara/Quechua from Bolivia and Quechua from Peru. The main criteria for marker selection were both high information content for Native American/European ancestry (measured as the standardized variance of the allele frequencies, also known as "f value") and small frequency differences between the Mesoamerican and South American samples. This genomewide AM panel will make it possible to apply AM approaches in many admixed populations throughout the Americas.

  11. Epidemiology of hypertension from childhood to young adulthood in black, white, and Hispanic population samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, G S; Wattigney, W A; Webber, L S

    1996-01-01

    RESEARCHERS RECORDED BLOOD PRESSURE LEVELS of children and adolescents in the Bogalusa Heart Study (black and white populations) and in the Brooks Country Study (Hispanic population). Hispanic children had smaller stature, while whites and Hispanics tended to be fatter than blacks in childhood. In Bogalusa, black boys showed higher blood pressure levels. Hispanic girls showed lower systolic blood pressure than the other ethnic groups. In cultures with a high prevalence of hypertension, such as blacks in the United States, it is important to understand the effect of environmental factors like dietary intake and electrolytes and obesity on the control of hypertension. PMID:8898760

  12. Dyslipidemia in special populations: Asian Indians, African Americans, and Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vibhuti; Deedwania, Prakash

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, and certain population groups, such as South Asians, African Americans, and Hispanics, carry a disproportionately larger burden of CVD manifested as coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, and hypertension. Persons of these special populations experience approximately two- to threefold greater morbidity and mortality. Prevalence of risk factors, including dyslipidemia, overweight, and diabetes, is not only higher in these groups, but is also rising. The reasons for such disparity appear to be multifactorial and influenced by such factors as lifestyle, diet, culture, genetics, and suboptimal healthcare. Furthermore, because these minority populations are not significantly represented in major clinical trials, evidence-based management strategies for treatment and prevention of CVD are seriously lacking. Lately, however, several randomized trials of therapy for dyslipidemia to reduce cardiovascular events among these ethnic groups have been undertaken. Preliminary data suggest the need for stricter goals and increasingly aggressive therapy for these special populations, including administrative and educational interventions.

  13. Genetic basis of hearing loss in Spanish, Hispanic and Latino populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rahul; Patel, Amit P; Nguyen, Desiree; Pan, Debbie R; Jhaveri, Vasanti M; Rudman, Jason R; Dharmaraja, Arjuna; Yan, Denise; Feng, Yong; Chapagain, Prem; Lee, David J; Blanton, Susan H; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2018-03-20

    Hearing loss (HL) is the most common neurosensory disorder affecting humans. The screening, prevention and treatment of HL require a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Genetic predisposition is one of the most common factors that leads to HL. Most HL studies include few Spanish, Hispanic and Latino participants, leaving a critical gap in our understanding about the prevalence, impact, unmet health care needs, and genetic factors associated with hearing impairment among Spanish, Hispanic and Latino populations. The few studies which have been performed show that the gene variants commonly associated with HL in non-Spanish and non-Hispanic populations are infrequently responsible for hearing impairment in Spanish as well as Hispanic and Latino populations (hereafter referred to as Hispanic). To design effective screening tools to detect HL in Spanish and Hispanic populations, studies must be conducted to determine the gene variants that are most commonly associated with hearing impairment in this racial/ethnic group. In this review article, we summarize gene variants and loci associated with HL in Spanish and Hispanic populations. Identifying new genetic variants associated with HL in Spanish and Hispanic populations will pave the way to develop effective screening tools and therapeutic strategies for HL. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Problems from Alcohol Use in Two Hispanic Youth Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villas, Paul; Cardenas, Manuel

    The purpose of this study was to compare differences in alcohol use and associated problems between two Hispanic youth groups. The subjects, from two different southwest sites, were self-identified Hispanics. Seventh and 12th graders from a northern New Mexico (NNM) (N=64) school and from a school on the U.S.-Mexico border (USM) (N=88) were…

  15. A New Conceptual Framework for Mental Health Clinical Service Research on Hispanic Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, Lloyd H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This report examines selected studies on the search for and utilization of mental health facilities among Hispanic populations and presents a framework for research on mental health services for Hispanics. Shortcomings of available data on this topic are reviewed. The research framework proposed is based on the assumption that clinical service…

  16. Novel genetic loci identified for the pathophysiology of childhood obesity in the Hispanic population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic variants responsible for susceptibility to obesity and its comorbidities among Hispanic children have not been identified. The VIVA LA FAMILIA Study was designed to genetically map childhood obesity and associated biological processes in the Hispanic population. A genome-wide association stu...

  17. The Association between Body Mass Index and Sleep in a Predominantly Hispanic College Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benham, Grant

    2017-01-01

    An association between inadequate sleep and body mass index (BMI) has been demonstrated in previous studies, but there is a relative paucity of data from Latino/Hispanic populations. In the present study, 750 college students, 93% of whom were Hispanic, completed an online survey that included standardized measures of sleep quantity, sleep…

  18. Health status of Hispanic elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassford, T L

    1995-02-01

    Hispanic elders living in the United States compose a rapidly increasing population. They are underinsured and more likely to be living in poverty. Health care is hindered in this population by lower access to health services and less use of preventive services. Barriers to access are primarily socioeconomic. Acculturation exerts an effect, primarily through its association with language skills, employment, and education. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality for Hispanics, who have a higher prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. Although neoplasia is the second most frequent cause of death among Hispanics, as it is in whites who are not Hispanic, Hispanics have an overall lower cancer rate. Cancer rates are increasing, however. Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the Hispanic population, affecting nearly a quarter of adult Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans. Although higher prevalence of obesity in the Hispanic population accounts for some of this difference, some data suggest the possibility of a genetic component as well. Assessment of psychological health in Hispanic elders is impeded by the lack of instruments designed for this population. Distress is often expressed as somatic symptoms. Values traditional to Hispanic culture, such as respeto, allocentrism, and familialism, are important to US Hispanic elders, many of whom were born in rural Mexico. Our knowledge of determinants of healthy aging in this population is still preliminary, but rapidly expanding, in part, because of increased attention to ethnicity in health reporting.

  19. FastStats: Health of Hispanic or Latino Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Sinusitis Whooping Cough or Pertussis Family Life Marriage and Divorce Health Care and Insurance Access to ... Cause of Death Contribute to the Hispanic Mortality Advantage in the United States? Related Links Birth Data ...

  20. Differences in breast cancer stage at diagnosis between non-Hispanic white and Hispanic populations, San Diego County 1988-1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, J R; Delfino, R J; Taylor, T H; Howe, S; Anton-Culver, H

    1998-07-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in the U.S. is lower among Hispanic women than non-Hispanic white women. However, population-based studies show that Hispanic women are more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage than non-Hispanic whites. We aimed to determine whether: 1) a lower proportion of breast cancer was diagnosed at early vs. late stages in Hispanic compared to non-Hispanic white women from 1988-93 in San Diego County, and 2) lower income is related to later stage at diagnosis for both groups. All incident cases of breast cancer in San Diego County from the California Cancer Registry (10,161 cases) were stratified by 'early' (in situ or localized) or 'late' (regional or distant) stage, and by race/ethnicity. Annual average age-adjusted incidence rates/100,000 (AAIR) were calculated. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) (AAIR for early stages divided by AAIR for late stages) were used as a surrogate of early detection. AAIRs for early and late stage disease were significantly higher for non-Hispanic whites (89.3, 42.3) than Hispanic women (46.7, 27.2). The IRR was significantly higher for non-Hispanic whites than Hispanics, (2.11 vs 1.72, p = 0.01). This difference was greatest among women under 50 years old (IRR difference 0.63), and not apparent for women 65 or older (IRR difference 0.06). There was also an association between increasing census tract per capita income and higher rates of early stage disease among non-Hispanic whites but not Hispanics. Results suggest that Hispanic women and lower income women should be targeted for early detection.

  1. Controversies and evidence for cardiovascular disease in the diverse Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Palma M; Chandra, Venita; Escobar, Guillermo A; Robbins, Nicholas; Rowe, Vincent; Macsata, Robyn

    2017-09-23

    Hispanics account for approximately 17% of the U.S. They are one of the fastest growing racial/ethnic groups, second only to Asians. This heterogeneous population has diverse socioeconomic conditions, making the prevention, diagnosis, and management of vascular disease difficult. This paper discusses the cultural, racial, and social aspects of the Hispanic community in the United States and assesses how they affect vascular disease within this population. Furthermore, it explores risk factors, medical and surgical treatments, and outcomes of vascular disease in the Hispanic population; generational evolution of these conditions; and the phenomenon called the Hispanic paradox. A systematic search of the literature was performed to identify all English-language publications from 1991 to 2014 using PubMed, which draws from the National Institutes of Health and U.S. National Library of Medicine, with the words "cardiovascular disease," "prevalence," "vascular," and "Hispanic." An additional search was performed using "cardiovascular disease and Mexico," "cardiovascular disease and Cuba," "cardiovascular disease and Puerto Rico," and "cardiovascular disease and Latin America" as well as for complications, management, outcomes, surgery, vascular disease, and Hispanic paradox. The resulting publications were queried for generational data (spanning multiple well-defined age groups) regarding cardiovascular disease, and cross-references were obtained from their bibliographies. Results are segmented by country of origin. Compared with non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics face higher risks of cardiovascular diseases because of a high prevalence of high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic stroke. However, the incidence of peripheral arterial disease and carotid disease appears to be significantly lower than in whites. The Hispanic paradox (lower mortality in spite of higher cardiovascular risk factors) may relate to challenges in ascribing life expectancy and

  2. Impacts of Hispanic Population Growth on Rural Wages. Agricultural Economic Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Constance

    Although earnings generally increased in rural areas in the 1990s, Hispanic population growth led to lower wages for at least one segment of the rural population--workers with a high school degree (skilled workers), particularly men in this skill group. Using data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the Current Population Survey, this report…

  3. Sleep Health in U.S. Hispanic Population

    OpenAIRE

    Loredo, Jose S.; Soler, Xavier; Bardwell, Wayne; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Dimsdale, Joel E.; Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of sleep on health has only been recently recognized, and the general public and the medical community are not yet fully knowledgeable about this issue. The great majority of sleep research has been performed in whites of European descent and to a lesser extent in African Americans, making generalization of the findings to other ethnic and racial groups difficult. Very little sleep research has been done in U.S. Hispanics. However, based on the available literature and the high...

  4. Local Immigration Enforcement and Arrests of the Hispanic Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Coon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Section 287(g of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA, which was added to the INA by the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (IIRIRA, allows the federal government to enter into voluntary partnerships with state and local law enforcement agencies to enforce immigration law. Upon entering these agreements, law enforcement officers are trained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE and receive delegated authority to enquire about an individual’s immigration status and, if found to be removable, to detain the individual while ICE makes a determination of whether to initiate deportation proceedings. In some instances, this inquiry about immigration status takes place as part of the intake process when a criminal defendant is arrested and placed into a criminal jail. In other instances, task force officers are trained to inquire in the field about immigration status and enforce immigration law against people who have not committed any criminal offense.  The key difference between the two models is that task force agents can arrest for immigration violations undocumented individuals who have not committed any criminal offense, whereas in the jail model individuals must be arrested on some other criminal charge before immigration status can be determined. The 287(g program has raised several concerns regarding its implementation and results. First, the program could lead to racial and ethnic profiling. In particular, given that the majority of undocumented immigrants hail from Latin American countries, it is highly plausible that Hispanics, regardless of immigrant status, might be disproportionally affected by this program. That is, in a jurisdiction that participates in the jail model, an officer might arrest a Hispanic individual for a very minor offence in order to process them through the jail and determine their immigration status, when perhaps without the program they may have only issued a citation

  5. The Use of Social Media for Health Promotion in Hispanic Populations: A Scoping Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut-Beumler, Julia; Po'e, Eli; Barkin, Shari

    2016-07-11

    The Internet is an increasingly popular platform for public health interventions due to its distinct ability to communicate with, engage, and educate communities. Given the widespread use of the Internet, these interventions could be a means of equalizing access to information to address health disparities in minority populations, such as Hispanics. Hispanics are disproportionately affected by poor health outcomes, including obesity, diabetes, and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Although underserved and underrepresented, Hispanics are among the leading users of social media in the United States. Previous reviews have examined the use of social media in public health efforts, but, to our knowledge, none have focused on the Hispanic population. To conduct a scoping systematic review of the published literature to capture the ways social media has been used in health interventions aimed at Hispanic populations and identify gaps in existing knowledge to provide recommendations for future research. We performed a systematic review of the literature related to social media, public health, and Hispanics using the PubMed, PsycINFO, and EMBASE databases to locate peer-reviewed studies published between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2015. Each article was reviewed for the following inclusion criteria: social media as a main component of study methodology or content; public health topic; majority Hispanic/Latino study population; English or Spanish language; and original research study. Relevant data were extracted from articles meeting inclusion criteria including publication year, location, study design, social media platform, use of social media, target population, and public health topic. Of the 267 articles retrieved, a total of 27 unique articles met inclusion criteria. All were published in 2012 or later. The most common study design was a cross-sectional survey, which was featured in 10 of the 27 (37%) articles. All articles used

  6. Eptifibatide: gender related complications in a Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Guerrero, Pamela; Carrero Quiñones, Milton; Bredy, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common indications of Eptifibatide, a GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor, is non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) due to its great antiplatelet activity. The aim of this study was to find out if there are gender discrepancies when comparing complications in Hispanics treated th Eptifibatide. A cross-sectional study. 116 medical records with diagnosis ofNSTEMI managed with Eptifibatide during 2010-2012 were included. Bleeding, thrombocytopenia, new ischemia, anemia and death were variables compared. The most common complication was death. There were four cases of bleeding, all of them occurred in the female gender, reaching a statistically significant difference compared to male gender (p = 0.0173); 8% of patients had thrombocytopenia; 9% had new ischemia during hospitalization; 13% died; 19% of patients developed anemia including the four cases of bleeding. Bleeding occurred only in women, and this difference was statistically significant when compared to males. More studies emphasizing the differences in Eptifibatide complications by gender are needed. Furthermore, it would be important to compare these results to non-Hispanic women. The difference found in the other complications analyzed was not statistically significant.

  7. Association of acculturation and country of origin with self-reported hypertension and diabetes in a heterogeneous Hispanic population

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Fátima; Hicks LeRoi S; López Lenny

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Hispanics are the fasting growing population in the U.S. and disproportionately suffer from chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Little is known about the complex interplay between acculturation and chronic disease prevalence in the growing and increasingly diverse Hispanic population. We explored the association between diabetes and hypertension prevalence among distinct U.S. Hispanic subgroups by country of origin and by degree of acculturation. Methods We...

  8. Migrant Health: A Preliminary Report on the Incidence of Gestational Diabetes in a Hispanic Migrant Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the preliminary results of an attempt to screen pregnant Hispanic migrant farm workers for gestational diabetes. They are slightly more prone than the overall population of pregnant women to suffer from it. Provides recommendations for management of women with gestational diabetes, and describes how this is performed at the Indian Health…

  9. Health Education Research and Practice Literature on Hispanic Health Issues: Have We Lost Sight of the Largest Minority Population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics constitute the largest racial/ethnic minority population in the United States and are the fastest growing segment of the population. Knowledge about health needs and practices, effective health promotion programs, and health policy making for Hispanics has the potential to improve population health outcomes for this group. Continued research and practice literature will aid in accomplishing these objectives. However, little is known about the extent of health education-related literature available on Hispanic health issues. In this review, we analyzed research and practice publications in all health education-related journals to assess the volume of articles published on Hispanic health issues. We found that the portion of journal articles devoted to Hispanic health issues varied widely among the journals and that there was a very limited emphasis on Hispanic health-related issues. Journal editors and editorial board members may need to be more proactive in soliciting manuscripts on Hispanic health, and our practitioners may have to improve their professional skills and cultural competence in order to work with Hispanic populations to produce research and practice literature that is of adequate quantity and quality to help improve Hispanics' health. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  10. Cataract and barriers to cataract surgery in a US Hispanic population: Proyecto VER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman, Aimee Teo; Hafiz, Gulnar; Muñoz, Beatriz; Rodriguez, Jorge; Snyder, Robert; Klein, Ronald; West, Sheila K

    2005-09-01

    To report the prevalence of visually significant cataract and cataract surgery and to determine demographic and socioeconomic factors that influence use of cataract surgery in a US Hispanic population. Proyecto VER is a population-based study of Hispanic individuals, 40 years or older, living in southern Arizona. Visual acuity was measured monocularly, and a dilated ophthalmic examination was performed to determine lens opacities. Visually significant cataract was defined as severe levels of opacity and acuity worse than 20/40. Risk factors were compared between those who obtained cataract surgery in the past and those having visually significant cataract. A majority of the 4774 participants in this study were of Mexican descent; 2.8% had visually significant cataract and 5.1% had undergone bilateral cataract surgery. Among those currently or previously needing surgery, having medical insurance (odds ratio, 2.88; P<.001) and speaking English (odds ratio, 1.80; P = .04) were significantly associated with having obtained surgery in the past. Visually significant cataract appears to be high among US Hispanic individuals of Mexican descent, as evidenced by rates of cataract and cataract surgery. Language and financial barriers in this population impede access to surgery. Further work to remove these barriers and provide sight restoration is warranted among Hispanic individuals of Mexican descent living in the United States.

  11. Streptococcus bovis Bacteremia in Neonates in a Predominantly Hispanic Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YI eJIA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus bovis bacteremia has been associated with gastrointestinal diseases, especially colon cancer, neoplastic colon polyps and other malignancies of the GI tract in adults. Sporadic cases of S. bovis disease have also been reported in neonates and young infants. Although uncommon, S. bovis infection can cause fulminant neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Objectives: We report a series of pediatric patients with S. bovis bacteremia in a county hospital in a United States - Mexico border city in order to examine the demographic and clinical associations. Methods: We characterized the demographic and clinical features in all pediatric patients with blood cultures positive for S. bovis at University Medical Center in El Paso, Texas between January 2000 and December 2010. Hospital records were systematically reviewed by using a standardized protocol.Results: A total of 7 episodes of S. bovis bacteremia were documented in 7 pediatric patients (4 female and 3 male. Mean age was 1.2 days (range 1-3 days, all were Hispanic, average birth weight (3.25 kg. Mode of delivery was spontaneous vaginal delivery (5 and Caesarian section (2. All of our patients developed early (< 1 week onset disease and presented with signs of respiratory distress. Five out of 7 babies presented with abdominal distention and diarrhea. Six had clinical evidence of sepsis at presentation. Respiratory distress was the most common manifestation of sepsis (7. Aspiration pneumonia was diagnosed in 2 of them. Most patients were treated with a combination of antibiotics (6, either ampicillin and gentamicin or ampicillin and cefotaxime, and one with ampicillin alone. None of the pediatric patients had endoscopy and none of them died.Conclusions: S. bovis is considered an uncommon pathogen in the newborn, but can be associated with substantial morbidity and mortality if not identified and treated early. Physicians should be alert to the less common presentation of neonatal

  12. Weight-loss interventions for Hispanic populations: the role of culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Nangel M; Stevens, Victor J; Halperin, Ruben O

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, ethnic minorities are overrepresented among the overweight and obese population, with Hispanic individuals being among the groups most at risk for obesity and obesity-related disease and disability. Most weight-loss interventions designed for the general population have been less successful with individuals from ethnic minorities and there is a pressing need to develop more effective interventions for these groups. This paper examines the importance of culture in the development of "culturally competent" weight-loss interventions for ethnic minority populations, and discusses specific culturally mediated factors that should be considered in the design and implementation of treatment interventions. While specifically focusing on Hispanic populations, we also address issues of relevance to other multiethnic societies.

  13. Factors which affect use of breast conservation and mastectomy in an underinsured Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen-Deeter, Lyndsay; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Nodora, Jesse N; Bouton, Marcia E; Nalagan, Justin; Martinez, Maria Elena; Komenaka, Ian K

    2014-12-01

    Despite no difference in overall survival between breast conservation and mastectomy, significant variation exists between institutions and within populations. Less data exists about racial and ethnic minority populations. The current study was performed to evaluate variables that affect use of breast conservation and mastectomy in an underinsured Hispanic population. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who self-identified as of Hispanic ethnicity and underwent breast cancer operations from July 2001 to February 2011 at a safety net hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment variables were evaluated. All patients with documented contraindications to breast conservation were excluded. Univariate analysis and multivariate analysis were performed to identify variables which were associated with type of operation. The average age of the 219 patients included was 50 years. Most of the patients (93%) were insured with Medicaid or uninsured and 59% presented with clinical stage 2A/B cancers. Mastectomy was performed in 33% of patients and 67% had breast conservation. In adjusted multivariate analysis higher pathologic stage (p=0.01) and English speakers (p=0.03) were associated with mastectomy. By contrast, higher BMI (p=0.03) and use of preoperative chemotherapy (p=0.01) were associated with breast conservation. In this underinsured Hispanic population, patients with higher pathologic stage and English speaking patients were more likely to undergo mastectomy. Patients who underwent preoperative chemotherapy and who had higher BMI were more likely to undergo breast conservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of anemia in a Hispanic population with decompensated congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río-Santiago, Valentín; Santiago-Trinidad, Ricardo; Espinell-González, Nelson; Valentín-Nieves, Julio; Giugliano, Robert P; Rodriguez-Ospina, Luis; Vicenty-Rivera, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Anemia in patients with heart failure (HF is a frequent event, commonly associated with worse prognosis. Despite the high incidence and adverse outcomes associated with anemia no studies have been conducted amongst Hispanics with HF. The study aims to determine the prevalence, predictors and outcomes of anemia in Hispanics admitted to Veteran Affairs Caribbean Healthcare System with diagnosis of Decompensated Congestive Heart Failure (D-CHF). Retrospective review of 617 patient medical charts that had been previously discharged with a diagnosis of HF as per International Classification of Diseases-9 code. The clinical, demographic, laboratory and echocardiographic data was assessed for a total of 148 male patient electronic medical records that met the study inclusion criteria. The re-hospitalization and mortality rates were determined from the admission date until April 2010. The burden of anemia with HF is substantial, with anemia present in 68.2% of patients. Anemia was associated with hypoalbuminemia, higher New York Heart Association classification, elevated pro-BNP level at discharge, renal insufficiency and diastolic dysfunction, all of which demonstrated statistical significance. Anemia had 2.18 and 2.95 times likelihood of any-cause mortality (p = 0.003) and cardiovascular deaths (p = 0.02) when compared with HF patients without anemia. Anemia is a very frequent and serious finding in patients with D-CHF. The study reveals a higher prevalence of anemia in HF patients among Hispanics in comparison with formerly reported studies covering non-Hispanic populations.

  15. Trends in Hispanic Teen Births: Differences across States. Research Brief. Publication #2007-22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzetta, Kerry; Schelar, Erin; Manlove, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Hispanics represent one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. population, and this rapid growth is projected to be even more dramatic for Hispanic teens. The number of Hispanic teens is projected to increase by 50 percent by 2025, even though the total teen population is expected to increase by only 6 percent in the same time period.…

  16. The spatial dynamics of stratification: metropolitan context, population redistribution, and black and Hispanic homeownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippen, Chenoa A

    2010-11-01

    Racial and ethnic inequality in homeownership remains stubbornly wide, even net of differences across groups in household-level sociodemographic characteristics. This article investigates the role of contextual forces in structuring disparate access to homeownership among minorities. Specifically, I combine household- and metropolitan-level census data to assess the impact of metropolitan housing stock, minority composition, and residential segregation on black and Hispanic housing tenure. The measure of minority composition combines both the size and rate of growth of the coethnic population to assess the impact on homeownership inequality of recent trends in population redistribution, particularly the increase in black migration to the South and dramatic dispersal of Hispanics outside traditional areas of settlement. Results indicate remarkable similarity between blacks and Hispanics with respect to the spatial and contextual influences on homeownership. For both groups, homeownership is higher and inequality with whites is smaller in metropolitan areas with an established coethnic base and in areas in which their group is less residentially segregated. Implications of recent trends in population redistribution for the future of minority homeownership are discussed.

  17. Survey of oral health practices among adults in a North Carolina Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Mariola; Overman, Vickie P; Frasier, Pamela Y; Platin, Enrique

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect baseline data pertaining to the oral health of Hispanics residing in Siler City, NC, a microcosm of the flourishing Latino growth found especially in the southeastern United States. A convenience sample of 158 Hispanic adults was recruited. A 41-item Spanish language survey was utilized. Questions addressed preventive oral health practices, oral health knowledge and beliefs, perceived needs, and demographic information. Analysis of data were conducted to find demographic characteristics, frequencies, and correlations. The following associations were found statistically significant (p clinical rotations to provide culturally diverse dental hygiene services; 4) changes should be made in North Carolina dental hygiene practice laws to increase care to underserved population.

  18. The prevalence of glaucoma in a population-based study of Hispanic subjects: Proyecto VER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, H A; West, S K; Rodriguez, J; Munoz, B; Klein, R; Snyder, R

    2001-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of glaucoma in a population-based sample of Hispanic adults older than 40 years. Using 1990 census data for Arizona, groups of persons living in sections of the city in Nogales and Tucson were randomly selected with a probability proportional to the Hispanic population older than 40 years. We tried to recruit all eligible adults in homes with 1 self-described Hispanic adult. Detailed ocular examinations at a local clinic included visual acuity testing, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, an optic disc evaluation, and a threshold visual field test. Open-angle glaucoma (OAG) was defined using a proposed international system for prevalence surveys, including threshold visual field defect and optic disc damage. Angle-closure glaucoma was defined as bilateral appositional angle closure, combined with optic nerve damage (judged by field and disc as for OAG). Examinations were conducted in 72% (4774/6658) of eligible persons, with a 1.97% prevalence (95% confidence interval, 1.58%-2.36%) of OAG (94 persons). The age-specific OAG prevalence increased nonlinearly from 0.50% in those aged 41 to 49 years to 12.63% in those 80 years and older. Angle-closure glaucoma was detected in 5 persons (0.10%). Sex, blood pressure, and cigarette smoking were not significant OAG risk factors. Only 36 (38%) of the 94 persons with OAG were aware of their OAG before the study. Screening results with an intraocular pressure higher than 22 mm Hg (in the eye with a higher pressure) would miss 80% of the OAG cases. The prevalence of OAG in Hispanic persons was intermediate between reported values for white and black persons. The prevalence increased more quickly with increasing age than in other ethnic groups. Glaucoma was the leading cause of bilateral blindness.

  19. Evaluation of hospice care by family members of Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkendall, Abbie; Holland, Jason M; Keene, Jennifer R; Luna, Nora

    2015-05-01

    The Hispanic older adult population is increasing rapidly and past research suggests that this demographic group underutilizes hospice services, highlighting the need to improve our understanding of their needs in end of life. This study relied upon information from the family evaluation of hospice care survey provided by 2980 caregivers, 152 of whom cared for a Hispanic patient and 2828 who cared for a non-Hispanic patient. Caregivers of Hispanic patients were more likely to report that hospice was inconsistent with the patient's wishes, and that they received more attention than desired for emotional issues. Caregivers of Hispanic patients were also more likely to express that emotional/spiritual forms of support were insufficient. Similar levels of satisfaction were reported for caregivers of Hispanics and non-Hispanics regarding dignity/respect, information received, care coordination, and overall satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Hispanic Demographics: Looking Ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Emily G.

    This paper provides an overview of the current socioeconomic characteristics of Hispanics in the United States, and suggests factors of particular significance in projecting future Hispanic demographics and their implications for the Hispanic community and the broader American population. Hispanics are the second largest minority group and more…

  1. Association of passive and active smoking with pre-diabetes risk in a predominantly Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucheli, Jose R; Manshad, Ahmad; Ehrhart, Mark D; Camacho, Jenny; Burge, Mark R

    2017-02-01

    Smoking is the leading cause of avoidable death and is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Previous studies on the impact of passive smoking have not been applied to a Hispanic-majority population. We investigated the association between active smoking, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), and pre-diabetes risk in a New Mexico population. We hypothesized that pre-diabetes risk increases with increasing smoking status after adjustment for important covariates. We screened 219 adults from an ongoing study who were categorized according to their smoking status (never smoker, current smoker, previous smoker) and their exposure to ETS (exposed or unexposed). Glucose homeostasis status was assigned using A1c: no diabetes (A1c 6.4%). Among 160 patients with complete data, 51.6% had no diabetes and 48.4% had pre-diabetes. The mean age was 44.8±13.5 years. The study population was predominantly female (64.4%), and the ethnic composition was 44.4% Hispanic, 39.4% non-Hispanic White (NHW), 10.6% American Indian, 2.5% African-American, and 3.1% other. Using a logistic model with 2-way interactions, all predicted probabilities for being at risk for pre-diabetes were significant at the 0.001 level for smoking status and ETS exposure after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, family history of diabetes, alcohol consumption, BMI, and blood pressure. Active or passive smoking is independently associated with pre-diabetes risk. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  2. Social and Health Correlates of Sleep Duration in a US Hispanic Population: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay R; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Castañeda, Sheila F; Dudley, Katherine A; Gallo, Linda C; Hernandez, Rosalba; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Penedo, Frank J; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Ramos, Alberto R; Redline, Susan; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-10-01

    To define the prevalence of poor sleep patterns in the US Hispanic/Latino population, identify sociodemographic and psychosocial predictors of short and long sleep duration, and the association between sleep and cardiometabolic outcomes. Cross-sectional analysis. Community-based study. Adults age 18-74 y free of sleep disorders (n = 11,860) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos baseline examination (2008-2011). N/A. The mean self-reported sleep duration was 8.0 h per night with 18.6% sleeping less than 7 h and 20.1% sleeping more than 9 h in age- and sex-adjusted analyses. Short sleep was most common in individuals of Puerto Rican heritage (25.6%) and the Other Hispanic group (27.4%). Full-time employment, low level of education, and depressive symptoms were independent predictors of short sleep, whereas unemployment, low household income, low level of education, and being born in the mainland US were independent predictors of long sleep. After accounting for sociodemographic differences, short sleep remained significantly associated with obesity with an odds ratio of 1.29 [95% confidence interval 1.12-1.49] but not with diabetes, hypertension, or heart disease. In contrast, long sleep was not associated with any of these conditions. Sleep duration is highly variable among US Hispanic/Latinos, varying by Hispanic/Latino heritage as well as socioeconomic status. These differences may have health consequences given associations between sleep duration and cardiometabolic disease, particularly obesity. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Population priorities: the challenge of continued rapid population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Adair

    2009-10-27

    Rapid population growth continues in the least developed countries. The revisionist case that rapid population could be overcome by technology, that population density was advantageous, that capital shallowing is not a vital concern and that empirical investigations had not proved a correlation between high population growth and low per capita income was both empirically and theoretically flawed. In the modern world, population density does not play the role it did in nineteenth-century Europe and rates of growth in some of today's least developed nations are four times than those in nineteenth-century Europe, and without major accumulation of capital per capita, no major economy has or is likely to make the low- to middle-income transition. Though not sufficient, capital accumulation for growth is absolutely essential to economic growth. While there are good reasons for objecting to the enforced nature of the Chinese one-child policy, we should not underestimate the positive impact which that policy has almost certainly had and will have over the next several decades on Chinese economic performance. And a valid reticence about telling developing countries that they must contain fertility should not lead us to underestimate the severely adverse impact of high fertility rates on the economic performance and prospects of many countries in Africa and the Middle East.

  4. Association of acculturation and country of origin with self-reported hypertension and diabetes in a heterogeneous Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Fátima; Hicks, LeRoi S; López, Lenny

    2012-09-11

    Hispanics are the fasting growing population in the U.S. and disproportionately suffer from chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Little is known about the complex interplay between acculturation and chronic disease prevalence in the growing and increasingly diverse Hispanic population. We explored the association between diabetes and hypertension prevalence among distinct U.S. Hispanic subgroups by country of origin and by degree of acculturation. We examined the adult participants in the 2001, 2003, 2005, and 2007 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). Using weighted logistic regression stratified by nativity, we measured the association between country of origin and self-reported hypertension and diabetes adjusting for participants' demographics, insurance status, socio-economic status and degree of acculturation measured by citizenship, English language proficiency and the number of years of residence in the U.S. There were 33,633 self-identified Hispanics (foreign-born: 19,988; U.S.-born: 13,645). After multivariable adjustment, we found significant heterogeneity in self-reported hypertension and diabetes prevalence among Hispanic subgroups. Increasing years of U.S. residence was associated with increased disease prevalence. Among all foreign-born subgroups, only Mexicans reported lower odds of hypertension after adjustment for socioeconomic and acculturation factors. Both U.S.-born and foreign-born Mexicans had higher rates of diabetes as compared to non-Hispanic whites. We found significant heterogeneity among Hispanics in self-reported rates of hypertension and diabetes by acculturation and country of origin. Our findings highlight the importance of disaggregation of Hispanics by country of origin and acculturation factors whenever possible.

  5. Association of acculturation and country of origin with self-reported hypertension and diabetes in a heterogeneous Hispanic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez Fátima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hispanics are the fasting growing population in the U.S. and disproportionately suffer from chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Little is known about the complex interplay between acculturation and chronic disease prevalence in the growing and increasingly diverse Hispanic population. We explored the association between diabetes and hypertension prevalence among distinct U.S. Hispanic subgroups by country of origin and by degree of acculturation. Methods We examined the adult participants in the 2001, 2003, 2005, and 2007 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS. Using weighted logistic regression stratified by nativity, we measured the association between country of origin and self-reported hypertension and diabetes adjusting for participants’ demographics, insurance status, socio-economic status and degree of acculturation measured by citizenship, English language proficiency and the number of years of residence in the U.S. Results There were 33,633 self-identified Hispanics (foreign-born: 19,988; U.S.-born: 13,645. After multivariable adjustment, we found significant heterogeneity in self-reported hypertension and diabetes prevalence among Hispanic subgroups. Increasing years of U.S. residence was associated with increased disease prevalence. Among all foreign-born subgroups, only Mexicans reported lower odds of hypertension after adjustment for socioeconomic and acculturation factors. Both U.S.-born and foreign-born Mexicans had higher rates of diabetes as compared to non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions We found significant heterogeneity among Hispanics in self-reported rates of hypertension and diabetes by acculturation and country of origin. Our findings highlight the importance of disaggregation of Hispanics by country of origin and acculturation factors whenever possible.

  6. Validating an electronic health literacy scale in an older hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, Judith; Nokes, Kathleen M

    2017-09-01

    To examine the validity of the Spanish version of an instrument used to measure electronic health literacy (eHEALS) with an older Hispanic population from a number of Spanish-language countries living in New York City in the United States (US). Although the Internet is available globally, complex skills are needed to use this source of valuable health-related information effectively. Electronic health literacy is a multifactorial concept that includes health literacy but also requires technology skills. Cross-sectional. Recruitment occurred at a Senior Organization located in a largely Hispanic neighbourhood in New York City (N = 100). Participants completed eHEALS and selected items from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) which assesses how adults use different communication channels, including the Internet, to obtain vital health information. Data from the US HINTS sample (N = 162) were matched to the Senior Organization sample on age range and Hispanic ethnicity. The average Senior Organization participant was 68 years old, female, born in one of six different Spanish-language countries, and completed high school while the average HINTS participant was 67 years old, female and had high school or less education. Although there was no relationship with the two HINTS subscales and electronic health literacy, there were significant relationships between electronic health literacy and health status and confidence in self-care. Inadequate electronic health literacy is a barrier to positive health outcomes. The Spanish version of eHEALS could be used as a screening instrument to identify gaps and tailored interventions could be developed to increase consumer confidence in using the Internet for reliable health-related information. Knowledge in self-management is related to positive health outcomes; all persons irrespective of their electronic health literacy should be able to use all sources of health information to enhance their self-care.

  7. Obesity and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Obesity Obesity and Hispanic Americans Among Mexican American women, 77 ... youthonline . [Accessed 08/18/2017] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY People who are overweight are more likely to ...

  8. Outcomes of combined trabecular micro-bypass and phacoemulsification in a predominantly Hispanic patient population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallardo MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mark J Gallardo,1,2 Richard A Supnet,1 Jane Ellen Giamporcaro,3 Dana M Hornbeak3 1El Paso Eye Surgeons, PA, El Paso, 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 3Division of Clinical Research and Medical Affairs, Glaukos Corporation, Laguna Hills, CA, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate intraocular pressure (IOP and topical ocular hypotensive medication burden at 12 months postoperatively in a predominantly Hispanic patient population with primary open-angle glaucoma each implanted with one trabecular micro-bypass stent during cataract surgery.Methods: This was a retrospective, consecutive case series. The main objective was to assess reduction of IOP and/or medication burden in all eyes at the 12-month postoperative exam. A secondary objective was to assess outcomes in 3 subgroups, distinguished preoperatively by IOP control and by medication burden (suboptimal or maximum therapy and with different treatment goals. Group 1 had medication-controlled IOP and goal to reduce medications while maintaining IOP control (n=65; Group 2 had uncontrolled IOP on ≤2 medications and goal to reduce IOP and maintain/reduce medication burden (n=31; and Group 3 had uncontrolled IOP on ≥3 medications and goal to reduce IOP and avoid filtering surgery (n=38. Evaluations included IOP, medication use, cup-to-disc ratio, visual fields, complications, and interventions. One hundred subjects (134 eyes have been followed for 12 months.Results: Most patients (80% were Hispanic and had moderate or severe glaucoma (87%. At 12 months, mean IOP reduced to 12.9 mmHg vs 16.5 mmHg preoperatively; 92% had an IOP ≤15 mmHg at 12 months (99% had ≤18 mmHg. Mean medication burden had decreased to 0.9 vs 2.3 preoperatively. At the 12-month time point, 94% of all eyes achieved their predefined treatment goal of reduced IOP and/or medications. Reductions in medication burden for Group 1, and

  9. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Hispanics

    OpenAIRE

    Brehm, John M.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2007-01-01

    Hispanics are individuals whose ancestry can be traced to Spain and/or areas previously under Spanish control (e.g., Mexico, Puerto Rico). They are a rapidly growing subset of the population of the United States and are quite diverse in their racial ancestry, country of origin, area of residence, socioeconomic status, tobacco use, and access to health care. Current evidence suggests that the prevalence and morbidity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) vary widely among Hispanic-Am...

  10. Boosting Hispanic College Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurantz, Oded; Hurwitz, Michael; Smith, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Helping raise the Hispanic college graduation rate is an urgent goal, given the persistently high rate of poverty among Hispanic families, growth of the Hispanic population to account for one in five college-age Americans, and mounting concerns about racial and economic inequality. The question is, how? One potential strategy involves helping high…

  11. Gene-centric meta-analysis of lipid traits in African, East Asian and Hispanic populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara C Elbers

    Full Text Available Meta-analyses of European populations has successfully identified genetic variants in over 100 loci associated with lipid levels, but our knowledge in other ethnicities remains limited. To address this, we performed dense genotyping of ∼2,000 candidate genes in 7,657 African Americans, 1,315 Hispanics and 841 East Asians, using the IBC array, a custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array. Meta-analyses confirmed 16 lipid loci previously established in European populations at genome-wide significance level, and found multiple independent association signals within these lipid loci. Initial discovery and in silico follow-up in 7,000 additional African American samples, confirmed two novel loci: rs5030359 within ICAM1 is associated with total cholesterol (TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C (p = 8.8×10(-7 and p = 1.5×10(-6 respectively and a nonsense mutation rs3211938 within CD36 is associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels (p = 13.5×10(-12. The rs3211938-G allele, which is nearly absent in European and Asian populations, has been previously found to be associated with CD36 deficiency and shows a signature of selection in Africans and African Americans. Finally, we have evaluated the effect of SNPs established in European populations on lipid levels in multi-ethnic populations and show that most known lipid association signals span across ethnicities. However, differences between populations, especially differences in allele frequency, can be leveraged to identify novel signals, as shown by the discovery of ICAM1 and CD36 in the current report.

  12. Psychometric properties of the 25-item NEI-VFQ in a Hispanic population: Proyecto VER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman, A T; Munoz, B; West, S K; Rodriguez, J; Sanchez, R; Snyder, R; Klein, R

    2001-03-01

    To assess the psychometric properties of the NEI-VFQ-25 in a population-based study of older Hispanic persons living in the United States, explore other demographic factors that affect participant response, and observe the comparability of the Spanish and English versions of the instrument. A sample of randomly selected block groups in Tucson and Nogales, Arizona, were selected for study. Participants were interviewed at home; a majority of the interviews were conducted in Spanish. The home interview included questions from the NEI-VFQ-25 and HHANES: Presenting acuity was done using ETDRS methodology, followed by a standardized eye examination by an ophthalmologist. The authors analyzed the internal consistency of the NEI-VFQ-25 responses using Cronbach's alpha coefficient and the construct validity by assessing the relationship between presenting acuity and scale scores, adjusting for age and gender. A second model was also explored to determine whether other demographic variables affected scale scores; differences in reporting between the Spanish and English versions was observed in this model, used in a subset of the population that minimized interviewer effect. Of the 4774 participants in the study, 99.7% had completed questionnaires, not completed by proxy. The highest nonresponse rate occurred in the Driving scale, with 25% of participants not driving for reasons other than problems with vision. Internal consistency was high, with Cronbach alpha ranging between 0.65 and 0.86 for scales with multiple items. Adjusting for age and gender, those with presenting acuity worse than 20/40 scored significantly lower than those with presenting acuity 20/40 or better, for all scales. The demographic variables with the most consistent association across the NEI-VFQ-25 scales were presenting acuity, income, and gender. No significant differences in reporting were found between the Spanish and English versions of the questionnaire in the subset of the population. In this

  13. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  14. Mexican Americans and frailty: findings from the Hispanic established populations epidemiologic studies of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Graham, James E; Al Snih, Soham; Raji, Mukaila; Samper-Ternent, Rafael; Ostir, Glenn V; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2009-04-01

    We examined the prevalence of frailty among Mexican American older adults and explored the correlates associated with becoming frail to determine their affect on disability and morbidity in this population. We studied the trajectory of frailty over 10 years in 2049 Mexican Americans participating in the Hispanic Established Populations Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly. We constructed a frailty index based on weight loss, exhaustion, grip strength, walking speed, and physical activity and collected data on sociodemographic and health status, comorbidities, and functional measures of performance. The sample was 58% female, with a mean age of 74.43 years (SD = 6.04) at baseline. Fifty-five percent of participants at baseline and 75% of the surviving sample at follow-up (n = 777) were classified as prefrail or frail. Of persons identified as frail at baseline, 84% died by the end of follow-up. Baseline age, diabetes, arthritis, smoking status, body mass index, cognition, negative affect, and number of comorbid conditions were predictors of frailty at follow-up (R(2) = 0.29; P ways to reduce the number of Mexican American older adults who become frail and disabled and therefore lose their independence is needed. Future studies should continue to examine the trajectory of frailty as a dynamic process that includes psychosocial and cognitive components.

  15. A Population-Based Study of Job Stress in Mexican Americans, Non-Hispanic Blacks, and Non-Hispanic Whites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Norma; Franzini, Luisa; Freeman, Daniel H.; Ju, Hyunsu; Peek, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    There is little known about the association between socioeconomic status and job stress in Mexican Americans. To address this issue, data were originated on a community level using personal interviews from working Mexican Americans using a multistage probability sample. In this study we described the population's sociodemographic characteristics,…

  16. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in a population-based sample of Hispanic people in Arizona: Proyecto VER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Beatriz; Klein, Ronald; Rodriguez, Jorge; Snyder, Robert; West, Sheila K

    2005-11-01

    To report the prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a population-based sample of Hispanic individuals aged 50 years and older. Proyecto VER (Vision and Eye Research) is a population-based study of blindness and visual impairment of Hispanic people in Arizona. Participants underwent complete ophthalmic evaluation, including stereoscopic fundus photography of fields 1, 2, and 4. All photographs for participants aged 50 years and older were graded using the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading system. The following signs were graded: drusen size, drusen type, and the area covered by drusen; pigmentary abnormalities; geographic atrophy; and exudative AMD. Sixty-seven percent (3178) of the original 4774 participants were 50 years of age or older. Of those, 92% (2928) had fundus photographs in at least 1 eye, and 95% (2780) of the photographs were of sufficient quality to grade early and late AMD. The overall prevalence of late AMD was 0.5%. The prevalence increased from 0.1% in the 50- to 59-year age group to 4.3% in the group aged 80 years and older. Likewise, early AMD was strongly associated with age with a prevalence of 20% in the 50- to 59-year age group, increasing to 54% in the group aged 80 years and older. The prevalence of early AMD in Hispanic people was significantly higher than the reported prevalence in the white population. However, the prevalence of late AMD was lower than the estimates for the white population of the United States. Although early macular changes were very common among Hispanic people, the prevalence of late AMD was infrequent. Further work is necessary to understand the underlying reasons for the different patterns of presentation of early and late signs of AMD among racial/ethnic groups and to characterize early AMD based on predictive value for severe disease in different populations.

  17. Novel genetic loci identified for the pathophysiology of childhood obesity in the Hispanic population.

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    Anthony G Comuzzie

    Full Text Available Genetic variants responsible for susceptibility to obesity and its comorbidities among Hispanic children have not been identified. The VIVA LA FAMILIA Study was designed to genetically map childhood obesity and associated biological processes in the Hispanic population. A genome-wide association study (GWAS entailed genotyping 1.1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs using the Illumina Infinium technology in 815 children. Measured genotype analysis was performed between genetic markers and obesity-related traits i.e., anthropometry, body composition, growth, metabolites, hormones, inflammation, diet, energy expenditure, substrate utilization and physical activity. Identified genome-wide significant loci: 1 corroborated genes implicated in other studies (MTNR1B, ZNF259/APOA5, XPA/FOXE1 (TTF-2, DARC, CCR3, ABO; 2 localized novel genes in plausible biological pathways (PCSK2, ARHGAP11A, CHRNA3; and 3 revealed novel genes with unknown function in obesity pathogenesis (MATK, COL4A1. Salient findings include a nonsynonymous SNP (rs1056513 in INADL (p = 1.2E-07 for weight; an intronic variant in MTNR1B associated with fasting glucose (p = 3.7E-08; variants in the APOA5-ZNF259 region associated with triglycerides (p = 2.5-4.8E-08; an intronic variant in PCSK2 associated with total antioxidants (p = 7.6E-08; a block of 23 SNPs in XPA/FOXE1 (TTF-2 associated with serum TSH (p = 5.5E-08 to 1.0E-09; a nonsynonymous SNP (p = 1.3E-21, an intronic SNP (p = 3.6E-13 in DARC identified for MCP-1; an intronic variant in ARHGAP11A associated with sleep duration (p = 5.0E-08; and, after adjusting for body weight, variants in MATK for total energy expenditure (p = 2.7E-08 and in CHRNA3 for sleeping energy expenditure (p = 6.0E-08. Unprecedented phenotyping and high-density SNP genotyping enabled localization of novel genetic loci associated with the pathophysiology of childhood obesity.

  18. A community based participatory approach to improving health in a Hispanic population

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    Urquieta de Hernandez Brisa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Charlotte-Mecklenburg region has one of the fastest growing Hispanic communities in the country. This population has experienced disparities in health outcomes and diminished ability to access healthcare services. This city is home to an established practice-based research network (PBRN that includes community representatives, health services researchers, and primary care providers. The aims of this project are: to use key principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR within a practice-based research network (PBRN to identify a single disease or condition that negatively affects the Charlotte Hispanic community; to develop a community-based intervention that positively impacts the chosen condition and improves overall community health; and to disseminate findings to all stakeholders. Methods/design This project is designed as CBPR. The CBPR process creates new social networks and connections between participants that can potentially alter patterns of healthcare utilization and other health-related behaviors. The first step is the development of equitable partnerships between community representatives, providers, and researchers. This process is central to the CBPR process and will occur at three levels -- community members trained as researchers and outreach workers, a community advisory board (CAB, and a community forum. Qualitative data on health issues facing the community -- and possible solutions -- will be collected at all three levels through focus groups, key informant interviews and surveys. The CAB will meet monthly to guide the project and oversee data collection, data analysis, participant recruitment, implementation of the community forum, and intervention deployment. The selection of the health condition and framework for the intervention will occur at the level of a community-wide forum. Outcomes of the study will be measured using indicators developed by the participants as well as geospatial

  19. Reproducibility of a Standardized Actigraphy Scoring Algorithm for Sleep in a US Hispanic/Latino Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay R.; Weng, Jia; Rueschman, Michael; Dudley, Katherine A.; Loredo, Jose S.; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Ramirez, Maricelle; Ramos, Alberto R.; Reid, Kathryn; Seiger, Ashley N.; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Zee, Phyllis C.; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: While actigraphy is considered objective, the process of setting rest intervals to calculate sleep variables is subjective. We sought to evaluate the reproducibility of actigraphy-derived measures of sleep using a standardized algorithm for setting rest intervals. Design: Observational study. Setting: Community-based. Participants: A random sample of 50 adults aged 18–64 years free of severe sleep apnea participating in the Sueño sleep ancillary study to the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Participants underwent 7 days of continuous wrist actigraphy and completed daily sleep diaries. Studies were scored twice by each of two scorers. Rest intervals were set using a standardized hierarchical approach based on event marker, diary, light, and activity data. Sleep/wake status was then determined for each 30-sec epoch using a validated algorithm, and this was used to generate 11 variables: mean nightly sleep duration, nap duration, 24-h sleep duration, sleep latency, sleep maintenance efficiency, sleep fragmentation index, sleep onset time, sleep offset time, sleep midpoint time, standard deviation of sleep duration, and standard deviation of sleep midpoint. Intra-scorer intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were high, ranging from 0.911 to 0.995 across all 11 variables. Similarly, inter-scorer ICCs were high, also ranging from 0.911 to 0.995, and mean inter-scorer differences were small. Bland-Altman plots did not reveal any systematic disagreement in scoring. Conclusions: With use of a standardized algorithm to set rest intervals, scoring of actigraphy for the purpose of generating a wide array of sleep variables is highly reproducible. Citation: Patel SR, Weng J, Rueschman M, Dudley KA, Loredo JS, Mossavar-Rahmani Y, Ramirez M, Ramos AR, Reid K, Seiger AN, Sotres-Alvarez D, Zee PC, Wang R. Reproducibility of a standardized actigraphy scoring algorithm for sleep in a US Hispanic

  20. Novel genetic loci identified for the pathophysiology of childhood obesity in the Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comuzzie, Anthony G; Cole, Shelley A; Laston, Sandra L; Voruganti, V Saroja; Haack, Karin; Gibbs, Richard A; Butte, Nancy F

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants responsible for susceptibility to obesity and its comorbidities among Hispanic children have not been identified. The VIVA LA FAMILIA Study was designed to genetically map childhood obesity and associated biological processes in the Hispanic population. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) entailed genotyping 1.1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the Illumina Infinium technology in 815 children. Measured genotype analysis was performed between genetic markers and obesity-related traits i.e., anthropometry, body composition, growth, metabolites, hormones, inflammation, diet, energy expenditure, substrate utilization and physical activity. Identified genome-wide significant loci: 1) corroborated genes implicated in other studies (MTNR1B, ZNF259/APOA5, XPA/FOXE1 (TTF-2), DARC, CCR3, ABO); 2) localized novel genes in plausible biological pathways (PCSK2, ARHGAP11A, CHRNA3); and 3) revealed novel genes with unknown function in obesity pathogenesis (MATK, COL4A1). Salient findings include a nonsynonymous SNP (rs1056513) in INADL (p = 1.2E-07) for weight; an intronic variant in MTNR1B associated with fasting glucose (p = 3.7E-08); variants in the APOA5-ZNF259 region associated with triglycerides (p = 2.5-4.8E-08); an intronic variant in PCSK2 associated with total antioxidants (p = 7.6E-08); a block of 23 SNPs in XPA/FOXE1 (TTF-2) associated with serum TSH (p = 5.5E-08 to 1.0E-09); a nonsynonymous SNP (p = 1.3E-21), an intronic SNP (p = 3.6E-13) in DARC identified for MCP-1; an intronic variant in ARHGAP11A associated with sleep duration (p = 5.0E-08); and, after adjusting for body weight, variants in MATK for total energy expenditure (p = 2.7E-08) and in CHRNA3 for sleeping energy expenditure (p = 6.0E-08). Unprecedented phenotyping and high-density SNP genotyping enabled localization of novel genetic loci associated with the pathophysiology of childhood obesity.

  1. A population-based study of asthma, quality of life, and occupation among elderly Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites: a cross-sectional investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delclos George L

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U.S. population is aging and is expected to double by the year 2030. The current study evaluated the prevalence of asthma and its correlates in the elderly Hispanic and non-Hispanic white population. Methods Data from a sample of 3021 Hispanics and non-Hispanic White subjects, 65 years and older, interviewed as part of an ongoing cross-sectional study of the elderly in west Texas, were analyzed. The outcome variable was categorized into: no asthma (reference category, current asthma, and probable asthma. Polytomous logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between the outcome variable and various socio-demographic measures, self-rated health, asthma symptoms, quality of life measures (SF-12, and various occupations. Results The estimated prevalence of current asthma and probable asthma were 6.3% (95%CI: 5.3–7.2 and 9.0% (95%CI: 7.8–10.1 respectively. The majority of subjects with current asthma (Mean SF-12 score 35.8, 95%CI: 34.2–37.4 or probable asthma (35.3, 34.0–36.6 had significantly worse physical health-related quality of life as compared to subjects without asthma (42.6, 42.1–43.1. In multiple logistic regression analyses, women had a 1.64 times greater odds of current asthma (95%CI: 1.12–2.38 as compared to men. Hay fever was a strong predictor of both current and probable asthma. The odds of current asthma were 1.78 times (95%CI: 1.24–2.55 greater among past smokers; whereas the odds of probable asthma were 2.73 times (95%CI: 1.77–4.21 greater among current smokers as compared to non-smokers. Similarly fair/poor self rated health and complaints of severe pain were independently associated with current and probable asthma. The odds of current and probable asthma were almost two fold greater for obesity. When stratified by gender, the odds were significantly greater among females (p-value for interaction term = 0.038. The odds of current asthma were significantly greater for

  2. Perceptions of Medicinal Plant Use Amongst the Hispanic Population in the St. Louis Metropolitan Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim M. Grafford

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medicinal plant use in the United States has increased as reported by the National Center of Complementary and Integrative Health and U.S. Census Bureau.However, little is known about how many minority groups in the United States use medicinal plants.There is a rise in the Hispanic population; a community with a steep tradition of medicinal plant use, in the U.S., so understanding the perceptions of medicinal plant use is useful to healthcare providers. Methods: A survey was designed to gauge a better understanding of the perceptions of medicinal plant use amongst Latino patients with varying education levels who reside in the St. Louis Metropolitan Area. Survey questions highlighted the perceptions of medicinal plants use, patient communication regarding medicinal plant use with healthcare providers (pharmacists and doctors, and the impact the education level has on medicinal plant use. Results: Surveys were distributed to six different investigational sites around the St. Louis Metropolitan Area from August 2015 to December 2015. Survey respondents identified 45 different plants/herbs that they currently use or had used at some point in their life. Those with higher levels of education had varying opinions on medicinal plant use with their current practices. Conclusion: The participants’ high interest in the use of medicinal plants exemplifies the need for enhanced communication between patients and healthcare professionals about medicinal plant use. However, it was hard to determine whether the participants’ level of education had any direct relationship to this use. Conflict of Interest None   Type: Original Research

  3. Rural Hispanic populations at risk in developing diabetes: sociocultural and familial challenges in promoting a healthy diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuman, Amy N; Scholl, Juliann C; Wilkinson, Kenton

    2013-01-01

    Type II diabetes affects Hispanic populations disproportionately and is the fifth leading cause of death for Hispanic people in the United States ( Smith & Barnett, 2005 ). Risk of diabetes is of great concern throughout the United States and is clearly of epidemic proportions for regions such as the Southwest and Texas where the primary minority populations are Mexican American. We conducted four focus groups with a total of 49 Hispanic participants (23 adults and 26 adolescents) from rural West Texas communities to gain insights about participants' eating habits, knowledge of diabetes, and potential barriers to preventive care. From the data, we identified a three-tiered predisposition or vulnerability to diabetes-heredity; preferences for unhealthy, culturally based food; and temptations from U.S. mainstream fast food culture. These vulnerabilities added to the sociocultural concerns that participants identified-importance of parental and familial modeling; challenges to healthy eating based on a culturally based diet and mainstream fast food culture; and a lack of support from the larger sociocultural networks such as teachers, community leaders, and the media. From these data, we have a better understanding of familial and sociocultural factors that need to be addressed in the development of preventive public awareness and educational plans. We outline implications for practitioners and educators from an integrated cultural biomedical approach.

  4. Risk of cancer among Hispanics with AIDS compared with the general population in Puerto Rico: 1987-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Marrero, Farah A; Smit, Ellen; De La Torre-Feliciano, Taína; Pérez-Irizarry, Javier; Miranda, Sandra; Cruz, Maritza; Figueroa-Vallés, Nayda R; Crespo, Carlos J; Nazario, Cruz M

    2010-09-01

    The risk of cancer among Hispanics with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in the United States and Puerto Rico (PR) has not been well described. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of AIDS related and non-AIDS related cancers among Hispanics with AIDS in PR. A probabilistic record linkage of the PR AIDS Surveillance Program and PR Central Cancer Registry databases was conducted. AIDS cases were grouped according to year of AIDS onset and antiretroviral therapy availability: 1987-1989 (limited availability), 1990-1995 (mono and dual therapy), and 1996-2003 (highly active antiretroviral therapy: HAART). Cancer risk was described using the standardized incidence ratios (SIR). A total of 612 cancers were identified after 3 months of AIDS diagnosis: 409 (66.7%) AIDS related and 203 (33.1%) non-AIDS related. Although a decreasing trend in the risk of AIDS and non-AIDS related cancers was observed, the risk for both remained higher in the AIDS group compared to the general population in PR. Non-AIDS related cancers with higher risk during the HAART availability were: oropharyngeal, anal, liver, larynx, eye and orbit, Hodgkin lymphoma, and vaginal. Hispanics with AIDS in PR consistently showed a greater risk of AIDS and non-AIDS related cancers compared to the general population in PR and that has not changed over time.

  5. Outcomes in Ovarian Cancer among Hispanic Women Living in the United States: A Population-Based Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okechukwu A. Ibeanu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic cancer in the United States. There is limited data on presentation and outcomes among Hispanic women with ovarian cancer. Objective. To investigate how ovarian cancer presents among Hispanic women in the USA and to analyze differences in presentation, staging, and survival between Hispanic and non-Hispanic women with ovarian cancer. Methods. Data from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2004 were extracted from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER database. Results. The study sample comprised 1215 Hispanics (10%, 10 652 non-Hispanic whites (83%, and 905 non-Hispanic blacks (7%. Hispanic women were diagnosed with ovarian cancer at a younger age and earlier stage when compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks; . Similar proportion of Hispanics (33%, non-Hispanic whites (32%, and non-Hispanic blacks (24% underwent lymphadenectomy; . Hispanics with epithelial ovarian cancer histology had longer five-year survival of 30.6 months compared to non-Hispanic whites (22.8 months and non-Hispanic blacks (23.3 months; . Conclusion. Hispanic women with ovarian cancer have a statistically significantly longer median survival compared to whites and blacks. This survival difference was most apparent in patients with epithelial cancers and patients with stage IV disease.

  6. Personality Correlates of Alcohol Consumption and Aggression in a Hispanic College Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Grange, Linda; Hojnowski, Natalya; Nesterova, Svitlana

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined the association between alcohol consumption and aggression from a personality trait perspective with 92 self-identified Hispanic college students. They partially replicated a study by Quigley, Corbett, and Tedeshi, which examined the relationships between desired image of power, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol-related…

  7. Using the MMPI/MMPI-2 with the Hispanic/Latino Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Jennifer M.

    Examination of the relationship between Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, racial identification, acculturation, culture, language and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI/MMPI-2) has revealed controversial results. Because the MMPI/MMPI-2 is the most widely used personality assessment, it is important to understand how ethnic and…

  8. Improved clinical outcomes using a culturally sensitive diabetes education program in a Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metghalchi, Shiva; Rivera, Maribet; Beeson, Larry; Firek, Anthony; De Leon, Marino; Balcazar, Hector; Cordero-MacIntyre, Zaida R

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a culturally sensitive diabetes education program for Hispanics with type 2 diabetes. This study is a prospective cohort study to test the impact of a comprehensive diabetes education program on blood glucose control on Hispanics with type 2 diabetes. The educational program focused on maintaining glycemic control and general aspects of managing diabetes and complications. The study participants were recruited by flyers placed in Hispanic markets and in ambulatory care clinics. A total of 34 Hispanic male and female subjects with type 2 diabetes participated in the study. The concentrations of glucose, insulin, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were analyzed at baseline and at 3 months. A significant mean change was observed for HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, cholesterol/HDL ratio, and HDL after 3 months of education compared with baseline. There were significant reductions in weight, total fat, percent fat, trunk fat, and waist-to-hip ratio compared with baseline. After 3 months, subjects showed a significant positive correlation between changes in body mass index and insulin and weight, total fat, trunk fat, and fat free mass and insulin. A culturally sensitive program conducted in Spanish had a significant impact on important clinical parameters in Hispanic subjects with diabetes in a relatively short time period. The study demonstrates the importance of designing education intervention studies that are sensitive to cultural diversity, particularly in at-risk diabetic subjects.

  9. Rapid population increase in an introduced muskox population, West Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Riis Olesen

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available In 1962 and 1965, 27 (13 and 14 muskox yearlings were translocated from East Greenland (71°N to the Angujaartorfiup Nunaa range in West Greenland (67°N. Angujaartorfiup Nunaa is a 6600 km2 icefree, continental area where caribou are indigenous. The climate is strictly continental with a minimum of precipitation but with abundant vegetation. Aerial surveys in 1990 documented that the muskox population has increased to 2600 heads despite quota-based harvesting since 1988. The annual quota was 200, 300 and 400 for 1988, 1989 and 1990, respectively. Distribution of muskoxen shows a significant preference for low altitude habitats southeast of Kangerlussuaq Airport and around Arnangarnup Qoorua (Paradise valley. Annual population increment averages 30% and the calf crop is around 24% of the population. Yearling recruitment in the population reveals that calf mortality during winter is very limited. About half of the 1-year-old females are served and they eventually give birth to their first calf when they turn 2 years old. With half of the 2-year-old females reproducing, the calf/cow ration ranges between 0.9 and 1.0.

  10. Change in Obesity Prevalence across the United States Is Influenced by Recreational and Healthcare Contexts, Food Environments, and Hispanic Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Candice A; Slack, Tim; Martin, Corby K; Broyles, Stephanie T; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    To examine change in county-level adult obesity prevalence between 2004 and 2009 and identify associated community characteristics. Change in county-level adult (≥20 years) obesity prevalence was calculated for a 5-year period (2004-2009). Community measures of economic, healthcare, recreational, food environment, population structure, and education contexts were also calculated. Regression analysis was used to assess community characteristics associated (pobesity prevalence. Mean±SD change in obesity prevalence was 5.1±2.4%. Obesity prevalence decreased in 1.4% (n = 44) and increased in 98% (n = 3,060) of counties from 2004-2009. Results showed that both baseline levels and increases in physically inactive adults were associated with greater increases in obesity prevalence, while baseline levels of and increases in physician density and grocery store/supercenter density were related to smaller increases in obesity rates. Baseline levels of the Hispanic population share were negatively linked to changing obesity levels, while places with greater Hispanic population growth saw greater increases in obesity. Most counties in the U.S. experienced increases in adult obesity prevalence from 2004 to 2009. Findings suggest that community-based interventions targeting adult obesity need to incorporate a range of community factors, such as levels of physical inactivity, access to physicians, availability of food outlets, and ethnic/racial population composition.

  11. Patient understanding of radiation risk from medical computed tomography—A comparison of Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic emergency department populations

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    Afton McNierney-Moore

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cultural differences and language barriers may adversely impact patients with respect to understanding the risks/benefits of medical testing.Objective. We hypothesized that there would be no difference in Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic patients’ knowledge of radiation risk that results from CT of the abdomen/pelvis (CTAP.Methods. We enrolled a convenience sample of adults at an inner-city emergency department (ED. Patients provided written answers to rate agreement on a 10-point scale for two correct statements comparing radiation exposure equality between: CTAP and 5 years of background radiation (question 1; CTAP and 200 chest x-rays (question 3. Patients also rated their agreement that multiple CT scans increase the lifetime cancer risk (question 2. Scores of >8 were considered good knowledge. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the independent effect of the Hispanic variable.Results. 600 patients in the study group; 63% Hispanic, mean age 39.2 ± 13.9 years. Hispanics and non-Hispanics whites were similar with respect to good knowledge-level answers to question 1 (17.3 vs. 15.1%; OR = 1.2; 95% CI [0.74–2.0], question 2 (31.2 vs. 39.3%; OR = 0.76; 95% CI [0.54–1.1], and question 3 (15.2 vs. 16.5%; OR = 1.1; 95% CI [0.66–1.8]. Compared to patients who earned 40,000 were more likely to answer question 2 with good knowledge (OR = 1.96; 95% CI [1.2–3.1].Conclusion. The study group’s overall knowledge of radiation risk was poor, but we did not find significant differences between Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic patients.

  12. Rapid cycling genomic selection in a multiparental tropical maize population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic selection (GS) increases genetic gain by reducing the length of the selection cycle, as has been exemplified in maize using rapid cycling recombination of biparental populations. However, no results of GS applied to maize multi-parental populations have been reported so far. This study is th...

  13. Institutional support for diverse populations: perceptions of Hispanic and african american students and program faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Mary Lou; Cason, Carolyn L; Baxley, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Using the Adapted Model of Institutional Support as a framework, data were collected from 90 minority students, 80 faculty members, and 31 administrators from schools of nursing in Texas to determine perceived barriers and needed supports for program completion. Findings illustrate similar and differing perceptions of Hispanic and African American students, faculty, and program administrators. The data provide a baseline for making improvements and establishing "best practices" for minority recruitment and retention.

  14. Breast cancer characteristics and survival in a Hispanic population of costa rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srur-Rivero, Nadia; Cartin-Brenes, Mayra

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer characteristics may vary according to the patient's ethnic group. The goal of this cohort study was to evaluate the characteristics of a group of Costa Rican breast cancer patients and their relationship with survival. Age, stage, tumor grade, immunohistochemistry, lymphovascular invasion, recurrence, and survival data on 199 Hispanic patients with breast cancer diagnosis, treated between January 2009 and May 2010, were collected from a single institution in San Jose, Costa Rica. The data were statistically analyzed for significance. Median age at diagnosis was 53 years. With a median follow-up of 46.5 months, there was an 88% overall survival rate. Thirty-seven percent of the patients (p Costa Rica. The higher proportion of triple negative tumors, advanced stage, and younger median age at diagnosis could contribute to the inferior prognostic described among Hispanic women. There may be a different distribution of tumor subtypes compared to non-Hispanic white women. Further studies are necessary to confirm such findings.

  15. Latinas: Hispanic Women in the United States. The Hispanic Experience in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Hedda

    The term "Latinas" encompasses many different groups of women. Despite the disparities among the cultures of their countries of origin, Spanish-speaking peoples have been lumped as "Hispanics," and later "Latinos," in the United States. The Latino group is rapidly becoming the largest minority population in the United…

  16. Educating the Educator: Hispanic women in a new social context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Javier Pentón Herrera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hispanic population in the United States continues growing steadily and rapidly. This fertile and constant growth has reorganized the country’s social milieu and exposes immigrants to social, linguistic and educational realities that were previously unknown. Hispanic immigrant English Language Learners are immersed in a completely unfamiliar academic system, and face linguistic challenges that must be overcome if they are to be successful in school. In the same way, immigrant parents undergo similar challenges in their work environments in which language and other social barriers impede their professional success and involvement in their children’s academic life. This work presents the experiences of Hispanic students and mothers in the United States through the eyes of four Hispanic immigrant women. In depth interviews were used to test for the impact that parental involvement has in the academic development of Hispanic students in the United States

  17. Familism and Health Care Provision to Hispanic Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Brittany; Foli, Karen J; Edwards, Nancy E; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic older adult population's rapid growth calls for an awareness of values that can affect the rendering and receipt of care. Familism, or familismo, a traditional Hispanic value, places importance of family over the self and can potentially affect health care perceptions and practices for Hispanic older adults. The current article discusses familism, which is upheld by some Hispanic older adults, and the potential for underuse of health care services. The traditional feminine role, marianismo, and masculine role, machismo, are considered, as well as implications for how decision making may be made by family members rather than the patient. Clinical implications for the provision of health care to Hispanic older adults are provided, along with the importance of considering acculturation and ethnic heterogeneity. Health care management strategies that reflect recognition and respect of familism, yet emphasize optimization of adherence and self-care, are described. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Viva la Familia Study: genetic and environmental contributions to childhood obesity and its comorbidities in the Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butte, Nancy F; Cai, Guowen; Cole, Shelley A; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2006-09-01

    Genetic and environmental contributions to childhood obesity are poorly delineated. The Viva la Familia Study was designed to genetically map childhood obesity and its comorbidities in the Hispanic population. The objectives of this report were to describe the study design and to summarize genetic and environmental contributions to the phenotypic variation in obesity and risk factors for metabolic diseases in Hispanic children. The Viva la Familia cohort consisted of 1030 children from 319 families selected based on an overweight proband between the ages of 4 and 19 y. In-depth phenotyping to characterize the overweight children and their siblings included anthropometric and body-composition traits by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and assessments of diet by 24-h recalls, physical activity by accelerometry, and risk factors for metabolic diseases by standard biochemical methods. Univariate quantitative genetic analysis was used to partition phenotypic variance into additive genetic and environmental components by using the computer program SOLAR. Sex, age, and environmental covariates explained 1-91% of the phenotypic variance. Heritabilities of anthropometric indexes ranged from 0.24 to 0.75. Heritability coefficients for the body-composition traits ranged from 0.18 to 0.35. Diet and physical activity presented heritabilities of 0.32 to 0.69. Risk factors for metabolic diseases were heritable with coefficients ranging from 0.25 to 0.73. Significant genetic correlations between obesity traits and risk factors for metabolic diseases substantiated pleiotropy between traits. The Viva la Familia Study provides evidence of a strong genetic contribution to the high prevalence of obesity and its comorbidities in Hispanic children.

  19. Preferences for oral fluid rapid HIV self-testing among social media-using young black, Hispanic, and white men-who-have-sex-with-men (YMSM): implications for future interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, R C; Clark, M A; Liu, T; Rosenberger, J G; Romanoff, J; Bauermeister, J; Mayer, K H

    2017-04-01

    % were black, 36% Hispanic, and 45% white; and 18% previously used an oral fluid rapid HIV self-test. Although views about oral fluid rapid HIV self-testing test were favorable, few intended to use the test. Aspects about the oral fluid rapid HIV self-test associated with an increased preference for using the test were its privacy features, that it motivated getting tested more often or as soon as possible, and that it conferred feelings of more control over one's sexual health. Preferences for the oral fluid rapid HIV self-test were lower when costs were considered, yet these YMSM were much more interested in fingerstick blood sampling than oral fluid sampling rapid HIV self-testing. Despite the perceived advantages of the oral fluid rapid HIV self-test and favorable views about it by this population, prior use as well as future intention in using the test were low. Aspects about oral fluid rapid HIV self-testing identified as influential in this study might assist in interventions aimed to increase its use among this high HIV risk population as a means of encouraging regular HIV testing, identifying HIV-infected persons, and linking them to care. Although not yet commercially available in the United States, fingerstick rapid HIV self-testing might help motivate YMSM to be tested more than oral fluid rapid HIV self-testing. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid Population Growth and its Implication for Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Worldwide concern has recently focused on the negative aspects of rapid population growth for the' future as regards natural and non-renewable re- sources, energy and the environment. A United. Nations sponsored international conference on. "Environment and Development" was held in Brazil. inJune 1992 to focus ...

  1. Relationship between body fat and BMI in a U.S. Hispanic population-based cohort study: Results from HCHS/SOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the percentage of body fat (%BF)-BMI relationship, identify %BF levels corresponding to adult BMI cut points, and examine %BF-BMI agreement in a diverse Hispanic/Latino population. %BF by bioelectrical impedance analysis was corrected against %BF by 18O dilution in 434 participants of th...

  2. The statistics of genetic diversity in rapidly adapting populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Evolutionary adaptation is driven by the accumulation of beneficial mutations, but the sequence-level dynamics of this process are poorly understood. The traditional view is that adaptation is dominated by rare beneficial ``driver'' mutations that occur sporadically and then rapidly increase in frequency until they fix (a ``selective sweep''). Yet in microbial populations, multiple beneficial mutations are often present simultaneously. Selection cannot act on each mutation independently, but only on linked combinations. This means that the fate of any mutation depends on a complex interplay between its own fitness effect, the genomic background in which it arises, and the rest of the sequence variation in the population. The balance between these factors determines which mutations fix, the patterns of sequence diversity within populations, and the degree to which evolution in replicate populations will follow parallel (or divergent) trajectories at the sequence level. Earlier work has uncovered signatures of these effects, but the dynamics of genomic sequence evolution in adapting microbial populations have not yet been directly observed. In this talk, I will describe how full-genome whole-population sequencing can be used to provide a detailed view of these dynamics at high temporal resolution over 1000 generations in 40 adapting Saccharomyces cerevisiaepopulations. This data shows how patterns of sequence evolution are driven by a balance between chance interference and hitchhiking effects, which increase stochastic variation in evolutionary outcomes, and the deterministic action of selection on individual mutations, which favors parallel solutions in replicate populations.

  3. Fine mapping of QT interval regions in global populations refines previously identified QT interval loci and identifies signals unique to African and Hispanic descent populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Christy L; Wassel, Christina L; Richard, Melissa A; Highland, Heather M; Bien, Stephanie; Zubair, Niha; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Fornage, Myriam; Bielinski, Suzette J; Tao, Ran; Seyerle, Amanda A; Shah, Sanjiv J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Buyske, Steven; Rotter, Jerome I; Post, Wendy S; Rich, Stephen S; Hindorff, Lucia A; Jeff, Janina M; Shohet, Ralph V; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Lin, Dan Yu; Whitsel, Eric A; Peters, Ulrike; Haiman, Christopher A; Crawford, Dana C; Kooperberg, Charles; North, Kari E

    2017-04-01

    The electrocardiographically measured QT interval (QT) is heritable and its prolongation is an established risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases. Yet, most QT genetic studies have been performed in European ancestral populations, possibly reducing their global relevance. To leverage diversity and improve biological insight, we fine mapped 16 of the 35 previously identified QT loci (46%) in populations of African American (n = 12,410) and Hispanic/Latino (n = 14,837) ancestry. Racial/ethnic-specific multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for heart rate and clinical covariates were examined separately and in combination after inverse-variance weighted trans-ethnic meta-analysis. The 16 fine-mapped QT loci included on the Illumina Metabochip represented 21 independent signals, of which 16 (76%) were significantly (P-value≤9.1×10-5) associated with QT. Through sequential conditional analysis we also identified three trans-ethnic novel SNPs at ATP1B1, SCN5A-SCN10A, and KCNQ1 and three Hispanic/Latino-specific novel SNPs at NOS1AP and SCN5A-SCN10A (two novel SNPs) with evidence of associations with QT independent of previous identified GWAS lead SNPs. Linkage disequilibrium patterns helped to narrow the region likely to contain the functional variants at several loci, including NOS1AP, USP50-TRPM7, and PRKCA, although intervals surrounding SLC35F1-PLN and CNOT1 remained broad in size (>100 kb). Finally, bioinformatics-based functional characterization suggested a regulatory function in cardiac tissues for the majority of independent signals that generalized and the novel SNPs. Our findings suggest that a majority of identified SNPs implicate gene regulatory dysfunction in QT prolongation, that the same loci influence variation in QT across global populations, and that additional, novel, population-specific QT signals exist. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  4. A fetal variant in the GCM1 gene is associated with pregnancy induced hypertension in a predominantly hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Melissa L; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Desmond, Daniel H; Mandeville, John E; Goodwin, T Murphy; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2011-08-30

    The aim of the study was to determine whether polymorphism in the GCM1 gene is associated with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) in a case-control study of mother-baby dyads. Predominantly Hispanic women, ages 15-45, with (n=136) and without (n=169) PIH were recruited. We genotyped four polymorphisms in the GCM1 gene and examined the association with PIH using both logistic regression and likelihood expectation maximization (LEM) to adjust for intra-familial correlation between genotypes. Maternal genotype was not associated with PIH for any polymorphisms examined. Fetal genotype, however, was associated with maternal risk of PIH. Mothers carrying a fetus with ≥1 copy of the minor (C) allele for rs9349655 were less likely to develop PIH than women carrying a fetus with the GG genotype (parity-adjusted OR=0.44, 95% Cl: 0.21, 0.94). The trend of decreasing risk with increasing C alleles was also statistically significant (OR(trend)=0.41 95% Cl: 0.20, 0.85). The minor alleles for the other three SNPs also appear to be associated with protection. Multilocus analyses of fetal genotypes showed that the protective effect of carrying minor alleles at rs9349655 and rs13200319 (non-significant) remained unchanged when adjusting for genotypes at the other loci. However, the apparent (non-significant) effect of rs2816345 and rs2518573 disappeared when adjusting for rs9349655. In conclusion, we found that a fetal GCM1 polymorphism is significantly associated with PIH in a predominantly Hispanic population. These results suggest that GCM1 may represent a fetal-effect gene, where risk to the mother is conferred only through carriage by the fetus.

  5. Self-Harm Experiences among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croyle, Kristin L.

    2007-01-01

    Very little research exists on self-harm in Hispanic populations, although there is a strong literature that addresses suicidality in Hispanics. This study compares self-reported rates of self-harm in 255 non-Hispanic White (NHW) and 187 Hispanic (predominantly Mexican American) undergraduate students. Results indicated that self-harm is…

  6. The impact of mass media health communication on health decision-making and medical advice-seeking behavior of u.s. Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Mass media health communication has enormous potential to drastically alter how health-related information is disseminated and obtained by different populations. However, there is little evidence regarding the influence of media channels on health decision-making and medical advice-seeking behaviors among the Hispanic population. The Pew 2007 Hispanic Healthcare Survey was used to test the hypothesis that the amount of mass media health communication (i.e., quantity of media-based health information received) is more likely to influence Hispanic adults' health decision-making and medical advice-seeking behavior compared to health literacy and language proficiency variables. Results indicated that quantity of media-based health information is positively associated with health decision-making and medical advice-seeking behavior above and beyond the influence of health literacy and English and Spanish language proficiency. In a context where physician-patient dynamics are increasingly shifting from a passive patient role model to a more active patient role model, media-based health information can serve as an influential cue to action, prompting Hispanic individuals to make certain health-related decisions and to seek more health advice and information from a health provider. Study implications are discussed.

  7. Rapid Cycling Genomic Selection in a Multiparental Tropical Maize Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuecai Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genomic selection (GS increases genetic gain by reducing the length of the selection cycle, as has been exemplified in maize using rapid cycling recombination of biparental populations. However, no results of GS applied to maize multi-parental populations have been reported so far. This study is the first to show realized genetic gains of rapid cycling genomic selection (RCGS for four recombination cycles in a multi-parental tropical maize population. Eighteen elite tropical maize lines were intercrossed twice, and self-pollinated once, to form the cycle 0 (C0 training population. A total of 1000 ear-to-row C0 families was genotyped with 955,690 genotyping-by-sequencing SNP markers; their testcrosses were phenotyped at four optimal locations in Mexico to form the training population. Individuals from families with the best plant types, maturity, and grain yield were selected and intermated to form RCGS cycle 1 (C1. Predictions of the genotyped individuals forming cycle C1 were made, and the best predicted grain yielders were selected as parents of C2; this was repeated for more cycles (C2, C3, and C4, thereby achieving two cycles per year. Multi-environment trials of individuals from populations C0, C1, C2, C3, and C4, together with four benchmark checks were evaluated at two locations in Mexico. Results indicated that realized grain yield from C1 to C4 reached 0.225 ton ha−1 per cycle, which is equivalent to 0.100 ton ha−1 yr−1 over a 4.5-yr breeding period from the initial cross to the last cycle. Compared with the original 18 parents used to form cycle 0 (C0, genetic diversity narrowed only slightly during the last GS cycles (C3 and C4. Results indicate that, in tropical maize multi-parental breeding populations, RCGS can be an effective breeding strategy for simultaneously conserving genetic diversity and achieving high genetic gains in a short period of time.

  8. Loneliness among very old Mexican Americans: findings from the Hispanic Established Populations Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerst-Emerson, Kerstin; Shovali, Tamar E; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of researchers are finding that loneliness is a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality, and several variables have been found to be closely related to the experience of loneliness among elders. However, much of the research has focused on the general older population, with no research to date focusing on minority populations. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and the correlates of loneliness among a community-dwelling older Mexican American population. This study used a three-item loneliness scale to determine the prevalence of loneliness. Pearson's correlation and linear regression analyses were used to determine the cross-sectional association between sociodemographic, interpersonal relationship and health variables with the scale. Data used came from the most recent wave (2011) of the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (H-EPESE). A total of 873 Mexican Americans completed the loneliness scale. The age range was from 80 to 102, with a majority (65%) female. The mean score on the scale was 4.05 (range 3-9), indicating relatively low levels of loneliness. Regression results indicate that depressive symptoms, cognitive status, and living alone were significantly associated with higher loneliness scores. Being married and having a confidante were significantly associated with lower loneliness. Age, number of close relatives and frequency of contact were not associated with loneliness. Findings suggest that among community-dwelling Mexican American older adults, loneliness has multiple determinants. Loneliness is a significant public health topic and clinicians should be aware of the various factors that can affect loneliness. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Cephalomedullary nails: factors associated with impingement of the anterior cortex of the femur in a Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Omar R; Gómez Gélvez, Amparo; Espinosa, Kristian A; Cardona, José R

    2015-11-01

    Impingement and penetration of the anterior cortex of the femur have been reported as complications after cephalomedullary nailing. The purpose of this study was to determine factors related to nail impingement in our population of Hispanic patients. A non-matched case-control study was carried out and 156 patients who underwent cephalomedullary nailing from 2010 and 2013 were included; 78 cases with anterior cortical impingement and 78 control cases without impingement were documented. Demographic variables and specifications of the nails such as manufacture and radius of curvature were recorded. The presence of impingement, angle of incidence on radiographs--indirect measurement of the femoral bow on the sagittal plane--and nail entry site were determined. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the factors associated with cortical impingement. The distribution by sex corresponded to 87 females (56%) and 69 males (44%) with a mean age of 75 years [SD 18.2]. Cortical impingement was presented in 78 cases (50%) and 6 (3.8%) patients evidenced penetration of the anterior cortex of the femur. On the bivariate analysis the posterior nail start site is highlighted, which showed a positive association with impingement (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.1-36 and p = 0.04). After the multivariate analysis, the factors associated with anterior cortical impingement included female gender (OR 2.2; 95 % CI 1.1-4.6 and p ≤ 0.038), straight nails-short nails-(OR 4.9; 95% CI 2.2-10 and p ≤ 0.001) and angle of incidence ≥7° (OR 4.9; 95% CI 2.2-10 and p ≤ 0.001), the latter showing a likelihood of 57 % for impingement, increasing to 90% with an angle of incidence of 11°. Posterior entry site should be avoided and an anterior site should be used. Female gender, straight nails and greater angle of incidence of the femur were associated with cortical impingement. A specific intramedullary nail design is needed for the Hispanic population due to

  10. Cryptic population dynamics: rapid evolution masks trophic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takehito; Ellner, Stephen P; Jones, Laura E; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Lenski, Richard E; Hairston, Nelson G

    2007-09-01

    Trophic relationships, such as those between predator and prey or between pathogen and host, are key interactions linking species in ecological food webs. The structure of these links and their strengths have major consequences for the dynamics and stability of food webs. The existence and strength of particular trophic links has often been assessed using observational data on changes in species abundance through time. Here we show that very strong links can be completely missed by these kinds of analyses when changes in population abundance are accompanied by contemporaneous rapid evolution in the prey or host species. Experimental observations, in rotifer-alga and phage-bacteria chemostats, show that the predator or pathogen can exhibit large-amplitude cycles while the abundance of the prey or host remains essentially constant. We know that the species are tightly linked in these experimental microcosms, but without this knowledge, we would infer from observed patterns in abundance that the species are weakly or not at all linked. Mathematical modeling shows that this kind of cryptic dynamics occurs when there is rapid prey or host evolution for traits conferring defense against attack, and the cost of defense (in terms of tradeoffs with other fitness components) is low. Several predictions of the theory that we developed to explain the rotifer-alga experiments are confirmed in the phage-bacteria experiments, where bacterial evolution could be tracked. Modeling suggests that rapid evolution may also confound experimental approaches to measuring interaction strength, but it identifies certain experimental designs as being more robust against potential confounding by rapid evolution.

  11. Cryptic population dynamics: rapid evolution masks trophic interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehito Yoshida

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Trophic relationships, such as those between predator and prey or between pathogen and host, are key interactions linking species in ecological food webs. The structure of these links and their strengths have major consequences for the dynamics and stability of food webs. The existence and strength of particular trophic links has often been assessed using observational data on changes in species abundance through time. Here we show that very strong links can be completely missed by these kinds of analyses when changes in population abundance are accompanied by contemporaneous rapid evolution in the prey or host species. Experimental observations, in rotifer-alga and phage-bacteria chemostats, show that the predator or pathogen can exhibit large-amplitude cycles while the abundance of the prey or host remains essentially constant. We know that the species are tightly linked in these experimental microcosms, but without this knowledge, we would infer from observed patterns in abundance that the species are weakly or not at all linked. Mathematical modeling shows that this kind of cryptic dynamics occurs when there is rapid prey or host evolution for traits conferring defense against attack, and the cost of defense (in terms of tradeoffs with other fitness components is low. Several predictions of the theory that we developed to explain the rotifer-alga experiments are confirmed in the phage-bacteria experiments, where bacterial evolution could be tracked. Modeling suggests that rapid evolution may also confound experimental approaches to measuring interaction strength, but it identifies certain experimental designs as being more robust against potential confounding by rapid evolution.

  12. Population coding in area V4 during rapid shape detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Katherine F.

    2015-01-01

    While previous studies have suggested that neuronal correlations are common in visual cortex over a range of timescales, the effect of correlations on rapid visually based decisions has received little attention. We trained Macaca mulatta to saccade to a peripherally presented shape embedded in dynamic noise as soon as the shape appeared. While the monkeys performed the task, we recorded from neuronal populations (5–29 cells) using a microelectrode array implanted in area V4, a visual area thought to be involved in form perception. While modest correlations were present between cells during visual stimulation, their magnitude did not change significantly subsequent to the appearance of a shape. We quantified the reliability and temporal precision with which neuronal populations signaled the appearance of the shape and predicted the animals' choices using mutual information analyses. To study the impact of correlations, we shuffled the activity from each cell across observations while retaining stimulus-dependent modulations in firing rate. We found that removing correlations by shuffling across trials minimally affected the reliability or timing with which pairs, or larger groups of cells, signaled the presence of a shape. To assess the downstream impact of correlations, we also studied how shuffling affected the ability of V4 populations to predict behavioral choices. Surprisingly, shuffling created a modest increase in the accuracy of such predictions, suggesting that the reliability of downstream neurons is slightly compromised by activity correlations. Our findings are consistent with neuronal correlations having a minimal effect on the reliability and timing of rapid perceptual decisions. PMID:25787961

  13. SNPSTR rs59186128_D7S820 polymorphism distribution in European Caucasoid, Hispanic, and Afro-American populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odriozola, A; Aznar, J M; Valverde, L; Cardoso, S; Bravo, M L; Builes, J J; Martínez, B; Sanchez, D; González-Andrade, F; Sarasola, E; González-Fernández, M C; Martínez Jarreta, B; De Pancorbo, Marian M

    2009-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the flanking regions of microsatellite loci (SNPSTRs) help to increase the power of discrimination of short tandem repeat (STR) loci. SNPs are positions in the genome that have been well-conserved over the course of evolution, so analysing them can help distinguish between STR alleles in which the number of repetitions matches due to descent from those which match by chance. This provides support for the determination of biological paternity and other kinship analyses in which mutation needs to be ruled out as grounds for exclusion. Locus D7S820 shows a variable position, SNP rs59186128, in the 5' flanking region. This study is set out (1) to determine the frequencies of SNP rs59186128 in populations with various geographical origins and (2) to estimate the possible contribution of rs59186128 to the allele discrimination of locus D7S820. To that end, individuals from European Caucasoid, Hispanic, and Afro-American populations are studied using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, which enables locus rs59186128 to be quickly and highly cost-effectively screened. Moreover, a method is established for determining the haplotypes of SNPSTR rs59186128_D7820. The results show that SNP rs59186128 has a T allele frequency of more than 0.15 in one of the Afro-American populations studied, and the haplotype analysis shows that there is no preferential association between the alleles of SNPSTR rs59186128_D7S820, which supports the idea that they could be useful in forensic applications.

  14. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Hispanics living in Puerto Rico: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pons, María; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Sevilla, Javier; Márquez-Lespier, Juan M; Morgan, Douglas; Pérez, Cynthia M; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2018-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important etiologic factor for peptic ulcers and gastric cancer, one of the top ten leading causes of cancer death in Puerto Rico. However, the prevalence of H. pylori infections in this population was previously unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the seroprevalence of H. pylori and its associated risk factors in Puerto Rico. A cross-sectional study was designed using an existing population-based biorepository. Seropositivity was determined using the Premier ™ H. pylori immunoassay. Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence was estimated with 95% confidence using marginal standardization following logistic regression. To assess the risk factors associated with H. pylori seropositivity, a multivariable log-binomial model was fitted to estimate the prevalence ratio (PR) and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI). A total of 528 population-based serum samples were analyzed. The mean age of the study population was 41 ± 12 years, of whom 55.3% were females. The overall seroprevalence of H. pylori was 33.0% (95% CI = 28.3%-38.1%). Increasing age and having Puerto Rico. The H. pylori seroprevalence observed in Puerto Rico is similar to the seroprevalence reported in the overall population of the United States. The association between H. pylori seroprevalence and the risk factors analyzed offers insight into the epidemiology of gastric cancer in Puerto Rico and warrants further investigation. © 2017 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The News about Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Cheryl

    1983-01-01

    Describes the geographic distribution, demographic characteristics, and consumer preferences of Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, and Cubans in the United States. Suggests that a projected rapid growth in numbers of Hispanics with unique characteristics will produce a consumer market that will require special attention from businesses. (Author/MJL)

  16. Epidemiology of infant death among black and white non-Hispanic populations in Hampton Roads, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emuren, Leonard; Chauhan, Suneet; Vroman, Richard; Beydoun, Hind

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the presence of racial disparities in infant mortality rates and assess risk factors for infant death among black and white populations in Hampton Roads, Virginia. A retrospective study with secondary analyses of linked birth/death certificate data was conducted using a sample of 201,610 live-born infants and 1659 infant deaths identified between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2008 in Hampton Roads. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates were significantly (P deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities (P efforts should target prenatal care, preterm delivery, and low-birth-weight infants and neonates to reduce infant mortality rates.

  17. Hispanic Business Ownership: A Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Emily Gantz

    Hispanic Americans owned nearly 250,000 U.S. businesses in 1982. This is only one-fourth of the number which would be expected given their proportion of the population. Most Hispanic businesses were small service or retail establishments with no paid employees. This report provides an analysis of survey data which were collected by the Bureau of…

  18. Hispanic Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... placed above individual needs and respect to the parents and elders is of major importance • Suicidal behavior among Hispanic femails may be related to the stress cause by the expectation of obligation to the family • Family closeness and ...

  19. Postdischarge growth and development in a predominantly Hispanic, very low birth weight population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, George C; Ramamurthy, Rajam; Schoolfield, John; Matula, Kathleen

    2008-12-01

    The goals were to assess postdischarge growth and developmental progress of very low birth weight (birth weight: population and to identify predictors for neurodevelopmental impairment at 3 years of age. A cohort of 135 very low birth weight infants (gestational age: 23 to 35 weeks) were monitored to 3 years of age. Maternal and neonatal characteristics, anthropometric z scores, and developmental performance (using corrected age until 24 months) were analyzed collectively and according to gestational age groups. Specific criteria for failure to thrive and microcephaly were used. A characteristic pattern of poor weight gain in the first 12 months was followed by accelerated weight gain starting at 18 months, whereas head growth decreased at 18 months, with recovery beginning at 30 months of age. Infants born at gestational age of growth-impaired at 3 years of age, whereas infants born at gestational age of >or=27 weeks achieved catch-up growth by 30 months of age. Mean developmental scores also decreased in infancy, with improvements in motor development emerging at 18 months and cognitive skills at 30 months. Growth z scores, particularly for head growth, correlated with developmental scores. Infants born at gestational age of growth patterns that coincided with developmental progress in the first 3 years of life. Birth at gestational age of

  20. The Living Astronomy and People of the Mayan World Today: Engaging Hispanic Populations in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, I.; Tapia, F.

    2008-06-01

    From long ago, the Maya civilizations of Mesoamerica have been keenly attuned to the cycles of nature. The Maya have always been careful observers, and more than a thousand years ago, they recorded the motion of the planets, the Sun, and the Moon, and predicted eclipses. These observations were used to create a complex calendar to organize the events of their world. The Maya built great cities containing buildings aligned with the Sun, Moon, and the stars to mark important times of the year. Many astronomical traditions are still practiced today by the Maya of the Yucatán peninsula, Southern states in México, and other areas in Mesoamerica. Traditional farming communities time the cultivation of corn by observing the sky. The living culture of the Mayan people in the Yucatan integrates science and astronomy with every other aspect of their culture. Yucatec Maya, the language spoken by more than 1 million people in the Yucatán today, still carries through oral histories the ancient knowledge of nature. Our hope is that you'll increase your interest and knowledge of the Mayan people and of the enduring wisdom reflected in the daily lives of Mayan families. We present the results of education and public outreach efforts that position astronomy within its cultural context as an effective means of capturing the interest and enabling authentic participation of under-represented populations in science.

  1. Arsenic and ultraviolet radiation exposure: melanoma in a New Mexico non-Hispanic white population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Janice W; Erdei, Esther; Myers, Orrin; Siegel, Malcolm; Berwick, Marianne

    2016-06-01

    Cases of cutaneous melanoma and controls were enrolled in a New Mexico population-based study; subjects were administered questionnaires concerning ultraviolet (UV) and inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure. Historical iAs exposure was estimated. UV exposure estimates were also derived using geospatial methods. Drinking water samples were collected for iAs analysis. Blood samples were collected for DNA repair (Comet) and DNA repair gene polymorphism assays. Arsenic concentrations were determined in urine and toenail samples. UV exposures during the previous 90 days did not vary significantly between cases and controls. Mean (±SD) current home iAs drinking water was not significantly different for cases and controls [3.98 μg/L (±3.67) vs. 3.47 μg/L (±2.40)]. iAs exposure showed no effect on DNA repair or association with melanoma. Results did not corroborate a previously reported association between toenail As and melanoma risk. Arsenic biomarkers in urine and toenail were highly significantly correlated with iAs in drinking water. A UV-DNA repair interaction for UV exposure over the previous 7-90 days was shown; cases had higher DNA damage than controls at low UV values. This novel finding suggests that melanoma cases may be more sensitive to low-level UV exposure than are controls. A UV-APEX1 interaction was shown. Subjects with the homozygous rare APEX1 DNA repair gene allele had a higher risk of early melanoma diagnosis at low UV exposure compared with those with the homozygous wild type or the heterozygote. Notably, a UV-arsenic interaction on inhibition of DNA repair was not observed at iAs drinking water concentrations below 10 ppb (μg/L).

  2. Validation of the writing process questionnaire in two Hispanic populations: Spain and Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cerrato-Lara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Thesis work is the first important research where the PhD candidate has to take primary responsibility for their work. Sometimes it is forgotten, or at least not enough attention is paid to the fact, that for many PhD students it is also the first time they have to face such a complex, ultimately self-regulated learning task (Sachs, 2002, p.99 as thesis writing. But what do the protagonists think about it? There is a gap in the literature concerning studies that focus on PhD students’ writing conceptions as a main target. The aim of this study was to validate the structure of the Writing Process Questionnaire developed by Lonka and her colleagues (Lonka et al., 2014. To do this, we asked two groups of 631 Spanish and 431 Mexican PhD students to complete the questionnaire, and used Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling (ESEM to assess the validity of a hypothesized 6-factor model, and to test its invariance across the two groups. The results confirmed the broad 6-factor structure of the questionnaire but indicated that the knowledge transforming sub-scale needed to be revised into a more specific knowledge creation factor. This modified structure generalized across both the Spanish and Mexican samples. We suggest that the revised structure for the knowledge transforming factor reflects the fact that these two groups of Spanish-speaking PhD students perceive the development of knowledge in writing as a solitary rather than a collaborative process. Our research provides evidence that the Writing Process Questionnaire is a reliable and generalizable measure, having shown strong invariance properties in the two populations studied.

  3. Glomerular diseases in a Hispanic population: review of a regional renal biopsy database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Arias

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Epidemiological data provide useful information for clinical practice and investigations. This study aimed to determine glomerular disease frequencies in a region of Colombia and it represents the basis for future studies. DESIGN AND SETTING: Single-center retrospective analysis at the University of Antioquia, Colombia. METHODS: All native renal biopsies (July 1998 to December 2007 were reviewed, but only glomerular diseases were analyzed. The diagnosis of each case was based on histological, immunopathological and clinical features. RESULTS: A total of 1,040 biopsies were included. In 302 cases (29.0%, the patient's age was < 15 years. Primary glomerular diseases were diagnosed in 828 biopsies (79.6% and secondary in 212 (20.4%. The most common primary diseases were focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS (34.8%, immunoglobulin A (IgA nephropathy (IgAN (11.8%, membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN (10.6%, minimal change disease (MCD (10.6%, crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN (5.6%, and non-IgA mesangial proliferative GN (5.6%. Postinfectious GN represented 10.7% of the diagnoses if included as primary GN. Lupus nephritis corresponded to 17.8% of the entire series. In adults, the order of the most frequent primary diseases was: FSGS, IgAN, MGN, crescentic GN and MCD. In children (< 15 years, the most frequent were: FSGS, postinfectious GN, MCD, non-IgA mesangial proliferative GN, endocapillary diffuse GN and IgAN. CONCLUSIONS: As among Afro-Americans, FSGS is the most frequent type of glomerulopathy in our population, but in our group, there are more cases of IgAN. The reasons for these findings are unclear. This information is an important contribution towards understanding the prevalence of renal diseases in Latin America.

  4. The Changing Demographics of the Hispanic Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Emily Gantz

    Hispanics will become the largest United States minority population sometime early in the next century. A problem that arises with attempts to provide Hispanic people with better opportunities is the lack of adequate data on Hispanic socioeconomic status. Those data which do exist focus on problems of the individual, yet one of the greatest…

  5. Promoting Emotional Well-Being While Learning through Online Mentoring in a Hispanic Female Pre-Service Teacher Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsa, Patricia; Olivarez, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    Subjects were undergraduate online learners (Hispanic females) who responded to and requested to participate in mentoring at the University of Texas at El Paso, a border university located within two blocks of Mexico. Many requests for help came from the pre-service teachers who lacked confidence, were fearful, feeling isolated and stressed taking…

  6. Intergenerational fertility among Hispanic women: new evidence of immigrant assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, Emilio A; Morgan, S Philip

    2008-08-01

    In recent decades, rapid growth of the U.S. Hispanic population has raised concerns about immigrant adaptation, including fertility. Empirical research suggests that Hispanics, especially Mexicans, might not be following the historical European pattern of rapid intergenerational fertility decline (and convergence toward native levels). If confirmed, continued high Hispanic fertility could indicate a broader lack of assimilation into mainstream American society. In this paper, we reexamine the issue of Hispanic and Mexican fertility using an approach that combines biological and immigrant generations to more closely approximate a comparison of immigrant women with those of their daughters' and granddaughters' generation. Contrary to cross-sectional results, our new analyses show that Hispanic and Mexican fertility is converging with that of whites, and that it is similarly responsive to period conditions and to women's level of education. In addition, we employ a mathematical simulation to illustrate the conditions under which cross-sectional analyses can produce misleading results. Finally, we discuss the import of the fertility convergence we document for debates about immigrant assimilation.

  7. Hispanic Intermarriage in New York City: New Evidence from 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Greta A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Replicates previous research on Hispanic intermarriage using 1991 marriage records from New York (New York), focusing on trends in marital assimilation among Puerto Ricans and the non-Puerto Rican Hispanic population. Considerable intermarriage among Hispanics of different national origins is characteristic of all Hispanics in New York. (SLD)

  8. The C-shaped canal molar: an Endodontic-Archaeological study of the relationships between Mayan pre-Hispanic and contemporary population of Yucatán.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Salomón, M; Vega-Lizama, E; Tiesler, V; Alvarado-Cárdenas, G; López-Villanueva, M; Sierra-Sosa, T; Cucina, A

    2014-11-01

    To assess the prevalence of C-shaped canal systems in mandibular second molars, in samples of modern and pre-Hispanic Mayan individuals in Yucatán, Mexico, and to analyse the trait through time and attempt to find new evidence of ethnical bonds between populations. Three hundred and forty-one randomly selected patients were treated in the Endodontic Clinic at the Dental school of the Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, and 48 mandibular second molars from pre-Hispanic Mayan collections were macroscopically and radiographically inspected. Statistical analysis was performed with a Fisher's exact test to compare the prevalence of C-shaped canal systems in modern and archaeological samples. In the clinical observation, 118 of 341 (35%) patients treated endodontically had C-shaped mandibular second molars. In the radiographical evaluation, 17 of 48 (35%) archaeological molars had fused roots and pulp chamber morphology categorized as C-shaped. There were no significant differences between the frequencies in both samples. This study highlighted that a one-rooted mandibular molar was likely to have a C-shaped canal. The similarity between ancient and modern samples indicates that the genetic make-up since the European conquest has not affected the expression of this trait. This study supports the theory that the Mayan population has a relationship with the Northeast Asian population. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Rapid Reproducers Paradox: Population Control and Individual Procreative Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissenburg, M.L.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this article, I consider the impact of population policies on individual rights (in a very broad sense of the word), a topic that has received disproportionately little attention in debates on the legitimacy of population rights. I first concentrate on arguments in favour of very radical

  10. The effectiveness of a community health program in improving diabetes knowledge in the Hispanic population: Salud y Bienestar (Health and Wellness).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Yanira; Hernandez-Lane, Maria-Eugenia; Cohello, Janet I; Bautista, Christian T

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of the Salud y Bienestar program to deliver diabetes education in the Hispanic population in the United States. This program uses a community outreach model where community health promoters are trained and then they deliver education to other community members regarding diabetes disease, risk factors, and ways to prevent and control disease. This intervention applies a one-group pre- and post-test design to improve diabetes knowledge. The intervention carried out in the states of California, Texas, and Washington DC. A total of 1,413 participants were enrolled. Of these, 73% were females, 46% were 65 years or older, 59% were Mexican, 64% had at least elementary education, 56% had lived in the US for more than 20 years, and 38% participants were self-reported diabetic. Among diabetic participants, a significant improvement was observed on diabetes knowledge when comparing pre- and post-test scores (13.7 vs. 18.6, P Salud y Bienestar program conducted by community health workers was effective approach to improving diabetes knowledge in the Hispanic population.

  11. Differences in life satisfaction among older community-dwelling Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquine, María J; Maldonado, Yadira; Zlatar, Zvinka; Moore, Raeanne C; Martin, Averria Sirkin; Palmer, Barton W; Jeste, Dilip V

    2015-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing ethnic/racial group of the older adult population in the United States, yet little is known about positive mental health in this group. We examined differences in life satisfaction between demographically matched groups of older Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites, and sought to identify specific factors associated with these differences Participants included 126 community-dwelling English-speaking Hispanics aged 50 and older, and 126 age-, gender-, and education-matched non-Hispanic Whites. Participants completed standardized measures of life satisfaction and postulated correlates, including physical, cognitive, emotional and social functioning, as well as positive psychological traits and religiosity/spirituality. Hispanics reported greater life satisfaction than non-Hispanic Whites (p life satisfaction, except that Hispanics had lower levels of cognitive performance, and higher levels of daily spiritual experiences, private religious practices and compassion (ps life satisfaction in the overall sample. Multivariable analyses testing the influence of these three factors on the association between ethnicity and life satisfaction showed that higher spirituality among Hispanics accounted for ethnic differences in life satisfaction. English-speaking Hispanics aged 50 and older appeared to be more satisfied with their lives than their non-Hispanic White counterparts, and these differences were primarily driven by higher spirituality among Hispanics. Future studies should examine positive mental health among various Hispanic subgroups, including Spanish speakers, as an important step toward development of culturally sensitive prevention and intervention programs aimed at promoting positive mental health.

  12. Hispanic health status in Orange County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, James; Berndt, Donald J; Luther, Stephen L; Fisher, John W; van Caulil, Karen; Brennan, Margaret J; Martinez, Yolanda G; Clarke, Pete

    2005-01-01

    To assess the health status of the Hispanic population of Orange County, Florida. The methodology utilized secondary data for 66 ethnically identified indicators in a comparative framework applied for a 5-year period (1997-2001). Orange County Hispanics are younger with lower per capita income than their Florida peers, less likely to be White, and much more likely to be of Puerto Rican origin. Relative to the Hispanic populations in the selected peer counties and statewide, Orange County Hispanics have higher age-adjusted death rates for a majority of disease categories and conditions, such as breast, lung, and prostate cancers; chronic liver disease and cirrhosis; diabetes mellitus; pneumonia and influenza; stroke; acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; motor vehicle accidents; and infant, neonatal, and child mortality. Orange County Hispanics did better in comparison to Orange non-Hispanics, with lower age-adjusted death rates for major causes of death such as heart disease, cancer, and stroke. However, for many indicators, the 5-year trends for Orange County Hispanics are moving in an unfavorable direction in contrast to the trends for non-Hispanics, which are either stable or improving. Comparative assessments of Hispanic populations using secondary data enable the development of a comprehensive health status profile. However, this approach is currently constrained by the limited number of ethnically identified indicators and, especially for Hispanics, problems in the accuracy and consistency of the assignment to racial categories and subsequent reporting.

  13. Hispanics Find Jobs that Shift Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Economic opportunity, the force that has driven population shifts for years, is changing the face of migration as Hispanics move into parts of the nation beyond border states and traditional ports of entry. North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Indiana are experiencing a steady growth in Hispanic population. In addition, West Virginia, Ohio, and…

  14. Communication and The Challenges of Rapid Population Growth in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These factors include religious beliefs, customs and traditions, among others. The discourse also examined the various communication types in Africa and their appropriateness in educating Africans and their governments on the need to control high rate of population growth. Ironically, medical facilities available in African ...

  15. Responses of a vulnerable Hispanic population in New Jersey to Hurricane Sandy: Access to care, medical needs, concerns, and ecological ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Pittfield, Taryn; Jeitner, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Recent increases in hurricanes led to a need to evaluate access to medical care, medical needs, and personal and community impact on vulnerable populations, particularly elderly, low income, and minority communities. This investigation examined (1) access to care, (2) interruptions in medical services, (3) personal impact from Hurricane Sandy, and (4) agreement with ecological statements related to storms, flooding, and damages in Hispanic/Latino patients receiving health care at Federally Qualified Health Centers in New Jersey. Only 10% of 335 Hispanic interviewees were US born. Self-identified personal impact was a better indicator of effects from Sandy, health center use, and medical issues, than community impact rating. Respondents who provided a high personal impact rating were more likely to have evacuated, had longer power outage, were more likely to need medical care, displayed more trouble getting to centers, and exhibited more medical interruptions during Sandy. A higher % respondents who evacuated, needed the center, had trouble getting there, and had more "medical need" than those who did not evacuate. The greatest impacts were on respondents who were told to evacuate before the storm, but did not (46% had "medical need"). The respondents had high agreement ratings for "storms are due to climate change," followed by "frequent and stronger storms will come more often," "flooding is due to sea level rise," and "changing climate is due mainly to human activity and not natural causes". These ratings may aid public policymakers and planners in developing resiliency strategies for vulnerable coastal communities.

  16. Rapid three dimensional two photon neural population scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Renaud; Quicke, Peter; Copeland, Caroline; Garasto, Stefania; Annecchino, Luca A; Hwang, June Kyu; Schultz, Simon R

    2015-08-01

    Recording the activity of neural populations at high sampling rates is a fundamental requirement for understanding computation in neural circuits. Two photon microscopy provides one promising approach towards this. However, neural circuits are three dimensional, and functional imaging in two dimensions fails to capture the 3D nature of neural dynamics. Electrically tunable lenses (ETLs) provide a simple and cheap method to extend laser scanning microscopy into the relatively unexploited third dimension. We have therefore incorporated them into our Adaptive Spiral Scanning (SSA) algorithm, which calculates kinematically efficient scanning strategies using radially modulated spiral paths. We characterised the response of the ETL, incorporated its dynamics using MATLAB models of the SSA algorithm and tested the models on populations of Izhikevich neurons of varying size and density. From this, we show that our algorithms can theoretically at least achieve sampling rates of 36.2Hz compared to 21.6Hz previously reported for 3D scanning techniques.

  17. Rapid population growth and environmental degradation: ultimate versus proximate factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, R P

    1989-01-01

    This philosophical review of 2 arguments about responsibility for and solutions to environmental degradation concludes that both sides are correct: the ultimate and the proximal causes. Ultimate causes of pollution are defined as the technology responsible for a given type of pollution, such as burning fossil fuel; proximate causes are defined as situation-specific factors confounding the problem, such as population density or rate of growth. Commoner and others argue that developed countries with low or negative population growth rates are responsible for 80% of world pollution, primarily in polluting technologies such as automobiles, power generation, plastics, pesticides, toxic wastes, garbage, warfaring, and nuclear weapons wastes. Distortionary policies also contribute; examples are agricultural trade protection, land mismanagement, urban bias in expenditures, and institutional rigidity., Poor nations are responsible for very little pollution because poverty allows little waste or expenditures for polluting, synthetic technologies. The proximal causes of pollution include numbers and rate of growth of populations responsible for the pollution. Since change in the ultimate cause of pollution remains out of reach, altering the numbers of polluters can make a difference. Predictions are made for proportions of the world's total waste production, assuming current 1.6 tons/capita for developed countries and 0.17 tons/capita for developing countries. If developing countries grow at current rates and become more wealthy, they will be emitting half the world's waste by 2025. ON the other hand, unsustainable population growth goes along with inadequate investment in human capital: education, health, employment, infrastructure. The solution is to improve farming technologies in the 117 non-self-sufficient countries, fund development in the most unsustainable enclaves of growing countries, break institutionalized socio-political rigidity in these enclaves, and focus on

  18. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of BLAD in Cattle Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Elena Ilie

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD is an autosomal recessive disorder with negative impact on dairy cattle breeding. The molecular basis of BLAD is a single point mutation (A→G, resulting in a single amino acid substitution (aspartic acid → glycine at amino acid 128 in the adhesion molecule CD18. The object of this study was to establish a fast and sensitive molecular genotyping assay to detect BLAD carriers using high-resolution melting (HRM curve analysis. We tested animals with known genotypes for BLAD that were previously confirmed by PCR-RFLP method, and then examined the sensitivity of mutation detection using PCR followed by HRM curve analysis. BLAD carriers were readily detectable using HRM assay. Thus, the PCR-HRM genotyping method is a rapid, easily interpretable, reliable and cost-effective assay for BLAD mutant allele detection. This assay can be useful in cattle genotyping and genetic selection.

  19. Hispanic-American rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anand D; Kridel, Russell W H

    2010-05-01

    Hispanic Americans have quickly become a major ethnic group in the United States who are interested in nasal cosmetic surgery. They are derived from a variety of ethnicities with a corresponding diversity in nasal anatomy. Rhinoplasty in Hispanic Americans has evolved from imitating neoclassical canons to preservation of ethnic characteristics. Common problems addressed in this population are narrowing and augmenting the height of the nasal dorsum; increasing projection, rotation, and definition of the nasal tip; and reducing alar flare and base width. Anatomic goals for surgery should satisfy both individual desires and ethnic features that are to be created or to be preserved. Here we describe the techniques used by the senior author (R.W.H.K.). Thieme Medical Publishers.

  20. Pediatric Cushing disease: disparities in disease severity and outcomes in the Hispanic and African-American populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkourogianni, Alexandra; Sinaii, Ninet; Jackson, Sharon H; Karageorgiadis, Alexander S; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Keil, Margaret F; Zilbermint, Mihail; Chittiboina, Prashant; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lodish, Maya B

    2017-08-01

    BackgroundLittle is known about the contribution of racial and socioeconomic disparities to severity and outcomes in children with Cushing disease (CD).MethodsA total of 129 children with CD, 45 Hispanic/Latino or African-American (HI/AA) and 84 non-Hispanic White (non-HW), were included in this study. A 10-point index for rating severity (CD severity) incorporated the degree of hypercortisolemia, glucose tolerance, hypertension, anthropomorphic measurements, disease duration, and tumor characteristics. Race, ethnicity, age, gender, local obesity prevalence, estimated median income, and access to care were assessed in regression analyses of CD severity.ResultsThe mean CD severity in the HI/AA group was worse than that in the non-HW group (4.9±2.0 vs. 4.1±1.9, P=0.023); driving factors included higher cortisol levels and larger tumor size. Multiple regression models confirmed that race (P=0.027) and older age (P=0.014) were the most important predictors of worse CD severity. When followed up a median of 2.3 years after surgery, the relative risk for persistent CD combined with recurrence was 2.8 times higher in the HI/AA group compared with that in the non-HW group (95% confidence interval: 1.2-6.5).ConclusionOur data show that the driving forces for the discrepancy in severity of CD are older age and race/ethnicity. Importantly, the risk for persistent and recurrent CD was higher in minority children.

  1. Social Media Use and its Association with Sexual Risk and Parental Monitoring among a Primarily Hispanic Adolescent Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Dina L; Garnett, Chelsea; Younger, Alayna P; Stockwell, Melissa S; Soren, Karen; Catallozzi, Marina; Neu, Natalie

    2017-08-01

    In this study we assessed the association between social media (SM) use with sexual risk, and with parental monitoring among Hispanic adolescents. Self-administered anonymous survey. Urban primary care clinics. Primarily Hispanic adolescents ages 13-21 years old. Chi-square and regression analyses controlling for age and gender were used to assess associations between SM use or sexting and sexual behaviors (kissing, touching genitals, vaginal oral, and anal sex), sexual risk (≥4 lifetime partners, >1 recent partner, inconsistent condom use, and history of sexually transmitted infection diagnosis) and contraceptive use. Similar analyses were used to assess relationships between adolescent-reported parental monitoring and SM use, and sexting. Participants with frequent SM use (social networking sites or apps) had greater odds of all sexual activity. Ever sexters had greater odds of penetrative sex only (oral, vaginal, and anal sex) as well as use of hormonal contraception (except long-acting reversible contraception). Approximately half of the participants reported parental access to profiles on SM. Female participants had higher odds of parental access to online profiles and having a parental discussion of privacy settings. Those having privacy discussions had greater odds of "private" profiles on SM and lower odds of ever sexting. Frequent SM use and sexting was associated with an increase in all types of sexual behaviors; sexting alone was associated with more lifetime and recent sexual partners. Parental discussion of privacy settings was found to be protective. Providers and parents should be aware of the effect of SM use on sexual behaviors. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nursing as a Career Choice by Hispanic/Latino College Students: A Multi-Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, Linda M; Kuk, Linda

    2015-09-01

    Despite rapid growth in the Hispanic/Latino population, there is significant underrepresentation of Hispanic/Latino individuals in the nursing workforce and nursing programs. This study investigated college students' interest in and self-efficacy for nursing as a career choice, and factors that students believe will impact their success in a nursing program. A nonexperimental, associational research study using a survey instrument was conducted at three comprehensive, public state universities and one community college in the western United States in an area with a significant Hispanic/Latino population. Descriptive and multivariable correlation statistical analysis suggested that college students' interest in and self-efficacy for nursing as a career choice was similar for both Hispanic/Latino and non-Hispanic/Latino students in the sample. Perceived facilitators for success in a nursing program were identified. Findings can be used to develop strategies and programs to enhance the success of Hispanic/Latino students interested in nursing as a career choice. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Rapid adaptive evolution in novel environments acts as an architect of population range expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szűcs, M; Vahsen, M L; Melbourne, B A; Hoover, C; Weiss-Lehman, C; Hufbauer, R A

    2017-12-19

    Colonization and expansion into novel landscapes determine the distribution and abundance of species in our rapidly changing ecosystems worldwide. Colonization events are crucibles for rapid evolution, but it is not known whether evolutionary changes arise mainly after successful colonization has occurred, or if evolution plays an immediate role, governing the growth and expansion speed of colonizing populations. There is evidence that spatial evolutionary processes can speed range expansion within a few generations because dispersal tendencies may evolve upwards at range edges. Additionally, rapid adaptation to a novel environment can increase population growth rates, which also promotes spread. However, the role of adaptive evolution and the relative contributions of spatial evolution and adaptation to expansion are unclear. Using a model system, red flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum), we either allowed or constrained evolution of populations colonizing a novel environment and measured population growth and spread. At the end of the experiment we assessed the fitness and dispersal tendency of individuals originating either from the core or edge of evolving populations or from nonevolving populations in a common garden. Within six generations, evolving populations grew three times larger and spread 46% faster than populations in which evolution was constrained. Increased size and expansion speed were strongly driven by adaptation, whereas spatial evolutionary processes acting on edge subpopulations contributed less. This experimental evidence demonstrates that rapid evolution drives both population growth and expansion speed and is thus crucial to consider for managing biological invasions and successfully introducing or reintroducing species for management and conservation.

  4. FastStats: Health of Mexican American Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or Alaska Native Population Health of Asian or Pacific Islander Population Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population Health of Hispanic or Latino Population Health of Mexican American Population Health of White non-Hispanic Population ...

  5. Recent Hispanic Polls: A Summary of Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Emily G.

    Summarized in this document are findings from several recent surveys of Hispanic Americans. Each of the surveys had a different purpose and their samples were extremely varied. None had a sample design which would allow results to be generalized to reflect the attitudes or characteristics of the overall U.S. Hispanic population. Each, however,…

  6. Responses of a vulnerable Hispanic population in New Jersey to Hurricane Sandy: Access to care, medical needs, concerns and ecological ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Pittfield, Taryn; Jeitner, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Recent increases in hurricanes led to a need to evaluate access to medical care, medical needs, and personal and community impact on vulnerable populations, particularly elderly, low income, and minority communities. This article examines access to care, interruptions in medical services, personal impact from Hurricane Sandy, and agreement with ecological statements related to storms, flooding and damages in Hispanic/Latino patients receiving health care at Federally Qualified Health Centers in New Jersey. Only 10 % of 335 Hispanic interviewees were U.S. born. Self-identified personal impact was a better indicator of effects from Sandy, health center use, and medical issues, than was a community impact rating. Respondents who gave a high personal impact rating were more likely to have evacuated, had longer power outage, were more likely to need medical care, had more trouble getting to centers, and had more medical interruptions during Sandy. A higher percentage of respondents who evacuated, needed the center, had trouble getting there, and had more “medical need” than those who did not evacuate. The greatest impacts were on respondents who were told to evacuate before the storm, but did not (46 % had “medical need”). The respondents had high agreement ratings for “storms are due to climate change”, followed by “frequent and stronger storms will come more often”, “flooding is due to sea level rise”, and “changing climate is due mainly to human activity and not natural causes”. These ratings will aid public policy makers and planners in developing resiliency strategies for vulnerable coastal communities. PMID:28644717

  7. Evolution in an Afternoon: Rapid Natural Selection and Adaptation of Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, Roger

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, rapid and low-cost technique for growing bacteria (or other microbes) in an environmental gradient, in order to determine the tolerance of the microbial population to varying concentrations of sodium chloride ions, and suggests how the evolutionary response of a microbial population to the selection pressure of the…

  8. Hispanic Assimilation and Fertility in New Destinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichter, Daniel T; Johnson, Kenneth M; Turner, Richard N; Churilla, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates comparative patterns of fertility in new Hispanic destinations and established gateways using pooled cross-sectional data from the 2005-2009 microdata files of the American Community Survey. Changing Hispanic fertility provides a useful indicator of cultural incorporation. Analyses show that high fertility among Hispanics has been driven in part by the Mexican-origin and other new immigrant populations (e.g., noncitizens, those with poor English language skills, etc.). However, high fertility rates among Hispanics - and Mexican-origin Hispanics in particular - cannot be explained entirely by socio-demographic characteristics that place them at higher risk of fertility. For 2005-2009, Hispanic fertility rates were 48 percent higher than fertility among whites; they were roughly 25 percent higher after accounting for differences in key social characteristics, such as age, nativity, county of origin, and education. Contrary to most previous findings of spatial assimilation among in-migrants, fertility rates among Hispanics in new destinations exceeded fertility in established gateways by 18 percent. In the multivariate analyses, Hispanics in new destinations were roughly 10 percent more likely to have had a child in the past year than those living in established gateways. Results are consistent with sub-cultural explanations of Hispanic fertility and raise new questions about the spatial patterning of assimilation and the formation of ethnic enclaves outside traditional settlement areas.

  9. Rapid differentiation of sexual signals in invasive toads: call variation among populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumiba, Kiyomi; Duffy, Richard L.; Parsons, Scott A.; Alford, Ross A.; Schwarzkopf, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Advertisement calls tend to differ among populations, based on morphological and environmental factors, or simply geographic distance, in many taxa. Invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) were introduced to Australia in 1935 and their distribution has expanded at increasing rates over time. Rapid evolution occurred in morphological and behavioural characters that accelerate dispersal, but the effects of rapid expansion on sexual signals have not been examined. We collected advertisement calls from four populations of different ages since invasion, and analysed the geographic differentiation of seven call parameters. Our comparisons indicate that the calls of R. marina differ among Australian populations. The signal variation was not simply clinal with respect to population age, climate, or morphological differentiation. We suggest that selection on signalling among populations has been idiosyncratic and may reflect local female preferences or adaptation to environmental factors that are not clinal such as energy availability. PMID:27328666

  10. Loneliness among very old Mexican Americans: Findings from the Hispanic established populations epidemiologic studies of the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Gerst-Emerson, Kerstin; Shovali, Tamar E.; Markides, Kyriakos S.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of researchers are finding that loneliness is a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality, and several of variables have been found to be closely related to the experience of loneliness among elders. However, much of the research has focused on the general older population, with no research to date focusing on minority populations. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and the correlates of loneliness among a community-dwelling older Mexican ...

  11. Rapid climate change did not cause population collapse at the end of the European Bronze Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armit, Ian; Swindles, Graeme T; Becker, Katharina; Plunkett, Gill; Blaauw, Maarten

    2014-12-02

    The impact of rapid climate change on contemporary human populations is of global concern. To contextualize our understanding of human responses to rapid climate change it is necessary to examine the archeological record during past climate transitions. One episode of abrupt climate change has been correlated with societal collapse at the end of the northwestern European Bronze Age. We apply new methods to interrogate archeological and paleoclimate data for this transition in Ireland at a higher level of precision than has previously been possible. We analyze archeological (14)C dates to demonstrate dramatic population collapse and present high-precision proxy climate data, analyzed through Bayesian methods, to provide evidence for a rapid climatic transition at ca. 750 calibrated years B.C. Our results demonstrate that this climatic downturn did not initiate population collapse and highlight the nondeterministic nature of human responses to past climate change.

  12. Rapid evolution leads to differential population dynamics and top-down control in resurrectedDaphniapopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goitom, Eyerusalem; Kilsdonk, Laurens J; Brans, Kristien; Jansen, Mieke; Lemmens, Pieter; De Meester, Luc

    2018-01-01

    There is growing evidence of rapid genetic adaptation of natural populations to environmental change, opening the perspective that evolutionary trait change may subsequently impact ecological processes such as population dynamics, community composition, and ecosystem functioning. To study such eco-evolutionary feedbacks in natural populations, however, requires samples across time. Here, we capitalize on a resurrection ecology study that documented rapid and adaptive evolution in a natural population of the water flea Daphnia magna in response to strong changes in predation pressure by fish, and carry out a follow-up mesocosm experiment to test whether the observed genetic changes influence population dynamics and top-down control of phytoplankton. We inoculated populations of the water flea D. magna derived from three time periods of the same natural population known to have genetically adapted to changes in predation pressure in replicate mesocosms and monitored both Daphnia population densities and phytoplankton biomass in the presence and absence of fish. Our results revealed differences in population dynamics and top-down control of algae between mesocosms harboring populations from the time period before, during, and after a peak in fish predation pressure caused by human fish stocking. The differences, however, deviated from our a priori expectations. An S-map approach on time series revealed that the interactions between adults and juveniles strongly impacted the dynamics of populations and their top-down control on algae in the mesocosms, and that the strength of these interactions was modulated by rapid evolution as it occurred in nature. Our study provides an example of an evolutionary response that fundamentally alters the processes structuring population dynamics and impacts ecosystem features.

  13. Hispanics and Health Care in the United States: Access, Information and Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Dawson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Hispanic population is the largest growing minority group in the United States. A helpful resource to assist in designing programs and interventions aimed at Hispanic communities was recently completed by the Pew Hispanic Center and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Over 4,000 Hispanic adults were included in the study which highlights how the diverse characteristics of the Hispanic population affect their health care needs and their comprehension of health care resources.

  14. Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you Breadcrumb Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women It is a common misconception ... Are Available? Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  15. Barriers to and Methods of Help Seeking for Domestic Violence Victimization: A Comparison of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Women Residing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Ana J; Karlsson, Marie E; Jackson, Jennifer C; Andrews, Arthur R; Villalobos, Bianca T

    2018-02-01

    This study examined strategies Hispanic and non-Hispanic White victims of domestic violence use to manage violence and leave their relationships. Participants ( N = 76, 41% Hispanic) completed self-report questionnaires and a semistructured interview with a language-congruent research assistant. Hispanics reported child care needs and fears of social embarrassment as barriers to leaving, while non-Hispanic Whites reported fewer social supports as a barrier. Hispanics were more likely to use legal resources for help, while non-Hispanic Whites used more informal resources. Recognizing unique barriers to leaving abusive relationships and accessing help can guide service providers and others to target vulnerable populations more effectively.

  16. Cross-sectional study of HPV-16 infection in a population-based subsample of Hispanic adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, A P; Unger, E R; Muñoz, C; Panicker, G; Tortolero-Luna, G; Soto-Salgado, M; Otero, Y; Suárez, E; Pérez, C M

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to estimate the prevalence and correlates of seropositivity to human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 in a subsample of adults who participated in the parent study Epidemiology of Hepatitis C in the adult population of Puerto Rico (PR). Setting The parent study was a population-based household survey aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of hepatitis C and other viral infections (hepatitis A, hepatitis B, HIV, and herpes simplex type 2) in PR (n=1654) between 2005 and 2008. Participants A subsample of the last 450 consecutive adults aged 21–64 years, recruited between February 2007 and January 2008, who participated in the parent study and agreed to participate in HPV testing. Primary and secondary outcome measures The samples were tested by ELISA for HPV-16 viral-like particle-specific immunoglobulin G. Information on sociodemographic, health, and lifestyle characteristics was collected. Logistic regression modelling was used to estimate the prevalence odds ratio (POR) to assess factors associated to HPV-16 seropositivity. Results Prevalence of seropositivity to HPV-16 was 11.3%. Seroprevalence was higher in women (15.8%) than men (5.6%; p=0.001). After adjusting for age and sex, ever smokers (POR 2.06, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.92) and participants with at least five lifetime sexual partners (POR 2.91, 95% CI 1.24 to 6.81) were more likely to be HPV-16 seropositive. Conclusions HPV-16 seropositivity is similar to that reported in the USA (10.4%) for NHANES 2003–2004 participants, although different assays were used in these studies. While future studies should evaluate HPV seroprevalence using a larger population-based sample, our results highlight the need to further understand the burden of HPV infection and HPV-related malignancies in PR, population with a low vaccine uptake. PMID:24496698

  17. Changing Hispanic Demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Emily Gantz

    This report provides a demographic overview of Hispanics in the United States. Information was drawn largely from recent census figures. The following highlights are reported: (1) Hispanic Americans are the youngest and fastest growing minority group, but they are also more likely than non-Hispanics to drop out of school, be unemployed or…

  18. Rapid Point-of-Care Diagnostic Test for Syphilis in High-Risk Populations, Manaus, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzaken, Adele S.; de Andrade Rodrigues, Ệnio José; Mayaud, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the acceptability and operational suitability of a rapid point-of-care syphilis test and identified barriers to testing among high-risk groups and healthcare professionals in a sexually transmitted infections clinic in Manaus, Brazil. Use of this test could considerably alleviate the impact of syphilis in hard-to-reach populations in the Amazon region of Brazil. PMID:19331762

  19. A Pilot Study of Rapid Hepatitis C Testing in Probation and Parole Populations in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Nickolas D; Patry, Emily J; Bazerman, Lauri B; Noska, Amanda; Kuo, Irene; Kurth, Ann; Beckwith, Curt G

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects between five and seven million individuals in the United States and chronic infection can lead to liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Probation/parole offices are a novel setting for rapid HCV testing, providing outreach to populations at increased risk for HCV infection and/or transmitting HCV to others. While some correctional facilities offer HCV testing, many individuals who present to probation/parole offices are never or briefly incarcerated and may not access medical services. We conducted a rapid HCV testing pilot at probation/parole offices in Rhode Island. Overall, 130 people accepted rapid HCV testing, of whom 12 had reactive tests. Only four of these individuals presented to a community-based clinic for confirmatory testing, despite being offered a monetary incentive. Identifying and addressing barriers to HCV confirmatory testing and follow-up care is critical to increasing the uptake of HCV care and treatment in this vulnerable population.

  20. Rapid declines of large mammal populations after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragina, Eugenia V; Ives, A R; Pidgeon, A M; Kuemmerle, T; Baskin, L M; Gubar, Y P; Piquer-Rodríguez, M; Keuler, N S; Petrosyan, V G; Radeloff, V C

    2015-06-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that socioeconomic shocks strongly affect wildlife populations, but quantitative evidence is sparse. The collapse of socialism in Russia in 1991 caused a major socioeconomic shock, including a sharp increase in poverty. We analyzed population trends of 8 large mammals in Russia from 1981 to 2010 (i.e., before and after the collapse). We hypothesized that the collapse would first cause population declines, primarily due to overexploitation, and then population increases due to adaptation of wildlife to new environments following the collapse. The long-term Database of the Russian Federal Agency of Game Mammal Monitoring, consisting of up to 50,000 transects that are monitored annually, provided an exceptional data set for investigating these population trends. Three species showed strong declines in population growth rates in the decade following the collapse, while grey wolf (Canis lupus) increased by more than 150%. After 2000 some trends reversed. For example, roe deer (Capreolus spp.) abundance in 2010 was the highest of any period in our study. Likely reasons for the population declines in the 1990s include poaching and the erosion of wildlife protection enforcement. The rapid increase of the grey wolf populations is likely due to the cessation of governmental population control. In general, the widespread declines in wildlife populations after the collapse of the Soviet Union highlight the magnitude of the effects that socioeconomic shocks can have on wildlife populations and the possible need for special conservation efforts during such times. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. And This, Amigos, Is (Again)? the Decade of the Hispanic!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Carlos A.

    The U.S. Hispanic population is increasing faster than the non-Hispanic White population, and during the first half of the 21st century, the United States will have a "minority majority." California will reach that status in the next 4-7 years. Focus should not be on the "threat" that Latino population growth brings, hoping to…

  2. Recruitment and Retention of Hispanic Nursing Students: Through the Lens of Associate Degree Nursing Program Administrators and Hispanic Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handlos DeVoe, Debra Jean

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic population in the United States is changing and will constitute 30% of the population in 2050; however, the Hispanic registered nurse population is less than 3%. Cultural differences between patients and nurses may cause harm and a mistrust that can affect patient outcomes. A mixed methods convergent research study was done by an…

  3. Implementing a clinical practice guideline for the treatment of bronchiolitis in a high-risk Hispanic pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Flores, Dora; Busen, Nancy H; Smout, Randall; Velasquez, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization among infants and young children. Because of its frequency, a clinical practice guideline for bronchiolitis was implemented in this population in an effort to decrease costs and the number of diagnostic evaluations performed and medications used without increasing length of stay or transfers to the pediatric intensive care unit. A retrospective chart review of 322 pediatric admissions to a rural community hospital was conducted (169 before guideline implementation and 153 after guideline implementation), and data were categorically stratified into three groups for comparison purposes. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data, with a p value bronchiolitis. Statistically significant decreases in cost per day and decreases in use of antibiotics and chest radiographs were achieved without increasing length of stay or pediatric intensive care unit transfers. This project demonstrated feasibility in implementing an evidence-based clinical practice guideline in a rural hospital to improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Self-Efficacy, Health Literacy, and Nutrition and Exercise Behaviors in a Low-Income, Hispanic Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntzviller, Lisa M; King, Andy J; Jensen, Jakob D; Davis, LaShara A

    2017-04-01

    Public health goals have emphasized healthy nutrition and exercise behaviors, especially in underserved populations. According to social cognitive theory (SCT), self-efficacy and capability (e.g., health literacy) may interact to predict preventative behaviors. We surveyed 100 low-income, native Spanish-speakers living in the United States who were low in English proficiency and predominantly of Mexican heritage. Participants reported their nutritional and exercise self-efficacy, Spanish health literacy, and nutrition and physical activity behaviors. Consistent with SCT, the interaction of self-efficacy and health literacy significantly predicted fruit and vegetable consumption and weekly exercise, and marginally predicted avoidance of high fat foods. For all three interactions, higher health literacy levels strengthened the positive relationship between self-efficacy and health behaviors. The results offer support for the tenets of SCT and suggest-for low-income, Spanish-speaking adults-that a combination of behavioral confidence and literacy capability are necessary to enact appropriate health behaviors.

  5. Hispanic Families and Their Culture: Implications for FCS Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Barbara N.; Bencomo, Angelina

    2015-01-01

    Hispanic children constitute the largest population of racial/ethnic minority students in the nation's public schools. By the year 2023, the Hispanic enrollment is expected to increase to 30% of the total school population (pre-K through 12) in the United States. Because cultural background affects student learning, family and consumer sciences…

  6. Galaxy Zoo: evidence for rapid, recent quenching within a population of AGN host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smethurst, R. J.; Lintott, C. J.; Simmons, B. D.; Schawinski, K.; Bamford, S. P.; Cardamone, C. N.; Kruk, S. J.; Masters, K. L.; Urry, C. M.; Willett, K. W.; Wong, O. I.

    2016-12-01

    We present a population study of the star formation history of 1244 Type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGN) host galaxies, compared to 6107 inactive galaxies. A Bayesian method is used to determine individual galaxy star formation histories, which are then collated to visualize the distribution for quenching and quenched galaxies within each population. We find evidence for some of the Type 2 AGN host galaxies having undergone a rapid drop in their star formation rate within the last 2 Gyr. AGN feedback is therefore important at least for this population of galaxies. This result is not seen for the quenching and quenched inactive galaxies whose star formation histories are dominated by the effects of downsizing at earlier epochs, a secondary effect for the AGN host galaxies. We show that histories of rapid quenching cannot account fully for the quenching of all the star formation in a galaxy's lifetime across the population of quenched AGN host galaxies, and that histories of slower quenching, attributed to secular (non-violent) evolution, are also key in their evolution. This is in agreement with recent results showing that both merger-driven and non-merger processes are contributing to the co-evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes. The availability of gas in the reservoirs of a galaxy, and its ability to be replenished, appear to be the key drivers behind this co-evolution.

  7. Recruiting Hispanics to dietetics: WIC educators' perceptions of the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Cynthia J; Henley, Samantha M; Daniluk, Patricia; Rengers, Bruce; Fajardo-Lira, Claudia; Gillette, Cynthia Dormer; Bizeau, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although Hispanics comprise approximately 12% of the population, only 3% of registered dietitians (RDs) are Hispanic. This pilot study explored non-RD Hispanic Women, Infant and Children (WIC) educators' perceptions of dietetics and identified recruitment strategies to increase Hispanic representation. Hispanic WIC educators (n = 48) completed a questionnaire to determine reasons for not pursuing RD status, reasons Hispanics are underrepresented in dietetics, and recruitment strategies. Thirty-eight percent of respondents planned on becoming an RD; 56% had considered becoming an RD. Eighty-two percent postponed pursing the RD due to expense and 65% due to life circumstances. Reasons cited for underrepresentation of Hispanics in the field included lack of knowledge about dietetics, lack of Hispanic role models, and length and expense of training. Suggested recruitment strategies included scholarships, mentoring programs, and awareness campaigns with schools and community-based organizations serving Hispanics. Many WIC educators are interested in becoming RDs, but barriers prevent them from pursing the necessary education and training. To support WIC educators in becoming RDs, the length and expense of the education/ training should be addressed. Increasing awareness of the profession in the Hispanic community and providing financial support would help recruit more Hispanics to the dietetics major.

  8. Six rapid assessments of alcohol and other substance use in populations displaced by conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelekan Moruf

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance use among populations displaced by conflict is a neglected area of public health. Alcohol, khat, benzodiazepine, opiate, and other substance use have been documented among a range of displaced populations, with wide-reaching health and social impacts. Changing agendas in humanitarian response-including increased prominence of mental health and chronic illness-have so far failed to be translated into meaningful interventions for substance use. Methods Studies were conducted from 2006 to 2008 in six different settings of protracted displacement, three in Africa (Kenya, Liberia, northern Uganda and three in Asia (Iran, Pakistan, and Thailand. We used intervention-oriented qualitative Rapid Assessment and Response methods, adapted from two decades of experience among non-displaced populations. The main sources of data were individual and group interviews conducted with a culturally representative (non-probabilistic sample of community members and service providers. Results Widespread use of alcohol, particularly artisanally-produced alcohol, in Kenya, Liberia, Uganda, and Thailand, and opiates in Iran and Pakistan was believed by participants to be linked to a range of health, social and protection problems, including illness, injury (intentional and unintentional, gender-based violence, risky behaviour for HIV and other sexually transmitted infection and blood-borne virus transmission, as well as detrimental effects to household economy. Displacement experiences, including dispossession, livelihood restriction, hopelessness and uncertain future may make communities particularly vulnerable to substance use and its impact, and changing social norms and networks (including the surrounding population may result in changed - and potentially more harmful-patterns of use. Limited access to services, including health services, and exclusion from relevant host population programmes, may exacerbate the harmful consequences

  9. Severe injury among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children in Washington state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Catherine J; Rivara, Frederick P; Cummings, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The authors' anecdotal experience at a regional Level I trauma center was that Hispanic children were overrepresented among burn patients, particularly among children with burns due to scalding from hot food. This study describes injury incidence and severity among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white infants, children, and adolescents with serious traumatic injuries in Washington State. Data from the Washington State Trauma Registry for 1995-1997 were used to identify injured individuals aged injury incidence rates for Hispanic children relative to non-Hispanic white children were calculated using denominator estimates derived from U.S. Census Bureau population data. Hispanic children and non-Hispanic white children were also compared on several measures of severity of injury. In 1995-1997, serious traumatic injuries were reported to the Registry for 231 Hispanic children aged white children (56 per 100,000 person-years), yielding an overall rate ratio (RR) of 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8, 1.1). Motor vehicle crashes and falls accounted for one-third to one-half of the injuries for each group. Infants, children, and adolescents identified as Hispanic had higher rates of injuries related to hot objects (i.e., burns) (RR=2.3; 95% CI 1.3, 4.1), guns (RR=2.2; 95% CI 1.5 to 3.3), and being cut or pierced (RR=3.5; 95% CI 2.2 to 5.5). The Hispanic group had a lower injury rate for motor vehicle accidents (RR=0.7; 95% CI 0.5, 0.9). Mortality rates were similar (RR=1.1; 95% CI 0.7, 1.7). The mean length of hospital stay was 5.5 days for the Hispanic group and 8.8 days for the non-Hispanic white group (difference=3.3 days; 95% CI -0.7, 7.4). The study found little difference between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white infants, children, and adolescents in the burden of traumatic pediatric injury. However, burns, guns, drowning, and being pierced/cut appeared to be particularly important mechanisms of injury for Hispanic children. More specific investigations targeted toward

  10. The population genomics of rapid adaptation: disentangling signatures of selection and demography in white sands lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Stefan; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Settles, Matthew L; Hunter, Samuel S; Hardwick, Kayla M; Ormond, Louise; Sousa, Vitor C; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Rosenblum, Erica Bree

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the process of adaptation during rapid environmental change remains one of the central focal points of evolutionary biology. The recently formed White Sands system of southern New Mexico offers an outstanding example of rapid adaptation, with a variety of species having rapidly evolved blanched forms on the dunes that contrast with their close relatives in the surrounding dark soil habitat. In this study, we focus on two of the White Sands lizard species, Sceloporus cowlesi and Aspidoscelis inornata, for which previous research has linked mutations in the melanocortin-1 receptor gene (Mc1r) to blanched coloration. We sampled populations both on and off the dunes and used a custom sequence capture assay based on probed fosmid libraries to obtain >50 kb of sequence around Mc1r and hundreds of other random genomic locations. We then used model-based statistical inference methods to describe the demographic and adaptive history characterizing the colonization of White Sands. We identified a number of similarities between the two focal species, including strong evidence of selection in the blanched populations in the Mc1r region. We also found important differences between the species, suggesting different colonization times, different genetic architecture underlying the blanched phenotype and different ages of the beneficial alleles. Finally, the beneficial allele is dominant in S. cowlesi and recessive in A. inornata, allowing for a rare empirical test of theoretically expected patterns of selective sweeps under these differing models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Postcranial sex estimation of individuals considered Hispanic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tise, Meredith L; Spradley, M Katherine; Anderson, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    When forensic anthropologists estimate the sex of Hispanic skeletal remains using nonpopulation specific metric methods, initial observations cause males to frequently misclassify as female. To help improve these methods, this research uses postcranial measurements from United States-Mexico border migrant fatalities at the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner in Tucson, Arizona, as well as Hispanic individuals from the Forensic Anthropology Data Bank. Using a total of 114 males and 28 females, sectioning points and discriminant functions provide classification rates as high as 89.43% for Hispanic individuals. A test sample assessed the reliability of these techniques resulting in accuracy up to 99.65%. The clavicle maximum length measurement provides the best univariate estimate of sex, while the radius provides the best multivariate estimated of sex. The results of this research highlight the need for population specific data in the creation of a biological profile, especially when working with individuals considered Hispanic. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. China's rapidly aging population creates policy challenges in shaping a viable long-term care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhanlian; Liu, Chang; Guan, Xinping; Mor, Vincent

    2012-12-01

    In China, formal long-term care services for the large aging population have increased to meet escalating demands as demographic shifts and socioeconomic changes have eroded traditional elder care. We analyze China's evolving long-term care landscape and trace major government policies and private-sector initiatives shaping it. Although home and community-based services remain spotty, institutional care is booming with little regulatory oversight. Chinese policy makers face mounting challenges overseeing the rapidly growing residential care sector, given the tension arising from policy inducements to further institutional growth, a weak regulatory framework, and the lack of enforcement capacity. We recommend addressing the following pressing policy issues: building a balanced system of services and avoiding an "institutional bias" that promotes rapid growth of elder care institutions over home or community-based care; strengthening regulatory oversight and quality assurance with information systems; and prioritizing education and training initiatives to grow a professionalized long-term care workforce.

  13. Emerging infectious disease leads to rapid population declines of common British birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Robinson

    Full Text Available Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly cited as threats to wildlife, livestock and humans alike. They can threaten geographically isolated or critically endangered wildlife populations; however, relatively few studies have clearly demonstrated the extent to which emerging diseases can impact populations of common wildlife species. Here, we report the impact of an emerging protozoal disease on British populations of greenfinch Carduelis chloris and chaffinch Fringilla coelebs, two of the most common birds in Britain. Morphological and molecular analyses showed this to be due to Trichomonas gallinae. Trichomonosis emerged as a novel fatal disease of finches in Britain in 2005 and rapidly became epidemic within greenfinch, and to a lesser extent chaffinch, populations in 2006. By 2007, breeding populations of greenfinches and chaffinches in the geographic region of highest disease incidence had decreased by 35% and 21% respectively, representing mortality in excess of half a million birds. In contrast, declines were less pronounced or absent in these species in regions where the disease was found in intermediate or low incidence. Also, populations of dunnock Prunella modularis, which similarly feeds in gardens, but in which T. gallinae was rarely recorded, did not decline. This is the first trichomonosis epidemic reported in the scientific literature to negatively impact populations of free-ranging non-columbiform species, and such levels of mortality and decline due to an emerging infectious disease are unprecedented in British wild bird populations. This disease emergence event demonstrates the potential for a protozoan parasite to jump avian host taxonomic groups with dramatic effect over a short time period.

  14. Emerging Infectious Disease Leads to Rapid Population Declines of Common British Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toms, Mike P.; Peck, Kirsi M.; Kirkwood, James K.; Chantrey, Julian; Clatworthy, Innes R.; Evans, Andy D.; Hughes, Laura A.; Hutchinson, Oliver C.; John, Shinto K.; Pennycott, Tom W.; Perkins, Matthew W.; Rowley, Peter S.; Simpson, Vic R.; Tyler, Kevin M.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly cited as threats to wildlife, livestock and humans alike. They can threaten geographically isolated or critically endangered wildlife populations; however, relatively few studies have clearly demonstrated the extent to which emerging diseases can impact populations of common wildlife species. Here, we report the impact of an emerging protozoal disease on British populations of greenfinch Carduelis chloris and chaffinch Fringilla coelebs, two of the most common birds in Britain. Morphological and molecular analyses showed this to be due to Trichomonas gallinae. Trichomonosis emerged as a novel fatal disease of finches in Britain in 2005 and rapidly became epidemic within greenfinch, and to a lesser extent chaffinch, populations in 2006. By 2007, breeding populations of greenfinches and chaffinches in the geographic region of highest disease incidence had decreased by 35% and 21% respectively, representing mortality in excess of half a million birds. In contrast, declines were less pronounced or absent in these species in regions where the disease was found in intermediate or low incidence. Also, populations of dunnock Prunella modularis, which similarly feeds in gardens, but in which T. gallinae was rarely recorded, did not decline. This is the first trichomonosis epidemic reported in the scientific literature to negatively impact populations of free-ranging non-columbiform species, and such levels of mortality and decline due to an emerging infectious disease are unprecedented in British wild bird populations. This disease emergence event demonstrates the potential for a protozoan parasite to jump avian host taxonomic groups with dramatic effect over a short time period. PMID:20805869

  15. Hispanic Business Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca-Cola USA, Atlanta, GA.

    This is a corporate policy statement of the Hispanic business agenda of Coca Cola USA, and the results of a community survey conducted to inform that agenda. The statement outlines several areas of company policy as they relate to Hispanic Americans. These areas include regional marketing, promotion, and community relations strategies, a…

  16. Rapid Decrease in Populations of Wild Ring-Tailed Lemurs (Lemur catta) in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, Marni; Clarke, Tara A; Reuter, Kim; Schaeffer, Toby

    2016-01-01

    Lemurs are the most threatened group of mammals on earth. Lemur catta (ring-tailed lemur) represents one of the most iconic lemur species and faces numerous anthropogenic threats in the wild. In this study, we present population estimates from 32 sites across the range of L. catta, collected from primary and secondary data sources, to assess the number of ring-tailed lemurs left in the wild. We estimate that there are approximately 2,220 individual L. catta remaining in the 32 sites considered. We note local extinctions of populations of L. catta in at least 12 of the 32 sites examined, and that significantly more extinctions occurred in areas without some form of protection. This decrease in extant populations could represent a decrease of more than 95% of all ring-tailed lemurs in Madagascar since the year 2000. While these results should be considered preliminary, we stress the rapid decline of the species and note that habitat loss, bushmeat hunting and the illegal pet trade are driving populations to local extinction. Based on the data presented here, urgent and immediate funding and conservation action are crucial to ensure the viability of the remaining wild populations of ring-tailed lemurs. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Pulmonary Disease and Age at Immigration among Hispanics. Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, R Graham; Avilés-Santa, Larissa; Davis, Sonia M; Aldrich, Tom K; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Henderson, Ashley G; Kaplan, Robert C; LaVange, Lisa; Liu, Kiang; Loredo, Jose S; Mendes, Eliana S; Ni, Ai; Ries, Andrew; Salathe, Matthias; Smith, Lewis J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma has been reported to be more prevalent among Hispanics of Puerto Rican heritage than among other Hispanics and among Hispanics born in the United States or who immigrated as children than among those who came as adults; however, direct comparisons across Hispanic groups are lacking. To test whether asthma is more prevalent among Hispanics of Puerto Rican heritage than among other Hispanic groups, whether asthma is associated with age of immigration, and whether chronic obstructive pulmonary disease varies by heritage in a large, population-based cohort of Hispanics in the United States. The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos researchers recruited a population-based probability sample of 16,415 Hispanics/Latinos, 18-74 years of age, in New York City, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego. Participants self-reported Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Central American, or South American heritage; birthplace; and, if relevant, age at immigration. A respiratory questionnaire and standardized spirometry were performed with post-bronchodilator measures for those with airflow limitation. The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma among Puerto Ricans (36.5%; 95% confidence interval, 33.6-39.5%) was higher than among other Hispanics (odds ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 3.3-4.6). Hispanics who were born in the mainland United States or had immigrated as children had a higher asthma prevalence than those who had immigrated as adults (19.6, 19.4, and 14.1%, respectively; P immigration. Asthma was more prevalent among Puerto Ricans, other Hispanics born in the United States, and those who had immigrated as children than among other Hispanics. In contrast, the higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among Puerto Ricans and Cubans was largely reflective of differential smoking patterns and asthma.

  18. Rapid global expansion of the fungal disease chytridiomycosis into declining and healthy amphibian populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Y James

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The fungal disease chytridiomycosis, caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, is enigmatic because it occurs globally in both declining and apparently healthy (non-declining amphibian populations. This distribution has fueled debate concerning whether, in sites where it has recently been found, the pathogen was introduced or is endemic. In this study, we addressed the molecular population genetics of a global collection of fungal strains from both declining and healthy amphibian populations using DNA sequence variation from 17 nuclear loci and a large fragment from the mitochondrial genome. We found a low rate of DNA polymorphism, with only two sequence alleles detected at each locus, but a high diversity of diploid genotypes. Half of the loci displayed an excess of heterozygous genotypes, consistent with a primarily clonal mode of reproduction. Despite the absence of obvious sex, genotypic diversity was high (44 unique genotypes out of 59 strains. We provide evidence that the observed genotypic variation can be generated by loss of heterozygosity through mitotic recombination. One strain isolated from a bullfrog possessed as much allelic diversity as the entire global sample, suggesting the current epidemic can be traced back to the outbreak of a single clonal lineage. These data are consistent with the current chytridiomycosis epidemic resulting from a novel pathogen undergoing a rapid and recent range expansion. The widespread occurrence of the same lineage in both healthy and declining populations suggests that the outcome of the disease is contingent on environmental factors and host resistance.

  19. Validity and feasibility of a satellite imagery-based method for rapid estimation of displaced populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Checchi Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimating the size of forcibly displaced populations is key to documenting their plight and allocating sufficient resources to their assistance, but is often not done, particularly during the acute phase of displacement, due to methodological challenges and inaccessibility. In this study, we explored the potential use of very high resolution satellite imagery to remotely estimate forcibly displaced populations. Methods Our method consisted of multiplying (i manual counts of assumed residential structures on a satellite image and (ii estimates of the mean number of people per structure (structure occupancy obtained from publicly available reports. We computed population estimates for 11 sites in Bangladesh, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Kenya and Mozambique (six refugee camps, three internally displaced persons’ camps and two urban neighbourhoods with a mixture of residents and displaced ranging in population from 1,969 to 90,547, and compared these to “gold standard” reference population figures from census or other robust methods. Results Structure counts by independent analysts were reasonably consistent. Between one and 11 occupancy reports were available per site and most of these reported people per household rather than per structure. The imagery-based method had a precision relative to reference population figures of Conclusions In settings with clearly distinguishable individual structures, the remote, imagery-based method had reasonable accuracy for the purposes of rapid estimation, was simple and quick to implement, and would likely perform better in more current application. However, it may have insurmountable limitations in settings featuring connected buildings or shelters, a complex pattern of roofs and multi-level buildings. Based on these results, we discuss possible ways forward for the method’s development.

  20. [Reference values for cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose in a population of Hispanic children from 6 to 11 y, in the northern border of Mexico and the United States of America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Berumen, Ever; Gómez Miranda, Luis Mario; Torres Balcázar, Elías; Padilla Alvarado, Victor Hugo; Renteria, Ivan

    2014-10-31

    Overweight and obesity in children in the Mexico-USA border have evolved differently to the rest of their respective countries. New reference values of cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose are required to treatment. To determine the reference values of cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose in Hispanic children between 6 and 11 years in the Mexico-USA border. A prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive and observational study. A population of Hispanic children between 6 and 11 years of both boys and girls, belonging to three public institutions in the cities of Ensenada and Chihuahua, randomly selected, were studied. The study variables were the levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) and glucose (G). From 300 subjects studied just 54 children completed the study. Higher average values of TC (168.7 ± 27.2 mg / dl), TG (80.6 ± 48.4 mg / dl) and G (88.3 ± 8.9 mg / dl) were observed. An additional behavior was founded, never reported previously to the limit of the knowledge of the authors; glucose levels of the children studied decreased with increased of cholesterol and triglycerides. To discard a random relationship between the variables, the Pearson correlation coefficient was determined between waist circumference and BMI, verifying an inverse association with G and direct with the TG. The reference values for Hispanic children between 6 and 11 years living on the northern border of Mexico-USA differ with respect to the national average values of the countries studied. Further studies are needed in larger populations to confirm the trend ob served in glucose levels of normal children, overweight and obese. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. Traffic law knowledge disparity between hispanics and non-hispanic whites in California

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, KL; Patel, CV; Vaca, F; Anderson, CL; Mendoza, R; Barton, RL; Lekawa, ME; Hoonpongsimanont, W; Lotfipour, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Hispanic population is one group that is involved in a disproportionately high percentage of fatal motor vehicle collisions in the United States. Study Objectives: This study investigated demographic factors contributing to a lack of knowledge and awareness of traffic laws among Hispanic drivers involved in motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) in southern California. Methods: The cross-sectional study enrolled adults (n = 190) involved in MVCs presenting to a Level I trauma center ...

  2. Cancer survivors in Switzerland: a rapidly growing population to care for

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer survivors are a heterogeneous group with complex health problems. Data concerning its total number and growing dynamics for Switzerland are scarce and outdated. Methods Population and mortality data were retrieved from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (FSO). Incidence and relative survival for invasive cancers were computed using data from the cancer registries Geneva (1970–2009), St. Gallen - Appenzell (1980–2010), Grisons & Glarus (1989–2010), and Valais (1989–2010). We estimated prevalence for 1990–2010 using the Prevalence, Incidence Approach MODel (PIAMOD) method. We calculated trends in prevalence estimates by Joinpoint analysis. Projections were extrapolated using the above models and based on time trends of the period 2007–2010. Results The estimated number of cancer survivors increased from 139′717 in 1990 (2.08% of the population) to 289′797 persons in 2010 (3.70%). The growth rate shows an exponential shape and was 3.3% per year in the period 2008 to 2010. Almost half of the survivors have a history of breast, prostate or colorectal cancer. Among cancer survivors, 55% are women but the increases have been more marked in men (p Switzerland. Conclusions There is a rapidly growing population of cancer survivors in Switzerland whose needs and concerns are largely unknown. PMID:23764068

  3. Rapid Population Growth and Human Carrying Capacity: Two Perspectives. World Bank Staff Working Papers No. 690 and Population and Development Series No. 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar, Dennis J., Ed.; And Others

    Two perspectives on carrying capacity and population growth are examined. The first perspective, "Carrying Capacity and Rapid Population Growth: Definition, Cases, and Consequences" (Robert Muscat), explores the possible meanings of the idea of carrying capacity under developing country conditions, looks at historical and present-day cases of…

  4. Evidence from phylogenetic and genome fingerprinting analyses suggests rapidly changing variation in Halorubrum and Haloarcula populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram Mohan, Nikhil; Fullmer, Matthew S.; Makkay, Andrea M.; Wheeler, Ryan; Ventosa, Antonio; Naor, Adit; Gogarten, J. Peter; Papke, R. Thane

    2014-01-01

    Halobacteria require high NaCl concentrations for growth and are the dominant inhabitants of hypersaline environments above 15% NaCl. They are well-documented to be highly recombinogenic, both in frequency and in the range of exchange partners. In this study, we examine the genetic and genomic variation of cultured, naturally co-occurring environmental populations of Halobacteria. Sequence data from multiple loci (~2500 bp) identified many closely and more distantly related strains belonging to the genera Halorubrum and Haloarcula. Genome fingerprinting using a random priming PCR amplification method to analyze these isolates revealed diverse banding patterns across each of the genera and surprisingly even for isolates that are identical at the nucleotide level for five protein coding sequenced loci. This variance in genome structure even between identical multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) haplotypes indicates that accumulation of genomic variation is rapid: faster than the rate of third codon substitutions. PMID:24782838

  5. Evidence from phylogenetic and genome fingerprinting analyses suggests rapidly changing variation in Halorubrum and Haloarcula populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil eRam Mohan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Halobacteria require high NaCl concentrations for growth and are the dominant inhabitants of hypersaline environments above 15% NaCl. They are well documented to be highly recombinogenic, both in frequency and in the range of exchange partners. In this study, we examine the genetic and genomic variation of cultured, naturally co-occurring environmental populations of Halobacteria. Sequence data from multiple loci (~2500bp identified closely related strains belonging to the genera Halorubrum and Haloarcula. Genome fingerprinting using a random priming PCR amplification method to analyze these isolates revealed diverse banding patterns within and across each of the genera and surprisingly even for isolates that are identical at the nucleotide level for five protein coding sequenced loci. This variance in genome structure even between identical multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA haplotypes suggests that accumulation of variation is rapid, perhaps occurring every generation.

  6. Neptune: a bioinformatics tool for rapid discovery of genomic variation in bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinier, Eric; Zaheer, Rahat; Berry, Chrystal; Weedmark, Kelly A; Domaratzki, Michael; Mabon, Philip; Knox, Natalie C; Reimer, Aleisha R; Graham, Morag R; Chui, Linda; Patterson-Fortin, Laura; Zhang, Jian; Pagotto, Franco; Farber, Jeff; Mahony, Jim; Seyer, Karine; Bekal, Sadjia; Tremblay, Cécile; Isaac-Renton, Judy; Prystajecky, Natalie; Chen, Jessica; Slade, Peter; Van Domselaar, Gary

    2017-10-13

    The ready availability of vast amounts of genomic sequence data has created the need to rethink comparative genomics algorithms using 'big data' approaches. Neptune is an efficient system for rapidly locating differentially abundant genomic content in bacterial populations using an exact k-mer matching strategy, while accommodating k-mer mismatches. Neptune's loci discovery process identifies sequences that are sufficiently common to a group of target sequences and sufficiently absent from non-targets using probabilistic models. Neptune uses parallel computing to efficiently identify and extract these loci from draft genome assemblies without requiring multiple sequence alignments or other computationally expensive comparative sequence analyses. Tests on simulated and real datasets showed that Neptune rapidly identifies regions that are both sensitive and specific. We demonstrate that this system can identify trait-specific loci from different bacterial lineages. Neptune is broadly applicable for comparative bacterial analyses, yet will particularly benefit pathogenomic applications, owing to efficient and sensitive discovery of differentially abundant genomic loci. The software is available for download at: http://github.com/phac-nml/neptune. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Rapid assessment of visual impairment in urban population of Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Noopur; Vashist, Praveen; Malhotra, Sumit; Senjam, Suraj Singh; Misra, Vasundhara; Bhardwaj, Amit

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence, causes and associated demographic factors related to visual impairment amongst the urban population of New Delhi, India. A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in East Delhi district using cluster random sampling methodology. This Rapid Assessment of Visual Impairment (RAVI) survey involved examination of all individuals aged 40 years and above in 24 randomly selected clusters of the district. Visual acuity (VA) assessment and comprehensive ocular examination were done during the door-to-door survey. A questionnaire was used to collect personal and demographic information of the study population. Blindness and Visual Impairment was defined as presenting VA visual impairment. Of 2421 subjects enumerated, 2331 (96.3%) were available for ophthalmic examination. Among those examined, 49.3% were males. The prevalence of visual impairment (VI) in the study population, was 11.4% (95% C.I. 10.1, 12.7) and that of blindness was 1.2% (95% C.I. 0.8, 1.6). Uncorrected refractive error was the leading cause of VI accounting for 53.4% of all VI followed by cataract (33.8%). With multivariable logistic regression, the odds of having VI increased with age (OR = 24.6[95% C.I.: 14.9, 40.7]; p visual impairment is considerable in this region despite availability of adequate eye care facilities. Awareness generation and simple interventions like cataract surgery and provision of spectacles will help to eliminate the major causes of blindness and visual impairment in this region.

  8. Serving Hispanic School-Aged Children in after School Programming: Implications for School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joy Pastan

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. school-age population has been experiencing dramatic demographic changes over the past two decades. Hispanic students constitute the fastest growing student group today, and this growth is expected to continue such that there will be more Hispanic school-aged children than non-Hispanic school-aged children in 2050. Unfortunately, Hispanic…

  9. Promotores de Salud: Educating Hispanic Communities on Heart-Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Amanda; Balcazar, Hector; Hollen, Mary Luna; Nkhoma, Ella; Mas, Francisco Soto

    2007-01-01

    Background: Age-adjusted cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rates for Hispanics are lower than for non-Hispanics. However, CVD is the leading cause of death among Hispanics, and there is an increasing heart health problem among this population. One strategy for preventing CVD is the use of community health workers (CHWs). A CHW is a member of…

  10. Adapting a 1% or less milk campaign for a Hispanic/Latino population: the Adelante Con Leche Semi-descremada 1% experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Arnell J; Mistry, Ritesh; McCarthy, William J; Yancey, Antronette K

    2008-01-01

    Describe and evaluate a media campaign to encourage 1% or nonfat milk consumption. Uncontrolled pre/post test. One largely rural (Santa Paula) and one urban (East Los Angeles) California community. Community residents and milk vendors in primarily low-income Latino/Hispanic communities. The "1% or Less" milk campaign, which promotes substitution of 2% fat or whole milk with 1% or less fat milk was adapted and implemented. Comparison of post-campaign milk sales with pre-campaign sales. Chi-square tests of independence used to compare precampaign and postcampaign sales. There were decreases in the proportion of whole milk sold and increases in the proportion of reduced-fat, low-fat, and nonfat milk sold in the weeks following each campaign (Santa Paula: p = .0165; East Los Angeles: p < .0001). However, follow-up data from East Los Angeles suggest that these changes were not sustained. The proportions of the different units of milk sold also changed in the weeks following each campaign (p < .0001). Sales of whole milk gallon units decreased from 36.3% to 28.4% in Santa Paula, and from 43.5% to 10.2% in East Los Angeles. Highly focused campaigns to promote substitution of high-fat milk with low-fat or nonfat milk can show dramatic initial changes in sales patterns. However, whether such campaigns can have a sustained impact in largely Latino/Hispanic communities is not evident.

  11. Drinking in different social contexts among white, black, and Hispanic men.

    OpenAIRE

    Caetano, R.; HERD, D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes alcohol use by White, Black, and Hispanic men in eight different social settings. Data were obtained from a multi-stage probability sample of the household population of White, Black, and Hispanic adults aged 18 years and over, residing in the 48 contiguous United States. The response rate was 73 percent for Whites, 76 percent for Blacks, and 72 percent for Hispanics. Results show that Whites go more frequently and drink more frequently than Blacks and Hispanics at restau...

  12. Application of Molecular Cytogenetic Technique for Rapid Prenatal Diagnosis of Aneuploidies in Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Nasiri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Classic cell culture and karyotyping is routinely used for prenatal detection of different chromosomal abnormalities. Molecular cytogenetic techniques have also recently been developed and used for this purpose. Quantitative florescence PCR using short tandem repeat (STR markers has more potential for high throughput diagnosis. Marker heterozygosity in short tandem repeats (STR is of critical importance in the clinical applicablity of this method. Materials and Methods: Different STR markers on chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y  were analysed from  amniotic samples to detect related disorders such as Down, Edward, Patau,  Klinefelter sundromes , as well as sex chromosomes numerical abnormalities . Results: In our population some markers (D18S976, DXS6854, D21S11, and D21S1411 showed alleles with sizes out of expected ranges. But others occupied narrower range of predicted distribution. Most markers have enough heterozygosity (66.3-94.7 to be used for prenatal diagnosis. Furthermore, results obtained from full karyotype for all samples were in concordance with results of molecular cytogenetic testing. Conclusion: It is concluded that, in urgent situations, if proper markers used, molecular cytogenetic testing (QF-PCR could be a useful method for rapid prenatal diagnosis (PND in populations with high rate of consanguinity such as Iran.  

  13. Rapid expansion of intravitreal drug injection procedures, 2000 to 2008: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert J; Bronskill, Susan E; Bell, Chaim M; Paterson, J Michael; Whitehead, Marlo; Gill, Sudeep S

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate patterns of care for age-related macular degeneration following the introduction of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. Using a population-based retrospective design, we studied monthly fee claims for intravitreal injections submitted to the Ontario Health Insurance Plan between January 1, 2000, and March 30, 2008, and linked procedures to the physicians who performed them. This database records physician services provided as part of universal health care insurance coverage in Ontario, Canada. This program covers all residents of Ontario, which had an average population of 12.1 million during the study period. Following regulatory approval of bevacizumab for colorectal cancer in 2005, off-label use of this drug for the treatment of retinal disease, particularly age-related macular degeneration, became increasingly common. The rate of intravitreal injections in Ontario rapidly grew 8-fold, and this growth preceded the availability of ranibizumab by more than a year. Moreover, in 2007, more than 50% of intravitreal injections in Ontario were performed by 3% of ophthalmologists. The development of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors has revolutionized the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. To our knowledge, this study is the first to quantify the dramatic uptake of these treatments at a population level. Our findings also suggest that off-label injection of bevacizumab was highly prevalent in Ontario. Serial intravitreal injections requiring direct physician administration and the concentration of injection procedures in the hands of a small number of ophthalmologists have the potential to affect services for other vision-threatening conditions.

  14. Improving Nonmetric Sex Classification for Hispanic Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klales, Alexandra R; Cole, Stephanie J

    2017-07-01

    Current techniques used by forensic anthropologists for the identification of unknown human skeletal remains have largely been created using U.S. Black and White samples. When applied to Hispanics, these techniques perform poorly and can lead to misclassifications; consequently, there is an imperative need for population-specific standards for Hispanics. This research examines the classification accuracies obtained by the original Walker (Am J Phys Anthropol, 136, 2008) and Klales et al. (Am J Phys Anthropol, 149, 2012) methods for nonmetric sex estimation and provides recalibrated regression equations specifically for Hispanics. Ordinal data were collected for five skull and three pelvic traits from a sample of 54 modern Hispanic individuals. Recalibration of the Klales et al. equation improved accuracy (90.3% vs. 94.1%), while recalibration of the Walker method equation decreased accuracy (81.5% vs. 74.1%), but greatly improved sex bias (22.2% vs. -7.4%), thereby making the recalibrated equations more appropriate for use with Hispanics. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. HISPANIC ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT OUTREACH PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian Puente

    1998-07-25

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) in cooperation with the Self Reliance Foundation (SRF) is conducting the Hispanic Environmental and Waste Management Outreach Project (HEWMO) to increase science and environmental literacy, specifically that related to nuclear engineering and waste management in the nuclear industry, among the US Hispanic population. The project will encourage Hispanic youth and young adults to pursue careers through the regular presentation of Spanish-speaking scientists and engineers and other role models, as well as career information on nationally broadcast radio programs reaching youth and parents. This project will encourage making science, mathematics, and technology a conscious part of the everyday life experiences of Hispanic youth and families. The SRF in collaboration with the Hispanic Radio Network (HRN) produces and broadcasts radio programs to address the topics and meet the objectives as outlined in the Environmental Literacy Plan and DOE-EM Communications Plan in this document. The SRF has in place a toll-free ''800'' number Information and Resource Referral (I and RR) service that national radio program listeners can call to obtain information and resource referrals as well as give their reactions to the radio programs that will air. HRN uses this feature to put listeners in touch with local organizations and resources that can provide them with further information and assistance on the related program topics.

  16. Nonparametric spirometry reference values for Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Nancy L; Brown, Vanessa M

    2011-02-01

    Recent literature sites ethnic origin as a major factor in developing pulmonary function reference values. Extensive studies established reference values for European and African Americans, but not for Hispanic Americans. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey defines Hispanic as individuals of Spanish speaking cultures. While no group was excluded from the target population, sample size requirements only allowed inclusion of individuals who identified themselves as Mexican Americans. This research constructs nonparametric reference value confidence intervals for Hispanic American pulmonary function. The method is applicable to all ethnicities. We use empirical likelihood confidence intervals to establish normal ranges for reference values. Its major advantage: it is model free, but shares asymptotic properties of model based methods. Statistical comparisons indicate that empirical likelihood interval lengths are comparable to normal theory intervals. Power and efficiency studies agree with previously published theoretical results.

  17. CKD Progression and Mortality among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael J; Hsu, Jesse Y; Lora, Claudia M; Ricardo, Ana C; Anderson, Amanda H; Bazzano, Lydia; Cuevas, Magdalena M; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Kusek, John W; Renteria, Amada; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Raj, Dominic S; Rosas, Sylvia E; Pan, Qiang; Yaffe, Kristine; Go, Alan S; Lash, James P

    2016-11-01

    Although recommended approaches to CKD management are achieved less often in Hispanics than in non-Hispanics, whether long-term outcomes differ between these groups is unclear. In a prospective longitudinal analysis of participants enrolled into the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC Studies, we used Cox proportional hazards models to determine the association between race/ethnicity, CKD progression (50% eGFR loss or incident ESRD), incident ESRD, and all-cause mortality, and linear mixed-effects models to assess differences in eGFR slope. Among 3785 participants, 13% were Hispanic, 43% were non-Hispanic white (NHW), and 44% were non-Hispanic black (NHB). Over a median follow-up of 5.1 years for Hispanics and 6.8 years for non-Hispanics, 27.6% of all participants had CKD progression, 21.3% reached incident ESRD, and 18.3% died. Hispanics had significantly higher rates of CKD progression, incident ESRD, and mean annual decline in eGFR than did NHW (P<0.05) but not NHB. Hispanics had a mortality rate similar to that of NHW but lower than that of NHB (P<0.05). In adjusted analyses, the risk of CKD progression did not differ between Hispanics and NHW or NHB. However, among nondiabetic participants, compared with NHB, Hispanics had a lower risk of CKD progression (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.39 to 0.95) and incident ESRD (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.30 to 0.84). At higher levels of urine protein, Hispanics had a significantly lower risk of mortality than did non-Hispanics (P<0.05). Thus, important differences in CKD progression and mortality exist between Hispanics and non-Hispanics and may be affected by proteinuria and diabetes. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. Rapid assessment of trachoma in underserved population of Car-Nicobar Island, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Vashist

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the burden of trachoma and its related risk factors amongst the native population of Car-Nicobar Island in India. METHODS: Rapid assessment for trachoma was conducted in ten villages of Car-Nicobar Island according to standard WHO guidelines. An average of 50 children aged 1-9 years were assessed clinically for signs of active trachoma and facial cleanliness in each village. Additionally, all adults above 15 years of age in these households were examined for evidence of trachomatous trichiasis and corneal opacity. Environmental risk factors contributing to trachoma like limited access to potable water & functional latrine, presence of animal pen and garbage within the Nicobari hut were also noted in all villages. RESULTS: Out of a total of fifteen villages in Car-Nicobar Island, ten villages were selected for trachoma survey depending on evidence of socio-developmental indicators like poverty and decreased access to water, sanitation and healthcare facilities. The total population of the selected clusters was 7277 in the ten villages. Overall, 251 of 516 children (48.6%;CI: 46.5-55.1 had evidence of follicular stage of trachoma and 11 children (2.1%;CI:1.0-3.4 had evidence of inflammatory stage of trachoma. Nearly 15%(CI:12.1-18.3 children were noted to have unclean faces in the ten villages. Trachomatous trichiasis was noted in 73 adults (1.0%;CI:0.8-1.2. The environmental sanitation was not found to be satisfactory in the surveyed villages mainly due to the co-habitance of Nicobari people with domestic animals like pigs, hens, goats, dogs, cats etc in most (96.4% of the households. CONCLUSION: Active trachoma and trachomatous trichiasis was observed in all the ten villages surveyed, wherein trachoma control measures are needed.

  19. Hispanic Health PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-05-05

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  20. Rapid assessment of populations trends of invasive species: Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANA, ED

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA is a powerful analytical approach for biodi-versity management. Its main advan-tages are due to its intuitive processing and visualization, since mathematical workflow is conceptually similar to the widely accepted Principal Components Analysis. Detailed analyses of popula-tion trends with mathematical tools are often difficult to achieve for managers by a number of reasons (large numbers or areas monitored, large number of species, insufficient statistics skills, strong knowledge level in demographic analyses, etc.. SSA has been used since the 1970’s in signal processing to clarify signal vs. noisy information, but it has also been used in climate change analy-sis and other developmental areas. Be-sides, SSA is a rapid-learning method for technicians and managers with medium level of mathematical knowledge. Free software in Unix environment is avail-able. Unfortunately, no free and friendly software is available for Win-dows SO. Although R package may offer solutions for really advanced users, it does not fit real work situations for managers of biological invasions. Cater-pillar (Gistat Group, Ltd is by now, the best option found by the author in terms of price, facility for results inter-pretation and time consumed in learn-ing. The main disadvantage is the poor content of tutorial files

  1. Investigation of QF-PCR Application for Rapid Prenatal Diagnosis of Chromosomal Aneuploidies in Iranian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Habib; Noori-Dalooi, Mohammad-Reza; Dastan, Jila; Ghaffari, Saeed-Reza

    2011-03-01

    G-Banding followed by standard chromosome analysis is routinely used for prenatal detection of chromosomal abnormalities. In recent years, molecular cytogenetic techniques have been developed for rapid diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities. Among these methods Quantitative Florescence Polymerase Chain Reaction (QF-PCR) has been widely used for this purpose. Heterozygosity of short tandem repeat (STR) markers which leads to informativity is the most critical requirement for feasibility of QF-PCR. In this study we analyzed several short tandem repeats on chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y on amniotic fluid samples obtained from PND candidates to diagnose conditions such as Down, Edward and Patau syndromes and also numerical sex chromosome abnormalities such as Klinefelter and Turner syndromes. Most of the analyzed STRs had acceptable heterozygosity (66.3-94.7) to be used in QF-PCR based prenatal diagnosis. Moreover, results obtained from both methods (standard karyotype and QF-PCR) for all samples were in accordance with each other. In case of using appropriate STR markers, and in certain clinical indications, QF-PCR could be used as useful technique for prenatal diagnosis even in consanguine populations such as Iranians.

  2. Bicultural Advertising and Hispanic Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wan-Hsiu Sunny; Li, Cong

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of acculturation modes (assimilated, integrated, and separated) on Hispanic consumers' responses to three advertising targeting strategies (Caucasian targeted, bicultural, and Hispanic targeted). The hypotheses were empirically tested in a 3 x 3 factorial experiment with 155 self-identified Hispanic adult…

  3. Hispanic immigrants in the USA: social and mental health perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Renato D; Parekh, Amrita; Wainberg, Milton L; Duarte, Cristiane S; Araya, Ricardo; Oquendo, María A

    2016-09-01

    Hispanic immigration in the USA and its effect on many areas of US society are of great relevance to health care, public health, mental health, and medical and social sciences. In this report, we review and discuss pertinent literature on causes, procedures, and eventual outcomes of Hispanic migration waves throughout the last four decades. Hispanic immigrants do not constitute a monolithic group, despite the clear predominance of Mexican and Mexican-American segments. Common features of Hispanic immigrants include a younger average age, higher presence of married households, and lower educational levels than the overall US population. Differences within the Hispanic immigrant population are present in naturalisation figures, English language fluency, occupational and income status, health insurance coverage, and sense of accomplishment in the host society. We examine most of these aspects in the context of the so-called Hispanic paradox, presented as both a cause and a result of a heavily discussed acculturative process. We investigate prevalence and other data on depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and psychotic syndromes, with emphasis on the need to do further neurobiological, epigenetic, and sociocultural research in the Hispanic population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) populations

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehead, Andrew; Clark, Bryan W.; Reid, Noah M.; Hahn, Mark E.; Nacci, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Abstract For most species, evolutionary adaptation is not expected to be sufficiently rapid to buffer the effects of human‐mediated environmental changes, including environmental pollution. Here we review how key features of populations, the characteristics of environmental pollution, and the genetic architecture underlying adaptive traits, may interact to shape the likelihood of evolutionary rescue from pollution. Large populations of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) persist in som...

  5. Lived experience of Hispanic new graduate nurses - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Esther G

    2014-05-01

    To seek understanding of lived experience from the voice of Hispanic new graduate nurses. Nurse educators and leaders have called for a more diverse nursing workforce while the body of the literature and knowledge about Hispanic registered nurses in the United States appears underdeveloped. A qualitative approach with a phenomenological methodology was used. A purposive sampling of Hispanic new graduate nurses (n = 7) completed a demographic questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. The study setting was within the Midwest and the south-west of the United States. There were seven general themes: (1) being an employee, (2) an orientation with or without preceptors, (3) a transition, (4) shadows of doubt, (5) being Hispanic, (6) being bilingual and being pulled, and (7) blessed. Hispanic new graduates would prefer Hispanic preceptors and anticipated that their first employment would be in a hospital setting. Hispanic new graduate nurses anticipate, desire and expect orientation programmes and preceptors in acute care and outpatient healthcare settings to aid in their transition from student to professional nurse. Hispanic new graduate nurses described an experience of transition typical of new graduate nurses in the United States, but with added dimensions such as cultural understandings and language proficiency with Spanish. Appropriate support and interventions for all new graduate nurses across multiple employment settings may retain a diverse nursing workforce appropriately positioned to serve vulnerable populations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Homogenous Population Genetic Structure of the Non-Native Raccoon Dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in Europe as a Result of Rapid Population Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drygala, Frank; Korablev, Nikolay; Ansorge, Hermann; Fickel, Joerns; Isomursu, Marja; Elmeros, Morten; Kowalczyk, Rafał; Baltrunaite, Laima; Balciauskas, Linas; Saarma, Urmas; Schulze, Christoph; Borkenhagen, Peter; Frantz, Alain C

    2016-01-01

    The extent of gene flow during the range expansion of non-native species influences the amount of genetic diversity retained in expanding populations. Here, we analyse the population genetic structure of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in north-eastern and central Europe. This invasive species is of management concern because it is highly susceptible to fox rabies and an important secondary host of the virus. We hypothesized that the large number of introduced animals and the species' dispersal capabilities led to high population connectivity and maintenance of genetic diversity throughout the invaded range. We genotyped 332 tissue samples from seven European countries using 16 microsatellite loci. Different algorithms identified three genetic clusters corresponding to Finland, Denmark and a large 'central' population that reached from introduction areas in western Russia to northern Germany. Cluster assignments provided evidence of long-distance dispersal. The results of an Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis supported a scenario of equal effective population sizes among different pre-defined populations in the large central cluster. Our results are in line with strong gene flow and secondary admixture between neighbouring demes leading to reduced genetic structuring, probably a result of its fairly rapid population expansion after introduction. The results presented here are remarkable in the sense that we identified a homogenous genetic cluster inhabiting an area stretching over more than 1500km. They are also relevant for disease management, as in the event of a significant rabies outbreak, there is a great risk of a rapid virus spread among raccoon dog populations.

  7. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to non-Hispanic whites. While all of the causes of asthma remain unclear, children exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke exposure are at increased risk for acute lower respiratory tract infections, such as bronchitis. Children living below or near the poverty level are more likely to have high levels ...

  8. Inventing the Hispanic Psyche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavans, Ilan

    1992-01-01

    Many Latin American authors have undertaken cultural criticism designed to explain the psyche of the Hispanic countries. Carlos Fuentes, in "The Buried Mirror: Reflections on Spain and the New World," presents another example of the obsessive need to interpret Latin America to the rest of the world. (SLD)

  9. When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    For most species, evolutionary adaptation is not expected to be sufficiently rapid to buffer the effects of human-mediated environmental changes. Yet large persistent populations of small bodied fish residing in some of the most contaminated estuaries of the US have provided some...

  10. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Texas Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Men: Implications for Gastric Cancer Risk Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long Parma, Dorothy; Muñoz, Edgar; Ogden, Susan M; Westin, Gustavo F; Leach, Robin J; Thompson, Ian M; Ramirez, Amelie G

    2017-07-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori) infection is a major gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) risk factor. GA disproportionately affects U.S. Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). Since H. pylori infection studies in Hispanics are few, infection rates in Hispanic and NHW men in Bexar County were compared, and relationships with ethnicity and obesity examined. Age- and zip code-matched participants from a community-dwelling cohort were randomly selected. Sera from 284 men were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay for H. pylori antibodies. Adjusted risk ratio estimation for matched data was conducted to identify differences. Hispanics had a markedly higher prevalence of infection (30.3%) than NHWs (9.2%). Matched risk ratio (mRR) analyses revealed a strong association between H. pylori seropositivity and Hispanic ethnicity (mRR = 3.31; 95% CI [1.91, 5.73], adjusted by BMI, smoking status, and family history of cancer (mRR range = 3.28-3.89). BMI mRRs (range = 1.19-1.22) were significant in all models. In this cohort, Hispanic men had higher H. pylori infection rates than NHWs, and parallel the disproportionately higher rates of GA; obesity contributes to this higher prevalence. Future studies should address country of origin, acculturation, and other factors influencing obesity to further elucidate risk of GA in Hispanic populations.

  11. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Texas Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Men: Implications for Gastric Cancer Risk Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma, Dorothy Long; Muñoz, Edgar; Ogden, Susan M.; Westin, Gustavo F.; Leach, Robin J.; Thompson, Ian M.; Ramirez, Amelie G.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) risk factor. GA disproportionately affects U.S. Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). Since H. pylori infection studies in Hispanics are few, infection rates in Hispanic and NHW men in Bexar County were compared, and relationships with ethnicity and obesity examined. Age- and zip code-matched participants from a community-dwelling cohort were randomly selected. Sera from 284 men were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay for H. pylori antibodies. Adjusted risk ratio estimation for matched data was conducted to identify differences. Hispanics had a markedly higher prevalence of infection (30.3%) than NHWs (9.2%). Matched risk ratio (mRR) analyses revealed a strong association between H. pylori seropositivity and Hispanic ethnicity (mRR = 3.31; 95% CI [1.91, 5.73], adjusted by BMI, smoking status, and family history of cancer (mRR range = 3.28–3.89). BMI mRRs (range = 1.19–1.22) were significant in all models. In this cohort, Hispanic men had higher H. pylori infection rates than NHWs, and parallel the disproportionately higher rates of GA; obesity contributes to this higher prevalence. Future studies should address country of origin, acculturation, and other factors influencing obesity to further elucidate risk of GA in Hispanic populations. PMID:28413904

  12. The influence of noncognitive factors on the Mini-Mental State Examination in older Mexican-Americans: findings from the Hispanic EPESE. Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, S A; Espino, D V; Mahurin, R; Lichtenstein, M J; Hazuda, H P; Fabrizio, D; Ray, L A; Markides, K S

    1999-11-01

    Mini-Mental State Examination data from the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly baseline survey, a population-based study of community-dwelling Mexican Americans aged 65 and older, were used to examine the relationship between cognitive impairment, sociodemographics, and health-related characteristics. The rate of cognitive impairment found in this group of older Mexican Americans, using the conventional cut point of 23/24 on the MMSE, was 36.7%. Using a more conservative cut point of 17/18 indicated an overall rate of severe cognitive impairment of 6.7%. Rates of impairment varied significantly with age, education, literacy, marital status, language of interview, and immigrant status and were associated with high and moderate levels of depressive symptoms, and history of stroke. Importantly, although education was strongly related to poor cognitive performance, it was not a significant predictor of severe cognitive impairment. Multivariate analyses further indicated that as a screen for cognitive impairment in older Mexican Americans, the MMSE is strongly influenced by these noncognitive factors. Scores may reflect test bias, secondary to cultural differences or the level of education in this population.

  13. Pathway Analysis using Gene-expression Profiles of HPV-positive and HPV-negative Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients in a Hispanic Population: Methodological Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Erick; González, Lorena; Pérez-Mitchell, Carlos; Ortiz, Ana P; Ramírez-Sola, Maricarmen; Acosta, Jaime; Bernabe-Dones, Raúl D; González-Aquino, Carlos; Montes-Rodríguez, Ingrid; Cadilla, Carmen L

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer in Puerto Rican men is higher than it is in the men of any other ethnic/racial group in the United States of America (US). The information regarding the effect of the human papilloma virus (HPV) in the gene-expression profile among patients with this cancer is limited in Hispanic community. We aim to describe the methodology for future studies to identify the molecular networks for determining overrepresented signaling and metabolic canonical pathways, based on the differential gene-expression profiles of HPV+ and HPV- samples from patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in Puerto Rico. We analyzed the RNA expression of 5 tissue samples from subjects diagnosed with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, 2 HPV+ and 3 HPV-, using Affymetrix GeneChips. The relative difference between the average gene expressions of the HPV+ and HPV- samples was assessed, based on the fold change (log2-scale). Our analysis revealed 10 up regulated molecules (Mup1, LRP1, P14KA, ALYREF, and BHMT) and 5 down regulated ones (PSME4, KEAP1, ELK3, FAM186B, and PRELID1), at a cutoff of 1.5-fold change. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed the following biological functions to be affected in the HPV+ samples: cancer, hematological disease, and RNA post-transcriptional modification. QRT-PCR analysis confirmed only the differential regulation of ALYREF, KEAP1, and FAM186B genes. The relevant methodological procedures described are sufficient to detect the most significant biological functions and pathways according to the HPV status in patients with oropharyngeal cancer in Puerto Rico.

  14. Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Aortic Root Morphology in Hispanic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Sofia A; Mihos, Christos G; Rodriguez-Escudero, Juan P; Elmahdy, Hany M; Pineda, Andres M; Rosen, Gerald P; Carlos Brenes, Juan; Santana, Orlando

    2015-11-01

    The study aim was to evaluate the aortic valve and aortic root morphology in Hispanic patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). BAV disease is one of the most common congenital anomaly of the heart, and is associated with abnormalities of the aorta. Interracial differences have been described between Caucasian and African-American patients with BAV, which may have clinical and therapeutic implications. The clinical and anatomical spectrum of BAV disease in Hispanic patients has not been well established. A retrospective review was conducted of all heart operations performed at the authors' institution between April 2008 and June 2013. Patients with BAV who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) were identified. All echocardiograms available were reviewed in order to compare cusp morphology, valvular function, and ascending aorta dimensions between Hispanic and non-Hispanic individuals. A total of 291 patients (159 Hispanic, 132 non-Hispanic) with a mean age of 62 ± 13 years were identified. The baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. In both Hispanics and non-Hispanics, the most prevalent cusp morphology was fusion of the right and left coronary cusps (82% for both groups). The most common indication for surgery was aortic stenosis. Hispanic patients had a larger aortic annulus diameter (2.58 ± 0.32 cm versus 2.39 ± 0.39 cm, p = 0.04). However, this difference was not significant after adjusting for age, gender, body surface area, and the presence of moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency. Ascending aortopathy was present in 42.7% of the total study population. Regardless of ethnicity, the most common pattern of aortopathy involved the tubular ascending aorta with mild to moderate root enlargement (type 1). Compared with other ethnic groups, Hispanics with BAVs have similar aortic valve morphology and function, as well as comparable aortopathy.

  15. FastStats: Health of Asian or Pacific Islander Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health of Hispanic or Latino Population Health of Mexican American Population Health of White non-Hispanic Population More data Health, United States, trend tables with data for Asian or Pacific Islander population Tables of Summary Health Statistics from ...

  16. Traffic law knowledge disparity between Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kenton L; Patel, Chirag V; Vaca, Federico; Anderson, Craig L; Mendoza, Rosemarie; Barton, Renee L; Lekawa, Michael E; Hoonpongsimanont, Wirachin; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2011-06-01

    The Hispanic population is one group that is involved in a disproportionately high percentage of fatal motor vehicle collisions in the United States. This study investigated demographic factors contributing to a lack of knowledge and awareness of traffic laws among Hispanic drivers involved in motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) in southern California. The cross-sectional study enrolled adults (n = 190) involved in MVCs presenting to a Level I trauma center in southern California over a 7-month period. Subjects completed a survey about California traffic law knowledge (TLK) consisting of eight multiple-choice questions. The mean number of questions answered correctly was compared between groups defined by demographic data. The mean number of TLK questions answered correctly by Hispanic and non-Hispanic white groups were significantly different at 4.13 and 4.62, respectively (p = 0.005; 95% confidence interval -0.83 to -0.15). Scores were significantly lower in subjects who were not fluent in English, had less than a high school education, did not possess a current driver's license, and received their TLK from sources other than a driver's education class or Department of Motor Vehicle materials. Analysis of variance showed that the source of knowledge was the strongest predictor of accurate TLK. Source of TLK is a major contributing factor to poor TLK in Hispanics. An emphasis on culturally specific traffic law education is needed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SunSmart: Evaluation of a Pilot School-Based Sun Protection Intervention in Hispanic Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. A.; Langholz, B. M.; Ly, T.; Harris, S. C.; Richardson, J. L.; Peng, D. H.; Cockburn, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma is rising among Hispanic populations in the United States. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of a pilot sun safety educational intervention conducted from 2006 to 2012 on Hispanic early adolescents in a high ultraviolet environment. Nineteen schools with high Hispanic enrollment were recruited from urban…

  18. Science News for the U.S. Hispanic Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-02-01

    A science and health news service targeted toward the U.S. Hispanic community was launched on 23 January. ConCiencia, billed as the first Spanish-language science newswire service in the United States, provides free weekly news feeds to media targeting the U.S. Hispanic population. The news feeds, available to Spanish-language newspapers and radio stations, include newspaper features, radio segments, and online news content.

  19. Comparisons Between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Informal Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Karlin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on understanding similarities and differences between non-Hispanic White and Hispanic informal caregivers of those with Alzheimer’s disease. Comparisons take place between caregivers reporting high levels of burden as indicated by the Zarit Burden Inventory. Data suggest similarities and differences between Hispanic (n = 17 and non-Hispanic White (n = 17 caregivers in this study in several areas. Hispanic caregivers indicated fewer sources of income, had less investment money for family member’s treatment, reported caregiving as a greater interference with life’s accomplishments, and indicated a lesser percentage of the total care cost provided by the family member. Non-Hispanic White caregivers reported having completed a higher level of formal education and that organized religion’s importance prior to becoming a caregiver was not quite as important as compared with the Hispanic care provider. With current trends, of demographic and cultural changes, it is crucial to fully understand the changing role and needs of both Hispanic and non-Hispanic White caregivers.

  20. A qualitative study of science education in nursing school: Narratives of Hispanic female nurses' sense of identity and participation in science learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensemer, Patricia S.

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to learn from Hispanic nursing students regarding their experiences as participants in science learning. The participants were four female nursing students of Hispanic origin attending a small, rural community college in a southeastern state. The overarching question of this study was "In what ways does being Hispanic mediate the science-related learning and practices of nursing students?" The following questions more specifically provided focal points for the research: (1) In what ways do students perceive being Hispanic as relevant to their science education experiences? (a) What does it mean to be Hispanic in the participants' home community? (b) What has it meant to be Hispanic in the science classroom? (2) In what ways might students' everyday knowledge (at home) relate to the knowledge or ways of knowing they practice in the nursing school community? The study took place in Alabama, which offered a rural context where Hispanic populations are rapidly increasing. A series of four interviews was conducted with each participant, followed by one focus group interview session. Results of the study were re presented in terms of portrayals of participant's narratives of identity and science learning, and then as a thematic interpretation collectively woven across the individuals' narratives. Portraitures of each participant draw upon the individual experiences of the four nursing students involved in this study in order to provide a beginning point towards exploring "community" as both personal and social aspects of science practices. Themes explored broader interpretations of communities of practice in relation to guiding questions of the study. Three themes emerged through the study, which included the following: Importance of Science to Nurses, Crossing with a Nurturing and Caring Identity, and Different Modes of Participation. Implications were discussed with regard to participation in a community of practice and

  1. Homogenous Population Genetic Structure of the Non-Native Raccoon Dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides in Europe as a Result of Rapid Population Expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Drygala

    Full Text Available The extent of gene flow during the range expansion of non-native species influences the amount of genetic diversity retained in expanding populations. Here, we analyse the population genetic structure of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides in north-eastern and central Europe. This invasive species is of management concern because it is highly susceptible to fox rabies and an important secondary host of the virus. We hypothesized that the large number of introduced animals and the species' dispersal capabilities led to high population connectivity and maintenance of genetic diversity throughout the invaded range. We genotyped 332 tissue samples from seven European countries using 16 microsatellite loci. Different algorithms identified three genetic clusters corresponding to Finland, Denmark and a large 'central' population that reached from introduction areas in western Russia to northern Germany. Cluster assignments provided evidence of long-distance dispersal. The results of an Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis supported a scenario of equal effective population sizes among different pre-defined populations in the large central cluster. Our results are in line with strong gene flow and secondary admixture between neighbouring demes leading to reduced genetic structuring, probably a result of its fairly rapid population expansion after introduction. The results presented here are remarkable in the sense that we identified a homogenous genetic cluster inhabiting an area stretching over more than 1500km. They are also relevant for disease management, as in the event of a significant rabies outbreak, there is a great risk of a rapid virus spread among raccoon dog populations.

  2. Hispanic/Latino Disparities in Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Role of a Culturally Competent Transplant Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Elisa J; Lee, Jungwha; Kang, Raymond; Ladner, Daniela P; Skaro, Anton I; Holl, Jane L; French, Dustin D; Abecassis, Michael M; Caicedo, Juan Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Hispanic Americans face disparities in access to kidney transplantation, particularly living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). This study compared characteristics of LDKT recipients before and after implementing the Hispanic Kidney Transplant Program (HKTP) at Northwestern Medicines (NM) and other centers. The NM HKTP, initiated in December 2006, delivers culturally and linguistically competent and congruent care. Program-specific data were used to compare the mean ratios of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs between pre-HKTP (2001-2006) and post-HKTP (2008-2013), and to compare the characteristics of NM's adult LDKT patients between pre-HKTP and post-HKTP. The same ratio was calculated for transplant centers in regions with a significant Hispanic population (≥25%) and performing in the top tertile of total LDKT volume in the pre-HKTP period. The number of Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients added to the waiting list were compared between pre-HKTP (2001-2006) and post-HKTP (2008-2013) as a proxy for increased patient referrals and a pathway by which the HKTP may increase LDKTs. The ratio of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs significantly increased by 70% after the implementation of NM's HKTP (pre-HKTP mean = 0.20, post-HKTP mean = 0.34; P= 0.001). None of the other transplant centers experienced a similar increase in their ratio of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs. The NM waiting list additions grew by 91% among Hispanics, but grew only 4% for non-Hispanic whites. These data suggest that the development and implementation of a culturally congruent transplant program can positively affect Hispanic LDKT and thereby reduce Hispanics disparities in LDKT rates. Further studies are needed to prospectively evaluate the generalizability of implementing such culturally competent interventions at other transplant programs.

  3. Four Decades of Obesity Trends among Non-Hispanic Whites and Blacks in the United States: Analyzing the Influences of Educational Inequalities in Obesity and Population Improvements in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Both obesity (body mass index ≥ 30) and educational attainment have increased dramatically in the United States since the 1970s. This study analyzed the influences of educational inequalities in obesity and population improvements in education on national obesity trends between 1970 and 2010. For non-Hispanic white and black males and females aged 25-74 years, educational differences in the probability of being obese were estimated from the 1971-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, and population distributions of age and educational groups, from the 1970 Census and 2010 American Community Survey. In the total population, obesity increased from 15.7% to 38.8%, and there were increases in the greater obese probabilities of non-college graduates relative to four-year college graduates. The increase in obesity would have been lower by 10% (2.2 percentage points) if educational inequalities in obesity had stayed at their 1970 values and lower by one third (7.9 points) if obesity inequalities had been eliminated. Obesity inequalities were larger for females than males and for whites than blacks, and obesity did not differ by education among black males. As a result, the impact of obesity inequalities on the obesity trend was largest among white females (a 47% reduction in the obesity increase if obesity inequalities had been eliminated), and virtually zero among black males. On the other hand, without educational improvements, the obesity increase would have been 9% more in the total population, 23% more among white females and not different in the other three subpopulations. Results indicate that obesity inequalities made sizable contributions to the obesity trends, and the obesity reductions associated with educational improvements were more limited.

  4. Rapid Adaptation of a Daphnia magna Population to Metal Stress Is Associated with Heterozygote Excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmuth, Jennifer D; De Meester, Luc; Pereira, Cecília M S; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-08-04

    Although natural populations can harbor evolutionary potential to adapt genetically to chemical stress, it is often thought that natural selection leads to a general reduction of genetic diversity and involves costs. Here, a 10 week microevolution experiment was conducted with a genetically diverse and representative sample of one natural Daphnia magna population that was exposed to copper and zinc. Both Cu- and Zn-selected populations developed a significantly higher metal tolerance (i.e., genetic adaptation), indicated by higher reproduction probabilities of clonal lines in Cu and Zn exposures than observed for the original and control populations. The complete recovery of the population densities after 10 weeks of Zn selection (following an initial decrease of 74%) illustrates an example of evolutionary rescue. Microsatellite genotyping revealed a decrease in clonal diversity but no change in allelic richness, and showed an excess in heterozygosity in the Cu- and Zn-selected populations compared to the control and original populations. The excess heterozygosity in metal-selected populations that we observed has important consequences for risk assessment, as it contributes to the maintenance of a higher allelic diversity under multigenerational chemical exposure. This study is, to our knowledge, the first report of an increase in heterozygosity following multigenerational exposure to metal stress, despite a decline in clonal diversity. In a follow-up study with the Zn-selected populations, we observed no effect of Zn selection on the tolerance to heat and cyanobacteria. However, we observed higher tolerance to Cd in the Zn-selected than in the original and control populations if the 20% effective concentration of Cd was considered (cross-tolerance). Our results suggest only limited costs of adaptation but future research is needed to evaluate the adaptive potential of metal-selected populations to novel stressors and to determine to what extent increased

  5. Caregiving Practice Patterns of Asian, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White American Family Caregivers of Older Adults Across Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2016-03-01

    This study is a cross-sectional investigation of caregiving practice patterns among Asian, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White American family caregivers of older adults across three immigrant generations. The 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) dataset was used, and 591 Asian, 989 Hispanic and 6537 non-Hispanic White American caregivers of older adults were selected. First, descriptive analyses of caregivers' characteristics, caregiving situations and practice patterns were examined by racial/ethnic groups and immigrant generations. Practice patterns measured were respite care use, hours and length of caregiving. Three hypotheses on caregiving patterns based on assimilation theory were tested and analyzed using logistic regression and generalized linear models by racial/ethnic groups and generations. Caregiving patterns of non-Hispanic White caregivers supported all three hypotheses regarding respite care use, caregiving hours and caregiving duration, showing less caregiving involvement in later generations. However, Asian and Hispanic counterparts showed mixed results. Third generation Asian and Hispanic caregivers used respite care the least and spent the most caregiving hours per week and had the longest caregiving duration compared to earlier generations. These caregiving patterns revealed underlying cultural values related to filial responsibility, even among later generations of caregivers of color. Findings suggest the importance of considering the cultural values of each racial/ethnic group regardless of generation when working with racially and ethnically diverse populations of family caregivers of older adults.

  6. Hispanic Statistics Summary. A Compendium of Data on Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Emily G.

    This summary of Hispanic statistics reviews information in the following areas: (1) subgroups and residential distribution among Hispanic Americans; (2) income, employment, and education; (3) lack of institutional access in terms of the church, schools, government, corporations, the media, and private philanthropy; and (4) lack of data on…

  7. Rise and fall of a wolf population: genetic diversity and structure during recovery, rapid expansion and drastic decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, E; Ruokonen, M; Kojola, I; Aspi, J

    2012-11-01

    The grey wolves (Canis lupus) of Finland have had a varied history, with a period of rapid population expansion after the mid-1990s followed by a decline with a current census size of about 140 wolves. Here, we investigate the impact of unstable population size and connectivity on genetic diversity and structure in a long-term genetic study of 298 Finnish wolves born in 1995-2009 and genotyped for 17 microsatellite loci. During the initial recovery and prior to population expansion, genetic diversity was high (1995-1997: LD-N(e)  = 67.2; H(o)  = 0.749; H(e)  = 0.709) despite a small census size and low number of breeders (N(c)  < 100; N(b)  < 10) likely reflecting the status of the Russian source population. Surprisingly, observed heterozygosity decreased significantly during the study period (t = -2.643, P = 0.021) despite population expansion, likely a result of an increase in inbreeding (F(IS)  = 0.108 in 2007-2009) owing to a low degree of connectivity with adjacent Russian wolf population (m = 0.016-0.090; F(ST)  = 0.086, P < 0.001) and population crash after 2006. However, population growth had a temporary positive impact on N(e) and number of family lines. This study shows that even strong population growth alone might not be adequate to retain genetic diversity, especially when accompanied with low amount of subsequent gene flow and population decline. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Outreach to Hispanic/Latino Communities With a Spanish-Language Version of the Earthscope Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, A. M.; Stein, S.; Delaughter, J.

    2005-12-01

    Spanish is estimated to be the fourth language in the world based on number of speakers, the second as a vehicle of international communication and the third as an international language of politics, economics and culture. Its importance in the U.S. is illustrated by the fact that the Hispanic/Latino population is becoming the largest minority group because it has the fastest growth rate of all ethnic groups in the U.S. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2004 there were ~41 million people in the U.S. (~14% of the total population) of Hispanic or Latino origin. Although the Spanish-speaking population is growing rapidly, the same cannot be said about the number of Hispanic/Latino high school and college graduates. Studies by the National Center for Education Statistics show that Hispanic/Latino students are as likely to drop out are to complete high school. Similarly, although more Hispanic/Latino students enroll in college and/or universities than a decade ago, few complete degrees. For example, in the geosciences only 3% of bachelor's degrees were granted to people identifying themselves as Hispanic or Latino. Over the last 28 years, only 263 of the 20,000 geoscience Ph.D.s awarded in the U.S. went to Hispanic Americans. Bilingual educational offerings are one technique for addressing this discrepancy. For example, scientists and research programs such as EarthScope, NASA, NOAA, and ODP frequently reach out to students and the general public using the internet. Many well-made and useful websites with scientific themes in the U.S. are available to millions of users worldwide, providing a resource that is limited or non-existent in other countries. Unfortunately, few geoscience education sites are available in languages other than English. To address this need, Earthscope is developing a Spanish version of its website describing its goals, techniques, and educational opportunities. Currently, approximately 90% of the educational content on this site (http

  9. Contraceptive continuation in Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, S Rose; Secura, Gina M; Broughton, Hilary O; Jones, Maria E; Dickey, Viani; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Hispanic ethnicity on the continuation and satisfaction of reversible contraceptive methods. We analyzed 12 months of data that were collected from 7913 participants in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to estimate continuation, and Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk of discontinuation. Hispanic women were more likely to choose a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) method compared with non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white women (80%, 73%, and 75%, respectively; P methods than combined hormonal methods for all race/ethnicity (Hispanic women, 87% vs 40%; non-Hispanic black women, 85% vs 46%; non-Hispanic white women, 87% vs 56%). There was no statistical difference in discontinuation of LARC methods at 12 months. Eighty percent of LARC users reported high satisfaction levels at 12 months, regardless of race/ethnicity. Hispanic women in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project experienced high continuation and satisfaction for LARC methods, similar to women of other ethnicities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid population growth. Effects on the social infrastructures of southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J D

    1995-01-01

    Southern Africa's high rate of population growth and widespread poverty have serious implications for the region's social infrastructure. Large increases in the school-age population have undermined efforts to improve the quality of education since all resources are directed toward expansion of availability. To achieve a teacher-pupil ratio of 1:40 at the primary level and 1:35 at the secondary level, an estimated additional 50,000 classrooms would be required. Also jeopardized by high fertility is access to health services, safe water, and sanitation. In Mozambique, for example, where only 30% of the population has access to health services, the under-five years mortality rate is 297/1000 live births and the physician-population ratio is 1:37,970. Substandard housing, homelessness, congestion, deteriorating public services, pollution, and crime dominate urban areas. The single most effective intervention to reduce population growth in Southern Africa is female education. Women without a secondary education bear an average of seven children; if 40% of women attend secondary school, this drops to three children. Thus, governments must make gender equality a central focus of development planning and ensure that women are participants in this process. Property and inheritance laws that serve to increase the economic need for early marriage should be eliminated. Public health programs, including family planning, must be expanded. Finally, women's organizations should be strengthened and urged to foster female empowerment.

  11. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Surveillance in Marginalized Populations, Tijuana, Mexico, and West Nile Virus Knowledge among Hispanics, San Diego, California, 2006

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-10

    This podcast describes public health surveillance and communication in hard to reach populations in Tijuana, Mexico, and San Diego County, California. Dr. Marian McDonald, Associate Director of CDC's Health Disparities in the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, discusses the importance of being flexible in determining the most effective media for health communications.  Created: 8/10/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.   Date Released: 8/10/2010.

  12. Recruitment of Hispanics into an observational study of chronic kidney disease: the Hispanic Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Claudia M; Ricardo, Ana C; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Fischer, Michael J; Rosman, Robert T; Carmona, Eunice; Lopez, Amada; Balaram, Manjunath; Nessel, Lisa; Tao, Kaixiang Kelvin; Xie, Dawei; Kusek, John W; Go, Alan S; Lash, James P

    2012-11-01

    Despite the large burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Hispanics, this population has been underrepresented in research studies. We describe the recruitment strategies employed by the Hispanic Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study, which led to the successful enrollment of a large population of Hispanic adults with CKD into a prospective observational cohort study. Recruitment efforts by bilingual staff focused on community clinics with Hispanic providers in high-density Hispanic neighborhoods in Chicago, academic medical centers, and private nephrology practices. Methods of publicizing the study included church meetings, local Hispanic print media, Spanish television and radio stations, and local health fairs. From October 2005 to July 2008, we recruited 327 Hispanics aged 21-74 years with mild-to-moderate CKD as determined by age-specific estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Of 716 individuals completing a screening visit, 49% did not meet eGFR inclusion criteria and 46% completed a baseline visit. The mean age at enrollment was 57.1 and 67.1% of participants were male. Approximately 75% of enrolled individuals were Mexican American, 15% Puerto Rican, and 10% had other Latin American ancestry. Eighty two percent of participants were Spanish-speakers. Community-based and academic primary care clinics yielded the highest percentage of participants screened (45.9% and 22.4%) and enrolled (38.2% and 24.5%). However, academic and community-based specialty clinics achieved the highest enrollment yield from individuals screened (61.9% to 71.4%). A strategy focused on primary care and nephrology clinics and the use of bilingual recruiters allowed us to overcome barriers to the recruitment of Hispanics with CKD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment outcomes in undocumented Hispanic immigrants with HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth K Poon

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the treatment outcomes of undocumented Hispanic immigrants with HIV infection. We sought to compare the treatment outcomes of undocumented and documented patients 12-months after entering HIV care. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of antiretroviral-naive patients 18 years and older attending their first visit at Thomas Street Health Center in Houston, Texas, between 1/1/2003 and 6/30/2008. The study population of 1,620 HIV-infected adults included 186 undocumented Hispanic, 278 documented Hispanic, 986 Black, and 170 White patients. The main outcome measures were retention in care (quarter years with at least one completed HIV primary care provider visit and HIV suppression (HIV RNA <400 copies/mL, both measured 12-months after entering HIV care. RESULTS: Undocumented Hispanic patients had lower median initial CD4 cell count (132 cells/mm(3 than documented Hispanic patients (166 cells/mm(3; P = 0.186, Black patients (226 cells/mm(3; P<0.001, and White patients (264 cells/mm(3; P = 0.001. However, once in care, undocumented Hispanic patients did as well or better than their documented counterparts. One year after entering HIV care, undocumented Hispanics achieved similar rates of retention in care and HIV suppression as documented Hispanic and White patients. Of note, black patients were significantly less likely to have optimal retention in care (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.65, CI = 0.45-0.94 or achieve HIV suppression (aOR 0.32, CI = 0.17-0.61 than undocumented Hispanics. CONCLUSIONS: Undocumented Hispanic persons with HIV infection enter care with more advanced disease than documented persons, suggesting testing and/or linkage to care efforts for this difficult-to-reach population need intensification. Once diagnosed, however, undocumented Hispanics have outcomes as good as or better than other racial/ethnic groups. Safety net providers for undocumented immigrants are vital for maintaining

  14. Divergent Pathways to Assimilation? Local Marriage Markets and Intermarriage among U.S. Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhenchao; Lichter, Daniel T; Tumin, Dmitry

    2018-02-01

    The growing diversity of the U.S. population raises questions about integration among America's fastest growing minority population-Hispanics. The canonical view is that intermarriage with the native-born white population represents a singular pathway to assimilation, one that varies over geographic space in response to uneven local marital opportunities. Using data on past-year marriage from the 2009-2014 American Community Survey, we demonstrate high rates of intermarriage among Hispanics. Our analyses identify whether Hispanics marry co-ethnics, non-co-ethnic Hispanics, non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, or other minorities. We highlight variation by race, nativity, and socioeconomic status, but also reveal that Hispanics living in new immigrant destinations are more likely to intermarry than those living in traditional Hispanic gateways. Indeed, the higher out-marriage in new destinations disappears when the demographic context of reception is taken into account. Our analysis underscores that patterns of marital assimilation among Hispanics are neither monolithic nor expressed uniformly across geographic space.

  15. Population genomics reveal recent speciation and rapid evolutionary adaptation in polar bears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Shiping; Lorenzen, Eline D.; Fumagalli, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Polar bears are uniquely adapted to life in the High Arctic and have undergone drastic physiological changes in response to Arctic climates and a hyperlipid diet of primarily marine mammal prey. We analyzed 89 complete genomes of polar bear and brown bear using population genomic modeling and show...

  16. Tissue-resident adult stem cell populations of rapidly self-renewing organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Bartfeld, S.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine, stomach, and skin is continuously exposed to environmental assault, imposing a requirement for regular self-renewal. Resident adult stem cell populations drive this renewal, and much effort has been invested in revealing their identity. Reliable adult stem

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography in the UK Biobank Study - Rapid Automated Analysis of Retinal Thickness for Large Population-Based Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearse A Keane

    Full Text Available To describe an approach to the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging in large, population-based studies, including methods for OCT image acquisition, storage, and the remote, rapid, automated analysis of retinal thickness.In UK Biobank, OCT images were acquired between 2009 and 2010 using a commercially available "spectral domain" OCT device (3D OCT-1000, Topcon. Images were obtained using a raster scan protocol, 6 mm x 6 mm in area, and consisting of 128 B-scans. OCT image sets were stored on UK Biobank servers in a central repository, adjacent to high performance computers. Rapid, automated analysis of retinal thickness was performed using custom image segmentation software developed by the Topcon Advanced Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (TABIL. This software employs dual-scale gradient information to allow for automated segmentation of nine intraretinal boundaries in a rapid fashion.67,321 participants (134,642 eyes in UK Biobank underwent OCT imaging of both eyes as part of the ocular module. 134,611 images were successfully processed with 31 images failing segmentation analysis due to corrupted OCT files or withdrawal of subject consent for UKBB study participation. Average time taken to call up an image from the database and complete segmentation analysis was approximately 120 seconds per data set per login, and analysis of the entire dataset was completed in approximately 28 days.We report an approach to the rapid, automated measurement of retinal thickness from nearly 140,000 OCT image sets from the UK Biobank. In the near future, these measurements will be publically available for utilization by researchers around the world, and thus for correlation with the wealth of other data collected in UK Biobank. The automated analysis approaches we describe may be of utility for future large population-based epidemiological studies, clinical trials, and screening programs that employ OCT imaging.

  18. Physical activity among Hispanic/Latino and non-Hispanic/Latino white visitors to urban-proximate public lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonia A. Wilhelm Stanis; Ingrid E. Schneider; Kimberly J. Shinew; Deborah J. Chavez; Mary C. Vogel

    2008-01-01

    Health benefits of physical activity are well recognized and documented, yet obesity rates remain high in the United States, particularly among Hispanics/Latinos. As our population becomes more urban and ethnically diverse, a greater understanding of specific populations may help agencies better address issues related to obesity and sedentary lifestyles. This study...

  19. Monitoring the welfare of polar bear populations in a rapidly changing Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Todd C.; Duncan, Colleen G.; Patyk, Kelly A.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.

    2017-01-01

    Most programs for monitoring the welfare of wildlife populations support efforts aimed at reaching discrete management objectives, like mitigating conflict with humans. While such programs can be effective, their limited scope may preclude systemic evaluations needed for large-scale conservation initiatives, like the recovery of at-risk species. We discuss select categories of metrics that can be used to monitor how polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are responding to the primary threat to their long-term persistence—loss of sea ice habitat due to the unabated rise in atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG; e.g., CO2) concentrations—that can also provide information on ecosystem function and health. Monitoring key aspects of polar bear population dynamics, spatial behavior, health and resiliency can provide valuable insight into ecosystem state and function, and could be a powerful tool for achieving Arctic conservation objectives, particularly those that have transnational policy implications.

  20. Integrated care for older populations and its implementation facilitators and barriers: A rapid scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threapleton, Diane E; Chung, Roger Y; Wong, Samuel Y S; Wong, Eliza; Chau, Patsy; Woo, Jean; Chung, Vincent C H; Yeoh, Eng-Kiong

    2017-06-01

    Inform health system improvements by summarizing components of integrated care in older populations. Identify key implementation barriers and facilitators. A scoping review was undertaken for evidence from MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, organizational websites and internet searches. Eligible publications included reviews, reports, individual studies and policy documents published from 2005 to February 2017. Initial eligible documents were reviews or reports concerning integrated care approaches in older/frail populations. Other documents were later sourced to identify and contextualize implementation issues. Study findings and implementation barriers and facilitators were charted and thematically synthesized. Thematic synthesis using 30 publications identified 8 important components for integrated care in elderly and frail populations: (i) care continuity/transitions; (ii) enabling policies/governance; (iii) shared values/goals; (iv) person-centred care; (v) multi-/inter-disciplinary services; (vi) effective communication; (vii) case management; (viii) needs assessments for care and discharge planning. Intervention outcomes and implementation issues (barriers or facilitators) tend to depend heavily on the context and programme objectives. Implementation issues in four main areas were observed: (i) Macro-level contextual factors; (ii) Miso-level system organization (funding, leadership, service structure and culture); (iii) Miso-level intervention organization (characteristics, resources and credibility) and (iv) Micro-level factors (shared values, engagement and communication). Improving integration in care requires many components. However, local barriers and facilitators need to be considered. Changes are expected to occur slowly and are more likely to be successful where elements of integrated care are well incorporated into local settings.

  1. Population Genomics Reveal Recent Speciation and Rapid Evolutionary Adaptation in Polar Bears

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shiping; Lorenzen, Eline D.; Fumagalli, Matteo; Li, Bo; Harris, Kelley; Xiong, Zijun; ZHOU, Long; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Somel, Mehmet; Babbitt, Courtney; Wray, Greg; Li, Jianwen; He, Weiming; Wang, Zhuo; Fu, Wenjing

    2014-01-01

    Polar bears are uniquely adapted to life in the High Arctic and have undergone drastic physiological changes in response to Arctic climates and a hyperlipid diet of primarily marine mammal prey. We analyzed 89 complete genomes of polar bear and brown bear using population genomic modeling and show that the species diverged only 479–343 thousand years BP. We find that genes on the polar bear lineage have been under stronger positive selection than in brown bears; nine of the top 16 genes under...

  2. A Visual Summary of Hispanic Demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Emily G.

    Eighteen graphic charts containing demographic data on Hispanic Americans are provided in this report. The headings of each table are as follows: (1) Hispanic Subgroups-1985; (2) Hispanic Residence by State, 1980; (3) Median Age-1985; (4) Unemployment Rates-1985; (5) Hispanic Unemployment-1985; (6) Median Family Income-1984; (7) Median Weekly…

  3. Breast cancer survival of Hispanic women in the USA is influenced by country of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subhankar; Smith, Lynette; Ganti, Apar Kishor; Bonthu, Neelima; Shimizhu, Tomohiro; Batra, Surinder K

    2014-06-01

    People of Hispanic origin comprise nearly 16 percent of the (US) population. With the growing population of Hispanics in the USA, an important epidemiological question is whether their country of origin affects survival in Hispanic women living in the USA at the time of diagnosis of breast cancer. We searched the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database for Hispanic women with a single primary breast cancer with known country of origin diagnosed between 1973 and 2008. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate whether the country of origin was an independent predictor of survival. In total, 48,849 female breast cancer patients of Hispanic origin were included in the SEER database. Nearly 23 percent of them had an origin in Mexico, 9 percent in South or Central America 3 percent in Puerto Rico, 2 percent in Cuba, 0.3 percent in the Dominical Republic and 3 percent in other countries, including Europe. About 60 percent of patients were identified as Hispanic by their surname or classified as Spanish/Hispanic not otherwise specified. Median survival of patients in these groups was 204, 240, 142, 169, 82.4, 115.5 and 210 months, respectively (P origin was an independent predictor of survival in Hispanic women with breast cancer. The country of origin is an independent predictor of overall survival among Hispanic women diagnosed with breast cancer. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. FREQ-Seq: a rapid, cost-effective, sequencing-based method to determine allele frequencies directly from mixed populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lon M Chubiz

    Full Text Available Understanding evolutionary dynamics within microbial populations requires the ability to accurately follow allele frequencies through time. Here we present a rapid, cost-effective method (FREQ-Seq that leverages Illumina next-generation sequencing for localized, quantitative allele frequency detection. Analogous to RNA-Seq, FREQ-Seq relies upon counts from the >10(5 reads generated per locus per time-point to determine allele frequencies. Loci of interest are directly amplified from a mixed population via two rounds of PCR using inexpensive, user-designed oligonucleotides and a bar-coded bridging primer system that can be regenerated in-house. The resulting bar-coded PCR products contain the adapters needed for Illumina sequencing, eliminating further library preparation. We demonstrate the utility of FREQ-Seq by determining the order and dynamics of beneficial alleles that arose as a microbial population, founded with an engineered strain of Methylobacterium, evolved to grow on methanol. Quantifying allele frequencies with minimal bias down to 1% abundance allowed effective analysis of SNPs, small in-dels and insertions of transposable elements. Our data reveal large-scale clonal interference during the early stages of adaptation and illustrate the utility of FREQ-Seq as a cost-effective tool for tracking allele frequencies in populations.

  5. High resolution melting analytical platform for rapid prenatal and postnatal diagnosis of β-thalassemia common among Southeast Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajantasen, Thanet; Fucharoen, Supan; Fucharoen, Goonnapa

    2015-02-20

    High resolution melting (HRM) analysis is a powerful technology for scanning sequence alteration. We have applied this HRM assay to screen common β-thalassemia mutations found among Southeast Asian population. Known DNA samples with 8 common mutations were used in initial development of the methods including -28 A-G, codon 17 A-T, IVSI-1G-T, IVSI-5G-C, codon 26G-A (Hb E), codons 41/42 -TTCT, codons 71/72+A and IVSII-654 C-T. Further validation was done on 60 postnatal and 6 prenatal diagnoses of β-thalassemia. Each mutation has specific HRM profile which could be used in rapid screening. Apart from those with DNA deletions, the results of HRM assay matched 100% with those of routine diagnosis made by routine allele specific PCR. In addition, the HRM assay could initially recognize three unknown mutations including a hitherto un-described one in Thai population. The established HRM assay should prove useful for rapid and high throughput platform for screening and prenatal diagnosis of β-thalassemia common in the region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Using Qualitative Methods for Revising Items in the Hispanic Stress Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Richard C.; Goldbach, Jeremy T.; Padilla, Amado M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite progress in the development of measures to assess psychosocial stress experiences in the general population, a lack of culturally informed assessment instruments exist to enable clinicians and researchers to detect and accurately diagnosis mental health concerns among Hispanics. The Hispanic Stress Inventory (HSI) was developed…

  7. Rapidly increasing body mass index among children, adolescents and young adults in a transitioning population, South Africa, 2008-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, B; Sartorius, K; Taylor, M; Aagaard-Hansen, J; Dukhi, N; Day, C; Ndlovu, N; Slotow, R; Hofman, K

    2017-12-14

    There is a global epidemic of overweight and obesity; however, this rate of increase is even greater in some low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). South Africa (SA) is undergoing rapid socioeconomic and demographic changes that have triggered a rapid nutrition transition. The paper focuses on the recent rate of change of body mass index (BMI) among children, adolescents and young adults, further stratified by key sociodemographic factors. We analysed mean BMI of 28 247 individuals (including children) from 7301 households by age and year, from anthropometric data from four national cross-sectional (repeated panel) surveys using non-linear fitted curves and associated 95% confidence intervals. From 2008 to 2015, there was rapid rise in mean BMI in the 6-25 age band, with the highest risk (3-4+ BMI unit increase) among children aged 8-10 years. The increase was largely among females in urban areas and of middle-high socioeconomic standing. Prominent gains were also observed in certain rural areas, with extensive geographical heterogeneity across the country. We have demonstrated a major deviation from the current understanding of patterns of BMI increase, with a rate of increase substantially greater in the developing world context compared with the global pattern. This population-wide effect will have major consequences for national development as the epidemic of related non-communicable disease unfolds, and will overtax the national health care budget. Our refined understanding highlights that risks are further compounded for certain groups/places, and emphasizes that urgent geographical and population-targeted interventions are necessary. These interventions could include a sugar tax, clearer food labelling, revised school feeding programmes and mandatory bans on unhealthy food marketing to children.The scenario unfolding in South Africa will likely be followed in other LMICs.

  8. POPULATION GENOMICS REVEAL RECENT SPECIATION AND RAPID EVOLUTIONARY ADAPTATION IN POLAR BEARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiping; Lorenzen, Eline D.; Fumagalli, Matteo; Li, Bo; Harris, Kelley; Xiong, Zijun; Zhou, Long; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Somel, Mehmet; Babbitt, Courtney; Wray, Greg; Li, Jianwen; He, Weiming; Wang, Zhuo; Fu, Wenjing; Xiang, Xueyan; Morgan, Claire C.; Doherty, Aoife; O’Connell, Mary J.; McInerney, James O.; Born, Erik W.; Dalén, Love; Dietz, Rune; Orlando, Ludovic; Sonne, Christian; Zhang, Guojie; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Polar bears are uniquely adapted to life in the High Arctic and have undergone drastic physiological changes in response to Arctic climates and a hyperlipid diet of primarily marine mammal prey. We analyzed 89 complete genomes of polar bear and brown bear using population genomic modeling and show that the species diverged only 479–343 thousand years BP. We find that genes on the polar bear lineage have been under stronger positive selection than in brown bears; nine of the top 16 genes under strong positive selection are associated with cardiomyopathy and vascular disease, implying important reorganization of the cardio-vascular system. One of the genes showing the strongest evidence of selection, APOB, encodes the primary lipoprotein component of low-density lipoprotein (LDL); functional mutations in APOB may explain how polar bears are able to cope with life-long elevated LDL levels that are associated with high risk of heart disease in humans. PMID:24813606

  9. Rapid growth and genetic diversity retention in an isolated reintroduced black bear population in the central appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean M.; Cox, John J.; Clark, Joseph D.; Augustine, Benjamin J.; Hast, John T.; Gibbs, Dan; Strunk, Michael; Dobey, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Animal reintroductions are important tools of wildlife management to restore species to their historical range, and they can also create unique opportunities to study population dynamics and genetics from founder events. We used non-invasive hair sampling in a systematic, closed-population capture-mark-recapture (CMR) study design at the Big South Fork (BSF) area in Kentucky during 2010 and Tennessee during 2012 to estimate the demographic and genetic characteristics of the black bear (Ursus americanus) population that resulted from a reintroduced founding population of 18 bears in 1998. We estimated 38 (95% CI: 31–66) and 190 (95% CI: 170–219) bears on the Kentucky and Tennessee study areas, respectively. Based on the Tennessee abundance estimate alone, the mean annual growth rate was 18.3% (95% CI: 17.4–19.5%) from 1998 to 2012. We also compared the genetic characteristics of bears sampled during 2010–2012 to bears in the population during 2000–2002, 2–4 years following reintroduction, and to the source population. We found that the level of genetic diversity since reintroduction as indicated by expected heterozygosity (HE) remained relatively constant (HE(source, 2004) = 0.763, HE(BSF, 2000–2002) = 0.729, HE(BSF, 2010–2012) = 0.712) and the effective number of breeders (NB) remained low but had increased since reintroduction in the absence of sufficient immigration (NB(BSF, 2000–2002) = 12, NB(BSF, 2010–2012)  = 35). This bear population appears to be genetically isolated, but contrary to our expectations, we did not find evidence of genetic diversity loss or other deleterious genetic effects typically observed from small founder groups. We attribute that to high initial genetic diversity in the founder group combined with overlapping generations and rapid population growth. Although the population remains relatively small, the reintroduction using a small founder group appears to be demographically and genetically

  10. Being cabezona: success strategies of Hispanic nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moceri, Joane T

    2010-01-01

    Hispanic registered nurses (RNs) are poorly represented in professional nursing, comprising only 1.7% of RNs despite representing 15% of the population of the United States. Furthermore, their numbers are actually decreasing in nursing at the same time the Hispanic population is experiencing serious health disparities. This descriptive, interpretive study explores strategies used by Hispanic nursing students to overcome obstacles from the perspectives of 13 currently enrolled students and recent graduates through focus groups and individual interviews. Successful students were highly motivated to succeed, while at the same time able to maintain strong cultural ties and family responsibilities, and used a strategy they called being cabezona(stubborn) in the face of numerous obstacles, including discrimination. Recommendations for nurse educators are presented, including the need for increased flexibility, mentoring support, and including curricular content about issues of privilege and oppression in nursing programs.

  11. Traumatic occupational injuries in Hispanic and foreign born workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, Linda; Avila, Susan; Anozie, Stella; Rubin, Rachel

    2010-04-01

    Hispanic and foreign-born workers suffer high rates of occupational fatality. Reasons for this are not well understood. Our aim was to gather information about the details related to severe, non-fatal occupational injuries in this vulnerable population. Eight years of data were obtained from an urban trauma center. In addition, medical consultations of individuals admitted for an occupational injury during an 8-month period are reported. Hispanics were more highly represented than expected; their number of injuries steadily rose. Hispanics were more likely to be injured by machinery and hand tools. Workers reported hazardous working conditions, lack of workers compensation, short time in current employment, and not working in their usual job. Trauma systems can provide a glimpse of risk factors for severe injuries in vulnerable workers. We recommend greater use of this data source, follow backs, long-term follow up of individuals, and improvement of surveillance of vulnerable working populations. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Profile: Hispanic/Latino Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. According to the 2015 U.S. ... PDF | 1.1MB] Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin: 2010 [PDF | 1.9MB] Health Insurance Coverage in ...

  13. Lupus among Asians and Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Lupus among Asians and Hispanics Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... compared with white women. Signs and Symptom of Lupus Lupus can affect people of all ages. However, ...

  14. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have a bit of a penchant for racial bias where Hispanic and Latina women are concerned. And ... Tu Corazón About Go Red For Women Alliances Media Room The American Heart Association is a qualified ...

  15. Population genomics reveal recent speciation and rapid evolutionary adaptation in polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiping; Lorenzen, Eline D; Fumagalli, Matteo; Li, Bo; Harris, Kelley; Xiong, Zijun; Zhou, Long; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Somel, Mehmet; Babbitt, Courtney; Wray, Greg; Li, Jianwen; He, Weiming; Wang, Zhuo; Fu, Wenjing; Xiang, Xueyan; Morgan, Claire C; Doherty, Aoife; O'Connell, Mary J; McInerney, James O; Born, Erik W; Dalén, Love; Dietz, Rune; Orlando, Ludovic; Sonne, Christian; Zhang, Guojie; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske; Wang, Jun

    2014-05-08

    Polar bears are uniquely adapted to life in the High Arctic and have undergone drastic physiological changes in response to Arctic climates and a hyper-lipid diet of primarily marine mammal prey. We analyzed 89 complete genomes of polar bear and brown bear using population genomic modeling and show that the species diverged only 479-343 thousand years BP. We find that genes on the polar bear lineage have been under stronger positive selection than in brown bears; nine of the top 16 genes under strong positive selection are associated with cardiomyopathy and vascular disease, implying important reorganization of the cardiovascular system. One of the genes showing the strongest evidence of selection, APOB, encodes the primary lipoprotein component of low-density lipoprotein (LDL); functional mutations in APOB may explain how polar bears are able to cope with life-long elevated LDL levels that are associated with high risk of heart disease in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid identification of causal mutations in tomato EMS populations via mapping-by-sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Virginie; Bres, Cécile; Just, Daniel; Fernandez, Lucie; Tai, Fabienne Wong Jun; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Le Paslier, Marie-Christine; Bérard, Aurélie; Brunel, Dominique; Aoki, Koh; Alseekh, Saleh; Fernie, Alisdair R; Fraser, Paul D; Rothan, Christophe

    2016-12-01

    The tomato is the model species of choice for fleshy fruit development and for the Solanaceae family. Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutants of tomato have already proven their utility for analysis of gene function in plants, leading to improved breeding stocks and superior tomato varieties. However, until recently, the identification of causal mutations that underlie particular phenotypes has been a very lengthy task that many laboratories could not afford because of spatial and technical limitations. Here, we describe a simple protocol for identifying causal mutations in tomato using a mapping-by-sequencing strategy. Plants displaying phenotypes of interest are first isolated by screening an EMS mutant collection generated in the miniature cultivar Micro-Tom. A recombinant F2 population is then produced by crossing the mutant with a wild-type (WT; non-mutagenized) genotype, and F2 segregants displaying the same phenotype are subsequently pooled. Finally, whole-genome sequencing and analysis of allele distributions in the pools allow for the identification of the causal mutation. The whole process, from the isolation of the tomato mutant to the identification of the causal mutation, takes 6-12 months. This strategy overcomes many previous limitations, is simple to use and can be applied in most laboratories with limited facilities for plant culture and genotyping.

  17. Rapid and sensitive magnetoelastic biosensors for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in a mixed microbial population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntupalli, R; Lakshmanan, R S; Hu, J; Huang, T S; Barbaree, J M; Vodyanoy, V; Chin, B A

    2007-07-01

    In this article, we report the results of an investigation into the performance of a wireless, magnetoelastic biosensor designed to selectively detect Salmonella typhimurium in a mixed microbial population. The Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer technique was employed for antibody (specific to Salmonella sp.) immobilization on rectangular shaped strip magnetoelastic sensors (2 x 0.4 x 0.015 mm). Bacterial binding to the antibody on the sensor surface changes the resonance parameters, and these changes were quantified as a shift in the sensor's resonance frequency. Response of the sensors to increasing concentrations (5 x 10(1) to 5 x 10(8) cfu/ml) of S. typhimurium in a mixture of extraneous foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes) was studied. A detection limit of 5 x 10(3) cfu/ml and a sensitivity of 139 Hz/decade were observed for the 2 x 0.4 x 0.015 mm sensors. Binding kinetics studies have shown that the dissociation constant (K(d)) and the binding valencies for water samples spiked with S. typhimurium was 435 cfu/ml and 2.33 respectively. The presence of extraneous microorganisms in the mixture did not produce an appreciable change in the biosensor's dose response behavior.

  18. Rapid and unambiguous detection of DNase I hypersensitive site in rare population of cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ping Zeng

    Full Text Available DNase I hypersensitive (DHS sites are important for understanding cis regulation of gene expression. However, existing methods for detecting DHS sites in small numbers of cells can lead to ambiguous results. Here we describe a simple new method, in which DNA fragments with ends generated by DNase I digestion are isolated and used as templates for two PCR reactions. In the first PCR, primers are derived from sequences up- and down-stream of the DHS site. If the DHS site exists in the cells, the first PCR will not produce PCR products due to the cuts of the templates by DNase I between the primer sequences. In the second PCR, one primer is derived from sequence outside the DHS site and the other from the adaptor. This will produce a smear of PCR products of different sizes due to cuts by DNase I at different positions at the DHS site. With this design, we detected a DHS site at the CD4 gene in two CD4 T cell populations using as few as 2×10(4 cells. We further validated this method by detecting a DHS site of the IL-4 gene that is specifically present in type 2 but not type 1 T helper cells. Overall, this method overcomes the interference by genomic DNA not cut by DNase I at the DHS site, thereby offering unambiguous detection of DHS sites in the cells.

  19. Dynamic large-scale chromosomal rearrangements fuel rapid adaptation in yeast populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Lin Chang

    Full Text Available Large-scale genome rearrangements have been observed in cells adapting to various selective conditions during laboratory evolution experiments. However, it remains unclear whether these types of mutations can be stably maintained in populations and how they impact the evolutionary trajectories. Here we show that chromosomal rearrangements contribute to extremely high copper tolerance in a set of natural yeast strains isolated from Evolution Canyon (EC, Israel. The chromosomal rearrangements in EC strains result in segmental duplications in chromosomes 7 and 8, which increase the copy number of genes involved in copper regulation, including the crucial transcriptional activator CUP2 and the metallothionein CUP1. The copy number of CUP2 is correlated with the level of copper tolerance, indicating that increasing dosages of a single transcriptional activator by chromosomal rearrangements has a profound effect on a regulatory pathway. By gene expression analysis and functional assays, we identified three previously unknown downstream targets of CUP2: PHO84, SCM4, and CIN2, all of which contributed to copper tolerance in EC strains. Finally, we conducted an evolution experiment to examine how cells maintained these changes in a fluctuating environment. Interestingly, the rearranged chromosomes were reverted back to the wild-type configuration at a high frequency and the recovered chromosome became fixed in less selective conditions. Our results suggest that transposon-mediated chromosomal rearrangements can be highly dynamic and can serve as a reversible mechanism during early stages of adaptive evolution.

  20. El Estado de la Educacion para los Hispanos en los Estados Unidos (The Condition of Education for Hispanics in the United States).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, George H.; And Others

    Organized into 4 chapters, the report provides tabular data portraying the educational condition for about 12 million Hispanic Americans in the United States, and shows how Hispanics compare with the majority population on various measures of educational participation and achievement. Providing an overview of Hispanic Americans in the U.S.,…

  1. Genetic analysis of morphological traits in a new, versatile, rapid-cycling Brassica rapa recombinant inbred line population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Hedayat; El-Soda, Mohamed; van Oorschot, Inge; Hanhart, Corrie; Bonnema, Guusje; Jansen-van den Bosch, Tanja; Mank, Rolf; Keurentjes, Joost J. B.; Meng, Lin; Wu, Jian; Koornneef, Maarten; Aarts, Mark G. M.

    2012-01-01

    A recombinant inbred line (RIL) population was produced based on a wide cross between the rapid-cycling and self-compatible genotypes L58, a Caixin vegetable type, and R-o-18, a yellow sarson oil type. A linkage map based on 160 F7 lines was constructed using 100 Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 130 AFLP®, 27 InDel, and 13 publicly available SSR markers. The map covers a total length of 1150 centiMorgan (cM) with an average resolution of 4.3 cM/marker. To demonstrate the versatility of this new population, 17 traits, related to plant architecture and seed characteristics, were subjected to quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. A total of 47 QTLs were detected, each explaining between 6 and 54% of the total phenotypic variance for the concerned trait. The genetic analysis shows that this population is a useful new tool for analyzing genetic variation for interesting traits in B. rapa, and for further exploitation of the recent availability of the B. rapa whole genome sequence for gene cloning and gene function analysis. PMID:22912644

  2. Genetic analysis of morphological traits in a new, versatile, rapid-cycling Brassica rapa recombinant inbred line population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedayat eBagheri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A recombinant inbred line (RIL population was produced based on a wide cross between the rapid-cycling and self-compatible genotypes L58, a Caixin vegetable type, and R-o-18, a yellow sarson oil type. A linkage map based on 160 F7 lines was constructed using 100 SNP, 130 AFLP®, 27 InDel and 13 publicly available SSR markers. The map covers a total length of 1150 cM with an average resolution of 4.3 cM/marker. To demonstrate the versatility of this new population, 17 traits, related to plant architecture and seed characteristics, were subjected to QTL analysis. A total of 47 QTLs were detected, each explaining between 6 to 54% of the total phenotypic variance for the concerned trait. The genetic analysis shows that this population is a useful new tool for analyzing genetic variation for interesting traits in B. rapa, and for further exploitation of the recent availability of the B. rapa whole genome sequence for gene cloning and gene function analysis.

  3. Connecting Hispanic Women in Baltimore to the Mercy Medical Center Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners/Forensic Nurse Examiners Program: A Preliminary Assessment of Service Utilization and Community Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Margaret; Fitzgerald, Sheila; Holbrook, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Sexual violence and gender-based violence represent a major public health problem causing significant negative mental, physical, and social outcomes for victims. The rapidly growing population of Hispanic women in Baltimore are both more vulnerable to sexual assault and less able to access postassault services. In an effort to assess service utilization and community awareness of the Mercy Medical Center Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners/Forensic Nurse Examiners Program, we conducted a retrospective chart review of 2,322 women who were seen by the program between 2010 and 2013 and found that only 2.5% of the women were identified as Hispanic, about half of what Baltimore City demographic data would predict. This exploratory pilot project, augmented by key informant interviews, reveals that Hispanic women are underutilizing sexual assault services. Multiple barriers exist for Hispanic women in obtaining victim services, including lack of awareness within the community that the services exist, cultural factors, language barriers, lack of awareness of legal rights, and a fear of deportation.

  4. Self-Reported Cancer Prevalence among Hispanics in the US: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penedo, Frank J.; Yanez, Betina; Castañeda, Sheila F.; Gallo, Linda; Wortman, Katy; Gouskova, Natalia; Simon, Melissa; Arguelles, William; Llabre, Maria; Sanchez-Johnsen, Lisa; Brintz, Carrie; Gonzalez, Patricia; Van Horn, Linda; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Ramirez, Amelie G.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer has surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death among Hispanics in the U.S., yet data on cancer prevalence and risk factors in Hispanics in regard to ancestry remain scarce. This study sought to describe (a) the prevalence of cancer among Hispanics from four major U.S. metropolitan areas, (b) cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry, and (c) identify correlates of self-reported cancer prevalence. Participants were 16,415 individuals from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central or South American. All data were collected at a single time point during the HCHS/SOL baseline clinic visit. The overall self-reported prevalence rate of cancer for the population was 4%. The rates varied by Hispanic ancestry group, with individuals of Cuban and Puerto Rican ancestry reporting the highest cancer prevalence. For the entire population, older age (OR = 1.47, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.26–1.71) and having health insurance (OR = 1.93, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.42–2.62) were all significantly associated with greater prevalence, whereas male sex was associated with lower prevalence (OR = 0.56, p < .01, 95% CI, .40-.79). Associations between study covariates and cancer prevalence also varied by Hispanic ancestry. Findings underscore the importance of sociodemographic factors and health insurance in relation to cancer prevalence for Hispanics and highlight variations in cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry groups. Characterizing differences in cancer prevalence rates and their correlates is critical to the development and implementation of effective prevention strategies across distinct Hispanic ancestry groups. PMID:26808047

  5. Self-Reported Cancer Prevalence among Hispanics in the US: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J Penedo

    Full Text Available Cancer has surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death among Hispanics in the U.S., yet data on cancer prevalence and risk factors in Hispanics in regard to ancestry remain scarce. This study sought to describe (a the prevalence of cancer among Hispanics from four major U.S. metropolitan areas, (b cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry, and (c identify correlates of self-reported cancer prevalence. Participants were 16,415 individuals from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL, who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central or South American. All data were collected at a single time point during the HCHS/SOL baseline clinic visit. The overall self-reported prevalence rate of cancer for the population was 4%. The rates varied by Hispanic ancestry group, with individuals of Cuban and Puerto Rican ancestry reporting the highest cancer prevalence. For the entire population, older age (OR = 1.47, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.26-1.71 and having health insurance (OR = 1.93, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.42-2.62 were all significantly associated with greater prevalence, whereas male sex was associated with lower prevalence (OR = 0.56, p < .01, 95% CI, .40-.79. Associations between study covariates and cancer prevalence also varied by Hispanic ancestry. Findings underscore the importance of sociodemographic factors and health insurance in relation to cancer prevalence for Hispanics and highlight variations in cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry groups. Characterizing differences in cancer prevalence rates and their correlates is critical to the development and implementation of effective prevention strategies across distinct Hispanic ancestry groups.

  6. Rationale and Design of the Echocardiographic Study of Hispanics/Latinos (ECHO-SOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos J; Dharod, Ajay; Allison, Matthew A; Shah, Sanjiv J; Hurwitz, Barry; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Kitzman, Dalane; Gillam, Linda; Spevack, Daniel; Dadhania, Rupal; Langdon, Sarah; Kaplan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Information regarding the prevalence and determinants of cardiac structure and function (systolic and diastolic) among the various Hispanic background groups in the United States is limited. The Echocardiographic Study of Latinos (ECHO-SOL) ancillary study recruited 1,824 participants through a stratified-sampling process representative of the population-based Hispanic Communities Health Study - Study of Latinos (HCHS-SOL) across four sites (Bronx, NY; Chicago, Ill; San Diego, Calif; Miami, Fla). The HCHS-SOL baseline cohort did not include an echo exam. ECHO-SOL added the echocardiographic assessment of cardiac structure and function to an array of existing HCHS-SOL baseline clinical, psychosocial, and socioeconomic data and provides sufficient statistical power for comparisons among the Hispanic subgroups. Standard two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography protocol, including M-mode, spectral, color and tissue Doppler study was performed. The main objectives were to: 1) characterize cardiac structure and function and its determinants among Hispanics and Hispanic subgroups; and 2) determine the contributions of specific psychosocial factors (acculturation and familismo) to cardiac structure and function among Hispanics. We describe the design, methods and rationale of currently the largest and most comprehensive study of cardiac structure and function exclusively among US Hispanics. ECHO-SOL aims to enhance our understanding of Hispanic cardiovascular health as well as help untangle the relative importance of Hispanic subgroup heterogeneity and sociocultural factors on cardiac structure and function.

  7. Prevalence and treatment of eating disorders among Hispanics/Latino Americans in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Marisol; Ohrt, Tara K; Hoek, Hans W

    2016-11-01

    We reviewed the recent literature on prevalence rates, and application of evidence-based treatments for eating disorders among Hispanics/Latinos residing in the United States. Lifetime prevalence rates of anorexia nervosa are lower among Hispanic/Latinos than non-Hispanic Whites. There are comparable rates of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder (BED) among Hispanic/Latinos and non-Hispanic Whites. BED is the most common eating disorder among Hispanic/Latinos. Evidence-based treatments have begun to be implemented with Hispanics/Latinos. The core concepts of cognitive behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa and BED apply to this population. Culture-specific adaptations include strengthening the collectivistic framework within an individualistic treatment, psychoeducation of immediate and extended family, and adjustment of meal plans that incorporated cultural foods. There are more similarities than differences in the prevalence of eating disorders across Hispanics/Latinos and non-Hispanic Whites. However, the social context such as immigration status and acculturation is important to consider in the development of eating disorders. In addition, the Westernization of Latin America may change the future relationship of immigration status and development of eating disorder within the United States. Overall, cultural adaptations of evidence-based treatments involved the inclusion of family within treatment, acculturation-related issues, and managing family conflicts that arise because of the changes in eating patterns.

  8. Breast Cancer Prevalence and Mortality among Hispanic Subgroups in the United States, 2009–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijou R. Hunt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper presents data on breast cancer prevalence and mortality among US Hispanics and Hispanic subgroups, including Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central American, and South American. Methods. Five-year average annual female breast cancer prevalence and mortality rates for 2009–2013 were examined using data from the National Health Interview Survey (prevalence and the National Center for Health Statistics and the American Community Survey (mortality rates. Results. Overall breast cancer prevalence among US Hispanic women was 1.03%. Although the estimates varied slightly by Hispanic subgroup, these differences were not statistically significant. The breast cancer mortality rate for Hispanics overall was 17.71 per 100,000 women. Higher rates were observed among Cubans (17.89, Mexicans (18.78, and Puerto Ricans (19.04, and a lower rate was observed among Central and South Americans (10.15. With the exception of the rate for Cubans, all Hispanic subgroup rates were statistically significantly different from the overall Hispanic rate. Additionally, all Hispanic subgroups rates were statistically significantly higher than the Central and South American rate. Conclusion. The data reveal significant differences in mortality across Hispanic subgroups. These data enable public health officials to develop targeted interventions to help lower breast cancer mortality among the highest risk populations.

  9. Culture-Sensitive Question Order Effects of Self-Rated Health Between Older Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunghee; Schwarz, Norbert; Goldstein, Leanne Streja

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to examine context effects created by the question order for self-rated health (SRH) by race/ethnicity and language. Differences in SRH estimates for non-Hispanic Whites and Hispanics were first examined with multiple observational data that asked SRH in different contexts. To examine context effects by socio-demographics and health-related characteristics, we conducted experiments on SRH question order. While Hispanics reported poorer health than non-Hispanic Whites, this difference, in part, depended on question contexts. With SRH asked after rather than before specific health questions, Hispanics, especially Spanish-speaking Hispanics, reported better health, while non-Hispanic Whites' reports remained consistent. Among Spanish-speaking Hispanics, the context effect was larger for unmarried and less educated persons and those with comorbidities. Question contexts influence SRH reports by Spanish-speaking older adults. Cross-cultural inquiries on the meaning of health and its dynamics with question contexts may explain what SRH measures for increasingly diverse populations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Influence of rapid rural-urban population migration on riverine nitrogen pollution: perspective from ammonia-nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangshou; Swaney, Dennis P; Hong, Bongghi; Howarth, Robert W; Li, Xuyong

    2017-09-30

    China is undergoing a rapid transition from a rural to an urban society. This societal change is a consequence of a national drive toward economic prosperity. However, accelerated urban development resulting from rapid population migration from rural to urban lands has led to high levels of untreated sewage entering aquatic ecosystems directly. Consequently, many of these regions have been identified as hot spots of riverine nitrogen (N) pollution because of the increasing level of urban point-source discharge. In order to address this concern, we assessed effects of urban development on ammonia-nitrogen (AN) loads using a panel data regression model. The model, expressed as an exponential function of anthropogenic N inputs multiplied by a power function of streamflow, was applied to 20 subwatersheds of the Huai River Basin for the years 2003-2010. The results indicated that this model can account for 81% of the variation in annual AN fluxes over space and time. Application of this model to three scenarios of urban development and sewage treatment (termed urbanization priority, sustainable development, and environmental priority) suggests that future N pollution will inevitably deteriorate if current urban environmental management and investment are not significantly improved. Stronger support for environmental management is very critical to alleviate N pollution and improve water quality. More effort should focus on improving sewage treatment and the N removal rate of the current sewage system in light of the increasing degree of urbanization.

  11. Annual cancer incidence rates for Hispanics in the United States: surveillance, epidemiology, and end results, 1992-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, M T; Chu, K C

    2000-06-01

    The expansion of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program and the determination of annual population estimates by county level for different racial/ethnic groups since 1990 allow the calculation of annual cancer incidence rates for Hispanics. Incidence rates were calculated for 11 SEER areas representing 25% of the Hispanic population. Standard regression analyses of log-transformed rates were used to determine the trends of the rates. An important measure of the cancer burden among Hispanics is the rank order of their cancers. For Hispanic males, the five major cancers (in declining order) are prostate, lung and bronchus, colon/rectum, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and stomach cancers. For Hispanic females, the top five cancers are breast, colon/rectum, lung and bronchus, cervix, and endometrial cancers. Another measure of cancer burden is their rates relative to white non-Hispanics. Hispanic males have rates greater than white non-Hispanic males for stomach (1.6 times greater) and liver and IBD cancers (2.2), whereas Hispanic females have greater rates for cervix (2.2 times greater), liver and IBD (2.0), stomach (2.1), and gallbladder cancers (3.3). Other measures of cancer burden include the trends in Hispanic rates. Hispanic males have significant declining trends for all sites, prostate cancer, and urinary bladder cancer, and an increasing trend for liver and IBD cancers. Hispanic females have significant declining trends for cervix and urinary bladder cancers. The SEER cancer incidence rates and trends provide a general overview of the cancer burden among Hispanics residing in the SEER sites. This type of information is critical for determining interventions to reduce the cancer burden among Hispanics in the United States. Copyright 2000 American Cancer Society.

  12. Latinos' Economic Recovery: Postsecondary Participation and Hispanic-Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastic, Billie; Nieto, David Gonzalez

    2010-01-01

    The majority of Latinos currently enrolled in colleges and universities attend Hispanic-serving Institutions (HSIs), or those institutions where Latino undergraduate full-time equivalent enrollment equals or exceeds 25% of the student population. While HSIs only make up 7% of colleges and universities in the U.S., they enroll more than half of all…

  13. The New Face of America: Hispanics, Immigration, and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Roy

    2007-01-01

    America is in the midst of a massive demographic shift. The U.S. population hit the 300 million mark in late 2006, and a full 36 percent of the last 100 million people who contributed to that growth were Hispanic. Moreover, in 31 of the nation's 50 largest cities, minorities are now the majority. Just last year, Phoenix, Tucson, and Denver joined…

  14. Hispanics and Patronage Preferences for Shopping From the Internet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Korgaonkar, Pradeep; Silverblatt, Ronnie; Becerra, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    ..., 1.3 million households and 2.3 million Hispanic small businesses are using the Web. Still, little published research exists documenting the shopping preferences for buying from the Web by this growing segment of the U.S. population...

  15. Hispanics, Latinos, or Americanos: the evolution of identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas-Díaz, L

    2001-05-01

    This essay identifies and categorizes terms used to designate the Hispanic/Latino population in the United States. It provides an analysis framing the process of ethnic self-designation within an ethnopolitical and psychosocial context. The analysis concludes by presenting mestizaje and transculturation as processes involved in the evolution of Latino identity.

  16. Population Divergence in Venom Bioactivities of Elapid Snake Pseudonaja textilis: Role of Procoagulant Proteins in Rapid Rodent Prey Incapacitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skejić, Jure; Hodgson, Wayne C.

    2013-01-01

    This study looked at how toxic proteins in venoms of adult Australian eastern Brown snakes Pseudonaja textilis from South Australian and Queensland populations interact with physiological functions of the lab SD rat Rattus norvegicus. Circulatory collapse and incoagulable blood occurred instantly after injection of venom under the dorsal skin of anaesthetised and mechanically ventilated rats in an imitation of a P. textilis bite. Intravenous injection of purified P. textilis (Mackay, QLD) venom prothrombin activator proteins caused instant failure of circulation, testifying of high toxicity of these proteins and suggesting their role in rapid incapacitation of rodent prey. The hypothesis is further supported by circulatory collapse occurring instantly despite artificial respiration in envenomed rats and the finding of extremely high venom procoagulant potency in rat plasma. LC-MS and physiology assays revealed divergent venom composition and biological activity of South Australian (Barossa locality) and Queensland (Mackay locality) populations, which may be driven by selection for different prey. The Queensland venom of P. textilis was found to be more procoagulant and to exhibit predominately presynaptic neurotoxicity, while the South Australian venom contained diverse postsynaptic type II and III α-neurotoxins in addition to the presynaptic neurotoxins and caused significantly faster onset of neuromuscular blockade in the rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation. LC-MS analysis found evidence of multiple coagulation factor X-like proteins in P. textilis venoms, including a match to P. textilis coagulation factor X isoform 2, previously known to be expressed only in the liver. PMID:23691135

  17. Rapidly rising incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes in Chinese population: epidemiology in Shanghai during 1997-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhuhui; Sun, Chengjun; Wang, Chunfang; Li, Pin; Wang, Wei; Ye, Jun; Gu, Xuefan; Wang, Xiaodong; Shen, Shuixian; Zhi, Dijing; Lu, Zhong; Ye, Rong; Cheng, Ruoqian; Xi, Li; Li, Xiaojing; Zheng, Zhangqian; Zhang, Miaoying; Luo, Feihong

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate incidence trend of childhood type 1 diabetes in Shanghai, a megalopolis in east China. We established a population-based retrospective registry for the disease in the city's registered population during 1997-2011 and collected 622 incident type 1 diabetes in children aged 0-14 years. Standardized incidence rates and 95 % CI were estimated by applying the capture-recapture method and assuming Poisson distribution. Incidence trend was analyzed using the Poisson regression model. The mean annual incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes was 3.1 per 100,000 person-years. We did not observe significant difference in incidence between boys and girls. The incidence is unstable and had a mean annual increase 14.2 % per year during the studied period. A faster annual increase was observed in boys, warmer seasons, and in the outer regions of the city. If present trends continue, the number of new type 1 diabetes cases will double from 2016 to 2020, and prevalent cases will sextuple by 2025. Our results showed the incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes was rising rapidly in Shanghai. More studies are needed to analyze incidence changes in other regions of China for appropriate allocation of healthcare resources.

  18. Population divergence in venom bioactivities of elapid snake Pseudonaja textilis: role of procoagulant proteins in rapid rodent prey incapacitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Skejić

    Full Text Available This study looked at how toxic proteins in venoms of adult Australian eastern Brown snakes Pseudonaja textilis from South Australian and Queensland populations interact with physiological functions of the lab SD rat Rattus norvegicus. Circulatory collapse and incoagulable blood occurred instantly after injection of venom under the dorsal skin of anaesthetised and mechanically ventilated rats in an imitation of a P. textilis bite. Intravenous injection of purified P. textilis (Mackay, QLD venom prothrombin activator proteins caused instant failure of circulation, testifying of high toxicity of these proteins and suggesting their role in rapid incapacitation of rodent prey. The hypothesis is further supported by circulatory collapse occurring instantly despite artificial respiration in envenomed rats and the finding of extremely high venom procoagulant potency in rat plasma. LC-MS and physiology assays revealed divergent venom composition and biological activity of South Australian (Barossa locality and Queensland (Mackay locality populations, which may be driven by selection for different prey. The Queensland venom of P. textilis was found to be more procoagulant and to exhibit predominately presynaptic neurotoxicity, while the South Australian venom contained diverse postsynaptic type II and III α-neurotoxins in addition to the presynaptic neurotoxins and caused significantly faster onset of neuromuscular blockade in the rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation. LC-MS analysis found evidence of multiple coagulation factor X-like proteins in P. textilis venoms, including a match to P. textilis coagulation factor X isoform 2, previously known to be expressed only in the liver.

  19. Rapid changes in transcription profiles of the Plasmodium yoelii yir multigene family in clonal populations: lack of epigenetic memory?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Cunningham

    Full Text Available The pir multigene family, found in the genomes of Plasmodium vivax, P. knowlesi and the rodent malaria species, encode variant antigens that could be targets of the immune response. Individual parasites of the rodent malaria Plasmodium yoelii, selected by micromanipulation, transcribe only 1 to 3 different pir (yir suggesting tight transcriptional control at the level of individual cells. Using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that despite this very restricted transcription in a single cell, many yir genes are transcribed throughout the intra-erythrocytic asexual cycle. The timing and level of transcription differs between genes, with some being more highly transcribed in ring and trophozoite stages, whereas others are more highly transcribed in schizonts. Infection of immunodeficient mice with single infected erythrocytes results in populations of parasites each with transcriptional profiles different from that of the parent parasite population and from each other. This drift away from the original 'set' of transcribed genes does not appear to follow a preset pattern and "epigenetic memory" of the yir transcribed in the parent parasite can be rapidly lost. Thus, regulation of pir gene transcription may be different from that of the well-characterised multigene family, var, of Plasmodium falciparum.

  20. Rapid changes in transcription profiles of the Plasmodium yoelii yir multigene family in clonal populations: lack of epigenetic memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Deirdre; Fonager, Jannik; Jarra, William; Carret, Celine; Preiser, Peter; Langhorne, Jean

    2009-01-01

    The pir multigene family, found in the genomes of Plasmodium vivax, P. knowlesi and the rodent malaria species, encode variant antigens that could be targets of the immune response. Individual parasites of the rodent malaria Plasmodium yoelii, selected by micromanipulation, transcribe only 1 to 3 different pir (yir) suggesting tight transcriptional control at the level of individual cells. Using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that despite this very restricted transcription in a single cell, many yir genes are transcribed throughout the intra-erythrocytic asexual cycle. The timing and level of transcription differs between genes, with some being more highly transcribed in ring and trophozoite stages, whereas others are more highly transcribed in schizonts. Infection of immunodeficient mice with single infected erythrocytes results in populations of parasites each with transcriptional profiles different from that of the parent parasite population and from each other. This drift away from the original 'set' of transcribed genes does not appear to follow a preset pattern and "epigenetic memory" of the yir transcribed in the parent parasite can be rapidly lost. Thus, regulation of pir gene transcription may be different from that of the well-characterised multigene family, var, of Plasmodium falciparum.

  1. Rapid evolution in the wild: changes in body size, life-history traits, and behavior in hunted populations of the Japanese mamushi snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kiyoshi; Fox, Stanley F; Duvall, David

    2009-02-01

    Rapid evolution caused by human exploitation of wildlife is not usually addressed in studies of the impacts of such exploitation despite its direct relevance to population persistence. Japanese mamushi (Gloydius blomhoffii), an endemic venomous snake of the Japanese archipelago, has been heavily hunted by humans, and many populations appear to be declining or are already extirpated. We compared local populations that have been hunted regularly with populations that have not been hunted. Mamushi in hunted populations were smaller, had fewer vertebrae, produced more and smaller offspring, had increased reproductive effort among smaller females, and in nature fled at greater distances from an approaching human and were less defensive than mamushi in unhunted populations, as predicted from life-history theory. Heritability estimates for body size, number of vertebrae, and antipredator behavior were statistically significant, and neonates from hunted sites showed the same distribution of altered characters (compared with those from unhunted sites) as adults. Thus, distribution of the divergent trait between hunted and unhunted sites appeared in part to be genetically based, which suggests rapid evolution to human predation pressures. Trait distributions in hunted populations probably deviate from naturally (as opposed to anthropogenically) selected optima and, therefore, may have long-term negative repercussions on population persistence. Because rapid evolution affects a suite of parameters that characterize exploited populations, accurate understanding of the impacts of exploitation and effective resource management and conservation can only be achieved if evolutionary consequences are considered explicitly.

  2. Acculturation and healthy lifestyle habits among Hispanics in United States-Mexico border communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghaddar, Suad; Brown, Cynthia J; Pagán, José A; Díaz, Violeta

    2010-01-01

    To explore the relationship between acculturation and healthy lifestyle habits in the largely Hispanic populations living in underserved communities in the United States of America along the U.S.-Mexico border...

  3. Psychosocial risk factors for eating disorders in Hispanic females of diverse ethnic background and non-Hispanic females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Valerie A; Erb, Allison F; Harris, Cristen L; Casazza, Krista

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated differences in psychosocial risk factors for eating disorders among university females (n=406) of diverse Hispanic background (Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central American/Mexican, Dominican, Venezuelan) and among White non-Hispanic (n=102) female students. Risk factors were assessed using the Psychosocial Risk Factor Questionnaire (PRFQ) which includes four subscales: Social Pressure for Thinness, Media Pressure for Thinness, Concern for Physical Appearance, and Perception of Physical Appearance. There were significant differences among the groups in total PRFQ score, F(7,499)=2.76, PBody Image score. Puerto Ricans had the highest score and Brazilians the lowest. Acknowledging that differences in psychosocial risk factors exist among Hispanic females of diverse background can assist us in creating more targeted approaches for the prevention of potential eating disorders in this population.

  4. Rapid approach to the quantitative determination of nocturnal ground irradiance in populated territories: a clear-sky case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Petržala, Jaromír

    2016-11-01

    A zero-order approach to the solving of the radiative transfer equation and a method for obtaining the horizontal diffuse irradiance at night-time are both developed and intended for wide use in numerical predictions of nocturnal ground irradiance in populated territories. Downward diffuse radiative fluxes are computed with a two-stream approximation, and the data products obtained are useful for scientists who require rapid estimations of illumination levels during the night. The rapid technique presented here is especially important when the entire set of calculations is to be repeated for different lighting technologies and/or radiant intensity distributions with the aim of identifying high-level illuminance/irradiance, the spectral composition of scattered light or other optical properties of diffuse light at the ground level. The model allows for the computation of diffuse horizontal irradiance due to light emissions from ground-based sources with arbitrary spectral compositions. The optical response of a night sky is investigated using the ratio of downward to upward irradiance, R⊥, λ(0). We show that R⊥, λ(0) generally peaks at short wavelengths, thus suggesting that, e.g., the blue light of an LED lamp would make the sky even more bluish. However, this effect can be largely suppressed or even removed with the spectral sensitivity function of the average human eye superimposed on to the lamp spectrum. Basically, blue light scattering dominates at short optical distances, while red light is transmitted for longer distances and illuminates distant places. Computations are performed for unshielded as well as fully shielded lights, while the spectral function R⊥, λ(0) is tabulated to make possible the modelling of various artificial lights, including those not presented here.

  5. Occupational Differences between Hispanics and Non-Hispanics. A Rand Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Ross M.

    A study examined the occupational differences between Hispanics and non-Hispanics. The study focused on the determinants of Hispanic occupational achievement; differences in the process of occupational achievement among different Hispanic ethnic subgroups; variations in the process of occupational achievement across geographic areas; and…

  6. The Hispanic Paradox and Older Adults’ Disabilities: Is There a Healthy Migrant Effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrah Raza

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The “Hispanic Paradox” suggests that despite rates of poverty similar to African Americans, Hispanics have far better health and mortality outcomes, more comparable to non-Hispanic White Americans. Three prominent possible explanations for the Hispanic Paradox have emerged. The “Healthy Migrant Effect” suggests a health selection effect due to the demands of migration. The Hispanic lifestyle hypothesis focuses on Hispanics’ strong social ties and better health behaviors. The reverse migration argument suggests that the morbidity profile in the USA is affected when many Hispanic immigrants return to their native countries after developing a serious illness. We analyzed data from respondents aged 55 and over from the nationally representative 2006 American Community Survey including Mexican Americans (13,167 U.S. born; 11,378 immigrants, Cuban Americans (314 U.S. born; 3,730 immigrants, and non-Hispanic White Americans (629,341 U.S. born; 31,164 immigrants. The healthy migrant effect was supported with SES-adjusted disability comparable between Mexican, Cuban and non-Hispanic Whites born in the USA and all immigrants having lower adjusted odds of functional limitations than U.S. born non-Hispanic Whites. The reverse migration hypothesis was partially supported, with citizenship and longer duration in the USA associated with higher rates of SES-adjusted disability for Mexican Americans. The Hispanic healthy life-style explanation had little support in this study. Our findings underline the importance of considering nativity when planning for health interventions to address the needs of the growing Hispanic American older adult population.

  7. Teaching Hispanic Linguistics: Strategies to Engage Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knouse, Stephanie M.; Gupton, Timothy; Abreau, Laurel

    2015-01-01

    Even though many post-secondary institutions offer a variety of Hispanic linguistics classes (Hualde 2006; Lipski 2006), research on the pedagogy of Hispanic linguistics is an underdeveloped or non-existent area of the discipline. Courses in Hispanic linguistics can present not only linguistic challenges for non-native speakers of Spanish, but…

  8. BREATHING FIRE: HOW STELLAR FEEDBACK DRIVES RADIAL MIGRATION, RAPID SIZE FLUCTUATIONS, AND POPULATION GRADIENTS IN LOW-MASS GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Geha, Marla [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Wetzel, Andrew; Hopkins, Philip F. [TAPIR, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA USA (United States); Kereš, Dusan; Chan, T. K. [Department of Physics, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André, E-mail: kareem.el-badry@yale.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and CIERA, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We examine the effects of stellar feedback and bursty star formation on low-mass galaxies (M{sub star} = 2 × 10{sup 6} − 5 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ⊙}) using the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. While previous studies emphasized the impact of feedback on dark matter profiles, we investigate the impact on the stellar component: kinematics, radial migration, size evolution, and population gradients. Feedback-driven outflows/inflows drive significant radial stellar migration over both short and long timescales via two processes: (1) outflowing/infalling gas can remain star-forming, producing young stars that migrate ∼1 kpc within their first 100 Myr, and (2) gas outflows/inflows drive strong fluctuations in the global potential, transferring energy to all stars. These processes produce several dramatic effects. First, galaxies’ effective radii can fluctuate by factors of >2 over ∼200 Myr, and these rapid size fluctuations can account for much of the observed scatter in the radius at fixed M{sub star}. Second, the cumulative effects of many outflow/infall episodes steadily heat stellar orbits, causing old stars to migrate outward most strongly. This age-dependent radial migration mixes—and even inverts—intrinsic age and metallicity gradients. Thus, the galactic-archaeology approach of calculating radial star formation histories from stellar populations at z = 0 can be severely biased. These effects are strongest at M{sub star} ≈ 10{sup 7–9.6} M{sub ⊙}, the same regime where feedback most efficiently cores galaxies. Thus, detailed measurements of stellar kinematics in low-mass galaxies can strongly constrain feedback models and test baryonic solutions to small-scale problems in ΛCDM.

  9. Hispanic Americans and African Americans with multiple sclerosis have more severe disease course than Caucasian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Rachel E; Antezana, Ariel O; Bacon, Tamar; Kister, Ilya

    2017-10-01

    Whether disease course in Hispanic Americans (HA) with multiple sclerosis (MS) is different from Caucasian Americans (CA) or African Americans (AA) is unknown. We compared MS severity in the three main ethnic populations in our tertiary MS clinics using disease duration-adjusted rank score of disability: Patient-Derived Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (P-MSSS). The age- and gender-adjusted P-MSSS was significantly higher in HA (3.9 ± 2.6) and AA (4.5 ± 3.0) compared to CA (3.4 ± 2.6; p < 0.0001 for both). Adjusting for insurance did not change these results. These findings suggest that HA, as AA, have more rapid disability accumulation than CA.

  10. Stories of Success: Understanding Academic Achievement of Hispanic Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Amanda

    A review of the literature shows that there is much evidence to suggest the challenges facing Hispanic students in American public schools. Hispanic enrollment in K--12 public schools has increased from 6 to 19% in the last thirty years, yet schools have not made adequate adjustments to accommodate this changing population. Issues such as remedial tracking and cultural differences have led to low high school graduate rates for Hispanic students and inequities in schooling experiences (Gay, 2000). Particularly in the area of science, Hispanic students struggle with academic success (Cole & Espinoza, 2008). Despite these obstacles, some Hispanic students are academically successful (Rochin & Mello, 2007; Merisotis & Kee, 2006). This dissertation tells the stories of these Hispanic students who have been successful in science in secondary public schools. This study followed a grounded theory methodology and utilized individual interviews to collect data about Hispanics who have demonstrated achievement in the area of science. Through the analysis of these interviews, factors were identified which may have contributed to the success of these Hispanics in the field of science. Implications for future practice in public schools are also discussed.

  11. Changes in Life Expectancy by Race and Hispanic Origin in the United States, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Data from the National Vital Statistics System, Mortality •Between 2013 and 2014, life expectancy at birth for the total U.S. population (78.8 years), males (76.4), or females (81.2) did not change. •Life expectancy at birth increased by 0.4 years for non-Hispanic black males and by 0.1 years for Hispanic males. It remained unchanged for non-Hispanic white males. •Life expectancy at birth increased by 0.2 years for Hispanic females, remained unchanged for non-Hispanic black females, and declined by 0.1 years for non-Hispanic white females. •Hispanic males experienced the greatest increase in life expectancy at age 65 (0.3 years), followed by Hispanic females (0.2), and all other groups experienced a 0.1 year increase in life expectancy at age 65. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  12. Kentucky Hispanic School Board Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestero, Victor; Wright, Sam

    2009-01-01

    The study was designed to provide information on Kentucky Hispanic school board members. The data was obtained from Kentucky school superintendents or their designees in the 174 public school districts through a survey mailed in the spring, 2009. The survey was mailed to Kentucky Superintendents on March 12, 2009. The follow-up survey was mailed…

  13. Education Profile of Kansas Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Dept. of Human Resources, Topeka.

    The education and employment of Kansas Hispanics in public, elementary and secondary schools were examined, utilizing 1980 data from the U.S. Census Bureau and 1979 data from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Data pertained to 18 counties located in western, central, and eastern Kansas: Finney, Ford, Grant, Seward, Sherman, Harvey,…

  14. Statistical Profile of Older Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with non-relatives, and 26 percent lived alone. INCOME AND POVERTY* Households containing families headed by Hispanics age 65 and over reported ... and over was 20.4 percent which is double the rate for all older Americans (10.2 percent). *Income and poverty estimates are based on redesigned income ...

  15. Hispanics' Awareness of Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Alberto; Ostrander, Noam

    2009-01-01

    This study compared Hispanics' awareness of services available to acquire assistive technology and whether they actually sought help to the findings from a national sample. The study assists the field by providing information on a group largely ignored in the literature. The authors sought to answer the following research questions: Are there…

  16. Is acculturation related to obesity in Hispanic/Latino adults? Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasi, Carmen R; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Madanat, Hala; Penedo, Frank; Loria, Catherine M; Elder, John P; Daviglus, Martha L; Barnhart, Janice; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Van Horn, Linda; Schneiderman, Neil

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the association of obesity with acculturation in a large and diverse sample of US Hispanic/Latino adults. The Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of Latinos (SOL) is a community-based cohort study of Hispanic/Latino adults aged 18-74 years (N = 16,415) from four urban areas. Height and weight were directly measured using a standardized protocol. Acculturation was assessed by the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics (SASH). Other immigration related variables included place of birth, length of residency in the US, and age at immigration. Odds ratios were calculated to assess the association of overweight, moderate obesity, and extreme obesity (≥40 kg/m(2)) with acculturation and sociodemographic variables. The prevalence of obesity was 42.4% for women and 36.5% for men and varied by field center and Hispanic/Latino background. The strongest predictor of moderate and extreme obesity was length of residency in mainland US. This association was consistent across Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. Acculturation was not significantly associated with obesity. The burden of obesity is high among Hispanic/Latino adults. The study findings suggest that prolonged exposure to the environments in these communities, rather than acculturation, is an important risk factor for obesity in this population.

  17. Is Acculturation Related to Obesity in Hispanic/Latino Adults? Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen R. Isasi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study examined the association of obesity with acculturation in a large and diverse sample of US Hispanic/Latino adults. Methods. The Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS/Study of Latinos (SOL is a community-based cohort study of Hispanic/Latino adults aged 18–74 years (N=16,415 from four urban areas. Height and weight were directly measured using a standardized protocol. Acculturation was assessed by the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics (SASH. Other immigration related variables included place of birth, length of residency in the US, and age at immigration. Odds ratios were calculated to assess the association of overweight, moderate obesity, and extreme obesity (≥40 kg/m2 with acculturation and sociodemographic variables. Results. The prevalence of obesity was 42.4% for women and 36.5% for men and varied by field center and Hispanic/Latino background. The strongest predictor of moderate and extreme obesity was length of residency in mainland US. This association was consistent across Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. Acculturation was not significantly associated with obesity. Discussion. The burden of obesity is high among Hispanic/Latino adults. The study findings suggest that prolonged exposure to the environments in these communities, rather than acculturation, is an important risk factor for obesity in this population.

  18. Physical activity and gestational diabetes mellitus among Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Schmidt, Michael D; Pekow, Penelope; Sternfeld, Barbara; Manson, Joann E; Solomon, Caren G; Braun, Barry; Markenson, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    Studies in predominantly non-Hispanic white populations have suggested that physical activity during pregnancy is associated with a reduced risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). There are few such studies in Hispanic women, a group at increased risk for GDM. We conducted a prospective cohort study of household/caregiving, occupational, sports/exercise, and active living habits and the risk of GDM among 1006 Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) prenatal care patients in western Massachusetts from 2000 to 2004. Prepregnancy, early pregnancy, and midpregnancy physical activity was assessed using the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey. A total of 33 women (3.3%) were diagnosed with GDM, and 119 women (11.8%) were diagnosed with abnormal glucose tolerance. There were no significant associations between GDM risk and occupational and active living activities in prepregnancy, early pregnancy, and midpregnancy or with a change in levels of household/caregiving, occupational, and active living activities from prepregnancy to during pregnancy. However, after controlling for age and prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), women in the highest quartile of prepregnancy (OR = 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.8, p(trend) = 0.03) and midpregnancy (OR = 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.8, p(trend) = 0.004) household/caregiving activities as well as midpregnancy sports/exercise (0.1, 95% CI 0.0-0.7, p(trend) = 0.12) had a reduced risk of GDM compared with women in the lowest quartile. Findings in this Hispanic population, although based on small numbers of cases, are consistent with prior research among predominantly non-Hispanic white populations.

  19. Hispanic Segregation and Poor Health: It's Not Just Black and White.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, D Phuong; Frank, Reanne; Zheng, Cheng; Iceland, John

    2017-10-15

    Despite the importance of understanding the fundamental determinants of Hispanic health, few studies have investigated how metropolitan segregation shapes the health of the fastest-growing population in the United States. Using 2006-2013 data from the National Health Interview Survey, we 1) examined the relationship between Hispanic metropolitan segregation and respondent-rated health for US-born and foreign-born Hispanics and 2) assessed whether neighborhood poverty mediated this relationship. Results indicated that segregation has a consistent, detrimental effect on the health of US-born Hispanics, comparable to findings for blacks and black-white segregation. In contrast, segregation was salutary (though not always significant) for foreign-born Hispanics. We also found that neighborhood poverty mediates some, but not all, of the associations between segregation and poor health. Our finding of divergent associations between health and segregation by nativity points to the wide range of experiences within the diverse Hispanic population and suggests that socioeconomic status and structural factors, such as residential segregation, come into play in determining Hispanic health for the US-born in a way that does not occur among the foreign-born. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Moving up the Economic Ladder: Latino Workers and the Nation's Future Prosperity. State of Hispanic America, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Sonia M., Ed.

    This collection of papers looks at the employment status of the U.S. Hispanic population, a significant and growing segment of the nation's labor force. It analyzes characteristics of Latino workers, including educational attainment by Hispanic subgroups, work experience and skills, and computer literacy. The eight papers are: (1) "What…

  1. Hispanic/Latino Adolescents' Alcohol Use: Influence of Family Structure, Perceived Peer Norms, and Family Members' Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Wura; Barry, Adam E.; Xu, Lei; Valente, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Family structure and value system among Hispanic/Latino population are changing. However, very few studies have examined the combination of the influence of family structure, parental and sibling alcohol use, perceived peer norms about drinking, and alcohol use among Hispanic/Latino adolescents. Purpose: This study examined the…

  2. Rapid Response to Evaluate the Presence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Wild Amphibian Populations in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolby, Jonathan E; Smith, Kristine M; Ramirez, Sara D; Rabemananjara, Falitiana; Pessier, Allan P; Brunner, Jesse L; Goldberg, Caren S; Berger, Lee; Skerratt, Lee F

    2015-01-01

    We performed a rapid response investigation to evaluate the presence and distribution of amphibian pathogens in Madagascar following our identification of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranavirus in commercially exported amphibians. This targeted risk-based field surveillance program was conducted from February to April 2014 encompassing 12 regions and 47 survey sites. We simultaneously collected amphibian and environmental samples to increase survey sensitivity and performed sampling both in wilderness areas and commercial amphibian trade facilities. Bd was not detected in any of 508 amphibian skin swabs or 68 water filter samples, suggesting pathogen prevalence was below 0.8%, with 95% confidence during our visit. Ranavirus was detected in 5 of 97 amphibians, including one adult Mantidactylus cowanii and three unidentified larvae from Ranomafana National Park, and one adult Mantidactylus mocquardi from Ankaratra. Ranavirus was also detected in water samples collected from two commercial amphibian export facilities. We also provide the first report of an amphibian mass-mortality event observed in wild amphibians in Madagascar. Although neither Bd nor ranavirus appeared widespread in Madagascar during this investigation, additional health surveys are required to disentangle potential seasonal variations in pathogen abundance and detectability from actual changes in pathogen distribution and rates of spread. Accordingly, our results should be conservatively interpreted until a comparable survey effort during winter months has been performed. It is imperative that biosecurity practices be immediately adopted to limit the unintentional increased spread of disease through the movement of contaminated equipment or direct disposal of contaminated material from wildlife trade facilities. The presence of potentially introduced strains of ranaviruses suggests that Madagascar's reptile species might also be threatened by disease

  3. Rapid Response to Evaluate the Presence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Wild Amphibian Populations in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolby, Jonathan E.; Smith, Kristine M.; Ramirez, Sara D.; Rabemananjara, Falitiana; Pessier, Allan P.; Brunner, Jesse L.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Berger, Lee; Skerratt, Lee F.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a rapid response investigation to evaluate the presence and distribution of amphibian pathogens in Madagascar following our identification of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranavirus in commercially exported amphibians. This targeted risk-based field surveillance program was conducted from February to April 2014 encompassing 12 regions and 47 survey sites. We simultaneously collected amphibian and environmental samples to increase survey sensitivity and performed sampling both in wilderness areas and commercial amphibian trade facilities. Bd was not detected in any of 508 amphibian skin swabs or 68 water filter samples, suggesting pathogen prevalence was below 0.8%, with 95% confidence during our visit. Ranavirus was detected in 5 of 97 amphibians, including one adult Mantidactylus cowanii and three unidentified larvae from Ranomafana National Park, and one adult Mantidactylus mocquardi from Ankaratra. Ranavirus was also detected in water samples collected from two commercial amphibian export facilities. We also provide the first report of an amphibian mass-mortality event observed in wild amphibians in Madagascar. Although neither Bd nor ranavirus appeared widespread in Madagascar during this investigation, additional health surveys are required to disentangle potential seasonal variations in pathogen abundance and detectability from actual changes in pathogen distribution and rates of spread. Accordingly, our results should be conservatively interpreted until a comparable survey effort during winter months has been performed. It is imperative that biosecurity practices be immediately adopted to limit the unintentional increased spread of disease through the movement of contaminated equipment or direct disposal of contaminated material from wildlife trade facilities. The presence of potentially introduced strains of ranaviruses suggests that Madagascar's reptile species might also be threatened by disease

  4. The changing geography of U.S. Hispanics, 1850-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverluk, T

    1997-01-01

    "In 1930, the majority of Hispanics were of Mexican descent and lived in the five Southwestern states of Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. After World War II the Latino migrant stream began to diversify and include large numbers of Caribbeans, and Central and South Americans who generally settled in the Eastern states and California.... The U.S. Hispanic population has increased from approximately one million in 1930, to approximately 32 million in 1997. County maps chronicle the changing distribution and numbers of Hispanics from 1850 to 1990." excerpt

  5. Asthma in Hispanics. An 8-Year Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Franziska J.; Forno, Erick; Cooper, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an update on asthma in Hispanics, a diverse group tracing their ancestry to countries previously under Spanish rule. A marked variability in the prevalence and morbidity from asthma remains among Hispanic subgroups in the United States and Hispanic America. In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans have high and low burdens of asthma, respectively (the “Hispanic Paradox”). This wide divergence in asthma morbidity among Hispanic subgroups is multifactorial, likely reflecting the effects of known (secondhand tobacco smoke, air pollution, psychosocial stress, obesity, inadequate treatment) and potential (genetic variants, urbanization, vitamin D insufficiency, and eradication of parasitic infections) risk factors. Barriers to adequate asthma management in Hispanics include economic and educational disadvantages, lack of health insurance, and no access to or poor adherence with controller medications such as inhaled corticosteroids. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of asthma in Hispanic subgroups, many questions remain. Studies of asthma in Hispanic America should focus on environmental or lifestyle factors that are more relevant to asthma in this region (e.g., urbanization, air pollution, parasitism, and stress). In the United States, research studies should focus on risk factors that are known to or may diverge among Hispanic subgroups, including but not limited to epigenetic variation, prematurity, vitamin D level, diet, and stress. Clinical trials of culturally appropriate interventions that address multiple aspects of asthma management in Hispanic subgroups should be prioritized for funding. Ensuring high-quality healthcare for all remains a pillar of eliminating asthma disparities. PMID:24881937

  6. Hispanics: An Untapped Leadership Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-09

    management are all reasons why AF senior leadership needs to pay attention. The sheer numbers of the Hispanic growth cry out for action by all...and Wing Command Selection for group and wing command is another highly selective process and those selected exhibit the leadership traits that are...moving beyond compliance of equal opportunity and to accomplish more in the diversity arena. Getting senior leadership involved in diversity management

  7. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid in Hispanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Koo Lin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lily Koo Lin1, Han Lee2, Eli Chang11Department of Oculoplastics, Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: Pigmented basal cell carcinoma (PBCC of the eyelid has not been well cited in the literature, and is often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of pigmented eyelid lesions. We aim to describe PBCC of the eyelid in Hispanic patients.Methods: Retrospective review of patients with eyelid skin cancer who presented to the Department of Dermatology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California and the Doheny Eye Institute from January 2002 to November 2005.Results: Sixty-nine of the 79 patients with eyelid skin cancer had basal cell carcinoma. Eight of these patients were Hispanic. Four of the eight Hispanic patients had PBCC.Conclusions: Although eyelid PBCC is regarded as a rare condition, it may occur more commonly in the Hispanic population and should be remembered in the differential diagnosis of pigmented eyelid lesions.Keywords: pigmented basal cell carcinoma, eyelid, skin cancer, lesions

  8. Rapid Buildup of Genetic Diversity in Founder Populations of the Gynodioecious Plant Species Origanum vulgare after Semi-Natural Grassland Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Kenny; Jacquemyn, Hans; Hermy, Martin; Vandepitte, Katrien; Honnay, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    In most landscapes the success of habitat restoration is largely dependent on spontaneous colonization of plant species. This colonization process, and the outcome of restoration practices, can only be considered successful if the genetic makeup of founding populations is not eroded through founder effects and subsequent genetic drift. Here we used 10 microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic effects of recent colonization of the long-lived gynodioecious species Origanum vulgare in restored semi-natural grassland patches. We compared the genetic diversity and differentiation of fourteen recent populations with that of thirteen old, putative source populations, and we evaluated the effects of spatial configuration of the populations on colonization patterns. We did not observe decreased genetic diversity in recent populations, or inflated genetic differentiation among them. Nevertheless, a significantly higher inbreeding coefficient was observed in recent populations, although this was not associated with negative fitness effects. Overall population genetic differentiation was low (FST = 0.040). Individuals of restored populations were assigned to on average 6.1 different source populations (likely following the ‘migrant pool’ model). Gene flow was, however, affected by the spatial configuration of the grasslands, with gene flow into the recent populations mainly originating from nearby source populations. This study demonstrates how spontaneous colonization after habitat restoration can lead to viable populations in a relatively short time, overcoming pronounced founder effects, when several source populations are nearby. Restored populations can therefore rapidly act as stepping stones and sources of genetic diversity, likely increasing overall metapopulation viability of the study species. PMID:23840642

  9. Resiliency in the face of disadvantage: do Hispanic cultural characteristics protect health outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Linda C; Penedo, Frank J; Espinosa de los Monteros, Karla; Arguelles, William

    2009-12-01

    Hispanics living in the United States may face substantial adversity, given stresses of immigration and acculturation, low incomes, poor educational and occupational opportunities, inadequate access to health care, and exposure to discrimination. Despite these disadvantages, the Hispanic population often shows equal or better health outcomes when compared to non-Hispanic Whites, a trend that has puzzled researchers and has been referred to as the "Hispanic Paradox." Hispanics with non-U.S. nativity also tend to show better health than those born in the United States, although this advantage dissipates with increasing time spent in the United States. The current article discusses the Reserve Capacity Model (L.C. Gallo & K. A. Matthews, 2003) as a potential framework for understanding how psychosocial risk and resilient factors may contribute to health disparities associated with broad sociocultural factors, such as low socioeconomic status or minority ethnicity. In addition, we examine theory concerning features of the Hispanic culture that may enhance resilience (e.g., social resources, familism, religiousness; G. Marin & B. V. Marin, 1991) in the face of adverse circumstances. We summarize some of our recent work that has empirically tested effects of risk and resilient factors in Hispanic health in the contexts of prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease. We conclude by discussing future directions and opportunities for researchers interested in culture-specific resiliency factors in relation to health outcomes.

  10. Redes En Acción. Increasing Hispanic participation in cancer research, training, and awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Talavera, Gregory A; Marti, Jose; Penedo, Frank J; Medrano, Martha A; Giachello, Aida L; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2006-10-15

    Hispanics are affected by many health care disparities. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through its Special Populations Branch, is supporting networking and capacity-building activities designed to increase Hispanic participation and leadership in cancer research. Redes En Acción established a national network of cancer research centers, community-based organizations, and federal partners to facilitate opportunities for junior Hispanic scientists to participate in training and research projects on cancer control. Since 2000, Redes En Acción has established a network of more than 1800 Hispanic leaders involved in cancer research and education. The project has sustained 131 training positions and submitted 29 pilot projects to NCI for review, with 16 awards for a total of $800,000, plus an additional $8.8 million in competing grant funding based on pilot study results to date. Independent research has leveraged an additional $32 million in non-Redes funding, and together the national and regional network sites have participated in more than 1400 community and professional awareness events. In addition, the program conducted extensive national survey research that provided the basis for the Redes En Acción Latino Cancer Report, a national agenda on Hispanic cancer issues. Redes En Acción has increased participation in cancer control research, training, and awareness among Hispanic scientists and within Hispanic communities. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  11. Cardiovascular risk in Hispanic and non-Hispanic preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Amy J; Gilbert, Lynn; Baramee, Julaluk; Granger, Theresa

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women among all racial and ethnic groups. Identifying risk factors early in life can facilitate use of preventive strategies to reduce risk and improve health status across the life span. The aim of this study was to identify modifiable (tobacco smoke exposure, physical inactivity, dietary fat intake, overweight, and high blood pressure [BP]) and nonmodifiable (family history, gender, and age) cardiovascular risk factors in low-income preschool children. Low-income preschool children (N = 205) 3-5 years old were recruited to participate. Parents completed a multigenerational cardiovascular health history form and a 24-hour dietary recall for themselves and their child. The children's height, weight, and BP were obtained. Of the 205 children, 61% reported ethnicity as Latino or Hispanic, 31.7% non-Hispanic White, 1% non-Hispanic Black, 3.9% Asian, and 2.4% mixed race. The number of males (50.7%) and females (49.3%) was similar. Only 22 (10.7%) children had no identified cardiovascular risk factors. At least one modifiable risk factor was present in 179 (87.3%) children. Fifty-two (25.5%) children had a body mass index (BMI) > or = 85th percentile for gender and age; 44 (22.3%) had a systolic or diastolic BP over the 90th percentile for gender, age, and height; 128 (66.3%) had a dietary fat intake of > 30%; 77 (37.6%) watched TV or played video games more than 2 hr/day; and 48 (23.4%) were exposed to passive tobacco smoke. The identification of cardiovascular risk factors in almost 90% of presumably healthy preschoolers provides evidence to support testing of interventions that can improve health behaviors and reduce risks.

  12. Enrollment in Hispanic Serving Institutions as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Drinking Norms and Quantity of Alcohol Use Among Hispanic College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Ellen L; Chang, Tiffany K; Escobar, Oscar S; de Dios, Marcel A

    2015-01-01

    Hispanic college students represent a growing proportion of the college population. Studies have found that an individual's perception of the drinking of others is linked to one's own personal use and that college students frequently overestimate the drinking of their peers. The current study builds on previous college student drinking literature by examining the influence that attending a Hispanic-serving institution (HSI) has on the personal alcohol use and perception of peers' drinking norms among Hispanic college students. This secondary data analysis utilized data from the American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment. Participants were self-identified Hispanics between the ages of 18 and 25 (N = 4336). Results indicated that there was a significant interaction between attending an HSI and the perception of the number of drinks of a typical student. Specifically, the perception of others' drinking was more strongly linked to personal drinking for students in non-Hispanic serving institutions. The protective effect of attending a Hispanic-serving institution may be related to a more culturally affirming college environment.

  13. Factors That Affect Graduation and Retention Rates of Hispanic Students at a Hispanic Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sandra Darlene

    2012-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in the United States and the second fastest growing group in the in post-secondary education. However, at most major universities Hispanic students are less likely to stay enrolled and less likely to graduate than any other racial group. It is vital for Hispanics to earn a college degree, as earning…

  14. A Boom for Whom? Exploring the Impacts of a Rapid Increase in the Male Population Upon Women's Services in Darwin, Northern Territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Gretchen; Tofa, Matalena; Finlayson, Mary; U'Ren, Julie

    2016-05-03

    A rapidly expanding natural-resource extraction industry and a growing military presence mean an increasingly male-skewed population for the city of Darwin, Australia. This has sparked concerns about the potential for increased violence against women. In this article, we present qualitative research detailing the views of 13 participants from 10 women's support services in the Darwin area. We argue that women's support services bear witness to and are tasked with responding to the impacts of population change on women, yet their work is undermined by uncertainties that stem from neoliberal funding rationales and limited demands on companies to address social issues. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. The Hispanic Americans baseline alcohol survey (HABLAS): DUI rates, birthplace, and acculturation across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2008-03-01

    This article examines the association between birthplace, acculturation, and self-reported driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI), 12-month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Using a multistage cluster sample design, 5,224 adults (18 years of age or older) were interviewed from households in five metropolitan areas of the United States: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. Birthplace was not associated with DUI, 12-month DUI arrest rates, or lifetime DUI arrest rates. Mexican Americans in the medium- and high-acculturation groups were more likely to engage in DUI. A higher proportion of U.S.-born than foreign-born respondents as well as those in the high-acculturation group, irrespective of national origin, reported having been stopped by police when driving. U.S.-born Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans, and South/Central Americans thought they could consume a higher mean number of drinks before their driving is impaired compared with those who are foreign born. There are considerable differences in DUI-related behavior across Hispanic national groups. U.S.-born Hispanics and those born abroad, but not those at different levels of acculturation, have equal risk of involvement with DUI.

  16. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): DUI Rates, Birthplace, and Acculturation Across Hispanic National Groups*

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAETANO, RAUL; RAMISETTY-MIKLER, SUHASINI; RODRIGUEZ, LORI A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective This article examines the association between birthplace, acculturation, and self-reported driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI), 12-month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Method Using a multistage cluster sample design, 5,224 adults (18 years of age or older) were interviewed from households in five metropolitan areas of the United States: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. Results Birthplace was not associated with DUI, 12-month DUI arrest rates, or lifetime DUI arrest rates. Mexican Americans in the medium- and high-acculturation groups were more likely to engage in DUI. A higher proportion of U.S.-born than foreign-born respondents as well as those in the high-acculturation group, irrespective of national origin, reported having been stopped by police when driving. U.S.-born Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans, and South/Central Americans thought they could consume a higher mean number of drinks before their driving is impaired compared with those who are foreign born. Conclusions There are considerable differences in DUI-related behavior across Hispanic national groups. U.S.-born Hispanics and those born abroad, but not those at different levels of acculturation, have equal risk of involvement with DUI. PMID:18299767

  17. Reconstruction of the diet of a pre hispanic population sector of Cuauhnahuac, Morelos by means of the chemical elements analysis in skeletal rests; Reconstruccion de la dieta de un sector de la poblacion prehispanica de Cuauhnahuac, Morelos, a traves del analisis de elementos quimicos en restos esqueleticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, L. [INAH-Estado de Mexico, Av. Morelos Oriente Num. 502, Col. San Sebastian, C.P. 50090, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garza, I. [INAH-Morelos, Matamoros Num. 14, Col. Acapatzingo, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Banos, L. [IIM-UNAM. Circuito escolar s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Chaire, F. [ENAH, Periferico Sur y Zapote s/n, Delegacion Tlalpan, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The goal of this work was diet reconstruction of 25 pre hispanic residents of Cuauhnahuac, tributary town of the mexicas, during the Late Pos classic period (1350-1521 a.C.). The analysis included human skull samples proceeding from human femur, tibia and fibula. The applied technique was X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) to know the mineral concentrations, which are closely related with the quality and quantity of the consumed food. The main indicative elements are strontium (Sr), that denotes the consumption of vegetables, zinc (Zn), that shows the consumption of animal proteins, and magnesium (Mg), associated with Meso american food resources. The results indicate the existence of differences in the diet among the same population's individuals, probably because social stratification determined the power resources acquisition. (Author) 28 refs., 7 tabs., 2 figs.

  18. Rapid Gene Turnover as a Significant Source of Genetic Variation in a Recently Seeded Population of a Healthcare-Associated Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Graña-Miraglia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing has been useful to gain an understanding of bacterial evolution. It has been used for studying the phylogeography and/or the impact of mutation and recombination on bacterial populations. However, it has rarely been used to study gene turnover at microevolutionary scales. Here, we sequenced Mexican strains of the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii sampled from the same locale over a 3 year period to obtain insights into the microevolutionary dynamics of gene content variability. We found that the Mexican A. baumannii population was recently founded and has been emerging due to a rapid clonal expansion. Furthermore, we noticed that on average the Mexican strains differed from each other by over 300 genes and, notably, this gene content variation has accrued more frequently and faster than the accumulation of mutations. Moreover, due to its rapid pace, gene content variation reflects the phylogeny only at very short periods of time. Additionally, we found that the external branches of the phylogeny had almost 100 more genes than the internal branches. All in all, these results show that rapid gene turnover has been of paramount importance in producing genetic variation within this population and demonstrate the utility of genome sequencing to study alternative forms of genetic variation.

  19. Rapid Gene Turnover as a Significant Source of Genetic Variation in a Recently Seeded Population of a Healthcare-Associated Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graña-Miraglia, Lucía; Lozano, Luis F; Velázquez, Consuelo; Volkow-Fernández, Patricia; Pérez-Oseguera, Ángeles; Cevallos, Miguel A; Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Genome sequencing has been useful to gain an understanding of bacterial evolution. It has been used for studying the phylogeography and/or the impact of mutation and recombination on bacterial populations. However, it has rarely been used to study gene turnover at microevolutionary scales. Here, we sequenced Mexican strains of the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii sampled from the same locale over a 3 year period to obtain insights into the microevolutionary dynamics of gene content variability. We found that the Mexican A. baumannii population was recently founded and has been emerging due to a rapid clonal expansion. Furthermore, we noticed that on average the Mexican strains differed from each other by over 300 genes and, notably, this gene content variation has accrued more frequently and faster than the accumulation of mutations. Moreover, due to its rapid pace, gene content variation reflects the phylogeny only at very short periods of time. Additionally, we found that the external branches of the phylogeny had almost 100 more genes than the internal branches. All in all, these results show that rapid gene turnover has been of paramount importance in producing genetic variation within this population and demonstrate the utility of genome sequencing to study alternative forms of genetic variation.

  20. High prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and histologic gastritis in asymptomatic Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehesa, M; Dooley, C P; Cohen, H; Fitzgibbons, P L; Perez-Perez, G I; Blaser, M J

    1991-06-01

    In this study, we estimated the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and histologic gastritis in 58 asymptomatic Hispanic adult volunteers (mean age, 41 years; 59% male) by endoscopic biopsy of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Forty-six subjects (79%) were found to harbor H. pylori in gastric biopsies, and all had histologic gastritis. Four other subjects were found to have gastritis in the absence of H. pylori. Similar prevalences of H. pylori and gastritis were noted in all age groups and also in American-born and immigrant Hispanics. Biopsy data and serologic studies of H. pylori antibodies correlated well. We conclude that H. pylori infection is an almost universal finding in the gastric mucosa of asymptomatic adult Hispanics, regardless of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unknown, but we speculate that H. pylori and its associated gastritis could have a role in the high incidence of gastric carcinoma in Hispanic populations.

  1. Anguish, Yearning, and Identity: Toward a Better Understanding of the Pregnant Hispanic Woman's Prenatal Care Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Elizabeth Moran; Cronin, Sherill Nones; Boccella, Sarah Hess

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to seek a better understanding of needs and access issues among pregnant, low-income Hispanic women. Hispanic women who attended a community prenatal education program participated in follow-up focus groups to explore their experiences regarding prenatal education, pregnancy resources, access to, and satisfaction with, the care available to them. Focus groups were facilitated by a leader, bilingual in English and Spanish, with knowledge of the Hispanic culture. Sessions were audiotaped, then translated into English for transcription. Data were analyzed according to guidelines by Colaizzi and three themes emerged: pregnant Hispanic women experienced a sense of anguish (la angustia) from questions and unknowns rampant during pregnancy, leading to a yearning (el anhelo) to learn and understand more, but with a desire to do so without sacrificing native identity (la identidad). Implications of these themes for improving prenatal care for this population are explored. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Spectrum of mismatch repair gene mutations and clinical presentation of Hispanic individuals with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunga, Annette Y; Ricker, Charité; Espenschied, Carin R; Castillo, Danielle; Melas, Marilena; Herzog, Josef; Bannon, Sarah; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Lynch, Patrick; Solomon, Ilana; Gruber, Stephen B; Weitzel, Jeffrey N

    2017-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, is caused by mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. However, data about MMR mutations in Hispanics are limited. This study aims to describe the spectrum of MMR mutations in Hispanics with LS and explore ancestral origins. This case series involved an IRB-approved retrospective chart review of self-identified Hispanic patients (n = 397) seen for genetic cancer risk assessment at four collaborating academic institutions in California, Texas, and Puerto Rico who were evaluated by MMR genotyping and/or tumor analysis. A literature review was conducted for all mutations identified. Of those who underwent clinical genetic testing (n = 176), 71 had MMR gene mutations. Nine mutations were observed more than once. One third (3/9) of recurrent mutations and two additional mutations (seen only once) were previously reported in Spain, confirming the influence of Spanish ancestry on MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. The recurrent mutations identified (n = 9) included both previously reported mutations as well as unique mutations not in the literature. This is the largest report of Hispanic MMR mutations in North America; however, a larger sample and haplotype analyses are needed to better understand recurrent MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Dyslipidemia Patterns among Hispanics/Latinos in the United States of Diverse Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Swett, Katrina; González, Hector M.; Gallo, Linda C.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Giachello, Aida L.; Teng, Yanping; Schneiderman, Neil; Talavera, Gregory A.; Kaplan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence and determinants of dyslipidemia patterns among Hispanics/Latinos are not well known. Methods Lipid and lipoprotein data were used from the Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos -- a population-based cohort of 16,415 US Hispanic/Latinos ages 18–74. National Cholesterol Education Program cutoffs were employed. Differences in demographics, lifestyle factors, biological and acculturation characteristics were compared among those with and without dyslipidemia. Results Mean age was 41.1 years and 47.9% were male. The overall prevalence of any dyslipidemia was 65.0%. The prevalence of elevated LDL-C was 36.0% and highest among Cubans (44.5%; pdyslipidemia. In multivariate analyses, the presence of any dyslipidemia was associated with increasing age, body mass index and low physical activity. Older age, female gender, diabetes, low physical activity, and alcohol use were associated with specific dyslipidemia types. Spanish-language preference and lower educational status were associated with higher dyslipidemia prevalence. Conclusion Dyslipidemia is highly prevalent among US Hispanics/Latinos; Cubans seem particularly at risk. Determinants of dyslipidemia varied across Hispanic backgrounds with socioeconomic status and acculturation having a significant effect on dyslipidemia prevalence. This information can help guide public health measures to prevent disparities among the US Hispanic/Latino population. PMID:25195188

  4. Dyslipidemia patterns among Hispanics/Latinos of diverse background in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos J; Daviglus, Martha L; Swett, Katrina; González, Hector M; Gallo, Linda C; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Giachello, Aida L; Teng, Yanping; Schneiderman, Neil; Talavera, Gregory A; Kaplan, Robert C

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence and determinants of dyslipidemia patterns among Hispanics/Latinos are not well known. Lipid and lipoprotein data were used from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos—a population-based cohort of 16,415 US Hispanic/Latinos ages 18-74 years. National Cholesterol Education Program cutoffs were employed. Differences in demographics, lifestyle factors, and biological and acculturation characteristics were compared among those with and without dyslipidemia. Mean age was 41.1 years, and 47.9% were male. The overall prevalence of any dyslipidemia was 65.0%. The prevalence of elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was 36.0%, and highest among Cubans (44.5%; P prevalence among Cubans (43.3%; P prevalence of most types of dyslipidemia. In multivariate analyses, the presence of any dyslipidemia was associated with increasing age, body mass index, and low physical activity. Older age, female sex, diabetes, low physical activity, and alcohol use were associated with specific dyslipidemia types. Spanish-language preference and lower educational status were associated with higher dyslipidemia prevalence. Dyslipidemia is highly prevalent among US Hispanics/Latinos; Cubans seem particularly at risk. Determinants of dyslipidemia varied across Hispanic backgrounds, with socioeconomic status and acculturation having a significant effect on dyslipidemia prevalence. This information can help guide public health measures to prevent disparities among the US Hispanic/Latino population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Awareness of heart attack and stroke symptoms among Hispanic male adults living in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Bardales, Ricardo; Bales, Robert; Aguero, Carlos; Brady, Shelly; Tobar, Adriana; McGrath, Cynthia; Zaiser, Julia; Lipsky, Martin S

    2010-10-01

    There is evidence that Hispanic men are a high risk group for treatment delay for both heart attack and stroke. More targeted research is needed to elucidate this specific population's knowledge of warning signs for these acute events. This study sought to describe within-group disparities in Hispanic men's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology. Multivariate techniques were used to analyze a multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Heart and Stroke module database. The data were cross-sectional and focused on health risk factors and behaviors. The research participants were U.S. male Hispanic adults aged 18-99. The main outcome measure for the study was heart attack and stroke symptom knowledge score. Multivariate logistic regression analysis yielded that Hispanic men aged >or=18 years who earned low scores on the composite heart attack and stroke knowledge questions (range 0-8 points) were more likely to: have less than a high school education, have deferred medical care because of cost, not have an identified health care provider, and be uninsured. There were significant within-group differences. Targeting educational efforts toward older (>or=55 years) Hispanic men with less than high school education, those who do not have an identified health care provider or health insurance, and who defer health care because of cost could be ways to improve the outcome of acute vascular events among the U.S. Hispanic adult male population.

  6. Public health services and their relationship with rapid HIV test utilization and access for key populations in Morelos, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Jesús Conde González

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In 2009, 4 749 rapid HIV tests were run in Morelos, Mexico, despite lacking evidence on their results. This article seeks to analyze how public health organization relates to utility of rapid HIV test among healthcare users. Materials and methods. Joint study: comparison of differences in applied test and positive results for each group with the Bonferroni statistical tool, observational study in 34 health subsystems, and 11 interviews with public healthcare users. Results. Each subsystem processes influenced the use and usefulness of screening; for instance, primary care centers test only pregnant women and exclude men who have sex with men (MSM. That group shows significant differences (p<0.007 in the HIV-positive test with respect to other groups. Conclusions. Despite the availability of rapid detection tests and epidemiological evidence, the way public health services are organized impedes an efficient diagnosis in the group with higher risk, namely MSM. The distribution of rapid HIV tests was guided by stigmatization.

  7. Predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors among gay Hispanic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Joseph P; Layerla, Dennys Martin; Barroso, Susana; Gattamorta, Karina A; Sanchez, Michael; Prado, Guillermo J

    2012-04-01

    Gay men are a vulnerable population at risk for a number of health disparities, but little is known about eating disorders among gay Hispanic men. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of eating attitudes and behaviors with alcohol abuse, body image, depression, self-esteem, and sexual behaviors to determine predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors in a community sample of gay Hispanic men. Significant numbers of the participants were at risk for eating disorders (13%), alcohol abuse (18%), body image disturbance (29%), depression (25%), low self-esteem (12%), and high-risk sexual behaviors (34%). Alcohol abuse, body image, depression, self-esteem, and sexual behaviors were significant predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors and accounted for 38% of the variance in eating attitudes and behaviors. Nurses providing care to this population of gay men must be aware of this cluster of related mental health conditions that are experienced by these men. Addressing and treating these health conditions as a group of related mental health conditions are necessary. More research is needed to further explore this cluster of health issues among gay Hispanic men. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Disparities in liver cancer incidence by nativity, acculturation, and socioeconomic status in California Hispanics and Asians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ellen T.; Yang, Juan; Alfaro-Velcamp, Theresa; So, Samuel K. S.; Glaser, Sally L.; Gomez, Scarlett Lin

    2010-01-01

    Background Asians and Hispanics have the highest incidence rates of liver cancer in the US, but little is known about how incidence patterns in these largely immigrant populations vary by nativity, acculturation, and socioeconomic status (SES). Such variations can identify high-priority subgroups for prevention and monitoring. Methods Incidence rates and rate ratios (IRRs) by nativity among 5,400 Hispanics and 5,809 Asians diagnosed with liver cancer in 1988–2004 were calculated in the California Cancer Registry. Neighborhood ethnic enclave status and SES were classified using 2000 US Census data for cases diagnosed in 1998–2002. Results Foreign-born Hispanic males had significantly lower liver cancer incidence rates than US-born Hispanic males in 1988–2004 (e.g., IRR=0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.50–0.59), whereas foreign-born Hispanic females had significantly higher rates in 1988–1996 (IRR=1.42, 95% CI=1.18–1.71), but not 1997–2004. Foreign-born Asian males and females had up to 5-fold higher rates than the US-born. Among Hispanic females, incidence rates were elevated by 21% in higher-enclave versus lower-enclave neighborhoods, and by 24% in lower- versus higher-SES neighborhoods. Among Asian males, incidence rates were elevated by 23% in higher-enclave neighborhoods and by 21% in lower-SES neighborhoods. In both racial/ethnic populations, males and females in higher-enclave, lower-SES neighborhoods had higher incidence rates. Conclusions Nativity, residential enclave status, and neighborhood SES characterize Hispanics and Asians with significantly unequal incidence rates of liver cancer, implicating behavioral or environmental risk factors and revealing opportunities for prevention. Impact Liver cancer control efforts should especially target foreign-born Asians, US-born Hispanic men, and residents of lower-SES ethnic enclaves. PMID:20940276

  9. 25 Great Ideas for Hispanic Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instructor, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Hispanic Heritage Month, celebrated September 15th through October 15th, is a great opportunity to kick off a whole year of cultural discovery. This article presents 25 great ideas for Hispanic heritage. These 25 fresh ideas--from Aztec math to Carnaval masks--are easy to put together, and they offer students the chance to celebrate their own…

  10. Hispanic Literature: A Fiesta for Literacy Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isom, Bess A.; Casteel, Carolyn P.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how literature can facilitate students' appreciation of the multifaceted Hispanic culture. Offers advice on merging Hispanic literature and literacy instruction, organizing children's books by category to help structure classroom activities, exploring themes and cultural concepts, and integrating literacy/thinking strategies with…

  11. Adult Hispanic ESL Students and Graded Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Liza E.

    2013-01-01

    Adult Hispanic ESL students in rural San Luis, Arizona, face a challenging situation. Since San Luis lies on the southwestern tip of Arizona and borders with Mexico, Spanish is the predominant language. English, on the other hand, is mostly heard in classrooms. This can be a predicament for adult Hispanics who need to be proficient in English in…

  12. The Hispanic Character. (El Caracter Hispano.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Hugo

    1980-01-01

    A discussion of the Hispanic character includes comments on the emulation of an ideal self; the sociopolitical background centered around a large, loving family network; congeniality; sense of humor; work ethics, attitudes, and habits; and religion. The article notes three significant realities surrounding differences among Hispanic groups. (SB)

  13. Outreach to Future Hispanic Educational Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This paper discusses issues related to the recruitment of Hispanic-American educational leaders, focusing on the El Centro de Recursos Educativos outreach center at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, which began operation in Fall 1997. It examines the characteristics of successful programs for Hispanic recruitment and retention and the…

  14. Joblessness among Hispanic Youth: 1973-1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Philip; Hurtado, Aida

    1984-01-01

    Uses census data from 1973-1981 to examine patterns of employment and unemployment during recession and recovery phases of the business cycle among Hispanic, Black, and White youth, aged 16-19. Describes intra-Hispanic differences by gender and ethnic subgroup. Contains eight statistical tables. (SV)

  15. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  16. The Impact of Technology on Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Cheryl; Mata-Claflin, Guadalupe; Holland, Glenda; Castillo, Jose Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if elementary teachers use technology as a tool to enhance classroom strategies for improving student achievement among Hispanic students. The following research questions were utilized: a) Are computers available for classroom teachers and Hispanic students? b) Has the available technology contributed to…

  17. Biospecimen Sharing Among Hispanic Women in a Safety-Net Clinic: Implications for the Precision Medicine Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Nodora, Jesse N.; Komenaka, Ian K.; Bouton, Marcia E; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Schwab, Richard; Kim, Hyeon-eui; Farcas, Claudiu; Perez, Giovanna; Elena Martinez, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Biospecimen donation is key to the Precision Medicine Initiative, which pioneers a model for accelerating biomedical research through individualized care. Personalized medicine should be made available to medically underserved populations, including the large and growing US Hispanic population. We present results of a study of 140 Hispanic women who underwent a breast biopsy at a safety-net hospital and were randomly assigned to receive information and request for consent for biospecimen and ...

  18. Low Health Literacy among Immigrant Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Benjamin J; Arias, Devin; Becerra, Monideepa B

    2017-06-01

    Low health literacy is a significant barrier to healthcare access and service utilization; however, there are few studies that have evaluated the factors associated with having low health literacy, especially among immigrant minority populations. This exploratory study aimed to assess the key determinants of low health literacy among immigrant Hispanic adults in California using the California Health Interview Survey, the largest population-based state health survey in the United States. Analysis accounted for complex survey design, allowing generalizations to the entire state of California. Low health literacy was associated with living in poverty (OR = 1.63), lacking consistent health insurance (OR = 1.40), and limited English language proficiency (OR = 3.22), while women were less likely than men (OR = 0.59) to report low health literacy. The results of this study demonstrate that language proficiency, in addition to other key sociodemographic variables, can significantly posit limitations to health literacy. Future efforts should address providing linguistically competent health literacy interventions in order to improve associated health outcomes.

  19. Rapid assessment of genetic ancestry in populations of unknown origin by genome-wide genotyping of pooled samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charleston W K Chiang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available As we move forward from the current generation of genome-wide association (GWA studies, additional cohorts of different ancestries will be studied to increase power, fine map association signals, and generalize association results to additional populations. Knowledge of genetic ancestry as well as population substructure will become increasingly important for GWA studies in populations of unknown ancestry. Here we propose genotyping pooled DNA samples using genome-wide SNP arrays as a viable option to efficiently and inexpensively estimate admixture proportion and identify ancestry informative markers (AIMs in populations of unknown origin. We constructed DNA pools from African American, Native Hawaiian, Latina, and Jamaican samples and genotyped them using the Affymetrix 6.0 array. Aided by individual genotype data from the African American cohort, we established quality control filters to remove poorly performing SNPs and estimated allele frequencies for the remaining SNPs in each panel. We then applied a regression-based method to estimate the proportion of admixture in each cohort using the allele frequencies estimated from pooling and populations from the International HapMap Consortium as reference panels, and identified AIMs unique to each population. In this study, we demonstrated that genotyping pooled DNA samples yields estimates of admixture proportion that are both consistent with our knowledge of population history and similar to those obtained by genotyping known AIMs. Furthermore, through validation by individual genotyping, we demonstrated that pooling is quite effective for identifying SNPs with large allele frequency differences (i.e., AIMs and that these AIMs are able to differentiate two closely related populations (HapMap JPT and CHB.

  20. Hispanic Baby Boomers: Health Inequities Likely to Persist in Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Valentine M.; Wallace, Steven P.; Bagdasaryan, Sofya; Aranda, Maria P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As the Baby-Boom generation enters the ranks of the elderly adults over the next 4 decades, the United States will witness an unprecedented growth in racial/ethnic diversity among the older adult population. Hispanics will comprise 20% of the next generation of older adults, representing the largest minority population aged 65 years and…

  1. Conducting Program Evaluation with Hispanics in Rural Settings: Ethical Issues and Evaluation Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Claudia X. Aguado; McDermott, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting evaluations that are both valid and ethical is imperative for the support and sustainability of programs that address underserved and vulnerable populations. A key component is to have evaluators who are knowledgeable about relevant cultural issues and sensitive to population needs. Hispanics in rural settings are vulnerable for many…

  2. Population dynamics of Empetrum hermaphroditum (Ericaceae) on a subarctic sand dune: Evidence of rapid colonization through efficient sexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Stéphane; Ropars, Pascale; Harper, Karen Amanda

    2010-05-01

    The importance of sexual reproduction for clonal plant species has long been underestimated, perhaps as a consequence of the difficulty in identifying individuals, preventing the study of their population dynamics. Such is the case for Empetrum hermaphroditum, an ericaceous species, which dominates the ground vegetation of subarctic ecosystems. Despite abundant seed production, seedlings are rarely observed. Therefore, prevalent seedling recruitment on a subarctic dune system provided an opportunity to study the population dynamics and spatial pattern of the colonization phase of this species. We established a 6-ha grid on the dune systems that extended from the shoreline to the fixed dunes and mapped and measured all E. hermaphroditum individuals in the grid. Moreover, we sampled 112 individuals just outside the grid to identify any allometric relationship between the size and age of the individuals, which allowed us to reconstruct population expansion. The overall size structure suggests that the population is still expanding. In the last 50 yr, E. hermaphroditum advanced more than 200 m in the dune system. Expansion started in the 1960s simultaneously at different distances from the shoreline. Colonization did not proceed gradually from the fixed dune toward the shoreline but instead individuals established earlier in the troughs between the dunes, with an increasingly clumped spatial pattern as the population filled in with time.

  3. Assessing service use for mental health by Indigenous populations in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States of America: a rapid review of population surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Cecily; Harris, Meredith G; Baxter, Amanda J; Leske, Stuart; Diminic, Sandra; Gone, Joseph P; Hunter, Ernest; Whiteford, Harvey

    2017-08-04

    Indigenous people in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States of America experience disproportionately poor mental health compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. To optimally allocate resources, health planners require information about the services Indigenous people use for mental health, their unmet treatment needs and the barriers to care. We reviewed population surveys of Indigenous people to determine whether the information needed to guide service development is being collected. We sought national- or state-level epidemiological surveys of Indigenous populations conducted in each of the four selected countries since 1990 that asked about service use for mental health. Surveys were identified from literature reviews and web searches. We developed a framework for categorising the content of each survey. Using this framework, we compared the service use content of the surveys of Indigenous people to each other and to general population mental health surveys. We focused on identifying gaps in information coverage and topics that may require Indigenous-specific questions or response options. Nine surveys met our inclusion criteria. More than half of these included questions about health professionals consulted, barriers to care, perceived need for care, medications taken, number, duration, location and payment of health professional visits or use of support services or self-management. Less than half included questions about interventions received, hospital admissions or treatment dropout. Indigenous-specific content was most common in questions regarding use of support services or self-management, types of health professionals consulted, barriers to care and interventions received. Epidemiological surveys measuring service use for mental health among Indigenous populations have been less comprehensive and less standardised than surveys of the general population, despite having assessed similar content. To better understand the gaps in mental

  4. A comprehensive analysis of the mortality experience of hispanic subgroups in the United States: Variation by age, country of origin, and nativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fenelon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although those identifying as “Hispanic or Latino” experience lower adult mortality than the more socioeconomically advantaged non-Hispanic white population, the ethnic category Hispanic conceals variation by country of origin, nativity, age, and immigration experience. The current analysis examines adult mortality differentials among 12 Hispanic subgroups by region of origin and nativity, and non-Hispanic whites, adjusting for socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. We use the National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality Files pooled 1990–2009 to obtain sufficient sample of each subgroup to calculate mortality estimates by sex and age group (25–64, 65+. Among adults aged 65 and over, all foreign born subgroups have an advantage over non-Hispanic whites, and many USB subgroups exhibit an advantage in the adjusted model. Foreign-born Dominicans, Central/South Americans, and other Hispanics exhibit consistent advantages across models for both men and women, aged 25–64 and 65 and over, and both unadjusted and adjusted for socioeconomic covariates. Both US-born and foreign-born Mexicans between ages 25 and 64 have mortality disadvantaged relative to non-Hispanic whites, while older Mexicans exhibit clear advantages. Our results complicate the traditional formulation of the Hispanic Paradox and cast doubt on the singularity of the mortality experience of those of Hispanic origin.

  5. Carboxylesterase 1A2 encoding gene with increased transcription and potential rapid drug metabolism in Asian populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Madsen, Majbritt Busk; Lyauk, Yassine Kamal

    2017-01-01

    The carboxylesterase 1 gene (CES1) encodes a hydrolase implicated in the metabolism of commonly used drugs. CES1A2, a hybrid of CES1 and a CES1-like pseudogene, has a promoter that is weak in most individuals. However, some individuals harbor a promoter haplotype of this gene with two overlapping...... Sp1 sites that confer significantly increased transcription potentially leading to rapid drug metabolism. This CES1A2 haplotype has previously been reported to be common among Asians. Using polymerase chain reaction followed by sequencing, the present study examined variation in the promoter and 5...

  6. Interventions for Hispanic caregivers of patients with dementia: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanque, Sarah M; Enriquez, Maithe

    2012-02-01

    The number of Hispanics/Latinos living with dementia in the United States is expected to rise from 200,000 to 1.3 million by 2050, which will result in large numbers of Hispanics/Latinos assuming the role of caregiver. The demands of caregiving can negatively impact caregivers' health. The purpose of this review was to identify intervention strategies that can help Hispanics/Latinos deal with the burden associated with providing care for older adults with dementia. The authors critically reviewed and analyzed the literature for interventions and their relevance to these caregivers. The search engines and electronics databases of Google Scholar; Social Gerontology; Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition; MEDLINE; PsycARTICLES; CINAHL; and PubMed, were used to locate articles published between 1999 and 2011. Ten intervention studies published between 2000 and 2011 were identified that targeted Hispanic/Latino caregivers: most were from one clinical trial (REACH). Future studies should consider culturally tailoring interventions for Hispanic/Latino caregivers from differing subcultures, utilizing relevant technology in studies, and evaluating the functional level of the care receiver and assess where he/she is in the disease process continuum. A better understanding of within-group differences among Hispanic/Latino caregivers, especially with respect to acculturation, could lead to better tailoring of interventions. Future research should consider the possibility of discovery-based participatory approaches. Few studies have addressed these areas of concern in this population.

  7. A qualitative study of the emotional and spiritual needs of Hispanic families in hospice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Alicia; Holland, Jason M; Beckman, Lisa; Kirkendall, Abbie; Luna, Nora

    2017-05-02

    As the older U.S. population becomes more ethnically diverse, there will be an increased need for culturally sensitive hospice care services. Hispanics often experience multiple barriers to quality end-of-life care services. To address the underlying disparities in the cultural, emotional, and spiritual aspects of hospice care, the objective of the present qualitative study was to examine the emotional and spiritual needs of Hispanic patients' families while in hospice. Semistructured in-person interviews were conducted with 29 Hispanic patients' families regarding their perceived experience of the hospice-based emotional and spiritual support received. Demographic information was collected on both the family member and the patient. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic content analysis. Participant narratives fell into five main themes: (1) the influence of Hispanic culture in the relationship with hospice care providers; (2) types of social support received from hospice; (3) barriers to receiving support; (4) lack of health literacy regarding hospice care; and (5) cultural preferences for religious/spiritual support in hospice. Our results provide insight into the specific emotional and spiritual needs of Hispanic families receiving hospice services. Our findings highlight that cultural values play an important role in the hospice care experiences of Hispanic families.

  8. Rapidly increasing body mass index among children, adolescents and young adults in a transitioning population, South Africa, 2008-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sartorius, B; Sartorius, K; Taylor, M

    2017-01-01

    budget. Our refined understanding highlights that risks are further compounded for certain groups/places, and emphasizes that urgent geographical and population-targeted interventions are necessary. These interventions could include a sugar tax, clearer food labelling, revised school feeding programmes...

  9. Rapid increase in log populations in drought-stressed mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests in northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph L. Ganey; Scott C. Vojta

    2012-01-01

    Down logs provide important ecosystem services in forests and affect surface fuel loads and fire behavior. Amounts and kinds of logs are influenced by factors such as forest type, disturbance regime, forest man-agement, and climate. To quantify potential short-term changes in log populations during a recent global- climate-change type drought, we sampled logs in mixed-...

  10. Development of a rapid multiplex SSR genotyping method to study populations of the fun-gal plant pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautier, A.; Marcel, T.C.; Confais, J.; Crane, C.; Kema, G.H.J.; Suffert, F.; Walker, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Zymoseptoria tritici is a hemibiotrophic ascomycete fungus causing leaf blotch of wheat that often decreases yield severely. Populations of the fungus are known to be highly diverse and poorly differentiated from each other. However, a genotyping tool is needed to address further

  11. Development of a rapid multiplex SSR genotyping method to study populations of the fungal plant pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Angélique; Marcel, Thierry C; Confais, Johann; Crane, Charles; Kema, Gert; Suffert, Frédéric; Walker, Anne-Sophie

    2014-06-18

    Zymoseptoria tritici is a hemibiotrophic ascomycete fungus causing leaf blotch of wheat that often decreases yield severely. Populations of the fungus are known to be highly diverse and poorly differentiated from each other. However, a genotyping tool is needed to address further questions in large collections of isolates, regarding regional population structure, adaptation to anthropogenic selective pressures, and dynamics of the recently discovered accessory chromosomes. This procedure is limited by costly and time-consuming simplex PCR genotyping. Recent development of genomic approaches and of larger sets of SSRs enabled the optimization of microsatellite multiplexing. We report here a reliable protocol to amplify 24 SSRs organized in three multiplex panels, and covering all Z. tritici chromosomes. We also propose an automatic allele assignment procedure, which allows scoring alleles in a repeatable manner across studies and laboratories. All together, these tools enabled us to characterize local and worldwide populations and to calculate diversity indexes consistent with results reported in the literature. This easy-to-use, accurate, repeatable, economical, and faster technical strategy can provide useful genetic information for evolutionary inferences concerning Z. tritici populations. Moreover, it will facilitate the comparison of studies from different scientific groups.

  12. Promotora de salud: promoting folic acid use among Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deRosset, Leslie; Mullenix, Amy; Flores, Alina; Mattia-Dewey, Daniel; Mai, Cara T

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Public Health Service recommends that all women in the United States capable of becoming pregnant consume 400 μg of folic acid daily to reduce their risk of having a pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect (NTD). However, disparities exist in the consumption of folic acid, with Hispanic women having lower rates of folic acid consumption than non-Hispanic white women. A community-based feasibility study was designed to assess the utility of the promotora de salud model to promote consumption of multivitamins containing folic acid for the prevention of NTDs among Spanish-speaking Hispanic women in North Carolina. The study consisted of an educational intervention given by a promotora (a lay, community health worker), with data collection occurring at baseline and four months post-intervention to measure changes in knowledge and behavior. Overall, 52% (n=303) of participants completed all components of the study. Self-reported daily multivitamin consumption increased from 24% at baseline to 71% four months post-intervention. During the same time frame, awareness of folic acid increased from 78% to 98% and knowledge of the role of folic acid in the prevention of birth defects increased from 82% to 92%. The results of this study indicate that the promotora de salud model may be effective in reaching a subpopulation of women with the folic acid message. Additional studies with larger population sizes are warranted to validate these findings.

  13. Rapid changes in key ruminal microbial populations during the induction of and recovery from diet-induced milk fat depression in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, D E; Preston, S H; Risser, J M; Harvatine, K J

    2015-08-14

    The ruminant provides a powerful model for understanding the temporal dynamics of gastrointestinal microbial communities. Diet-induced milk fat depression (MFD) in the dairy cow is caused by rumen-derived bioactive fatty acids, and is commonly attributed to the changes in the microbial population. The aim of the present study was to determine the changes occurring in nine ruminal bacterial taxa with well-characterised functions, and abundance of total fungi, ciliate protozoa and bacteria during the induction of and recovery from MFD. Interactions between treatment and time were observed for ten of the twelve populations. The total number of both fungi and ciliate protozoa decreased rapidly (days 4 and 8, respectively) by more than 90% during the induction period and increased during the recovery period. The abundance of Streptococcus bovis (amylolytic) peaked at 350% of control levels on day 4 of induction and rapidly decreased during the recovery period. The abundance of Prevotella bryantii (amylolytic) decreased by 66% from day 8 to 20 of the induction period and increased to the control levels on day 12 of the recovery period. The abundance of Megasphaera elsdenii and Selenomonas ruminantium (lactate-utilising bacteria) increased progressively until day 12 of induction (>170%) and decreased during the recovery period. The abundance of Fibrobacter succinogenes (fibrolytic) decreased by 97% on day 4 of induction and increased progressively to an equal extent during the recovery period, although smaller changes were observed for other fibrolytic bacteria. The abundance of the Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens/Pseudobutyrivibrio group decreased progressively during the induction period and increased during the recovery period, whereas the abundance of Butyrivibrio hungatei was not affected by treatment. Responsive taxa were modified rapidly, with the majority of changes occurring within 8 d and their time course was similar to the time course of the induction of MFD

  14. A Selection of Hispanic Nonfiction for Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Isabel

    1990-01-01

    This annotated bibliography lists 10 works of English-language nonfiction recommended for Hispanic young adults, including a view of pre-Columbian Mexico, biographies of controversial Hispanic men, an anthology of the writings of Juana Ines de la Cruz, an account of bullfighting, and books about Hispanic countries and Hispanic villages in New…

  15. Populism

    OpenAIRE

    Abts, Koenraad; Van Kessel, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    Populism is a concept applied to a wide range of political movements and actors across the globe. There is, at the same time, considerable confusion about the attributes and manifestation of populism, as well as its impact on democracy. This contribution identifies the defining elements of the populist ideology and discusses the varieties in which populism manifests itself, for instance as a component of certain party families. We finally discuss various normative interpretations of populism,...

  16. Factors Contributing to Successful Employment Outcomes for Hispanic Women Who Are Deaf: Utilization of Chi-Squared Automatic Interaction Detector and Logistic Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Amber M.

    2013-01-01

    Hispanic women who are deaf constitute a heterogeneous group of individuals with varying vocational needs. To understand the unique needs of this population, it is important to analyze how consumer characteristics, presence of public supports, and type of services provided influence employment outcomes for Hispanic women who are deaf. The purpose…

  17. Aprendiendo en Casa: Media as a Resource for Learning among Hispanic-Latino Families. A Report of the Families and Media Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, June; Barron, Brigid

    2015-01-01

    The Hispanic-Latino population is one of the largest--and most diverse--demographics in the U.S. Aprendiendo en casa reveals findings from a national survey of Hispanic parents about their home media environments and practices, and their perceptions of their children's use of educational media across a range of different platforms. The report…

  18. The Geology of Mexico: A Quantitative Evaluation of a Course Designed to Increase the Number of Hispanic Students Participating in the Geosciences at California State University, Sacramento

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersley, Lisa C.; Levine, R.; Cornwell, K.; Kusnick, J. E.; Hausback, B. P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of a newly developed introductory course, Geology of Mexico, in attracting Hispanic students, encouraging them to take more geology courses, and recruiting them to the major. The student population in the Geology of Mexico course was 93% Hispanic compared with 18.5% in Physical Geology. We…

  19. An Analysis of Promotion and Retention Factors Among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Marine Corps Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    notable difference was that TBS overall class rank was lower for Hispanics , as well as for other minority groups, compared to whites. 36 Table 12...for educational attainment. According to a Pew Research Center report, Hispanic high school graduates in the class of 2012 for the first time saw...https://www.collegeboard.org/press), Hispanics have consistently under-performed on the SAT and have with lower test scores in comparison with the

  20. Comparison of outcomes for African Americans, Hispanics, and Non-Hispanic Whites in the CATIE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jodi Gonzalez; Miller, Alexander L; Cañive, José M; Rosenheck, Robert A; Swartz, Marvin S; Mintz, Jim

    2013-06-01

    Medication outcome literature in schizophrenia across racial-ethnic groups is sparse, with inconsistent findings. The Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study provided an opportunity for exploratory analyses of racial-ethnic outcomes. The study objective was to examine race-ethnicity outcomes for CATIE's main outcome (study discontinuation) and secondary outcomes. CATIE participants included whites (non-Hispanic) (N=722), African Americans (N=506), and Hispanics (N=170). Survival analyses and mixed-effects regression modeling were conducted, with adjustment for baseline sociodemographic differences and baseline scores of the secondary outcomes. Racial-ethnic groups had unique patterns of outcomes. Hispanics were much more likely to discontinue for lack of efficacy from perphenazine (64% versus 42% non-Hispanic whites and 24% African Americans) and ziprasidone (71% versus 40% non-Hispanic whites and 24% African Americans); Hispanics' quality of life also declined on these medications. Non-Hispanic whites were more likely to discontinue for lack of efficacy in general (averaging olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone discontinuation rates). African Americans were less likely to continue after the first phase (32% continuing versus 40% for non-Hispanic whites and 41% Hispanics). Discontinuations were driven by research burden, personal issues, and unspecified loss to follow-up. Non-Hispanic whites had higher depression scores during the follow-up period. African Americans had fewer side effects. CATIE results did not show disparities favoring non-Hispanic whites. CATIE may have provided state-of-the-art treatment and thus reduced disparate treatments observed in community clinics. African Americans discontinued even after consideration of socioeconomic differences. Why perphenazine and ziprasidone may be less effective with Hispanics should be explored.

  1. Mental health disparities between Hispanic and non-Hispanic parents of childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeske, Kathleen A; Sherman-Bien, Sandra; Hamilton, Ann S; Olson, Anamara Ritt; Slaughter, Rhona; Kuperberg, Aura; Milam, Joel

    2013-09-01

    Parents of childhood cancer survivors (CCS) experience considerable distress related to their child's cancer. However, little is known about cultural variation in this experience. We examine parental distress, specifically symptoms of post-traumatic stress (PTSS) and depression, comparing Hispanic and non-Hispanic parents of CCS. Seventy-nine Hispanic and 60 non-Hispanic parents of CCS (currently aged 14-25, off treatment ≥2 years) completed questionnaires assessing demographics, depression, PTSS, perceived stress, and child's health status/quality of life (QOL). t-Tests and chi-square statistics were used to compare differences in demographic characteristics between Hispanic and non-Hispanic parents and multivariable regression was used to determine independent risk factors associated with parental PTSS and depression. Hispanic parents were significantly younger, had less education, lower incomes and reported significantly more PTSS and depressive symptoms than non-Hispanic parents (all P-values parents, foreign birthplace predicted higher PTSS after controlling for other factors (P parents, regardless of birthplace, reported more depressive symptoms than non-Hispanic parents (US-born, P parental stress and negative relationships with the child's psychosocial QOL. Hispanic and non-Hispanic CCS did not differ significantly on disease and treatment factors or health-related QOL. Hispanic parents of CCS may be at greater risk for poorer mental health outcomes. Ethnic-specific factors (e.g., acculturation, immigration status, and previous trauma) may influence parents' responses and adjustment to their child's cancer. Research is needed to determine how to meet the needs of the most vulnerable parents. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Osteoporosis in celiac disease: a Hispanic pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-Rivera, Joel; Rosado Carrión, Bárbara; Antommattei Frontera, Osvaldo; Bredy-Domínguez, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis has become an issue of worldwide significance. This condition has been demonstrated in Celiac disease (CD) populations in Europe, South America and the United States. However, data from the Hispanic population is limited. Record review containing patients with Celiac disease in a Gastroenterology Clinic to evaluate the association of decreased bone density such as Osteoporosis and Osteopenia in subjects with Celiac disease in the southern population of Puerto Rico. We compared the results of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Clinical manifestations of CD in Hispanic population are described. Celiac disease data was available for seven patients; of those 6 were female (86%). The average age was 46 yr Most patients were overweight with a body mass index value of 29. CD patients showed abnormalities in hemoglobin, TSH and 25-Hydroxyvitamin D. The screening markers for CD showed a high value on IgA. The data to excel is the association of IgA vs. TSH showing strength of 90%. There was significantly lower bone density in women with Celiac Disease accounting for 86% of the cases. Women with Celiac Disease were associated with lower bone density and a higher prevalence of Osteopenia but not Osteoporosis.

  3. Rapid differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes epidemic clones III and IV and their intact compared with heat-killed populations using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarko, Esmond B; Puzey, Kenneth A; Donnelly, Catherine W

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis (chemometrics) could be used to rapidly differentiate epidemic clones (ECs) of Listeria monocytogenes, as well as their intact compared with heat-killed populations. FT-IR spectra were collected from dried thin smears on infrared slides prepared from aliquots of 10 μL of each L. monocytogenes ECs (ECIII: J1-101 and R2-499; ECIV: J1-129 and J1-220), and also from intact and heat-killed cell populations of each EC strain using 250 scans at a resolution of 4 cm(-1) in the mid-infrared region in a reflectance mode. Chemometric analysis of spectra involved the application of the multivariate discriminant method for canonical variate analysis (CVA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). CVA of the spectra in the wavelength region 4000 to 600 cm(-1) separated the EC strains while LDA resulted in a 100% accurate classification of all spectra in the data set. Further, CVA separated intact and heat-killed cells of each EC strain and there was 100% accuracy in the classification of all spectra when LDA was applied. FT-IR spectral wavenumbers 1650 to 1390 cm(-1) were used to separate heat-killed and intact populations of L. monocytogenes. The FT-IR spectroscopy method allowed discrimination between strains that belong to the same EC. FT-IR is a highly discriminatory and reproducible method that can be used for the rapid subtyping of L. monocytogenes, as well as for the detection of live compared with dead populations of the organism. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis can be used for L. monocytogenes source tracking and for clinical case isolate comparison during epidemiological investigations since the method is capable of differentiating epidemic clones and it uses a library of well-characterized strains. The FT-IR method is potentially less expensive and more rapid compared to genetic

  4. Patterns of contraception choice among Hispanic and non-Hispanic female adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Florence; Arden, Martha; Fisher, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This study examines contraception choices among Hispanic and non-Hispanic girls, to determine if there are differences when the barrier of cost is removed by facilitating enrollment in a Title X Family Planning Program. Charts of adolescent females aged 13-19 years, seen for the first time at a university hospital clinic from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2007, were reviewed. Access to contraception was facilitated by enrollment in the Title X Family Planning Program. Patients were categorized as public insurance if they had Medicaid or Child/Family Health Plus or chose to enroll in the Title X program. Among the 666 eligible patients, 27% were Hispanic, with a mean age of 14.9 years. At least 20% had used one form of contraception before their first clinic visit. About one-third of the youth were enrolled in the Title X Family Planning Program, with no statistical difference between Hispanic and non-Hispanic youth. Three hundred and ninety subjects (58%) chose contraception during their visit. Hispanic subjects, who represented 32% of the group, were more likely to choose condoms and oral contraceptive pills compared to non-Hispanic subjects. The privately insured adolescents chose condoms less often than the publicly insured adolescents, and this was true regardless of ethnicity. There are significant differences in contraception choices between Hispanic and non-Hispanic youth. The Title X Family Planning Program allowed young women to make independent choices. Adolescents may benefit from further improvements in culturally sensitive family planning programs.

  5. Hospital discharge destinations for Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients treated for traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Todd J; Smith, Hayden L; Chigazola, Angela; Wortman, Mikelle R; Sidwell, Richard A; Piper, John G

    2013-01-01

    To examine hospital discharge destinations for Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients treated for traumatic brain injury. Retrospective cohort study with patient matching. Ethnicity status not determined a significant predictor of discharge destination (P = .2150). Patient hospital length of stay determined a significant predictor of discharge destination (P = .0072), with every 1 day increase in length of stay, resulting in a 12% increase in odds of being discharged to care facility. Study data suggest that length of stay can predict discharge destination for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients in a medium-sized trauma center in the Midwest.

  6. A rapid and sensitive GC-MS/MS method to measure deuterium labeled deoxyadenosine in DNA from limited mouse cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, Don E.; Buxbaum, Nataliya P.; Bare, Catherine V.; Treadwell, Shirin M.; Kapoor, Veena; Williams, Kirsten M.; Gress, Ronald E.

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive GC-MS/MS method was developed to quantitatively measure low levels of DNA base deoxyadenosine (dA) and its isotopologues (e.g. dA M+1) from limited mouse cell populations. Mice undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation (AHSCT) received deuterated water at biologically relevant time intervals post AHSCT, allowing labeling of DNA upon cell division, which was detected as the dA M+1 isotopologue. Targeted mouse cell populations were isolated from lymphoid organs and purified by multi-parameter fluorescence activated cell sorting. Cell lysis, DNA extraction and hydrolysis were accomplished using available commercial procedures. The novel analytical method utilized a hydrophilic-lipophilic balanced sample preparation, rapid on-line hot GC inlet gas phase sample derivatization, fast GC low thermal mass technology, and a recently marketed GC-MS/MS system. Calibration standards containing dA and fortified with relevant levels of dA M+1 (0.25–20%) and dA M+5 (internal standard) were used for sample quantitation. The method employed a quadratic fit for calibration of dA M+1 (0.25–20%) and dA, demonstrated excellent accuracy and precision, and had limits of detection of 100 fg on-column for the dA isotopologues. The method was validated and required only 20,000 cells to characterize population dynamics of cells involved in the biology of chronic graft-versus-host disease, the main cause of late morbidity and non-relapse-mortality following AHSCT. The high sensitivity and specificity of the method makes it useful for investigating in vivo kinetics on limited and important cell populations (e.g. T regulatory cells) from disease conditions or in disease models that are immune-mediated, such as diabetes, HIV/AIDS, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis. PMID:23541182

  7. Determinants of breast cancer screening among inner-city Hispanic women in comparison with other inner-city women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J P; Rakowski, W; Jones, A C

    1995-01-01

    A telephone survey of a random sample of Rhode Island women ages 40 and older residing in minority low-income census tracts--census tracts in the lowest quartile of a variety of socioeconomic indicators in which at least 5 percent of the population was classified as Hispanic or non-Hispanic black--was conducted in 1991, focusing on breast cancer screening. Hispanic women were found to have about half the breast cancer screening rate (20 percent, according to current screening guidelines) of other respondents (37 percent). Determinants of screening were explored to suggest reasons for this difference. The Health Belief Model was used to identify and compare determinants of breast cancer screening (sociodemographics, health care utilization, perceived susceptibility to breast cancer, perceived seriousness of breast cancer, cues to screening such as a provider's recommendation, and the perceived benefits and costs of screening) among Hispanics, non-Hispanic whites, and non-Hispanic blacks. Hispanics were younger, less educated, and had lower family incomes than other women residing in minority low-income census tracts, were less likely to receive medical care, to perceive themselves as susceptible to breast cancer, and to perceive breast cancer as curable. Logistic regression analyses revealed the importance of use of health care, cues for screening, and perceptions of mammography to explain the screening behavior of Hispanics and non-Hispanics alike. Access to medical care is a significant problem in the Rhode Island Hispanic community, related to recent immigration, undocumented immigration, and low income characteristics of its members. Efforts to increase long-term screening for breast cancer in this community should focus on access while paying attention to its unique perceptions of breast cancer.

  8. The Yo me cuido® Program: Addressing Breast Cancer Screening and Prevention Among Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jenna L; Ramos, Roberto; Rivera-Colón, Venessa; Escobar, Myriam; Palencia, Jeannette; Grant, Cathy G; Green, B Lee

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is less likely to be diagnosed at the earliest stage in Hispanic/Latino (Hispanic) women compared to non-Hispanic White women, even after accounting for differences in age, socioeconomic status, and method of detection. Moffitt Cancer Center created a comprehensive health education program called Yo me cuido (®) (YMC) to address and reduce breast cancer disparities among Spanish- and English-speaking Hispanic women by providing breast cancer and healthy lifestyles awareness and education, and promoting breast cancer screenings, reminders, and referrals for women 40 years and older. The purpose of this paper is to showcase the innovative approaches and methods to cancer prevention and early detection of the YMC program, and to promote it as an effective tool for improving outcomes in community health education, outreach, and engagement activities with Hispanic populations. Key components of the program include educational workshops, mammogram referrals, and a multimedia campaign. The YMC program is unique because of its approaches in reaching the Hispanic population, such as delivering the program with compassionate services to empower participants to live a healthier lifestyle. Additionally, direct follow-up for mammography screenings is provided by program staff. From 2011 to 2013, YMC has educated 2,226 women and 165 men through 93 workshops. About 684 (52 %) women ages 40 and older have had a screening mammogram within their first year of participating in the program. The YMC program is an innovative cancer education and outreach program that has demonstrated a positive impact on the lives of the Hispanic community in the Tampa Bay region.

  9. Understanding access to care and health needs of Hispanic women from an urban community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie; Dunphy Suplee, Patricia; Gardner, Marcia R

    2014-01-01

    As a first step in a proposed program of community-based participatory research, this study investigated access to care and specific health needs in a population of Hispanic women from a medically underserved, urban community. There were 66 Hispanic women recruited at a local church to complete a 94-item researcher-developed survey. Thirty-two percent of women in the study were not U.S. citizens. Being insured, being a citizen, and having a medical diagnosis were significant in satisfaction with care. The most prevalent health issue for this population was being overweight or obese. This study demonstrates the use of the community needs assessment process in the development of interventions to improve a community's health and health care. This is especially true in the Hispanic community in which large variations based on culture and country of origin will impact the success of planned interventions.

  10. High incidence of community-acquired pneumonia among rapidly aging population in Japan: a prospective hospital-based surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Masahiro; Nakama, Takahiro; Ishida, Masayuki; Morimoto, Hitomi; Nagasaki, Yuka; Shiramizu, Rina; Hamashige, Naohisa; Chikamori, Masayuki; Yoshida, Laymyint; Ariyoshi, Koya; Suzuki, Motoi; Morimoto, Konosuke

    2014-01-01

    The age-group-specific incidence and etiological patterns of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have not been fully established in Japan. A 2-year prospective surveillance was conducted in Kochi city, Western Japan. All CAP patients aged ≥15 years who visited a community-based hospital were enrolled in the study. Clinical samples were examined by conventional bacterial culture and urinary antigen tests, and 6 bacterial pathogens and 16 respiratory viruses were identified from sputum samples by multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays. The age-group-specific incidence of CAP was estimated using a population-based data set of the total number of outpatients in the whole city. Ninety of the 131 enrolled patients, 68.7% were positive for respiratory pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the leading bacterial pathogen identified (28.2%). Respiratory viruses were identified in 36 patients (27.5%), and human entero-rhinovirus was the most common (13.3%) among them. The estimated overall incidence of adult CAP in Kochi was 9.6 per 1,000 person-years (PY); the estimated age group-specific incidence was 3.4, 10.7, and 42.9 per 1,000 PY for those aged 15-64, 65-74, and ≥75 years, respectively. The high incidence of CAP in these rural city of Japan, probably reflects the substantial aged population. S. pneumoniae and respiratory viruses play important roles in CAP in all age groups.

  11. The Role of Language Use in Reports of Musculoskeletal Pain Among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Kapoor, Anna; Omidpanah, Adam; Monico, Evelyn; Buchwald, Dedra; Harris, Raymond; Jimenez, Nathalia

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the role of English language use in the reported frequency of musculoskeletal pain among Hispanic and non-Hispanic White youth. This is a secondary data analysis using a cross-sectional sample of 12,189 Hispanic and non-Hispanic White adolescents recruited for the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Respondents were classified into three groups: (a) English-speaking non-Hispanic Whites, (b) English-speaking Hispanics, and (c) Spanish-speaking Hispanics. After controlling for body mass index and demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral variables, Spanish-speaking Hispanics reported the least frequent musculoskeletal pain ( OR = 0.415, 95% CI [0.361, 0.477]; p cultural phenomenon. Health care providers should consider the role of language use in reports of pain in Hispanic and non-Hispanic White adolescents.

  12. Measurement of proliferation and disappearance of rapid turnover cell populations in human studies using deuterium-labeled glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macallan, Derek C; Asquith, Becca; Zhang, Yan; de Lara, Catherine; Ghattas, Hala; Defoiche, Julien; Beverley, Peter C L

    2009-01-01

    Cell proliferation may be measured in vivo by quantifying DNA synthesis with isotopically labeled deoxyribonucleotide precursors. Deuterium-labeled glucose is one such precursor which, because it achieves high levels of enrichment for a short period, is well suited to the study of rapidly dividing cells, in contrast to the longer term labeling achieved with heavy water ((2)H(2)O). As deuterium is non-radioactive and glucose can be readily administered, this approach is suitable for clinical studies. It has been widely applied to investigate human lymphocyte proliferation, but solid tissue samples may also be analyzed. Rate, duration and route (intravenous or oral) of [6,6-(2)H(2)]-glucose administration should be adapted to the target cell of interest. For lymphocytes, cell separation is best achieved by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), although magnetic bead separation is an alternative. DNA is then extracted, hydrolyzed enzymatically and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Appropriate mathematical modeling is critical to interpretation. Typical time requirements are as follows: labeling, 10-24 h; sampling, approximately 3 weeks; DNA extraction/derivatization, 2-3 d; and GC/MS analysis, approximately 2 d.

  13. Hispanic Teens & Drugs. A Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Across the Nation, teen drug use is down 23 percent since 2001 among 8th, 10th, and 12th graders, reflecting reductions in the use of nearly every drug. However, data from 2005 and 2006 indicate that there are still some areas of concern for Hispanic youth. Hispanic 8th graders have a higher rate of illicit drug use than other teens in the same…

  14. A historical review of R.J. Reynolds' strategies for marketing tobacco to Hispanics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Rios, Lisbeth; Parascandola, Mark

    2013-05-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing racial/ethnic group in the United States, and smoking is the leading preventable cause of morbidity and mortality among this population. We analyzed tobacco industry documents on R. J. Reynolds' marketing strategies toward the Hispanic population using tobacco industry document archives from the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library (http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu) between February-July 2011 and April-August 2012. Our analysis revealed that by 1980 the company had developed a sophisticated surveillance system to track the market behavior of Hispanic smokers and understand their psychographics, cultural values, and attitudes. This information was translated into targeted marketing campaigns for the Winston and Camel brands. Marketing targeted toward Hispanics appealed to values and sponsored activities that could be perceived as legitimating. Greater understanding of tobacco industry marketing strategies has substantial relevance for addressing tobacco-related health disparities.

  15. A Historical Review of R. J. Reynolds’ Strategies for Marketing Tobacco to Hispanics in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parascandola, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing racial/ethnic group in the United States, and smoking is the leading preventable cause of morbidity and mortality among this population. We analyzed tobacco industry documents on R. J. Reynolds’ marketing strategies toward the Hispanic population using tobacco industry document archives from the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library (http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu) between February–July 2011 and April–August 2012. Our analysis revealed that by 1980 the company had developed a sophisticated surveillance system to track the market behavior of Hispanic smokers and understand their psychographics, cultural values, and attitudes. This information was translated into targeted marketing campaigns for the Winston and Camel brands. Marketing targeted toward Hispanics appealed to values and sponsored activities that could be perceived as legitimating. Greater understanding of tobacco industry marketing strategies has substantial relevance for addressing tobacco-related health disparities. PMID:23488493

  16. Periodontal disease in Hispanic Americans with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, M John; Potter, Richard M; Blodgett, Janet; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2008-04-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for the development of periodontal disease in certain populations. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increased in Hispanic Americans, but its impact on the extent and severity of periodontal disease in this population has not been determined. Sixty-three Hispanic Americans, aged 33 to 72 years, from South Texas were grouped based on the presence or absence of type 2 diabetes. Past medical histories, including smoking, were obtained. Periodontal status was evaluated by measuring probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque, bleeding on probing, visual gingival inflammation, and calculus. Type 2 diabetes was associated frequently with major medical complications in this population. Diabetes was associated with significantly more calculus formation and tooth loss and an increased extent and severity of periodontitis. Subjects with diabetes had nearly three times the mean CAL and frequency of PD >6 mm than subjects without diabetes and nearly twice the frequency of moderate to advanced attachment loss (> or =3 mm). Smoking and diabetes had significant independent effects on mean CAL and the frequency of deep pockets. Diabetes and smoking combined were associated with a significantly higher frequency of sites with CAL > or =3 mm compared to healthy non-smokers, healthy smokers, and non-smokers with diabetes. Hispanic Americans with type 2 diabetes had more supra- and subgingival calculus, an increased extent and severity of periodontal destruction, and an increased frequency of tooth loss due to periodontitis. An additive/synergistic contribution of type 2 diabetes and smoking for increasing the extent of periodontal disease was observed.

  17. Applying Ecological Frameworks in Obesity Intervention Studies in Hispanic/Latino Youth:: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Carmen; Turk, Melanie T; Kalarchian, Melissa A; Shaffer, Cheryl

    2017-09-01

    In the United States, Hispanic children have higher rates of obesity compared with non-Hispanic White children. An ecological framework provides a holistic view of the environment to which Hispanic/Latino children are exposed that can potentially inform prevention and treatment initiatives for this vulnerable population. This systematic review examines the existing evidence on the use of an ecological framework in intervention studies targeting overweight and obesity in Hispanic youth from birth to 8 years. Key terms guided the search of PubMed, Google Scholar, CINAHL, and EBSCOhost databases from 1997 to 2016. Results were organized using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) method. Seven studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Significant improvements in body mass index z scores in treatment children were evident in five of the seven studies. Increases in fruit, water, and vegetable consumption and physical activity levels were reported in four of the seven studies. Multilevel interventions targeting a child's home and community suggest efficacy in reducing or preventing obesity; increasing fruit, water, and vegetable consumption; and increasing physical activity in overweight/obese young Hispanic children. Future research is needed to explore the sustainability of multilevel obesity prevention interventions in this vulnerable population.

  18. Assessing Colorectal Cancer Screening Behaviors and Knowledge among At-Risk Hispanics in Southern New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Janeth I; Palacios, Rebecca; Thompson, Beti; Martinez, Vanessa; O'Connell, Mary A

    2013-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality rates in New Mexico (NM) continue to be higher than national rates. Hispanic CRC mortality rates in NM surpass those of overall Hispanics in the US. This study was designed to characterize and understand factors contributing to low CRC screening rates in this border region. A CRC Knowledge Assessment Survey (KAS) was administered in either English or Spanish to 247 individuals attending community events throughout southern NM. A subset of these individuals completed an online CRC risk assessment survey managed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Data analysis tested for significant differences in knowledge, physician-patient CRC interactions, CRC risk level perception, and screening rates across diverse ethnic and age groups. Both CRC knowledge and physician-patient CRC interactions were positively associated with participant screening history. Significant age and ethnic differences for CRC knowledge, physician-patient CRC interactions, and screening history in the NM border sample were also seen. Age-eligible Hispanics (50+) as well as those less than 50 years of age had lower CRC knowledge and were less likely to engage in physician-patient CRC interactions than non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). The age-eligible Hispanics also reported lower CRC screening rates than their NHW counterparts. Low CRC knowledge and limited physician-patient CRC interactions appear to contribute to low screening rates in this NM population. Expanding education and outreach efforts for this border population are essential to promote early CRC detection and thereby decrease overall CRC mortality rates.

  19. The underrepresentation of Hispanics/Latinos in nursing education: a deafening silence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxis, J Carole

    2002-01-01

    While our national population is growing more ethnically and racially diverse, the nursing workforce and faculty remains predominantly White (non-Hispanic). Ethnic/racial minorities are seriously underrepresented in nursing and, as such, are a factor in the nursing workforce shortage. The nursing literature has addressed the need for ethnic/racial diversity for several decades, most often citing diversification as a means of providing culturally competent care. However the fact remains that the nursing population continues to be underrepresented by people of color. The diversification of the nursing profession will require culturally sensitive research and theory development regarding the recruitment and education of ethnic/racial minorities. While there is a growing body of knowledge regarding the educational needs and experiences of minorities in nursing education, much of this data generalize minorities as if they were a homogeneous group. There is a striking paucity of research regarding the underepresentation of Hispanics in nursing and the unique issues of recruitment and retention of this group in nursing education. This paper provides a review of the mostly anecdotal literature regarding the experiences of Hispanics in nursing education. It explores the underrepresentation and paucity of culturally specific knowledge regarding the recruitment, retention, and graduation of Hispanics/Latinos in nursing. The homogeneity of nursing and its consequences specifically in relation to Hispanics is discussed. The research implications are highlighted throughout.

  20. A Review of Teen Dating Violence Prevention Research: What About Hispanic Youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Krithika; Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M; Mitchell, Emma M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a critical review of the literature on evidence-based teen dating violence (TDV) prevention programs with a particular focus on highlighting gaps in the literature with regard to prevention efforts targeting Hispanic teens. The target populations, characteristics, designs, and results of TDV prevention studies reported in the scientific literature for the last 20 years were reviewed and analyzed according to cultural and contextual factors associated with TDV among Hispanic teens. To date, three studies have focused on a predominantly Hispanic population with only one study looking at the long-term effects of a TDV intervention. There is a growing need to develop and evaluate immediate and long-term effects of TDV prevention programs that address ethnic pride, acculturation and acculturative stress, familism, and gender norms within the context of Hispanic communities (e.g., machismo and marianismo). The authors discuss the implications for research, prevention practice, and policy regarding TDV prevention for Hispanic teens. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Rapid impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction to the National Immunization plan in southern Israel: comparison between 2 distinct populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givon-Lavi, Noga; Ben-Shimol, Shalom; Cohen, Raanan; Greenberg, David; Dagan, Ron

    2015-04-15

    Rotavirus vaccines were licensed in Israel in 2007, and in 2011 the pentavalent-vaccine (RV5) was introduced into the Israeli National Immunization plan. To determine the effect of rotavirus-vaccines on the incidence of hospital visits due to rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) and all-cause diarrhea in Jewish and Bedouin children vaccine period, the overall RVGE hospital visits rates per 1000 in children Vaccine uptake was faster in the Jewish vs. the Bedouin population. In the year following RV5 introduction, RVGE hospital visits rates declined by 82%, 70% (Pvaccine introduction in southern Israel in both Jewish and Bedouin children. However, the impact was faster and more profound in Jewish children, probably related to higher vaccine uptake and possibly to lifestyle differences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A survey of a population of anaesthesiologists from South India regarding practices for rapid sequence intubation in patients with head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyen Parida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Evidence and utility of the individual steps of the rapid sequence induction and tracheal intubation protocols have been debated, especially in the setting of traumatic brain injury. The purpose of this survey was to determine preferences in the current approach to rapid sequence intubation ( RSI in head injury patients among a population of anaesthesiologists from South India. Methods: A questionnaire was E-mailed to all the members of the Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists′ South Zone Chapter to ascertain their preferences, experience and comfort level with regard to their use of rapid sequence intubation techniques in adult patients with head injury. Participants were requested to indicate their practices for RSI technique for a head-injured patient upon arrival at the Emergency Medical Services department of their hospital. Results: The total response rate was 56.9% (530/932. Of the total respondents, 35% of the clinicians used cricoid pressure routinely, most respondents (68% stated that they pre-oxygenate the patients for about 3 min prior to RSI, thiopentone (61% and propofol (34% were commonly used prior to intubation. Rocuronium was the muscle relaxant of choice for RSI among the majority (44%, compared to succinylcholine (39%. Statistical analyses were performed after the initial entry onto a spreadsheet. Data were summarised descriptively using frequency distribution. Conclusion: In a rapid sequence intubation situation, the practice differed significantly among anaesthesiologists. Owing to disagreements and paucity of evidence-based data regarding the standards of RSI, it is apparent that RSI practice still has considerable variability in clinical practice.

  3. Picture this!: using participatory photo mapping with Hispanic girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Campos, Daisy Y; Parra-Medina, Deborah; Esparza, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    Hispanic girls are burdened with high levels of obesity and are less active than the general adolescent population, highlighting the need for creative strategies developed with community input to improve physical activity behaviors. Involving girls, parents, and the community in the intervention planning process may improve uptake and maintenance of physical activity. The purpose of this article was to describe how we engaged adolescent girls as partners in community-based intervention planning research. We begin with an overview of the research project and then describe how we used Participatory Photo Mapping to engage girls in critical reflection and problems solving.

  4. A Pre-Hispanic Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianucci, Raffaella; Jeziorska, Maria; Lallo, Rudy; Mattutino, Grazia; Massimelli, Massimo; Phillips, Genevieve; Appenzeller, Otto

    2008-01-01

    This report on a male head revealed biologic rhythms, as gleaned from hydrogen isotope ratios in hair, consistent with a South-American origin and Atomic Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dating (AMS) compatible with the last pre-Hispanic period (1418–1491 AD, 95.4% probability). Biopsies showed exceptionally well-preserved tissues. The hair contained high levels of toxic elements (lead, arsenic and mercury) incompatible with life. There was no evidence for lead deposition in bone consistent with post-mortem accumulation of this toxic element in the hair. We propose that the high content of metals in hair was the result of metabolic activity of bacteria leading to metal complexation in extra cellular polymeric substances (EPS). This is a recognized protective mechanism for bacteria that thrive in toxic environments. This mechanism may account for the tissues preservation and gives a hint at soil composition where the head was presumably buried. Our results have implications for forensic toxicology which has, hitherto, relied on hair analyses as one means to reconstruct pre-mortem metabolism and for detecting toxic elements accumulated during life. Our finding also has implications for other archaeological specimens where similar circumstances may distort the results of toxicological studies. PMID:18446229

  5. Proportion of gestational diabetes mellitus attributable to overweight and obesity among non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, and Hispanic women in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavicchia, Philip P; Liu, Jihong; Adams, Swann A; Steck, Susan E; Hussey, James R; Daguisé, Virginie G; Hebert, James R

    2014-10-01

    Objective was to estimate race-specific proportions of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) attributable to overweight and obesity in South Carolina. South Carolina birth certificate and hospital discharge data were obtained from 2004 to 2006. Women who did not have type 2 diabetes mellitus before pregnancy were classified with GDM if a diagnosis was reported in at least one data source. Relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using the log-binomial model. The modified Mokdad equation was used to calculate population attributable fractions for overweight body mass index (BMI: 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)), obese (30.0-34.9 kg/m(2)), and extremely obese (≥35 kg/m(2)) women after adjusting for age, gestational weight gain, education, marital status, parity, tobacco use, pre-pregnancy hypertension, and pregnancy hypertension. Overall, the adjusted RR of GDM was 1.6, 2.3, and 2.9 times higher among the overweight, obese, and extremely obese women compared to normal-weight women in South Carolina. RR of GDM for extremely obese women was higher among White (3.1) and Hispanic (3.4) women than that for Black women (2.6). The fraction of GDM cases attributable to extreme obesity was 14.0 % among White, 18.1 % among Black, and 9.6 % among Hispanic women. The fraction of GDM cases attributable to obesity was about 12 % for all racial groups. Being overweight (BMI: 25.0-29.9) explained 8.8, 7.8, and 14.4 % of GDM cases among White, Black, and Hispanic women, respectively. Results indicate a significantly increased risk of GDM among overweight, obese, and extremely obese women. The strength of the association and the proportion of GDM cases explained by excessive weight categories vary by racial/ethnic group.

  6. Design and manufacturing of customised femoral stems for the Indian population using rapid manufacturing: a finite element approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhugiri, T S; Kuthe, A M; Deshmukh, T R

    2011-01-01

    Joint replacement surgeries in India primarily involve the use of conventional implants, also referred to as 'standard implants'. There has been a little awareness about the possibility of using customised implants for such surgeries. Although standard implants from various biomedical companies are easily available in the Indian market, they are expensive and rarely conform to patient's anatomy. Studies in the past have shown that there are anatomical variations in the hip joint for different ethnic backgrounds and geographical locations. This article evaluates the feasibility of using custom-manufactured hip implants and presents a comparison between the former and standard implant from stress reduction point of view. Two CAD models of femoral stems - one from standard sized hip implant available in the market and other from customised hip implant designed as per parameters from a radiograph (specific to the patient's anatomy) - are used for evaluation. Finite element analysis was carried out for a double-legged stance. The comparative study indicated lesser stresses in head and neck region of the customised femoral stems than the standard implant. The study suggests design feasibility of customised implants for the Indian population owing to reduction in stresses in the implant.

  7. Hispanic Americans: comparative considerations and the educational problems of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-orozco, M M

    1987-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the diversity in character among the various Hispanic-American subgroups. The author compares the following subgroups historically and demographically: Mexican-Americans, Cuban-Americans, Mainland Puerto-Ricans, and "other" Hispanics. As a group, Hispanic-Americans lag far behind the majority population in any array of standard educational measurements. 40% of Hispanic-American students leave school before 10th grade. Children of "immigrant" minorities, such as Chinese, Japanese, and South and Central Americans, tend to do better in school than "caste-like" minorities, such as Black Americans, Mainland Puerto-Ricans and Mexican-Americans in the US. The author discusses several models which explain why Mexican and Puerto-Rican Americans fail in American schools at such high rates: 1) culture of poverty, 2) the various schools emphasizing "discontinuity" between the minority Hispanic and the majority culture, and 3) the psychosocial approach. Features which differentiate immigrants from caste-like minorities include 1) caste-like minorities were incorporated into the society against their will, whereas historically, immigrant minorities choose more or less freely to leave their country to enter a new social order; and 2) immigrants may anticipate or fantasize that in the future they will return home to enjoy the fruits of their hard work in the foreign land. 2 factors alleviate the longterm effects of the hardships and discrimination immigrants face: 1) the levels of discrimination became less evident as accents disappeared and names were Anglicized; immigrants develop a dual frame of reference, enabling them to evaluate their current reality against the reality of life back home; and 3) hard work in the new land will at the very least benefit the children in the future. Factors which veto the Mexican immigrant case as a heurstically "paradiomatic" immigrant minority include: 1) many Mexicans still resent the loss of 1/3 or Mexico

  8. Human CD4+ CD25hi Foxp3+ regulatory T cells are derived by rapid turnover of memory populations in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukmanovic-Stejic, Milica; Zhang, Yan; Cook, Joanne E.; Fletcher, Jean M.; McQuaid, Arthur; Masters, Joanne E.; Rustin, Malcolm H.A.; Taams, Leonie S.; Beverley, Peter C.L.; Macallan, Derek C.; Akbar, Arne N.

    2006-01-01

    While memory T cells are maintained by continuous turnover, it is not clear how human regulatory CD4+CD45RO+CD25hi Foxp3+ T lymphocyte populations persist throughout life. We therefore used deuterium labeling of cycling cells in vivo to determine whether these cells could be replenished by proliferation. We found that CD4+CD45RO+Foxp3+CD25hi T lymphocytes were highly proliferative, with a doubling time of 8 days, compared with memory CD4+CD45RO+Foxp3–CD25– (24 days) or naive CD4+CD45RA+Foxp3–CD25– populations (199 days). However, the regulatory population was susceptible to apoptosis and had critically short telomeres and low telomerase activity. It was therefore unlikely to be self regenerating. These data are consistent with continuous production from another population source. We found extremely close TCR clonal homology between regulatory and memory CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, antigen-related expansions within certain TCR Vβ families were associated with parallel numerical increases of CD4+CD45RO+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs with the same Vβ usage. It is therefore unlikely that all human CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs are generated as a separate functional lineage in the thymus. Instead, our data suggest that a proportion of this regulatory population is generated from rapidly dividing, highly differentiated memory CD4+ T cells; this has considerable implications for the therapeutic manipulation of these cells in vivo. PMID:16955142

  9. Participation in Physical Activity among Normal- and Overweight Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovitz, Steven D.; Steffen, Lyn M.; Boostrom, Ardys

    2008-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between weight status and participation in physical activity (PA) among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white (NHW) adolescent boys and girls. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, height and weight were measured and a modified 2001 Youth Risk Behavior Survey was administered to 1302…

  10. Well-being in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white survivors of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, Shannon Ruff; Erickson, Julie Reed

    2002-06-01

    To test a well-being model on Hispanic and non-Hispanic white survivors of breast cancer by comparing responses about variables hypothesized to predict well-being. Healthcare orientation, uncertainty, social support, resourcefulness, self-esteem, and well-being. Descriptive and comparative. 50 Hispanic and 50 non-Hispanic white women who completed treatment for breast cancer and were disease-free. Regional cancer center in southwestern United States. Subjects completed the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale-Health Care Orientation Subscale, Mishel Uncertainty Illness Scale, Personal Resource Questionnaire, Self-Control Schedule, Self-Esteem Inventory, and Index of Well-Being. Both groups of women reported high well-being. Sample characteristics were not related significantly to well-being in either group. No statistically significant differences were found between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women on any variables. Comparison of well-being models revealed similarities between the two groups, including variables entering each regression equation, and explained variance. Further research is needed to explore whether commonalities in women's responses to breast cancer exist independent of ethnicity. Nurses should continue encouraging both Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women to share concerns and seek information from healthcare providers while strengthening feelings of self-worth because these factors directly affect well-being.

  11. American, Hispanic, Spanish-Speaking? Hispanic Immigrants and the Question of Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglani, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This article explores Hispanics' concepts of cultural and linguistic identity. It is based on the findings of a recent study conducted by the author in Iglesia hispana de Cristo, a Hispanic church community in Western New York. Data come from ethnographic interviews conducted with 48 participants aged 13 to 80 years and with church leaders and…

  12. Hispanic Student Experiences at a Hispanic-Serving Institution: Strong Voices, Key Message

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Christina A.; Posadas, Carlos E.

    2012-01-01

    A symposium at New Mexico State University, a Hispanic-Serving Institution, revealed Hispanic students' attitudes about their experiences at the university. Discussions concerned the campus climate, mentors, the experiences of first-time students, cultural challenges, retention, and accountability. Discussion of the resulting data yields policy…

  13. Strategies for recruiting Hispanic women into a prospective cohort study of modifiable risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hastings Valerie

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this article was to describe effective strategies for recruitment of Hispanic women into a prospective cohort study of modifiable risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Although Hispanic women have two to four times the risk of developing GDM compared with non-Hispanic white women, few GDM prevention studies have included Hispanic women. Methods The study was conducted in the ambulatory obstetrical practices of Baystate Medical Center located in a socioeconomically and ethnically diverse city in Massachusetts. The study employed a range of strategies to recruit Hispanic women based on a review of the literature as well as prior experience with the study population. Results Over a period of 32 months, a total of 851 Hispanic prenatal care patients were recruited. Among eligible women, 52.4% agreed to participate. Participants were young (70% Conclusions Findings suggest that investigators can successfully recruit pregnant women from ethnic minority groups of low socioeconomic status into observational studies. The study provides culturally appropriate recruitment strategies useful for practice-based settings recruiting Hispanic research participation.

  14. Quantitative autistic trait measurements index background genetic risk for ASD in Hispanic families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Joshua; Constantino, John Nicholas; Zambrana, Katherine; Martin, Eden; Tunc, Ilker; Zhang, Yi; Abbacchi, Anna; Messinger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that quantitative autistic traits (QATs) of parents reflect inherited liabilities that may index background genetic risk for clinical autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in their offspring. Moreover, preferential mating for QATs has been observed as a potential factor in concentrating autistic liabilities in some families across generations. Heretofore, intergenerational studies of QATs have focused almost exclusively on Caucasian populations-the present study explored these phenomena in a well-characterized Hispanic population. The present study examined QAT scores in siblings and parents of 83 Hispanic probands meeting research diagnostic criteria for ASD, and 64 non-ASD controls, using the Social Responsiveness Scale-2 (SRS-2). Ancestry of the probands was characterized by genotype, using information from 541,929 single nucleotide polymorphic markers. In families of Hispanic children with an ASD diagnosis, the pattern of quantitative trait correlations observed between ASD-affected children and their first-degree relatives (ICCs on the order of 0.20), between unaffected first-degree relatives in ASD-affected families (sibling/mother ICC = 0.36; sibling/father ICC = 0.53), and between spouses (mother/father ICC = 0.48) were in keeping with the influence of transmitted background genetic risk and strong preferential mating for variation in quantitative autistic trait burden. Results from analysis of ancestry-informative genetic markers among probands in this sample were consistent with that from other Hispanic populations. Quantitative autistic traits represent measurable indices of inherited liability to ASD in Hispanic families. The accumulation of autistic traits occurs within generations, between spouses, and across generations, among Hispanic families affected by ASD. The occurrence of preferential mating for QATs-the magnitude of which may vary across cultures-constitutes a mechanism by which background genetic liability

  15. Language Intervention for Hispanic Children with Language-Learning Disabilities: Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerer, Sharon Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (1996) estimated that 10% of the United States population has a disorder of speech, language, or hearing, with proportional distribution among members of racially and ethnically diverse groups. Individuals of Hispanic origin are the fastest-growing minority group in the country. Current national…

  16. Effectively Serving AB 540 and Undocumented Students at a Hispanic Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, Dawn; Gutierrez Keeton, Rebecca; Medina, Noemy; Gonzalez, Jacquelyn; Minero, Laura P.

    2017-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined the experiences of undocumented students at a 4-year Hispanic Serving Institution. Barriers identified by these students included a lack of resources and minimal career opportunities after graduation. Faculty and staff perceived this historically underserved population as exhibiting high levels of optimism and…

  17. For Selected Services, Blacks And Hispanics More Likely To Receive Low-Value Care Than Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schpero, William L; Morden, Nancy E; Sequist, Thomas D; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Colla, Carrie H

    2017-06-01

    US minority populations receive fewer effective health services than whites. Using Medicare administrative data for 2006-11, we found no consistent, corresponding protection against the receipt of ineffective health services. Compared with whites, blacks and Hispanics were often more likely to receive the low-value services studied. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  18. Household food insecurity status and Hispanic immigrant children’s body mass index and adiposity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the high prevalence rates of food insecurity and obesity among children of Hispanic immigrants, there has been a dearth of research on the direct relationship between food insecurity and obesity among this population. Further, prior research examining the association between food insecurity ...

  19. ?Cuan buenas son nuestras viviendas?: Los hispanos [How Good Is Our Housing? Hispanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezer, Anthony; Limmer, Ruth

    This report provides statistical information regarding the quality and cost of housing occupied by Hispanic Americans throughout the United States. Some of the findings include: (1) Hispanos occupy older and worse dwellings than the general U.S. population, with a significant number of dwellings lacking heat and adequate electricity and plumbing…

  20. Red blood cell phenotype prevalence in blood donors who self-identify as Hispanic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheppard, Chelsea A; Bolen, Nicole L; Eades, Beth

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Molecular genotyping platforms provide a quick, high-throughput method for identifying red blood cell units for patients on extended phenotype-matching protocols, such as those with sickle cell disease or thalassemia. Most of the antigen prevalence data reported are for non-Hispanic ......CONCLUSIONS: Molecular genotyping platforms provide a quick, high-throughput method for identifying red blood cell units for patients on extended phenotype-matching protocols, such as those with sickle cell disease or thalassemia. Most of the antigen prevalence data reported are for non......-Hispanic populations. Therefore, this study sought to determine the phenotype prevalence in a single blood center's Hispanic population and to compare those results with previously reported rates in non-Hispanic donor populations. We performed a retrospective review of all serologic and molecular typing from donors....... The most prevalent probable Rh phenotypes were R1r (26.6%), R1R2 (21.5%), and R1R1 (20.7%); rr was found in 7.8 percent of donors tested. The percentage of K+ donors in this population was 2.8 percent. The most prevalent Duffy phenotypes were Fy(a+b+) (35.9%), Fy(a+b-) (35.6%), and Fy(a-b+) (27...

  1. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): Rates and predictors of DUI across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines rates of self-reported driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol and 12-month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Using a multistage cluster sample design, a total of 5224 individuals 18 years of age and older were selected from the household population in five metropolitan areas of the U.S.: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston and Los Angeles. The survey weighted response rate was 76%. Among men, 21% of Mexican Americans, 19.9% of South/Central Americans, 11.6% of Puerto Ricans and 6.9% of Cuban Americans reported DUI. Rates were lower among women, ranging from 9.7% for Mexican Americans to 1.3% for Cuban Americans. Mexican American men had the highest 12-month arrest rate (1.6%) and the highest lifetime arrest rate (11.2%). Drinkers who reported DUI were heavier drinkers than those not reporting DUI according to a variety of indicators. However, most DUI incidents involved non-alcohol-dependent drivers. Mexican Americans and South Central/Americans, men, younger drivers, those with less than high school education, those with higher income and higher alcohol consumption were more likely to report DUI and DUI arrests. These findings show that Hispanic national groups in the U.S. are diverse regarding drinking and DUI-related experiences.

  2. Efficacy and safety of fingolimod in Hispanic patients with multiple sclerosis: pooled clinical trial analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinea Martinez, Angel R; Correale, Jorge; Coyle, Patricia K; Meng, Xiangyi; Tenenbaum, Nadia

    2014-10-01

    The disease characteristics of multiple sclerosis (MS) appear to differ between Hispanic and Caucasian patients, with Hispanic patients having a younger age at onset, and a higher prevalence of optic nerve and spinal cord involvement. Fingolimod, the first-in-class oral sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulator approved for the treatment of relapsing MS, has been shown to significantly reduce annualized relapse rates (ARRs), lesion-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) activity, confirmed disability, and brain volume loss, compared with placebo or intramuscular interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a IM) in randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical studies. Here, the efficacy and safety profile of fingolimod in Hispanic patients was compared to that observed in the overall study populations. This was a post hoc analysis of relapses and safety data for Hispanic patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) randomized to receive daily fingolimod 0.5 mg, weekly IFNβ-1a IM (30 mg) or placebo, in the phase 3, controlled FREEDOMS, FREEDOMS II, and TRANSFORMS fingolimod studies. The ARR was estimated for each treatment group; only relapses that were confirmed by an independent examining neurologist were included in these analyses. Safety assessments included the incidence of adverse events and serious adverse events. Eligible Hispanic patients aged 18-55 years (n=181) had been treated as follows: fingolimod 0.5 mg (n=89), IFNβ-1a IM (n=65), and placebo (n=27). Hispanic patients treated with fingolimod for up to 2 years had lower ARRs (ARR: 0.22, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.14-0.35) than those receiving placebo (ARR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.24-0.88) or IFNβ-1a IM (ARR: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.18-0.63), with relative reductions of 52% and 35%, respectively. A transient decrease in heart rate that started to attenuate 6 h after fingolimod administration was observed, consistent with the well-characterized pharmacologic effect following fingolimod treatment initiation. No cases of

  3. Two populations of amphibole in dacite magmas at Volcan Aucanquilcha, Chile: A case for rapid and repeated mixing of a tiered magmatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemetti, E. W.; Grunder, A. L.

    2006-12-01

    Magmatic amphibole is a ubiquitous phase in most dacitic magmas in continental arc systems. Amphibole can react quickly to changes in P, T and water content caused by processes such as underplating of new magma, degassing, ascension and mixing of magma. This allows amphibole to be a valuable and sensitive barometer, thermometer and hygrometer in silicic magmatic systems. It can be especially suitable for disentangling the potential geometry of subvolcanic systems and limiting the timescales that these processes can occur. Volcán Aucanquilcha (Chile) is a Quaternary volcano that has erupted dacite lavas (63-67 wt% SiO2) that contain two populations of amphibole during its entire 1 M.y. eruptive history. The amphibole is found as phenocrysts of hornblende and pargasite that range in size from 0.5 mm to 1 cm. The amphibole populations exhibit a variety of textures: (1) thin opacite rims; (2) thick reaction rims of pyroxene, plagioclase and opaque oxides; (3) cored" with other phases such as plagioclase, biotite and anhydride; and (4) unrimmed. Representative electron microprobe analyses of amphibole find that very few of the phenocrysts are compositionally zoned, i.e., the two populations are not pargasite cores with hornblende rims. The presence of two populations of amphibole such as those found at Aucanquilcha appears to be rare; there are documented occurrences of two amphibole populations found in lavas from continental-arc related volcanoes. Sajama, Parinacota and Porquesa in Central Andes of Chile exhibit the same two populations of amphibole phenocrysts as Aucanquilcha. Evidence from Aucanquilcha suggest that the populations of amphibole crystallized at different pressures: 0.5-2 kb and 3-6 kb. Textures of the amphibole imply that the processes that mix the amphibole occur quickly before eruption, possibly in a timescales of days. The constant presence of these amphibole in all Aucanquilcha lavas indicate that the processes that juxtapose pargasite and

  4. How did Japanese rural dwellers become rapidly healthier in the two decades following World War II?: Examining the diverse policy interventions that improved the population's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Motoyuki

    2017-01-01

    policies implemented in Japan as well as the integration of various policies and programs addressing livelihoods, economics, and education greatly improved the population's health in a relatively short time. These non-health initiatives intersected with a wide range of health determinants. Verifying these hypotheses in detail would help develop effective measures for international aid to poverty-stricken regions. It also encourages alternative ways through which Japan could overcome its present-day challenges such as a rapidly aging population with limited access to national schemes for social security.

  5. A population-based cross-sectional study of barriers to uptake of eye care services in South India: the Rapid Assessment of Visual Impairment (RAVI) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmamula, Srinivas; Khanna, Rohit C; Shekhar, Konegari; Rao, Gullapalli N

    2014-06-12

    To assess the barriers to uptake of eye care services among those with avoidable impairment in the population aged ≥40 years in the South Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. Cross-sectional study. Community setting. Of 7800 participants recruited from one urban and two rural locations using a two-stage cluster random sampling methodology, 7378 (95%) were examined. Eye examinations were conducted using a rapid assessment protocol. Visual impairment (VI) was defined as presenting visual acuity attitude and 'felt need' to improve vision, newer and much intensive awareness campaigns are needed to bring about an attitudinal/behavioural change among individuals to improve the uptake of services. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): is the "prevention paradox" applicable to alcohol problems across Hispanic national groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Mills, Britain A

    2011-07-01

    The "prevention paradox," a notion that most alcohol-related problems are generated by nonheavy drinkers, has significant relevance to public health policy and prevention efforts. The extent of the paradox has driven debate over the type of balance that should be struck between alcohol policies targeting a select group of high-risk drinkers versus more global approaches that target the population at-large. This paper examines the notion that most alcohol problems among 4 Hispanic national groups in the United States are attributable to moderate drinkers. A general population survey employing a multistage cluster sample design, with face-to-face interviews in respondents' homes was conducted in 5 metropolitan areas of the United States. Study participants included a total of 2,773 current drinkers 18 years and older. Alcohol consumed in the past year (bottom 90% vs. top 10%), binge drinking (binge vs. no binge), and a 4-way grouping defined by volume and binge criteria were used. Alcohol-related harms included 14 social and dependence problems. Drinkers at the bottom 90% of the distribution are responsible for 56 to 73% of all social problems, and for 55 to 73% of all dependence-related problems reported, depending on Hispanic national group. Binge drinkers are responsible for the majority of the social problems (53 to 75%) and dependence-related problems (59 to 73%), also depending on Hispanic national group. Binge drinkers at the bottom 90% of the distribution are responsible for a larger proportion of all social and dependence-related problems reported than those at the top 10% of the volume distribution. Cuban Americans are an exception. The prevention paradox holds when using volume-based risk groupings and disappears when using a binge-drinking risk grouping. Binge drinkers who drink moderately on an average account for more harms than those who drink heavily across all groups, with exception of Cuban Americans. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on

  7. From Sea to Shining Sea and the Great Plains to Patagonia: A Review on Current Knowledge of Diabetes Mellitus in Hispanics/Latinos in the US and Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Larissa Avilés-Santa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have witnessed many advances in the prevention, treatment, and control of diabetes mellitus (DM and its complications. Increased screening has led to a greater recognition of type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM and prediabetes; however, Hispanics/Latinos, the largest minority group in the US, have not fully benefited from these advances. The Hispanic/Latino population is highly diverse in ancestries, birth places, cultures, languages, and socioeconomic backgrounds, and it populates most of the Western Hemisphere. In the US, the prevalence of DM varies among Hispanic/Latino heritage groups, being higher among Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Dominicans, and lower among South Americans. The risk and prevalence of diabetes among Hispanics/Latinos are significantly higher than in non-Hispanic Whites, and nearly 40% of Hispanics/Latinos with diabetes have not been formally diagnosed. Despite these striking facts, the representation of Hispanics/Latinos in pharmacological and non-pharmacological clinical trials has been suboptimal, while the prevalence of diabetes in these populations continues to rise. This review will focus on the epidemiology, etiology and prevention of type 2 DM in populations of Latin American origin. We will set the stage by defining the terms Hispanic, Latino, and Latin American, explaining the challenges identifying Hispanics/Latinos in the scientific literature and databases, describing the epidemiology of diabetes—including type 2 DM and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM—and cardiovascular risk factors in Hispanics/Latinos in the US and Latin America, and discussing trends, and commonalities and differences across studies and populations, including methodology to ascertain diabetes. We will discuss studies on mechanisms of disease, and research on prevention of type 2 DM in Hispanics/Latinos, including women with GDM, youth and adults; and finalize with a discussion on lessons learned and opportunities

  8. Promoting Multivitamins to Hispanic Adolescents and Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mackert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs can be reduced by 50% to 70% with sufficient periconceptional intake of folic acid. Hispanic women are up to 3 times more likely than non-Hispanics to have a child affected by NTDs. This disparity is complicated by health literacy, as women impacted by this disparity are also at-risk for low health literacy. The purpose of this project was to pilot advertisements to promote multivitamins, increasing folic acid consumption, among Hispanic adolescents. The advertisements for Hispanic adolescents and their mothers focused on broad benefits of a multivitamin, downplaying folic acid’s role in prenatal health. Participants were Hispanic mothers (n = 25 and adolescents (n = 25 at a clinic in the Southwestern United States. Likert-type survey items and an open-ended question were used to assess attitudes toward multivitamins and advertisements. The Newest Vital Sign (NVS was used to assess participants’ health literacy. Participants’ impressions of the ads were positive. Both groups expressed the intent to start taking a daily multivitamin after viewing the ads—adolescents for themselves and mothers to start their daughters on a daily multivitamin. There was no relationship between participants’ health literacy and perceptions of the advertisements or intentions to begin a multivitamin habit. This research illustrates the potential of messages that rely on peripheral health benefits to overcome communication barriers posed by health literacy and address serious health problems such as NTDs.

  9. The Hispanic paradox in twin pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B; Misiunas, Ruta B; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor H; Nugent, Clark; van de Ven, Cosmas; Witter, Frank R; Newman, Roger B; D'Alton, Mary; Hankins, Gary D V; Grainger, David A; Macones, George A

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare length of gestation, fetal growth, and birthweight by race/ethnicity and pregravid weight groups in twin pregnancies. Three thousand and thirty-six twin pregnancies of 28 weeks or more gestation were divided by race/ethnicity (White, Black and Hispanic), and pregravid body mass index (BMI) groups (less than 25.0 vs. 25.0 or more). Outcomes were modeled using multiple regression, controlling for confounders, with White non-Hispanic women as the reference group. Hispanic women had the highest average birthweight and the longest gestation, as well as the lowest proportions of low birthweight, very low birthweight, preterm and early preterm births of the 3 race/ethnicity groups. In the multivariate analyses, Hispanic women had significantly longer gestations (by 7.8 days) and faster rates of fetal growth midgestation (20 to 28 weeks, by 17.4 g/week) and late gestation (after 28 weeks, by 5.3 g/week), whereas Black women had significantly slower rates of fetal growth (by 5.7 g/week and by 4.5 g/week, respectively). These findings in twins reflect the racial and ethnic disparities previously shown in singletons, including the Hispanic paradox of longer gestations and higher rates of fetal growth.

  10. Examining the impact of acculturative stress on body image disturbance among Hispanic college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Chloe V; Harter, Stephanie L

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the impact of acculturative stress on psychological well-being and body image disturbance in a sample of female and male Hispanic individuals. The unique protective effects of differing social support sources, including family and peer support, were examined against acculturative stress and body image disturbance. A total of 399 participants of Hispanic origin were recruited from Texas Tech University in West Texas. Students completed a battery of measures of acculturative stress and internalization of the thin ideal, as well as perceived social support. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that acculturative stress is a significant positive predictor of body image disturbance among Hispanic college students. Thin ideal internalization was found to mediate this relationship such that acculturative stress was associated with heightened body image disturbance through its impact on thin ideal internalization. Social support significantly reduced acculturative stress as well as body image disturbance but did not moderate the relation between these 2 factors. Results highlight the importance of considering acculturative stress as a strong predictor of body image disturbance among college students of Hispanic origin. The mechanisms of influence of acculturative stress on body image disturbance are discussed in relation to thin ideal internalization. The protective role of social support on these negative psychological outcomes is also clarified. This study is the first to examine these issues in a sample of female and male Hispanic college students and provides avenues for clinical interventions and future trials with diverse populations.

  11. Religion, acculturation, and incarceration: determinants of substance use among Hispanic adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Benjamin J; Becerra, Monideepa B; Gerdine, Miryam C; Banta, Jim E

    2014-01-01

    The influence of religion, acculturation, and incarceration on substance abuse has been studied, though predominantly among adolescents. Little research exists on how such factors influence substance use among Hispanic adults. The objective of this study was to assess key determinants of substance use among Hispanic adults. Public access 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health was utilized. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted while accounting for complex survey design to obtain population-weighted estimates. Receiver operator curve analysis was used to evaluate the relative contribution of each variable. Importance of religious influence in life and Spanish language interview were associated with lower odds of substance use, while history of incarceration increased the likelihood of substance use among Hispanic adults. Other factors associated with lower odds were increasing age, being female, and currently married. Other factors associated with increased odds were high school graduate and some college in addition to living above the 200% federal poverty level. Results from this study add to the limited body of the literature on determinants of substance use among Hispanic adults. Health education measures should target acculturated Hispanic adults and those with incarceration history to reduce substance use.

  12. A case of probable non-familial early onset Alzheimer dementia in a Hispanic male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephrussi, Corey; Alweis, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Early onset Alzheimer's type dementia (EOAD) is usually familial and associated with mutations in the Presenilin-1 (PSEN1), Presenilin-2 (PSEN2) or amyloid precursor protein (APP) genes. It is rarely reported in patients of Hispanic descent. A 49-year-old Hispanic male developed significant cognitive impairment over a 4-year period. PET scan showed diminished metabolic activity in the posterior parietal/temporal lobes. Genetic testing revealed the presence of a PSEN1 gene mutation. Disparities in health care may account for an under-recognition of EOAD in the Hispanic population. Clinicians should test for EOAD in all patients with appropriate symptomatology, regardless of ethnicity. Early recognition and enrollment in clinical trials is vital to enhancing our understanding of the natural history and treatment of this condition.

  13. Health outcomes for older Hispanics with HIV in New York City using the Oaxaca Decomposition Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Cruz, Juan J; Karpiak, Stephen E; Brennan-Ing, Mark

    2014-08-22

    Although HIV and aging are two well-established medical and economic domains, their intersection represents an emerging area of study. Older adults with HIV, who sill comprise 50% of the US HIV-infected population by 2015, are disadvantaged as evidenced by disproportionately poorer health outcomes. The Oaxaca Decomposition Approach (ODA) was used to analyze data from the Research on Older Adults with HIV (ROAH) Study of 1,000 older adults with HIV in New York City (NYC). This paper establishes the sources of health disparities for Hispanics with HIV compared to a match group of Non-Hispanics with HIV. The ODA analyses shows that Hispanics on average have higher levels of declining health and increased depression attributable to the discrimination factor.

  14. Exploratory factor analysis of borderline personality disorder criteria in monolingual Hispanic outpatients with substance use disorders†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel F.; Añez, Luis Miguel; Paris, Manuel; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the DSM-IV criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD) in Hispanic patients. Subjects were 130 monolingual Hispanic adults who had been admitted to a specialty outpatient clinic that provides psychiatric and substance abuse services to Spanish-speaking individuals. All were reliably assessed with the Spanish-Language Version of the Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders. After evaluating internal consistency of the BPD criterion set, an exploratory factor analysis was performed using principal axis factoring. Results suggested a unidimensional structure, and were consistent with similar studies of the DSM-IV criteria for BPD in non-Hispanic samples. These findings have implications for understanding borderline psychopathology in this population, and for the overall validity of the DSM-IV BPD construct. PMID:20472296

  15. A case of probable non-familial early onset Alzheimer dementia in a Hispanic male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Ephrussi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early onset Alzheimer's type dementia (EOAD is usually familial and associated with mutations in the Presenilin-1 (PSEN1, Presenilin-2 (PSEN2 or amyloid precursor protein (APP genes. It is rarely reported in patients of Hispanic descent. Case report: A 49-year-old Hispanic male developed significant cognitive impairment over a 4-year period. PET scan showed diminished metabolic activity in the posterior parietal/temporal lobes. Genetic testing revealed the presence of a PSEN1 gene mutation. Conclusion: Disparities in health care may account for an under-recognition of EOAD in the Hispanic population. Clinicians should test for EOAD in all patients with appropriate symptomatology, regardless of ethnicity. Early recognition and enrollment in clinical trials is vital to enhancing our understanding of the natural history and treatment of this condition.

  16. Familism and Social Inclusion: Hispanics in New London, Connecticut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Amparo Cruz-Saco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the financial support and inclusiveness within Hispanic families in New London, Connecticut, and the causes of their social exclusion in the larger society. We designed and administered a survey of 114 items that was answered by 148 participants representing 1.3% of the non-Puerto Rican Hispanic population. Using factor analysis, we reduced a large number of items in two familism scores to four latent factors: "Financial Support for Family", "Obligation to Family", "Plan to Return", and "Filial Responsibility". We found that financial support for family and obligation to family are strongly endorsed by participants. Approximately one-half would return back to their home countries where they believe to be happier. One-fifth rejects this option. Three-quarters of participants remit money to family, parents in particular, who reside in countries of origin. In contrast to other studies, remitting money is not affected by any given personal characteristic such as gender, income or level of education. Similarly, participants remit irrespective of their degree of self-reported familism measured by scores on the latent factors. A large incidence of poverty among this population, lack of English proficiency, low skills, immigration status, and a lack of voice and political representation inhibit their social inclusion.

  17. Metropolitan-level ethnic residential segregation, racial identity, and body mass index among U.S. Hispanic adults: a multilevel cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Kiarri N; Albrecht, Sandra S

    2014-03-27

    The few studies that have examined whether metropolitan-level ethnic residential segregation is associated with obesity among Hispanics are mixed. The segmented assimilation theory, which suggests patterns of integration for immigrant groups varies by social factors, may provide an explanation for these mixed findings. In this study we examined whether one social factor, racial identity, modified the association between ethnic residential segregation and body mass index (BMI) among Hispanics. We used data on 22,901 male and 37,335 non-pregnant female Hispanic adult participants of the 2003-2008 U.S. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System living in 227 metropolitan or micropolitan areas (MMSAs). Participants self-identified as White, Black, and 'some other race'. BMI was calculated using self-reported height and weight; the Hispanic isolation index was used to measure Hispanic residential segregation. Using multi-level linear regression models, we examined the association of Hispanic residential segregation with BMI, and we investigated whether this relationship varied by race. Among men, Hispanic segregation was unassociated with BMI after adjusting for age, race, MMSA-level poverty, and MMSA-level population size; there was no variation in this relationship by race. Among women, significant associations between Hispanic segregation and BMI in models adjusted for demographics and MMSA-level confounders became attenuated with further adjustment for education and language of exam. However, there was statistically significant variation by race (Pinteraction = 0.03 and 0.09 for Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics who identified as some other race, respectively, vs. Hispanic Whites). Specifically, higher segregation was associated with higher mean BMI among Hispanic Whites, but it was associated with lower mean BMI among Hispanic Blacks. Segregation was unassociated with BMI among Hispanic women identifying as some other race. This heterogeneity highlights the

  18. Rapid HIV-1 testing during labor: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulterys, Marc; Jamieson, Denise J; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Cohen, Mardge H; Maupin, Robert; Nesheim, Steven; Webber, Mayris P; Van Dyke, Russell; Wiener, Jeffrey; Branson, Bernard M

    2004-07-14

    Timely testing of women in labor with undocumented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status could enable immediate provision of antiretroviral prophylaxis. To determine the feasibility and acceptance of rapid HIV testing among women in labor and to assess rapid HIV assay performance. The Mother-Infant Rapid Intervention At Delivery (MIRIAD) study implemented 24-hour counseling and voluntary rapid HIV testing for women in labor at 16 US hospitals from November 16, 2001, through November 15, 2003. A rapid HIV-1 antibody test for whole blood was used. Acceptance of HIV testing; sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the rapid test; time from blood collection to patient notification of results. There were 91,707 visits to the labor and delivery units in the study, 7381 of which were by eligible women without documentation of HIV testing. Of these, 5744 (78%) women were approached for rapid HIV testing and 4849 (84%) consented. HIV-1 test results were positive for 34 women (prevalence = 7/1000). Sensitivity and specificity of the rapid test were 100% and 99.9%, respectively; positive predictive value was 90% compared with 76% for enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Factors independently associated with higher test acceptance included younger age, being black or Hispanic, gestational age less than 32 weeks, and having had no prenatal care. Lower acceptance was associated with being admitted between 4 pm and midnight, particularly on Friday nights, but this may be explained in part by fewer available personnel. Median time from blood collection to patient notification of result was 66 minutes (interquartile range, 45-120 minutes), compared with 28 hours for EIA (PHIV testing is feasible and delivers accurate and timely test results for women in labor. It provides HIV-positive women prompt access to intrapartum and neonatal antiretroviral prophylaxis, proven to reduce perinatal HIV transmission, and may be particularly applicable to higher-risk populations.

  19. The Validity of Race and Hispanic-origin Reporting on Death Certificates in the United States: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Elizabeth; Heron, Melonie; Hakes, Jahn

    2016-08-01

    Objectives This report presents the findings of an updated study of the validity of race and Hispanic-origin reporting on death certificates in the United States, and its impact on race- and Hispanic origin-specific death rates. Methods The latest version of the National Longitudinal Mortality Study (NLMS) was used to evaluate the classification of race and Hispanic origin on death certificates for deaths occurring in 1999–2011 to decedents in NLMS. To evaluate change over time, these results were compared with those of a study based on an earlier version of NLMS that evaluated the quality of race and ethnicity classification on death certificates for 1979–1989 and 1990–1998. NLMS consists of a series of annual Current Population Survey files (1973 and 1978–2011) and a sample of the 1980 decennial census linked to death certificates for 1979–2011. Pooled 2009–2011 vital statistics mortality data and 2010 decennial census population data were used to estimate and compare observed and corrected race- and Hispanic origin-specific death rates. Results Race and ethnicity reporting on death certificates continued to be highly accurate for both white and black populations during the 1999–2011 period. Misclassification remained high at 40% for the American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) population. It improved, from 5% to 3%, for the Hispanic population, and from 7% to 3% for the Asian or Pacific Islander (API) population. Decedent characteristics such as place of residence and nativity affected the quality of reporting on the death certificate. Effects of misclassification on death rates were large for the AIAN population but not significant for the Hispanic or API populations.

  20. Rapid and accurate species and genomic species identification and exhaustive population diversity assessment of Agrobacterium spp. using recA-based PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, M; Vial, L; Chapulliot, D; Nesme, X; Lavire, C

    2013-07-01

    Agrobacteria are common soil bacteria that interact with plants as commensals, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria or alternatively as pathogens. Indigenous agrobacterial populations are composites, generally with several species and/or genomic species and several strains per species. We thus developed a recA-based PCR approach to accurately identify and specifically detect agrobacteria at various taxonomic levels. Specific primers were designed for all species and/or genomic species of Agrobacterium presently known, including 11 genomic species of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens complex (G1-G9, G13 and G14, among which only G2, G4, G8 and G14 still received a Latin epithet: pusense, radiobacter, fabrum and nepotum, respectively), A. larrymoorei, A. rubi, R. skierniewicense, A. sp. 1650, and A. vitis, and for the close relative Allorhizobium undicola. Specific primers were also designed for superior taxa, Agrobacterium spp. and Rhizobiaceace. Primer specificities were assessed with target and non-target pure culture DNAs as well as with DNAs extracted from composite agrobacterial communities. In addition, we showed that the amplicon cloning-sequencing approach used with Agrobacterium-specific or Rhizobiaceae-specific primers is a way to assess the agrobacterial diversity of an indigenous agrobacterial population. Hence, the agrobacterium-specific primers designed in the present study enabled the first accurate and rapid identification of all species and/or genomic species of Agrobacterium, as well as their direct detection in environmental samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiplex Minisequencing of the HBB Gene: A Rapid Strategy to Confirm the Most Frequent β-Thalassemia Mutations in the Tunisian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Charfeddine, Ilhem; Ben Lazreg, Taheni; M'sakni, Ahlem; Amara, Abdelbasset; Mlika, Adnène; Chaïeb, Anouar; Hlel, Khalid; Zouari, Noura; Zbidi, Faïza; Bouguila, Jihène; Soyah, Najla; Ayedi, Abdelkarim; Ben Hamouda, Hechmi; Abroug, Saoussen; Boughamoura, Lamia; Saad, Ali; Gribaa, Moez

    2015-01-01

    The β hemoglobinopathies [β-thalassemia (β-thal) and structural hemoglobin (Hb) variants such as Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) and Hb E (HBB: c.79G > A)] are among the most common inherited diseases worldwide. In Tunisia, due to the high prevalence of consanguineous marriages, the recurrent risk of this disease is high. The average prevalence of hemoglobinopathies is 4.48%, reaching 12.50% in some focus regions. The molecular investigations on thalassemia contributed to establishing the spectrum of mutations in the Tunisian population. The total number of HBB gene mutations identified was 24. The two most frequent mutations, codon 39 (C > T) (HBB: c.118C > T) and IVS-I-110 (G > A) (HBB: c.93-21G > A) accounted for 70.0% of the total encountered β-thal cases. These two mutations together with IVS-I-2 (T > G) (HBB: c.92 + 2T > G) and the Hb S variant account for more than 90.0% of all HBB genetic variants in Tunisia. Thus, developing rapid, inexpensive and reliable mutation-specific molecular diagnostic assays targeting our Tunisian populations is our aim to facilitate routine detection of hemoglobinopathies. In this report, we describe the successful application of the multiplex minisequencing assay as an alternative strategy for genetic diagnosis of HBB gene disorders in Tunisia.

  2. 77 FR 55233 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Scheduling... matters involving the recruitment, hiring, and advancement of Hispanics in the Federal workforce. The...

  3. 77 FR 71200 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Scheduling... matters involving the recruitment, hiring, and advancement of Hispanics in the Federal workforce. The...

  4. Science Is "Ciencia": Meeting the Needs of Hispanic American Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.; Bermudez, Andrea B.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews some of the factors known to influence the achievement and retention of Hispanic Americans in technologically related fields. Discusses directions in which research should focus to meet the needs of Hispanic-American students. (PR)

  5. CDC Vital Signs-Hispanic Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-05-05

    This podcast is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  6. Factors Affecting the Performance of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Marine Corps Enlistees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    BMI greater than or equal to 25 and less than 30 is considered "Ove1weight." An adult with a BMI greater than 30 is considered " Obese " (Center for...background. Compared to whites, Hispanics from Mexico are 17.1 ppts (53.8%) less likely to attrite within the first 45 months. The smallest effect occurs...largest effect occurs among Hispanics from Mexico . In the Army and the Navy, the largest effect occurs among Hispanics from Latin America. In the

  7. An ultra-high density bin-map for rapid QTL mapping for tassel and ear architecture in a large F₂ maize population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zongliang; Wang, Baobao; Dong, Xiaomei; Liu, Han; Ren, Longhui; Chen, Jian; Hauck, Andrew; Song, Weibin; Lai, Jinsheng

    2014-06-04

    Understanding genetic control of tassel and ear architecture in maize (Zea mays L. ssp. mays) is important due to their relationship with grain yield. High resolution QTL mapping is critical for understanding the underlying molecular basis of phenotypic variation. Advanced populations, such as recombinant inbred lines, have been broadly adopted for QTL mapping; however, construction of large advanced generation crop populations is time-consuming and costly. The rapidly declining cost of genotyping due to recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies has generated new possibilities for QTL mapping using large early generation populations. A set of 708 F2 progeny derived from inbreds Chang7-2 and 787 were generated and genotyped by whole genome low-coverage genotyping-by-sequencing method (average 0.04×). A genetic map containing 6,533 bin-markers was constructed based on the parental SNPs and a sliding-window method, spanning a total genetic distance of 1,396 cM. The high quality and accuracy of this map was validated by the identification of two well-studied genes, r1, a qualitative trait locus for color of silk (chromosome 10) and ba1 for tassel branch number (chromosome 3). Three traits of tassel and ear architecture were evaluated in this population, a total of 10 QTL were detected using a permutation-based-significance threshold, seven of which overlapped with reported QTL. Three genes (GRMZM2G316366, GRMZM2G492156 and GRMZM5G805008) encoding MADS-box domain proteins and a BTB/POZ domain protein were located in the small intervals of qTBN5 and qTBN7 (~800 Kb and 1.6 Mb in length, respectively) and may be involved in patterning of tassel architecture. The small physical intervals of most QTL indicate high-resolution mapping is obtainable with this method. We constructed an ultra-high-dentisy linkage map for the large early generation population in maize. Our study provides an efficient approach for fast detection of quantitative loci responsible

  8. Hispanics and the Military: A Reference Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    the primary minority language groups, intergenerational anglicization, language patterns of American adolescents , and correlations between language...Hispanics . as a group and as subgroups, and to determine the degree to which Hispanics in general may influence policy within American society or within...on whether or not there may be unique features of the general Hispanic culture and/or personality which, among other things, may influence Hispanic

  9. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in US Hispanic/Latino Adults: Results From the NHANES 2007–2010 and HCHS/SOL Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniholm, Mark H.; Jung, Molly; Everhart, James E.; Cotler, Scott; Heiss, Gerardo; McQuillan, Geraldine; Kim, Ryung S.; Strickler, Howard D.; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Youngblood, Marston; Kaplan, Robert C.; Ho, Gloria Y. F.

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody has been reported in Mexican Americans, but its prevalence in other US Hispanic/Latino groups is unknown. We studied 2 populations of US Hispanic/Latino adults; 3210 from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2010 and 11 964 from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Age-standardized prevalence of HCV antibody was similar in NHANES 2007–2010 (1.5%) and HCHS/SOL (2.0%) but differed significantly by Hispanic/Latino background in HCHS/SOL (eg, 11.6% in Puerto Rican men vs 0.4% in South American men). These findings suggest that the HCV epidemic among US Hispanics/Latinos is heterogeneous. PMID:24423693

  10. Predictors of Participation in Mammography Screening among non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic White, and Hispanic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Melvin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many factors influence women’s decisions to participate in guideline recommended screening mammography. We evaluated the influence of women’s socioeconomic characteristics, healthcare access, and cultural and psychological healthcare preferences on timely mammography screening participation.Materials and methods: A random digit dial survey of United States non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic White, and Hispanic women ages 40-75, from January-August 2009 determined self- reported time of most recent mammogram. Screening rates were assessed based on receipt of a screening mammogram within the prior 12 months, the interval recommended at the time by the American Cancer Society.Results: Thirty-nine percent of women reported not having a mammogram within the last 12 months. The odds of not having had a screening mammography was higher for non-Hispanic White women than for non-Hispanic Black (OR=2.16, 95% CI=0.26, 0.82, p=0.009 or Hispanic (OR=4.17, 95% CI=0.12, 0.48, p=0.01 women. Lack of health insurance (OR=3.22, 95% CI=1.54, 6.73, p=0.002 and lack of usual source of medical care (OR=3.37, 95% CI=1.43, 7.94, p=0.01 were associated with not being screened as were lower self-efficacy to obtain screening (OR=2.43, 95% CI=1.26, 4.73, p=0.01 and greater levels of religiosity and spirituality (OR=1.42, 95% CI=1.00, 2.00, p=0.05. Neither perceived risk nor present temporal orientation was significant.Discussion: Odds of not having a mammogram increased if women were uninsured, without medical care, non-Hispanic white, older in age, not confident in their ability to obtain screening, or held passive or external religious/spiritual values. Results are encouraging given racial disparities in healthcare participation and suggest that efforts to increase screening among minority women may be working.

  11. Sociocultural Contexts of Time to First Sex among Hispanic Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Dawn M.; Aneshensel, Carol S.; Mudgal, Jyoti; McNeely, Clea Sucoff

    2001-01-01

    Examines the sociocultural influences on risk of first sex among Hispanic teens living in Los Angeles County. Hispanic teens living in low-density Hispanic neighborhoods have significantly higher risk of sex than do teens living in neighborhoods with higher levels of ambient hazards. Results highlight the importance of characterizing sociocultural…

  12. An Overview of Citizenship in the Hispanic Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachon, Harry

    1987-01-01

    This study investigates political and social consequences of non-citizenship in the U.S. Hispanic community. Currently one-third of Hispanic adults are legally unable to vote. Although Hispanics may become the largest United States minority group by the year 2010, non-citizenship will impede their political empowerment. Naturalization must be…

  13. Recent Alcohol Use and Episodic Heavy Drinking among Hispanic Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A sizeable percentage of Hispanic youth are affected by alcohol use. Research is needed to identify specific factors placing Hispanic youth at elevated risk. Purpose: This study examined whether recent alcohol use (past 30 days) and frequent episodic heavy drinking among 7th - 12th grade Hispanic students (N = 946) in Greater…

  14. Alternative Definitions of Hispanics: Consequences in a Alcohol Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul

    1986-01-01

    Examines impact of different definitions of Hispanic ethnicity on sociodemographic characteristics, drinking patterns, and rate of alcohol problems among 1,453 Hispanic-American respondents. Defines Hispanic ethnicity by ethnicity of family of origin, national group, country most ancestors came from, and birthplace. Finds major differences between…

  15. Improving the Mental Health, Healthy Lifestyle Choices, and Physical Health of Hispanic Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette M.; Jacobson, Diana; Kelly, Stephanie; O'Haver, Judith; Small, Leigh; Mays, Mary Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Obesity and mental health disorders are 2 major public health problems in American adolescents, with prevalence even higher in Hispanic teens. Despite the rapidly increasing incidence and adverse health outcomes associated with overweight and mental health problems, very few intervention studies have been conducted with adolescents to…

  16. Hispanic women overcoming deterrents to computer science: A phenomenological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Lourdes

    The products of computer science are important to all aspects of society and are tools in the solution of the world's problems. It is, therefore, troubling that the United States faces a shortage in qualified graduates in computer science. The number of women and minorities in computer science is significantly lower than the percentage of the U.S. population which they represent. The overall enrollment in computer science programs has continued to decline with the enrollment of women declining at a higher rate than that of men. This study addressed three aspects of underrepresentation about which there has been little previous research: addressing computing disciplines specifically rather than embedding them within the STEM disciplines, what attracts women and minorities to computer science, and addressing the issues of race/ethnicity and gender in conjunction rather than in isolation. Since women of underrepresented ethnicities are more severely underrepresented than women in general, it is important to consider whether race and ethnicity play a role in addition to gender as has been suggested by previous research. Therefore, this study examined what attracted Hispanic women to computer science specifically. The study determines whether being subjected to multiple marginalizations---female and Hispanic---played a role in the experiences of Hispanic women currently in computer science. The study found five emergent themes within the experiences of Hispanic women in computer science. Encouragement and role models strongly influenced not only the participants' choice to major in the field, but to persist as well. Most of the participants experienced a negative atmosphere and feelings of not fitting in while in college and industry. The interdisciplinary nature of computer science was the most common aspect that attracted the participants to computer science. The aptitudes participants commonly believed are needed for success in computer science are the Twenty

  17. Cross-cultural study of idioms of distress among Spanish nationals and Hispanic American migrants: susto, nervios and ataque de nervios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durà-Vilà, Glòria; Hodes, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Susto (fright), nervios (nerves) and ataque de nervios (attack of nerves) are idioms of distress widely experienced amongst Hispanic Americans, often associated with psychiatric disorders. This study explores understanding of these idioms of distress and attitudes to help seeking amongst indigenous Spanish and Hispanic American residents in Spain. A population survey was undertaken in four adult education centres in Spain. Hypothetical case vignettes of individuals suffering from the idioms of distress were used to investigate understanding and help seeking by a Spanish sample compared with Hispanic American migrants to Spain. 350 questionnaires were obtained (94.6% response rate). The idioms ataque de nervios and nervios were recognised by the majority of the Spanish group but by significantly more of the Hispanic American migrants. However, susto was infrequently recognised by the Spanish group but it was recognised by half of the Hispanic Americans. Hispanic Americans were also more likely to recommend consultation with a psychiatrist/psychologist than Spanish respondents for ataque de nervios and nervios. The Spanish group were more likely to recommend non-medical sources of support such as relatives and priest than Hispanic Americans. Hispanic Americans, more recently arrived, did not show greater recognition of the three idioms than those who have been in Spain longer. Regression analysis showed that being Hispanic American and having lower educational attainment was associated with greater use of susto. The study suggests that people hold multiple models of distress and disorder. This may influence clinical presentations and help seeking behaviour in Spanish as well as Hispanic American populations.

  18. The relationship between obesity, hyperglycemia symptoms, and health-related quality of life among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Rohrer James E; Arif Ahmed A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The current study was conducted to evaluate the effects of overweight, hyperglycemia symptoms, Hispanic ethnicity, and language barriers on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among children and adolescents. Methods Parents'/guardians of a population based sample of 5530 children between ages 3 and 18 were administered the parents' version of the KINDL® survey instrument to assess HRQoL in children and adolescents. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess ...

  19. Hispanic Mothers' Perceptions of Self-Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogren, Karrie

    2012-01-01

    Limited research has explored the perceptions of self-determination held by diverse families. In this study, seven mothers of transition-age youth with severe disabilities who were Hispanic were interviewed. Each mother was actively engaged in advocacy related to diverse children with disabilities in their local schools and communities. Mothers…

  20. Predictors of College Adjustment among Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazedjian, Ani; Toews, Michelle L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess personal and interpersonal predictors of college adjustment among a sample of 190 first-year Hispanic students. Specifically, we examined the extent to which personal factors such as self-esteem, acculturation, and ethnic identity and interpersonal factors such as parental education and parental attachment…

  1. Media and Sex: Perspectives from Hispanic Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston Polacek, Georgia N. L.; Rojas, Viviana; Levitt, Steven; Mika, Virginia Seguin

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about Hispanic teens' sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors and their relationship to media influences. Information about this relationship could contribute to an understanding of the early onset of sexual behavior and early teen pregnancy. This paper reports preliminary findings from a pilot project conducted to determine…

  2. A Language Challenge to the Hispanic American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nino, Miguel A.

    The Hispanic-American, because he or she is bilingual and bicultural, could play an important role in the future economic development of the United States. Declines in steel, automotive, and electronics industries due to foreign competition and market saturation have caused industrial displacement and unemployment. The Maquiladora or Twin Plant…

  3. Teatro! Hispanic Plays for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Angel

    This collection of 14 folk drama scripts is drawn from the Hispanic culture and traditions of the American Southwest and designed for use in educational settings. The plays are short, simple, and easy to produce. A single play can fill a class period, while several plays grouped together would make a school assembly. Six plays, intended for grades…

  4. Hispanic Parents' Perceptions of Children's Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young Suk; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    This study examined 32 Hispanic parents' perceptions of education, especially, (a) parent's motivation for their children's career choice, (b) their perceptions of education, and (c) informal means of education at home. The data were collected using openended questions and were analyzed using content analysis. Findings in this study provide…

  5. Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes in U.S. Breast Cancer Mortality: Impact of Neighborhood Poverty and Hispanic Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Sandi L; Tiro, Jasmin A; Xuan, Lei; Lee, Simon J Craddock

    2016-12-14

    To test the Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes-i.e., survival advantages despite a worse risk factor profile-and the modifying role of neighborhood context, we examined associations between patient ethnicity, birthplace, neighborhood Hispanic density and neighborhood poverty among 166,254 female breast cancer patients diagnosed 1995-2009 in Texas, U.S. Of all, 79.9% were non-Hispanic White, 15.8% Hispanic U.S.-born, and 4.2% Hispanic foreign-born. We imputed birthplace for the 60.7% of Hispanics missing birthplace data using multiple imputation. Shared frailty Cox proportional hazard models (patients nested within census tracts) adjusted for age, diagnosis year, stage, grade, histology, urban/rural residence, and local mammography capacity. Whites (vs. U.S.-born Hispanics) had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Foreign-born (vs. U.S.-born) Hispanics had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Living in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods was generally associated with increased mortality, although associations differed slightly in magnitude and significance by ethnicity, birthplace, and neighborhood poverty. We found no evidence of an Immigrant Paradox and some evidence of a Hispanic Paradox where protective effects were limited to U.S.-born Hispanics. Contrary to prior studies, foreign birthplace and residence in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods were associated with increased mortality. More research on intersections between ethnicity, birthplace and neighborhood context are needed.

  6. Binge-Drinking Attitudes and Behaviors among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic College Students: Suggestions for Tailoring Health Campaign Messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Julie Delaney; Archiopoli, Ashley M.; Bentley, Joshua M.; Weiss, David; Hoffmann, Jeffrey; White, Judith McIntosh; Sharp, Mercedes Kelsey; Hong, Zhibin; Kimura, Miwa

    2016-01-01

    This study explores binge-drinking behaviors and attitudes among Hispanic and non-Hispanic college students. The authors surveyed students at the same large Hispanic-serving university used in a 1999 study by Bennett et al., partially replicating that earlier research. While the percentage of students who reported binge drinking in the present…

  7. Inflammation, Obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome. Implications in Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcial, José; Altieri, Pablo I; Banchs, Héctor L

    2016-01-01

    We report clinical and molecular mechanisms relating the process of inflammation involved in the progression of obesity and the metabolic syndrome, emphasizing the cardiovascular problems developed in Hispanic populations. Namely, the incidence, component characteristics and complications of obesity and metabolic syndrome in island Puerto Ricans are described and evidence is presented supporting the fact that the metabolic syndrome may be milder in Puerto Rico than in the mainland United States because it is characterized by less aggressive coronary artery disease and a relatively normal lipid profile. Moreover, data supports the fact that increased serum cholesterol levels produce less myocardial infarctions in Puerto Rico than in mainland Hispanics and Caucasians. In addition, the incidence of ventricular tachycardia, a complication caused by remodeling and ischemia of the heart, may be lower in Puerto Rico than in the United States, although the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is higher in the island. On the other hand, there is evidence of a rising epidemic of obesity and vascular inflammation in Puerto Rico that suggests that cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the island will continue to increase in the future decades.

  8. Non-hispanic whites have higher risk for pulmonary impairment from pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasipanodya Jotam G

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disparities in outcomes associated with race and ethnicity are well documented for many diseases and patient populations. Tuberculosis (TB disproportionately affects economically disadvantaged, racial and ethnic minority populations. Pulmonary impairment after tuberculosis (PIAT contributes heavily to the societal burden of TB. Individual impacts associated with PIAT may vary by race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status. Methods We analyzed the pulmonary function of 320 prospectively identified patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who had completed at least 20 weeks standard anti-TB regimes by directly observed therapy. We compared frequency and severity of spirometry-defined PIAT in groups stratified by demographics, pulmonary risk factors, and race/ethnicity, and examined clinical correlates to pulmonary function deficits. Results Pulmonary impairment after tuberculosis was identified in 71% of non-Hispanic Whites, 58% of non-Hispanic Blacks, 49% of Asians and 32% of Hispanics (p p p = 0.978. Conclusions Despite controlling for cigarette smoking, socioeconomic status and time to beginning TB treatment, non-Hispanic White race/ethnicity remained an independent predictor for disproportionately frequent and severe pulmonary impairment after tuberculosis relative to other race/ethnic groups. Since race/ethnicity was self reported and that race is not a biological construct: these findings must be interpreted with caution. However, because race/ethnicity is a proxy for several other unmeasured host, pathogen or environment factors that may contribute to disparate health outcomes, these results are meant to suggest hypotheses for further research.

  9. How high is Hispanic/Mexican fertility in the united states? Immigration and tempo considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, Emilio A

    2011-08-01

    In this article, I demonstrate that the apparently much higher fertility of Hispanic/Mexican women in the United States is almost exclusively the product of period estimates obtained for immigrant women and that period measures of immigrant fertility suffer from three serious sources of bias that together significantly overstate fertility levels: difficulties in estimating the size of immigrant groups; the tendency for migration to occur at a particular stage in life; and, most importantly, the tendency for women to have a birth soon after migration. When these sources of bias are taken into consideration, the fertility of native Hispanic/Mexican women is very close to replacement level. In addition, the completed fertility of immigrant women in the United States is dramatically lower than the level obtained from period calculations. Findings are consistent with classical theories of immigrant assimilation but are a striking departure from the patterns found in previous studies and published statistics. The main implication is that without a significant change in immigration levels, current projections based on the premise of high Hispanic fertility are likely to considerably exaggerate Hispanic population growth, its impact on the ethno-racial profile of the country, and its potential to counteract population aging.

  10. Development of a plan for improved recruitment and retention of Hispanic practical nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Carol

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, Hispanic Americans represented 14% of the US population, but only 5.8% of licensed practical nurses (US Dept. of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2007). The lack of diversity in the nursing workforce results in disparities in healthcare delivery. Nursing educators are challenged to develop strategies to recruit and retain a more diverse student population. This article focuses on the development of a plan to improve recruitment and retention of Hispanic practical nursing students at an urban community college in Northern New Jersey. The first step of the project was to complete a needs assessment to understand the disproportionately low numbers of Hispanic students enrolled in the practical nursing program as compared with other majors. Phase two of the project was to identify best practices nationally that have proven to be successful in recruiting and retaining Hispanic students. Data obtained from phases one and two were used in phase three of the project to develop specific recruitment and retention strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Epidemiology of NAFLD and Type 2 Diabetes: Health Disparities Among Persons of Hispanic Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Mariana; Bilal, Usama; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver condition in the USA and worldwide and affects Hispanics disproportionally. In this review, we aim to document and contrast the epidemiology of NAFLD and type 2 diabetes, provide a framework to study health disparities in NAFLD in Hispanic populations, and identify points of action within the health care system to tackle these health disparities. NAFLD shares many common risk factors with type 2 diabetes, specially obesity and insulin resistance, but shows different prevalence patterns by ethnicity: while Hispanics are disproportionately affected by both NAFLD and type 2 diabetes, non-Hispanic black populations have a low prevalence of NAFLD. The current literature suggests a strong role of polymorphisms in the PNPLA3 gene and potential interactions with environmental factors in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. However, given potential interactions and the shared risk factors with type 2 diabetes, a health disparity approach that acknowledges upstream determinants is needed. Solutions to these determinants can also be found in the health system. The role of interventions that have shown efficacy in type 2 diabetes, like community health workers, may be implemented to prevent and control NAFLD.

  12. Limited Access to Healthcare among Hispanics in the US-Mexico Border Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Minghui; Gai, Yunwei; Feng, Li

    2016-09-01

    Using large national databases, we investigated how living in the US-Mexico border region further limited access to healthcare among the non-elderly Hispanic adult population after controlling individual and county-level characteristics. The 2008-2012 individual-level data of non-elderly Hispanic adults from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were merged with county-level data from Area Health Resources File (AHRF). Multivariate logistic analyses were performed to predict insurance status and access to doctors using residency in the US-Mexico border region as the key predictor, adjusting individual and county-level factors. Controlling only individual characteristic, Hispanics living in the US-Mexico border region had significantly lower odds of having health insurance (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49-0.54) and access to doctors (AOR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.66-0.72). After including county-level measurements of healthcare system capacity and other local characteristics, the border region continued to be associated with lower likelihood of healthcare access. Hispanic residents in the U.S.-Mexico border had less access to healthcare than their inland counterparts. The findings highlight unique features in this region and support policies and initiatives to improve minority healthcare access, particularly among disadvantaged populations in this region.

  13. Demographic risk factors for injury among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children: an ecologic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Agran, P.; Winn, D.; Tran, C.

    1998-01-01

    Objectives—To determine the effects of neighborhood levels of poverty, household crowding, and acculturation on the rate of injury to Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children. Setting—Orange County, California. Methods—An ecologic study design was used with census block groups as the unit of analysis. Measures of neighborhood poverty, household crowding, and acculturation were specific to each ethnic group. Poisson regression was used to calculate mutually adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRRs) corresponding to a 20% difference in census variables. Results—Among non-Hispanic white children, injury rates were more closely associated with neighborhood levels of household crowding (adjusted IRR 2.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22 to 4.57) than with neighborhood poverty (adjusted IRR 1.06, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.26). For Hispanic children, the strongest risk factors were the proportion of Hispanic adults who spoke only some English (compared with the proportion who spoke little or no English, adjusted IRR 1.26, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.53) and the proportion who were US residents for injury among Hispanic children (adjusted IRR 0.98, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.08), but surprisingly, neighborhood poverty was associated with lower injury rates (adjusted IRR 0.89, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.97). Conclusions—Cultural and geographic transitions, as well as socioeconomic differences, appear to contribute to differences in childhood injury rates between ethnic groups. PMID:9595329

  14. Effect of lifestyle on the risk of gestational diabetes and obstetric outcomes in immigrant Hispanic women living in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ferre, Natalia; Fernández, Dolores; Torrejón, Maria J; Del Prado, Nayade; Runkle, Isabelle; Rubio, Miguel A; Montañez, Carmen; Bordiu, Elena; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2012-12-01

    Data about the immigrant population living in Spain, their lifestyle habits, and risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are limited. Thus, the aim of the present study was to describe risk factors for the onset of GDM, the evolution of gestation and delivery, and newborns of Hispanic women living in Spain compared with those of Spanish women. A semiquantitative questionnaire regarding lifestyle habits was administered to 459 pregnant women (115 Hispanic) with a positive O'Sullivan test (24-28 weeks gestation) between 1 April 2007 and 31 March 2008. Information was collected regarding gestation, delivery, and the newborn. The prevalence of GDM increased with mother's age, pregestational overweight/obesity, and multiparity. In addition, GDM was associated with lower pregestational fiber and a lower intake of low glycaemic index foods in Hispanic women. The odds ratios (OR) for the total population were 2.53 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-5.01) for overweight, 3.68 (95% CI 1.72-7.90) for obesity, 3.83 (95% 2.03-7.23) for age ≥35 years, and 1.64 (95% CI 1.02-3.01) for multiparity. Newborns from the Hispanic population were significantly heavier than newborns from Spanish women and the rate of Caesarean delivery was significantly higher in the Hispanic population with GDM compared with those without GDM. The immigrant Hispanic population living in Spain trends to acquire the same risk factors associated with lifestyle to the indigenous population. Preventive strategies must stress increased physical activity and fiber intake, decreased intake of sweetened beverages, and an effective reduction in body weight before pregnancy. © 2012 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Spirometry Reference Equations from the HCHS/SOL (Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVange, Lisa; Davis, Sonia M; Hankinson, John; Enright, Paul; Wilson, Rebbecca; Barr, R Graham; Aldrich, Thomas K; Kalhan, Ravi; Lemus, Hector; Ni, Ai; Smith, Lewis J; Talavera, Gregory A

    2017-10-15

    Accurate reference values for spirometry are important because the results are used for diagnosing common chronic lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, estimating physiologic impairment, and predicting all-cause mortality. Reference equations have been established for Mexican Americans but not for others with Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. To develop spirometry reference equations for adult Hispanic/Latino background groups in the United States. The HCHS/SOL (Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos) recruited a population-based probability sample of 16,415 Hispanics/Latinos aged 18-74 years living in the Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego. Participants self-identified as being of Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, or Central or South American background. Spirometry was performed using standardized methods with central quality control monitoring. Spirometric measures from a subset of 6,425 never-smoking participants without respiratory symptoms or disease were modeled as a function of sex, age, height, and Hispanic/Latino background to produce background-specific reference equations for the predicted value and lower limit of normal. Dominican and Puerto Rican Americans had substantially lower predicted and lower limit of normal values for FVC and FEV 1 than those in other Hispanic/Latino background groups and also than Mexican American values from NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). For patients of Dominican and Puerto Rican background who present with pulmonary symptoms in clinical practice, use of background-specific spirometry reference equations may provide more appropriate predicted and lower limit of normal values, enabling more accurate diagnoses of abnormality and physiologic impairment.

  16. Do Lung Cancer Eligibility Criteria Align with Risk among Blacks and Hispanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fiscella

    Full Text Available Black patients have higher lung cancer risk despite lower pack years of smoking. We assessed lung cancer risk by race, ethnicity, and sex among a nationally representative population eligible for lung cancer screening based on Medicare criteria.We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2012 to assess lung cancer risk by sex, race and ethnicity among persons satisfying Medicare age and pack-year smoking eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening. We assessed Medicare eligibility based on age (55-77 years and pack-years (≥ 30. We assessed 6-year lung cancer risk using a risk prediction model from Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening trial that was modified in 2012 (PLCOm2012. We compared the proportions of eligible persons by sex, race and ethnicity using Medicare criteria with a risk cut-point that was adjusted to achieve comparable total number of persons eligible for screening.Among the 29.7 million persons aged 55-77 years who ever smoked, we found that 7.3 million (24.5% were eligible for lung cancer screening under Medicare criteria. Among those eligible, Blacks had statistically significant higher (4.4% and Hispanics lower lung cancer risk (1.2% than non-Hispanic Whites (3.2%. At a cut-point of 2.12% risk for lung screening eligibility, the percentage of Blacks and Hispanics showed statistically significant changes. Blacks eligible rose by 48% and Hispanics eligible declined by 63%. Black men and Hispanic women were affected the most. There was little change in eligibility among Whites.Medicare eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening do not align with estimated risk for lung cancer among Blacks and Hispanics. Data are urgently needed to determine whether use of risk-based eligibility screening improves lung cancer outcomes among minority patients.

  17. Health Assimilation among Hispanic Immigrants in the United States: The Impact of Ignoring Arrival-cohort Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Tod G; Palermo, Tia; Green, Tiffany L

    2015-12-01

    A large literature has documented that Hispanic immigrants have a health advantage over their U.S.-born counterparts upon arrival in the United States. Few studies, however, have disentangled the effects of immigrants' arrival cohort from their tenure of U.S. residence, an omission that could produce imprecise estimates of the degree of health decline experienced by Hispanic immigrants as their U.S. tenure increases. Using data from the 1996-to-2014 waves of the March Current Population Survey, we show that the health (i.e., self-rated health) of Hispanic immigrants varies by both arrival cohort and U.S. tenure for immigrants hailing from most of the primary sending countries/regions of Hispanic immigrants. We also find evidence that acculturation plays an important role in determining the health trajectories of Hispanic immigrants. With respect to self-rated health, however, our findings demonstrate that omitting arrival-cohort measures from health assimilation models may result in overestimates of the degree of downward health assimilation experienced by Hispanic immigrants. © American Sociological Association 2015.

  18. Genetic variants and non-genetic factors predict circulating vitamin D levels in Hispanic and non-Hispanic White women: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Ingles, Sue Ann; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Stern, Mariana C; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Schwartz, Gary G; Nelson, David O; Fejerman, Laura; Wolff, Roger K; Slattery, Martha L; John, Esther M

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common polymorphisms in or near GC, CYP2R1, CYP24A1, and NADSYN1/DHCR7 genes to be associated with circulating levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in European populations. To replicate these GWAS findings, we examined six selected polymorphisms from these regions and their relation with circulating 25(OH)D levels in 1,605 Hispanic women (629 U.S. Hispanics and 976 Mexicans) and 354 non-Hispanic White (NHW) women. We also assessed the potential interactions between these variants and known non-genetic predictors of 25(OH)D levels, including body mass index (BMI), sunlight exposure and vitamin D intake from diet and supplements. The minor alleles of the two GC polymorphisms (rs7041 and rs2282679) were significantly associated with lower 25(OH)D levels in both Hispanic and NHW women. The CYP2R1 polymorphism, rs2060793, also was significantly associated with 25(OH)D levels in both groups. We found no significant associations for the polymorphisms in the CYP24A1. In Hispanic controls, 25(OH)D levels were significantly associated with the rs12785878T and rs1790349G haplotype in the NADSYN1/DHCR7 region. Significant interactions between GC rs2282679 and BMI and between rs12785878 and time spent in outdoor activities were observed. These results provide further support for the contribution of common genetic variants to individual variability in circulating 25(OH)D levels. The observed interactions between SNPs and non-genetic factors warrant confirmation. PMID:24596595

  19. Genetic ancestry modifies the association between genetic risk variants and breast cancer risk among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejerman, Laura; Stern, Mariana C; Ziv, Elad; John, Esther M; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa M; Wolff, Roger; Wang, Wei; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Giuliano, Anna R; Slattery, Martha L

    2013-08-01

    Hispanic women in the USA have lower breast cancer incidence than non-Hispanic white (NHW) women. Genetic factors may contribute to this difference. Breast cancer genome-wide association studies (GWAS) conducted in women of European or Asian descent have identified multiple risk variants. We tested the association between 10 previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of breast cancer in a sample of 4697 Hispanic and 3077 NHW women recruited as part of three population-based case-control studies of breast cancer. We used stratified logistic regression analyses to compare the associations with different genetic variants in NHWs and Hispanics classified by their proportion of Indigenous American (IA) ancestry. Five of 10 SNPs were statistically significantly associated with breast cancer risk. Three of the five significant variants (rs17157903-RELN, rs7696175-TLR1 and rs13387042-2q35) were associated with risk among Hispanics but not in NHWs. The odds ratio (OR) for the heterozygous at 2q35 was 0.75 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.50-1.15] for low IA ancestry and 1.38 (95% CI = 1.04-1.82) for high IA ancestry (P interaction 0.02). The ORs for association at RELN were 0.87 (95% CI = 0.59-1.29) and 1.69 (95% CI = 1.04-2.73), respectively (P interaction 0.03). At the TLR1 locus, the ORs for women homozygous for the rare allele were 0.74 (95% CI = 0.42-1.31) and 1.73 (95% CI = 1.19-2.52) (P interaction 0.03). Our results suggest that the proportion of IA ancestry modifies the magnitude and direction of the association of 3 of the 10 previously reported variants. Genetic ancestry should be considered when assessing risk in women of mixed descent and in studies designed to discover causal mutations.

  20. Accuracy of Self-reported Weight in Hispanic/Latino Adults of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay; Robinson, Whitney R; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Franceschini, Nora; Castañeda, Sheila F; Buelna, Christina; Moncrieft, Ashley; Llabre, Maria; Daviglus, Martha L; Qi, Qibin; Agarwal, Anita; Isasi, Carmen R; Smokowski, Paul; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; North, Kari E

    2017-11-01

    Previous US population-based studies have found that body weight may be underestimated when self-reported. However, this research may not apply to all US Hispanics/Latinos, many of whom are immigrants with distinct cultural orientations to ideal body size. We assessed the data quality and accuracy of self-reported weight in a diverse, community-based, US sample of primarily foreign-born Hispanic/Latino adults. Using baseline data (2008-2011) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), we described the difference between contemporaneous self-reported and measured current body weight (n = 16,119) and used multivariate adjusted models to establish whether the observed trends in misreporting in potential predictors of inaccuracy persisted after adjustment for other predictors. Last, we described the weighted percentage agreement in body mass classification using either self-reported or measured weight (n = 16,110). Self-reported weight was well correlated with (r = 0.95) and on average 0.23 kg greater than measured weight. The range of this misreporting was large and several factors were associated with misreporting: age group, gender, body mass categories, nativity, study site by background, unit of self-report (kg or lb), and end-digit preference. The percentage agreement of body mass classification using self-reported versus measured weight was 86% and varied across prevalent health conditions. The direction of misreporting in self-reported weight, and thus the anticipated bias in obesity prevalence estimates based on self-reported weights, may differ in US Hispanic/Latinos from that found in prior studies. Future investigations using self-reported body weight in US Hispanic/Latinos should consider this information for bias analyses.See video abstract at, http://links.lww.com/EDE/B276.

  1. Highly visible street-based HIV rapid testing: is it an attractive option for a previously untested population? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Balbuena, Sonia; de la Fuente, Luis; Hoyos, Juan; Rosales-Statkus, M Elena; Barrio, Gregorio; Belza, María-José

    2014-03-01

    Given the shortage of community-based HIV testing initiatives in resource-rich countries not targeting most-at-risk populations, we aimed to evaluate whether a highly visible mobile programme promoting and offering rapid HIV testing in the street can attract persons at risk for infection who have never been tested. Between 2008 and 2011, the programme served 7552 persons in various Spanish cities who answered a brief questionnaire while awaiting their results. The factors associated with being tested for the first time were analysed using two logistic regression models, one for men who have sex with men (MSM) and the other for only heterosexual men (MSW) and women. 3517 participants (47%) were first-time testers (24% of MSM, 56% of MSW and 60% of women). Among them, 22 undiagnosed HIV infections were detected with a global prevalence of 0.6% and 3.1% in MSM. Undergoing a first HIV test was independently associated with age gay community. Among those tested for the first time, 22% had never thought of being tested and 62% decided to be tested when they passed by and noticed the programme, regardless of their previous intentions. This community programme attracted a substantial number of persons previously untested and particularly hard to reach, such as those with low education and MSM who were least involved in the gay community. Programme visibility was a decisive factor for almost two of every three persons who had never been tested.

  2. Alcohol tax policy and related mortality. An age-period-cohort analysis of a rapidly developed Chinese population, 1981-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Roger Y; Kim, Jean H; Yip, Benjamin H; Wong, Samuel Y S; Wong, Martin C S; Chung, Vincent C H; Griffiths, Sian M

    2014-01-01

    To delineate the temporal dynamics between alcohol tax policy changes and related health outcomes, this study examined the age, period and cohort effects on alcohol-related mortality in relation to changes in government alcohol policies. We used the age-period-cohort modeling to analyze retrospective mortality data over 30 years from 1981 to 2010 in a rapidly developed Chinese population, Hong Kong. Alcohol-related mortality from 1) chronic causes, 2) acute causes, 3) all (chronic+acute) causes and 4) causes 100% attributable to alcohol, as defined according to the Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI) criteria developed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, were examined. The findings illustrated the possible effects of alcohol policy changes on adult alcohol-related mortality. The age-standardized mortality trends were generally in decline, with fluctuations that coincided with the timing of the alcohol policy changes. The age-period-cohort analyses demonstrated possible temporal dynamics between alcohol policy changes and alcohol-related mortality through the period effects, and also generational impact of alcohol policy changes through the cohort effects. Based on the illustrated association between the dramatic increase of alcohol imports in the mid-1980s and the increased alcohol-related mortality risk of the generations coming of age of majority at that time, attention should be paid to generations coming of drinking age during the 2007-2008 duty reduction.

  3. Depression and sexual adjustment following breast cancer in low-income Hispanic and non-Hispanic White women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Kysa M; Meyerowitz, Beth E; Maly, Rose C

    2010-10-01

    Hispanics are the largest and fastest growing ethnic minority group in the United States and breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Hispanic women. However, Hispanics are underrepresented in the psychosocial breast cancer literature. This study included 677 low-income women (425 Hispanic, 252 non-Hispanic White) enrolled in the Medi-Cal Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Program. Data were gathered through phone interviews conducted in English or Spanish 6 and 18 months following breast cancer diagnosis. We focus on three variables that the literature indicates are salient for breast cancer survivors: sexual function, body image and depression. Results of an ANCOVA indicated worse sexual function for Hispanic women, even after controlling for significant covariates. Hispanics reported significantly less sexual desire, greater difficulty relaxing and enjoying sex, and greater difficulty becoming sexually aroused and having orgasms than non-Hispanic White women. Both Hispanic and non-Hispanic White women endorsed a lack of sexual desire more frequently than problems with sexual function. Body image did not differ between Hispanic and non-Hispanic White women. In all, 38% of Hispanic and 48% of non-Hispanic White women scored above cut-off scores for depressive symptoms. While there was no ethnic difference in depressive symptoms, single women reported more depressive symptoms than partnered women. Findings suggest that low-income breast cancer survivors may experience symptoms of depression more than a year following diagnosis, and that sexual dysfunction may be particularly salient for low-income Hispanic women. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Attitudes and behaviors of Hispanic smokers: implications for cessation interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, B V; Perez-Stable, E J; Marin, G; Sabogal, F; Otero-Sabogal, R

    1990-01-01

    The smoking behavior of Hispanics, especially Mexican Americans, has been reported to differ from that of non-Hispanic whites, in both large gender differences in prevalence as well as a lower self-reported number of cigarettes smoked per day. This study compared the responses of a convenience sample of 263 Hispanic (44% Mexican American and 38% Central American) and 150 non-Hispanic white smokers, in order to identify other ethnic; gender, and acculturation differences in smoking behaviors. Hispanic women smoked fewer cigarettes and initiated smoking at a comparatively later age than Hispanic men; they were also less likely to smoke during pregnancy than non-Hispanic white women. Hispanics smoked more cigarettes on Saturday than other days, but this was not true for non-Hispanic whites. Will power (voluntad propia) and knowing the negative effects of smoking were considered the most helpful techniques for quitting by Hispanics. Considering that light smokers are able to quit with less intensive cessation techniques, these data suggest that a properly developed health education community intervention may have an impact on smoking rates among Hispanics.

  5. Lung cancer mutations and use of targeted agents in Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, W Douglas; Chiappori, Alberto; Santiago, Pedro; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic/Latinos (H/L) are expected to grow to over 24% of the USA population by 2050 and lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death among H/L men. Due to the information that is becoming available via genetic testing, lung cancer molecular profiling is allowing for increasing application of personalized lung cancer therapies. However, to benefit the most people, development of these therapies and genetic tests must include research on as many racial and ethnic groups as possible. The purpose of this review is to bring attention to the fact that the mutations driving lung cancer in H/Ls differ in frequency and nature relative to the non-Hispanic White (WNH) majority that dominate current databases and participate in clinical trials that test new therapies. Clinical trials using new agents targeting genetic alterations (driver mutations) in lung cancer have demonstrated significant improvements in patient outcomes (for example, gefitinib, erlotinib or crizotinib for lung adenocarcinomas harboring EGFR mutations or EML4-ALK fusions, respectively). The nature and frequencies of some lung cancer driver mutations have been shown to be considerably different among racial and ethnic groups. This is particularly true for H/Ls. For example, several reports suggest a dramatic shift in the mutation pattern from predominantly KRAS in a WNH population to predominantly EGFR in multiple H/L populations. However, these studies are limited, and the effects of racial and ethnic differences on the incidence of mutations in lung cancer remain incompletely understood. This review serves as a call to address this problem.

  6. Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): effects of container size adjustments on estimates of alcohol consumption across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Mills, Britain A; Harris, T Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine discrepancies in alcohol consumption estimates between a self-reported standard quantity-frequency measure and an adjusted version based on respondents' typically used container size. Using a multistage cluster sample design, 5,224 Hispanic individuals 18 years of age and older were selected from the household population in five metropolitan areas of the United States: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. The survey-weighted response rate was 76%. Personal interviews lasting an average of 1 hour were conducted in respondents' homes in either English or Spanish. The overall effect of container adjustment was to increase estimates of ethanol consumption by 68% for women (range across Hispanic groups: 17%-99%) and 30% for men (range: 14%-42%). With the exception of female Cuban American, Mexican American, and South/Central American beer drinkers and male Cuban American wine drinkers, all percentage differences between unadjusted and container-adjusted estimates were positive. Second, container adjustments produced the largest change for volume of distilled spirits, followed by wine and beer. Container size adjustments generally produced larger percentage increases in consumption estimates for the higher volume drinkers, especially the upper tertile of female drinkers. Self-reported alcohol consumption based on standard drinks underreports consumption when compared with reports based on the amount of alcohol poured into commonly used containers.

  7. Hispanic Medical Organizations' Support for LGBT Health Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, John Paul; Sola, Orlando; Ramallo, Jorge; Sánchez, Nelson Felix; Dominguez, Kenneth; Romero-Leggott, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    Hispanics represent the fastest growing ethnic segment of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community in the United States and are disproportionately burdened by LGBT-related health issues and limited political support from Hispanic medical organizations. Recently, the Latino Medical Student Association, the National Hispanic Medical Association, and the Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools, representing over 60,000 Hispanic students and providers and 35 institutions, collaborated to support a resolution opposing discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity and recognizing the obstacles encountered by LGBTQ Hispanics. The resolution provides an important framework for organizational members and leaders to address LGBT health issues and serve to support a more positive sociopolitical climate for the Hispanic LGBT community nationally and internationally.

  8. Negotiating Religiosity and Sexual Identity Among Hispanic Lesbian Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Zelma

    2016-09-01

    Hispanic lesbian mothers face bicultural tensions that stigmatize their roles as mothers. Religion could produce heightened conflict given their potential incompatibility with the role of a "good mother." In particular, there is a potential for conflict between the definition of a "good mother" set forth in Catholicism and the sexual orientation of Hispanic lesbians. I conducted semistructured in-depth interviews to examine how Hispanic lesbian mothers negotiate their Catholic religious identity with aspects of their sexual identity. More specifically, I examined the strategies that Hispanic lesbian mothers use to reconcile or navigate perceived conflict between their roles as a Catholic and as a lesbian. The research questions to be answered were: How do Hispanic lesbian mothers negotiate a Catholic religious and a sexual identity? How do Hispanic lesbian mothers create and maintain a religious narrative? How do Hispanic lesbian mothers redefine religion and spirituality?

  9. Why are hispanics at greater risk for PTSD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pole, Nnamdi; Best, Suzanne R; Metzler, Thomas; Marmar, Charles R

    2005-05-01

    Several studies have found that Hispanic Americans have higher rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than non-Hispanic Caucasian and Black Americans. The authors identified predictors of PTSD symptom severity that distinguished Hispanic police officers (n=189) from their non-Hispanic Caucasian (n=317) and Black (n=162) counterparts and modeled them to explain the elevated Hispanic risk for PTSD. The authors found that greater peritraumatic dissociation, greater wishful thinking and self-blame coping, lower social support, and greater perceived racism were important variables in explaining the elevated PTSD symptoms among Hispanics. Results are discussed in the context of Hispanic culture and may be important for prevention of mental illness in the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States. Copyright (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Does Applied Critical Leadership Theory Really Apply? The Formation of Hispanic-Latin@ Ecclesial Leaders at Seminaries Accredited by the Association of Theological Schools: A Historical-Critical Analysis of the Progress and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Walker, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    A front-seat view allows the observer to see (a) the continual growth of the Hispanic population in the United States, (b) an increase in the number of Hispanic churches, and a (c) Latin@ community with significant buying power that also leaves its mark in the entertainment and sports industries. The view from the back is seldom beheld, but it…

  11. Improving access to shared decision-making for Hispanics/Latinos with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jaime A; Rosales, Aracely; Shillington, Alicia C; Bailey, Robert A; Kabir, Chris; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2015-01-01

    To describe the cultural and linguistic adaptation and Spanish translation of an English-language patient decision aid (PDA) for use in supporting shared decision-making in Hispanics/Latinos with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a group at a high risk for complications. A steering committee of endocrinologists, a primary care physician, a certified diabetes educator, and a dietician, each with extensive experience in providing care to Hispanics/Latinos was convened to assess a PDA developed for English-speaking patients with T2DM. English content was reviewed for cultural sensitivity and appropriateness for a Hispanic/Latino population. A consensus-building process and iterative version edits incorporated clinician perspectives. The content was adapted to be consistent with traditional Hispanic/Latino cultural communication precepts (eg, avoidance of hostile confrontation; value for warm interaction; respect for authority; value of family support for decisions). The PDA was translated by native-speaking individuals with diabetes expertise. The PDA underwent testing during cognitive interviews with ten Spanish-speaking Hispanics/Latinos with T2DM to ensure that the content is reflective of the experience, understanding, and language Hispanic/Latino patients use to describe diabetes and treatment. Content edits were made to assure a literacy level appropriate to the audience, and the PDA was produced for online video dissemination. High-quality, well-developed tools to facilitate shared decision-making in populations with limited access to culturally sensitive information can narrow gaps and align care with individual patient preferences. A newly developed PDA is available for shared decision-making that provides culturally appropriate treatment information for inadequately controlled Hispanics/Latinos with T2DM. The impact on the overall health of patients and care management of T2DM requires further study.

  12. Media and Technology Use Among Hispanics/Latinos in New York: Implications for Health Communication Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer A; Gerstner, Gena; Pergolino, Kristen; Graham, Yvonne; Strogatz, David

    2016-09-01

    There is limited information about media and technology use, as well as health information-seeking patterns, specifically for Hispanics/Latinos at the state level. An understanding of access, usage patterns, and preferences for receiving health information is critical for state-level organizations to effectively reach and serve this growing population. A telephone survey was developed to assess media and technology access, use patterns, health-seeking information patterns, and preferences for receiving health information. The survey was conducted in New York state from August 8 to November 4, 2013, using random digit dialing. The overall sample of 1350 included 412 Hispanic/Latino adults who are the focus of this study. Most Hispanic/Latino respondents reported having at least one working computer at home (78 %) and using the Internet (84 %); almost all who had a computer reported having high-speed Internet service (90 %). Cell phone ownership was common (88 %), and many had a smartphone (71 %). Activities most likely to occur several times per day were sending text messages (61 %), using phone apps (49 %), using a search engine (40 %), using email (34 %), and using social networking sites (32 %). The most preferred channels of receiving health information were websites, mail, and television. Older respondents were significantly less likely to have the technologies, engage in technology activities, and prefer newer forms of information dissemination (i.e., text messages). Education and income were important predictors in some cases. While most Hispanics/Latinos have access to various technologies, the reason for using those technologies and preferences for receiving health information most often varies by age and, sometimes, by education and income. Older adults tend to seek health information from traditional sources such as television and brochures, while younger adults favored newer technologies. Knowing preferences of the population can help ensure

  13. Perceptions of Weight and Health Practices in Hispanic Children: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron Alexander Foster

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Perception of weight by parents of obese children may be associated with willingness to engage in behavior change. The relationship between parents’ perception of their child’s weight and their health beliefs and practices is poorly understood, especially among the Hispanic population which experiences disparities in childhood obesity. This study sought to explore the relationship between perceptions of weight and health beliefs and practices in a Hispanic population. Methods. A cross-sectional, mixed-methods approach was used with semistructured interviews conducted with parent-child (2–5 years old dyads in a primarily Hispanic, low-income population. Parents were queried on their perceptions of their child’s health, health practices, activities, behaviors, and beliefs. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze participants’ discussion of health practices and behaviors. Results. Forty parent-child dyads completed the interview. Most (58% of the parents of overweight and obese children misclassified their child’s weight status. The qualitative analysis showed that accurate perception of weight was associated with internal motivation and more concrete ideas of what healthy meant for their child. Conclusions. The qualitative data suggest there may be populations at different stages of readiness for change among parents of overweight and obese children, incorporating this understanding should be considered for interventions.

  14. Self-reported HIV-positive status but subsequent HIV-negative test result using rapid diagnostic testing algorithms among seven sub-Saharan African military populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Harbertson

    Full Text Available HIV rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs combined in an algorithm are the current standard for HIV diagnosis in many sub-Saharan African countries, and extensive laboratory testing has confirmed HIV RDTs have excellent sensitivity and specificity. However, false-positive RDT algorithm results have been reported due to a variety of factors, such as suboptimal quality assurance procedures and inaccurate interpretation of results. We conducted HIV serosurveys in seven sub-Saharan African military populations and recorded the frequency of personnel self-reporting HIV positivity, but subsequently testing HIV-negative during the serosurvey. The frequency of individuals who reported they were HIV-positive but subsequently tested HIV-negative using RDT algorithms ranged from 3.3 to 91.1%, suggesting significant rates of prior false-positive HIV RDT algorithm results, which should be confirmed using biological testing across time in future studies. Simple measures could substantially reduce false-positive results, such as greater adherence to quality assurance guidelines and prevalence-specific HIV testing algorithms as described in the World Health Organization's HIV testing guidelines. Other measures to improve RDT algorithm specificity include classifying individuals with weakly positive test lines as HIV indeterminate and retesting. While expansion of HIV testing in resource-limited countries is critical to identifying HIV-infected individuals for appropriate care and treatment, careful attention to potential causes of false HIV-positive results are needed to prevent the significant medical, psychological, and fiscal costs resulting from individuals receiving a false-positive HIV diagnosis.

  15. Self-reported HIV-positive status but subsequent HIV-negative test result using rapid diagnostic testing algorithms among seven sub-Saharan African military populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbertson, Judith; Hale, Braden R; Tran, Bonnie R; Thomas, Anne G; Grillo, Michael P; Jacobs, Marni B; McAnany, Jennifer; Shaffer, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    HIV rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) combined in an algorithm are the current standard for HIV diagnosis in many sub-Saharan African countries, and extensive laboratory testing has confirmed HIV RDTs have excellent sensitivity and specificity. However, false-positive RDT algorithm results have been reported due to a variety of factors, such as suboptimal quality assurance procedures and inaccurate interpretation of results. We conducted HIV serosurveys in seven sub-Saharan African military populations and recorded the frequency of personnel self-reporting HIV positivity, but subsequently testing HIV-negative during the serosurvey. The frequency of individuals who reported they were HIV-positive but subsequently tested HIV-negative using RDT algorithms ranged from 3.3 to 91.1%, suggesting significant rates of prior false-positive HIV RDT algorithm results, which should be confirmed using biological testing across time in future studies. Simple measures could substantially reduce false-positive results, such as greater adherence to quality assurance guidelines and prevalence-specific HIV testing algorithms as described in the World Health Organization's HIV testing guidelines. Other measures to improve RDT algorithm specificity include classifying individuals with weakly positive test lines as HIV indeterminate and retesting. While expansion of HIV testing in resource-limited countries is critical to identifying HIV-infected individuals for appropriate care and treatment, careful attention to potential causes of false HIV-positive results are needed to prevent the significant medical, psychological, and fiscal costs resulting from individuals receiving a false-positive HIV diagnosis.

  16. Using Structural Equation Modeling to Identify Predictors of Sexual Behaviors among Hispanic Men who have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Joseph P; Arcia, Adriana; Vermeesch, Amber; Gattamorta, Karina A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hispanic men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections related to high risk sexual behaviors. Little attention has been paid to the identification of predictors of sexual behaviors among this population. Objective The aim of this study was to test a model that predicts the sexual behaviors of Hispanic MSM that is based on an epidemiological framework. Methods Structural equation modeling was used to test relationships between demographic and study variables of alcohol abuse, body image, depressive symptoms, eating attitudes and behaviors, and self-esteem as predictors of sexual behaviors using a sample of 100 Hispanic MSM. Results A number of participants were at risk for alcohol abuse, body image disturbance, depression, eating disorders, and low self-esteem. Physical and social factors were not predictive of sexual behaviors. A model that included the latent variables of mental health and appearance concern adequately fit the data (X2 (10, N = 100) = 14.498, CFI = 0.966, RMSEA = 0.067, SRMR = 0.043), demonstrating that mental health is a significant predictor of sexual behaviors in this sample. Discussion The results of this study supported a model predicting sexual behaviors of Hispanic MSM. This study highlights the importance of understanding the influence of psychological/mental health on the sexual behaviors of Hispanic MSM. Interventions to decrease high risk sexual behaviors among this population must consider the impact of psychological/mental health on sexual behaviors. PMID:21501734

  17. Culturally informed and flexible family-based treatment for adolescents: a tailored and integrative treatment for Hispanic youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santisteban, Daniel A; Mena, Maite P

    2009-06-01

    The increasing utilization of evidence-based treatments has highlighted the need for treatment development efforts that can craft interventions that are effective with Hispanic substance abusing youth and their families. The list of evidence-based treatments is extremely limited in its inclusion of interventions that are explicitly responsive to the unique characteristics and treatment needs of young Hispanics and that have been rigorously tested with this population. Some treatments that have been tested with Hispanics do not articulate the manner in which cultural characteristics and therapy processes interact. Other treatments have emphasized the important role of culture but have not been tested rigorously. The value of well designed interventions built upon an appreciation for unique patient characteristics was highlighted by Beutler et al. (1996) when they argued that "psychotherapy is comprised of a set of complex tasks, and practitioners need comprehensive knowledge of how different processes used in psychotherapy interact with patient characteristics in order to make treatment decisions that will maximize and optimize therapeutic power" (p. 30). A focus on how treatment processes interact with patient characteristics is particularly relevant in the Hispanic population because of the considerable heterogeneity beneath the Hispanic umbrella. Our new program of clinical research focuses on articulating how the varied profiles with regard to immigration stressors, acculturation processes, values clashes, sense of belonging to the community, discrimination, and knowledge about issues important to adolescent health can be more effectively addressed by a culturally informed treatment.

  18. Integrating health literacy and ESL: an interdisciplinary curriculum for Hispanic immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Mas, Francisco; Mein, Erika; Fuentes, Brenda; Thatcher, Barry; Balcázar, Héctor

    2013-03-01

    Adult Hispanic immigrants are at a greater risk of experiencing the negative outcomes related to low health literacy, as they confront cultural and language barriers to the complex and predominately monolingual English-based U.S. health system. One approach that has the potential for simultaneously addressing the health, literacy, and language needs of Hispanics is the combination of health literacy and English as a second language (ESL) instruction. The purpose of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of using ESL instruction as a medium for improving health literacy among Hispanic immigrants. Objectives included the development, implementation, and evaluation of an interdisciplinary health literacy/ESL curriculum that integrates theories of health literacy and health behavior research and practice, sociocultural theories of literacy and communication, and adult learning principles. This article describes the curriculum development process and provides preliminary qualitative data on learners' experiences with the curriculum. Results indicate that the curriculum was attractive to participants and that they were highly satisfied with both the format and content. The curriculum described here represents one example of an audience-centered approach designed to meet the specific health and literacy needs of the Hispanic population on the U.S.-Mexico border. The combination of ESL and health literacy contributed to a perceived positive learning experience among participants. Interdisciplinary approaches to health literacy are recommended.

  19. The impact of Hispanic and white group cues on attitudes towards the violation of generic norms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Cranmer

    Full Text Available While much work in political science has examined the impact of racial cues on individual perceptions, we know little about how individuals evaluate members of minority outgroups on issues that are not linked to stereotypes. We measure the impacts of Hispanic and White cues on individual assessments related to a stereotype-independent norm violation: alcoholism. We test three competing theories--cognition, intergroup emotions, and social identity--using a population-based vignette experiment included in the General Social Survey. Our results contradict much of the literature, but keep with social identity theory's predictions. Hispanic alcoholics, when Hispanics constitute the outgroup, are assessed less negatively than White alcoholics in the ingroup, the latter experiencing what is called the black sheep effect. The black sheep effect occurs when ingroup members are more punitive towards members of the ingroup than the outgroup. However, the black sheep effect does not extend to measures that are more consistent with outgroup stereotypes, such as violence or money mismanagement; Hispanic alcoholics are evaluated more negatively than Whites on these measures. The implication is that the effect of racial cues depends strongly on issue linkages to group stereotypes.

  20. Chronic Stress, Inflammation, and Glucose Regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurley, Jessica L.; Mills, Paul J.; Roesch, Scott C.; Carnethon, Mercedes; Giacinto, Rebeca E.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Teng, Yanping; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Llabre, Maria M.; Penedo, Frank J.; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, and diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics and other underserved groups. Chronic stress may contribute to diabetes risk, but few studies have examined this relationship in U.S. Hispanics. We examined associations of chronic stress with fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Hispanics without diabetes, and also assessed indirect effects of stress through inflammation (CRP). Participants were 3923 men and women, aged 18-74, without diabetes, from the four U.S. field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)-Sociocultural Ancillary study. Participants completed a measure of chronic life stress and a physical exam with oral glucose tolerance test. In a multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for demographic and health covariates, higher chronic stress was related to higher fasting glucose (standardized regression coefficient: β=.09, pstress through inflammation. Findings suggest that higher chronic stress is associated with poorer glucose regulation in Hispanics, prior to the onset of a clinical diabetes diagnosis. PMID:25898909

  1. Chronic stress, inflammation, and glucose regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurley, Jessica L; Mills, Paul J; Roesch, Scott C; Carnethon, Mercedes; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Isasi, Carmen R; Teng, Yanping; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Llabre, Maria M; Penedo, Frank J; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, and diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics and other underserved groups. Chronic stress may contribute to diabetes risk, but few studies have examined this relationship in U.S. Hispanics. We examined associations of chronic stress with fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Hispanics without diabetes, and also assessed indirect effects of stress through inflammation (CRP). Participants were 3,923 men and women, aged 18-74, without diabetes, from the four U.S. field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary study. Participants completed a measure of chronic life stress and a physical exam with oral glucose tolerance test. In a multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for demographic and health covariates, higher chronic stress was related to higher fasting glucose (standardized regression coefficient: β = .09, p stress through inflammation. Findings suggest that higher chronic stress is associated with poorer glucose regulation in Hispanics, prior to the onset of a clinical diabetes diagnosis. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  2. [Cardiovascular risk factors in an Arab and Hispanic working population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivielso, P; García, A; de Rus, I; Avila, J M; Andrade, R; Escolar, J L; González, P

    1991-07-01

    318 records of male workers, 169 Spanish and 149 Arab were retrospectively studied in 1987 at the "Gabinete de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo" (Council for Safety and Hygiene in the Workplace) in Ceuta in order to prove the hypothesis that 2 different ethnic groups living in the same geographic area have a non-equal distribution of cardiovascular risk factors. The Spanish group showed a higher prevalence in blood hypertension, diabetes, glucose intolerance, obesity and alcohol intake, compared to the Arab group. Smoking and high levels of seric cholesterol were similar in both groups, however, medium levels of seric cholesterol were lower in the Arab group. Family histories of cardiovascular disease were very rare in the latter mentioned group. These observations suggested a major predisposition to ischemic cardiopathy in the Spanish group.

  3. Genome-wide association study of red blood cell traits in Hispanics/Latinos: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jean V.; Brown, Lisa; Schurmann, Claudia; Chen, Diane D.; Liu, Yong Mei; Auer, Paul L.; Taylor, Kent D.; Papanicolaou, George; Kurita, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Loos, Ruth J. F.; North, Kari E.; Thornton, Timothy A.; Pankratz, Nathan; Bauer, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Prior GWAS have identified loci associated with red blood cell (RBC) traits in populations of European, African, and Asian ancestry. These studies have not included individuals with an Amerindian ancestral background, such as Hispanics/Latinos, nor evaluated the full spectrum of genomic variation beyond single nucleotide variants. Using a custom genotyping array enriched for Amerindian ancestral content and 1000 Genomes imputation, we performed GWAS in 12,502 participants of Hispanic Community Health Study and Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) for hematocrit, hemoglobin, RBC count, RBC distribution width (RDW), and RBC indices. Approximately 60% of previously reported RBC trait loci generalized to HCHS/SOL Hispanics/Latinos, including African ancestral alpha- and beta-globin gene variants. In addition to the known 3.8kb alpha-globin copy number variant, we identified an Amerindian ancestral association in an alpha-globin regulatory region on chromosome 16p13.3 for mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. We also discovered and replicated three genome-wide significant variants in previously unreported loci for RDW (SLC12A2 rs17764730, PSMB5 rs941718), and hematocrit (PROX1 rs3754140). Among the proxy variants at the SLC12A2 locus we identified rs3812049, located in a bi-directional promoter between SLC12A2 (which encodes a red cell membrane ion-transport protein) and an upstream anti-sense long-noncoding RNA, LINC01184, as the likely causal variant. We further demonstrate that disruption of the regulatory element harboring rs3812049 affects transcription of SLC12A2 and LINC01184 in human erythroid progenitor cells. Together, these results reinforce the importance of genetic study of diverse ancestral populations, in particular Hispanics/Latinos. PMID:28453575

  4. Ethnicity, Geography, and Occupational Achievement of Hispanic Men in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Ross M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines occupational inequality between Hispanic and non-Hispanic White men in the U.S. Neither geographic distribution nor Hispanic subgroup structure strongly affects Hispanic occupational disadvantage, but results support a pattern of "conditional occupational assimilation" by which the extent of Hispanic men's schooling and English…

  5. The relation between physical activity and mental health among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnahan, Jennifer; Steffen, Lyn M; Lytle, Leslie; Patterson, Joan; Boostrom, Ardys

    2004-08-01

    To assess the relation of physical activity (PA) with feelings of sadness and suicidal thoughts and behaviors among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white adolescent boys and girls. Cross-sectional study using a modified 2001 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. One thousand eight hundred seventy Hispanic and non-Hispanic white adolescents, aged 14 to 18 years, attending high school in Nueces County, Texas. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relation between PA, including moderate and vigorous PAs, strength and toning, total PA, physical education class, and participation in team sports, and the dependent variables feelings of sadness and considering, planning, and attempting suicide. More boys reported participating in PA than girls (Pclass was inversely related to feelings of sadness (odds ratio [OR], 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.68-0.94]); participation in more total PA sessions per week was associated with a lower risk of considering suicide (OR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.65-0.79]); and higher levels of vigorous PA (OR, 0.73 [95% CI, 0.57-0.93]), total PA (OR, 0.65 [95% CI, 0.48-0.87]), and strength and toning activity (OR, 0.64 [95% CI, 0.42-0.99]) were associated with a lower risk of planning suicide. These findings are consistent with a beneficial effect of PA on feelings of sadness and suicidal behaviors in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white boys and girls. Physical activity may be considered as part of an intervention strategy to improve adolescent health as a whole.

  6. Association between Cognitive Activity and Cognitive Function in Older Hispanics

    OpenAIRE

    Marquine, María J.; Segawa, Eisuke; Wilson, Robert S.; Bennett, David A.; Barnes, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    There is limited research on the association between participation in cognitively stimulating activity and cognitive function in older Hispanics. The main purpose of the present study was to explore whether frequency of cognitive activity and its association with cognitive function in Hispanics is comparable to that of non-Hispanics. In a multiethnic cohort of 1571 non-demented older adults, we assessed past and current cognitive activity, availability of cognitive resources in the home in ch...

  7. Inbreeding among Caribbean Hispanics from the Dominican Republic and its effects on risk of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardarajan, Badri N; Schaid, Daniel J; Reitz, Christiane; Lantigua, Rafael; Medrano, Martin; Jiménez-Velázquez, Ivonne Z; Lee, Joseph H; Ghani, Mahdi; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Mayeux, Richard P

    2015-08-01

    Inbreeding can be associated with a modification of disease risk due to excess homozygosity of recessive alleles affecting a wide range of phenotypes. We estimated the inbreeding coefficient in Caribbean Hispanics and examined its effects on risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease. The inbreeding coefficient was calculated in 3,392 subjects (1,451 late-onset Alzheimer disease patients and 1,941 age-matched healthy controls) of Caribbean Hispanic ancestry using 177,997 nearly independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms from genome-wide array. The inbreeding coefficient was estimated using the excess homozygosity method with and without adjusting for admixture. The average inbreeding coefficient in Caribbean Hispanics without accounting for admixture was F = 0.018 (±0.048), suggesting a mating equivalent to that of second cousins or second cousins once removed. Adjusting for admixture from three parent populations, the average inbreeding coefficient was found to be 0.0034 (±0.019) or close to third-cousin mating. Inbreeding coefficient was a significant predictor of Alzheimer disease when age, sex, and APOE genotype were used as adjusting covariates (P = 0.03). The average inbreeding coefficient of this population is significantly higher than that of the general Caucasian populations in North America. The high rate of inbreeding resulting in increased frequency of recessive variants is advantageous for the identification of rare variants associated with late-onset Alzheimer disease.Genet Med 17 8, 639-643.

  8. High prevalence of metabolic syndrome in young Hispanic women: findings from the national Sister to Sister campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Fátima; Naderi, Sahar; Wang, Yun; Johnson, Caitlin E; Foody, JoAnne M

    2013-04-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population and have a higher prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors as compared with non-Hispanic whites. Further data suggests that Hispanics have undiagnosed complications of metabolic syndrome, namely diabetes mellitus, at an earlier age. We sought to better understand the epidemiology of metabolic syndrome in Hispanic women using data from a large, community-based health screening program. Using data from the Sister to Sister: The Women's Heart Health Foundation community health fairs from 2008 to 2009 held in 17 U.S. cities, we sought to characterize how cardiometabolic risk profiles vary across age for women by race and ethnicity. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the updated National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) guidelines, which included three or more of the following: Waist circumference ≥35 inches, triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) <50 mg/dL, systolic blood pressure ≥130 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥85 mmHg, or a fasting glucose ≥100 mg/dL. A total of 6843 community women were included in the analyses. Metabolic syndrome had a prevalence of 35%. The risk-adjusted odds ratio for metabolic syndrome in Hispanic women versus white women was 1.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.4, 2.0). Dyslipidemia was the strongest predictor of metabolic syndrome among Hispanic women. This disparity appeared most pronounced for younger women. Additional predictors of metabolic syndrome included black race, increasing age, and smoking. In a large, nationally representative sample of women, we found that metabolic syndrome was highly prevalent among young Hispanic women. Efforts specifically targeted to identifying these high-risk women are necessary to prevent the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with metabolic syndrome.

  9. Acculturation and diabetes among Hispanics: evidence from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainous, Arch G; Majeed, Azeem; Koopman, Richelle J; Baker, Richard; Everett, Charles J; Tilley, Barbara C; Diaz, Vanessa A

    2006-01-01

    Hispanic individuals in the United States have a greater prevalence of diabetes mellitus than non-Hispanic white individuals; however, it is unclear whether Hispanics' risk of diabetes differs based on their level of acculturation. The purpose of our research was to examine acculturation among Hispanic Americans with respect to prevalence and control of diabetes. We conducted an analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002, a nationally representative sample of the noninstitutionalized U.S. population. We evaluated data on Hispanic adults (> or = 18 years of age, unweighted n=2,696), analyzing diagnosed diabetes, glycemic blood pressure and lipid control, and diabetes complications according to acculturation as measured by language and birth outside the United States. Hispanics with low acculturation were more likely to be without a routine place for health care, have no health insurance, and have low levels of education. In adjusted analyses, individuals with low acculturation, measured by language, were more likely to have diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02, 3.54). Among individuals with diagnosed diabetes, no significant association was yielded between acculturation and diabetes control. However, individuals with low language acculturation were more likely to have the diabetes complication of peripheral neuropathy (OR 4.01, 95% CI 1.40, 11.48). Acculturation as measured through language is associated with diabetes and complications among Hispanics even after controlling for a variety of demographic characteristics including health insurance and education. The findings suggest that even within a "single" minority ethnic group, there are differences in disease prevalence and complications and access to health care.

  10. The Effect of Stress on Self-Reported Academic Performance Measures among Hispanic Undergraduate Students at Arizona State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Research on the impact of stress on the academic performance of Hispanic undergraduate students is limited, leaving institutions of higher education without needed information about how to better support this growing population of students. The purpose of this study was to identify stressors that have a negative impact on academic performance of…

  11. 76 FR 64357 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ...)/Study of Latinos (SOL) will identify risk factors for cardiovascular and lung disease in Hispanic populations and determine the role of acculturation in the prevalence and development of these diseases... Chicago, Miami, San Diego, and the Bronx. The study will examine measures of obesity, physical activity...

  12. Increasing cell phone usage among Hispanics: implications for telephone surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunghee; Elkasabi, Mahmoud; Streja, Leanne

    2012-06-01

    We examined whether the widespread assumption that Hispanics are subject to greater noncoverage bias in landline telephone surveys because they are more likely than other ethnic groups to use cell phones exclusively was supported by data. Data came from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey and the 2009 California Health Interview Survey. We considered estimates derived from surveys of adults with landline telephones biased and compared them with findings for all adults. Noncoverage bias was the difference between them, examined separately for Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites. Differences in demographic and health characteristics between cell-only and landline users were larger for non-Hispanic Whites than Hispanics; cell usage was much higher for Hispanics than non-Hispanic Whites. The existence, pattern, and magnitude of noncoverage bias were comparable between the groups. We found no evidence to support a larger noncoverage bias for Hispanics than non-Hispanic Whites in landline telephone surveys. This finding should be considered in the design and interpretation of telephone surveys.

  13. Prevalence of Amblyopia or Strabismus in Asian and Non-Hispanic White Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Cotter, Susan A.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Kristina; Wen, Ge; Kim, Jeniffer; Borchert, Mark; Varma, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the age- and race-specific prevalence of amblyopia in Asian and non-Hispanic white children aged 30 to 72 months and of strabismus in children aged 6 to 72 months. Design Cross-sectional survey. Participants A population-based, multiethnic sample of children aged 6 to 72 months was identified in Los Angeles and Riverside counties in California to evaluate the prevalence of ocular conditions. Methods A comprehensive eye examination and in-clinic interview were conducted with 80% of eligible children. The examination included evaluation of ocular alignment, refractive error, and ocular structures in children aged 6 to 72 months, as well as a determination of optotype visual acuity (VA) in children aged 30 to 72 months. Main Outcome Measures The proportion of 6- to 72-month-old participants with strabismus and 30- to 72-month-olds with optotype VA deficits and amblyopia risk factors consistent with study definitions of amblyopia. Results Strabismus was found in 3.55% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.68–4.60) of Asian children and 3.24% (95% CI, 2.40–4.26) of non-Hispanic white children, with a higher prevalence with each subsequent older age category from 6 to 72 months in both racial/ethnic groups (P=0.0003 and 0.02, respectively). Amblyopia was detected in 1.81% (95% CI, 1.06–2.89) of Asian and non-Hispanic white children; the prevalence of amblyopia was higher for each subsequent older age category among non-Hispanic white children (P=0.01) but showed no significant trend among Asian children (P=0.30). Conclusions The prevalence of strabismus was similar in Asian and non-Hispanic white children and was found to be higher among older children from 6 to 72 months. The prevalence of amblyopia was the same in Asian and non-Hispanic white children; prevalence seemed to be higher among older non-Hispanic white children but was relatively stable by age in Asian children. These findings may help clinicians to better understand the patterns of

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study of Blood Pressure Traits by Hispanic/Latino Background: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Tamar; Wong, Quenna; Hartwig, Fernando P; Taylor, Kent; Warren, Helen R; Evangelou, Evangelos; Cabrera, Claudia P; Levy, Daniel; Kramer, Holly; Lange, Leslie A; Horta, Bernardo L; Kerr, Kathleen F; Reiner, Alex P; Franceschini, Nora

    2017-09-04

    Hypertension prevalence varies between ethnic groups, possibly due to differences in genetic, environmental, and cultural determinants. Hispanic/Latino Americans are a diverse and understudied population. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of blood pressure (BP) traits in 12,278 participants from the Hispanics Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). In the discovery phase we identified eight previously unreported BP loci. In the replication stage, we tested these loci in the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study of admixed Southern Brazilians, the COGENT-BP study of African descent, women of European descent from the Women Health Initiative (WHI), and a sample of European descent from the UK Biobank. No loci met the Bonferroni-adjusted level of statistical significance (0.0024). Two loci had marginal evidence of replication: rs78701042 (NGF) with diastolic BP (P = 0.008 in the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study), and rs7315692 (SLC5A8) with systolic BP (P = 0.007 in European ancestry replication). We investigated whether previously reported loci associated with BP in studies of European, African, and Asian ancestry generalize to Hispanics/Latinos. Overall, 26% of the known associations in studies of individuals of European and Chinese ancestries generalized, while only a single association previously discovered in a people of African descent generalized.

  15. Differences between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Families in Social Capital and Child Development: First-Year Findings from an Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamoran, Adam; Turley, Ruth N. Lopez; Turner, Alyn; Fish, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Disadvantages faced by Hispanic children in the U.S., compared to non-Hispanic Whites, have been widely reported. Economic differences account for some of the gaps, but the social isolation of Hispanic families also serves as a barrier to children's success. Whereas Hispanic families tend to have strong kinship networks, their social ties often do…

  16. Behavioral Health in Multiracial Adolescents: The Role of Hispanic/Latino Ethnicity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arthur L. Whaley; Kimberly Francis

    2006-01-01

    ...: Secondary analyses of data in a subsample from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey of 3,704 (27.2%) adolescents who identified as Hispanic/Latino only, multiracial Hispanic, or multiracial non-Hispanic were conducted...

  17. Providing health messages to Hispanics/Latinos: understanding the importance of language, trust in health information sources, and media use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayman, Marla L; Manganello, Jennifer A; Viswanath, K; Hesse, Bradford W; Arora, Neeraj K

    2010-01-01

    Health communication is critical to promoting healthy lifestyles and preventing unhealthy behaviors. However, populations may differ in terms of their trust in and use of health information sources, including mass media, the Internet, and interpersonal channels. We used the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to test the hypothesis that Hispanics who are less comfortable speaking English would differ from Hispanics who are comfortable speaking English with respect to trust in health information sources and media use. Hispanics/Latinos comprised 9% of the 2005 HINTS sample (n = 496). Respondents not born in the United States regardless of race/ethnicity and all Hispanics were asked, "How comfortable do you feel speaking English?" Responses of "completely," "very," or "native speaker" were combined into "comfortable speaking English": all other responses were categorized as "less comfortable speaking English." Those comfortable speaking English reported higher trust for health information from newspapers (p speaking English. They also reported more media exposure: daily hours listening to the radio and watching television (both p speaking English reported much higher levels of Internet use (54% versus 14%, p speaking English may be difficult to reach, not only because of language barriers and lower trust in media, but also because they report relatively little use of various media channels. These findings have important implications for health communications toward non-native speakers of English in general and Hispanics in particular.

  18. Accelerometer-measured sedentary time among Hispanic adults: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Merchant

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive sedentary behavior is associated with negative health outcomes independent of physical activity. Objective estimates of time spent in sedentary behaviors are lacking among adults from diverse Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. The objective of this study was to describe accelerometer-assessed sedentary time in a large, representative sample of Hispanic/Latino adults living in the United States, and compare sedentary estimates by Hispanic/Latino background, sociodemographic characteristics and weight categories. This study utilized baseline data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL that included adults aged 18–74 years from four metropolitan areas (N = 16,415. Measured with the Actical accelerometer over 6 days, 76.9% (n = 12,631 of participants had >10 h/day and >3 days of data. Participants spent 11.9 h/day (SD 3.0, or 74% of their monitored time in sedentary behaviors. Adjusting for differences in wear time, adults of Mexican background were the least (11.6 h/day, whereas adults of Dominican background were the most (12.3 h/day, sedentary. Women were more sedentary than men, and older adults were more sedentary than younger adults. Household income was positively associated, whereas employment was negatively associated, with sedentary time. There were no differences in sedentary time by weight categories, marital status, or proxies of acculturation. To reduce sedentariness among these populations, future research should examine how the accumulation of various sedentary behaviors differs by background and region, and which sedentary behaviors are amenable to intervention.

  19. Beliefs, Fertility, and Earnings of African American, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Jacqueline M.; Christie-Mizell, C. Andre

    2008-01-01

    This study explores gender ideology, fertility factors (e.g., age at first birth, number of children), and their effects on earnings of African American (n = 413), Hispanic American (n = 271), and White (n = 817) mothers. An analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth over a 10-year period (1988 to 1998) shows that, on average,…

  20. Applying Ecodevelopmental Theory and the Theory of Reasoned Action to Understand HIV Risk Behaviors Among Hispanic Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Johis; Huang, Shi; Prado, Guillermo

    2012-01-03

    HIV/AIDS is listed as one of the top 10 reasons for the death of Hispanics between the ages of 15 and 54 in the United States. This cross sectional, descriptive secondary study proposed that using both the systemic (ecodevelopmental) and the individually focused (theory of reasoned action) theories together would lead to an increased understanding of the risk and protective factors that influence HIV risk behaviors in this population. The sample consisted of 493 Hispanic adolescent 7th and 8th graders and their immigrant parents living in Miami, Florida. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used for the data analysis. Family functioning emerged as the heart of the model, embedded within a web of direct and mediated relationships. The data support the idea that family can play a central role in the prevention of Hispanic adolescents' risk behaviors.

  1. Moyamoya in Hispanics: not only in Japanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmad Said

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease was first described in 1957 as hypoplasia of the bilateral internal carotid arteries, the characteristic appearance of the associated network of abnormally dilated collateral vessels on angiography was later likened to something hazy, like a puff of cigarette smoke, which, in Japanese, is moyamoya. This paper describes two cases of moyamoya presentations, including moyamoya disease and moyamoya syndrome. Moyamoya may rarely occur in North American Hispanic patients. The presentation can vary significantly and ranges bwtween fulminant outcome and prolonged survival. Awareness about moyamoya and its different presentations may be beneficial for the patients and can improve the outcome.

  2. Fostering Healthy Lifestyles in the African American Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murimi, Mary; Chrisman, Matthew S.; McAllister, Tiffany; McDonald, Olevia D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 8.3% of the U.S. population (25.8 million people) is affected by type 2 diabetes. The burden of diabetes is disproportionately greater in the African American community. Compared with non-Hispanic Caucasian adults, the risk of diagnosed type 2 diabetes was 77% higher among non-Hispanic Blacks, who are 27% more likely to die of…

  3. Epithelial ovarian cancer mortality among Hispanic women: Sub-ethnic disparities and survival trend across time: An analysis of SEER 1992-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Markossian, Talar W; Silva, Abigail; Tarasenko, Yelena N

    2018-02-01

    Over the past half century the proportion of Hispanics in the US population has been steadily increasing, and groups of Hispanic origin have diversified. Despite notable racial and ethnic disparities in ovarian cancer (OC) mortality, population-based studies on OC among Hispanic females are lacking. To examine sub-ethnic disparities in OC mortality and survival trends using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) 18 data on Hispanic women diagnosed with epithelial OC during 1992-2013. The disparities in OC 5 year survival and mortality were examined using log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for sociodemographic and pathological characteristics, time of diagnosis, receipt of resection surgery and county socioeconomic status. Trends in 5-year survival rates were examined using joinpoint regression models. The 5-year survival was lowest in Puerto Ricans (median survival: 33 months; survival rate: 31.07%) and was highest in the "Other" Hispanic subgroup (median survival: 59 months; survival rate: 49.14%) (log-rank test: P survival rates: from 43.37% to 48.94% (APC = 0.41, P = 0.40) and from 48.72% to 53.46% (APC = 0.29, P = 0.50), respectively. OC mortality in Hispanic patients varied by sub-ethnicity. This heterogeneity should be considered in future cancer data collection, reports and research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Novel Admixture-Based Pharmacogenetic Approach to Refine Warfarin Dosing in Caribbean Hispanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Duconge

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at developing a novel admixture-adjusted pharmacogenomic approach to individually refine warfarin dosing in Caribbean Hispanic patients.A multiple linear regression analysis of effective warfarin doses versus relevant genotypes, admixture, clinical and demographic factors was performed in 255 patients and further validated externally in another cohort of 55 individuals.The admixture-adjusted, genotype-guided warfarin dosing refinement algorithm developed in Caribbean Hispanics showed better predictability (R2 = 0.70, MAE = 0.72mg/day than a clinical algorithm that excluded genotypes and admixture (R2 = 0.60, MAE = 0.99mg/day, and outperformed two prior pharmacogenetic algorithms in predicting effective dose in this population. For patients at the highest risk of adverse events, 45.5% of the dose predictions using the developed pharmacogenetic model resulted in ideal dose as compared with only 29% when using the clinical non-genetic algorithm (p<0.001. The admixture-driven pharmacogenetic algorithm predicted 58% of warfarin dose variance when externally validated in 55 individuals from an independent validation cohort (MAE = 0.89 mg/day, 24% mean bias.Results supported our rationale to incorporate individual's genotypes and unique admixture metrics into pharmacogenetic refinement models in order to increase predictability when expanding them to admixed populations like Caribbean Hispanics.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01318057.

  5. Genetic architecture of lipid traits in the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Emery, Leslie S; Justice, Anne E; Parra, Esteban; Below, Jennifer E; Palmer, Nicholette D; Gao, Chuan; Duan, Qing; Valladares-Salgado, Adan; Cruz, Miguel; Morrison, Alanna C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Whitsel, Eric A; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alex; Li, Yun; Rodriguez, Carlos Jose; Talavera, Gregory A; Langefeld, Carl D; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Norris, Jill M; Taylor, Kent D; Papanicolaou, George; Kenny, Eimear; Loos, Ruth J F; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Laurie, Cathy; Sofer, Tamar; North, Kari E

    2017-10-12

    Despite ethnic disparities in lipid profiles, there are few genome-wide association studies investigating genetic variation of lipids in non-European ancestry populations. In this study, we present findings from genetic association analyses for total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), and triglycerides in a large Hispanic/Latino cohort in the U.S., the Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). We estimated a heritability of approximately 20% for each lipid trait, similar to previous estimates in Europeans. To search for novel lipid loci, we performed conditional association analysis in which the statistical model was adjusted for previously reported SNPs associated with any of the four lipid traits. SNPs that remained genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10-8) after conditioning on known loci were evaluated for replication. We identified eight potentially novel lipid signals with minor allele frequencies <1%, none of which replicated. We tested previously reported SNP-trait associations for generalization to Hispanics/Latinos via a statistical framework. The generalization analysis revealed that approximately 50% of previously established lipid variants generalize to HCHS/SOL based on directional FDR r-value < 0.05. Some failures to generalize were due to lack of power. These results demonstrate that many loci associated with lipid levels are shared across populations.

  6. 76 FR 59499 - National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... opportunities in higher education for our next generation of Hispanic leaders. The hundreds of HSIs across our... adult education. We are working to expand access to pre- kindergarten programs and reduce high school... inextricably tied to the future of the Hispanic community, and by working to strengthen HSIs, we will secure a...

  7. Hispanics/Latinos & Cardiovascular Disease: Statistical Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 30.9 and 28.0 for females. ©2013 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use prohibited. Hispanics/ ... HDL cholesterol less than 40 mg/dL. ©2013 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use prohibited. Hispanics/ ...

  8. An Introduction to Policy Analysis from an Hispanic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Emily G.

    Up until now Hispanics have not gotten involved in the policy analysis field. By learning to specifically assess the actual or potential impact of alternate policies or programs, it will be possible to help decision makers adopt policies which are more equitable to Hispanics. The following steps may help an individual carry out policy analysis:…

  9. Overweight, Body Image, and Depression in Asian and Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Unger, Jennifer B.; Gallaher, Peggy; Johnson, C. Anderson; Wu, Qiaobing; Chou, Chih-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively investigate associations between overweight and depressive symptoms in Asian and Hispanic adolescents. Methods: Data included 780 Hispanic and 375 Asian students. Structural equation model was used to prospectively explore moderation effects of gender, ethnicity, and acculturation on associations of overweight, body…

  10. Institutional and Racial Barriers to Employment Equity for Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    In Los Angeles County, equal employment in the local government workforce has been defined as a black-white issue, and underrepresentation of Hispanics has been justified as stemming from the lack of an educated and qualified Hispanic labor pool. Contrary to this myth, numbers of high school and college graduates, 1979-92, were greater for…

  11. Working with Hispanic Parents of Visually Impaired Children: Cultural Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, V. I.

    1987-01-01

    The article describes the critical issues involved in working with Hispanic families who have visually-impaired children (such as difficulty in accepting the impairment and cultural and linguistic differences) and the ways in which teachers can plan appropriate educational interventions. A demographic profile of Hispanic Americans is provided.…

  12. Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund: Los Angeles Program Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Los Angeles, CA.

    The Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund was created in response to the high school dropout problem in Los Angeles. The Fund enables the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Los Angeles to build upon the successful relationship it has developed in the Hispanic community and maximizes the effectiveness of existing student support programs by directing needy…

  13. Parental Expectations of Adapted Physical Educators: A Hispanic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columna, Luis; Pyfer, Jean; Senne, Terry; Velez, Luisa; Bridenthrall, Nancy; Canabal, Maria Yolanda

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perspectives of Hispanic parents of children with disabilities regarding adapted physical education (APE) professionals in relationship to their child's purposeful play and transition to school programming. Participants (N = 11) were Hispanic parents of children with disabilities. Parents participated…

  14. 78 FR 12107 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the Chair of the National Hispanic Leadership... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Scheduling..., the Council shall advise the Director of the Office of Personnel Management on matters involving the...

  15. Spanish USA, 1984: A Study of the Hispanic Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankelovich, Daniel; And Others

    This report summarizes results of a 1984 study of the lifestyles, values, buying behavior, and media habits of the Hispanic American market. First, a number of shifts in U.S. political, social, and economic life (since 1981, when the first study of this type was conducted) which are changing the orientation of Hispanics are discussed. These shifts…

  16. Outcomes in African Americans and Hispanics with lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, G; Lenz, O; Pardo, V; Borja, E; Cely, C; Iqbal, K; Nahar, N; de La Cuesta, C; Hurtado, A; Fornoni, A; Beltran-Garcia, L; Asif, A; Young, L; Diego, J; Zachariah, M; Smith-Norwood, B

    2006-05-01

    Poor outcomes have been reported in African Americans and Hispanics compared to Caucasians with lupus nephritis. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to identify independent predictors of outcomes in African Americans and Hispanics with lupus nephritis. In total, 93 African Americans, 100 Hispanics, and 20 Caucasians with a mean age of 28 +/- 13 years and an annual household income of 32.9 +/- 17.3 (in 1000 US dollars) were studied. World Health Organization (WHO) lupus nephritis classes II, III, IV, and V were seen in 9, 13, 52, and 26%, respectively. Important baseline differences were higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) in African Americans compared to Hispanics and Caucasians (107 +/- 19, 102 +/- 15, and 99 +/- 13 mmHg, P lower hematocrit compared to Hispanics and Caucasians (29 +/- 5, and 31 +/- 6, and 32 +/- 7%, P lower annual household income (30.8 +/- 14.9, 33.1 +/- 15.9, and 42.2 +/- 29.3 in 1000 US dollars; P Lower prevalence of WHO class IV was seen in Caucasians (30%) compared to Hispanics (57%, P = 0.03) and African Americans (51%, P = 0.09). Development of doubling creatinine or end-stage renal disease was higher in African Americans and Hispanics than in Caucasians (31, 18, and 10%; P Hispanics with lupus nephritis, and outcomes in these groups are worse than in Caucasians.

  17. 77 FR 37077 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... of Personnel Management and the Assistant Secretary for Human Resources and Administration at the... No: 2012-14952] OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Scheduling of Council meeting. SUMMARY: The Hispanic Council on...

  18. Intrapersonal and Ecodevelopmental Factors Associated with Smoking in Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Barbara; Huang, Shi; Wang, Wei; Prado, Guillermo; Brown, C. Hendricks; Zeng, Guang; Flavin, Kathryn; Pantin, Hilda

    2010-01-01

    We examined how relationships among intrapersonal (i.e., attitudes and beliefs about smoking) and ecodevelopmental (i.e., family, school, and peer) factors influence risk for lifetime smoking in immigrant Hispanic adolescents. Our sample was comprised of 223 immigrant Hispanic adolescents and their families and was drawn from 3 middle schools in a…

  19. 78 FR 65010 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the Chair of the National Hispanic Leadership... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Cancelling..., the Council shall advise the Director of the Office of Personnel Management on matters involving the...

  20. 78 FR 45580 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the Chair of the National Hispanic Leadership... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Cancelling..., the Council shall advise the Director of the Office of Personnel Management on matters involving the...