WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapid frost susceptibility

  1. Predictive modeling of freezing and thawing of frost-susceptible soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Frost depth is an essential factor in design of various transportation infrastructures. In frost : susceptible soils, as soils freezes, water migrates through the soil voids below the freezing line : towards the freezing front and causes excessive he...

  2. Frost susceptibility of granular subbase materials contaminated by deicing chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Stuhr; Orlander, Tobias; Doré, Guy

    2013-01-01

    in order to determine the frost susceptibility of the material when it is contaminated by a deicing agent. Two series of three freezing tests with isothermal cooling has been conducted using identical saline gradient added through brine. Two types of cooling ramp, an automatic cooling and a manual cooling......, were used in order to determine any influence from the cooling ramp. The tests included settings that allowed the samples additional brine during freezing. Hence, the water and salinity were measured before and after the tests in order to determine the redistribution of water and salinity. The test...... results do not support the theory that a saline gradient effectively can replace a thermal gradient and create favorable conditions for frost heave. There was no evidence of ice segregation during the tests. During freezing, heave of maximum 0.02 % was observed which, however, is not considered...

  3. Frost susceptibility of sub-base gravel used in Pearl-Chain Bridges: an experimental investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Andersen, Iben Brøndum

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates frost susceptibility of sub-base gravel determined by the ASTM D5918-13 standard as a conservative estimate of the frost heave risk of fill in overfilled arch bridges, particularly in Pearl-Chain Bridges. Frost heave of granular materials has been of great research interes...

  4. Frost susceptibility of sub-base gravel used in Pearl-Chain Bridges: an experimental investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Andersen, Iben Brøndum

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates frost susceptibility of sub-base gravel determined by the ASTM D5918-13 standard as a conservative estimate of the frost heave risk of fill in overfilled arch bridges, particularly in Pearl-Chain Bridges. Frost heave of granular materials has been of great research interest...

  5. Flagstaff Robotic Survey Telescope (FRoST): Rapid Response for NEOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avner, Louis Daniel; Trilling, David E.; Dunham, Edward W.

    2016-10-01

    The Flagstaff Robotic Survey Telescope (FRoST) is a robotic 0.6m Schmidt telescope that will be used for instant follow-up observations of newly discovered Near Earth Objects (NEOs). Here, we present the progress being made on FRoST as well as the remaining tasks until the telescope is fully operational. With more than one thousand NEOs being found yearly, more telescopes are needed to carry out follow-up observations. Most NEOs are found at their peak brightness, meaning that these observations need to happen quickly before they fade. By using the Catalina Sky Survey Queue Manager, FRoST will be able to accept interruptions during the night and prioritize observations automatically, allowing instant follow-up observations. FRoST will help refine the orbit of these newly discovered objects while providing optical colors. We will ingest information from the NEOCP and JPL's Scout program at five minute intervals and observe newly discovered targets robotically, process the data automatically, and autonomously generate astrometry and colors. We estimate that will we provide essentially 100% recovery of objects brighter than V~20. This work was supported by the NSF MRI program as well as by NAU and Lowell Observatory.

  6. [Rapid antibiotic susceptibility test in Clinical Microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. A review is presented here of recently developed techniques for the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence, mass spectrometry, commercial methods used in routine work, colorimetric methods, nephelometry, microarrays, microfluids, and methods based on cell disruption and sequencing, are analyzed and discussed in detail. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. Impacts of a water stress followed by an early frost event on beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) susceptibility to Scolytine ambrosia beetles - Research strategy and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Spina, Sylvie; de Cannière, Charles; Molenberg, Jean-Marc; Vincke, Caroline; Deman, Déborah; Grégoire, Jean-Claude

    2010-05-01

    Climate change tends to induce more frequent abiotic and biotic extreme events, having large impacts on tree vitality. Weakened trees are then more susceptible to secondary insect outbreaks, as it happened in Belgium in the early 2000s: after an early frost event, secondary Scolytine ambrosia beetles attacks were observed on beech trees. In this study, we test if a combination of stress, i.e. a soil water deficit preceding an early frost, could render trees more attractive to beetles. An experimental study was set in autumn 2008. Two parcels of a beech forest were covered with plastic tents to induce a water stress by rain interception. The parcels were surrounded by 2-meters depth trenches to avoid water supply by streaming. Soil water content and different indicators of tree water use (sap flow, predawn leaf water potential, tree radial growth) were followed. In autumn 2010, artificial frost injuries will be inflicted to trees using dry ice. Trees attractivity for Scolytine insects, and the success of insect colonization will then be studied. The poster will focus on experiment setting and first results (impacts of soil water deficit on trees).

  8. Crushed aggregates for roads and their properties for frost protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Willy Danielsen, Svein

    2015-04-01

    Crushed aggregates for roads and their properties for frost protection Elena Kuznetsova, NTNU and Svein Willy Danielsen, SINTEF With natural (fluvial, glaciofluvial) sand/gravel resources being rapidly depleted in many countries, the last decade has seen a significant trend towards using more alternative materials for construction purpose. In Norway the development and implementation of crushed aggregate technology has been the most important way to get around the problem with increased resource scarcity. Today Norway is one the European countries with the highest percentage of crushed/manufactured aggregates. A crushed product will reveal a different particle size distribution, a sharper, more angular particle shape, and not least - a significantly different mineral composition. The latter may often be characterised by more polymineral composition, and it will also much more depend on the local bedrock. When handled with care and knowledge, these differences can give the user a lot of new opportunities relating to materials design. Norwegian road construction practice has changed significantly during the last 40 years due to the replacement of gravel by crushed rock materials in the granular layers of the pavements. The use of non-processed rock materials from blasting was allowed in the subbase layer until 2012. This was a reason for a lot of problems with frost heaving due to inhomogeneity of this material, and in practice it was difficult to control the size of large stones. Since 2012 there is a requirement that rock materials for use in the subbase layer shall be crushed (Handbook N200, 2014). During the spring 2014 The Norwegian Public Roads Administration introduced a new handbook with requirements for roads construction in Norway, including new specifications for the frost protection layer. When pavements are constructed over moist and/or frost susceptible soils in cold and humid environments, the frost protection layer also becomes a very important part

  9. Frost hardiness of tree species is independent of phenology and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Biogeography; bud burst; LT50 ; macroclimatic niche; spring frost. Abstract. The differences in timing in bud burst between species have been interpreted as an adaptation to late frost events in spring. Thus, it has been suggested that the degree of frost susceptibility of leaves is species-specific and depends on ...

  10. Frost resistance in alpine woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of key findings related to frost resistance in alpine woody plant species, summarizes data on their frost resistance, highlights the importance of freeze avoidance mechanisms, and indicates areas of future research. Freezing temperatures are possible throughout the whole growing period in the alpine life zone. Frost severity, comprised of both intensity and duration, becomes greater with increasing elevation and, there is also a greater probability, that small statured woody plants, may be insulated by snow cover. Several frost survival mechanisms have evolved in woody alpine plants in response to these environmental conditions. Examples of tolerance to extracellular freezing and freeze dehydration, life cycles that allow species to escape frost, and freeze avoidance mechanisms can all be found. Despite their specific adaption to the alpine environment, frost damage can occur in spring, while all alpine woody plants have a low risk of frost damage in winter. Experimental evidence indicates that premature deacclimation in Pinus cembra in the spring, and a limited ability of many species of alpine woody shrubs to rapidly reacclimate when they lose snow cover, resulting in reduced levels of frost resistance in the spring, may be particularly critical under the projected changes in climate. In this review, frost resistance and specific frost survival mechanisms of different organs (leaves, stems, vegetative and reproductive over-wintering buds, flowers, and fruits) and tissues are compared. The seasonal dynamics of frost resistance of leaves of trees, as opposed to woody shrubs, is also discussed. The ability of some tissues and organs to avoid freezing by supercooling, as visualized by high resolution infrared thermography, are also provided. Collectively, the report provides a review of the complex and diverse ways that woody plants survive in the frost dominated environment of the alpine life zone.

  11. Rapid cytometric antibiotic susceptibility testing utilizing adaptive multidimensional statistical metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu-Hsueh; Ning, Xinghai; Wang, Xiaojian; Murthy, Niren; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Dickson, Robert M

    2015-02-03

    Flow cytometry holds promise to accelerate antibiotic susceptibility determinations; however, without robust multidimensional statistical analysis, general discrimination criteria have remained elusive. In this study, a new statistical method, probability binning signature quadratic form (PB-sQF), was developed and applied to analyze flow cytometric data of bacterial responses to antibiotic exposure. Both sensitive lab strains (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a multidrug resistant, clinically isolated strain (E. coli) were incubated with the bacteria-targeted dye, maltohexaose-conjugated IR786, and each of many bactericidal or bacteriostatic antibiotics to identify changes induced around corresponding minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC). The antibiotic-induced damages were monitored by flow cytometry after 1-h incubation through forward scatter, side scatter, and fluorescence channels. The 3-dimensional differences between the flow cytometric data of the no-antibiotic treated bacteria and the antibiotic-treated bacteria were characterized by PB-sQF into a 1-dimensional linear distance. A 99% confidence level was established by statistical bootstrapping for each antibiotic-bacteria pair. For the susceptible E. coli strain, statistically significant increments from this 99% confidence level were observed from 1/16x MIC to 1x MIC for all the antibiotics. The same increments were recorded for P. aeruginosa, which has been reported to cause difficulty in flow-based viability tests. For the multidrug resistant E. coli, significant distances from control samples were observed only when an effective antibiotic treatment was utilized. Our results suggest that a rapid and robust antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) can be constructed by statistically characterizing the differences between sample and control flow cytometric populations, even in a label-free scheme with scattered light alone. These distances vs paired controls coupled with rigorous

  12. [Rapid test for detection of susceptibility to cefotaxime in Enterobacteriaceae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Guerra, Gemma; Hoyos-Mallecot, Yannik; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    In this work an "in house" rapid test based on the change in pH that is due to hydrolysis for detecting Enterobacteriaceae susceptible to cefotaxime is evaluated. The strains of Enterobacteriaceae from 1947 urine cultures were assessed using MicroScan panels and the "in house" test. This rapid test includes red phenol solution and cefotaxime. Using MicroScan panels, 499 Enterobacteriaceae isolates were evaluated, which included 27 isolates of Escherichia coli producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL), 16 isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae ESBL and 1 isolate of Klebsiella oxytoca ESBL. The "in house" test offers the following values: sensitivity 98% and specificity 97%, with negative predictive value 100% and positive predictive value 78%. The "in house" test based on the change of pH is useful in our area for detecting presumptively cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct, rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test from positive blood cultures based on microscopic imaging analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jungil; Jeong, Hyun Yong; Lee, Gi Yoon; Han, Sangkwon; Han, Shinhun; Jin, Bonghwan; Lim, Taegeun; Kim, Shin; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Hee Chan; Kim, Eui-Chong; Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Taek Soo; Kwon, Sunghoon

    2017-01-01

    For the timely treatment of patients with infections in bloodstream and cerebrospinal fluid, a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) is urgently needed. Here, we describe a direct and rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (dRAST) system, which can determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria from a positive blood culture bottle (PBCB) in six hours. The positive blood culture sample is directly mixed with agarose and inoculated into a micropatterned plastic microchip wit...

  14. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditionsThe Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for a...

  15. Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test based on simple surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Ying Liu; Yin-Yi Han; Po-Han Shih; Wei-Nan Lian; Huai-Hsien Wang; Chi-Hung Lin; Po-Ren Hsueh; Juen-Kai Wang; Yuh-Lin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurement are important to help reduce the widespread misuse of antibiotics and alleviate the growing drug-resistance problem. We discovered that, when a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli is exposed to an antibiotic, the intensity of specific biomarkers in its surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra drops evidently in two hours. The discovery has been exploi...

  16. Bacterial Cytological Profiling (BCP as a Rapid and Accurate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method for Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Quach

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful treatment of bacterial infections requires the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The failure to initiate the correct therapy in a timely fashion results in poor clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs. Current approaches to antibiotic susceptibility testing of cultured pathogens have key limitations ranging from long run times to dependence on prior knowledge of genetic mechanisms of resistance. We have developed a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus based on bacterial cytological profiling (BCP, which uses quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure antibiotic induced changes in cellular architecture. BCP discriminated between methicillin-susceptible (MSSA and -resistant (MRSA clinical isolates of S. aureus (n = 71 within 1–2 h with 100% accuracy. Similarly, BCP correctly distinguished daptomycin susceptible (DS from daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS S. aureus strains (n = 20 within 30 min. Among MRSA isolates, BCP further identified two classes of strains that differ in their susceptibility to specific combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics. BCP provides a rapid and flexible alternative to gene-based susceptibility testing methods for S. aureus, and should be readily adaptable to different antibiotics and bacterial species as new mechanisms of resistance or multidrug-resistant pathogens evolve and appear in mainstream clinical practice.

  17. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing with electrokinetics enhanced biosensors for diagnosis of acute bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yi; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Rapid pathogen detection and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are required in diagnosis of acute bacterial infections to determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Molecular approaches for AST are often based on the detection of known antibiotic resistance genes. Phenotypic culture analysis requires several days from sample collection to result reporting. Toward rapid diagnosis of bacterial infection in non-traditional healthcare settings, we have developed a rapid AST approach that combines phenotypic culture of bacterial pathogens in physiological samples and electrochemical sensing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under various antibiotic conditions. AC electrokinetic fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation are optimized to enhance the sensor signal and minimize the matrix effect, which improve the overall sensitivity of the assay. The electrokinetics enhanced biosensor directly detects the bacterial pathogens in blood culture without prior purification. Rapid determination of the antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli clinical isolates is demonstrated.

  18. Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test based on simple surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Ying; Han, Yin-Yi; Shih, Po-Han; Lian, Wei-Nan; Wang, Huai-Hsien; Lin, Chi-Hung; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2016-03-01

    Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurement are important to help reduce the widespread misuse of antibiotics and alleviate the growing drug-resistance problem. We discovered that, when a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli is exposed to an antibiotic, the intensity of specific biomarkers in its surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra drops evidently in two hours. The discovery has been exploited for rapid AST and MIC determination of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and wild-type E. coli as well as clinical isolates. The results obtained by this SERS-AST method were consistent with that by the standard incubation-based method, indicating its high potential to supplement or replace existing time-consuming methods and help mitigate the challenge of drug resistance in clinical microbiology.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of rapid susceptibility testing against second-line drugs for tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dowdy, D. W.; van't Hoog, A.; Shah, M.; Cobelens, F.

    2014-01-01

    Drug susceptibility testing (DST) against second-line tuberculosis drugs (SLDs) is essential for improving outcomes among multidrug-resistant (MDR-) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) cases. To evaluate the potential cost-effectiveness of rapid DST for SLDs. We constructed a

  20. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinical isolates by digital time-lapse microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, M; Rosenvinge, F S; Spillum, E

    2015-01-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is essential for early and appropriate therapy. Methods with short detection time enabling same-day treatment optimisation are highly favourable. In this study, we evaluated the potential of a digital time-lapse microscope system, the oCelloScope s...

  1. A Microfluidic Channel Method for Rapid Drug-Susceptibility Testing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yoshimi; Grushnikov, Andrey; Kikuchi, Kazuma; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Yagi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The recent global increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and lack of development of new therapeutic agents emphasize the importance of selecting appropriate antimicrobials for the treatment of infections. However, to date, the development of completely accelerated drug susceptibility testing methods has not been achieved despite the availability of a rapid identification method. We proposed an innovative rapid method for drug susceptibility testing for Pseudomonas aeruginosa that provides results within 3 h. The drug susceptibility testing microfluidic (DSTM) device was prepared using soft lithography. It consisted of five sets of four microfluidic channels sharing one inlet slot, and the four channels are gathered in a small area, permitting simultaneous microscopic observation. Antimicrobials were pre-introduced into each channel and dried before use. Bacterial suspensions in cation-adjusted Mueller–Hinton broth were introduced from the inlet slot and incubated for 3 h. Susceptibilities were microscopically evaluated on the basis of differences in cell numbers and shapes between drug-treated and control cells, using dedicated software. The results of 101 clinically isolated strains of P. aeruginosa obtained using the DSTM method strongly correlated with results obtained using the ordinary microbroth dilution method. Ciprofloxacin, meropenem, ceftazidime, and piperacillin caused elongation in susceptible cells, while meropenem also induced spheroplast and bulge formation. Morphological observation could alternatively be used to determine the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to these drugs, although amikacin had little effect on cell shape. The rapid determination of bacterial drug susceptibility using the DSTM method could also be applicable to other pathogenic species, and it could easily be introduced into clinical laboratories without the need for expensive instrumentation. PMID:26872134

  2. A Microfluidic Channel Method for Rapid Drug-Susceptibility Testing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimi Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The recent global increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and lack of development of new therapeutic agents emphasize the importance of selecting appropriate antimicrobials for the treatment of infections. However, to date, the development of completely accelerated drug susceptibility testing methods has not been achieved despite the availability of a rapid identification method. We proposed an innovative rapid method for drug susceptibility testing for Pseudomonas aeruginosa that provides results within 3 h. The drug susceptibility testing microfluidic (DSTM device was prepared using soft lithography. It consisted of five sets of four microfluidic channels sharing one inlet slot, and the four channels are gathered in a small area, permitting simultaneous microscopic observation. Antimicrobials were pre-introduced into each channel and dried before use. Bacterial suspensions in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth were introduced from the inlet slot and incubated for 3 h. Susceptibilities were microscopically evaluated on the basis of differences in cell numbers and shapes between drug-treated and control cells, using dedicated software. The results of 101 clinically isolated strains of P. aeruginosa obtained using the DSTM method strongly correlated with results obtained using the ordinary microbroth dilution method. Ciprofloxacin, meropenem, ceftazidime, and piperacillin caused elongation in susceptible cells, while meropenem also induced spheroplast and bulge formation. Morphological observation could alternatively be used to determine the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to these drugs, although amikacin had little effect on cell shape. The rapid determination of bacterial drug susceptibility using the DSTM method could also be applicable to other pathogenic species, and it could easily be introduced into clinical laboratories without the need for expensive instrumentation.

  3. Collateral damage: rapid exposure-induced evolution of pesticide resistance leads to increased susceptibility to parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Mieke; Stoks, Robby; Coors, Anja; van Doorslaer, Wendy; de Meester, Luc

    2011-09-01

    Although natural populations may evolve resistance to anthropogenic stressors such as pollutants, this evolved resistance may carry costs. Using an experimental evolution approach, we exposed different Daphnia magna populations in outdoor containers to the carbamate pesticide carbaryl and control conditions, and assessed the resulting populations for both their resistance to carbaryl as well as their susceptibility to infection by the widespread bacterial microparasite Pasteuria ramosa. Our results show that carbaryl selection led to rapid evolution of carbaryl resistance with seemingly no cost when assessed in a benign environment. However, carbaryl-resistant populations were more susceptible to parasite infection than control populations. Exposure to both stressors reveals a synergistic effect on sterilization rate by P. ramosa, but this synergism did not evolve under pesticide selection. Assessing costs of rapid adaptive evolution to anthropogenic stress in a semi-natural context may be crucial to avoid too optimistic predictions for the fitness of the evolving populations. © 2011 The Author(s).

  4. Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis : Its utility in resource poor settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poojary A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the rapid colorimetric nitrate reductase based antibiotic susceptibility (CONRAS test performed on Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with the conventional method i.e., the proportion method. Methods: One hundred clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were tested for susceptibility to isoniazid (INH and rifampicin (RIF by the conventional proportion method and CONRAS in Middlebrook 7H9 liquid medium enriched with growth supplements (MB7H9S. Results: The performance of the CONRAS test was evaluated using proportion method as the gold standard. The sensitivity (ability to detect true drug resistance and specificity (ability to detect true drug susceptibility of the CONRAS test to INH was 93.75 and 98.52% and for RIF it was 96.10 and 100% respectively. The mean time for reporting was 6.3 days and the test showed excellent reproducibility. The kappa (k value for INH was 0.92 and for RIF was 0.99, indicating excellent agreement between the two methods. Conclusions: CONRAS test is a rapid and reliable method of drug susceptibility for M. tuberculosis.

  5. Susceptibility testing of filamentous fungi to amphotericin B by a rapid radiometric method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, W.G.; Fay, D.; Thumar, B.; Dixon, D.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid, radiometric method was developed to determine the susceptibility of filamentous fungi to amphotericin B. The rapid, radiometric method depended on measurement of the inhibition of /sup 24/CO/sub 2/ production in the presence of amphotericin B. Thirty isolates of filamentous fungi were tested by the rapid, radiometric method and a reference agar dilution method. There was 93% agreement between the two methods when an 80% or greater decrease in CO/sub 2/ production was used to calculate the minimal inhibitory concentration with the rapid, radiometric method. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, based on 80% decrease of CO/sub 2/ production, were achieved within 24 h of incubation with all of the fungi tested.

  6. Full-scale chilled pipeline frost heave testing, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, B. [Northern Engineering and Scientific, Anchorage, AK (United States); Isaacs, R.M. [RMI Associates, Camano Island, WA (United States); Myrick, J.E. [Myrick International, Tyler, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed a chilled pipeline frost-heave testing facility that was developed to simulate and record the rate of frost heave and frost-bulb growth for a buried, chilled pipeline in frost-susceptible soil and to determine the effectiveness of different mitigation techniques. The test facility, which was established near Fairbanks, Alaska, in 1979, has 10 test sections using 1.22-metre-diameter pipe. The testing involved un-insulated, insulated, and insulated with over-excavation and gravel berm configurations as well as the frost heave of the chilled pipeline. The test facility was described in detail. Frost heave and frost-bulb growth measurements from the first 10 months of testing were presented, as these are the first data to enter the public domain. The testing was undertaken to investigate the frost-heave relationships between sections, to better understand frost heave in permafrost, to explore possible mitigation options, and to advance the predicative capabilities of frost heave models. 12 refs., 1 tab., 17 figs.

  7. Spring frost vulnerability of sweet cherries under controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzneller, Philipp; Götz, Klaus-P.; Chmielewski, Frank-M.

    2016-01-01

    Spring frost is a significant production hazard in nearly all temperate fruit-growing regions. Sweet cherries are among the first fruit varieties starting their development in spring and therefore highly susceptible to late frost. Temperatures at which injuries are likely to occur are widely published, but their origin and determination methods are not well documented. In this study, a standardized method was used to investigate critical frost temperatures for the sweet cherry cultivar `Summit' under controlled conditions. Twigs were sampled at four development stages ("side green," "green tip," "open cluster," "full bloom") and subjected to three frost temperatures (-2.5, -5.0, -10.0 °C). The main advantage of this method, compared to other approaches, was that the exposition period and the time interval required to reach the target temperature were always constant (2 h). Furthermore, then, the twigs were placed in a climate chamber until full bloom, before the examination of the flowers and not further developed buds started. For the first two sampling stages (side green, green tip), the number of buds found in open cluster, "first white," and full bloom at the evaluation date decreased with the strength of the frost treatment. The flower organs showed different levels of cold hardiness and became more vulnerable in more advanced development stages. In this paper, we developed four empirical functions which allow calculating possible frost damages on sweet cherry buds or flowers at the investigated development stages. These equations can help farmers to estimate possible frost damages on cherry buds due to frost events. However, it is necessary to validate the critical temperatures obtained in laboratory with some field observations.

  8. Spring frost vulnerability of sweet cherries under controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzneller, Philipp; Götz, Klaus-P; Chmielewski, Frank-M

    2016-01-01

    Spring frost is a significant production hazard in nearly all temperate fruit-growing regions. Sweet cherries are among the first fruit varieties starting their development in spring and therefore highly susceptible to late frost. Temperatures at which injuries are likely to occur are widely published, but their origin and determination methods are not well documented. In this study, a standardized method was used to investigate critical frost temperatures for the sweet cherry cultivar 'Summit' under controlled conditions. Twigs were sampled at four development stages ("side green," "green tip," "open cluster," "full bloom") and subjected to three frost temperatures (-2.5, -5.0, -10.0 °C). The main advantage of this method, compared to other approaches, was that the exposition period and the time interval required to reach the target temperature were always constant (2 h). Furthermore, then, the twigs were placed in a climate chamber until full bloom, before the examination of the flowers and not further developed buds started. For the first two sampling stages (side green, green tip), the number of buds found in open cluster, "first white," and full bloom at the evaluation date decreased with the strength of the frost treatment. The flower organs showed different levels of cold hardiness and became more vulnerable in more advanced development stages. In this paper, we developed four empirical functions which allow calculating possible frost damages on sweet cherry buds or flowers at the investigated development stages. These equations can help farmers to estimate possible frost damages on cherry buds due to frost events. However, it is necessary to validate the critical temperatures obtained in laboratory with some field observations.

  9. Coatings to prevent frost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lusada, Ricardo; Holberg, Stefan; Bennedsen, Jeanette Marianne Dalgaard

    2016-01-01

    at temperatures just below 0°C, for example at −4°C, is low. Freezing of a single drop on aluminum leads, however, to instant freezing of the complete surface. On hydrophobic coatings, such a freezing drop is isolated; the frozen area grows slowly. At −4°C surface temperature in a +12°C/90% relative humidity...... environment, on surfaces providing a water contact angle hysteresis of about 10° and receding water contact angles higher than 90°, a rate for the growth of the average radius of the frozen area of about 2 µm/s was observed. Submitting the surface to an airflow of 1 m/s led to faster frost spreading in flow...

  10. A microfluidic platform for rapid, stress-induced antibiotic susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikov, Maxim; Lee, Jean C; Campbell, Jennifer; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F

    2012-11-07

    The emergence and spread of bacterial resistance to ever increasing classes of antibiotics intensifies the need for fast phenotype-based clinical tests for determining antibiotic susceptibility. Standard susceptibility testing relies on the passive observation of bacterial growth inhibition in the presence of antibiotics. In this paper, we present a novel microfluidic platform for antibiotic susceptibility testing based on stress-activation of biosynthetic pathways that are the primary targets of antibiotics. We chose Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) as a model system due to its clinical importance, and we selected bacterial cell wall biosynthesis as the primary target of both stress and antibiotic. Enzymatic and mechanical stresses were used to damage the bacterial cell wall, and a β-lactam antibiotic interfered with the repair process, resulting in rapid cell death of strains that harbor no resistance mechanism. In contrast, resistant bacteria remained viable under the assay conditions. Bacteria, covalently-bound to the bottom of the microfluidic channel, were subjected to mechanical shear stress created by flowing culture media through the microfluidic channel and to enzymatic stress with sub-inhibitory concentrations of the bactericidal agent lysostaphin. Bacterial cell death was monitored via fluorescence using the Sytox Green dead cell stain, and rates of killing were measured for the bacterial samples in the presence and absence of oxacillin. Using model susceptible (Sanger 476) and resistant (MW2) S. aureus strains, a metric was established to separate susceptible and resistant staphylococci based on normalized fluorescence values after 60 min of exposure to stress and antibiotic. Because this ground-breaking approach is not based on standard methodology, it circumvents the need for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurements and long wait times. We demonstrate the successful development of a rapid microfluidic-based and stress

  11. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, L.E.; Hoffner, S.E.; Ansehn, S.

    1988-08-01

    Mycobacterial growth was monitored by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP. Cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and of 25 clinical isolates of the same species were exposed to serial dilutions of ethambutol, isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. A suppression of ATP, indicating growth inhibition, occurred for susceptible but not resistant strains within 5 to 7 days of incubation. Breakpoint concentrations between susceptibility and resistance were determined by comparing these results with those obtained by reference techniques. Full agreement was found in 99% of the assays with the resistance ratio method on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, and 98% of the assays were in full agreement with the radiometric system (BACTEC). A main advantage of the bioluminescence method is its rapidity, with results available as fast as with the radiometric system but at a lower cost and without the need for radioactive culture medium. The method provides kinetic data concerning drug effects within available in vivo drug concentrations and has great potential for both rapid routine susceptibility testing and research applications in studies of drug effects on mycobacteria.

  12. Rapid calculations of susceptibility-induced magnetostatic field perturbations for in vivo magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Kevin M; Papademetris, Xenophon; Rothman, Douglas L; Graaf, Robin A de [Yale University, Magnetic Resonance Research Center, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2006-12-21

    Static magnetic field perturbations generated by variations of magnetic susceptibility within samples reduce the quality and integrity of magnetic resonance measurements. These perturbations are difficult to predict in vivo where wide variations of internal magnetic susceptibility distributions are common. Recent developments have provided rapid computational means of estimating static field inhomogeneity within the small susceptibility limits of materials typically studied using magnetic resonance. Such a predictive mechanism could be a valuable tool for sequence simulation, field shimming and post-acquisition image correction. Here, we explore this calculation protocol and demonstrate its predictive power in estimating in vivo inhomogeneity within the human brain. Furthermore, we quantitatively explore the predictive limits of the computation. For in vivo comparison, a method of magnetic susceptibility registration using MRI and CT data is presented and utilized to carry out subject-specific inhomogeneity estimation. Using this algorithm, direct comparisons in human brain and phantoms are made between field map acquisitions and calculated inhomogeneity. Distortion correction in echo-planar images due to static field inhomogeneity is also demonstrated using the computed field maps.

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of rapidly growing mycobacteria by microdilution - Experience of a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Set R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of the study was to perform antimicrobial susceptibility testing of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM isolated from various clinically suspected cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, from January 2007 to April 2008, at a tertiary care centre in Mumbai. Materials and Methods: The specimens were processed for microscopy and culture using the standard procedures. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined by broth microdilution, using Sensititre CA MHBT. Susceptibility testing was also carried out on Mueller Hinton agar by the Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Results: Of the 1062 specimens received for mycobacterial cultures, 104 (9.79% grew mycobacteria. Of the mycobacterial isolates, six (5.76% were rapid growers. M. abscessus and M. chelonae appeared to be resistant organisms, with M. chelonae showing intermediate resistance to amikacin and minocycline. However, all the six isolates showed sensitivity to vancomycin and gentamicin by the disc diffusion test. Also all three isolates of M. abscessus were sensitive to piperacillin and erythromycin. Further studies are required to test their sensitivity to these four antimicrobials by using the microbroth dilution test, before they can be prescribed to patients. Conclusions: We wish to emphasize that reporting of rapidly growing mycobacteria from clinical settings, along with their sensitivity patterns, is an absolute need of the hour.

  14. Real-time PCR using mycobacteriophage DNA for rapid phenotypic drug susceptibility results for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pholwat, Suporn; Ehdaie, Beeta; Foongladda, Suporn; Kelly, Kimberly; Houpt, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Managing drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires drug susceptibility testing, yet conventional drug susceptibility testing is slow, and molecular testing does not yield results for all antituberculous drugs. We addressed these challenges by utilizing real-time PCR of mycobacteriophage D29 DNA to evaluate the drug resistance of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. Mycobacteriophages infect and replicate in viable bacterial cells faster than bacterial cells replicate and have been used for detection and drug resistance testing for M. tuberculosis either by using reporter cells or phages with engineered reporter constructs. Our primary protocol involved culturing M. tuberculosis isolates for 48 h with and without drugs at critical concentrations, followed by incubation with 10(3) PFU/ml of D29 mycobacteriophage for 24 h and then real-time PCR. Many drugs could be incubated instantly with M. tuberculosis and phage for 24 h alone. The change in phage DNA real-time PCR cycle threshold (C(T)) between control M. tuberculosis and M. tuberculosis treated with drugs was calculated and correlated with conventional agar proportion drug susceptibility results. Specifically, 9 susceptible clinical isolates, 22 multidrug-resistant (MDR), and 1 extensively drug-resistant (XDR) M. tuberculosis strains were used and C(T) control-C(T) drug cutoffs of between +0.3 and -6.0 yielded 422/429 (98%) accurate results for isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, ethambutol, amikacin, kanamycin, capreomycin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ethionamide, para-aminosalicylic acid, cycloserine, and linezolid. Moreover, the ΔC(T) values correlated with isolate MIC for most agents. This D29 quantitative PCR assay offers a rapid, accurate, 1- to 3-day phenotypic drug susceptibility test for first- and second-line drugs and may suggest an approximate MIC.

  15. Rapid susceptibility testing and microcolony analysis of Candida spp. cultured and imaged on porous aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Colin J; Boonstra, Sjoukje; Levels, Suzanne; de Lange, Marit; Meis, Jacques F; Schneeberger, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    Acquired resistance to antifungal agents now supports the introduction of susceptibility testing for species-drug combinations for which this was previously thought unnecessary. For pathogenic yeasts, conventional phenotypic testing needs at least 24 h. Culture on a porous aluminum oxide (PAO) support combined with microscopy offers a route to more rapid results. Microcolonies of Candida species grown on PAO were stained with the fluorogenic dyes Fun-1 and Calcofluor White and then imaged by fluorescence microscopy. Images were captured by a charge-coupled device camera and processed by publicly available software. By this method, the growth of yeasts could be detected and quantified within 2 h. Microcolony imaging was then used to assess the susceptibility of the yeasts to amphotericin B, anidulafungin and caspofungin (3.5 h culture), and voriconazole and itraconazole (7 h culture). Overall, the results showed good agreement with EUCAST (86.5% agreement; n = 170) and E-test (85.9% agreement; n = 170). The closest agreement to standard tests was found when testing susceptibility to amphotericin B and echinocandins (88.2 to 91.2%) and the least good for the triazoles (79.4 to 82.4%). Furthermore, large datasets on population variation could be rapidly obtained. An analysis of microcolonies revealed subtle effects of antimycotics on resistant strains and below the MIC of sensitive strains, particularly an increase in population heterogeneity and cell density-dependent effects of triazoles. Additionally, the method could be adapted to strain identification via germ tube extension. We suggest PAO culture is a rapid and versatile method that may be usefully adapted to clinical mycology and has research applications.

  16. Rapid susceptibility testing and microcolony analysis of Candida spp. cultured and imaged on porous aluminum oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J Ingham

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquired resistance to antifungal agents now supports the introduction of susceptibility testing for species-drug combinations for which this was previously thought unnecessary. For pathogenic yeasts, conventional phenotypic testing needs at least 24 h. Culture on a porous aluminum oxide (PAO support combined with microscopy offers a route to more rapid results. METHODS: Microcolonies of Candida species grown on PAO were stained with the fluorogenic dyes Fun-1 and Calcofluor White and then imaged by fluorescence microscopy. Images were captured by a charge-coupled device camera and processed by publicly available software. By this method, the growth of yeasts could be detected and quantified within 2 h. Microcolony imaging was then used to assess the susceptibility of the yeasts to amphotericin B, anidulafungin and caspofungin (3.5 h culture, and voriconazole and itraconazole (7 h culture. SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, the results showed good agreement with EUCAST (86.5% agreement; n = 170 and E-test (85.9% agreement; n = 170. The closest agreement to standard tests was found when testing susceptibility to amphotericin B and echinocandins (88.2 to 91.2% and the least good for the triazoles (79.4 to 82.4%. Furthermore, large datasets on population variation could be rapidly obtained. An analysis of microcolonies revealed subtle effects of antimycotics on resistant strains and below the MIC of sensitive strains, particularly an increase in population heterogeneity and cell density-dependent effects of triazoles. Additionally, the method could be adapted to strain identification via germ tube extension. We suggest PAO culture is a rapid and versatile method that may be usefully adapted to clinical mycology and has research applications.

  17. Rapid Ganciclovir Susceptibility Assay Using Flow Cytometry for Human Cytomegalovirus Clinical Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, James J.; Lurain, Nell S.; Drusano, George L.; Landay, Alan L.; Notka, Mostafa; O’Gorman, Maurice R. G.; Weinberg, Adriana; Shapiro, Howard M.; Reichelderfer, Patricia S.; Crumpacker, Clyde S.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid, quantitative, and objective determination of the susceptibilities of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) clinical isolates to ganciclovir has been assessed by an assay that uses a fluorochrome-labeled monoclonal antibody to an HCMV immediate-early antigen and flow cytometry. Analysis of the ganciclovir susceptibilities of 25 phenotypically characterized clinical isolates by flow cytometry demonstrated that the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ganciclovir for 19 of the isolates were between 1.14 and 6.66 μM, with a mean of 4.32 μM (±1.93) (sensitive; IC50 less than 7 μM), the IC50s for 2 isolates were 8.48 and 9.79 μM (partially resistant), and the IC50s for 4 isolates were greater than 96 μM (resistant). Comparative analysis of the drug susceptibilities of these clinical isolates by the plaque reduction assay gave IC50s of less than 6 μM, with a mean of 2.88 μM (±1.40) for the 19 drug-sensitive isolates, IC50s of 6 to 8 μM for the partially resistant isolates, and IC50s of greater than 12 μM for the four resistant clinical isolates. Comparison of the IC50s for the drug-susceptible and partially resistant clinical isolates obtained by the flow cytometry assay with the IC50s obtained by the plaque reduction assay showed an acceptable correlation (r2 = 0.473; P = 0.001), suggesting that the flow cytometry assay could substitute for the more labor-intensive, subjective, and time-consuming plaque reduction assay. PMID:9736557

  18. Managing potato biodiversity to cope with frost risk in the high Andes: a modeling perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Condori

    Full Text Available Austral summer frosts in the Andean highlands are ubiquitous throughout the crop cycle, causing yield losses. In spite of the existing warming trend, climate change models forecast high variability, including freezing temperatures. As the potato center of origin, the region has a rich biodiversity which includes a set of frost resistant genotypes. Four contrasting potato genotypes--representing genetic variability--were considered in the present study: two species of frost resistant native potatoes (the bitter Solanum juzepczukii, var. Luki, and the non-bitter Solanum ajanhuiri, var. Ajanhuiri and two commercial frost susceptible genotypes (Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum var. Alpha and Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigenum var. Gendarme. The objective of the study was to conduct a comparative growth analysis of four genotypes and modeling their agronomic response under frost events. It included assessing their performance under Andean contrasting agroecological conditions. Independent subsets of data from four field experiments were used to parameterize, calibrate and validate a potato growth model. The validated model was used to ascertain the importance of biodiversity, represented by the four genotypes tested, as constituents of germplasm mixtures in single plots used by local farmers, a coping strategy in the face of climate variability. Also scenarios with a frost routine incorporated in the model were constructed. Luki and Ajanhuiri were the most frost resistant varieties whereas Alpha was the most susceptible. Luki and Ajanhuiri, as monoculture, outperformed the yield obtained with the mixtures under severe frosts. These results highlight the role played by local frost tolerant varieties, and featured the management importance--e.g. clean seed, strategic watering--to attain the yields reported in our experiments. The mixtures of local and introduced potatoes can thus not only provide the products demanded by the markets but also reduce the

  19. Real time PCR for the rapid identification and drug susceptibility of Mycobacteria present in Bronchial washings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilini Piushani Keerthirathne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacteria have a spectrum of virulence and different susceptibilities to antibiotics. Distinguishing mycobacterial species is vital as patients with non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM infections present clinical features that are similar to those of patients with tuberculosis. Thus, rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from NTM is critical to administer appropriate treatment. Hence the aim of the study was to rapid identification of mycobacterial species present in bronchial washings using multiplex real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR and to determine the drug susceptibility in identified mycobacterial species. Methods Sputum smear negative bronchoscopy specimens (n = 150 were collected for a period of one year, from patients attending the General Hospital Kandy, Sri Lanka. The specimens were processed with modified Petroff’s method and were cultured on Löwenstein– Jensen medium. DNA, extracted from the mycobacterial isolates were subjected to a SYBR green mediated real time multiplex, PCR assay with primers specific for the M. tuberculosis complex, M. avium complex, M. chelonae-M.abscessus group and M. fortuitum group. DNA sequencing was performed for the species confirmation, by targeting the 16S rRNA gene and the drug susceptibility testing was performed for the molecularly identified isolates of M. tuberculosis and NTM. Results The optimized SYBR Green mediated multiplex real-time PCR assay was able to identify the presence of genus Mycobacterium in 25 out of 26 AFB positive isolates, two M. tuberculosis complex, three M. avium complex and two isolates belonging to M. chelonae-M. abscessus group. DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of M. tuberculosis, M. chelonae-M. abscessus, M. intracellulare, M. avium, Rhodococcus sp. and M. celatum. Remaining isolates were identified as Mycobacterium sp. All the NTM isolates were sensitive to amikacin and seven were resistant to ciproflaxacin

  20. A Rapid Molecular Test for Determining Yersinia pestis Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin by the Quantification of Differentially Expressed Marker Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida eSteinberger-Levy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Standard antimicrobial susceptibility tests used to determine bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are growth dependent and time consuming. The long incubation time required for standard tests may render susceptibility results irrelevant, particularly for patients infected with lethal bacteria that are slow growing on agar but progress rapidly in vivo, such as Yersinia pestis. Here, we present an alternative approach for the rapid determination of antimicrobial susceptibility, based on the quantification of the changes in the expression levels of specific marker genes following exposure to growth-inhibiting concentrations of the antibiotic, using Y. pestis and ciprofloxacin as a model. The marker genes were identified by transcriptomic DNA microarray analysis of the virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain after exposure to specific concentrations of ciprofloxacin for various time periods. We identified several marker genes that were induced following exposure to growth-inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, and we confirmed the marker expression profiles at additional ciprofloxacin concentrations using quantitative RT-PCR. Eleven candidate marker transcripts were identified, of which four mRNA markers were selected for a rapid quantitative RT-PCR susceptibility test that correctly determined the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC values and the categories of susceptibility of several Y. pestis strains and isolates harboring various ciprofloxacin MIC values. The novel molecular susceptibility test requires just 2 h of antibiotic exposure in a 7-h overall test time, in contrast to the 24 h of antibiotic exposure required for a standard microdilution test.

  1. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1994-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of HIV infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The AIDS patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. We proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis.

  2. Modified agar dilution method for rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, C W; Martin, W J

    1978-01-01

    A simplified method has been developed for agar dilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria, designed to economize on time and money when only a few isolates need to be tested. The procedure is based on the principle of using filter paper disks as carriers of the antibiotic and 35- by 10-mm petri dishes which, when inoculated with the Steers replicator, can test up to four organisms per plate. The procedure was run in parallel with conventional agar dilution techniques and showed 95% agreement to within one dilution for all minimal inhibitory concentrations recorded on fresh anaerobic isolates from clinical specimens. The technique was further simplified by using commercially available antibiotic-containing disks, thereby alleviating the tedious and time-consuming procedure of preparing the disks. The data indicated that 48- to 72-h diffusion periods were sufficient to achieve a uniform concentration of the antibiotic in the petri plate and that the antibiotics were stable at room temperature for that period of time. In terms of applicability and relevance to the needs of the clinical microbiology laboratory, the modified agar dilution method for rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of individual anaerobic isolates was found to be superior to the broth dilution method since it was easier to read and required considerably less set up time. PMID:400819

  3. Rapid Isolation and Susceptibility Testing of Leptospira spp. Using a New Solid Medium, LVW Agar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Paris, Daniel H.; Langla, Sayan; Thaipadunpanit, Janjira; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Smythe, Lee D.; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp., the causative agents of leptospirosis, are slow-growing Gram-negative spirochetes. Isolation of Leptospira from clinical samples and testing of antimicrobial susceptibility are difficult and time-consuming. Here, we describe the development of a new solid medium that facilitates more-rapid growth of Leptospira spp. and the use of this medium to evaluate the Etest's performance in determining antimicrobial MICs to drugs in common use for leptospirosis. The medium was developed by evaluating the effects of numerous factors on the growth rate of Leptospira interrogans strain NR-20157. These included the type of base agar, the concentration of rabbit serum (RS), and the concentration and duration of CO2 incubation during the initial period of culture. The highest growth rate of NR-20157 was achieved using a Noble agar base supplemented with 10% RS (named LVW agar), with an initial incubation at 30°C in 5% CO2 for 2 days prior to continuous culture in air at 30°C. These conditions were used to develop the Etest for three species, L. interrogans (NR-20161), L. kirschnerii (NR-20327), and L. borgpetersenii (NR-20151). The MICs were read on day 7 for all samples. The Etest was then performed on 109 isolates of pathogenic Leptospira spp. The MIC90 values for penicillin G, doxycycline, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and chloramphenicol were 0.64 units/ml and 0.19, 0.047, 0.5, and 2 μg/ml, respectively. The use of LVW agar, which enables rapid growth, isolation of single colonies, and simple antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Leptospira spp., provides an opportunity for new areas of fundamental and applied research. PMID:23114772

  4. Rapid, automated, nonradiometric susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex to four first-line antituberculous drugs used in standard short-course chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Marjamäki, Merja

    2004-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis necessitates rapid and accurate susceptibility testing. The nonradiometric BACTEC Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube 960 (MGIT) system for susceptibility testing was evaluated on 222 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates...... MGIT system is a rapid and reliable alternative for susceptibility testing of M. tuberculosis complex to first-line drugs....

  5. Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing in a microfluidic pH sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yanyan; Zhen, Li; Liu, Jingqing; Wu, Jianmin

    2013-03-05

    For appropriate selection of antibiotics in the treatment of pathogen infection, rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) is urgently needed in clinical practice. This study reports the utilization of a microfluidic pH sensor for monitoring bacterial growth rate in culture media spiked with different kinds of antibiotics. The microfluidic pH sensor was fabricated by integration of pH-sensitive chitosan hydrogel with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic channels. For facilitating the reflectometric interference spectroscopic measurements, the chitosan hydrogel was coated on an electrochemically etched porous silicon chip, which was used as the substrate of the microfluidic channel. Real-time observation of the pH change in the microchannel can be realized by Fourier transform reflectometric interference spectroscopy (FT-RIFS), in which the effective optical thickness (EOT) was selected as the optical signal for indicating the reversible swelling process of chitosan hydrogel stimulated by pH change. With this microfluidic pH sensor, we demonstrate that confinement of bacterial cells in a nanoliter size channel allows rapid accumulation of metabolic products and eliminates the need for long-time preincubation, thus reducing the whole detection time. On the basis of this technology, the whole bacterial growth curve can be obtained in less than 2 h, and consequently rapid AST can be realized. Compared with conventional methods, the AST data acquired from the bacterial growth curve can provide more detailed information for studying the antimicrobial behavior of antibiotics during different stages. Furthermore, the new technology also provides a convenient method for rapid minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) determination of individual antibiotics or the combinations of antibiotics against human pathogens that will find application in clinical and point-of-care medicine.

  6. Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility Assay for Rapid Diagnosis of Lymph Node Tuberculosis and Detection of Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Daniela E; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Gilman, Robert H; Caviedes, Luz; Rizvi, Hasan; Ticona, Eduardo; Chavez, Gonzalo; Cabrera, José Luis; Matos, Eduardo D; Evans, Carlton A; Moore, David A J; Friedland, Jon S

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 132 patients with lymphadenopathy were investigated. Fifty-two (39.4%) were diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB). The microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay provided rapid (13 days), accurate diagnosis (sensitivity, 65.4%) and reliable drug susceptibility testing (DST). Despite its lower sensitivity than that of other methods, its faster results and simultaneous DST are advantageous in resource-poor settings, supporting the incorporation of MODS into diagnostic algorithms for extrapulmonary TB. Copyright © 2015 Kirwan et al.

  7. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test for identification of new therapeutics and drug combinations against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Wei; Weingarten, Rebecca A; Xu, Miao; Southall, Noel; Dai, Sheng; Shinn, Paul; Sanderson, Philip E; Williamson, Peter R; Frank, Karen M; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Current antimicrobial susceptibility testing has limited screening capability for identifying empirical antibiotic combinations to treat severe bacterial infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. We developed a new antimicrobial susceptibility assay using automated ultra-high-throughput screen technology in combination with a simple bacterial growth assay. A rapid screening of 5170 approved drugs and other compounds identified 25 compounds with activities against MDR Klebsiella pne...

  8. Miniaturized Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test by Combining Concentration Gradient Generation and Rapid Cell Culturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel C. Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective treatment of bacterial infection relies on timely diagnosis and proper prescription of antibiotic drugs. The antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST is one of the most crucial experimental procedures, providing the baseline information for choosing effective antibiotic agents and their dosages. Conventional methods, however, require long incubation times or significant instrumentation costs to obtain test results. We propose a lab-on-a-chip approach to perform AST in a simple, economic, and rapid manner. Our assay platform miniaturizes the standard broth microdilution method on a microfluidic device (20 × 20 mm that generates an antibiotic concentration gradient and delivers antibiotic-containing culture media to eight 30-nL chambers for cell culture. When tested with 20 μL samples of a model bacterial strain (E. coli ATCC 25922 treated with ampicillin or streptomycin, our method allows for the determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations consistent with the microdilution test in three hours, which is almost a factor of ten more rapid than the standard method.

  9. Evaluation of rapid alternative methods for drug susceptibility testing in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mengatto

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to compare the performance of a commercial method (MGIT and four inexpensive drug susceptibility methods: nitrate reductase assay (NRA, microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS assay, MTT test, and broth microdilution method (BMM. A total of 64 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were studied. The Lowenstein-Jensen proportion method (PM was used as gold standard. MGIT, NRA, MODS, and MTT results were available on an average of less than 10 days, whereas BMM results could be reported in about 20 days. Most of the evaluated tests showed excellent performance for isoniazid and rifampicin, with sensitivity and specificity values > 90%. With most of the assays, sensitivity for ethambutol was low (62-87% whereas for streptomycin, sensitivity values ranged from 84 to 100%; NRA-discrepancies were associated with cultures with a low proportion of EMB-resistant organisms while most discrepancies with quantitative tests (MMT and BMM were seen with isolates whose minimal inhibitory concentrations fell close the cutoff. MGIT is reliable but still expensive. NRA is the most inexpensive and easiest method to perform without changing the organization of the routine PM laboratory performance. While MODS, MTT, and BMM, have the disadvantage from the point of view of biosafety, they offer the possibility of detecting partial resistant strains. This study shows a very good level of agreement of the four low-cost methods compared to the PM for rapid detection of isoniazid, rifampicin and streptomycin resistance (Kappa values > 0.8; more standardization is needed for ethambutol.

  10. Mapping Statistical Characteristics of Frosts in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mahmoudi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To model and map the statistical characteristics of frost in Iran, the data related to the minimum daily temperature for a 15-year period (1990–2005 was obtained from Iran Meteorological Organization. Then using multivariate regression models, the relationship among five statistical characteristics, i.e. the mean Julian day of the first frost, mean Julian day of the last frost, mean number of frost days per year, mean length of the frost period and mean length of growing season were modeled by three geo – climate factors: elevation, longitude and latitude. The precision of each model was explored using four hypotheses: linearity of the relationship between independent variables and the dependent variable, normality of errors, constancy of error variance and lake of correlation of errors were tested, and their precisions were confirmed. At the second stage, contour lines resulting from STRM were converted to the point features class. Altogether, 661 474 points were gathered from all over Iran. Then, the studied five frost characteristics were generalized to 661 474 points; then, the regionalization maps of statistical characteristics of frost were obtained for Iran using Kriging interpolation method. The results showed that the temperature of highland areas above 4200 m above sea level always was at least zero and below zero during the year, and also the coastal strip of southern Iran had no frost. Elevation was the most effective factor in the spatial arrangement for the frequency of occurrence of Julian day of the first frost. The most effective factors in spatial arrangement for the frequency of occurrence of Julian day of the last frost, length of frost period and length of growing season were elevation and latitude. Finally, spatial arrangement for the frequency of occurrence of the frost days was also a function of three factors of elevation, longitude and latitude. The dominant role of elevation in spatial arrangement for the

  11. Integrated Biosensor Assay for Rapid Uropathogen Identification and Phenotypic Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, Emanuela; Mohan, Ruchika; Mach, Kathleen E; Sin, Mandy Lai Yi; Anikst, Victoria; Buscarini, Maurizio; Wong, Pak Kin; Gau, Vincent; Banaei, Niaz; Liao, Joseph C

    2017-04-01

    Standard diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) via urine culture for pathogen identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) takes 2-3 d. This delay results in empiric treatment and contributes to the misuse of antibiotics and the rise of resistant pathogens. A rapid diagnostic test for UTI may improve patient care and antibiotic stewardship. To develop and validate an integrated biosensor assay for UTI diagnosis, including pathogen ID and AST, with determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for ciprofloxacin. Urine samples positive for Enterobacteriaceae (n=84) or culture-negative (n=23) were obtained from the Stanford Clinical Microbiology Laboratory between November 2013 and September 2014. Each sample was diluted and cultured for 5h with and without ciprofloxacin, followed by quantitative detection of bacterial 16S rRNA using a single electrochemical biosensor array functionalized with a panel of complementary DNA probes. Pathogen ID was determined using universal bacterial, Enterobacteriaceae (EB), and pathogen-specific probes. Phenotypic AST with ciprofloxacin MIC was determined using an EB probe to measure 16S rRNA levels as a function of bacterial growth. Electrochemical signals for pathogen ID at 6 SD over background were considered positive. An MIC signal of 0.4 log units lower than the no-antibiotic control indicated sensitivity. Results were compared to clinical microbiology reports. For pathogen ID, the assay had 98.5% sensitivity, 96.6% specificity, 93.0% positive predictive value, and 99.3% negative predictive value. For ciprofloxacin MIC the categorical and essential agreement was 97.6%. Further automation, testing of additional pathogens and antibiotics, and a full prospective study will be necessary for translation to clinical use. The integrated biosensor platform achieved microbiological results including MIC comparable to standard culture in a significantly shorter assay time. Further assay automation

  12. Utility and Value of Satellite-Based Frost Forecasting for Kenya's Tea Farming Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, I.

    2016-12-01

    Frost damage regularly inflicts millions of dollars of crop losses in the tea-growing highlands of western Kenya, a problem that the USAID/NASA Regional Visualization and Monitoring System (SERVIR) program is working to mitigate through a frost monitoring and forecasting product that uses satellite-based temperature and soil moisture data to generate up to three days of advanced warning before frost events. This paper presents the findings of a value of information (VOI) study assessing the value of this product based on Kenyan tea farmers' experiences with frost and frost-damage mitigation. Value was calculated based on historic trends of frost frequency, severity, and extent; likelihood of warning receipt and response; and subsequent frost-related crop-loss aversion. Quantification of these factors was derived through inferential analysis of survey data from 400 tea-farming households across the tea-growing regions of Kericho and Nandi, supplemented with key informant interviews with decision-makers at large estate tea plantations, historical frost incident and crop-loss data from estate tea plantations and agricultural insurance companies, and publicly available demographic and economic data. At this time, the product provides a forecasting window of up to three days, and no other frost-prediction methods are used by the large or small-scale farmers of Kenya's tea sector. This represents a significant opportunity for preemptive loss-reduction via Earth observation data. However, the tea-growing community has only two realistic options for frost-damage mitigation: preemptive harvest of available tea leaves to minimize losses, or skiving (light pruning) to facilitate fast recovery from frost damage. Both options are labor-intensive and require a minimum of three days of warning to be viable. As a result, the frost forecasting system has a very narrow margin of usefulness, making its value highly dependent on rapid access to the warning messages and flexible access

  13. Mathematical modeling of heat transfer between the plant seedling and the environment during a radiation frost

    OpenAIRE

    Finnikov K.A.; A.V. Minakov; A.A. Dekterev; A.A. Gavrilov; A.M. Korzun; V.K. Voinikov; Kolesnichenko, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    The power of the internal heat source sufficient to maintain a positive temperature of plants during one of the possible form of cold stress - radiation frost was determined with the help of numerical simulation.The simulation of unsteady heat transfer in the soil-plant-air system in the conditions of radiation frost showed that the the ground part of plants is cooling most rapidly, and this process is partially slowed down by the natural-convection heat transfer with warmer air. If the frost...

  14. A microfluidic platform for rapid, stress-induced antibiotic susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kalashnikov, Maxim; Lee, Jean C.; Campbell, Jennifer; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence and spread of bacterial resistance to ever increasing classes of antibiotics intensifies the need for fast phenotype-based clinical tests for determining antibiotic susceptibility. Standard susceptibility testing relies on the passive observation of bacterial growth inhibition in the presence of antibiotics. In this paper, we present a novel microfluidic platform for antibiotic susceptibility testing basedon stress-activation of biosynthetic pathways that are the primary targets...

  15. ISOLATION AND ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY TESTING OF RAPIDLY-GROWING MYCOBACTERIA FROM GRASSLAND SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Kyselková

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM are common soil saprophytes, but certain strains cause infections in human and animals. The infections due to RGM have been increasing in past decades and are often difficult to treat. The susceptibility to antibiotics is regularly evaluated in clinical isolates of RGM, but the data on soil RGM are missing. The objectives of this study was to isolate RGM from four grassland soils with different impact of manuring, and assess their resistance to antibiotics and the ability to grow at 37°C and 42°C. Since isolation of RGM from soil is a challenge, a conventional decontamination method (NaOH/malachite green/cycloheximide and a recent method based on olive oil/SDS demulsification were compared. The olive oil/SDS method was less efficient, mainly because of the emulsion instability and plate overgrowing with other bacteria. Altogether, 44 isolates were obtained and 23 representatives of different RGM genotypes were screened. The number of isolates per soil decreased with increasing soil pH, consistently with previous findings that mycobacteria were more abundant in low pH soils. Most of the isolates belonged to the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The majority of isolates was resistant to 2-4 antibiotics. Multiresistant strains occurred also in a control soil that has a long history without the exposure to antibiotic-containing manure. Seven isolates grew at 37°C, including the species M. septicum and M. fortuitum known for infections in humans. This study shows that multiresistant RGM close to known human pathogens occur in grassland soils regardless the soil history of manuring.

  16. Real-Time Digital Bright Field Technology for Rapid Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canali, Chiara; Spillum, Erik; Valvik, Martin; Agersnap, Niels; Olesen, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Optical scanning through bacterial samples and image-based analysis may provide a robust method for bacterial identification, fast estimation of growth rates and their modulation due to the presence of antimicrobial agents. Here, we describe an automated digital, time-lapse, bright field imaging system (oCelloScope, BioSense Solutions ApS, Farum, Denmark) for rapid and higher throughput antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) of up to 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time. The imaging system consists of a digital camera, an illumination unit and a lens where the optical axis is tilted 6.25° relative to the horizontal plane of the stage. Such tilting grants more freedom of operation at both high and low concentrations of microorganisms. When considering a bacterial suspension in a microwell, the oCelloScope acquires a sequence of 6.25°-tilted images to form an image Z-stack. The stack contains the best-focus image, as well as the adjacent out-of-focus images (which contain progressively more out-of-focus bacteria, the further the distance from the best-focus position). The acquisition process is repeated over time, so that the time-lapse sequence of best-focus images is used to generate a video. The setting of the experiment, image analysis and generation of time-lapse videos can be performed through a dedicated software (UniExplorer, BioSense Solutions ApS). The acquired images can be processed for online and offline quantification of several morphological parameters, microbial growth, and inhibition over time.

  17. Frost resistance of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    In this thesis it is shown that the critical degree of saturation is suitable as parameter for the frost resistance of porous building materials. A numerical model for prediction of critical degrees of saturation based on fracture mechanics and phase geometry of two-phase materials, e.g. porous...... materials, has been developed.The importance of the pore structure on the development of stresses in the material during freezing is emphasized. To verify the model, experimental investigations are made on various concretes without air-entrainment and brick tiles with different porosities...

  18. Frost Heave in Colloidal Soils

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We develop a mathematical model of frost heave in colloidal soils. The theory accountsfor heave and consolidation while not requiring a frozen fringe assumption. Two solidificationregimes occur: a compaction regime in which the soil consolidates to accommodate the ice lenses, and a heave regime during which liquid is sucked into the consolidated soil from an external reservoir, and the added volume causes the soil to heave. The ice fraction is found to vary inversely with thefreezing velocity V , while the rate of heave is independent of V , consistent with field and laboratoryobservations. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  19. A rapid method for the determination of microbial susceptibility using the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M.; Weinstein, L.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was optimized for pure bacteria in broth in order to evaluate if changes in bacterial ATP content could be used as a rapid measure of antibiotic effect on microorganisms. Broth cultures of log phase bacteria were incubated at 310 K (37 C) for 2.5 hours at antimicrobial concentrations which resulted in the best discrimination between sensitive and resistant strains. Eighty-seven strains of 11 bacterial species were studied for their susceptibility to 12 commonly used antimicrobial agents: ampicillin, Penicillin G, nafcillin, carbenicillin, cephalothin, tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, colistin, and chloramplenicol. The major advantage of the ATP system over existing methods of rapid microbial susceptibility testing is that the assay can be made specific for bacterial ATP.

  20. Rapid detection of blaOXA in carbapenem-susceptible Acinetobacter radioresistens bacteremia leading to unnecessary antimicrobial administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Adam C; Lewis, James S; Pfeiffer, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Rapid molecular techniques to identify resistant pathogens are revolutionizing antibiotic stewardship; however, it is important to recognize the limitations of these techniques. Herein we describe two cases of bacteremia that were both initially identified by genotypic testing as carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. and subsequently identified phenotypically as carbapenem-susceptible A. radioresistens. The genotypic results prompted unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotic use and infection control concerns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Galilean satellites: identification of water frost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, C B; Ridgway, S T; McCord, T B

    1972-12-08

    Water frost absorptions have been detected in the infrared reflectivities of Jupiter's Galilean satellites JII (Europa) and JIII (Ganymede). We have determined the percentage of frost-covered surface area to be 50 to 100 percent for JII, 20 to 65 percent for JIII, and possibly 5 to 25 percent for JIV (Callisto). The leading side of JIII has 20 percent more frost cover than the trailing side, which explains the visible geometric albedo differences between the two sides. The reflectivity of the material underlying the frost on JII, JIII, and JIV resembles that of silicates. The surface of JI (Io) may be covered by frost particles much smaller than those on JII and JIII.

  2. H2O frost point detection on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The Viking Mars landers contain meteorological instrumentation to measure wind, temperature, and pressure but not atmospheric water content. The landings occurred during local summer, and it was observed that the nocturnal temperature decrease at sensor height (1.6 m) did not exhibit a uniform behavior at either site. It was expected that the rate of decrease would gradually slow, leveling off near sunrise. Instead, a leveling occurred several hours earlier. Temperature subsequently began a more rapid decrease which slowed by sunrise. This suggested that the temperature sensors may be detecting the frost point of water vapor. Analysis of alternative hypotheses demonstrates that none of these are viable candidates. The frost point interpretation is consistent with other lander and orbiter observations, with terrestrial experience, and with modeling of Mars' atmospheric behavior. It thus appears that the meteorology experiment can help provide a basis toward understanding the distribution and dynamics of Martian water vapor.

  3. A rapid virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) method for assessing resistance and susceptibility to cassava mosaic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Taylor, Nigel J

    2017-03-07

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) is a major constraint to cassava production in sub-Saharan Africa. Under field conditions, evaluation for resistance to CMD takes 12-18 months, often conducted across multiple years and locations under pressure from whitefly-mediated transmission. Under greenhouse or laboratory settings, evaluation for resistance or susceptibility to CMD involves transmission of the causal viruses from an infected source to healthy plants through grafting, or by using Agrobacterium-mediated or biolistic delivery of infectious clones. Following inoculation, visual assessment for CMD symptom development and recovery requires 12-22 weeks. Here we report a rapid screening system for determining resistance and susceptibility to CMD based on virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of an endogenous cassava gene. A VIGS vector was developed based on an infectious clone of the virulent strain of East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-K201). A sequence from the cassava (Manihot esculenta) ortholog of Arabidopsis SPINDLY (SPY) was cloned into the CP position of the DNA-A genomic component and used to inoculate cassava plants by Helios® Gene Gun microparticle bombardment. Silencing of Manihot esculenta SPY (MeSPY) using MeSPY1-VIGS resulted in shoot-tip necrosis followed by death of the whole plant in CMD susceptible cassava plants within 2-4 weeks. CMD resistant cultivars were not affected and remained healthy after challenge with MeSPY1-VIGS. Significantly higher virus titers were detected in CMD-susceptible cassava lines compared to resistant controls and were correlated with a concomitant reduction in MeSPY expression in susceptible plants. A rapid VIGS-based screening system was developed for assessing resistance and susceptibility to CMD. The method is space and resource efficient, reducing the time required to perform CMD screening to as little as 2-4 weeks. It can be employed as a high throughput rapid screening system to assess new cassava cultivars and for

  4. A rapid in situ procedure for determination of bacterial susceptibility or resistance to antibiotics that inhibit peptidoglycan biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bou Germán

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotics which inhibit bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis are the most widely used in current clinical practice. Nevertheless, resistant strains increase dramatically, with serious economic impact and effects on public health, and are responsible for thousands of deaths each year. Critical clinical situations should benefit from a rapid procedure to evaluate the sensitivity or resistance to antibiotics that act at the cell wall. We have adapted a kit for rapid determination of bacterial DNA fragmentation, to assess cell wall integrity. Results Cells incubated with the antibiotic were embedded in an agarose microgel on a slide, incubated in an adapted lysis buffer, stained with a DNA fluorochrome, SYBR Gold and observed under fluorescence microscopy. The lysis affects the cells differentially, depending on the integrity of the wall. If the bacterium is susceptible to the antibiotic, the weakened cell wall is affected by the lysing solution so the nucleoid of DNA contained inside the bacterium is released and spread. Alternatively, if the bacterium is resistant to the antibiotic, it is practically unaffected by the lysis solution and does not liberate the nucleoid, retaining its normal morphological appearance. In an initial approach, the procedure accurately discriminates susceptible, intermediate and resistant strains of Escherichia coli to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. When the bacteria came from an exponentially growing liquid culture, the effect on the cell wall of the β-lactam was evident much earlier that when they came from an agar plate. A dose-response experiment with an E. coli strain susceptible to ampicillin demonstrated a weak effect before the MIC dose. The cell wall damage was not homogenous among the different cells, but the level of damage increased as dose increased with a predominant degree of effect for each dose. A microgranular-fibrilar extracellular background was evident in gram

  5. Direct nitrate reductase assay versus microscopic observation drug susceptibility test for rapid detection of MDR-TB in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie Bwanga

    Full Text Available The most common method for detection of drug resistant (DR TB in resource-limited settings (RLSs is indirect susceptibility testing on Lowenstein-Jensen medium (LJ which is very time consuming with results available only after 2-3 months. Effective therapy of DR TB is therefore markedly delayed and patients can transmit resistant strains. Rapid and accurate tests suitable for RLSs in the diagnosis of DR TB are thus highly needed. In this study we compared two direct techniques--Nitrate Reductase Assay (NRA and Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS for rapid detection of MDR-TB in a high burden RLS. The sensitivity, specificity, and proportion of interpretable results were studied. Smear positive sputum was collected from 245 consecutive re-treatment TB patients attending a TB clinic in Kampala, Uganda. Samples were processed at the national reference laboratory and tested for susceptibility to rifampicin and isoniazid with direct NRA, direct MODS and the indirect LJ proportion method as reference. A total of 229 specimens were confirmed as M. tuberculosis, of these interpretable results were obtained in 217 (95% with either the NRA or MODS. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa agreement for MDR-TB diagnosis was 97%, 98% and 0.93 with the NRA; and 87%, 95% and 0.78 with the MODS, respectively. The median time to results was 10, 7 and 64 days with NRA, MODS and the reference technique, respectively. The cost of laboratory supplies per sample was low, around 5 USD, for the rapid tests. The direct NRA and MODS offered rapid detection of resistance almost eight weeks earlier than with the reference method. In the study settings, the direct NRA was highly sensitive and specific. We consider it to have a strong potential for timely detection of MDR-TB in RLS.

  6. Rapid susceptibility testing and microcolony analysis of Candida spp. cultured and imaged on porous aluminum oxide.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingham, C.J.; Boonstra, S.; Levels, S.; Lange, Marit de; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Schneeberger, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acquired resistance to antifungal agents now supports the introduction of susceptibility testing for species-drug combinations for which this was previously thought unnecessary. For pathogenic yeasts, conventional phenotypic testing needs at least 24 h. Culture on a porous aluminum oxide

  7. Rapid Susceptibility Testing and Microcolony Analysis of Candida spp. Cultured and Imaged on Porous Aluminum Oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingham, C.J.; Boonstra, S.; Levels, S.; Lange, H.J.; Meis, J.F.; Schneeberger, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acquired resistance to antifungal agents now supports the introduction of susceptibility testing for species-drug combinations for which this was previously thought unnecessary. For pathogenic yeasts, conventional phenotypic testing needs at least 24 h. Culture on a porous aluminum oxide

  8. Frost risks in the Mantaro river basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Trasmonte

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available As part of the study on the Mantaro river basin's (central Andes of Perú current vulnerability to climate change, the temporal and spatial characteristics of frosts were analysed. These characteristics included intensity, frequency, duration, frost-free periods, area distribution and historical trends. Maps of frost risk were determined for the entire river basin, by means of mathematical algorithms and GIS (Geographic Information Systems tools, using minimum temperature – 1960 to 2002 period, geomorphology, slope, land-use, types of soils, vegetation and life zones, emphasizing the rainy season (September to April, when the impacts of frost on agriculture are most severe. We recognized four categories of frost risks: low, moderate, high and critical. The critical risks (with a very high probability of occurrence were related to high altitudes on the basin (altitudes higher than 3800 m a.s.l., while the low (or null probability of occurring risks were found in the lower zones (less than 2500 m a.s.l.. Because of the very intense agricultural activity and the high sensitivity of the main crops (Maize, potato, artichoke in the Mantaro valley (altitudes between 3100 and 3300 m a.s.l., moderate to high frost risks can be expected, with a low to moderate probability of occurrence. Another significant result was a positive trend of 8 days per decade in the number of frost days during the rainy season.

  9. Miniaturized Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test by Combining Concentration Gradient Generation and Rapid Cell Culturing

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Samuel C.; Stefano Cestellos-Blanco; Keisuke Inoue; Zare, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of bacterial infection relies on timely diagnosis and proper prescription of antibiotic drugs. The antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) is one of the most crucial experimental procedures, providing the baseline information for choosing effective antibiotic agents and their dosages. Conventional methods, however, require long incubation times or significant instrumentation costs to obtain test results. We propose a lab-on-a-chip approach to perform AST in a simple, econo...

  10. New method for rapid Susceptibility Testing on blood culture with HB&L system: preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Rondinelli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Blood culture, although represents the gold standard in detecting the ethiological agent of sepsis, is rather rarely required in relation to the real diagnostic importance. The result of this test depends in fact on many factors (sample volume, time of collection, accuracy, antibiotic therapy, contamination, number of drawings, drawing site, interpretation difficulties, etc. that are often considered by many clinicians so limited as to doubt about their actual value. The disadvantages are therefore represented by the lack of standardization but also by the low sensitivity and above all by the technical times too long for the clinical needs. Blood culture begins with the drawing of samples from the “septic” patient followed incubation of the bottles in automatic thermostated systems. In case of positive result (36 hours, the culture is Gram stained and streaked on solid media in order to obtain isolated colonies for the identification and the susceptibility testing (48 hours from positive result. The long time required for pathogen identification and susceptibility testing involves empirical broad spectrum antibiotic therapy that can promote the increase of bacterial resistance but also patient management costs. A clinically useful report should be available on short notice in order to guide the clinician to choose the most appropriate antibiotic. The microbiologist has therefore the hard work of reviewing the organization and the management of the procedures.We have therefore started to consider the possibility of treating the blood as an biological liquid in order to quickly determine the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics.

  11. Seasonal frost depths, midwestern USA, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset includes frost tube data from 37 stations in the Upper Midwest (Minnesota, North Dakota, Wisconsin), USA. The responsible agency was the St. Paul...

  12. Rapid Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Uropathogenic E. coli by Tracking Submicron Scale Motion of Single Bacterial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syal, Karan; Shen, Simon; Yang, Yunze; Wang, Shaopeng; Haydel, Shelley E; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-08-25

    To combat antibiotic resistance, a rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) technology that can identify resistant infections at disease onset is required. Current clinical AST technologies take 1-3 days, which is often too slow for accurate treatment. Here we demonstrate a rapid AST method by tracking sub-μm scale bacterial motion with an optical imaging and tracking technique. We apply the method to clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, Escherichia coli O157: H7 and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) loosely tethered to a glass surface. By analyzing dose-dependent sub-μm motion changes in a population of bacterial cells, we obtain the minimum bactericidal concentration within 2 h using human urine samples spiked with UPEC. We validate the AST method using the standard culture-based AST methods. In addition to population studies, the method allows single cell analysis, which can identify subpopulations of resistance strains within a sample.

  13. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test for identification of new therapeutics and drug combinations against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Weingarten, Rebecca A; Xu, Miao; Southall, Noel; Dai, Sheng; Shinn, Paul; Sanderson, Philip E; Williamson, Peter R; Frank, Karen M; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Current antimicrobial susceptibility testing has limited screening capability for identifying empirical antibiotic combinations to treat severe bacterial infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. We developed a new antimicrobial susceptibility assay using automated ultra-high-throughput screen technology in combination with a simple bacterial growth assay. A rapid screening of 5170 approved drugs and other compounds identified 25 compounds with activities against MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae. To further improve the efficacy and reduce the effective drug concentrations, we applied a targeted drug combination approach that integrates drugs' clinical antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints, achievable plasma concentrations, clinical toxicities and mechanisms of action to identify optimal drug combinations. Three sets of three-drug combinations were identified with broad-spectrum activities against 10 MDR clinical isolates including K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli. Colistin–auranofin–ceftazidime and colistin–auranofin–rifabutin suppressed >80% growth of all 10 MDR strains; while rifabutin–colistin–imipenem inhibited >75% of these strains except two Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. The results demonstrate this new assay has potential as a real-time method to identify new drugs and effective drug combinations to combat severe clinical infections with MDR organisms. PMID:27826141

  14. Fully automated disc diffusion for rapid antibiotic susceptibility test results: a proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, Michael; Jetter, Marion; Blöchliger, Nicolas; Kolesnik-Goldmann, Natalia; Böttger, Erik C

    2017-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance poses a significant threat to patients suffering from infectious diseases. Early readings of antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) results could be of critical importance to ensure adequate treatment. Disc diffusion is a well-standardized, established and cost-efficient AST procedure; however, its use in the clinical laboratory is hampered by the many manual steps involved, and an incubation time of 16-18 h, which is required to achieve reliable test results. We have evaluated a fully automated system for its potential for early reading of disc diffusion diameters after 6-12 h of incubation. We assessed availability of results, methodological precision, categorical agreement and interpretation errors as compared with an 18 h standard. In total, 1028 clinical strains (291 Escherichia coli , 272 Klebsiella pneumoniae , 176 Staphylococcus aureus and 289 Staphylococcus epidermidis ) were included in this study. Disc diffusion plates were streaked, incubated and imaged using the WASPLab TM automation system. Our results demonstrate that: (i) early AST reading is possible for important pathogens; (ii) methodological precision is not hampered at early timepoints; and (iii) species-specific reading times must be selected. As inhibition zone diameters change over time and are phenotype/drug combination dependent, specific cut-offs and expert rules will be essential to ensure reliable interpretation and reporting of early susceptibility testing results.

  15. Future bloom and blossom frost risk for Malus domestica considering climate model and impact model uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Holger; Rath, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The future bloom and risk of blossom frosts for Malus domestica were projected using regional climate realizations and phenological ( = impact) models. As climate impact projections are susceptible to uncertainties of climate and impact models and model concatenation, the significant horizon of the climate impact signal was analyzed by applying 7 impact models, including two new developments, on 13 climate realizations of the IPCC emission scenario A1B. Advancement of phenophases and a decrease in blossom frost risk for Lower Saxony (Germany) for early and late ripeners was determined by six out of seven phenological models. Single model/single grid point time series of bloom showed significant trends by 2021-2050 compared to 1971-2000, whereas the joint signal of all climate and impact models did not stabilize until 2043. Regarding blossom frost risk, joint projection variability exceeded the projected signal. Thus, blossom frost risk cannot be stated to be lower by the end of the 21st century despite a negative trend. As a consequence it is however unlikely to increase. Uncertainty of temperature, blooming date and blossom frost risk projection reached a minimum at 2078-2087. The projected phenophases advanced by 5.5 d K(-1), showing partial compensation of delayed fulfillment of the winter chill requirement and faster completion of the following forcing phase in spring. Finally, phenological model performance was improved by considering the length of day.

  16. Future bloom and blossom frost risk for Malus domestica considering climate model and impact model uncertainties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Hoffmann

    Full Text Available The future bloom and risk of blossom frosts for Malus domestica were projected using regional climate realizations and phenological ( = impact models. As climate impact projections are susceptible to uncertainties of climate and impact models and model concatenation, the significant horizon of the climate impact signal was analyzed by applying 7 impact models, including two new developments, on 13 climate realizations of the IPCC emission scenario A1B. Advancement of phenophases and a decrease in blossom frost risk for Lower Saxony (Germany for early and late ripeners was determined by six out of seven phenological models. Single model/single grid point time series of bloom showed significant trends by 2021-2050 compared to 1971-2000, whereas the joint signal of all climate and impact models did not stabilize until 2043. Regarding blossom frost risk, joint projection variability exceeded the projected signal. Thus, blossom frost risk cannot be stated to be lower by the end of the 21st century despite a negative trend. As a consequence it is however unlikely to increase. Uncertainty of temperature, blooming date and blossom frost risk projection reached a minimum at 2078-2087. The projected phenophases advanced by 5.5 d K(-1, showing partial compensation of delayed fulfillment of the winter chill requirement and faster completion of the following forcing phase in spring. Finally, phenological model performance was improved by considering the length of day.

  17. Has introduction of rapid drug susceptibility testing at diagnosis impacted treatment outcomes among previously treated tuberculosis patients in Gujarat, India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Paresh; Vadera, Bhavin; Kumar, Ajay M V; Chinnakali, Palanivel; Modi, Bhavesh; Solanki, Rajesh; Patel, Pranav; Patel, Prakash; Pujara, Kirit; Nimavat, Pankaj; Shah, Amar; Bharaswadkar, Sandeep; Rade, Kiran; Parmar, Malik; Nair, Sreenivas Achuthan

    2015-01-01

    Revised National TB Control Programme (RNTCP) in India recommends that all previously-treated TB (PT) patients are offered drug susceptibility testing (DST) at diagnosis, using rapid diagnostics and screened out for rifampicin resistance before being treated with standardized, eight-month, retreatment regimen. This is intended to improve the early diagnosis of rifampicin resistance and its appropriate management and improve the treatment outcomes among the rest of the patients. In this state-wide study from Gujarat, India, we assess proportion of PT patients underwent rapid DST at diagnosis and the impact of this intervention on their treatment outcomes. This is a retrospective cohort study involving review of electronic patient-records maintained routinely under RNTCP. All PT patients registered for treatment in Gujarat during January-June 2013 were included. Information on DST and treatment outcomes were extracted from 'presumptive DR-TB patient register' and TB treatment register respectively. We performed a multivariate analysis to assess if getting tested is independently associated with unfavourable outcomes (death, loss-to-follow-up, failure, transfer out). Of 5,829 PT patients, 5306(91%) were tested for drug susceptibility with rapid diagnostics. Overall, 71% (4,113) TB patients were successfully treated - 72% among tested versus 60% among non-tested. Patients who did not get tested at diagnosis had a 34% higher risk of unsuccessful outcomes as compared to those who got tested (aRR - 1.34; 95% CI 1.20-1.50) after adjusting for age, sex, HIV status and type of TB. Unfavourable outcomes (particularly failure and switched to category IV) were higher among INH-resistant patients (39%) as compared to INH-sensitive (29%). Offering DST at diagnosis improved the treatment outcomes among PT patients. However, even among tested, treatment outcomes remained suboptimal and were related to INH resistance and high loss-to-follow-up. These need to be addressed urgently

  18. Rapid urinary tract infection diagnostics by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS): identification and antibiotic susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premasiri, W R; Chen, Ying; Williamson, P M; Bandarage, D C; Pyles, C; Ziegler, L D

    2017-04-01

    SERS spectra of 12 bacterial strains of urinary tract infection (UTI) clinical isolates grown and enriched from urine are reported. A partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) classification treatment of these SERS spectra results in strain level identification with >95% sensitivity and >99% specificity. The classification model successfully identified the SERS spectra of a urine-cultured strain not used to build this statistical model. Enrichment was accomplished by a filtration and centrifugation protocol. The predetermined drug susceptibility profiles of these clinical isolates thus allowed the SERS methodology to provide appropriate UTI antibiotic information in less than 1 h. Most of this time was used for sample preparation procedures (enrichment and washing) for this proof of principle study. SERS spectra of the enriched bacterial samples are dominated by nucleotide degradation metabolites: adenine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, guanine, uric acid, AMP, and guanosine. Strain-specific specificity is due to the different relative amounts of these purines contributing to the corresponding SERS spectra of these clinical isolates. All measurements were made at the minimal bacterial concentration in urine for UTI diagnosis (105 cfu/mL). Graphical abstract The relative contribution of each of the seven purines found to contribute to the bacterial SERS spectra are summarized in this bar graph. Although strain specific differences are evident, it can be see how the pattern of contributing purines is more different between the four species than between strains of a given species.

  19. Effects of climate change on phenology, frost damage, and floral abundance of montane wildflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, David W

    2008-02-01

    The timing of life history traits is central to lifetime fitness and nowhere is this more evident or well studied as in the phenology of flowering in governing plant reproductive success. Recent changes in the timing of environmental events attributable to climate change, such as the date of snowmelt at high altitudes, which initiates the growing season, have had important repercussions for some common perennial herbaceous wildflower species. The phenology of flowering at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory (Colorado, USA) is strongly influenced by date of snowmelt, which makes this site ideal for examining phenological responses to climate change. Flower buds of Delphinium barbeyi, Erigeron speciosus, and Helianthella quinquenervis are sensitive to frost, and the earlier beginning of the growing season in recent years has exposed them to more frequent mid-June frost kills. From 1992 to 1998, on average 36.1% of Helianthella buds were frosted, but for 1999-2006 the mean is 73.9%; in only one year since 1998 have plants escaped all frost damage. For all three of these perennial species, there is a significant relationship between the date of snowmelt and the abundance of flowering that summer. Greater snowpack results in later snowmelt, later beginning of the growing season, and less frost mortality of buds. Microhabitat differences in snow accumulation, snowmelt patterns, and cold air drainage during frost events can be significant; an elevation difference of only 12 m between two plots resulted in a temperature difference of almost 2 degrees C in 2006 and a difference of 37% in frost damage to buds. The loss of flowers and therefore seeds can reduce recruitment in these plant populations, and affect pollinators, herbivores, and seed predators that previously relied on them. Other plant species in this environment are similarly susceptible to frost damage so the negative effects for recruitment and for consumers dependent on flowers and seeds could be

  20. Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1999-01-01

    of 0.4-1% by volume of fibres cannot replace air entrainment in order to secure a frost resistant concrete; the minimum amount of air needed to make the concrete frost resistant is not changed when adding fibres· the amount of air entrainment must be increased when fibres are added to establish......Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete with 2.5-4.2% air and 6-9% air (% by volume in fresh concrete) casted in the laboratory and in-situ is compared. Steel fibres with hooked ends (ZP, length 30 mm) and polypropylene fibres (PP, CS, length 12 mm) are applied. It is shown that· addition...

  1. Air void structure and frost resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2014-01-01

    are conducted. Results were not originally presented in a way, which made comparison possible. Here the amount of scaled material is depicted as function of air voids parameters: total air content, specific surface, spacing factor, and total surface area of air voids. The total surface area of air voids...... is proportional to the product of total air content and specific surface. In all 4 cases, the conclusion is concurrent that the parameter of total surface area of air voids performs equally well or better than the spacing factor when linking air void characteristics to frost resistance (salt frost scaling...... will take place in the air void, being feed from the capillary, but without pressure build-up in the capillary. If the capillary is not connected to an air void, ice formation will take place in the capillary pore, where it can generate substantial pressure. Like this, frost resistance depends...

  2. Endothelial Cells Are Susceptible to Rapid siRNA Transfection and Gene Silencing Ex Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Chopra, Atish; Monahan, Thomas S.; Malek, Junaid Y.; Jain, Monica; Pradhan, Leena; Ferran, Christiane; LoGerfo, Frank W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Endothelial gene silencing via small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection represents a promising strategy for the control of vascular disease. Here, we demonstrate endothelial gene silencing in human saphenous vein using three rapid siRNA transfection techniques amenable for use in the operating room. MATERIALS AND METHODS Control siRNA, Cy5 siRNA, or siRNA targeting glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) or endothelial specific nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were applied to surplus human saphenous vein for 10 minutes by (i) soaking, (ii) applying 300 mmHg hyperbaric pressure, or (iii) 120 mmHg luminal distending pressure. Transfected vein segments were maintained in organ culture. siRNA delivery and gene silencing were assessed by tissue layer using confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS Distending pressure transfection yielded the highest levels of endothelial siRNA delivery (22% pixels fluorescing) and gene silencing (60% GAPDH knockdown, 55% eNOS knockdown) as compared to hyperbaric (12% pixels fluorescing, 36% GAPDH knockdown, 30% eNOS knockdown) or non-pressurized transfections (10% pixels fluorescing, 30% GAPDH knockdown, 25% eNOS knockdown). Cumulative endothelial siRNA delivery (16% pixels fluorescing) and gene silencing (46% GAPDH knockdown) exceeded levels achieved in the media/adventitia (8% pixels fluorescing, 24% GAPDH knockdown) across all transfection methods. CONCLUSION Endothelial gene silencing is possible within the timeframe and conditions of surgical application without the use of transfection reagents. The high sensitivity of endothelial cells to siRNA transfection marks the endothelium as a promising target of gene therapy in vascular disease. PMID:20801607

  3. Cell-on-hydrogel platform made of agar and alginate for rapid, low-cost, multidimensional test of antimicrobial susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Han; Liu, Zhengzhi; Hu, Chong; Ren, Kangning

    2016-08-02

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a rapidly increasing threat to the effective treatment of infectious diseases worldwide. The two major remedies include: (1) using narrow-spectrum antibiotics based on rapid diagnosis; and (2) developing new antibiotics. A key part of both remedies is the antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST). However, the current standard ASTs that monitor colony formation are costly and time-consuming and the new strategies proposed are not yet practical to be implemented. Herein, we report a strategy to fabricate whole-hydrogel microfluidic chips using alginate-doped agar. This agar-based microfabrication makes it possible to prepare inexpensive hydrogel devices, and allows a seamless link between microfluidics and conventional agar-based cell culture. Different from common microfluidic systems, in our system the cells are cultured on top of the device, similar to normal agar plate culture; on the other hand, the microfluidic channels inside the hydrogel allow precise generation of linear gradient of drugs, thus giving a better performance than the conventional disk diffusion method. Cells in this system are not exposed to any shear flow, which allows the reliable tracking of individual cells and AST results to be obtained within 2-3 hours. Furthermore, our system could test the synergistic effect of drugs through two-dimensional gradient generation. Finally, the platform could be directly implemented to new drug discovery and other applications wherein a fast, cost-efficient method for studying the response of microorganisms upon drug administration is desirable.

  4. Short communication. Harvest time in hedgerow Arbequina olive orchards in areas with early frosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracia, P.; Sanchez-Gimeno, A. C.; Benito, M.; Oria, R.; Lasa, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The shortening of harvest time attained in hedgerow olive (Olea europaea L.) orchards represents an advantage for the adoption of this cropping system in areas that are prone to suffer frost during the harvest period. To establish an optimal harvesting window, we carried out a study of the fruit ripening process on a hedgerow orchard of Arbequina olive trees, located in Zaragoza (Spain). From 2007 to 2009, oil accumulation on the fruit (% of dry weight) and oil yield (grams of oil per 100 fruits) were monitored, from early September to late November. Over the three years both variables peaked around November 15th, indicating that Arbequina reached full ripening earlier than has been reported previously for this variety. In two of the three seasons the orchard suffered several frosts during November. Long term climatic data from this area indicated that the risk of early frosts (< -2 degree centigrade) increases as November progresses with a high risk after November 20{sup t}h. In conclusion, the optimal harvesting period for Arbequina in this area should not extend beyond November 20{sup t}h. A rapid harvesting before this date is advisable to avoid the risk of damage caused by early frost in Zaragoza. Hedgerow planting provides an additional advantage in frost-prone areas, because mechanization of operations permits a short harvest period, easier to fit into the optimal harvesting window. (Author) 20 refs.

  5. Development of a Frost Risk Assessment Tool in Agriculture for a Mediterranean ecosystem Utilizing MODIS satellite observations Geomatics and Surface Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louka, Panagiota; Papanikolaou, Ioannis; Petropoulos, George; Migiros, George; Tsiros, Ioannis

    2014-05-01

    Frost risk in Mediterranean countries is a critical factor in agricultural planning and management. Nowadays, the rapid technological developments in Earth Observation (EO) technology have improved dramatically our ability to map the spatiotemporal distribution of frost conditions over a given area and evaluate its impacts on the environment and society. In this study, a frost risk model for agricultural crops cultivated in a Mediterranean environment has been developed, based primarily on Earth Observation (EO) data from MODIS sensor and ancillary spatial and point data. The ability of the model to predict frost conditions has been validated for selected days on which frost conditions had been observed for a region in Northwestern Greece according to ground observations obtained by the Agricultural Insurance Organization (ELGA). An extensive evaluation of the frost risk model predictions has been performed herein to evaluate objectively its ability to predict the spatio-temporal distribution of frost risk in the studied region, including comparisons against physiographical factors of the study area. The topographical characteristics that were taken under consideration were latitude, altitude, slope steepness, topographic convergence and the extend of the areas influenced by water bodies (such as lake and sea) existing in the study area. Additional data were also used concerning land use data and vegetation classification (type and density). Our results showed that the model was able to produce reasonably the spatio-temporal distribution of the frost conditions in our study area, following largely explainable patterns in respect to the study site and local weather conditions characteristics. All in all, the methodology implemented herein proved capable in obtaining rapidly and cost-effectively cartography of the frost risk in a Mediterranean environment, making it potentially a very useful tool for agricultural management and planning. The model presented here has

  6. Frost sensitivity of various deciduous plant species during leaf development in spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrella, Nicole; Heinzmann, Verena; Menzel, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Frost damage in deciduous woody plants is a major climate component affecting fitness and distribution of species. It is a trade-off between early bud burst enlarging the potential growing season and frost risk for deciduous plants in many regions. In a warming world observed earlier budburst may lead to an increased risk of spring frost damage caused by higher variability in temperatures (IPCC 2007). Lenz et al. (2013) showed that leaves are in general more sensitive to frost in later leaf development stages. But still there is little knowledge on stages of leaf development and their susceptibility to frost damage in many deciduous species. Additionally there might be variation with plant traits or different strategies within specific groups of species. Frost risk minimization can also be achieved by variability in bud burst within a specimen. Therefore, in this study we observed more than 174 individual plant specimen of 96 deciduous woody plant species growing in a comparable microclimate outside on the campus of the Technical University of Munich in Freising, southern Germany. Their phenology was intensively studied from 12th of March to 4th of May, including variation within a specimen. Several times twigs for the frost experiment were cut in different stages of leaf development and exposed to freezing temperatures of -4 and -6°C in two lab freezers. Since the leaf development in spring 2015 started comparably late, too many species emerged simultaneously leading to some capacity problems in the freezers. Nevertheless, our results still reveal novel aspects concerning leaf development and frost sensitivity. The phenological development proceeded in general from outside to inside of the crown (59%), in 33% of the cases all over the plant simultaneously. Sporadic, inside to outside or vertical development characteristics occurred in rare cases (8%). Mixed model analysis indicated impacts on phenology by plant family, natural origin, pollination mode, and

  7. COMPARISON OF THE FROST RESISTANCE OF BARLEY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    immediate recovery of the photosynthetic quantum yield after freezing. Landraces which showed the highest cold tolerance were found to acclimatize best. Key words/phrases: Barley, chlorophyll fluorescence, cold acclimation, Ethiopia, frost tolerance. INTRODUCTION. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is a traditional crop.

  8. Micropropagation of frost-resistant Eucalyptus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel Boulay

    1983-01-01

    A method for the in vitro propagation of frost resistant eucalyptus is presented. It was used for the propagation of 2-30 years old trees. This method is presently used for the fast production of mother trees from selected trees.

  9. Insulator (Heat and Frost). Occupational Analyses Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRory, Aline; Ally, Mohamed

    This analysis covers tasks performed by an insulator, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as heat and frost insulator. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To facilitate understanding the nature of the occupation,…

  10. Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive blood cultures using MALDI-TOF MS and a modification of the standardised disc diffusion test: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, C

    2016-04-27

    In an era when clinical microbiology laboratories are under increasing financial pressure, there is a need for inexpensive, yet effective, rapid microbiology tests. The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel modification of standard methodology for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of pathogens in positive blood cultures, reducing the turnaround time of laboratory results by 24 h.

  11. Rapid, low-cost fluorescent assay of β-lactamase-derived antibiotic resistance and related antibiotic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, S. Sibel; Khan, Shazia; Palanisami, Akilan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is increasingly prevalent in low and middle income countries (LMICs), but the extent of the problem is poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is a critical deficiency, leaving local health authorities essentially blind to AR outbreaks and crippling their ability to provide effective treatment guidelines. The crux of the problem is the lack of microbiology laboratory capacity available in LMICs. To address this unmet need, we demonstrate a rapid and simple test of β-lactamase resistance (the most common form of AR) that uses a modified β-lactam structure decorated with two fluorophores quenched due to their close proximity. When the β-lactam core is cleaved by β-lactamase, the fluorophores dequench, allowing assay speeds of 20 min to be obtained with a simple, streamlined protocol. Furthermore, by testing in competition with antibiotics, the β-lactamase-associated antibiotic susceptibility can also be extracted. This assay can be easily implemented into standard lab work flows to provide near real-time information of β-lactamase resistance, both for epidemiological purposes as well as individualized patient care.

  12. Comparative assessment of antibiotic susceptibility of coagulase-negative staphylococci in biofilm versus planktonic culture as assessed by bacterial enumeration or rapid XTT colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerca, Nuno; Martins, Silvia; Cerca, Filipe; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Pier, Gerald B; Oliveira, Rosário; Azeredo, Joana

    2005-08-01

    To quantitatively compare the antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms formed by the coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus with the susceptibility of planktonic cultures. Several CoNS strains were grown planktonically or as biofilms to determine the effect of the mode of growth on the level of susceptibility to antibiotics with different mechanisms of action. The utility of a new, rapid colorimetric method that is based on the reduction of a tetrazolium salt (XTT) to measure cell viability was tested by comparison with standard bacterial enumeration techniques. A 6 h kinetic study was performed using dicloxacillin, cefazolin, vancomycin, tetracycline and rifampicin at the peak serum concentration of each antibiotic. In planktonic cells, inhibitors of cell wall synthesis were highly effective over a 3 h period. Biofilms were much less susceptible than planktonic cultures to all antibiotics tested, particularly inhibitors of cell wall synthesis. The susceptibility to inhibitors of protein and RNA synthesis was affected by the biofilm phenotype to a lesser degree. Standard bacterial enumeration techniques and the XTT method produced equivalent results both in biofilms and planktonic assays. This study provides a more accurate comparison between the antibiotic susceptibilities of planktonic versus biofilm populations, because the cell densities in the two populations were similar and because we measured the concentration required to inhibit bacterial metabolism rather than to eradicate the entire bacterial population. While the biofilm phenotype is highly resistant to antibiotics that target cell wall synthesis, it is fairly susceptible to antibiotics that target RNA and protein synthesis.

  13. A rapid method for testing in vivo the susceptibility of different strains of Trypanosoma cruzi to active chemotherapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leny S. Filardi

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available A method is described which permits to determine in vivo an in a short period of time (4-6 hours the sensitivity of T. cruzo strains to known active chemotherapeutic agents. By using resistant- and sensitive T. cruzi stains a fairly good correlation was observed between the results obtained with this rapid method (which detects activity against the circulating blood forms and those obtained with long-term schedules which involve drug adminstration for at least 20 consecutive days and a prolonged period of assessment. This method may be used to characterize susceptibility to active drugs used clinically, provide infomation on the specific action against circulating trypomastigotes and screen active compounds. Differences in the natural susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi strains to active drugs have been already reported using different criteria, mostly demanding long-term study of the animal (Hauschka, 1949; Bock, Gonnert & Haberkorn, 1969; Brener, Costa & Chiari, 1976; Andrade & Figueira, 1977; Schlemper, 1982. In this paper we report a method which detects in 4-6 hours the effect of drugs on bloodstream forms in mice with established T. cruzi infections. The results obtained with this method show a fairly good correlation with those obtained by prolonged treatment schedules used to assess the action of drugs in experimental Chagas' disease and may be used to study the sensitivity of T. cruzi strains to active drugs.No presente trabalho descreve-se um metodo que permite determinar in vivo e em curto espaço de tempo (4-6 horas a sensibilidade de cepas de T. cruzi a agentes terapeuticos ativos na doença de Chagas. Usando-se cepas sensíveis e resistentes aos medicamentos foi possível observar uma boa correlação entre os resultados obtidos com o método rápido (que detecta atividade contra as formas circulantes do parasita e aqueles obtidos com esquema de acao prolongada que envolve a administração da droga por 20 dias e posterior avalia

  14. Frost damage of concrete subject to confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2016-01-01

    When internal frost damage is observed in real concrete structures, the usual pattern is cracks with a preferred orientation parallel to the exposed surface. When exposing concrete with poor frost resistance to a standardised freeze/thaw test in the laboratory, the orientations of the resulting...... cracks are more or less random. The present study is an experimental study, which aims at investigating the influence of confinement during freeze/thaw action on the developed crack pattern. Confinement is established by mounting hose clamps on cylindrical test specimens, using similar test specimens...... without hose clamps as reference. The results show that confinement can change the outcome of a freeze/thaw test as regards extent of internal cracking, crack orientations, and amount of surface scaling. Thus it seems likely that the difference in confinement (and therefore also in stress state) can...

  15. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of grown blood cultures by combining culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction is rapid and effective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Beuving

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy in bacteraemia patients dramatically reduces mortality. A new method for RApid Molecular Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (RAMAST that can be applied directly to positive blood cultures was developed and evaluated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Growth curves and antibiotic susceptibility of blood culture isolates (Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci and (facultative aerobic gram-negative rods were determined by incubating diluted blood cultures with and without antibiotics, followed by a quantitative universal 16S PCR to detect the presence or absence of growth. Testing 114 positive blood cultures, RAMAST showed an agreement with microbroth dilution of 96.7% for gram-negative rods, with a minor error (false-susceptibility with a intermediate resistant strain rate of 1.9%, a major error (false resistance rate of 0.8% and a very major error (false susceptibility rate of 0.6%. Agreement for S. aureus was 97.9%, with a very major error rate of 2.1%. Enterococcus species showed 95.0% agreement, with a major error rate of 5.0%. These agreements are comparable with those of the Phoenix system. Starting from a positive blood culture, the test was completed within 9 hours. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This new rapid method for antibiotic susceptibility testing can potentially provide accurate results for most relevant bacteria commonly isolated from positive blood cultures in less time than routine methods.

  16. Analysis and Simulation of Frost's Beamformer

    OpenAIRE

    Strupl, M.; Sovka, Pavel

    2003-01-01

    Sensor arrays are often used for a signal separation from noises using the information about the direction of arrival. The aim of this paper is to analyze Frost's beamformer with respect to the speech preprocessing for the hearing impaired people. The frequency response of the system including the background noise attenuation are derived as functions of the direction of arrival. The derivation supposes a uniform linear array of sensors and plane waves. It is shown that the number of possible ...

  17. Changes in phenology and frost risks of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kartschall

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For a retrospective period of 110 years between 1901 and 2010 (observed data, and for the subsequent future period between 2011 and 2100 we calculated the phenological development (bud burst, harvest ripeness, and in particular the spring frost risk (frost after bud burst, as one important derived variable for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv Riesling for the whole of Germany. For the future climate we included two different scenarios (RCP8.5, RCP2.6 each of them containing a triple set with minimum, medium and maximum temperature increase. The time period between 1981 and 2010 as the last three decades in the observed data was chosen as reference. In general we found an acceleration of the phenological development (all main phases mainly beginning in the late 1980s. For the three-decade period between 2031 and 2060 this acceleration will reach 11±3$11\\pm3$ days in the RCP8.5-scenario. The acceleration for the other stages behaved similarly and results in an earlier harvest ripeness of 13±1$13\\pm1$ days. Since a warmer spring in general leads to earlier bud burst, but does not reduce the risk of frost events during this period in the same manner, changes in the risk of spring frost damage were relatively small. For the coming decades this risk will not decrease for all traditional German viticultural regions in the RCP8.5-scenarios; on the contrary, our results suggest it is likely to increase. The results showed an increasing spring frost risk not only for the debated “upcoming” potential viticultural areas in eastern Germany, an effect which will partly also reach the southernmost viticultural areas. This effect in northern and eastern Germany is due to earlier bud burst together with the stronger continental influence, but for the southern and western regions of Germany is mainly due to the even earlier bud burst. This could modify the regionally nuanced character of German wines.

  18. Forecasting Frost Damage: Follow the Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Frost damage takes place when the pressure exerted against pore walls exceeds the cohesive strength of water-infiltrated rock and causes cracks to extend. Elegant theoretical treatments supported by meticulous field and laboratory observations have combined to unravel the basic mechanical and thermodynamic controls in idealized systems. Frost damage is most vigorous when conditions are cold enough that the net pressure exerted against the pore walls can cause crack extension, yet warm enough to enable the flow that supplies further ice growth in the newly opened space. This insight is applied here to develop practical geomorphic process laws for the effects of frost damage at the larger scales that are relevant for describing the evolution of landscapes. To this end, a direct connection is made between the intensity of frost damage and the porosity increase that results from gradients in water flux under conditions that are cold enough for ice-rock interactions to propagate cracks. This implies that the annual temperature variation at the ground surface can be combined with considerations of heat and mass transport to derive rigorous forecasts of the potential for frost damage that are tied to the increases in water mass that accompany solidification in porous rock. As an example, the image shows the depth-integrated porosity change λ promoted by crack growth at temperatures colder than -ΔTc over an annual cycle for different choices of mean annual temperature MAT and surface amplitude A (assuming a thermal diffusivity of 1 mm2/s and a power-law relationship between permeability and undercooling with exponent α=4, such that a base value of 10-14m2 is reached at a reference undercooling of 0.1 ºC). The abrupt onset in cracking once MAT decreases below a threshold is produced by the requirement that undercooling surpass ΔTc in order to generate sufficient pressures to propagate cracks. The eventual reduction and gradual tail in λ at colder MAT is produced by

  19. Direct susceptibility testing by disk diffusion on clinical samples : a rapid and accurate tool for antibiotic stewardship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coorevits, L.; Boelens, J.; Claeys, G.

    We compared the accuracy of direct susceptibility testing (DST) with conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), both using disk diffusion, on clinical samples. A total of 123 clinical samples (respiratory tract samples, urine, vaginal and abdominal abscess discharges, bile fluid and a

  20. The periglacial engine of mountain erosion – Part 1: Rates of frost cracking and frost creep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    2015-01-01

    With accelerating climate cooling in the late Cenozoic, glacial and periglacial erosion became more widespread on the surface of the Earth. The resultant shift in erosion patterns significantly changed the large-scale morphology of many mountain ranges worldwide. Whereas the glacial fingerprint....... Here we investigate the important role that periglacial processes also play in less steep parts of mountain landscapes. Understanding the influences of frost-driven processes in low-relief areas requires a focus on the consequences of an accreting soil mantle, which characterises such surfaces. We...... of the soil mantle strongly modulates the relation between climate and the intensity of mechanical weathering and sediment flux. Our results also point to an offset between the conditions that promote frost cracking and those that promote frost creep, indicating that a stable climate can provide optimal...

  1. Frost flower chemical signature in winter snow on Vestfonna ice cap, Nordaustlandet, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Beaudon

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry of snow and ice cores from Svalbard is influenced by variations in local sea ice margin and distance to open water. Snow pits sampled at two summits of Vestfonna ice cap (Nordaustlandet, Svalbard, exhibit spatially heterogeneous soluble ions concentrations despite similar accumulation rates, reflecting the importance of small-scale weather patterns on this island ice cap. The snow pack on the western summit shows higher average values of marine ions and a winter snow layer that is relatively depleted in sulphate. One part of the winter snow pack exhibits a [SO42-/Na+] ratio reduced by two thirds compared with its ratio in sea water. This low sulphate content in winter snow is interpreted as the signature of frost flowers, which are formed on young sea ice when offshore winds predominate. Frost flowers have been described as the dominant source of sea salt to aerosol and precipitation in ice cores in coastal Antarctica but this is the first time their chemical signal has been described in the Arctic. The eastern summit does not show any frost flower signature and we interpret the unusually dynamic ice transport and rapid formation of thin ice on the Hinlopen Strait as the source of the frost flowers.

  2. Bilateral Frosted Branch Angiitis in a Patient with Tuberculous Meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Liping; Du, Fang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Yusheng

    2015-06-01

    To present a case of frosted branch angiitis with tuberculous meningoencephalitis who was followed up for 18 months after treatment. Case report. A 19-year-old female with tuberculous meningoencephalitis complained of bilateral blurred vision, and presented with frosted branch angiitis and macula edema in both eyes. Treatment with systemic glucocorticoid and standard anti-tuberculosis medicine totally resolved the retinal periphlebitis and macular edema, with vision improvement achieved at the 18-month follow-up. Frosted branch angiitis could be secondary to tuberculous meningoencephalitis. Based on standard anti-tuberculosis medicine, systemic glucocorticoid may help in the remission of frosted branch angiitis.

  3. Rapid nanoparticle-mediated monitoring of bacterial metabolic activity and assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility in blood with magnetic relaxation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos Kaittanis

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the increased incidence of bacterial infections and the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria at the global level, we designed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nanosensors for the assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility through magnetic relaxation. In this report, we demonstrate that iron oxide nanosensors, either dextran-coated supplemented with Con A or silica-coated conjugated directly to Con A, can be used for the fast (1 quantification of polysaccharides, (2 assessment of metabolic activity and (3 determination of antimicrobial susceptibility in blood. The use of these polysaccharide nanosensors in the determination of antimicrobial susceptibility in the clinic or the field, and the utilization of these nanoprobes in pharmaceutical R&D are anticipated.

  4. Hydrological significance of soil frost for pre-alpine areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähli, Manfred

    2017-03-01

    Soil frost can have a substantial impact on water flows at the soil surface and-potentially-alter the dynamics of catchment runoff. While these findings are mainly based on studies from alpine and Northern-latitude areas (including permafrost areas), little is known about the significance of soil frost for hydrology in pre-alpine areas, i.e. the region at the transition from central European lowlands to high-alpine areas. Here I synthesize soil temperature data and soil frost observations from ten sites in Switzerland to assess the occurrence of soil frost and to determine its impact on catchment runoff. In addition, a well-established numerical model was used to reconstruct the presence of soil frost in two first-order catchments for single runoff events and winters. The data clearly demonstrates that shallow soil frost has formed regularly in this altitudinal range over the past decade. The presence of a frozen soil surface was found to be highly variable among the sites under study and did not significantly correlate with altitude or forest density. For the first-order catchments, it was not possible to relate important flood peaks or increased runoff coefficients to winter situations with substantial soil frost. Thus, the present analysis suggests that although soil frost is widespread and regularly occurring at this altitudinal range, it has no significant impact on winter runoff in pre-alpine watersheds.

  5. Long-term water absorption tests for frost insulation materials taking into account frost attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni A. Pakkala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water absorption of several different frost insulation materials was tested for four years. The test took into account both immersion and frost attack to materials. On the basis of the research the water absorption on XPS specimens is significantly minor compared to EPS specimens that were studied. The most significant result was that freezing of test specimens did not affect on water absorption of XPS specimens but had a major effect on water absorption of EPS specimens. With frozen EPS specimen the absorption continued increasing even after 48 months of immersion. Presumably the reason for such a behaviour is that the pore structure of EPS is not able to resist the tension caused by freezing water and therefore cracks are formed. Thus, more water absorbs inside the EPS through the cracks and it causes cracking deeper in the specimen which is why absorption increases after every freezing period.

  6. Informing Antibiotic Treatment Decisions: Evaluating Rapid Molecular Diagnostics To Identify Susceptibility and Resistance to Carbapenems against Acinetobacter spp. in PRIMERS III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Scott R; Hujer, Andrea M; Jiang, Hongyu; Hill, Carol B; Hujer, Kristine M; Mediavilla, Jose R; Manca, Claudia; Tran, Thuy Tien T; Domitrovic, T Nicholas; Higgins, Paul G; Seifert, Harald; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Patel, Robin; Jacobs, Michael R; Chen, Liang; Sampath, Rangarajan; Hall, Thomas; Marzan, Christine; Fowler, Vance G; Chambers, Henry F; Bonomo, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    The widespread dissemination of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. has created significant therapeutic challenges. At present, rapid molecular diagnostics (RMDs) that can identify this phenotype are not commercially available. Two RMD platforms, PCR combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) and molecular beacons (MB), for detecting genes conferring resistance/susceptibility to carbapenems in Acinetobacter spp. were evaluated. An archived collection of 200 clinical Acinetobacter sp. isolates was tested. Predictive values for susceptibility and resistance were estimated as a function of susceptibility prevalence and were based on the absence or presence of beta-lactamase (bla) NDM, VIM, IMP, KPC, and OXA carbapenemase genes (e.g., blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24/40, and blaOXA-58 found in this study) against the reference standard of MIC determinations. According to the interpretation of MICs, 49% (n = 98) of the isolates were carbapenem resistant (as defined by either resistance or intermediate resistance to imipenem). The susceptibility sensitivities (95% confidence interval [CI]) for imipenem were 82% (74%, 89%) and 92% (85%, 97%) for PCR/ESI-MS and MB, respectively. Resistance sensitivities (95% CI) for imipenem were 95% (88%, 98%) and 88% (80%, 94%) for PCR/ESI-MS and MB, respectively. PRIMERS III establishes that RMDs can discriminate between carbapenem resistance and susceptibility in Acinetobacter spp. In the context of a known prevalence of resistance, SPVs and RPVs can inform clinicians regarding the best choice for empiric antimicrobial therapy against this multidrug-resistant pathogen. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Mathematical modeling of heat transfer between the plant seedling and the environment during a radiation frost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finnikov K.A.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The power of the internal heat source sufficient to maintain a positive temperature of plants during one of the possible form of cold stress - radiation frost was determined with the help of numerical simulation.The simulation of unsteady heat transfer in the soil-plant-air system in the conditions of radiation frost showed that the the ground part of plants is cooling most rapidly, and this process is partially slowed down by the natural-convection heat transfer with warmer air. If the frost is not continuous, the radiative cooling is the main danger for plant. The necessary power of heat-production inside plant that allows it to avoid hypothermia depends both on natural conditions and the size of the plant. For plants with a typical diameter of the stem about 2 mm this heat-production should be from 50 to 100 W / kg. Within 2 hours a total amount of heat about 0.5 MJ / kg in the plant should be allocated. Larger plants will have a smaller surface to mass ratio, and the maintaining of it's temperature will require a lower cost of nutrients per unit, accordingly. Modeling of the influence of plant surface trichomes presence on the process of its cooling showed that the role of trichomes in the protection of plants from hypothermia during radiation frost usually is negative due to the fact that the presence of trichomes increases the radiative heat transfer from the plant and the impediment in air movement near the plant reduces heat flux entering the plant from a warmer air. But in cases where the intensity of heat generation within the plant is sufficient for the maintenance of the plant temperature higher than the air temperature, the presence of trichomes impairs heat transfer from plant to air, and therefore contributes to a better heating of plants.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Academic Award (Draths and Frost)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winners, Dr. Karen M. Draths and Professor John W. Frost, used benign, genetically engineered microbes and sugars (instead of benzene) to synthesize adipic acid and catechol.

  9. Modified porosity rate frost heave model and tests verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhi-qiang; Xu, Xue-yan

    2008-11-01

    To avoid the complexity of modeling frost heave from microscope, porosity rate function has been used in predication of frost heave phenomenon. The approach explored in this paper is based on frost heave tests and the concept of the segregated potential which has been widely accepted by researchers in order to find the proper form of the porosity rate function. In the frozen fringe the porosity rate function was derived: n•=Be(-aPe) (gradT)2 (1-n) , (Tstests were carried out to verify the model, and the comparison between test results and analog results shows that the modified model is efficient for the prediction of frost heave, and it can be used in engineering practice.

  10. Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive blood cultures using MALDI-TOF MS and a modification of the standardised disc diffusion test: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, C; Stapleton, P; Phelan, E; Mulhare, P; Carey, B; Hickey, M; Lynch, B; Doyle, M

    2016-04-27

    In an era when clinical microbiology laboratories are under increasing financial pressure, there is a need for inexpensive, yet effective, rapid microbiology tests. The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel modification of standard methodology for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of pathogens in positive blood cultures, reducing the turnaround time of laboratory results by 24 h. 277 positive blood cultures had a Gram stain performed and were subcultured and incubated at 37°C in a CO2 atmosphere for 4-6 h. Identification of the visible growth was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Taking a modified approach to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute-standardised AST methodology, an inoculum density of 0.5 McFarland was prepared from the early growth for disc diffusion testing. The standard AST method was also performed on the 18-24 h culture. 96% (n=73/76) of gram-negative organisms were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Comparative analysis of the rapid and standard AST results showed an overall interpretive category error rate of 7.7% (6.7% minor errors, 0.6% major errors and 0.4% very major errors). 100% of Staphylococcus aureus (n=41) and enterococcus isolates (n=9) were correctly identified after 4-6 h incubation. The overall AST categorical agreement was also 100% for these isolates. An incubation of 4-6 h directly from positive blood cultures allowed for both a rapid species identification and an antimicrobial susceptibility result approximately 24 h earlier than is possible using standard methodology. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Saponin promotes rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in blood cultures with the Vitek 2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupetti, A; Barnini, S; Morici, P; Ghelardi, E; Nibbering, P H; Campa, M

    2013-04-01

    The rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of bacteria in clinical blood cultures is crucial to optimise antimicrobial therapy. A previous study involving small sample numbers revealed that the addition of saponin to blood cultures, further referred to as the new method, shortened considerably the turn-around time for the identification and AST of Gram-positive cocci as compared to the current method involving an overnight subculture. Here, we extend previous results and compare the identification and AST of blood cultures containing Gram-negative bacilli by the new and current methods. The identification and AST of 121 Gram-positive and 109 Gram-negative bacteria in clinical monomicrobial blood cultures by the new and current methods and, in the case of Gram-negative bacilli, by direct (no additions) inoculation into an automated system (rapid method) was assessed using the Vitek 2 system. Discrepancies between the results obtained with the different methods were solved by manual methods. The new method correctly identified 88 % of Gram-positive and 98 % of Gram-negative bacteria, and the rapid method correctly identified 94 % of Gram-negative bacteria. The AST for all antimicrobials by the new method were concordant with the current method for 55 % and correct for an additional 9 % of Gram-positive bacteria, and concordant with the current method for 62 % and correct for an additional 21 % of Gram-negative bacilli. The AST by the rapid method was concordant with the current method for 62 % and correct for an additional 12 % of Gram-negative bacilli. Together, saponin-treated monomicrobial blood cultures allow rapid and reliable identification and AST of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  12. Frost-resistance of red ceramic products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramires, M. V. V.

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work is a study about degradation occurring with red ceramics whenever they are exposed to the environmental conditions of a cold and humid climate. Four different types of clay from Rio Grande do Sul were studied: two of them from the Serra Geral formation, and the other two from the formation of Strada Nova, which are commonly used to make roof tiles. The clay was characterised to identify its chemical and mineralogical composition. Also the physical properties were researched. In the ceramic processing, the pressure with four different sintering temperatures (850ºC, 900ºC, 950ºC, and 1000ºC at three different intervals (3, 12, and 24 hours were used. The ceramic materials thus obtained were characterised according to their physical properties (water absorption, total density, porosity, and porous size, and mechanical (mechanical resistance over four points. For the characterisation of the degradation mechanism, some trials were carried out to obtain the coefficient of saturation and on frost and defrost cycles. The microstructural analysis was made with a scanning electronic microscopy. On the basis of the results obtained, a model for the degradation mechanism is presented, and a degradation factor which relates the total volume of mesopores to the standard size of mesopores is suggested. It was concluded that the red ceramic products more prone to be frost-resistant are those presenting a degradation factor below 100.

    Se estudia la degradación que sufre la cerámica roja cuando se expone a la acción de los climas fríos e húmedos. La experimentación se ha realizado con cuatro arcillas de la son expuestas a los climas fríos y húmedos. Se investigaron cuatro diferentes arcillas de la provincia del Rio Grande do Sul, que se emplean tradicionalmente en la fabricación de tejas. Dos de ellas pertenecen a la formación de la Serra Geral y las otras dos de la formación Estrada Nova. La caracterización de las arcillas

  13. Forecast of Frost Days Based on Monthly Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, M. T.; Tarquis, A. M.; Morató, M. C.; Saa-Requejo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Although frost can cause considerable crop damage and mitigation practices against forecasted frost exist, frost forecasting technologies have not changed for many years. The paper reports a new method to forecast the monthly number of frost days (FD) for several meteorological stations at Community of Madrid (Spain) based on successive application of two models. The first one is a stochastic model, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), that forecasts monthly minimum absolute temperature (tmin) and monthly average of minimum temperature (tminav) following Box-Jenkins methodology. The second model relates these monthly temperatures to minimum daily temperature distribution during one month. Three ARIMA models were identified for the time series analyzed with a stational period correspondent to one year. They present the same stational behavior (moving average differenced model) and different non-stational part: autoregressive model (Model 1), moving average differenced model (Model 2) and autoregressive and moving average model (Model 3). At the same time, the results point out that minimum daily temperature (tdmin), for the meteorological stations studied, followed a normal distribution each month with a very similar standard deviation through years. This standard deviation obtained for each station and each month could be used as a risk index for cold months. The application of Model 1 to predict minimum monthly temperatures showed the best FD forecast. This procedure provides a tool for crop managers and crop insurance companies to asses the risk of frost frequency and intensity, so that they can take steps to mitigate against frost damage and estimated the damage that frost would cost. This research was supported by Comunidad de Madrid Research Project 076/92. The cooperation of the Spanish National Meteorological Institute and the Spanish Ministerio de Agricultura, Pesca y Alimentation (MAPA) is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Frosting on Wavy Fin-and-tube Heat Exchanger Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Wu, X. M.; Chu, F.; Zhu, B.

    2017-11-01

    Frost on fin surfaces of the heat exchanger increases thermal resistance and blocks air flow passage, which reduces the system energy efficiency. In this paper, a frosting model based on Euler multi-phase flow proposed before is used to simulate the frost layer growth process on wavy fin-and-tube heat exchanger surfaces. The model predicts the frost layer and temperature distributions on the heat exchanger surfaces. The air flow pressure drops before and after frosting have been obtained. The results show that the frost layer is unevenly distributed and no frost appears on the fin surfaces in the tube wake region. Frost on the wavy fin-and-tube heat exchanger surfaces restricts the airflow and the pressure drop increases about 140% after 45 min frosting. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frost Considering Mass Diffusion and Eddy Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    A physical model for the effective thermal conductivity of water frost is proposed for application to the full range of frost density. The proposed model builds on the Zehner-Schlunder one-dimensional formulation for porous media appropriate for solid-to-fluid thermal conductivity ratios less than about 1000. By superposing the effects of mass diffusion and eddy convection on stagnant conduction in the fluid, the total effective thermal conductivity of frost is shown to be satisfactorily described. It is shown that the effects of vapor diffusion and eddy convection on the frost conductivity are of the same order. The results also point out that idealization of the frost structure by cylindrical inclusions offers a better representation of the effective conductivity of frost as compared to spherical inclusions. Satisfactory agreement between the theory and the measurements for the effective thermal conductivity of frost is demonstrated for a wide range of frost density and frost temperature.

  16. A new rapid colourimetric method for testing Mycobacterium tuberculosis susceptibility to isoniazid and rifampicin: a crystal violet decolourisation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Yilmaz Coban

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of a new and accurate method for the detection of isoniazid (INH and rifampicin (RIF resistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates using a crystal violet decolourisation assay (CVDA. Fifty-five M. tuberculosis isolates obtained from culture stocks stored at -80ºC were tested. After bacterial inoculation, the samples were incubated at 37ºC for seven days and 100 µL of CV (25 mg/L stock solution was then added to the control and sample tubes. The tubes were incubated for an additional 24-48 h. CV (blue/purple was decolourised in the presence of bacterial growth; thus, if CV lost its colour in a sample containing a drug, the tested isolate was reported as resistant. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and agreement for INH were 92.5%, 96.4%, 96.1%, 93.1% and 94.5%, respectively, and 88.8%, 100%, 100%, 94.8% and 96.3%, respectively, for RIF. The results were obtained within eight-nine days. This study shows that CVDA is an effective method to detect M. tuberculosis resistance to INH and RIF in developing countries. This method is rapid, simple and inexpensive. Nonetheless, further studies are necessary before routine laboratory implementation.

  17. Heat and mass transfer in the melting of frost

    CERN Document Server

    Mohs, William F

    2015-01-01

    This Brief is aimed at engineers and researchers involved in the refrigeration industry: specifically, those interested in energy utilization and system efficiency. The book presents what the authors believe is the first comprehensive frost melting study involving all aspects of heat and mass transfer. The volume’s description of in-plane and normal digital images of frost growth and melting is also unique in the field, and the digital analysis technique offers an advantage over invasive measurement methods. The scope of book’s coverage includes modeling and experimentation for the frost formation and melting processes. The key sub-specialties to which the book are aimed include refrigeration system analysis and design, coupled heat and mass transfer, and phase-change processes.

  18. Frost sensor for use in defrost controls for refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Patrick D.; Butz, James R.; Veatch, Bradley D.; O'Connor, Michael W.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the total thermal resistance to heat flow from the air to the evaporative cooler fins of a refrigeration system. The apparatus is a frost sensor that measures the reduction in heat flow due to the added thermal resistance of ice (reduced conduction) as well as the reduction in heat flow due to the blockage of airflow (reduced convection) from excessive ice formation. The sensor triggers a defrost cycle when needed, instead of on a timed interval. The invention is also a method for control of frost in a system that transfers heat from air to a refrigerant along a thermal path. The method involves measuring the thermal conductivity of the thermal path from the air to the refrigerant, recognizing a reduction in thermal conductivity due to the thermal insulation effect of the frost and due to the loss of airflow from excessive ice formation; and controlling the defrosting of the system.

  19. Species ecology determines the role of nitrogen nutrition in the frost tolerance of pine seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toca, Andrei; Oliet, Juan A; Villar-Salvador, Pedro; Maroto, Judit; Jacobs, Douglass F

    2018-01-01

    Frost determines the evolution and distribution of plants in temperate and cold regions. Several environmental factors can influence frost acclimation of woody plants but the magnitude and direction of the effect of nitrogen (N) availability is controversial. We studied the effect of N availability on root and shoot frost tolerance in mid-fall and in winter in seedlings of four pines of contrasting ecology: Pinus nigra J.F. Arnold, P. pinaster Ait., P. pinea L. and P. halepensis Mill.. Organ N and soluble sugar concentration, and timing of cessation of shoot elongation were measured to assess the physiological mechanisms underlying frost acclimation. Nitrogen was supplied at high and low rates only during the pre-hardening period and at a moderate N rate during hardening in the fall. Shoot frost tolerance increased over winter while root frost tolerance did not change in any species. Pre-hardening N availability affected the frost tolerance of both roots and shoots, although the effect was species-specific: high N reduced the overall root and shoot frost tolerance in P. pinea and P. halepensis, and increased the frost tolerance in P. nigra, but had no effect in P. pinaster. Nitrogen supply in the fall consistently increased frost tolerance in all species. Differences in frost tolerance among species and N treatments were not explained by variations in organ N or soluble carbohydrate concentration, nor by timing of cessation of shoot elongation; however, the most frost tolerant species ceased elongation earlier than the least frost tolerant species. Despite the close phylogenetic relatedness of the studied species, the effect of N availability on seedling frost tolerance differed among species, indicating that species ecology (especially frost acclimation physiology) and timing of N supply drives the effect of N availability on frost tolerance of pine species. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  20. Identification by mass spectrometry and automated susceptibility testing from positive bottles: a simple, rapid, and standardized approach to reduce the turnaround time in the management of blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Carola; Principe, Luigi; Bracco, Silvia; Meroni, Elisa; Corbo, Nicoletta; Pini, Beatrice; Luzzaro, Francesco

    2017-12-06

    Speeding up identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is of foremost importance in the management of blood cultures. Here, we describe a simple, rapid, and standardized approach based on a very short-term incubation on solid medium from positive blood cultures followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification and automated AST. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact in the laboratory practice of this new procedure with respect to that previously used (standard method) by comparing TAT and cumulative percentage of final reports to clinicians. Compared with the standard method, the new procedure gave correct organism identification at genus or species level in 98.4% of monomicrobial samples. AST resulted in 97.7% essential agreement and 98.1% categorical agreement, with 0.9% minor errors, 1.0% major error, and 1.5% very major errors. The mean turnaround time to identification and AST was 61.4 h by using the new method compared to 83.1 h by using standard procedure. Concerning cumulative percentages of final reports, approximately a third of results were available at 48 h from the check-in of the sample when using the new procedure, whereas no final reports were ready at the same time with the standard method. The new procedure allows faster and reliable results using a simple and standardized approach. Thus, it represents an important tool for a more rapid management of blood cultures when molecular methods are not available in the laboratory.

  1. A rapid and low-cost microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay for detecting TB and MDR-TB among individuals infected by HIV in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Solomon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The converging epidemics of HIV and tuberculosis (TB pose one of the greatest public health challenges of our time. Rapid diagnosis of TB is essential in view of its infectious nature, high burden of cases, and emergence of drug resistance. Objective: The purpose of this present study was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing the microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS assay, a novel assay for the diagnosis of TB and multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB directly from sputum specimens, in the Indian setting. Materials and Methods: This study involved a cross-sectional, blinded assessment of the MODS assay on 1036 suspected cases of pulmonary TB in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients against the radiometric method, BD-BACTEC TB 460 system. Results: Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the MODS assay in detecting MTB among TB suspected patients were 89.1%, 99.1%, 94.2%, 95.8%, respectively. In addition, in the diagnosis of drug-resistant TB, the MODS assay was 84.2% sensitive for those specimens reporting MDR, 87% sensitivity for those specimens reporting INH mono-resistance, and 100% sensitive for specimens reporting RIF mono-resistance. The median time to detection of TB in the MODS assay versus BACTEC was 9 versus 21 days (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Costing 5 to 10 times lesser than the automated culture methods, the MODS assay has the potential clinical utility as a simple and rapid method. It could be effectively used as an alternative method for diagnosing TB and detection of MDR-TB in a timely and affordable way in resource-limited settings.

  2. Evaluation of GenoType® MTBDRplus assay for rapid detection of drug susceptibility testing of multi-drug resistance tuberculosis in Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Anand Kumar; Umrao, Jyoti; Singh, Amresh Kumar; Kant, Surya; Kushwaha, Ram Awadh Singh; Dhole, Tapan N

    2013-01-01

    The problem of multi-drug resistance tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is growing in several hotspots throughout the world. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of MDR-TB is crucial to facilitate early treatment and to reduce its spread in the community. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the new, novel GenoType® MTBDRplus assay for rapid detection of drug susceptibility testing (DST) of MDR-TB cases in Northern India. A total of 550 specimens were collected from highly suspected drug resistant from pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB cases. All the specimens were processed by Ziehl- Neelsen staining, culture, differentiation by the GenoType® CM assay, first line DST using BacT/ALERT 3D system and GenoType® MTBDRplus assay. The concordance of the GenoType® MTBDRplus assay was calculated in comparison with conventional DST results. Overall the sensitivity for detection of rifampicin, isoniazid and MDR-TB resistance by GenoType® MTBDRplus assay was 98.0%, 98.4% and 98.2% respectively. Out of 55 MDR-TB strains, 45 (81.8%), 52 (94.5%) and 17 (30.9%) strains showed mutation in rpoB, katG and inhA genes respectively (P < 0.05). The most prominent mutations in rpoB, katG and inhA genes were; 37 (67.3%) in S531L, 52 (94.5%) in S315T1 and 11 (20%) in C15T regions respectively (P < 0.05). Our study demonstrated a high concordance between the GenoType® MTBDRplus assay resistance patterns and those were observed by conventional DST with good sensitivity, specificity with short turnaround times and to control new cases of MDR-TB in countries with a high prevalence of MDR-TB.

  3. Fusarium keratitis in South India: causative agents, their antifungal susceptibilities and a rapid identification method for the Fusarium solani species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, Mónika; Shobana, Coimbatore S; Singh, Yendrembam R B; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Selvam, Kanesan P; Kredics, László; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Galgóczy, László

    2013-09-01

    Seventy Fusarium isolates derived from human keratomycosis were identified based on partial sequences of the β-tubulin (β-TUB) and translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) genes. Most of the isolates were confirmed as members of the F. solani species complex (75.71%), followed by the F. dimerum species complex (8.57%), the F. fujikuroi species complex (8.57%), the F. oxysporum species complex (4.29%) and the F. incarnatum-equiseti species complex (2.86%). A combined phylogenetic tree was estimated including all the 70 isolates. Isolates belonging to different species complexes formed separate clades. In this study, we also report the first isolation of F. napiforme from human keratomycosis. A new method based on a specific EcoRI restriction site in the EF-1α gene was developed for the rapid identification of F. solani. In vitro antifungal susceptibilities of the isolates to seven antifungals were determined by broth microdilution method. Terbinafine, natamycin and amphotericin B proved to be the most effective drugs, followed by voriconazole. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of clotrimazole, econazole and itraconazole were generally high (≥64 μg ml(-1) ). The interactions between the two most effective antifungals (natamycin and terbinafine) were determined by checkerboard microdilution method. Synergism (71.8%) or no interaction (28.2%) was revealed between the two compounds. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Preparing for climate change: Breeding frost tolerant potatoes adapted to Andean Highlands especially the Altiplano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost can have a devastating impact on potato production since most cultivated potatoes are very sensitive to frost and are severely damaged at air temperatures below -2 or -3 C. In the Altiplano of Peru and Bolivia over 60,000 hectares of potato production is impacted by frost. It has been estimate...

  5. Frost hardiness of tree species is independent of phenology and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-04

    Feb 4, 2015 ... et al. 2000) because increasing temperatures in early spring initiate bud dehardening (Leinonen et al. 1997; Beck et al. 2007; Hänninen et al. 2007) and freshly opened buds with young unfolded leaves are highly sensitive to frost damage. (Cannell and Smith 1984; Dittmar et al. 2006; Augspurger. 2009).

  6. Reduced-molecular-weight derivatives of frost grape polysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new Type II arabinogalactan was recently described as an abundant gum exudate from stems of wildfrost grape (Vitus riparia Michx.). The purpose of the current study is to more thoroughly characterize the physical properties of this frost grape polysaccharide (FGP), and develop methods to modify th...

  7. Condensation phenomena and frost problems in the air heat recuperators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamski Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation results of condensation phenomena and frost problems in the ventilation heat recuperators are presented. The experiments have been conducted for typical value of indoor temperature 20°C and a large range of humidity values from 20 to 75% and more of an exhausted air. The heat exchanger worked in the real conditions of the winter climate in Bialystok.

  8. Jeff FROST, video artist for U2, visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Video artist Jeff Frost came to CERN last April to produce video art for the U2 band's 2015 tour Innocence and Experience. He spent a week and visited in The Globe, the ATLAS, CMS experiments and ALICE caverns, Idea Square, the COMPASS experiment, the AD, the Aegis experiment, n-ToF, LEIR, ISOLDE, SM18, the Computing Centre.

  9. Genetic architecture of winter hardiness and frost tolerance in triticale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Liu

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress experienced by autumn-sown crops during winter is of great economic importance as it can have a severe negative impact on yield. In this study, we investigated the genetic architecture of winter hardiness and frost tolerance in triticale. To this end, we used a large mapping population of 647 DH lines phenotyped for both traits in combination with genome-wide marker data. Employing multiple-line cross QTL mapping, we identified nine main effect QTL for winter hardiness and frost tolerance of which six were overlapping between both traits. Three major QTL were identified on chromosomes 5A, 1B and 5R. In addition, an epistasis scan revealed the contribution of epistasis to the genetic architecture of winter hardiness and frost tolerance in triticale. Taken together, our results show that winter hardiness and frost tolerance are complex traits that can be improved by phenotypic selection, but also that genomic approaches hold potential for a knowledge-based improvement of these important traits in elite triticale germplasm.

  10. Inhibition of Condensation Frosting by Arrays of Hygroscopic Antifreeze Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoda; Damle, Viraj G; Uppal, Aastha; Linder, Rubin; Chandrashekar, Sriram; Mohan, Ajay R; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2015-12-29

    The formation of frost and ice can have negative impacts on travel and a variety of industrial processes and is typically addressed by dispensing antifreeze substances such as salts and glycols. Despite the popularity of this anti-icing approach, some of the intricate underlying physical mechanisms are just being unraveled. For example, recent studies have shown that in addition to suppressing ice formation within its own volume, an individual salt saturated water microdroplet forms a region of inhibited condensation and condensation frosting (RIC) in its surrounding area. This occurs because salt saturated water, like most antifreeze substances, is hygroscopic and has water vapor pressure at its surface lower than water saturation pressure at the substrate. Here, we demonstrate that for macroscopic drops of propylene glycol and salt saturated water, the absolute RIC size can remain essentially unchanged for several hours. Utilizing this observation, we demonstrate that frost formation can be completely inhibited in-between microscopic and macroscopic arrays of propylene glycol and salt saturated water drops with spacing (S) smaller than twice the radius of the RIC (δ). Furthermore, by characterizing condensation frosting dynamics around various hygroscopic drop arrays, we demonstrate that they can delay complete frosting over of the samples 1.6 to 10 times longer than films of the liquids with equivalent volume. The significant delay in onset of ice nucleation achieved by dispensing propylene glycol in drops rather than in films is likely due to uniform dilution of the drops driven by thermocapillary flow. This transport mode is absent in the films, leading to faster dilution, and with that facilitated homogeneous nucleation, near the liquid-air interface.

  11. Frosted branch angiitis as a result of immune recovery uveitis in a patient with cytomegalovirus retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeamornsiri, Supinda; Choopong, Pitipol; Tesavibul, Nattaporn

    2013-06-22

    Since the introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART), AIDs related morbidity and mortality have declined. However, the advent of HAART brought the new problem of immune recovery inflammatory syndrome. Cytomegalovirus retinitis remains the most common cause of visual loss in AIDs patients. Some patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis who experienced immune recovery as a consequence of HAART develop worsening of visual symptoms from immune recovery uveitis (IRU). We report a case of cytomegalovirus retinitis and AIDs who developed an unusual presentation of IRU after the initiation of HAART. A 40-year-old woman presented with a history of blurry vision in the right eye. She was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus infection and cytomegalovirus retinitis, treated with intravitreal injections of ganciclovir. The retinitis improved. One week after HAART initiation, she developed IRU, characterized by increased intraocular inflammation, extensive frosted branch angiitis and cystoid macular edema. The CD4+ T lymphocyte count increased from 53 to 107 cells/mm3. Systemic prednisolone with continuation of HAART and intravitreal injections of ganciclovir were given with significant improvement. Atypical presentation of IRU, characterized by extensive frosted branch angiitis and increased intraocular inflammation may occur in immunocompromised patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis who experienced immune recovery. The time from HAART initiation to develop IRU may vary from days to months. This case demonstrated a very rapidly developed IRU which should be recognized and appropriately managed to avoid permanent damage of the eye.

  12. Features of frost-affected areas from digital METEOSAT IR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalezios, N. R.; Lavrediadou, E. E.

    Frost is a natural hazard, which may cause significant damage to agriculture depending also on the phenological stage of the affected crops. In this paper, several features of the frost-affected areas are examined by using digital data of METEOSAT IR images. In particular the areal extent of frost is delineated by using the estimated temperature from the raw satellite data. Moreover, since digital METEOSAT IR images are recorded every thirty (30) minutes, it is possible to monitor the changes in the size of the frost-affected areas as well as the fluctuations in frost intensity and severity. The phenomenon is investigated in several regions in Greece.

  13. Holding emotional and linguistic rulers up to the poetry of Robert Frost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whissell, C

    1999-12-01

    The words in a large and representative sample of Robert Frost's poetry were compared with information in several data bases which provided estimates of the poetry's pleasantness, arousal, emotionality, imagery, and linguistic complexity. Findings confirmed that Frost's poetry was linguistically simple and emotionally restrained in comparison to that of his cohort. They also highlighted the increasing variability in Frost's poetry across time and its decreasing imagery. Frost's poetry was more restrained than that of his male cohort but similar to the poetry of his female cohort in its linguistic simplicity. Frost's acknowledged death poems were in fact quite pleasant and passive in emotional tone.

  14. Predicting Frost Resistance of Concrete with Different Coarse Aggregate Concentration by Porosity Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džigita NAGROCKIENĖ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Frost resistance is one of the key indicators of concrete quality. Frost resistance can be determined by direct testing; however it is time-consuming and labour-intensive method. Concrete decomposition is a complex process (from initial signs of degradation to complete failure of the surface subjected to freezing involving many factors. Frost resistance of concrete can be predicted from porosity parameters after determining their relation to frost resistance. Test results showed the relation between the closed porosity of concrete and frost resistance factor. Closed porosity of concrete was found to have a significant influence on frost resistance factor. It is shown that closed porosity depends on the concentration of coarse aggregate in concrete, the closed porosity and predicted frost resistance of concrete increase with lower concentration of coarse aggregate.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.2.493

  15. pso.ATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    isolates vere made using standard methods, Antibiotic susceptibility tests against commonly prescribed ... Acute otitis media is rapid with short .... sensitivity tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests: The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of major Gram positive and negative bacterial isolates obtained from clinical specimens.

  16. A Novel 7-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Clonotyping Test Allows Rapid Prediction of Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Extraintestinal Escherichia coli Directly From Urine Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; Avagyan, Hovhannes; Billig, Mariya; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Aprikian, Pavel; Chan, Diana; Pseunova, Julietta; Rechkina, Elena; Riddell, Kim; Scholes, Delia; Fang, Ferric C.; Johnson, James R.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Escherichia coli is a highly clonal pathogen. Extraintestinal isolates belong to a limited number of genetically related groups, which often exhibit characteristic antimicrobial resistance profiles. Methods. We developed a rapid clonotyping method for extraintestinal E coli based on detection of the presence or absence of 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 2 genes (fumC and fimH). A reference set of 2559 E coli isolates, primarily of urinary origin, was used to predict the resolving power of the 7-SNP-based typing method, and 582 representative strains from this set were used to evaluate test robustness. Results. Fifty-four unique SNP combinations (“septatypes”) were identified in the reference strains. These septatypes yielded a clonal group resolution power on par with that of traditional multilocus sequence typing. In 72% of isolates, septatype identity predicted sequence type identity with at least 90% (mean, 97%) accuracy. Most septatypes exhibited highly distinctive antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. The 7-SNP-based test could be performed with high specificity and sensitivity using single or multiplex conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative PCR. In the latter format, E coli presence and septatype identity were determined directly in urine specimens within 45 minutes with bacterial loads as low as 102 colony-forming units/mL and, at clinically significant bacterial loads, with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions. 7-SNP-based typing of E coli can be used for both epidemiological studies and clinical diagnostics, which could greatly improve the empirical selection of antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26925427

  17. Controlling condensation and frost growth with chemical micropatterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Murphy, Kevin R.; Nath, Saurabh; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In-plane frost growth on chilled hydrophobic surfaces is an inter-droplet phenomenon, where frozen droplets harvest water from neighboring supercooled liquid droplets to grow ice bridges that propagate across the surface in a chain reaction. To date, no surface has been able to passively prevent the in-plane growth of ice bridges across the population of supercooled condensate. Here, we demonstrate that when the separation between adjacent nucleation sites for supercooled condensate is properly controlled with chemical micropatterns prior to freezing, inter-droplet ice bridging can be slowed and even halted entirely. Since the edge-to-edge separation between adjacent supercooled droplets decreases with growth time, deliberately triggering an early freezing event to minimize the size of nascent condensation was also necessary. These findings reveal that inter-droplet frost growth can be passively suppressed by designing surfaces to spatially control nucleation sites and by temporally controlling the onset of freezing events. PMID:26796663

  18. The Physics of Frost Heave and Ice-Lens Growth

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen S. L.

    2013-01-01

    The principle cause of frost heave is the formation of segregated ice-ice lenses-in freezing soil columns. Despite much experimental and theoretical work, there remain many questions about the fundamental process by which this occurs. Frost-heave models fall into two main classes: capillary and frozen-fringe models. Which model is appropriate depends on whether there is a frozen fringe; these are difficult to observe but some experimental evidence does exist. Recent advances have revitalized the capillary model, such as the engulfment model and the concept of geometrical supercooling. Key experimental and theoretical challenges remain to be resolved. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA. All rights reserved.

  19. CFD analysis of tube-fin 'no-frost' evaporators

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Jr,Jader R; Hermes,Christian J. L; Melo,Cláudio

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess some aspects of the design of evaporators for household refrigeration appliances using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The evaporators under study are tube-fin 'no-frost' heat exchangers with forced convection on the air-side and a staggered tube configuration. The calculation methodology was verified against experimental data for the heat transfer rate, thermal conductance and pressure drop obtained for two evaporators with different geometries. The...

  20. The frost peat production; Routapalaturpeen tuotantoketjun tekniikka, talous ja ympaeristoevaikutukset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyroenen, T. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Leiviskae, V. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Thule Inst.

    1997-12-01

    The frost peat production means the cutting of frozen peat in the winter time. The aim of this study is to test the possibilities to prolong the peat production season and to produce peat pieces for the horticultural peat industry. In the frost peat production method the frozen peat field is sawed throughout the length and breadth of by a circle saw. The sawed peat pieces are loosened from the field by a so-called `splitter`. The circle saw is equipped with the five circle saw blades (diameter 90 cm). The distance of the blades is adjustable. The splitter is equipped with a horizontal position blade (width 35 cm). The dimensions of the peat pieces are changeable, but from the point of drying the upper limit of the side of the peat cube can be 15-20 cm. The frost peat production method is technically suitable for production of slightly decomposed (H1-5) energy and horticultural peat. The energy peat pieces are allowed to dry up 70-75 % moisture content on the cutting field and then the pieces can be ridged by the screening ridger. If necessary, the ridges can be turned over. In the frost peat production, the conventional sod peat winning machines can be used in the following stages of the working tasks: harrowing, ridging, loading, turning of ridges and stockpiling. The measured output of the circle saw was about 45-50 m{sup 3}/h of energy peat and 58-63 m{sup 3}/h of horticultural peat. The output of the splitter was 120-150 m{sup 3}/h. Theoretically, the output of circle saw and the splitter can easily be doubled. Thereafter the production costs will be about 19 FIM/MWh of energy peat and 18,6 FIM/m{sup 3} of horticultural peat

  1. Seasonality of cavitation and frost fatigue in Acer mono Maxim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Feng, Feng; Tyree, Melvin T

    2017-12-08

    Although cavitation is common in plants, it is unknown whether the cavitation resistance of xylem is seasonally constant or variable. We tested the changes in cavitation resistance of Acer mono before and after a controlled cavitation-refilling and freeze-thaw cycles for a whole year. Cavitation resistance was determined from 'vulnerability curves' showing the percent loss of conductivity (PLC) versus xylem tension. Cavitation fatigue was defined as a reduction of cavitation resistance following a cavitation-refilling cycle while frost fatigue was caused by a freeze-thaw cycle. A. mono developed seasonal changes in native embolisms; values were relatively high during winter but relatively low and constant throughout the growing season. Cavitation fatigue occurred and changed seasonally during the 12-month cycle; the greatest fatigue response occurred during summer and the weakest during winter, and the transitions occurred during spring and autumn. A. mono was highly resistant to frost damage during the relatively mild winter months; however, a quite different situation occurred during the growing season, as the seasonal trend of frost fatigue was strikingly similar to that of cavitation fatigue. Seasonality changes in cavitation resistance may be caused by seasonal changes in the mechanical properties of the pit membranes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or Sperling

    Full Text Available Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq. cm(-3 yr(-1 on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics.

  3. Strength and Stiffness of Stabilized Alluvial Silt under Frost Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Yellow River alluvial silt was stabilized into pavement base materials for cold regions. The stabilizing additives were cement, fly ash, and lime, which were included in a range of combinations and dosages when mixed with the silt. Freeze-thaw cyclic impacts were conducted on the treated samples to assess materials performance of withstanding the frost actions. The tests were conducted on samples cured for 7 days to up to 180 days. Test results show that the cement-fly ash-treated samples outperform the other two stabilization categories with respect to material strength and stiffness developed under both normal and frost conditions. Under the normal conditions, the material unconfined compressive (UC strength rises to 3.0 MPa on day 28 depending on the cement and fly ash dosage used. If subjected to frost actions, the fly ash inclusions warrant a residual UC strength value of 1.3 MPa and above. The antifrost performance of the cement-fly ash-treated samples is related to thermal buffer capacity of the fly ash particles. Water adsorption and material soundness results agree with the strength and stiffness development. An optimal dosage was 3–6% for the cement and 0.3 for cement to fly ash mass ratio.

  4. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm(-3) yr(-1) on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics.

  5. Ground level air convection produces frost damage patterns in turfgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Bruce J; Beier, Richard A; Martin, Dennis L

    2015-11-01

    Frost injury patterns are commonly observed on the warm-season turfgrass species bermudagrass (Cynodon species Rich.), zoysiagrass (Zoysia species Willd.), and buffalograss [Bouteloua dactyloides (Nutt.) J.T. Columbus] in cool-temperate and subtropical zones. Qualitative observations of these injury patterns are presented and discussed. A model for the formation of such patterns based on thermal instability and convection of air is presented. The characteristic length scale of the observed frost pattern injury requires a temperature profile that decreases with height from the soil to the turfgrass canopy surface followed by an increase in temperature with height above the turfgrass canopy. This is justified by extending the earth temperature theory to include a turf layer with atmosphere above it. Then the theory for a thermally unstable layer beneath a stable region by Ogura and Kondo is adapted to a turf layer to include different parameter values for pure air, as well as for turf, which is treated as a porous medium. The earlier porous medium model of Thompson and Daniels proposed to explain frost injury patterns is modified to give reasonable agreement with observed patterns.

  6. Effects of environmental factors and management practices on microclimate, winter physiology and frost resistance in trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume eCharrier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Freezing events are one of the most important limiting factors determining the ecological distribution and production of tree species. Assessment of frost risk, is therefore, critical for forestry, fruit production and horticulture. Frost risk is substantial when hazard (i.e., exposure to damaging freezing temperatures intersects with vulnerability (i.e., frost sensitivity. Based on a large number of studies on frost resistance and frost occurrence, we highlight the complex interactive role of environmental conditions (e.g., light, temperature, carbohydrates, and water status in frost risk development. To supersede the classical empirical relations used to model frost hardiness, we propose an integrated ecophysiologically-based framework of frost risk assessment. This framework details the individual or interactive roles of these factors, and how they are distributed in time and space at the individual level (within-crown and across organs. Based on this general framework, we are able to highlight factors by which different environmental conditions (temperature, flood, drought and management practices (pruning, thinning, girdling, sheltering, water aspersion, irrigation and fertilization could influence frost sensitivity and frost exposure of trees.

  7. Patterns of late spring frost leaf damage and recovery in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. stand in south-eastern Germany based on repeated digital photographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette eMenzel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Damage by late spring frost is a risk deciduous trees have to cope with in order to optimize the length of their growing season. The timing of spring phenological development plays a crucial role, not only at the species level, but also at the population and individual level, since fresh new leaves are especially vulnerable. For the pronounced late spring frost in May 2011 in Germany, we studied the individual leaf development of 35 deciduous trees (mainly European beech Fagus sylvatica L. at a mountainous forest site in the Bayerischer Wald National Park using repeated digital photographs. Analyses of the time series of greenness by a novel Bayesian multiple change point approach mostly revealed five change points which almost perfectly matched the expected break points in leaf development: i start of the first greening between DOY (day of the year 108 to 119 (mean 113, ii end of greening and iii visible frost damage after the frost on the night of May 3rd/4th (DOY 123, 124, iv re-sprouting 19 to 38 days after the frost, and v full maturity around DOY 178 (166 to 184 when all beech crowns had fully recovered. Since frost damage was nearly 100%, individual susceptibility did not depend on the timing of first spring leaf unfolding. However, we could identify significant patterns in fitness linked to an earlier start of leaf unfolding. Those individuals that had an earlier start of greening during the first flushing period had a shorter period of recovery and started the second greening earlier. Thus, phenological timing triggered the speed of recovery from such an extreme event. The maximum greenness achieved, however, did not vary with leaf unfolding dates. Two mountain ashes (Sorbus aucuparia L. were not affected by the low temperatures of −5°C. Time series analysis of webcam pictures can thus improve process-based knowledge and provide valuable insights into the link between phenological variation, late spring frost damage and recovery

  8. Observed variations in U.S. frost timing linked to atmospheric circulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Courtenay; McCabe, Gregory J.

    2017-01-01

    Several studies document lengthening of the frost-free season within the conterminous United States (U.S.) over the past century, and report trends in spring and fall frost timing that could stem from hemispheric warming. In the absence of warming, theory and case studies link anomalous frost timing to atmospheric circulation anomalies. However, recent efforts to relate a century of observed changes in U.S. frost timing to various atmospheric circulations yielded only modest correlations, leaving the relative importance of circulation and warming unclear. Here, we objectively partition the U.S. into four regions and uncover atmospheric circulations that account for 25–48% of spring and fall-frost timing. These circulations appear responsive to historical warming, and they consistently account for more frost timing variability than hemispheric or regional temperature indices. Reliable projections of future variations in growing season length depend on the fidelity of these circulation patterns in global climate models.

  9. Observed variations in U.S. frost timing linked to atmospheric circulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Courtenay; McCabe, Gregory J.

    2017-05-01

    Several studies document lengthening of the frost-free season within the conterminous United States (U.S.) over the past century, and report trends in spring and fall frost timing that could stem from hemispheric warming. In the absence of warming, theory and case studies link anomalous frost timing to atmospheric circulation anomalies. However, recent efforts to relate a century of observed changes in U.S. frost timing to various atmospheric circulations yielded only modest correlations, leaving the relative importance of circulation and warming unclear. Here, we objectively partition the U.S. into four regions and uncover atmospheric circulations that account for 25-48% of spring and fall-frost timing. These circulations appear responsive to historical warming, and they consistently account for more frost timing variability than hemispheric or regional temperature indices. Reliable projections of future variations in growing season length depend on the fidelity of these circulation patterns in global climate models.

  10. Anti-icing/frosting and self-cleaning performance of superhydrophobic aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Libang; Yan, Zhongna; Shi, Xueting; Sultonzoda, Firdavs

    2018-02-01

    Ice formation and frost deposition on cryogenic equipment and systems can result in serious problems and huge economic loss. Hence, it is quite necessary to develop new materials to prevent icing and frosting on cold surfaces in engineering fields. Here, a superhydrophobic aluminum alloy with enhanced anti-frosting, anti-icing, and self-cleaning performance has been developed by a facile one-step method. The anti-frosting/icing performance of superhydrophobic aluminum alloys is confirmed by frosting/icing time delay, consolidating and freezing temperature reduction, and lower amount of frost/ice adhesion. Meanwhile, the excellent self-cleaning performance is authenticated by the fact that simulated pollution particles can be cleaned out by rolling water droplets completely. Finally, based on the classical nucleation theory, anti-icing and anti-frosting mechanisms of the superhydrophobic aluminum alloys are deduced. Results show that grounded on "air cushion" and "heat insulation" effect, a larger nucleation barrier and a lower crystal growth rate can be observed, which, hence, inhibit ice formation and frost deposition. It can be concluded that preparing superhydrophobic surfaces would be an effective strategy for improving anti-icing, anti-frosting, and self-cleaning performance of aluminum alloys.

  11. Advances in rapid identification and susceptibility testing of bacteria in the clinical microbiology laboratory: implications for patient care and antimicrobial stewardship programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian P. Maurer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Early availability of information on bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility is of key importance for the management of infectious diseases patients. Currently, using traditional approaches, it usually takes at least 48 hours for identification and susceptibility testing of bacterial pathogens. Therefore, the slowness of diagnostic procedures drives prolongation of empiric, potentially inappropriate, antibacterial therapies. Over the last couple of years, the improvement of available techniques (e.g. for susceptibility testing, DNA amplification assays, and introduction of novel technologies (e.g. MALDI-TOF has fundamentally changed approaches towards pathogen identification and characterization. Importantly, these techniques offer increased diagnostic resolution while at the same time shorten the time-to-result, and are thus of obvious importance for antimicrobial stewardship. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in medical microbiology with special emphasis on the impact of novel techniques on antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  12. Advances in Rapid Identification and Susceptibility Testing of Bacteria in the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory: Implications for Patient Care and Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Florian P; Christner, Martin; Hentschke, Moritz; Rohde, Holger

    2017-03-30

    Early availability of information on bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility is of key importance for the management of infectious diseases patients. Currently, using traditional approaches, it usually takes at least 48 hours for identification and susceptibility testing of bacterial pathogens. Therefore, the slowness of diagnostic procedures drives prolongation of empiric, potentially inappropriate, antibacterial therapies. Over the last couple of years, the improvement of available techniques (e.g. for susceptibility testing, DNA amplification assays), and introduction of novel technologies (e.g. MALDI-TOF) has fundamentally changed approaches towards pathogen identification and characterization. Importantly, these techniques offer increased diagnostic resolution while at the same time shorten the time-to-result, and are thus of obvious importance for antimicrobial stewardship. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in medical microbiology with special emphasis on the impact of novel techniques on antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  13. Frost-bitten foot: dialogues we live by

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Carlos Augusto; Guimarães, Ana Paula

    2000-01-01

    Ao comparar versões portuguesas e brasileiras de “A Formiguinha e a Neve” (Thompson motivo Z.42: “Stronger and Strongest”: frost-bitten foot” / tipo AaTh 2031, Stronger and Strongest) e inserindo nos nossos passos um texto do Panchatantra (“A história da ratinha”), rumo à interpretação desta história aparentemente simples e infantil, propusémo-nos avançar algumas notas sobre dois tópicos particulares: um relacionado com a linguagem (o quarto passo do nosso artigo); e outro com a filosofia do ...

  14. Nowcasting in the FROST-2014 Sochi Olympic project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bica, Benedikt; Wang, Yong; Joe, Paul; Isaac, George; Kiktev, Dmitry; Bocharnikov, Nikolai

    2013-04-01

    FROST (Forecast and Research: the Olympic Sochi Testbed) 2014 is a WMO WWRP international project aimed at development, implementation, and demonstration of capabilities of short-range numerical weather prediction and nowcasting technologies for mountainous terrain in winter season. Sharp weather contrasts and high spatial and temporal variability are typical for the region of the Sochi-2014 Olympics. Steep mountainous terrain and an intricate mixture of maritime sub-tropical and Alpine environments make weather forecasting in this region extremely challenging. Goals of the FROST-2014 project: • To develop a comprehensive information resource of Alpine winter weather observations; • To improve and exploit: o Nowcasting systems of high impact weather phenomena (precipitation type and intensity, snow levels, visibility, wind speed, direction and gusts) in complex terrain; o High-resolution deterministic and ensemble mesoscale forecasts in winter complex terrain environment; • To improve the understanding of physics of high impact weather phenomena in the region; • To deliver forecasts (Nowcasts) to Olympic weather forecasters and decision makers and assess benefits of forecast improvement. 46 Automatic Meteorological Stations (AMS) were installed in the Olympic region by Roshydromet, by owners of sport venues and by the Megafon corporation, provider of mobile communication services. The time resolution of AMS observations does not exceed 10 minutes. For a subset of the stations it is even equal to 1 min. Data flow from the new dual polarization Doppler weather radar WRM200 in Sochi was organized at the end of 2012. Temperature/humidity and wind profilers and two Micro Rain Radars (MRR) will supplement the network. Nowcasting potential of NWP models participating in the project (COSMO, GEM, WRF, AROME, HARMONIE) is to be assessed for direct and post-processed (e.g. Kalman filter, 1-D model, MOS) model forecasts. Besides the meso-scale models, the specialized

  15. Effects of Spring Late Frost on Black Seed (Nigella sativa L. under Controlled Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Khorsandi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In many years plant growth strongly affected by late spring frost. In order to evaluate the effects of late frost on Black Seed plants, a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replications was carried out in college of agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad and five Black Seed ecotypes (Birjsnd, Sabzewar, Ferdows, Gonabad and Neyshabour after two months growth and hardening in natural environment, were exposed to seven temperatures (0, -1.5, -3, -4.5, -6, -7.5 and -9°C in termogradient freezer. For determining cold stress damages, Lethal Temperature (LT for 50% of plants according to the Electrolyte Leakage percentage (LT50el, LT for 50% of plants according to the Survival percentage (LT50su, LT for 50% of plants according to the plant necrose in Test Tube (LT50tt and Reduced Dry Matter Temperature 50 (RDMT50 were measured. Ability of plants for recovery was recorded based on leaf number and leaf area, plant dry weight and cold damage percentage of leaves. According to the LT50tt, LT50su and RDMT50 Black Seed plants can tolerated cold stress in range between -5.7 to -9.0 °C and Sabzewar and Ferdows ecotypes had the most and the least cold tolerance, respectively. At the point of ability of plants for recovery, Ferdows ecotype had the least and Sabzewar and Neyshabour ecotypes had the best plant recovery. Moreover there were high correlations between LT50tt and LT50 based on electrolyte leakage, survival and RDMT50. Electrolyte leakage and visual scoring of cold damage in test tube are rapid methods, so for assessing cold tolerance in plants LT50el and LT50tt indeces may be useful.

  16. Role of planting stock size and fertilizing in initial growth performance of rowan (Sorbus aucuparia L. reforestation in a mountain frost hollow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kuneš

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study: (1 to compare the survival rate, growth performance and nutrition of large and common-sized planting stock of rowan (Sorbus aucuparia L. on a frost-exposed site and (2 to assess whether fertilizing had any effect on the plantations.Area of study: The Jizera Mts., an area heavily disturbed by air pollution situated on the Czech-Polish border close to GermanyMaterials and methods: Two types of planting stock were tested in a mountain frost hollow on an acidic mountain humic podsol: (a the bare-rooted saplings 131–140 cm tall and (b common-sized containerized transplants 26–35 cm. One half of the saplings and common-sized transplants were left untreated and the other half were fertilized with a low dose (30 g per tree of a slow release fertilizer based on methylene urea and potassium magnesium phosphate. Growth performance and nutrition of plantations were investigated.Main results: Due to serious deformations and stem breakages inflicted by snow and frost, the prospects of common-sized transplants seem much worse than those of saplings. The height growth of saplings was significantly more rapid than that of common-sized transplants. As for growth, neither the saplings nor common-sized transplants did significantly respond to fertilizing. The effects of fertilizing on nutrition of rowans were unconvincing. The extreme temperature events during growth seasons and snow deformations in winters might be the decisive factors influencing growth performance of rowans under referred conditions.Research highlights: On the frost-exposed sites, the height of taller saplings might partly compensate for a missing shelter of forest stand since the terminal leaders are above ground-frost zone.Key words: mountain ash; sapling; common-sized transplants; nutritional status; temperature.Abbreviations: CS – Control Saplings; CT – Control Transplants; FS – Fertilized Saplings; FT – Fertilized Transplants

  17. Survival rate and expression of Heat-shock protein 70 and Frost genes after temperature stress in Drosophila melanogaster lines that are selected for recovery time from temperature coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaka, Hiroko; Ueda, Chiaki; Goto, Shin G

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the physiological mechanisms underlying temperature tolerance using Drosophila melanogaster lines with rapid, intermediate, or slow recovery from heat or chill coma that were established by artificial selection or by free recombination without selection. Specifically, we focused on the relationships among their recovery from heat or chill coma, survival after severe heat or cold, and survival enhanced by rapid cold hardening (RCH) or heat hardening. The recovery time from heat coma was not related to the survival rate after severe heat. The line with rapid recovery from chill coma showed a higher survival rate after severe cold exposure, and therefore the same mechanisms are likely to underlie these phenotypes. The recovery time from chill coma and survival rate after severe cold were unrelated to RCH-enhanced survival. We also examined the expression of two genes, Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and Frost, in these lines to understand the contribution of these stress-inducible genes to intraspecific variation in recovery from temperature coma. The line showing rapid recovery from heat coma did not exhibit higher expression of Hsp70 and Frost. In addition, Hsp70 and Frost transcription levels were not correlated with the recovery time from chill coma. Thus, Hsp70 and Frost transcriptional regulation was not involved in the intraspecific variation in recovery from temperature coma. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of Frost Occurrences Using Statistical Modeling Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyojin Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed the frost prediction models in spring in Korea using logistic regression and decision tree techniques. Hit Rate (HR, Probability of Detection (POD, and False Alarm Rate (FAR from both models were calculated and compared. Threshold values for the logistic regression models were selected to maximize HR and POD and minimize FAR for each station, and the split for the decision tree models was stopped when change in entropy was relatively small. Average HR values were 0.92 and 0.91 for logistic regression and decision tree techniques, respectively, average POD values were 0.78 and 0.80 for logistic regression and decision tree techniques, respectively, and average FAR values were 0.22 and 0.28 for logistic regression and decision tree techniques, respectively. The average numbers of selected explanatory variables were 5.7 and 2.3 for logistic regression and decision tree techniques, respectively. Fewer explanatory variables can be more appropriate for operational activities to provide a timely warning for the prevention of the frost damages to agricultural crops. We concluded that the decision tree model can be more useful for the timely warning system. It is recommended that the models should be improved to reflect local topological features.

  19. Rapid detection of amoxicillin-susceptible Escherichia coli in fresh uncultured urine: a new tool to limit the use of broad-spectrum empirical therapy of community-acquired pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelet, Guillaume; Corvec, Stéphane; Montassier, Emmanuel; Herbreteau, Guillaume; Berrut, Gilles; Batard, Eric; de Decker, Laure

    2016-06-01

    Because of the high prevalence of amoxicillin resistance among uropathogens, amoxicillin is not recommended as an empirical treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Quick detection of an amoxicillin-susceptible Escherichia coli (ASEC) would allow prescribing amoxicillin without preliminary broad-spectrum empirical treatment in uncomplicated pyelonephritis. To quickly diagnose UTIs due to ASEC, we developed a real-time PCR that detects in fresh uncultured urine the E. coli-specific gene yccT as well as the blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes. The ASEC rapid test was considered positive if the PCR was positive for the yccT gene but negative for blaTEM and blaCTX-M. The test was compared with culture and susceptibility testing. Among 200 patients with a suspected community-acquired UTI, 61 (30.5%) had a monobacterial UTI due to ASEC. The ASEC rapid test result was obtained in 3 h 13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3 h 12-3 h 15] and was positive for 43 patients (21.5%). Specificity and sensitivity were 97.8% (95% CI 95.8-99.8%) and 65.6% (95% CI 59.0-72.1%), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 93.0% (95% CI 89.5-96.5%) and 86.6% (95% CI 81.9-91.3%), respectively. Owing to its high specificity and positive predictive value, the ASEC rapid test allows the diagnosis of UTI due to ASEC only 3 h after urine sampling. A positive ASEC rapid test may be used to treat uncomplicated pyelonephritis with amoxicillin from the start, without preliminary broad-spectrum empirical treatment. The ASEC rapid test is a promising tool to spare fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins in UTIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid Direct Testing of Susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Isoniazid and Rifampin on Nutrient and Blood Agar in Resource-Starved Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram, Aamer; Coban, Ahmet Yilmaz; Martin, Anandi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the performance of blood agar (by macroscopic growth) and nutrient agar (by a microcolony detection method) for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis against rifampin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH), using 67 smear-positive sputum specimens. The direct proportion method on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) medium was used as the “gold standard.” Compared with LJ medium, results for both media were in 100% agreement for RIF, while for INH the agreement levels for blood agar and nutrient agar were 98% and 95%, respectively. Within 2 weeks, 100% of specimens yielded results on blood agar, while 96.8% of specimens yielded results on nutrient agar. Our study showed that blood agar and nutrient agar can be used as alternative media for direct susceptibility testing of RIF and INH, especially in resource-poor settings. PMID:22357498

  1. Measuring soil frost depth in forest ecosystems with ground penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Butnor; John L. Campbell; James B. Shanley; Stanley. Zarnoch

    2014-01-01

    Soil frost depth in forest ecosystems can be variable and depends largely on early winter air temperatures and the amount and timing of snowfall. A thorough evaluation of ecological responses to seasonally frozen ground is hampered by our inability to adequately characterize the frequency, depth, duration and intensity of soil frost events. We evaluated the use of...

  2. Frost Durability and Strength of Concrete Prepared with Crushed Sand of Different Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-kai Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influences of fines content, methylene blue (MB value, and lithology of crushed sand (CS on frost durability and strength of concrete were investigated, and the frost durability and strength of crushed sand concrete (CSC and river sand concrete (RSC were compared. The results show that inclusion of fines improves CSC compressive strength and reduces frost durability of C30 CSC when fines content reaches 10%, whereas it has little negative influence on frost durability of C60 CSC. Increasing MB value does not negatively affect compressive strength of C30 CSC but decreases compressive strength of C60 CSC and frost durability of CSC, and the reduction is more pronounced when MB value exceeds 1.0. Lithology has no prominent influence on frost durability and compressive strength of CSC within the lithologies (dolomite, limestone, granite, basalt, and quartz studied. Though compressive strength of CSC is a little higher than RSC under equal water to cement ratio, frost durability of CSC is no better than RSC especially for C30 CSC, and air-entraining agent is suggested for enhancing frost durability of C30 CSC exposed to freezing environment.

  3. Experimental study of frost heaving force based on transient shock response using piezoceramic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruolin; Peng, Tongxiao; Wang, Ming L.

    2016-04-01

    In seasonally frozen soil regions, the frost heaving problem made it difficult to monitor or evaluate the pile safety for long term. So far, no mature tool can be utilized to monitor the frost heaving force, which was unevenly distributed along the pile. In this paper, a piezoceramic sensing based transient excitation response approach was proposed to monitor the frost heaving force in real time. Freeze-thaw cycles can result in great changes of soil engineering properties, including the frost heaving force. So, the freeze-thaw cycle was repeated fourth to study its effect. In the experiment, transient horizontal shock on the top of the pile will be detected by the 6 PZT sensors glued on the pile. The signal data received by the 6 PZT sensors can be used to illustrate the frost heaving force distribution along the pile. Moisture content effect is also one of the important reasons that cause the variation of soil mechanical properties. So three different moisture content (6%, 12%, 18%) testing soil were used in this experiment to detect the variance of the frost heaving force. An energy indicator was developed to quantitatively evaluate the frost heaving force applied on the pile. The experimental results showed that the proposed method was effective in monitoring the uneven distribution of frost heaving force along the pile.

  4. Micrometeorological and thermal control of frost flower growth on young sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galley, R.J.; Else, B.G.T.; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Frost flowers are transient crystal structures that form on new and young sea ice surfaces. They have been implicated in a variety of biological, chemical and physical processes and interactions with the atmosphere at the sea ice surface. We describe the atmospheric and radiative conditions...... and the physical and thermal properties of the sea ice and atmosphere that form, decay and destroy frost flowers on young sea ice. Frost flower formation occurred during a high-pressure system that caused air temperatures to drop to -30°C, with relative humidity of 70% (an under saturated atmosphere), and very...... calm wind conditions. The sea ice surface temperature at the time of frost flower initiation was 10-13°C warmer than the air temperature. Frost flowers grew on nodules raised above the mean surface height by 5 mm, which were 4-6°C colder than the bare, brine-wetted, highly saline sea ice surface...

  5. Temporal and spatial variability of frost-free seasons in the Great Lakes region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejiang Yu; Shiyuan Zhong; Xindi Bian; Warren E. Heilman; Jeffrey A. Andresen

    2014-01-01

    The frequency and timing of frost events and the length of the growing season are critical limiting factors in many human and natural ecosystems. This study investigates the temporal and spatial variability of the date of last spring frost (LSF), the date of first fall frost (FFF), and the length of the frost-free season (FFS) in the Great Lakes region of the United...

  6. Severe soil frost reduced losses of carbon and nitrogen from the forest floor during simulated snowmelt: A laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew B. Reinmann; Pamela H. Templer; John L. Campbell

    2012-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the impacts of soil frost on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, but the effects of soil frost on C and N fluxes during snowmelt remain poorly understood. We conducted a laboratory experiment to determine the effects of soil frost on C and N fluxes from forest floor soils during snowmelt. Soil cores were collected...

  7. Rapid, automated, nonradiometric susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex to four first-line antituberculous drugs used in standard short-course chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Marjamäki, Merja

    2004-01-01

    for isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol. Fifty-seven of the isolates were tested for pyrazinamide. Results were compared to those of radiometric BACTEC 460 system and discrepancies were resolved by the agar proportion method. We found an overall agreement of 99.0% for isoniazid, 99.5% for rifampin, 98.......2% for ethambutol, and 100% for pyrazinamide. After resolution of discrepancies, MGIT yielded no false susceptibility for rifampin and isoniazid. Although turnaround times were comparable, MGIT provides an advantage as inoculation can be done on any weekday as the growth is monitored automatically. The automated...

  8. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-01

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28-0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes.

  9. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-21

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28-0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes.

  10. Influence of aggregate type and chemical admixtures on frost resistance of lightweight mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Beata; Widomski, Marcin K.; Barnat-Hunek, Danuta

    2017-07-01

    The aim of studies presented in this paper covered analyses of type of lightweight aggregate as well as aeration and hydrophobic admixtures influence on absorbability and frost resistance of heat-insulating mortars applied in the energy-efficient construction. In the presented research, expanded perlite (EP) and expanded clay aggregate (ceramsite) were used as lightweight aggregates. The measurements of the basic mechanical and physical characteristics of tested mortars were performed, including, inter alia, compressive and flexural tensile strength, density, effective (open) and total porosity, absorbability, thermal conductivity as well as frost resistance after 25 cycles of freezing and thawing. Substitution of some part of sand fraction by the lightweight aggregates, expanded clay aggregate or perlite, resulted in changes in physical properties of the tested mortars. The observed decrease in density (specific weight), coefficient of heat transport and strength parameters were simultaneously accompanied by the increase in absorbability. Researches concerning frost resistance of mortars containing ceramsite and perlite showed the improved frost resistance of mortar utilizing perlite. Most of the tested mortars shoved satisfactory frost resistance, only samples of mortar containing ceramsite and aeration admixture were destroyed. The significant influence of aerating admixture on frost resistance of mortars was determined. Hydrophobic siloxanes addition failed to adequately protect the mortars against frost erosion, regardless the type of applied aggregate.

  11. Climate change and spring frost damages for sweet cherries in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Frank-M.; Götz, Klaus-P.; Weber, Katharina C.; Moryson, Susanne

    2018-02-01

    Spring frost can be a limiting factor in sweet cherry ( Prunus avium L.) production. Rising temperatures in spring force the development of buds, whereby their vulnerability to freezing temperatures continuously increases. With the beginning of blossom, flowers can resist only light frosts without any significant damage. In this study, we investigated the risk of spring frost damages during cherry blossom for historical and future climate conditions at two different sites in NE (Berlin) and SW Germany (Geisenheim). Two phenological models, developed on the basis of phenological observations at the experimental sweet cherry orchard in Berlin-Dahlem and validated for endodormancy release and for warmer climate conditions (already published), were used to calculate the beginning of cherry blossom in Geisenheim, 1951-2015 (external model validation). Afterwards, on the basis of a statistical regionalisation model WETTREG (RCP 8.5), the frequency of frost during cherry blossom was calculated at both sites for historical (1971-2000) and future climate conditions (2011-2100). From these data, we derived the final flower damage, defined as the percentage of frozen flowers due to single or multiple frost events during blossom. The results showed that rising temperatures in this century can premature the beginning of cherry blossom up to 17 days at both sites, independent of the used phenological model. The frequency and strength of frost was characterised by a high temporal and local variability. For both sites, no significant increase in frost frequency and frost damage during blossom was found. In Geisenheim, frost damages significantly decreased from the middle of the twenty-first century. This study additionally emphasises the importance of reliable phenological models which not only work for current but also for changed climate conditions and at different sites. The date of endodormancy release should always be a known parameter in chilling/forcing models.

  12. Climate change and spring frost damages for sweet cherries in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Frank-M.; Götz, Klaus-P.; Weber, Katharina C.; Moryson, Susanne

    2017-09-01

    Spring frost can be a limiting factor in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) production. Rising temperatures in spring force the development of buds, whereby their vulnerability to freezing temperatures continuously increases. With the beginning of blossom, flowers can resist only light frosts without any significant damage. In this study, we investigated the risk of spring frost damages during cherry blossom for historical and future climate conditions at two different sites in NE (Berlin) and SW Germany (Geisenheim). Two phenological models, developed on the basis of phenological observations at the experimental sweet cherry orchard in Berlin-Dahlem and validated for endodormancy release and for warmer climate conditions (already published), were used to calculate the beginning of cherry blossom in Geisenheim, 1951-2015 (external model validation). Afterwards, on the basis of a statistical regionalisation model WETTREG (RCP 8.5), the frequency of frost during cherry blossom was calculated at both sites for historical (1971-2000) and future climate conditions (2011-2100). From these data, we derived the final flower damage, defined as the percentage of frozen flowers due to single or multiple frost events during blossom. The results showed that rising temperatures in this century can premature the beginning of cherry blossom up to 17 days at both sites, independent of the used phenological model. The frequency and strength of frost was characterised by a high temporal and local variability. For both sites, no significant increase in frost frequency and frost damage during blossom was found. In Geisenheim, frost damages significantly decreased from the middle of the twenty-first century. This study additionally emphasises the importance of reliable phenological models which not only work for current but also for changed climate conditions and at different sites. The date of endodormancy release should always be a known parameter in chilling/forcing models.

  13. Frost sensitivity and nutrient status in a fertilized Norway spruce stand in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, A. M.; Ingerslev, M.; Raulund-Rasmussen, K.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the N, P and K status on frost sensitivity of Norway spruce needles in a fertilization experiment situated in a nutrient poor 29-year-old Picea abies stand in western Denmark. The relative difference in frost sensitivity among trees was assessed...... by an index of injury, based on conductivity measurements of ion leakage from needles. Despite fertilization, all trees indicated N, P and K deficiency. The foliage, collected in late winter, was generally not very frost sensitive, but foliage from trees with the lowest K and P status were more sensitive...

  14. A Novel 7-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Clonotyping Test Allows Rapid Prediction of Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Extraintestinal Escherichia coli Directly From Urine Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; Avagyan, Hovhannes; Billig, Mariya; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Aprikian, Pavel; Chan, Diana; Pseunova, Julietta; Rechkina, Elena; Riddell, Kim; Scholes, Delia; Fang, Ferric C.; Johnson, James R.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2016-01-01

    Background. ?Escherichia coli is a highly clonal pathogen. Extraintestinal isolates belong to a limited number of genetically related groups, which often exhibit characteristic antimicrobial resistance profiles. Methods. ?We developed a rapid clonotyping method for extraintestinal E coli based on detection of the presence or absence of 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 2 genes (fumC and fimH). A reference set of 2559 E coli isolates, primarily of urinary origin, was used to pred...

  15. Numerical Model on Frost Height of Round Plate Fin Used for Outdoor Heat Exchanger of Mobile Electric Heat Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Yeon Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to provide the numerical model for prediction of the frost growth of the round plate fin for the purpose of using it as a round plate fin-tube heat exchanger (evaporator under frosting conditions. In this study, numerical model was considering the frost density change with time, and it showed better agreement with experimental data of Sahin (1994 than that of the Kim model (2004 and the Jonse and Parker model (1975. This is because the prediction on the frost height with time was improved by using the frost thermal conductivity reflecting the void fraction and density of ice crystal with frost growth. Therefore, the developed numerical model could be used for frosting performance prediction of the round plate fin-tube heat exchanger.

  16. Studies in Phylogeny, Development of Rapid IdentificationMethods, Antifungal Susceptibility, and Growth Rates of Clinical Strains of Sporothrix schenckii Complex in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Rumi; Yikelamu, Alimu; Tanaka, Reiko; Igawa, Ken; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Yaguchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal infection caused by the Sporothrix species, which have distinct virulence profiles and geographic distributions. We performed a phylogenetic study in strains morphologically identified as Sporothrix schenckii from clinical specimens in Japan, which were preserved at the Medical Mycology Research Center, Chiba University. In addition, we examined the in vitro antifungal susceptibility and growth rate to evaluate their physiological features. Three hundred strains were examined using sequence analysis of the partial calmodulin gene, or polymerase chain reaction(PCR)method using newly designed species-specific primers; 291 strains were Sporothrix globosa and 9 strains were S. schenckii sensu stricto (in narrow sense, s. s.). S. globosa strains were further clustered into two subclades, and S. schenckii s. s. strains were divided into three subclades. In 38 strains of S. globosa for which antifungal profiles were determined, 4 strains (11%) showed high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value for itraconazole. All tested strains of S. schenckii s. s. and S. globosa showed low sensitivity for amphotericin B. These antifungals are used for treatment of sporotrichosis when infection is severe. S. schenckii s. s. grew better than S. globosa; wherein S. globosa showed restricted growth at 35℃ and did not grow at 37℃. Our molecular data showed that S. globosa is the main causal agent of sporotrichosis in Japan. It is important to determine the antifungal profiles of each case, in addition to accurate species-level identification, to strategize the therapy for sporotrichosis.

  17. A rapid, high-throughput viability assay for Blastocystis spp. reveals metronidazole resistance and extensive subtype-dependent variations in drug susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Haris; Teo, Joshua D W; Upcroft, Jacqui; Tan, Kevin S W

    2011-02-01

    Blastocystis is an emerging protistan parasite of controversial pathogenesis. Although metronidazole (Mz) is standard therapy for Blastocystis infections, there have been accumulating reports of treatment failure, suggesting the existence of drug-resistant isolates. Furthermore, very little is known about Blastocystis susceptibility to standard antimicrobials. In the present study, we established resazurin and XTT viability microassays for Blastocystis spp. belonging to subtypes 4 and 7, both of which have been suggested to represent pathogenic zoonotic subtypes. The optimized resazurin assay was used to screen a total of 19 compounds against both subtypes. Interestingly, subtype 7 parasites were resistant to Mz, a 1-position-substituted 5-nitroimidazole (5-NI), while subtype 4 parasites were sensitive. Some cross-resistance was observed to tinidazole, another 1-position 5-NI. Conversely, subtype 4 parasites were resistant to emetine, while subtype 7 parasites were sensitive. Position 2 5-NIs were effective against both subtypes, as were ornidazole, nitazoxanide, furazolidone, mefloquine, quinicrine, quinine, cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole), and iodoacetamide. Both subtypes were resistant to chloroquine, doxycycline, paromomycin, ampicillin, and pyrimethamine. This is the first study to report extensive variations in drug sensitivities among two clinically important subtypes. Our study highlights the need to reevaluate established treatment regimens for Blastocystis infections and offers clear new treatment options for Mz treatment failures.

  18. Evaluation of Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS) and the string test for rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Meredith H; Reimer-McAtee, Melissa J; Gilman, Robert H; Lozano, Daniel; Saravia, Ruth; Pajuelo, Monica; Bern, Caryn; Castro, Rosario; Espinoza, Magaly; Vallejo, Maya; Solano, Marco; Challapa, Roxana; Torrico, Faustino

    2015-06-06

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the most common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death in HIV-positive people worldwide. Diagnosing TB is difficult, and is more challenging in resource-scarce settings where culture-based diagnostic methods rely on poorly sensitive smear microscopy by Ziehl-Neelsen stain (ZN). We performed a cross-sectional study examining the diagnostic utility of Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility liquid culture (MODS) versus traditional Ziehl-Neelsen staining (ZN) and Lowenstein Jensen culture (LJ) of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) in HIV-infected patients in Bolivia. For sputum scarce individuals we assessed the value of the string test and induced sputum for TB diagnosis. The presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in the sputum of 107 HIV-positive patients was evaluated by ZN, LJ, and MODS. Gastric secretion samples obtained by the string test were evaluated by MODS in 102 patients. The TB-HIV co-infection rate of HIV patients with respiratory symptoms by sputum sample was 45 % (48/107); 46/48 (96 %) were positive by MODS, 38/48 (79 %) by LJ, and 30/48 (63 %) by ZN. The rate of MDRTB was 9 % (4/48). Median time to positive culture was 10 days by MODS versus 34 days by LJ (p Bolivia.

  19. Enceladus' near-surface CO2 gas pockets and surface frost deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Johnson, Torrence V.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Thomas B.; Radebaugh, Jani; Singh, Sandeep

    2018-03-01

    Solid CO2 surface deposits were reported in Enceladus' South Polar Region by Brown et al. (2006). They noted that such volatile deposits are temporary and posited ongoing replenishment. We present a model for this replenishment by expanding on the Matson et al. (2012) model of subsurface heat and chemical transport in Enceladus. Our model explains the distributions of both CO2 frost and complexed CO2 clathrate hydrate as seen in the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data. We trace the journey of CO2 from a subsurface ocean. The ocean-water circulation model of Matson et al. (2012) brings water up to near the surface where gas exsolves to form bubbles. Some of the CO2 bubbles are trapped and form pockets of gas in recesses at the bottom of the uppermost ice layer. When fissures break open these pockets, the CO2 gas is vented. Gas pocket venting is episodic compared to the more or less continuous eruptive plumes, emanating from the "tiger stripes", that are supported by plume chambers. Two styles of gas pocket venting are considered: (1) seeps, and (2) blowouts. The presence of CO2 frost patches suggests that the pocket gas slowly seeped through fractured, cold ice and when some of the gas reached the surface it was cold enough to condense (i.e., T ∼70 to ∼119 K). If the fissure opening is large, a blowout occurs. The rapid escape of gas and drop in pocket pressure causes water in the pocket to boil and create many small aerosol droplets of seawater. These may be carried along by the erupting gas. Electrically charged droplets can couple to the magnetosphere, and be dragged away from Enceladus. Most of the CO2 blowout gas escapes from Enceladus and the remainder is distributed globally. However, CO2 trapped in a clathrate structure does not escape. It is much heavier and slower moving than the CO2 gas. Its motion is ballistic and has an average range of about 17 km. Thus, it contributes to deposits in the vicinity of the vent. Local heat

  20. Analysis of Leaf Heat Balance Affected by Operation of a Frost Protective Fan in Tea Fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KIMURA, Kensuke; MARUO, Kyosuke; OOKI, Takahiro; NAKAZONO, Kentaro; MATSUO, Kiyoshi; KITANO, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    .... The method for quantifying the thermal effect brought by operation of frost protection methods was newly developed based on analysis of leaf heat balance, where leaf boundary layer conductance...

  1. Ice Lens Formation and Frost Heave at the Phoenix Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, A. P.; Sizemore, H. G.; Rempel, A. W.

    2011-03-01

    A numerical model of frost heave and ice lens initiation, employing pre-melting physics, demonstrates that ice lenses are capable of initiating at the Phoenix landing site, even within the past few tens of thousands of years.

  2. Acclimation of Pistacia integerrima trees to frost in semi-arid environments depends on autumn's drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Or; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2017-03-01

    Main conclusion Cold acclimation is revealed through induced stem respiration during pre-winter frost of native Pistacia integerrima trees in continental semi-arid environments. Semi-arid environments challenge vegetation by simultaneous abiotic stresses. In this study, we examine the combined effects of water stress and frost on the physiology of Pistacia integerrima stems. This species is native to semi-arid environments where drought and frost frequently co-occur. We quantified carbohydrates and proline in P. integerrima stems responding to frost and experiencing water potentials between -0.2 and -1.8 MPa. We report that dehydrated trees (i.e., Ψstem semi-arid environments.

  3. Seasonal frost and soil temperature data, Western Cape Mountains, South Africa, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Micro-climatic monitoring of air and ground was started in 1990 to evaluate climatic controls on the present-day diurnal soil frost environment in the Western Cape...

  4. Siim Nestor soovitab : Ben Frost ja Alexander Robotnik Eclectical / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2007-01-01

    Austraalia muusik ja helilooja Ben Frost projektiga "6 guitars" esinemas festivali Eclectica raames 6. sept. Tartu klubis Rock ja Roll ja itaalia diskor Alexander Robotnik 7. sept. klubis Trehv, esinejatest

  5. Seasonal frost penetration, Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The frost tube network is located within a 3.25-square-mile sub-watershed of the Sleepers River Research Watershed near Danville, Vermont, USA. Tubes were positioned...

  6. Risk Modelling of Late Spring Frost Damage on Fruit Trees, Case Study; Apple Tree, Mashhad Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rahimi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mashhad plain is one of the most important regions of Apple cultivated areas. Occurring spring late frost creates a lot of damages on bud and decreasing the yield of Apple in this region. Assessment and risk modeling of frost damage would be useful to manage and decrease the damage. The study area is a part of Khorasan Razavi province which is located in Mashhad plain. This region is located in Northeast Iran (36º to 37 º N, 58 º 30' to 60 º E. The area of this region is about 13000 square km which is about one tenth of Khorasan province area. In order to modeling frost damage risk 12 affective parameters including climatological(Minimum temperature, temperature decreasing rate, temperature Increasing rate, Julian days of frost, cumulative degree days, Area under zero line, and frost duration and geographical parameters (Elevation, Longitude, Latitude, Aspect, and slope were selected. 3 damage full radiative frosts were selected in the period of Apple flowering time which was dated 20 April 2003, 8 April 2005, and 28 March 2005. Required meteorological data were collected from 9 meteorological standard stations inside and outside of study area. Linear multiple regression were used to modeling the relationship. The map for each parameter was plotted by using suitable interpolation method including IDW; Spline; Kriging. A grid map was defined with 5 by 5 kilometers to extract enough data for entering to the model. The regression equation was significant at the level of 99% significance. By using this equation the predicted amounts of frost risk damage were calculated for each point of grid and also the map was plotted. The regression equation of observed and predicted frost damage risk was provided by correlation of 0.93 and the error map also was prepared. According to this study in frost of 31 Farvardin 1388 South West parts of the plain estimated as the most frost risk areas by %53.19 and the southeast parts were estimated as the least

  7. Frosted branch angiitis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as an initial onset of neuro-Behçet's disease: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Bruno Fortaleza de Aquino; Rodriguez, Ever Ernesto Caso; Prado, Leandro Lara do; Gonçalves, Celio Roberto; Hirata, Carlos Eduardo; Yamamoto, Joyce Hisae

    2017-04-15

    Frosted branch angiitis is a rare, severe condition. It can be either a primary or a secondary condition and is characterized by rapid deterioration of vision and fulminant retinal vasculitis that manifests as diffuse sheathing of retinal vessels, macular edema, papillitis, vitritis and anterior uveitis. We aimed to describe a case of frosted branch angiitis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as an initial neuro-Behçet's disease onset. Diagnosis of Behçet's disease was based on the current 2014 International Criteria for Behçet's Disease and the International consensus recommendation criteria for neuro-Behçet's disease. In addition, a literature review using search parameters of "frosted branch angiitis", "Behçet" and "neuro-Behçet" in the PubMed database is presented. A 28-year-old Brazilian pardo woman presented to our hospital with abrupt bilateral vision loss associated with recurrent aphthous oral ulcers 6 months before visual symptom onset. A fundus examination showed bilateral widespread retinal vasculitis with venous and arterial white sheathing, optic disc swelling, macular edema, and retinal hemorrhages, leading to the diagnosis of frosted branch angiitis. An extensive systemic workup for retinal vasculitis was uneventful, except for brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and lymphocytic aseptic meningitis. A diagnosis of neuro-Behçet's disease was made, and treatment was started with methylprednisolone therapy 1 g/day for 5 consecutive days, followed by oral mycophenolate mofetil and infliximab 5 mg/kg infusion. The patient's response was rapid, with improvement of visual acuity to hand movement and counting fingers by day 7 and final visual acuity of counting fingers and 20/130. Frosted branch angiitis may be associated with infectious, noninfectious, or idiopathic causes. An extensive workup should be done to exclude systemic vasculitis such as Behçet's disease. Treatment with systemic steroids must be

  8. Frost resistance of concrete surfaces coated with waterproofing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klovas, A.; Dauksys, M.; Ciuprovaite, G.

    2015-03-01

    Present research lays emphasis on the problem of concrete surface exposed to aggressive surrounding quality. The test was conducted with concrete surfaces coated with different waterproofing materials exposed in solution of 3 % of sodium sulphate. Research was performed according to LST EN 1338:2003 standard requirements. Technological properties of concrete mixture as well as physical-mechanical properties of formed concrete specimens were established. The resistance of concrete to freezing - thawing cycles was prognosticated according to the porosity parameters established by the kinetic of water absorption. Five different waterproofing materials (coatings) such as liquid bitumen-rubber based, elastic fiber-strengthened, silane-siloxane based emulsion, mineral binder based and liquid rubber (caoutchouc) based coatings were used. Losses by mass of coating materials and specimens surface fractures were calculated based on the results of frost resistance test. Open code program "ImageJ" was used for visual analysis of concrete specimens. Based on the results, aggressive surrounding did not influence specimens coated with elastic, fibre-strengthened, mineral materials. On the other hand, specimens coated with liquid rubber (caoutchouc) based material were greatly influenced by aggressive surrounding. The biggest losses of specimen surface concrete (fractures) were obtained with silane-siloxane based emulsion coating. Generally, specimens coated with waterproofing materials were less influenced by aggressive surrounding compared with those without.

  9. Evaluation of the contact angle and frost resistance of hydrophobised heat-insulating mortars with polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnat-Hunek, Danuta; Łagód, Grzegorz; Klimek, Beata

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the research presented in the paper was to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrophobic preparation based on organosilicon compounds for surface protection on the heat-insulating mortars modified with polystyrene. The work discusses issues related to wettability, absorptivity and frost resistance of the surface layer of mortars. The experimental part pertains to the physical and mechanical properties of polystyrene-modified mortars and the influence of hydrophobic preparation on the contact angle and frost resistance. The frost resistance of mortars was examined following 25 cycles of freezing and thawing. The contact angle of light mortars (θw) was determined before and after the tests of frost resistance, in the function of time using a single measurement liquid. This provided a basis for calculating the surface free energy with Neumann method, characterizing the wettability and adhesion of mortars under normal conditions and with damages resulting from frost weathering. The structure of mortars and the adhesion of lightweight aggregate to cement paste were presented by means of scanning electron microscopy. The studies enabled to determine the hydrophobisation efficiency of heat-insulating mortars with polystyrene. The obtained results confirmed the possibility of producing heat-insulating mortars modified with polystyrene along with proper surface protection against moisture and frost.

  10. The vulnerability of silver fir populations to damage from late frosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klisz Marcin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the vulnerability of selected silver fir populations to damage from late frost in the climatic conditions of south-eastern Poland. To determine the vulnerability of apical and lateral shoots to damage caused by late frosts, we observed four test plots in 2009 and 2014, each containing progenies of selected seed stands. Our statistical analyses were based on a model incorporating the following variables: site, year, type of frost damage, population as well as the possible interaction between these variables. Significant differences between the populations were found in terms of their sensitivity to damage from low temperature occurring during the growth period. Furthermore, we indirectly demonstrated differences in the severity of late frost on the experimental plots, as well as the intensity and variability of late frost shoot damage. Based on these results, we divided the studied populations into two groups of low (EF, KRA1 and NAR and high (LES2 and BAL2 sensitivity to late frost damage.

  11. Plant safety margin against frost damages has declined in Switzerland over the last four decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitasse, Yann; Schneider, Léonard; Klein, Geoffrey; Rixen, Christian; Rebetez, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Winters and early springs have become warmer over the last decades which has in turn promoted earlier plant development in temperate regions. While temperatures will on average continue to increase in the coming decades due to the rise of greenhouse gases concentration in the atmosphere, there is no consensus about how the occurrence of late spring frosts will change. If the frequency and the severity of late spring frosts remain unchanged in the future or advance less than vegetation onset, vulnerable plant organs (young leaves, flowers or dehardened buds) may be more exposed to frost damage. Here we analyzed long-term series of temperature data during the period 1975-2016 at 50 locations in Switzerland. We used different thresholds of growing degree days (GDD) as a proxy for spring phenology of fruit trees based on long-term series of phenological observations. Finally, we tested whether the time lag between the date when the GDD is reached and the latest occurrence of frost has changed over the study period. Overall we found that the safety margin against potential frost damage to plants has slightly decreased during the study period, irrespective of elevation (from 203 to 2283 m). Our results suggest that the cost for preventing frost damages on fruit trees could increase in the coming decades and the introduction of new varieties of fruit trees adapted to warmer climate should be carefully considered as they generally exhibit earlier spring phenology.

  12. Dissecting the genetic architecture of frost tolerance in Central European winter wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yusheng; Gowda, Manje; Würschum, Tobias; Longin, C Friedrich H; Korzun, Viktor; Kollers, Sonja; Schachschneider, Ralf; Zeng, Jian; Fernando, Rohan; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Reif, Jochen C

    2013-11-01

    Abiotic stress tolerance in plants is pivotal to increase yield stability, but its genetic basis is still poorly understood. To gain insight into the genetic architecture of frost tolerance, this work evaluated a large mapping population of 1739 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) lines and hybrids adapted to Central Europe in field trials in Germany and fingerprinted the lines with a 9000 single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Additive effects prevailed over dominance effects. A two-dimensional genome scan revealed the presence of epistatic effects. Genome-wide association mapping in combination with a robust cross-validation strategy identified one frost tolerance locus with a major effect located on chromosome 5B. This locus was not in linkage disequilibrium with the known frost loci Fr-B1 and Fr-B2. The use of the detected diagnostic markers on chromosome 5B, however, does not allow prediction of frost tolerance with high accuracy. Application of genome-wide selection approaches that take into account also loci with small effect sizes considerably improved prediction of the genetic variation of frost tolerance in wheat. The developed prediction model is valuable for improving frost tolerance because this trait displays a wide variation in occurrence across years and is therefore a difficult target for conventional phenotypic selection.

  13. Decreased frost hardiness of Vaccinium vitis-idaea in reponse to UV-A radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taulavuori, Kari; Keränen, Johanna; Suokanerva, Hanne; Lakkala, Kaisa; Huttunen, Satu; Laine, Kari; Taulavuori, Erja

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate plant frost hardiness responses to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, since the few results reported are largely contradictory. It was hypothesized that functional adaptation of life forms could explain these contradictions. Dwarf shrubs and tree seedlings, representing both evergreen and deciduous forms, were tested (Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Vaccinium myrtillus, Pinus sylvestris, Betula pubescens and its red form f. rubra). The research was performed in Sodankylä, Northern Finland (67°N), with enhanced UV-B- and UV-A-radiation treatments between 2002 and 2009. Plant frost hardiness was determined using the freeze-induced electrolyte leakage method in early autumn, during the onset of the frost hardening process. Additional physiological variables (malondialdehyde, glutathione, total phenols, C and N contents) were analyzed in V. vitis-idaea to explain the possible responses. These variables did not respond significantly to UV-radiation treatments, but explained the frost hardiness well (r² = 0.678). The main finding was that frost hardiness decreased in the evergreen shrub V. vitis-idaea, particularly with enhanced UV-A radiation. No significant responses were observed with the other plants. Therefore, this study does not support the idea that enhanced UV radiation could increase plant frost hardiness. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  14. An inverse geometry problem in estimating frost growth on an evaporating tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C.H. [Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, National Cheng Kung University Tainan, Taiwan (Taiwan)

    2002-08-01

    When humid air comes into contact with a surface whose temperature is below the dew point of water vapor in air and also below the freezing point, frost deposition takes place over the surface. The phenomena of the frost growth are very complicated and therefore it is very difficult to model mathematically the behavior of frost growth and predict it. In the present study a transient inverse geometry heat conduction problem (shape identification problem) is solved using the conjugate gradient method (CGM) and boundary element method (BEM)-based inverse algorithm to estimate the unknown irregular frost thickness and shape. Results obtained by using the CGM to estimate the frost growth are justified based on the numerical experiments. It is concluded that the accurate frost shape can be estimated by the CGM except for the initial and final time. The reason and improvement of this singularity are addressed. Finally the effects of reducing the number of sensors and increasing the measurement errors on the inverse solutions are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Measuring enzymatic HIV-1 susceptibility to two reverse transcriptase inhibitors as a rapid and simple approach to HIV-1 drug-resistance testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Simple and cost-effective approaches for HIV drug-resistance testing are highly desirable for managing increasingly expanding HIV-1 infected populations who initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART, particularly in resource-limited settings. Non-nucleoside reverse trancriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based regimens with an NRTI backbone containing lamivudine (3TC or emtricitabine (FTC are preferred first ART regimens. Failure with these drug combinations typically involves the selection of NNRTI- and/or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses. Therefore, the availability of simple assays to measure both types of drug resistance is critical. We have developed a high throughput screening test for assessing enzymatic resistance of the HIV-1 RT in plasma to 3TC/FTC and NNRTIs. The test uses the sensitive "Amp-RT" assay with a newly-developed real-time PCR format to screen biochemically for drug resistance in single reactions containing either 3TC-triphosphate (3TC-TP or nevirapine (NVP. Assay cut-offs were defined based on testing a large panel of subtype B and non-subtype B clinical samples with known genotypic profiles. Enzymatic 3TC resistance correlated well with the presence of M184I/V, and reduced NVP susceptibility was strongly associated with the presence of K103N, Y181C/I, Y188L, and G190A/Q. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting resistance were 97.0% and 96.0% in samples with M184V, and 97.4% and 96.2% for samples with NNRTI mutations, respectively. We further demonstrate the utility of an HIV capture method in plasma by using magnetic beads coated with CD44 antibody that eliminates the need for ultracentifugation. Thus our results support the use of this simple approach for distinguishing WT from NNRTI- or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses in clinical samples. This enzymatic testing is subtype-independent and can assist in the clinical management of diverse populations particularly in resource-limited settings.

  16. Tropical Andean Forests Are Highly Susceptible to Nutrient Inputs—Rapid Effects of Experimental N and P Addition to an Ecuadorian Montane Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeier, Jürgen; Hertel, Dietrich; Camenzind, Tessa; Cumbicus, Nixon L.; Maraun, Mark; Martinson, Guntars O.; Poma, L. Nohemy; Rillig, Matthias C.; Sandmann, Dorothee; Scheu, Stefan; Veldkamp, Edzo; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Wullaert, Hans; Leuschner, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Tropical regions are facing increasing atmospheric inputs of nutrients, which will have unknown consequences for the structure and functioning of these systems. Here, we show that Neotropical montane rainforests respond rapidly to moderate additions of N (50 kg ha−1 yr−1) and P (10 kg ha−1 yr−1). Monitoring of nutrient fluxes demonstrated that the majority of added nutrients remained in the system, in either soil or vegetation. N and P additions led to not only an increase in foliar N and P concentrations, but also altered soil microbial biomass, standing fine root biomass, stem growth, and litterfall. The different effects suggest that trees are primarily limited by P, whereas some processes—notably aboveground productivity—are limited by both N and P. Highly variable and partly contrasting responses of different tree species suggest marked changes in species composition and diversity of these forests by nutrient inputs in the long term. The unexpectedly fast response of the ecosystem to moderate nutrient additions suggests high vulnerability of tropical montane forests to the expected increase in nutrient inputs. PMID:23071734

  17. Characterization of Finnish Building materials under salt frost artificial ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luodes, Nike M.; Torppa, Akseli; Pirinen, Heikki; Bellopede, Rossana; Marini, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Under a national project co financed by the Confederation of Finnish Construction Industries RT (CFCI), the Finnish Natural Stone Association and the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK), and thanks to the cooperation with the Polytechnic of Turin a comprehensive number of Finnish natural stones has been tested according to SFS EN standards for national CE marking and according to non standardized methods for research purposes. The aim was to evaluate the effects of combined salt and frost weathering caused by de-icing salts and to research a possible correlation between laboratory's accelerated decay and site weathering. The materials tested (60 stones in total) are mainly silicate rocks showing good resistance to the weathering. Results have been affected in some cases by uncertainties connected to the variation of material quality. Some materials have been from new quarries and variation of their properties has been higher than the effects of artificial weathering. Material sampled from crop presented higher weathering level and the additional artificial weathering has induced small variations. Results have shown that material weathering has been better represented by variation of flexural strength compared to uniaxial compressive strength. The most probable reason has been that small changes of planarity and perpendicularity had greater effects on the compressive strength than variations by weathering. Fifteen representative typologies of natural stones have been tested with non standardized methodologies to study the changes of the material and finding a possible correlation with methods used on site. Schmidt rebound test and Ultra Pulse Velocity (UPV) have been used on site to assess the durability of stone on construction. Materials tested in laboratory have shown less variation between rebounds compared to site tests, this can be because of a more controlled environment and saw cut surface instead of rocky or chiselled ones. Laboratory tests showed an average

  18. Cryogenic disturbance and its impact on soils of frost boil ecosystems of Taz peninsula, West Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myshonkov, Alexander; Matyshak, George; Petrzhik, Natalia

    2017-04-01

    For the last years there is an active development of permafrost zone, which is about 60% of the territory of Russia. More than 15% of this area belong to different types of tundra. Frost boil ecosystems, the formation of which is associated with the cryogenesis and cryogenic disturbance processes are one of the most specific tundra landscape. Such landscape forms of tundra ecosystems cover the area over 68000 sq. km - 20% of total Russian tundra area. Cryogenic processes leading to the formation of patterned ground (such as frost boils, non-sorted circles, ice-wedge polygons) are important mechanisms, which control the landscape distribution of soil and phytomass carbon in continuous permafrost terrain. Frost boil ecosystem's properties have been poorly studied. So, the aim of this work is to explore the functioning parameters and properties of frost boil soils. The object - frost boil ecosystems, - is located in the southern tundra of Taz peninsula, about 150 km north from Novy Urengoy (57°28 '50,6″ N, 76°42 '32,6″ E). Frost boils are small (0,5-2 m diameter and 5-15 cm height), barren, non-sorted circles separated by completely vegetated (moss-lichens and shrubs) troughs - interboils. Our monitoring section (100 sq. m.) was set on a typical frost-boil landscape. Within this area we obtained moisture content and temperature of upper layer (0-10 cm), active layer depth, CO2 flux. This analyzed site includes more than 40 frost boils. Measurements were made both on boil and interboil patches in 10-20 replicates. Samples were taken both from frost boils and interboils upper layers as well as from horizons two soil pit profiles. Different soil parameters were obtained by laboratory analysis: pH (1: 2,5), BR, SIR (Anderson, 1978), TC, DOC (Kalbitz, 2003). It is estimated that total area with frost boils is approx. twice larger than troughs area with vegetation cover within the monitoring site. The soil properties of frost boil and interboil are significantly

  19. Frost induced damages within porous materials - from concrete technology to fuel cells technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palecki, Susanne; Gorelkov, Stanislav; Wartmann, Jens; Heinzel, Angelika

    2017-12-01

    Porous media like concrete or layers of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) within fuel cells are affected by a cyclic frost exposure due to different damage mechanisms which could lead to essential degradation of the material. In general, frost damages can only occur in case of a specific material moisture content. In fuel cells, residual water is generally available after shut down inside the membrane i.e. the gas diffusion layer (GDL). During subsequent freezing, this could cause various damage phenomena such as frost heaves and delamination effects of the membrane electrode assembly, which depends on the location of pore water and on the pore structure itself. Porous materials possess a pore structure that could range over several orders of magnitudes with different properties and freezing behaviour of the pore water. Latter can be divided into macroscopic, structured and pre-structured water, influenced by surface interactions. Therefore below 0 °C different water modifications can coexist in a wide temperature range, so that during frost exposure a high amount of unfrozen and moveable water inside the pore system is still available. This induces transport mechanisms and shrinkage effects. The physical basics are similar for porous media. While the freezing behaviour of concrete has been studied over decades of years, in order to enhance the durability, the know-how about the influence of a frost attack on fuel cell systems is not fully understood to date. On the basis of frost damage models for concrete structures, an approach to describe the impact of cyclic freezing and thawing on membrane electrode assemblies has been developed within this research work. Major aim is beyond a better understanding of the frost induced mechanisms, the standardization of a suitable test procedure for the assessment of different MEA materials under such kind of attack. Within this contribution first results will be introduced.

  20. Use of LST images from MODIS/AQUA sensor as an indication of frost occurrence in RS

    OpenAIRE

    Débora de S. Simões; Denise C. Fontana; Matheus B. Vicari

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTAlthough frost occurrence causes severe losses in agriculture, especially in the south of Brazil, the data of minimum air temperature (Tmin) currently available for monitoring and predicting frosts show insufficient spatial distribution. This study aimed to evaluate the MDY11A1 (LST – Land Surface Temperature) product, from the MODIS sensor on board the AQUA satellite as an estimator of frost occurrence in the southeast of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. LST images from ...

  1. Use of LST images from MODIS/AQUA sensor as an indication of frost occurrence in RS

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, Débora de S.; Fontana, Denise C.; Vicari, Matheus B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTAlthough frost occurrence causes severe losses in agriculture, especially in the south of Brazil, the data of minimum air temperature (Tmin) currently available for monitoring and predicting frosts show insufficient spatial distribution. This study aimed to evaluate the MDY11A1 (LST – Land Surface Temperature) product, from the MODIS sensor on board the AQUA satellite as an estimator of frost occurrence in the southeast of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. LST images from the ni...

  2. Increasing frost risk associated with advanced citrus flowering dates in Kerman and Shiraz, Iran: 1960-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Jennifer M; Grab, Stefan W; Thompson, Dave I; Roshan, Gholamreza

    2014-10-01

    Flowering dates and the timing of late season frost are both driven by local ambient temperatures. However, under climatic warming observed over the past century, it remains uncertain how such impacts affect frost risk associated with plant phenophase shifts. Any increase in frost frequency or severity has the potential to damage flowers and their resultant yields and, in more extreme cases, the survival of the plant. An accurate assessment of the relationship between the timing of last frost events and phenological shifts associated with warmer climate is thus imperative. We investigate spring advances in citrus flowering dates (orange, tangerine, sweet lemon, sour lemon and sour orange) for Kerman and Shiraz, Iran from 1960 to 2010. These cities have experienced increases in both T max and T min, advances in peak flowering dates and changes in last frost dates over the study period. Based on daily instrumental climate records, the last frost dates for each year are compared with the peak flowering dates. For both cities, the rate of last frost advance lags behind the phenological advance, thus increasing frost risk. Increased frost risk will likely have considerable direct impacts on crop yields and on the associated capacity to adapt, given future climatic uncertainty.

  3. Increasing frost risk associated with advanced citrus flowering dates in Kerman and Shiraz, Iran: 1960-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Jennifer M.; Grab, Stefan W.; Thompson, Dave I.; Roshan, Gholamreza

    2014-10-01

    Flowering dates and the timing of late season frost are both driven by local ambient temperatures. However, under climatic warming observed over the past century, it remains uncertain how such impacts affect frost risk associated with plant phenophase shifts. Any increase in frost frequency or severity has the potential to damage flowers and their resultant yields and, in more extreme cases, the survival of the plant. An accurate assessment of the relationship between the timing of last frost events and phenological shifts associated with warmer climate is thus imperative. We investigate spring advances in citrus flowering dates (orange, tangerine, sweet lemon, sour lemon and sour orange) for Kerman and Shiraz, Iran from 1960 to 2010. These cities have experienced increases in both T max and T min, advances in peak flowering dates and changes in last frost dates over the study period. Based on daily instrumental climate records, the last frost dates for each year are compared with the peak flowering dates. For both cities, the rate of last frost advance lags behind the phenological advance, thus increasing frost risk. Increased frost risk will likely have considerable direct impacts on crop yields and on the associated capacity to adapt, given future climatic uncertainty.

  4. The flowering locus Hr colocalizes with a major QTL affecting winter frost tolerance in Pisum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune-Hénaut, I; Hanocq, E; Béthencourt, L; Fontaine, V; Delbreil, B; Morin, J; Petit, A; Devaux, R; Boilleau, M; Stempniak, J J; Thomas, M; Lainé, A L; Foucher, F; Baranger, A; Burstin, J; Rameau, C; Giauffret, C

    2008-05-01

    An understanding of the genetic determinism of frost tolerance is a prerequisite for the development of frost tolerant cultivars for cold northern areas. In legumes, it is not known to which extent vernalization requirement or photoperiod responsiveness are necessary for the development of frost tolerance. In pea (Pisum sativum L.) however, the flowering locus Hr is suspected to influence winter frost tolerance by delaying floral initiation until after the main winter freezing periods have passed. The objective of this study was to dissect the genetic determinism of frost tolerance in pea by QTL analysis and to assess the genetic linkage between winter frost tolerance and the Hr locus. A population of 164 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), derived from the cross Champagne x Terese was evaluated both in the greenhouse and in field conditions to characterize the photoperiod response from which the allele at the Hr locus was inferred. In addition, the population was also assessed for winter frost tolerance in 11 field conditions. Six QTL were detected, among which three were consistent among the different experimental conditions, confirming an oligogenic determinism of frost tolerance in pea. The Hr locus was found to be the peak marker for the highest explanatory QTL of this study. This result supports the hypothesis of the prominent part played by the photoperiod responsiveness in the determinism of frost tolerance for this species. The consistency of three QTL makes these positions interesting targets for marker-assisted selection.

  5. Statistical-Synoptic Analysis of the Atmosphere Thickness Pattern of Iran’s Pervasive Frosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Rousta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at analyzing the synoptic pattern of atmospheric thickness of winter pervasive frosts in Iran. To this end, the data related to the daily minimum temperature of a 50-year period (1961–2010 were gathered from 451 synoptic and climatology stations. Then, the instances in which the temperature was below 0 °C for at least two consecutive days and this phenomenon covered at least 50% of the entirety of Iran were selected. Subsequently, the atmosphere thickness pattern was extracted for these days, with the representative day being identified and analyzed through cluster analysis. The results showed that the Siberian high pressure plays a significant role in the occurrence of pervasive frosts in Iran. In some other cases, the northeast–southwest direction of this pattern leads to its combination with the East Europe high pressure, causing widespread frosts in Iran. Furthermore, the interaction between counter clockwise currents in this system and the clockwise currents in the Azores high pressure tongue directs cold weather from northern parts of Europe toward Iran. The formation of blocking systems leads to the stagnation of cold weather over Iran, a phenomenon that results in significant reduction of temperature and severe frosts in these areas. In addition, the omega pattern (the fifth pattern and Deep Eastern European trough and polar low pressure pattern (the fourth pattern were the most dominant and severe frost patterns in Iran respectively.

  6. Restoring sedges and mosses into frost heaving iron fens, San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Chimner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rare iron fens in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado are frequently in poor condition due to mining, roads and ditches, which have left much of the fen completely bare of vegetation. Natural revegetation is slow to occur in the bare areas because of severe frost heave in the cold mountain climate. Therefore, experimental revegetation plots were conducted in a factorial design with mulching and no mulching, crossed with moss diaspores, sedge transplants, and moss and sedge combined. Mulching influenced surface soil temperatures by reducing the midday highs and increasing the night-time lows, which decreased the frequency and amount of frost heave. Peat moisture also modified frost heave, with the greatest frost heaving occurring near 75 % peat moisture content (water table 10–20 cm below the surface and the least when soils were either wetter or drier. Moss survival was dependent on mulch, with no moss surviving in plots without mulch. Mulching also increased sedge transplant survival. In summary, mulching significantly increased the success of vegetation restoration efforts for frost heave areas in mountain fens.

  7. Potential sea salt aerosol sources from frost flowers in the pan-Arctic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Li [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Now at Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine California USA; Russell, Lynn M. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Burrows, Susannah M. [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-09-23

    In order to better represent observed wintertime aerosol concentrations at Barrow, Alaska, we implemented an observationally-based parameterization for estimating sea salt production from frost flowers in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). In this work, we evaluate the potential influence of this sea salt source on the pan-Arctic (60ºN-90ºN) climate. Results show that frost flower salt emissions substantially increase the modeled surface sea salt aerosol concentration in the winter months when new sea ice and frost flowers are present. The parameterization reproduces both the magnitude and seasonal variation of the observed submicron sea salt aerosol concentration at surface in Barrow during winter much better than the standard CESM simulation without a frost-flower salt particle source. Adding these frost flower salt particle emissions increases aerosol optical depth by 10% and results in a small cooling at surface. The increase in salt particle mass concentrations of a factor of 8 provides nearly two times the cloud condensation nuclei concentration, as well as 10% increases in cloud droplet number and 40% increases in liquid water content near coastal regions adjacent to continents. These cloud changes reduce longwave cloud forcing by 3% and cause a small surface warming, increasing the downward longwave flux at the surface by 2 W m-2 in the pan-Arctic under the present-day climate.

  8. Superabsorbent Polymers as a Means of Improving Frost Resistance of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Laustsen, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Superabsorbent polymer (SAP) was introduced in cementitious materials about 15 years ago. Since then, several studies on the frost resistance of concrete with SAP have been published. However, an up-to-date review across the different studies is missing. This paper presented a literature review...... on how SAP influences concrete frost resistance. Moreover, it also presented a larger experimental study on the topic. The conclusions that were drawn from the experimental study were in line with the extract of the pool of results from the literature, first of all that SAP addition can improve frost...... resistance of concrete. The improvement was attributed to voids created by SAP. As was clearly demonstrated in the paper, it was crucial to document the void structure of the hardened concrete. Other factors than SAP could lead to void formation. For example, residue of surfactant on SAP particles...

  9. Void structure of concrete with superabsorbent polymers and its relation to frost resistance of concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Laustsen, Sara

    2013-01-01

    surfactant prior to concrete mixing. The method comprises rinsing of the SAP with ethanol. This effectively removes the surfactant. Freeze-thaw testing of concrete with rinsed and non-rinsed SAP shows that for equal dosages of SAP, the extra air entrained due to surfactant is considerable and can make......Superabsorbent polymers (SAP) can be used to control air void formation in concrete. However, due to surfactant left on suspension polymerized SAP particles during production, they may not only create SAP voids but also entrain extra air. In the present investigation, a method is tested to remove...... the difference between poor and satisfactory frost-resistance. Furthermore, the results indicate that voids created directly by SAP protect concrete against frost deterioration just like other air voids; if the concrete contains enough SAP voids, these alone can provide sufficient frost resistance. © 2013 RILEM....

  10. Influence of dispersants on aging and frost elastomeric compositions based on butadiene acrylonitrile rubbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Dolinskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of use of dispergators of various nature for production of rubber technical products with expanded temperature conditions of operation is studied. It is investigated influences of dispergators of Dispergator FL and INT 159 on properties of rubber mixes for receiving products with high resistance to thermal aging or frost resistance. Research of influence of modifiers was conducted for rubber mixes on the basis of butadienenitrile rubbers synthetic (BNRS-18 and BNRS-28. I’s established that at addition of a dispergator of Dispergator FL the indicator of relative deformatstion of compression (RDC and respectively heat stability of rubbers increases. Introduction to structure of elastomeric composition of a dispergator of INT 159 practically doesn’t influence frost resistance, and Dispergator FL worsens her (the coefficient of frost resistance decreases by 15.4–17.8%. Possibly it is connected with the fact that at the lowered temperatures in the presence of Dispergator FL there is a bigger delay of relaxation processes and decrease in energy of the thermal movement of links of macromolecules of rubbers. It becomes insufficient for overcoming of intermolecular interaction in the modified system and commission of conformational transitions of macromolecules under the influence of external loading. Mechanical energy is to a large extent mentioned not on change of a form of macromolecules, and on their mechanodestruction. However, it increases heat stability since it that is higher, than molecular mobility is lower. INT 159 dispergator components, settling down on borders of supramolecular formations of elastomers, increase mobility of links of macromolecules of rubbers, weaken chemical bonds in them, reduce thermal stability, but at the same time INT 159 dispergator practically doesn’t reduce frost resistance therefore it is expedient to apply it when receiving frost-resistant elastomeric composition. Thus, when receiving

  11. Robert Frost's "The road not taken", Childhood, psychoanalytic symbolism, and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, J

    2001-01-01

    Robert Frost, often regarded as a folksy farmer-poet, was also a more profound, even terrifying, creator. His poem "The Road Not Taken" reveals his delight in multiple meanings, his ambivalence, and his penchant for misleading his readers. He denied that the poem proclaimed his striving for the unconventional and asserted that it was meant to tease his friend Edward Thomas for his compulsive indecisiveness. This essay also notes the unconscious meanings of the poem, including Frost's reactions to losing his close friend, his own indecisiveness, his conflict between heterosexual and homosexual object choices, his need for a "secret sharer," and his attachments.

  12. Cryoprotectants are metabolic fuels during long term frost exposure in the earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    C. Jørgensen, Sofia; Overgaard, Johannes; Holmstrup, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Ectothermic animals that live in the subarctic and temperate regions must have strategies to deal with periods of frost during winter. The earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra is a freeze tolerant species that accumulates large concentrations of the cryoprotectant glucose upon ice formation in the extr......Ectothermic animals that live in the subarctic and temperate regions must have strategies to deal with periods of frost during winter. The earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra is a freeze tolerant species that accumulates large concentrations of the cryoprotectant glucose upon ice formation...... as anaerobic fuel source than as a cryoprotectant....

  13. David Sanders. A Divided Poet: Robert Frost, North of Boston, and the Drama of Disappearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiani G. Rapatzikou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available David Sanders in his monograph entitled A Divided Poet: Robert Frost, North of Boston, and the Drama of Disappearance (2011 sheds light on the dilemmas, doubts and personal conflicts Frost confronted while composing his poetic collection North of Boston in which some of his most well-known lyrics, such as “Mending Wall,” “After Apple-Picking,” and “The Wood-Pile,” are contained. This book should be considered alongside a number of other publications either in monograph or essay form that app...

  14. AIR ENTRAINING, AIR VOID SYSTEM AND FROST DURABILITY OF FLY ASH CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    千歩, 修; 濱, 幸雄

    2002-01-01

    Control of air content and resistance to frost damage are essential for fly ash concrete. This paper demonstrates a possibility of controlling the air content of fly ash concrete by the basic properties of fly ash. It also elucidates the tendencies of the effects of the presence of fly ash, mixing conditions, and type of air-entraining admixture on the air content, air void system, and air loss by agitation. The frost resistance test results of fly ash concrete slightly lower than normal conc...

  15. Chlorophyll fluorescence as a parameter for frost hardiness in winter wheat. A comparison with other hardiness parameters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clement, JMAM; vanHasselt, PR

    1996-01-01

    Frost hardiness of winter wheat leaves (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Urban) was measured during an eight weeks hardening period using chlorophyll fluorescence. Determination of frost induced damage after freezing, measured as the decrease of photochemical capacity of photosystem II (F-V/F-M =

  16. Effect of defoliation prior to a frost on postharvest respiration rate, extractable sucrose, and invert sugar concentration of sugarbeet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the effect of defoliation prior to a frost on postharvest storage properties of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.). Roots of plants with canopies intact until harvest were compared to roots of plants that had been defoliated prior to a frost on multiple harvest dates following a da...

  17. Influence of soil frost on the character and degradability of dissolved organic carbon in boreal forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneer Selvam, B.; Laudon, H.; Guillemette, F.; Berggren, M.

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that increases in extent and duration of winter soil frost increases dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in boreal riparian soils and connected aquatic systems during the subsequent spring and summer. However, little is known about the impact of frost on DOC character and its degradability. We applied three experimental treatments to riparian soils in northern Sweden—shallow soil frost (insulated), deep soil frost (snow removed) and control plots—to test the effect of different soil frost regimes on the chemical characteristics and degradability of soil DOC. Soil pore water samples were analyzed using excitation-emission fluorescence (parallel factor analysis) combined with biological and photochemical degradation experiments. We found that the absolute bacterial metabolic rates were significantly lower in samples from the shallow soil frost treatments, compared with the other treatments. Explorative multivariate analyses indicate that increasing soil frost is contributing to increased protein-like fluorescence and to increased biological degradability of the DOC. Our study shows that decreases in riparian soil frost due to climate warming may not only contribute to decreased riparian DOC concentrations but also lead to shifts in the DOC composition, resulting in decreased biodegradability (yet similar photodegradability) of the DOC that is exported from riparian soils to streams.

  18. Frost flowers on young Arctic sea ice: The climatic, chemical, and microbial significance of an emerging ice type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barber, D.; Ehn, J.; Pucko, M.

    2014-01-01

    becomes available to a cold atmosphere and surface winds are low, allowing for supersaturation of the near-surface boundary layer. Ice grown in a pond cut in young ice at the mouth of Young Sound, NE Greenland, in March 2012, showed that expanding frost flower clusters began forming as soon as the ice...... formed. The new ice and frost flowers dramatically changed the radiative and thermal environment. The frost flowers were about 5°C colder than the brine surface, with an approximately linear temperature gradient from their base to their upper tips. Salinity and δ18O values indicated that frost flowers...... of CO2 at the brine-wetted sea ice surface, in line with expectations from the brine chemistry. Bacteria concentrations generally increased with salinity in frost flowers and the surface slush layer. Bacterial densities and taxa indicated that a selective process occurred at the ice surface...

  19. Frost flowers on young Arctic sea ice: The climatic, chemical, and microbial significance of an emerging ice type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, D. G.; Ehn, J. K.; Pućko, M.; Rysgaard, S.; Deming, J. W.; Bowman, J. S.; Papakyriakou, T.; Galley, R. J.; Søgaard, D. H.

    2014-10-01

    Ongoing changes in Arctic sea ice are increasing the spatial and temporal range of young sea ice types over which frost flowers can occur, yet the significance of frost flowers to ocean-sea ice-atmosphere exchange processes remains poorly understood. Frost flowers form when moisture from seawater becomes available to a cold atmosphere and surface winds are low, allowing for supersaturation of the near-surface boundary layer. Ice grown in a pond cut in young ice at the mouth of Young Sound, NE Greenland, in March 2012, showed that expanding frost flower clusters began forming as soon as the ice formed. The new ice and frost flowers dramatically changed the radiative and thermal environment. The frost flowers were about 5°C colder than the brine surface, with an approximately linear temperature gradient from their base to their upper tips. Salinity and δ18O values indicated that frost flowers primarily originated from the surface brine skim. Ikaite crystals were observed to form within an hour in both frost flowers and the thin pond ice. Average ikaite concentrations were 1013 µmol kg-1 in frost flowers and 1061 µmol kg-1 in the surface slush layer. Chamber flux measurements confirmed an efflux of CO2 at the brine-wetted sea ice surface, in line with expectations from the brine chemistry. Bacteria concentrations generally increased with salinity in frost flowers and the surface slush layer. Bacterial densities and taxa indicated that a selective process occurred at the ice surface and confirmed the general pattern of primary oceanic origin versus negligible atmospheric deposition.

  20. Genetic Susceptibility to Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Kovacic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a complex multifocal arterial disease involving interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Advances in techniques of molecular genetics have revealed that genetic ground significantly influences susceptibility to atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Besides further investigations of monogenetic diseases, candidate genes, genetic polymorphisms, and susceptibility loci associated with atherosclerotic diseases have been identified in recent years, and their number is rapidly increasing. This paper discusses main genetic investigations fields associated with human atherosclerotic vascular diseases. The paper concludes with a discussion of the directions and implications of future genetic research in arteriosclerosis with an emphasis on prospective prediction from an early age of individuals who are predisposed to develop premature atherosclerosis as well as to facilitate the discovery of novel drug targets.

  1. Man, Nature, and Art in Robert Frost's Poetry | Elimimian | Lwati: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although Robert Frost's poetic output is prodigious,1 three things or ideas predominate in his verse, namely: the love of man (or his fellow human beings); the love of nature and the physical world order; and the love of art, especially poetic art. These three areas are what this paper sets out to discuss, and it is along these ...

  2. A novel emulsion-forming arabinogalactan gum from the stems of Frost grape (Vitis riparia Michx.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel arabinogalactan polysaccharide (FGP) is described that is produced in large quantities from the cut stems of Frost grape (Vitis riparia Michx.). The sugar composition consists of L-arabinofuranose (L-Araf, 55.2 %) and D-galactopyranose (D-Galp 30.1%), with smaller components of D-xylose (11....

  3. Bacterial stem blight of alfalfa: A disease that increases frost damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalfa producers count on the first harvest in late spring to deliver the highest tonnage and best quality of forage of the year. A late frost can significantly reduce both yield and quality. Losses are due not only to the physical damage from freezing of the alfalfa stem and leaves but also from d...

  4. Application of Satellite Frost Forecast Technology to Other Parts of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martsolf, J. D.; Chen, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Thermal infrared data taken from the GOES satellite over a period of several hours was color enhanced by computer according to temperature. The varying temperatures were then used to assist in frost forecasting. Input from Michigan and Pennsylvania to the cold climate mapping project is emphasized in the report of the second year's activities of a two year effort.

  5. Snow and frost measurements in a watershed-management research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard S. Sartz

    1957-01-01

    I am going to tell you about our snow and frost work on the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Hubbard Brook is one of several experimental areas scattered throughout the country on which personnel of the United States Forest Service are seeking to learn how different kinds of forests and methods of managing them affect...

  6. Portrayal of Realism and Rationalism in the Selected Poems of Robert Frost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathi Veerraghava Reddy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Robert Frost (1874-1963 is a famous American Poet. As most of his poems are autobiographical in subject, it is evident that he has been mostly influenced by the environment around him in composing his masterpieces. Frost’s themes are very simple in the surface meaning endowed with an easily understandable diction and a liberal style of writing. Yet, a careful study of his works vividly reveals his greatness as a ‘true’ judge of various critical aspects associated with the everyday experiences of the humans. His major characters- the narrators in “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”, “Mending wall” and “The Road not Taken” are viewed as the real people with real struggles in real life. It is seen that Frost’s poetry is highly connotative and the same reader can interpret the poetry of Robert Frost in multiple ways in multiple settings. The present article aims at critically examining Frost’s ‘realistic’ and ‘rationalistic’ approaches in the elevation of human nature under the broad spectrum of human life. This article also aims at proving that no poem of Frost ends in an absolute imagination because Frost himself seems to believe in realism as the ultimate fate of the individuals though fancy and imagination provides a temporary relief to the disturbed soul.

  7. Frost hardiness of introduced sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. genotypes in Central Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozherelieva Zoya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. genotypes of different ecological and geographical origins were tested. Frost hardiness extent was determined during winter by artificial freezing, which allowed identify varietal differences in frost hardiness of buds and tissues of sea buckthorn shoots. In order to identify differences in adaptation to low temperature we determined the fractional composition of water in annual shoots; and proline and malone dialdehyde concentration and total amylase activity in bark of shoots of female and male genotypes. In December, the sea buckthorn genotypes were in deep dormancy, when maximum frost hardiness of buds and tissues of annual shoots occurred. During the next months, the frost hardiness of buds and shoot tissues decreased during the state of exogenous dormancy. The performed experiment gave an opportunity to select hardy genotypes ‘Kenigsbergskaya’, ‘Surpriz Baltiki’, B 23-34, and ‘Prima Dona’ for use in further breeding, as they had demonstrated stable hardiness during the whole winter period according to all of the components of winter hardiness.

  8. The Occurrence of Early Autumn Frost Frequency Analysis Case Study: Khorasan Razavi’s Synoptic Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Seyyed Nezhad Golkhatmi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The analysis of extreme events such as first frost dates are detrimental phenomena which influence in various branches of engineering, such as agriculture. The analysis and probability predicting of these events can decrease damage of agriculture, horticulture and the others. Furthermore, this phenomenon can have a relation with other thermal indexes. The analyzing of first frost dates of all synoptic stations of Khorasan Razavi province is subject of this article. The frequency analysis applied to eight distributions. Then the relationship between first frost dates and thermal index were studied. Best relation was between minimum temperature and return periods of first frost dates. Materials and Methods: The analyzing of first frost dates (origin is March 21 of all synoptic stations of Khorasan Razavi province is subject of this article. At first data of each station were screening. The basic properties such as homogeneity, randomness, stationary, independence and outliers must be tested. The eight distribution Normal, Gumbel type 1, Gamma 2-parameter, Log normal 2 or 3 parameters, Generalized Pareto, Generalized extreme values and Pearson Type 3 fitted to data and the parameters estimated with 7 methods by the name of the several types of Moments (5 methods, maximum likelihood and the maximum Entropy. The Kolmogorov – Smirnov goodness of fit test can be used to compare the best distribution. The return periods of first frost dates are major application in frequency analysis. There is maybe a relationship between periods and thermal index such as min, max and mean temperature. This relationship can be adapted by regression methods. Results and Discussion: The statistical analysis for prediction probabilities and return periods of the first frost dates for all synoptic stations in Khorasan Razavi province and the relationship between annual temperature indicators and this phenomenon is the aim of this article. The origin date of

  9. Simulating the probability of grain sorghum maturity before the first frost in northeastern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expanding grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] production northward from southeastern Colorado is thought to be limited by shorter growing seasons due to lower temperatures and earlier frost dates. This study used a simulation model for predicting crop phenology (PhenologyMMS) to predict the ...

  10. Development of frost tolerance in winter wheat as modulated by differential root and shoot temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, C.W.; van Hasselt, P.R

    Winter wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Urban), grown in nutrient solution, were exposed to differential shoot/root temperatures (i.e., 4/4, 4/20, 20/4 and 20/20 degrees C) for six weeks. Leaves grown at 4 degrees C showed an increase in frost tolerance from - 4 degrees C down to -11 degrees

  11. Effect of pyraclostrobin on postharvest storage and quality of sugarbeet harvested before and after a frost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyraclostrobin and other strobilurin fungicides have been reported to have beneficial effects on productivity that cannot be attributed to disease control. Enhanced late-season frost tolerance is one such effect that has been observed for sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) after a late season foliar pyra...

  12. Eucalypts and Their Potential for Invasiveness Particularly in Frost-Prone Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor H. Booth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eucalypts are being considered for biofuel production in the Lower Coastal Plain of the United States. The evolution of eucalypts in Australia has equipped some species to be successful in plantations and has also influenced their potential as invasive species. More than 200 eucalypt species have been evaluated in many countries around the world. Generally eucalypts have proved to have limited invasive potential for a number of reasons, including their poor dispersal capabilities. Two regions with climates similar to the Lower Coastal Plain of the United States are identified in Argentina and China. Frosts, particularly sudden frosts, are an important limitation for eucalypts in these regions, so existing plantations are very limited. However, invasive eucalypts do not appear to be a major problem in other regions of either country. The use of carefully selected frost-tolerant species and the development of genetically modified eucalypts may now open up more frost-affected areas for eucalypt plantations. Some control actions may be necessary and research needs are outlined, but it is concluded that experience in other regions around the world suggests that eucalypts are likely to be a relatively low risk as invasive species in the Lower Coastal Plain.

  13. On the need for data for the verification of service life models for frost damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Engelund, Sven

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to draw the attention to the need for the verification of service life models for frost attack on concrete and the collection of relevant data. To illustrate the type of data needed the paper presents models for internal freeze/thaw damage (internal cracking including...

  14. The Formation of Frost and Liquid Brines on Spacecraft Materials at Mars Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Erik; Martinez, German; Neamati, Daniel; Renno, Nilton O.

    2017-10-01

    There is evidence that frost formed on the camera calibration target of the Opportunity Rover [1], and that frozen brine splashed on the struts of the Phoenix lander during landing melted, producing droplets of liquid brine [2]. Moreover, there is evidence that tiny amounts of frost might have formed at the MSL landing site, early in the morning during the coldest winter sols [3].The Michigan Mars Environmental Chamber (MMEC) is capable of simulating temperatures ranging from ~90 to 500 K, atmospheric pressures ranging from ~10-3 to 105 Pa, and relative humidity ranging from less than 1% to 100%. The MMEC is also capable of simulating the diurnal and seasonal cycles of the Mars polar, mid-latitudes, and equatorial regions (including Mars Special Regions). Moreover, the MMEC is equipped with instruments to study the formation of frost and liquid brines [4,5].We use the MMEC to study the formation of frost and brine droplets on spacecraft materials. Our laboratory experiments indicate that frost forms on spacecraft materials at Mars environmental conditions. They also indicate that small amounts of liquid brine could form on spacecraft surfaces if salts are present (e.g., deposited with dust aerosols or splashed during landing) when frost forms. These results have important implications for planetary protection.Our main goal is to identify the spacecraft materials on which frost and liquid brines are most likely and least likely to form at the environmental conditions created by a Mars lander. This will improve our understanding of forward contamination so that standards for spacecraft fabrication and operations can be refined in order to minimize planetary contamination.References:[1] Landis, G. A. (2007). Lunar Planet. Sci. Conference 38, 2423.[2] Rennó, N. O., et al. (2009). J. Geophys. Res.: Planets (1991-2012), 114(E1).[3] Martínez, G. M., et al. (2016). Icarus, 280, 93-102.[4] Fischer, E., et al. (2014). Geophys. Res. Lett. 41(13), 4456-4462.[5] Fischer, E

  15. Frost Damage Detection in Sugarcane Crop Using Modis Images and Srtm Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudorff, B.; Alves de Aguiar, D.; Adami, M.

    2011-12-01

    Brazil is the largest world producer of sugarcane which is used to produce almost equal proportions of either sugar (food) or ethanol (biofuel). In recent years sugarcane crop production has increased fast to meet the growing market demand for sugar and ethanol. This increase has been mainly due to expansion in crop area, but sugarcane production is also subjected to several factors that influence both the agricultural crop yield (tons of stalks/ha) and the industrial yield (kg of sugar/ton of stalks). Sugarcane is a semi-perennial crop that experiences major growth during spring and summer seasons with large demands for water and high temperatures to produce good stalk formation (crop yield). The harvest is performed mainly during fall and winter seasons when water availability and temperature should be low in order to accumulate sucrose in the stalks (industrial yield). These favorable climatic conditions for sugarcane crop are found in several regions in Brazil, particularly in São Paulo state, which is the major sugarcane producer in Brazil being responsible for almost 60% of its production. Despite the favorable climate in São Paulo state there is a certain probability of frost occurrence from time to time that has a negative impact on sugarcane crop, particularly on industrial yield, reducing the amount of sugar in the stalks; having consequences on price increase and product shortage. To evaluate the impact of frost on sugarcane crop, in the field, on a state level, is not a trivial task; however, this information is relevant due to its direct impact on the consumer market. Remote sensing images allow a synoptic view and present great potential to monitor large sugarcane plantations as has been done since 2003 in São Paulo state by the Canasat Project with Landsat type images (http://www.dsr.inpe.br/laf/canasat/en/). Images acquired from sensors with high temporal resolution such as MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) present the

  16. Sensitivity of frost occurrence to temperature variability in the European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Ingeborg; Matulla, Christoph; Böhm, Reinhard; Ungersböck, Markus; Maugeri, Maurizio; Nanni, Teresa; Pastorelli, Rossella

    2005-11-01

    In this study, we set out to investigate the linkage of frost frequency to monthly mean temperature and its sensitivity to temperature changes. According to other related studies, the linkage between frost frequency and monthly mean temperature is approximated month per month via hyperbolic tangent functions. These models are validated using three validation experiments including split sample tests and temporal cross-validation. As there are quality-checked station data in Austria, whose temporal resolution and length allow for such a validation procedure, the validation experiments are conducted there.After the performance of the empirical models is evaluated and found adequate, the hyperbolic tangent approach is applied to about 500 stations within the so called Greater Alpine region (GAR), which extends from about 4 °E to 18 °E and from 44 °N to 49 °N. Using these models, it is possible to derive the sensitivity of frost frequency for any location for which the annual temperature cycle is known. This strategy is explicitly demonstrated for the Po Plain, where vertical temperature profiles on a monthly base are on hand as well as in Austria, where spatially high resolved maps of monthly mean temperature are available. Moreover, at stations for which long-term homogenised series of monthly mean temperature are available, reconstructions of frost frequency via the empirical models are done, returning to historical periods where no measurements of minimum temperature exist.On the basis of these findings, the impact of a possible future warming can be assessed, which is essential with regard to glaciers, permafrost and avalanches. Reduction in frost might bring positive economic aspects for agriculture, but negative consequences for low level skiing areas. Copyright

  17. Evaluation and refinement of sprinkler application rate models used in frost protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, K.B.

    1979-01-01

    Two models of the sprinkled orchard which predict the application rates required for successful frost protection were evaluated. A Sprinkling Application Rate (SPAR79) model, used the heat budget approach to determine the rate of heat lost by the plant part through radiative, convective, and latent heat transfer processes at the actual plant part temperature and at the plant part's critical temperature. The difference between these two rates of heat loss is the rate at which heat must be added by the latent heat of fusion liberated as the applied water freezes. This model added consideration of humidity and ice accumulation to a refinement of the heat budget configuration of earlier models. It showed that humidity is not a contributing factor in the determination of application rates. Ice accumulation was shown to decrease the required application rate by 67% when it increased the characteristic plant part size from 0.2 to 2.0 cm. A distribution factor, a component of a factor previously only estimated, was shown to increase by 30% (from 1.0 to 1.3) as blossom and leaf development progressed. Pulsed sprinkling for frost protection was carried out during six frost nights. Blossom temperatures, application rate, pulsing cycle, wind speed and air temperature were simultaneously recorded. These observations illustrated that in order to provide adequate protection an appropriate application rate and pulsing cycle must be provided by the model. It was concluded that by varying the distribution factor through the growing season and varying the application rate through a single frost night by pulsing, according to atmospheric parameters and ice accumulation, a significant decrease in amount of water applied may be realized. This decrease in water applied will alleviate ice buildup, water cost, soil drainage and nutrient leaching problems associated with sprinkling for frost protection.

  18. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of nitric acid uptake on frost point hygrometer performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Thornberry

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Chilled mirror hygrometers (CMH are widely used to measure water vapour in the troposphere and lower stratosphere from balloon-borne sondes. Systematic discrepancies among in situ water vapour instruments have been observed at low water vapour mixing ratios (<5 ppm in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Understanding the source of the measurement discrepancies is important for a more accurate and reliable determination of water vapour abundance in this region. We have conducted a laboratory study to investigate the potential interference of gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3 with the measurement of frost point temperature, and consequently the water vapour mixing ratio, determined by CMH under conditions representative of operation in the UT/LS. No detectable interference in the measured frost point temperature was found for HNO3 mixing ratios of up to 4 ppb for exposure times up to 150 min. HNO3 was observed to co-condense on the mirror frost, with the adsorbed mass increasing linearly with time at constant exposure levels. Over the duration of a typical balloon sonde ascent (90–120 min, the maximum accumulated HNO3 amounts were comparable to monolayer coverage of the geometric mirror surface area, which corresponds to only a small fraction of the actual frost layer surface area. This small amount of co-condensed HNO3 is consistent with the observed lack of HNO3 interference in the frost point measurement because the CMH utilizes significant reductions (>10% in surface reflectivity by the condensate to determine H2O.

  19. Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for improvement of Balloon Borne Frost Point Hygrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Teresa; Brunamonti, Simone; Wienhold, Frank G.; Peter, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In the StratoClim 2016 Balloon Campaign in Nainital (India) during the Asian Summer Monsoon, balloon born payloads containing the EN-SCI CFH - Cryogenic Frost point Hygrometer - were flown to observe water vapor and cloud formation processes in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere. Some of the recorded atmospheric water vapor profiles showed unexpected values above the tropopause and were considered contaminated. To interpret these contaminated results and in the scope of the development of a new frost point hygrometer - the Peltier Cooled Frost point Hygrometer (PCFH) - computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations with ANSYS Fluent software have been carried out. These simulations incorporate the fluid and thermodynamic characteristics of stratospheric air to predict airflow in the inlet tube of the instrument. An ice wall boundary layer based on the Murphy and Koop 2005 ice-vapor parametrization was created as a cause of the unexpected water vapor. Sensitivity was tested in relation to the CFD mesh, ice wall surface, inlet flow, inlet tube dimension, sensor head location and variation of atmospheric conditions. The development of the PCFH uses the results of this study and other computational fluid dynamic studies concerning the whole instrument boundary layer and heat exchanger design to improve on previous realizations of frost point hygrometers. As a novelty in the field of frost point hygrometry, Optimal Control Theory will be used to optimize the cooling of the mirror by the Peltier element, which will be described in a physical "plant model", since the cooling capacity of a cryogenic liquid will no longer be available in the new instrument.

  20. Delayed condensation and frost formation on superhydrophobic carbon soot coatings by controlling the presence of hydrophilic active sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmeryan, Karekin D.; Castano, Carlos E.; Mohammadi, Reza; Lazarov, Yuliyan; Radeva, Ekaterina I.

    2018-02-01

    Condensation frosting is an undesired natural phenomenon that could be impeded efficiently using appropriate wettability and morphologically patterned surfaces. The icephobic properties of carbon soot and the fabrication scalability of its synthesis method are a good foundation for anti-frosting applications; however, the fundamentals of frost growth and spreading on sooted surfaces have not been examined yet. In this study, we investigate the anti-frosting performance of three groups of superhydrophobic soot coatings by means of 16 MHz quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs). The analysis of the real-time sensor signal of each soot coated QCM pattern shows that frost formation and its propagation velocity depend on the quantity of oxygen functionalities and structural defects in the material. In turn, the reduction of both parameters shifts the onset of frost growth to temperatures below  ‑20 °C, whereas the interdroplet ice bridging is slowed by a factor of four. Moreover, high-resolution scanning electron micrographs of the samples imply delamination upon defrosting of the soot with spherical-like morphology via polar interactions driven mechanism. These results reveal an opportunity for control of frost incipiency on sooted surfaces by adjusting the synthesis conditions and depositing soot coatings with as low as possible content of hydrophilic active sites.

  1. Orchard floor management utilizing soil-applied coal dust for frost protection. Part 1. Potential microclimate modification on radiation frost nights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharratt, B.S.; Glenn, D.M.

    1988-06-01

    Little is known of the microclimate differences in orchards posed by different floor management systems. Comparisons were made of microclimatic factors on eight radiation frost nights in the spring of 1986 between two adjacent. 1.4 ha peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) plots in the Shenandoah Valley of West Virginia. The two plots were under different floor management systems; one plot with a complete grass cover (grass plot) and the other plot consisted of alternating 3-m-wide soil, 3-m-wide grass strips with coal dust applied to the soil strip of the tree row (coal dust plot). The net radiative flux (R/sub n/) on radiation frost nights from the coal dust plot was 10-15 W m/sup -2/ lower (greater radiative loss) than from the grass plot. Only 50% of this R/sub n/ difference in the early morning hours at the beginning of this study was accounted for by the soil heat flux (G) difference. However, G accounted for an increased percentage of the R/sub n/ difference in the early morning hours as the study progressed, reaching 100% at approximately 30 days from the commencement of this study. Because the differences in R/sub n/ and G were nearly equal during radiation frost nights, it is apparent that little of the energy liberated by the soil was intercepted by the canopy. Provided a means of trapping the energy from the soil in the canopy can be devised, a potential 2-3 degrees C difference in canopy temperature may be realized between these floor management systems for the site studied. These differences in canopy temperature, however would be site-specific due to the effect of aspect, slope, relative position on slope, and vegetation on solar energy partitioning. 12 refs.

  2. Modeling monthly meteorological and agronomic frost days, based on minimum air temperature, in Center-Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvares, Clayton Alcarde; Sentelhas, Paulo César; Stape, José Luiz

    2017-09-01

    Although Brazil is predominantly a tropical country, frosts are observed with relative high frequency in the Center-Southern states of the country, affecting mainly agriculture, forestry, and human activities. Therefore, information about the frost climatology is of high importance for planning of these activities. Based on that, the aims of the present study were to develop monthly meteorological (F MET) and agronomic (F AGR) frost day models, based on minimum shelter air temperature (T MN), in order to characterize the temporal and spatial frost days variability in Center-Southern Brazil. Daily minimum air temperature data from 244 weather stations distributed across the study area were used, being 195 for developing the models and 49 for validating them. Multivariate regression models were obtained to estimate the monthly T MN, once the frost day models were based on this variable. All T MN regression models were statistically significant (p < 0.001), presenting adjusted R 2 between 0.69 and 0.90. Center-Southern Brazil is mainly hit by frosts from mid-fall (April) to mid-spring (October). The period from November to March is considered as frost-free, being very rare a frost day within that period. Monthly F MET and F AGR presented significant sigmoidal relationships with T MN (p < 0.0001), with adjusted R 2 above of 0.82. The residuals of the frost day models were random, which means that the sigmoidal models performed quite well for interpreting the frost day variability throughout the study area. The highlands of Santa Catarina, Rio Grande do Sul, São Paulo, and Minas Gerais had in average more than 25 and 13 frosts per year, respectively, for F MET and F AGR. The F MET and F AGR maps developed in this study for Center-Southern Brazil is a useful tool for farmers, foresters, and researchers, since they contribute to reduce frost spatial and temporal uncertainty, helping in planning project for strategic purposes. Furthermore, the monthly F MET and F AGR maps

  3. Survival, frost susceptibility, growth, and disease resistance of corkbark and subalpine fir grown for landscape and Christmas trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees from six corkbark fir (Abies lasiocarpa var. arizonica) and 10 subalpine fir (A. lasiocarpa var. lasiocarpa) seed sources were grown at the University of Idaho Sandpoint Research and Extension Center (SREC) and two commercial nurseries in Idaho and Oregon. Post transplant mortality was highest...

  4. Frost Monitoring and Forecasting Using MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data and a Numerical Weather Prediction Model Forecasts for Eastern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabuchanga, Eric; Flores, Africa; Malaso, Susan; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Shaka, Ayub; Limaye, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Frost is a major challenge across Eastern Africa, severely impacting agricultural farms. Frost damages have wide ranging economic implications on tea and coffee farms, which represent a major economic sector. Early monitoring and forecasting will enable farmers to take preventive actions to minimize the losses. Although clearly important, timely information on when to protect crops from freezing is relatively limited. MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data, derived from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, and 72-hr weather forecasts from the Kenya Meteorological Service's operational Weather Research Forecast model are enabling the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD) and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to provide timely information to farmers in the region. This presentation will highlight an ongoing collaboration among the Kenya Meteorological Service, RCMRD, and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to identify frost events and provide farmers with potential frost forecasts in Eastern Africa.

  5. Physical, rheological, functional and film properties of a novel emulsifier: Frost grape polysaccharide (FGP) from Vitis riparia Michx

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel emulsifier, Frost grape polysaccharide (FGP), isolated from natural exudate of the species Vitis riparia Michx, was physically and rheologically characterized. The determination of the physical, structural, thermodynamic, emulsification, film, and rheological properties of FGP provide essent...

  6. Use of LST images from MODIS/AQUA sensor as an indication of frost occurrence in RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora de S. Simões

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAlthough frost occurrence causes severe losses in agriculture, especially in the south of Brazil, the data of minimum air temperature (Tmin currently available for monitoring and predicting frosts show insufficient spatial distribution. This study aimed to evaluate the MDY11A1 (LST – Land Surface Temperature product, from the MODIS sensor on board the AQUA satellite as an estimator of frost occurrence in the southeast of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. LST images from the nighttime overpass of the MODIS/AQUA sensor for the months of June, July and August from 2006 to 2012, and data from three conventional weather stations of the National Institute of Meteorology (INMET were used. Consistency was observed between Tmin data measured in weather stations and LST data obtained from the MODIS sensor. According to the results, LSTs below 3 ºC recorded by the MODIS/AQUA sensor are an indication of a favorable scenario to frost occurrence.

  7. USE OF PHASE CHANGE MATERIAL (PCM FOR FROST PREVENTION IN A MODEL GREENHOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet KÜRKLÜ

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the possibility of using phase change materials to prevent occurrance of frost in greenhouses during winter was investigated. The melting and freezing temperatures of the PCM were about 8 oC and 4 oC, respectively.The air temperature difference between the PCM and the control greenhouses was about 2oC on average during the day and night time, PCM greenhouse having the higher temperature at night and lower temperature during the day. Frost was prevented on 7 out of 9 occasions, though the temperature difference between the greenhouses was small for some of these days. Solar fraction stored by the PCM store was about 30 %.

  8. Frosted Branch Angiitis Diagnosed as Neuro-Behçet: A Diagnostic and Etiologic Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Portero

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of frosted branch angiitis (FBA secondary to neuro-Behçet. Methods: Description, diagnosis, angiogram imaging and follow-up of a 28-year-old female with FBA. Results: ‘Frosted branch angiitis’ is a clinical term applied to three conditions: infiltration of vessels by malignant cells, and sheathing of vessels either secondary to an active disorder or subsequently to a previous inflammatory disease. Our patient’s history of two optic neuropathies and the lack of demyelinating signs in neuroimaging made us consider FBA in the context of neuro-Behçet. Conclusion: Recognition of the category of FBA from the clinical signs is essential to establish the correct diagnosis and prescribe the appropriate treatment.

  9. The potential importance of frost flowers, recycling on snow, and open leads for ozone depletion events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Piot

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present model studies with the one-dimensional model MISTRA to investigate the potential role of frost flowers, recycling on snow, and open leads in the depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic spring. In our model, we assumed frost flower aerosols to be the major source of bromine. We show that a major ozone depletion event can be satisfactorily reproduced only if the recycling on snow of deposited bromine into gas phase bromine is assumed. In the model, this cycling is more efficient than the bromine explosion process and maintains sufficiently high levels of bromine to deplete ozone down to few nmol mol−1 within four days. We assessed the influence of different surface combinations (open lead/frost flowers on the chemistry in the model. Results showed noticeable modifications affecting the composition of aerosols and the deposition velocities. A model run with a series of coupled frost flower fields and open leads, separated by large areas of snow, showed results comparable with field observations. In addition, we studied the effects of modified temperature of either the frost flower field or the ambient airmass. A warmer frost flower field increases the relative humidity and the aerosol deposition rate. The deposition/re-emission process gains in importance, inducing more reactive bromine in the gas phase, and a stronger ozone depletion. A decrease of 1K in airmass temperature shows in our model that the aerosol uptake capacities of all gas phase species substantially increases, leading to enhanced uptake of acids from the gas phase. Consequently, the so-called bromine explosion accelerated and O3 mixing ratios decreased. In our model representation, variations in wind speed affected the aerosol source function and influenced the amount of bromine in the atmosphere and thus the ozone depletion strength. Recent studies have suggested the important role of the precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3

  10. Frost-Resistant Plants Selection Peculiarities at Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Varieties Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. П. Чебаков

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Giving regard to the main elements of Winter Wheat varieties assessment when selecting frost resistant plants and taking into account genetic potential of the parents, date of hybrids sowing and their assessment by the speed of spring vegetation, it is possible in the sense of successful breeding to derive the most steady genotypes by the specified characteristics starting from F1. hybrids.

  11. Historical Perspectives in Frost Heave Research: The Early Works of S. Taber and G. Beskow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    important their work remains today . laboratory studies found ambiguities as well, leading soil physicists to abandon soil freezing studies. During the...still used today and are presented together in this perceived an irreversible process dependent on the document. freezing of supercooled water. At...will reduce the heaving and smooth and slopes slightly outwards with depth. Forex - eliminate the frost boils. Of course, the effect of deep ample

  12. EFFICIENT NON-DESTRUCTIVE METHOD OF CONTROL OVER THE FROST-RESISTANCE OF CONCRETES DESIGNATED FOR HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING STRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Popov Valeriy Petrovich

    2012-01-01

    The author considers the problem of control over the frost resistance as the most important characteristic of concretes designated for hydraulic engineering structures. His method is based on the identification of correlation between the frost resistance and the Poisson ratio. The value of the Poisson ratio is measurable through the employment of the ultra-sound method. The proposed methodology contemplates the following sequence of acts. First, the value of the Poisson ratio o...

  13. EVALUATION OF FROST HEAVE ON WASTE TRANSFER LINES WITH SHALLOW DEPTHS IN DST (DOUBLE SHELL TANK) FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAQ MA

    2009-05-12

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate the effect of frost heave on waste transfer lines with shallow depths in DST farms. Because of the insulation, well compacted sandy material around waste transfer lines, the type of sandy and gravel soil, and relatively low precipitation at Hanford site, it is concluded that waste transfer lines with one foot of soil covers (sandy cushion material and insulation) are not expected to undergo frost heave damaging effects.

  14. Development and Sensitivity Analysis of a Frost Risk model based primarily on freely distributed Earth Observation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louka, Panagiota; Petropoulos, George; Papanikolaou, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    The ability to map the spatiotemporal distribution of extreme climatic conditions, such as frost, is a significant tool in successful agricultural management and decision making. Nowadays, with the development of Earth Observation (EO) technology, it is possible to obtain accurately, timely and in a cost-effective way information on the spatiotemporal distribution of frost conditions, particularly over large and otherwise inaccessible areas. The present study aimed at developing and evaluating a frost risk prediction model, exploiting primarily EO data from MODIS and ASTER sensors and ancillary ground observation data. For the evaluation of our model, a region in north-western Greece was selected as test site and a detailed sensitivity analysis was implemented. The agreement between the model predictions and the observed (remotely sensed) frost frequency obtained by MODIS sensor was evaluated thoroughly. Also, detailed comparisons of the model predictions were performed against reference frost ground observations acquired from the Greek Agricultural Insurance Organization (ELGA) over a period of 10-years (2000-2010). Overall, results evidenced the ability of the model to produce reasonably well the frost conditions, following largely explainable patterns in respect to the study site and local weather conditions characteristics. Implementation of our proposed frost risk model is based primarily on satellite imagery analysis provided nowadays globally at no cost. It is also straightforward and computationally inexpensive, requiring much less effort in comparison for example to field surveying. Finally, the method is adjustable to be potentially integrated with other high resolution data available from both commercial and non-commercial vendors. Keywords: Sensitivity analysis, frost risk mapping, GIS, remote sensing, MODIS, Greece

  15. Frosted branch angiitis, neuroretinitis as initial ocular manifestation in Behçet disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Behçet disease is an idiopathic, multisystem disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of orogenital ulceration and vasculitis of the veins and arteries of all calibers. Ocular involvement may affect the conjunctiva, sclera, uveal tract, vitreous, blood vessels, and retina. Many theories have pointed toward an autoimmune response behind its pathogenesis, which may be triggered by exposure to an infectious agent. Frosted branch angiitis is characterized by vascular inflammation, sheathing, retinal edema, and retinal hemorrhages. The disease may be idiopathic in a majority of the cases or may be associated with ocular and systemic pathology. Association between Behηet disease, Frosted branch angiitis, and neuroretinitis is not reported in literature. This uncommon combination reflects the varied systemic and ocular manifestations in Behηet disease, especially in patients who are not diagnosed and treated in time. We hereby report a case of bilateral frosted branch angiitis and neuroretinitis in a young male from Middle-east, suffering from Behçet disease.

  16. Numerical heat transfer model for frost protection of citrus fruits by water from a spraying system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa Roy J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A simplified model is developed to simulate the conditions associated with the protection of fruits from frost damage using water from a spraying system. The model simulates the movement of the solidifying water front on a single fruit, and based on that determines the spray frequency needed for a water film to continuously surround the ice-coated fruit to prevent the fruit temperature from dropping below 0ºC. Simulations are presented for the frost protection of sweet oranges (citrus sinensis. The effect of environmental conditions such as air temperature, air velocity, surface radiation and water film evaporation on the development of the ice layer encasing is considered. Simulations show the effect the encasing ice sheet thickness has on the fruit temperature if water from a spraying system is turned off permanently. Experimental tests are also conducted to determine the change in the thermal properties of citrus sinensis for operating temperatures that range from above freezing to sub-freezing. The results of the experimental tests and the numerical simulations shall lead to a better understanding of fruit protection from frost damage by the application of water from a spraying system.

  17. Climate Change and Crop Exposure to Adverse Weather: Changes to Frost Risk and Grapevine Flowering Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosedale, Jonathan R; Wilson, Robert J; Maclean, Ilya M D

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of grapevines in the UK and many other cool climate regions is expected to benefit from the higher growing season temperatures predicted under future climate scenarios. Yet the effects of climate change on the risk of adverse weather conditions or events at key stages of crop development are not always captured by aggregated measures of seasonal or yearly climates, or by downscaling techniques that assume climate variability will remain unchanged under future scenarios. Using fine resolution projections of future climate scenarios for south-west England and grapevine phenology models we explore how risks to cool-climate vineyard harvests vary under future climate conditions. Results indicate that the risk of adverse conditions during flowering declines under all future climate scenarios. In contrast, the risk of late spring frosts increases under many future climate projections due to advancement in the timing of budbreak. Estimates of frost risk, however, were highly sensitive to the choice of phenology model, and future frost exposure declined when budbreak was calculated using models that included a winter chill requirement for dormancy break. The lack of robust phenological models is a major source of uncertainty concerning the impacts of future climate change on the development of cool-climate viticulture in historically marginal climatic regions.

  18. Anthocyanins and glutathione S-transferase activities in response to low temperature and frost hardening in Vaccinium myrtillus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taulavuori, Erja; Tahkokorpi, Marjaana; Taulavuori, Kari; Laine, Kari

    2004-08-01

    Anthocyanin (Acy) contents and GST activities of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) were investigated in two experiments conducted in June (Exp. I: active growth) and in August September (Exp. II: beginning of frost hardening) in Northern Finland (65 degrees N). Bilberry plants were subjected to +2 degrees C and +18 degrees C in Exp. I or +5/0 degrees C (day/night) and +18/+13 degrees C (day/night) in Exp. II. GST activities were assessed using either 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) or trans-cinnamic acid (tCA) as substrates. We found temperature to have no effect on Acy during either active growth or frost hardening. Acy increased several-fold from active growth to the beginning of frost hardening, but no increment was observed during the development of frost hardening. This suggests a role of Acy in photoprotection at low temperatures rather than their direct involvement in the development of freezing tolerance. The lack of response of GST activity to frost hardening and to temperature in autumn may indicate an indirect role of GSTs in frost hardening as protective enzymes. GST activity was the same with the two substrates studied (CDNB, tCA), supporting the assumption that GSTs could catalyze reactions with endogenous phenylpropanoids.

  19. Recent changes in frost days events characteristics in Uruguay-Southeastern South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renom, Madeleine; De Mello, Santiago

    2015-04-01

    There are few studies about extreme temperature events in Southeastern South America as is it mentioned in the SREX report (2009), although these events generate human health impacts and big economical looses. Southeastern South America is one of the major agricultural production regions worldwide. Particularly in Uruguay, agricultural production represents a high percentage of the GDP and, in the last 15 years there has been a significant increase in the area used for that economic activity. Although frost is not always is considered as an extreme event it causes, in the case of Uruguay, an impact on society, energy consumption and agricultural losses. Previous studies have shown a negative trend in the occurrence of cold nights (TN10) during winter (June-July-August) and autumn (March-April-May) in Uruguay. This work try to determine if these trends affects the occurrences and characteristics of frost days (Tminpercentile based index (TN10) and a fixed index (FD). At monthly scale, May and September show a negative trend, although these months present a low number of cases that difficult the statistical treatment. It is noticeable that from a decadal point of view the last decade (2000-2009) was the decade with fewer occurrences comparing with the rest, while the 90's is the decade that presents more cases. We also analyzed changes in frost period (FP) which commonly extends from May to September. In general all the stations present a decrease in the FP in accordance with the negative trend detected at monthly scale, suggesting a warming in autumn and spring time. Although we detected different behaviour in two stations, one located inner land and the other located on the Atlantic coast of the country. The former presents a linear trend in the FP, while the other shows a decadal variability. Regarding the frost intensity we analysed the consecutive frost days (CFD) index, which shows that the usual length is around 2-4 days. The decadal analysis shows that during

  20. Frost weathering microstructures on quartz grains as paleoenvironmental indicators in Western Iberia mountain environments (Serra da Estrela, Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwendam, Alexandre; Woronko, Barbara; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2016-04-01

    Cailleux analysis (1942) with modifications from Mycielska-Dowgiallo and Woronko (1998) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) following Mahaney (2002) were performed on quartz grains from vertical slope deposits profiles. Other analyses include granulometric composition. The degree of weathering (ST) of single grains was determined by identifying frost-weathering microstructures. The frost action index (FAI) is the average value of the ST for a given sample. The FAI value varies between 0 and 3, and the higher the value, the more intensive the frost weathering (Woronko and Hoch, 2011). The effects of frost weathering comprise several microstructures, such as, breakage blocks and conchoidal fractures and scaling. Chemical weathering effects were also seen, like solution pits, solution crevasses and amorphous precipitation. The values of FAI index of the sediments from the slope deposits vary between 0.6 and 2.05. Samples with a FAI higher than 1.3 indicate that frost weathering occurred for a longer period and was more intense where the dominant microstructures are breakage blocks registered within microdepressions and microfissures. The samples that have a FAI below 1.3, frost weathering was less intense and for a shorter period, with less frequent freeze-thaw cycles and the dominant microstructures are small conchoidal fractures. The values of the FAI in sediments from the slope deposits reveal changes along the vertical profiles. The maximum value of frost-weathering intensity imprinted on quartz grains were observed in sediments near the base of the slope deposits, and this could be attributed to the effects of seasonal freezing and thawing, as well as to the influence of short term temperature changes. The lower frost-weathering intensity was observed in the near-surface layers probably because they were exposed to frost weathering for a shorter time. References Cailleux A. 1942. Les actiones éoliennes périglaciaires en Europe. Mémoires de la Société G

  1. The climatic risk of intense weather cooling in April across south-western Romania. Case study: extreme weather cooling and the frosts within the 07 - 09. IV. 2003 interval

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea Floriana Marinica; Dana Maria (Oprea) Constantin; Ion Marinica; Victor Viorel Vatamanu

    2014-01-01

    Even though April is regarded as the first month of the warm season, which begins after only 10 days from the winter solstice, the air temperature rises rapidly, and the transition into spring is swift and frequently occurs prematurely. Under the conditions of global warming, in south-western Romania it is observed a rise in the recurrence of warm April months or even extremely warm, and the growing tendency of air temperatures. However in some years late spring chills and powerful frosts ari...

  2. Diagnostic Value of Direct Antibiotic Susceptibility Test for Faster BacterialSusceptibility Reporting in Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Rebriarina Hapsari; Vincentia Rizke Ciptaningtyas; Masfiyah Masfiyah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid and accurate information on susceptibility of bacteria causing bacteraemia is very helpful in sepsis management. Blood culture is the gold standard for bacteraemia diagnosis. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing needs at least three days for completion while direct method can give the result a day earlier. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of direct antibiotic susceptibility testing in blood culture. Methods: Bloods from positive BACTEC b...

  3. The effect of watermelon frost on prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 in inflamed pulp tissue (in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Dennis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulp inflammation can be marked by the increase of prostaglandin E2(PGE2 level compared to normal pulp. The increase of PGE2 may lead to vasodilatation, increase of vascular permeability, pain and bone resorption. Watermelon frost has been well known in Chinese society for pain relief and inflammation in oral cavity and teeth. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate that watermelon frost can be used to decrease the PGE2 level. Method: 27 samples of pulp tissues used in this in-vitro study, were extirpated from the patients’ teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis referred to clinic of Conservative Dentistry, RSPGM Faculty of Dentistry, USU. Trial materials were applied to 27 samples i.e. watermelon frost as a trial material and commercial watermelon frost and eugenol to observe their effect on PGE2. PGE2 level of each material was detected through ELISA method by measuring and comparing the absorbance reading of the wells of the samples against standards with a micro plate reader at W1 = 650 nm and W2 = 490 nm. Result: The result showed the biggest effect was found in the third group (eugenol, mean 4.6933, followed by the first group (watermelon frost as a trial material, mean 18,1578 then the second group (commercial watermelon frost, mean 82,2689. OneWay ANOVA revealed that there were significant differences among all trial materials (p < 0.001 on PGE2 level. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that watermelon frost can be used to decrease the PGE2 level in inflamed pulp tissue and led to the acceptance of traditional medicine and natural products as an alternative form of dental care.

  4. Prediction of Frost Risks and Plagues using WRF model: a Port Wine region case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. A.; Rocha, A.; Monteiro, A.; Quénol, H.; de Freitas, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    In viticulture where the quality of the wine, the selection of the grapevines or even the characteristics of the farming soil, also depending from local soil features like topography, proximity of a river or water body, will act locally on the weather. Frosts are of significant concern to growers of many cultures crops such as winegrapes. Because of their high latitude and some altitude, the vineyards of the Demarcated Douro Region (DDR) are subjected to the frost, which cause serious damages. But the hazards of vineyard don't confine to the incidents of the fortuitous and meteorological character. The illnesses and plagues affect frequently the vineyards of Demarcated Douro Region due, namely to the weather, to the high power of the regional stocks, to the dense vegetation badly drained and favourable to the setting of numberless fungi, viruses and/or poisonous insects. In the case of DDR it is worth noticing the meteorological conditions due to the weather characteristics. Although there are several illnesses and plagues the most important enemies for the vine in the DDR are the mildew, oidium, grey rottenness, grape moth,. . . , if the climatic conditions favour their appearance and development. For this study, we selected some months for different periods, at the 16 weather stations of the Region of Douro. We use the Weather Research and Forecast Model (WRF) to study and possibly predict the occurrence of risk and plagues (mildew) episodes. The model is first validated with the meteorological data obtained at the weather stations. The knowledge of frost and plagues occurrence allows one to decrease its risks not only by selecting the cultural species and varieties but also the places of growth and the planting and sowing dates.

  5. Changes of Frost Damage and Treeline Advance for Swiss Stone Pine in the Calimani Mts. (Eastern Carpathians, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KERN, Zoltán

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Checking the tree-ring structure of 39 living and 9 crossdated dead samples of Swissstone pine (Pinus cembra L. collected from the upper timberline of the CalimaniMts. we haveidentified 59 frost rings over the past 250 years. We found concentrated occurrence of frost events inthree decades: in the 1790s, 1810s and 1910s. No frost ring was observed in two bidecadal periods:1750-1770 and 1850-1870. Out of the analysed interval 1963-2004 is the longest period without frostring occurrence. After 1920 both frequency and severity of frost events seem to decrease compared tothe prior 170 years. We determined the altitude of highest growing stone pine individuals in theBradului Ciont–Pietrosu region in June, 2006. Individuals were sorted into tree-form or bush-likemorphological groups. Mean elevation data of the groups were corrected by an estimated constant biasof GPS measurements (-30 m. Comparing the corrected values to early 20th century inventory data65 m and 95 m upward migration was determined for treeline and boundary of bush-like occurence,respectively. The parallel results suggest that the 20th century advance of the upper forest limit wasdue to the decrease of frost stress at the zone of timberline.

  6. Frost stress evolution and winter pea ideotype in the context of climate warming at a regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castel Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. is an important crop in temperate regions for its high seed protein concentration that is particularly sensitive to abiotic stresses. The abrupt temperature increase known as the “1987/1988 temperature regime shift” that occurs over Europe is questioning how winter pea will perform in the changing climate. This study assessed the winter frost damage evolution along from 1961 to 2015 in Burgundy-Franche-Comté by using: (1 daily observed and gridded regional temperature data and (2 a validated crop winter frost stress model calibrated for pea. This study shows a global decrease of the frost stress nevertheless resulting from a subtle balance between the decrease in its intensity and the increase of the number of events. The frost stress evolution patterns with warming depend on both plant frost resistance level and acclimation rate and are still sensitive to winter climate fluctuations. This study provides relevant information for breeding performant winter crop ideotypes able to moderate detrimental effects of climate change and offering new cropping opportunities in temperate regions.

  7. Frost Action Predictive Techniques for Roads and Airfields; A Comprehensive Survey of Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    about 102 by tensiometers at depths of about 533, 813, mm of asphalt-penetration macadam stone base 1118 and 1524 mm beloA the pavement sur- A.,,: and 127...mm of gravel subbase (Fig. 7). The sub- face at Taxiwa. A and 480, 640, 840 and , grade is silty fine sand. The penetration macadam 1140 mm below the...NEERS , Atterberg Imis. FROST DESIGN SOIL L solI classication CLASSIFICATON SYSTEM IMPIEMENIATION OF ’ RESEARCH FININCS SuCpbl af [ ~rrj grout , ’UrnOe

  8. Prediction of frost location using machine learning and wireless sensor networks

    OpenAIRE

    Diedrichs, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The damage caused by the frost takes place when the temperatures are below than a tolerable limit for the plants. Each phenological state, e.g owering, has a variable cold hardiness, so the lethal temperature is also variable. Freezing climatic events are the most dangerous, because they affect a large land surface. Mendoza is not an exception. According to the Instituto Nacional de Vitivinicultura (INV), in 2013 the loss of the vine crop reached up to 27%. Big part of that loss of yield was ...

  9. Assessing Wheat Frost Risk with the Support of GIS: An Approach Coupling a Growing Season Meteorological Index and a Hybrid Fuzzy Neural Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaojie Yue

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Crop frost, one kind of agro-meteorological disaster, often causes significant loss to agriculture. Thus, evaluating the risk of wheat frost aids scientific response to such disasters, which will ultimately promote food security. Therefore, this paper aims to propose an integrated risk assessment model of wheat frost, based on meteorological data and a hybrid fuzzy neural network model, taking China as an example. With the support of a geographic information system (GIS, a comprehensive method was put forward. Firstly, threshold temperatures of wheat frost at three growth stages were proposed, referring to phenology in different wheat growing areas and the meteorological standard of Degree of Crop Frost Damage (QX/T 88-2008. Secondly, a vulnerability curve illustrating the relationship between frost hazard intensity and wheat yield loss was worked out using hybrid fuzzy neural network model. Finally, the wheat frost risk was assessed in China. Results show that our proposed threshold temperatures are more suitable than using 0 °C in revealing the spatial pattern of frost occurrence, and hybrid fuzzy neural network model can further improve the accuracy of the vulnerability curve of wheat subject to frost with limited historical hazard records. Both these advantages ensure the precision of wheat frost risk assessment. In China, frost widely distributes in 85.00% of the total winter wheat planting area, but mainly to the north of 35°N; the southern boundary of wheat frost has moved northward, potentially because of the warming climate. There is a significant trend that suggests high risk areas will enlarge and gradually expand to the south, with the risk levels increasing from a return period of 2 years to 20 years. Among all wheat frost risk levels, the regions with loss rate ranges from 35.00% to 45.00% account for the largest area proportion, ranging from 58.60% to 63.27%. We argue that for wheat and other frost-affected crops, it is

  10. Real-Time Optical Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, Marlene; Andersen, Klaus R; Jørgensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in highly demand in health-care fields as antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope), which based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time, introdu......Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in highly demand in health-care fields as antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope), which based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time......, introduces real-time detection of bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility, with imaging material to support the automatically generated graphs. Automated antibiotic susceptibility tests of a monoculture showed statistically significant antibiotic effect within 6 minutes and within 30 minutes...

  11. Remedial measures to tame the frost heaves at gas distribution stations in west-east gas pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Daoming; Gong, Jing [Beijing Key Laboratory of Urban Oil and Gas Distribution Technology, China University of Petroleum (China); Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Kai; Jiang, Yongtao [West-East Gas Pipeline Company (China)

    2010-07-01

    In China, a pipeline running 3900 kilometers from Xinjiang to the Yangtze River Delta area and with a capacity of 12 billion cubic meters of gas annually was put into operation in 2004. Due to subfreezing gas temperatures, the distribution stations have since then suffered from frost heaves. One method to address this issue could be to install gas-fueled heaters, however, that would imply important additional costs as well as problems in acquiring land. The aim of this paper is to present and compare different methods to deal with the frost heaves issue. Soil replacement with a water mitigation technique was found to be the best option based on geotechnical survey, calculations and data; this technique was successfully applied to several distribution stations with different water tables. A frost heaves mitigation method was developed herein and proved to be more cost effective than gas-fueled heaters.

  12. [Frost-resistance of subtropical evergreen woody plants: an evaluation based on plant functional traits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi-Lu; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Yue; Xie, Yi-Ming; Wang, Liang-Yan; Yan, En-Rong

    2012-12-01

    Evaluating the frost-resistance of evergreen woody plants is of significance in guiding the species selection in forest management in subtropical region. In this paper, an investigation was made on the functional traits (including specific leaf area, stem wood density, leaf area, leaf dry matter content, leaf relative electrical conductance, and twig wood density) of 64 common evergreen broad-leaved and coniferous woody plant species in the Ningbo region of Zhejiang Province, East China, after a severe snowstorm in early 2008, aimed to select the evergreen woody plants with high ability of freeze-tolerance, and to establish a related evaluation system. By using a hierarchy analysis approach, the weight values of the functional traits of each species were determined, and an index system for evaluating the plants tolerance ability against freeze and mechanical damage was established. Based on this system, 23 evergreen plant species with high tolerance ability against freeze and mechanical damage, such as Cyclobalanopsis gilva, Cyclobalanopsis nubium, Neolitsea aurata, and Vacciniuim mandarinorum, were selected. In the meantime, on the basis of the ordering with each of the functional traits, the ordering of the tolerance ability of the 64 plant species against freeze and mechanical damage was made, and a list for the frost-resistance ability of the subtropical evergreen woody plant species in Ningbo region was constituted.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF CERAMIC TILE FROST RESISTANCE BY MEANS OF THE FREQUENCY INSPECTION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICHAL MATYSÍK

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results of our experimental analysis of ceramic cladding element frost resistance, particular attention being paid to the application of the frequency inspection method. Three different sets of ceramic tiles of the Ia class to EN 14 411 B standard made by various manufacturers have been analyzed. The ceramic tiles under investigation have been subjected to freeze-thaw-cycle-based degradation in compliance with the relevant ČSN EN ISO 10545-12 standard. Furthermore, accelerated degradation procedure has been applied to selected test specimens, consisting in reducing the temperature of water soaked ceramic tiles in the course of the degradation cycles down –70°C. To verify the correctness of the frequency inspection results, additional physical properties of the ceramic tiles under test have been measured, such as, the ceramic tile strength limit, modulus of elasticity and modulus of deformability, resulting from the flexural tensile strength tests, integrity defect and surface micro-geometry tracking. It has been proved that the acoustic method of frequency inspection is a sensitive indicator of the structure condition and can be applied to the ceramic cladding element frost resistance and service life prediction assessment.

  14. Frost related dieback in Estonian energy plantations of willows in relation to fertilisation and pathogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambours, M.A.; Nejad, P. [Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7026, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Heinsoo, K. [Institute of Zoology and Botany, Estonian Agricultural University, Riia 181, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Granhall, U. [Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7025, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    Two 9-year old Estonian Salix plantations suffering from dieback were studied: one situated on poor mineral soil and divided into fertilised and unfertilised plots (Saare plantation) and another growing on a well-decomposed and nitrogen-rich organic soil, without fertiliser application (Kambja plantation). Bacteria from internal tissues of visually damaged shoots from seven clones were isolated in spring and autumn. The strains were subsequently biochemically characterised and tested for ice nucleation activity and pathogenicity on Salix. Some strains were also analysed with 16S rRNA. High numbers of culturable bacteria were found, belonging mainly to Erwinia, Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas spp. Fertilised plots were significantly more colonised by bacteria than unfertilised plots and also more extensively damaged, showing a lower density of living plants after 7 years of culture. More ice nucleation active (INA) strains were found in Saare fertilised plots and at Kambja than in Saare unfertilised plots. Likewise, most pathogenic strains were isolated from Saare fertilised plots and from Kambja. For some of the willow clones studied, dieback appeared to be related to both clonal frost sensitivity and abundance of INA and pathogenic bacteria. The plantations probably suffered from the presence of high amounts of pathogens and from frost related injuries aggravated by INA bacteria. Most probably the fertilisation at Saare and the nitrogen-rich soil at Kambja created a favourable environment for bacterial development and led to high dieback levels after the first harvest. (author)

  15. Frost Growth and Densification on a Flat Surface in Laminar Flow with Variable Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, M.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments are performed concerning frost growth and densification in laminar flow over a flat surface under conditions of constant and variable humidity. The flat plate test specimen is made of aluminum-6031, and has dimensions of 0.3 mx0.3 mx6.35 mm. Results for the first variable humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 1.77 m/s, air temperature of 295.1 K, and a relative humidity continuously ranging from 81 to 54%. The second variable humidity test case corresponds to plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 2.44 m/s, air temperature of 291.8 K, and a relative humidity ranging from 66 to 59%. Results for the constant humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 263.7 K, air velocity of 1.7 m/s, air temperature of 295 K, and a relative humidity of 71.6 %. Comparisons of the data with the author's frost model extended to accommodate variable humidity suggest satisfactory agreement between the theory and the data for both constant and variable humidity.

  16. Frost flowers and sea-salt aerosols over seasonal sea-ice areas in northwestern Greenland during winter–spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hara

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sea salts and halogens in aerosols, frost flowers, and brine play an important role in atmospheric chemistry in polar regions. Simultaneous sampling and observations of frost flowers, brine, and aerosol particles were conducted around Siorapaluk in northwestern Greenland during December 2013 to March 2014. Results show that water-soluble frost flower and brine components are sea-salt components (e.g., Na+, Cl−, Mg2+, K+, Ca2+, Br−, and iodine. Concentration factors of sea-salt components of frost flowers and brine relative to seawater were 1.14–3.67. Sea-salt enrichment of Mg2+, K+, Ca2+, and halogens (Cl−, Br−, and iodine in frost flowers is associated with sea-salt fractionation by precipitation of mirabilite and hydrohalite. High aerosol number concentrations correspond to the occurrence of higher abundance of sea-salt particles in both coarse and fine modes, and blowing snow and strong winds. Aerosol number concentrations, particularly in coarse mode, are increased considerably by release from the sea-ice surface under strong wind conditions. Sulfate depletion by sea-salt fractionation was found to be limited in sea-salt aerosols because of the presence of non-sea-salt (NSS SO42−. However, coarse and fine sea-salt particles were found to be rich in Mg. Strong Mg enrichment might be more likely to proceed in fine sea-salt particles. Magnesium-rich sea-salt particles might be released from the surface of snow and slush layer (brine on sea ice and frost flowers. Mirabilite-like and ikaite-like particles were identified only in aerosol samples collected near new sea-ice areas. From the field evidence and results from earlier studies, we propose and describe sea-salt cycles in seasonal sea-ice areas.

  17. Frost flowers and sea-salt aerosols over seasonal sea-ice areas in northwestern Greenland during winter-spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Keiichiro; Matoba, Sumito; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Yamasaki, Tetsuhide

    2017-07-01

    Sea salts and halogens in aerosols, frost flowers, and brine play an important role in atmospheric chemistry in polar regions. Simultaneous sampling and observations of frost flowers, brine, and aerosol particles were conducted around Siorapaluk in northwestern Greenland during December 2013 to March 2014. Results show that water-soluble frost flower and brine components are sea-salt components (e.g., Na+, Cl-, Mg2+, K+, Ca2+, Br-, and iodine). Concentration factors of sea-salt components of frost flowers and brine relative to seawater were 1.14-3.67. Sea-salt enrichment of Mg2+, K+, Ca2+, and halogens (Cl-, Br-, and iodine) in frost flowers is associated with sea-salt fractionation by precipitation of mirabilite and hydrohalite. High aerosol number concentrations correspond to the occurrence of higher abundance of sea-salt particles in both coarse and fine modes, and blowing snow and strong winds. Aerosol number concentrations, particularly in coarse mode, are increased considerably by release from the sea-ice surface under strong wind conditions. Sulfate depletion by sea-salt fractionation was found to be limited in sea-salt aerosols because of the presence of non-sea-salt (NSS) SO42-. However, coarse and fine sea-salt particles were found to be rich in Mg. Strong Mg enrichment might be more likely to proceed in fine sea-salt particles. Magnesium-rich sea-salt particles might be released from the surface of snow and slush layer (brine) on sea ice and frost flowers. Mirabilite-like and ikaite-like particles were identified only in aerosol samples collected near new sea-ice areas. From the field evidence and results from earlier studies, we propose and describe sea-salt cycles in seasonal sea-ice areas.

  18. GC13I-0857: Designing a Frost Forecasting Service for Small Scale Tea Farmers in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Emily C.; Wanjohi, James Nyaga; Ellenburg, Walter Lee; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Mugo, Robinson M.; Flores Cordova, Africa Ixmucane; Irwin, Daniel; Case, Jonathan; Malaso, Susan; Sedah, Absae

    2017-01-01

    Kenya is the third largest tea exporter in the world, producing 10% of the world's black tea. Sixty percent of this production occurs largely by small scale tea holders, with an average farm size of 1.04 acres, and an annual net income of $1,075. According to a recent evaluation, a typical frost event in the tea growing region causes about $200 dollars in losses which can be catastrophic for a small holder farm. A 72-hour frost forecast would provide these small-scale tea farmers with enough notice to reduce losses by approximately 80 USD annually. With this knowledge, SERVIR, a joint NASA-USAID initiative that brings Earth observations for improved decision making in developing countries, sought to design a frost monitoring and forecasting service that would provide farmers with enough lead time to react to and protect against a forecasted frost occurrence on their farm. SERVIR Eastern and Southern Africa, through its implementing partner, the Regional Centre for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD), designed a service that included multiple stakeholder engagement events whereby stakeholders from the tea industry value chain were invited to share their experiences so that the exact needs and flow of information could be identified. This unique event allowed enabled the design of a service that fit the specifications of the stakeholders. The monitoring service component uses the MODIS Land Surface Temperature product to identify frost occurrences in near-real time. The prediction component, currently under testing, uses the 2-m air temperature, relative humidity, and 10-m wind speed from a series of high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction model runs over eastern Kenya as inputs into a frost prediction algorithm. Accuracy and sensitivity of the algorithm is being assessed with observations collected from the farmers using a smart phone app developed specifically to report frost occurrences, and from data shared

  19. There is no direct relationship between N-status and frost hardiness in needles of NH3-exposed Scots pine seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clement, JMAM; Venema, JH; Van Hasselt, PR

    2000-01-01

    The effect of short-term atmospheric ammonia deposition on frost hardening of needles of three-month-old seedlings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was studied. Plants were frost hardened under short day and moderate temperature conditions in the laboratory during exposure to gaseous NH3

  20. Nitrogen split dose fertilization, plant age and frost effects on phytochemical content and sensory properties of curly kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. sabellica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenbaek, Marie; Jensen, Sidsel; Neugart, Susanne; Schreiner, Monika; Kidmose, Ulla; Kristensen, Hanne L

    2016-04-15

    We investigated how concentrations of sensory relevant compounds: glucosinolates (GLSs), flavonoid glycosides, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and sugars in kale responded to split dose and reduced nitrogen (N) fertilization, plant age and controlled frost exposure. In addition, frost effects on sensory properties combined with N supply were assessed. Seventeen week old kale plants showed decreased aliphatic GLSs at split dose N fertilization; whereas reduced N increased aliphatic and total GLSs. Ontogenetic effects were demonstrated for all compounds: sugars, aliphatic and total GLSs increased throughout plant development, whereas kaempferol and total flavonoid glycosides showed higher concentrations in 13 week old plants. Controlled frost exposure altered sugar composition slightly, but not GLSs or flavonoid glycosides. Reduced N supply resulted in less bitterness, astringency and pungent aroma, whereas frost exposure mainly influenced aroma and texture. N treatment explained most of the sensory variation. Producers should not rely on frost only to obtain altered sensory properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigations Concerning Cavitation and Frost Fatigue in Clonal 84K Poplar Using High-Resolution Cavitron Measurements1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Ding, Fei; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    Both drought and freezing-thawing of stems induce a loss of hydraulic conductivity (percentage loss of conductivity [PLC]) in woody plants. Drought-induced PLC is often accompanied by physical damage to pit membranes, causing a shift in vulnerability curves (cavitation fatigue). Hence, if cavitated stems are flushed to remove embolisms, the next vulnerability curve is different (shifted to lower tensions). The 84K poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) clone has small vessels that should be immune from frost-induced PLC, but results demonstrated that freezing-thawing in combination with tension synergistically increased PLC. Frost fatigue has already been defined, which is similar to cavitation fatigue but induced by freezing. Frost fatigue caused a transition from a single to a dual Weibull curve, but drought-fatigued stems had single Weibull curves shifted to lower tensions. Studying the combined impact of tension plus freezing on fatigue provided evidence that the mechanism of frost fatigue may be the extra water tension induced by freezing or thawing while spinning stems in a centrifuge rather than direct ice damage. A hypothesis is advanced that tension is enhanced as ice crystals grow or melt during the freeze or thaw event, respectively, causing a nearly identical fatigue event to that induced by drought. PMID:25786827

  2. Experimental investigation of the effect of air velocity on a unit cooler under frosting condition: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, Ergin; Çağlayan, Akın; Konukman, Alp Er S.

    2017-10-01

    Finned tube evaporators are used in a wide range of applications such as commercial and industrial cold/freezed storage rooms with high traffic loading under frosting conditions. In this case study, an evaporator with an integrated fan was manufactured and tested under frosting conditions by only changing the air flow rate in an ambient balanced type test laboratory compared to testing in a wind tunnel with a more uniform flow distribution in order to detect the effect of air flow rate on frosting. During the test, operation was performed separately based on three different air flow rates. The parameters concerning test operation such as the changes of air temperature, air relative humidity, surface temperature, air-side pressure drop and refrigerant side capacity etc. were followed in detail for each air flow rate. At the same time, digital images were captured in front of the evaporator; thus, frost thicknesses and blockage ratios at the course of fan stall were determined by using an image-processing technique. Consequently, the test and visual results showed that the trendline of air-side pressure drop increased slowly at the first stage of test operations, then increased linearly up to a top point and then the linearity was disrupted instantly. This point speculated the beginning of defrost operation for each case. In addition, despite detecting a velocity that needs to be avoided, a test applied at minimum air velocity is superior to providing minimum capacity in terms of loss of capacity during test operations.

  3. Bacterial blight (Pseudomonas pisi Sackett) of peas in South Africa, with special reference to frost as a predisposing factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelema, B.H.

    1972-01-01

    In the beginning of the nineteen fifties bacterial blight caused much damage to pea crops in South Africa, particularly to those grown for seed production. A study has been made of the causal organism and the conditioning factors of the disease, special attention being paid to frost as a

  4. Numerical Simulation of Frost Heave in Soils around the Buried Oil Pipeline in Island Talik Permafrost Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaiguo Fu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A systematic method to obtain the freezing characteristics and the amounts of frost heave in the soils around a buried oil pipeline in island talik permafrost region is presented on the basis of the simulation of soil temperature fields and a classic segregated potential frost heave model. The finite thermal effect domain and the equivalent heat capacity method were adopted to analyze the heat transfer process with phase change. The calculation parameters were derived from the China-Russia Crude Oil Pipeline engineering. The developments of the annual maximum freezing circles and frost penetrations emerging in typical years within the pipeline operation life cycle under different oil temperature, different thickness of thermal insulation layer, and different water content of soils were investigated. The maximum frost heaves in four typical sections of island talik were predicted. The results can be used to further mechanical calculation and can provide references for risk evaluation and site management of the buried pipelines in island talik permafrost regions.

  5. Influence of Salt Stress on Growth and Frost Resistance of Three Winter Cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszak-Slamani, Renata; Brzóstowicz, Aleksander

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents results of a study on the influence of 0-150 mmol NaCl dm-3 Hoagland solution on growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthesis and frost resistance of seedlings of three winter cereals: wheat - cv. Almari, rye - cv. Amilo, and triticale - cv. Tornado. Sodium chloride at 25 mmol dm-3 caused better growth of wheat shoots and roots, both of fresh and dry matter. Higher concentrations of NaCl in the medium decreased the biomass of the tested seedlings. The influence of NaCl on the chlorophyll content in the seedlings varied. The conductometry method showed that the resistance of the cell walls of wheat and rye to low temperature decreased in the presence of NaCl in the growth medium. Luminescence has shown that seedlings that grew in NaCl-containing medium indicated an impediment of electron flow at a lower temperature than the control plants.

  6. The role of the observed tropical convection in the generation of frost events in the southern cone of South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, G.V. [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Transferencia Tecnologica a la Produccion (CICYTTP/CONICET), Diamante (Argentina); Ambrizzi, T. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Atmosfericas; Ferraz, S.E. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria/CRSPE-INPE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2008-07-01

    Based on previous results obtained from observations and linear wave theory analysis, the hypothesis that large-scale patterns can generate extreme cold events in southeast South America through the propagation of remotely excited Rossby waves was already suggested. This work will confirm these findings and extend their analysis through a series of numerical experiments using a primitive equation model where waves are excited by a thermal forcing situated in positions chosen according to observed convection anomalies over the equatorial region. The basic state used for these experiments is a composite of austral winters with maximum and minimum frequency of occurrence of generalized frosts that can affect a large area known as the Wet Pampas located in the central and eastern part of Argentina. The results suggest that stationary Rossby waves may be one important mechanism linking anomalous tropical convection with the extreme cold events in the Wet Pampas. The combination of tropical convection and a specific basic state can generate the right environment to guide the Rossby waves trigged by the tropical forcing towards South America. Depending on the phase of the waves entering the South American continent, they can favour the advection of anomalous wind at low levels from the south carrying cold and dry air over the whole southern extreme of the continent, producing a generalized frost in the Wet Pampa region. On the other hand, when a basic state based on the composites of minimum frosts is used, an anomalous anticyclone over the southern part of the continent generates a circulation with a south-southeast wind which brings maritime air and therefore humidity over the Wet Pampas region, creating negative temperature anomalies only over the northeastern part of the region. Under these conditions even if frosts occur they would not be generalized, as observed for the other basic state with maximum frequency of occurrence of generalized frosts. (orig.)

  7. Climatic significance of the bristlecone pine latewood frost-ring record at Almagre Mountain, Colorado, U.S.A.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunstein, F.C. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-02-01

    From 1900 to 1993, latewood frost rings occurred in 1903, 1912, 1941, 1961, and 1965 in 10 to 21% of the sampled bristlecone pines at Almagre Mountain, Colorado. In early to mid September in each of those years, a severe outbreak of unseasonably cold air from higher latitudes produced a memorable or historic late-summer snowstorm in the western United States. Record subfreezing temperatures during these snowstorms probably caused the latewood frost rings, shortened (by about 1 mo in 1912) already colder than normal growing seasons, and caused crop damage in parts of the Western United States. Latewood frost rings recorded in relatively high percentages of the sampled trees were probably caused by multiple severe outbreaks of unseasonably cold air from higher latitudes that occurred from early September to mid-September. Analyses of 1900-1992 temperature data for two widely separated Colorado stations, Fort Collins and Colorado Springs, show that average summer (June-September) temperatures during latewood frost-ring years in this century were 1.5 and 2.0{degrees}C cooler than normal, respectively. Mountain snowpack probably persisted through these cool summers and was subsequently buried by the earlier than normal snowfall in September. Latewood frost-ring, ring-width, historical, and other data suggest that severe to cataclysmic volcanic eruptions from 1812 to 1835 triggered (1) an extended period of climatic cooling from as early as 1816 or 1817 through the early 1850s in the Southern Rocky Mountains, (2) catastrophic winters in Colorado and Wyoming in 1842-43 and 1844 45, and in the Great Salt Lake Basin in 1836-37, that caused large-scale destruction of bison and other large plains animals, and (3) Little Ice Age alpine glacial advances in about 1850-60 in the western United States.

  8. Inter population variability of frost-resistance in provenances of scot pines (Pinusylvestris L.R. hamata Steven in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özel Halil Barış

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frost-resistance variability of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris L. var. hamata Steven seedlings grown in nurseries conditions, originated from 10 provenances, have been analyzed. The provenances from Black Sea region, Central Anatolian region and Eastern Anatolian region in Turkey have been used in selection of seed zones. The results of frost-resistance tests indicated a strong relationship of implemented freezing degrees with injury degrees of Scotch pine needles and photosynthetic productivities. On the other hand, another significant relationship has been determined between chlorophyll fluorescence and ion leakage methods (r=-0.801. This result shows that those two methods can be safely used in determining the damages due to low temperatures. In frost resistance tests, Scotch pine seedlings from different provenances have been frozen at -10, -20, -30 and -40°C. According to the Duncan test results, it has been determined that damage increased as temperature decreased. The damage level at -10°C implementation is 3.5% which can be tolerated by plants. But when the temperature has been decreased to -20°C, the level of damage has increased to 51.25%. As a result of photosynthetic analyses in this phase, it has been determined that there is a statistically significant relationship between provenances and temperature levels. Under the light of those findings, they have determined that the photosynthetic productivity has significantly decreased at temperatures between -20°C and -40°C. This situation conforms to injury index values determined in this study. As a result of injury index and photosynthetic productivity tests used for determining the damage after frost-resistance tests, it has been determined that the provenances of Amasya-Kunduz, Bolu-Aladağ, Düzce-Yığılca, Samsun-Vezirköprü and Eskişehir-Çatacık are more sensitive to frost than other provenances.

  9. Investigation the Frost Resistance of Vegetative and Reproductive Buds of Pear Cultivars in Mashhad Climate Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shadan khorshidi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most deciduous trees need low temperature to break flower bud dormancy. One of the most important abiotic stresses is low temperature which limits production of temperate fruits. Pear production has been considerably reduced in recent years. Important pear cultivars show different levels of resistance to cold. Cold compatibility followed by resistance increase is controlled genetically and contains several mechanisms which lead to production of different metabolites such as: polypeptides, amino acids and sugars. The object of this research was to evaluate the frost resistance of different ‘Dare Gazi’ genotypes and other pear cultivars in Mashhad climate condition. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted to investigate the frost resistance of 23 ‘Dare Gazi’ pear genotypes and nine other cultivars include: ‘William’s’, ‘Bell de june’, ‘Spadona’, ‘Koshia’, ‘Domkaj’, ‘Torsh’, ‘Sebri’ and ‘Tabrizi’. Plant material contained vegetative and reproductive buds of one-year-old shoot samples which were collected from 25-year old trees on March 2014, four days after winter cold (-6.6 °C in three directions of trees and sent to the laboratory. Frost damages of vegetative and reproductive buds were investigated based on visual observations (%, electrolyte leakage (EC and proline content. EC was measured with a Metrohm 644 digital conductivity meter and proline content was measured based on Bates et al. (1973 method, using acid ninhydrin. The experiment was performed on completely randomized experimental design with three replications. Statistical analysis was carried out using MSTAT-C and Excel software. Mean values were compared using the least significance difference test (LSD at 1% levels. Cluster analysis was conducted by SPSS 16 program. Results and Discussion: Highest EC of reproductive buds was observed in ‘Dare Gazi’ 10, 19, ‘Tabrizi’ and ‘Torsh’ whereas ‘Dare Gazi’ 8, 18

  10. Genetic susceptibility to environmental toxicants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The toxicological challenges to the chemical industry have in recent years been greatly affected by the rapid innovation and development of analytical, molecular and genetic technologies. ECETOC recognises the importance of developing the technical and intellectual skill bases in academia...... and industrial based laboratories to meet the rapid development of the science base of toxicology. As the technology to determine genetic susceptibility develops, so scientist will be able to describe altered gene expression provoked by chemicals long before they are able to offer valid interpretations...... of their meaning. A potential for inadvertently raising concerns over the effect of chemicals in experimental animals or man, or even the intentional misrepresentation of results to suggest chemicals are “playing” with our genes is enormous. History has shown that some individuals and groups in society are willing...

  11. (abstract) A Polarimetric Model for Effects of Brine Infiltrated Snow Cover and Frost Flowers on Sea Ice Backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    A polarimetric scattering model is developed to study effects of snow cover and frost flowers with brine infiltration on thin sea ice. Leads containing thin sea ice in the Artic icepack are important to heat exchange with the atmosphere and salt flux into the upper ocean. Surface characteristics of thin sea ice in leads are dominated by the formation of frost flowers with high salinity. In many cases, the thin sea ice layer is covered by snow, which wicks up brine from sea ice due to capillary force. Snow and frost flowers have a significant impact on polarimetric signatures of thin ice, which needs to be studied for accessing the retrieval of geophysical parameters such as ice thickness. Frost flowers or snow layer is modeled with a heterogeneous mixture consisting of randomly oriented ellipsoids and brine infiltration in an air background. Ice crystals are characterized with three different axial lengths to depict the nonspherical shape. Under the covering multispecies medium, the columinar sea-ice layer is an inhomogeneous anisotropic medium composed of ellipsoidal brine inclusions preferentially oriented in the vertical direction in an ice background. The underlying medium is homogeneous sea water. This configuration is described with layered inhomogeneous media containing multiple species of scatterers. The species are allowed to have different size, shape, and permittivity. The strong permittivity fluctuation theory is extended to account for the multispecies in the derivation of effective permittivities with distributions of scatterer orientations characterized by Eulerian rotation angles. Polarimetric backscattering coefficients are obtained consistently with the same physical description used in the effective permittivity calculation. The mulitspecies model allows the inclusion of high-permittivity species to study effects of brine infiltrated snow cover and frost flowers on thin ice. The results suggest that the frost cover with a rough interface

  12. Susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeck, Marcus Matheus Johannes

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the author studied the diagnostic procedures for susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH), with special emphasis upon refining the biological diagnostic test and improving protocols and guidelines for investigation of MH susceptibility. MH is a pharmacogenetic disease of skeletal

  13. Frost Resistance and Permeability of Cement Stabilized Gravel used as Filling Material for Pearl-Chain Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2014-01-01

    The Pearl-Chain Bridge Technology introduces a new innovative arch bridge solution which com-bines the statical advantages of an arch bridge with a minimum of traffic disturbance. The arch-shaped substructure is stabilized by a filling material, e.g. cement stabilized gravel, which should meet...... several requirements on its moisture properties. In this paper the frost resistance, the liquid water permeability and the water vapour permeability of cement stabilized gravel are examined for two different cement contents. It is found that a small increase in cement content from 4% to 5% increases...... the 28-days compressive strength from 6.2 MPa to 12.3 MPa. The frost resistance of cement stabilized gravel with 5% cement content is better than for cement stabilized gravel with 4% cement content. The liquid water permeability coefficient and the water vapour permeability coefficient are significantly...

  14. Frost damage of bricks composing a railway tunnel monument in Central Japan: field monitoring and laboratory simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Thomachot

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bricks of tunnels and bridges of Usui Pass railway (Japan exposed to north are subject to frost damage. Average depth of erosion due to detachment of angular blocks is around 1-1.5 cm. In order to assess this weathering and to understand its mechanism, an experimental study was carried out in the field and laboratory. Field monitoring showed the combination of seasonal and diurnal freezing with a maximum of heave when the freezing front reached 5 cm depth. Bricks taken from the site were submitted to unidirectional freezing at capillary and vacuum saturation in the laboratory. Results showed that frost damage of bricks was favoured by high saturation level and repetition of freeze-thaw cycles.

  15. Influence of frost damage and sample preconditioning on the porosity characterization of cement based materials using low temperature calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Fridh, Katja; Johannesson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature calorimetry (LTC) can be used to study the meso-porosity of cement based materials. The influence of frost damage on the meso-porosity determination by LTC was explored on a model material MCM-41 and two cement pastes by conducting repeated cycles of freezing and melting...... the preconditioning has limited influence on the freezing and melting behavior of the pore solution in the studied cement paste samples....... measurements. The results indicate that the pressure generated during freezing and melting measurements has little impact on the pore structure of the powder MCM-41 samples. As for the studied cylinder samples of cement pastes, frost damage probably took place and it changed the pore connectivity while it had...

  16. Frost stress evolution and winter pea ideotype in the context of climate warming at a regional scale

    OpenAIRE

    Castel Thierry; Lecomte Christophe; Richard Yves; Lejeune-Hénaut Isabelle; Larmure Annabelle

    2017-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important crop in temperate regions for its high seed protein concentration that is particularly sensitive to abiotic stresses. The abrupt temperature increase known as the “1987/1988 temperature regime shift” that occurs over Europe is questioning how winter pea will perform in the changing climate. This study assessed the winter frost damage evolution along from 1961 to 2015 in Burgundy-Franche-Comté by using: (1) daily observed and gridded regional temperature ...

  17. Digital Image Sensor-Based Assessment of the Status of Oat (Avena sativa L.) Crops after Frost Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Isidro Villegas-Romero; Matilde Santos; Antonia Macedo-Cruz; Gonzalo Pajares

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to classify the land covered with oat crops, and the quantification of frost damage on oats, while plants are still in the flowering stage. The images are taken by a digital colour camera CCD-based sensor. Unsupervised classification methods are applied because the plants present different spectral signatures, depending on two main factors: illumination and the affected state. The colour space used in this application is CIELab, based on the decomposition of the colou...

  18. Local adaptations to frost in marginal and central populations of the dominant forest tree Fagus sylvatica L. as affected by temperature and extreme drought in common garden experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyling, Juergen; Buhk, Constanze; Backhaus, Sabrina; Hallinger, Martin; Huber, Gerhard; Huber, Lukas; Jentsch, Anke; Konnert, Monika; Thiel, Daniel; Wilmking, Martin; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Local adaptations to environmental conditions are of high ecological importance as they determine distribution ranges and likely affect species responses to climate change. Increased environmental stress (warming, extreme drought) due to climate change in combination with decreased genetic mixing due to isolation may lead to stronger local adaptations of geographically marginal than central populations. We experimentally observed local adaptations of three marginal and four central populations of Fagus sylvaticaL., the dominant native forest tree, to frost over winter and in spring (late frost). We determined frost hardiness of buds and roots by the relative electrolyte leakage in two common garden experiments. The experiment at the cold site included a continuous warming treatment; the experiment at the warm site included a preceding summer drought manipulation. In both experiments, we found evidence for local adaptation to frost, with stronger signs of local adaptation in marginal populations. Winter frost killed many of the potted individuals at the cold site, with higher survival in the warming treatment and in those populations originating from colder environments. However, we found no difference in winter frost tolerance of buds among populations, implying that bud survival was not the main cue for mortality. Bud late frost tolerance in April differed between populations at the warm site, mainly because of phenological differences in bud break. Increased spring frost tolerance of plants which had experienced drought stress in the preceding summer could also be explained by shifts in phenology. Stronger local adaptations to climate in geographically marginal than central populations imply the potential for adaptation to climate at range edges. In times of climate change, however, it needs to be tested whether locally adapted populations at range margins can successfully adapt further to changing conditions. PMID:25035801

  19. The impact of climate change on the characteristics of the frost-free season over the contiguous USA as projected by the NARCCAP model ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiyuan Zhong; Lejiang Yu; Julie A. Winkler; Ying Tang; Warren E. Heilman; Xiandi. Bian

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the impacts of climate change on frost-free seasons is key to designing effective adaptation strategies for ecosystem management and agricultural production. This study examines the potential changes in the frost-free season length between historical (1971−2000) and future (2041−2070) periods over the contiguous USA with a focus on spatial variability and...

  20. Accuracy of tropospheric and stratospheric water vapor measurements by the cryogenic frost point hygrometer: Instrumental details and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    VöMel, H.; David, D. E.; Smith, K.

    2007-04-01

    The cryogenic frost point hygrometer (CFH), currently built at the University of Colorado, is a new balloon borne hygrometer, which is capable of continuously measuring water vapor between the surface and the middle stratosphere. The design is loosely based on the old NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer, with improved accuracy and a number of significant new features that overcome some limitations of the older instrument. The measurement uncertainty of the new instrument depends on altitude and ranges between less than 4% in the tropical lower troposphere to no more than 10% in the middle stratosphere at 28 km. In the tropopause region the uncertainty is less than 9%. This instrument is used routinely at several sites for validation of satellite measurements and process studies in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region. It has proved to be particularly well suited for dehydration observations in the tropical upper troposphere, because the effects of cloud contamination have been significantly reduced. Results of this instrument are compared with the old NOAA/CMDL hygrometer, the Russian Fluorescent Lyman Alpha Stratospheric Hygrometer, the Vaisala RS92, the AURA/MLS satellite instrument, a cloud lidar, the NOAA/CSD frost point hygrometer and the Harvard Lyman-alpha hygrometer, both of the later instruments flown on board the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft. These comparisons demonstrate the level of accuracy of tropospheric and stratospheric water vapor measurements made by this instrument and point to areas where more research and development are needed.

  1. Side-effects of formulations of permethrin and fenvalerate insecticides on frost resistance and field performance of Picea abies seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohmann, Ketil [Norwegian Forest Research Inst., Aas (Norway)

    1999-10-01

    Side-effects of the permethrin formulations Gori 920 and Gori 920 L, the fenvalerate formulation Sumicidin 10 FW and the emulsifier of the Gori formulations were studied in seedlings of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.]. Whole plant treatment with the Gori formulations in early autumn resulted in a 5-10 deg C poorer frost tolerance (TDI) later in the autumn. Moreover, this treatment increased mortality by 30% within 2 yrs of testing in field trials. In contrast, a basal part treatment with the Gori formulations and whole plant treatment with Sumicidin 10 FW containing 10% fenvalerate had no negative effects during 2 yrs of field testing. Late autumn treatment with Gori 920 and Gori 920 L, followed by cold storage for 6 months, revealed poorer frost tolerance (3-4 deg C) in the spring than that in the control. These treatments also reduced leader shoot growth in the first year and increased the frequency of seedlings lacking a dominant leader after 2 yrs by 20-40%. The detrimental agent in Gori 920 L was found to be the emulsifier, ethoxylated nonylphenol, alone and in combination with the dispersal agent, linseed oil. The linseed oil had no significant additional negative effect on frost resistance and growth after the cold storage during the winter. The investigation demonstrates the necessity of testing for possible side-effects before practical use of any commercial pesticide formulation 12 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Significance of frost action and surface soil characteristics to wind erosion at Rocky Flats, Colorado. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, N.

    1978-09-01

    This study of the potential links between soil freezing and wind erosion was conducted at Rocky Flats during 4 winters. Most of the study has involved the conditions leading to the growth of segregation ice in the surface soil and the ground heave which that produces. This occurs about 15 times in the average winter at Rocky Flats, always on a diurnal cycle. Such frost action is preferentially distributed in time and space and cannot be estimated from air temperatures alone. November and March are the months of most frequent frost heave, and then only in the days following precipitation or snowmelt. The most marked frost effects are found on exposed interfluve and hillcrest situations, where there are patches of bare soil. Almost no effects are found on the valley floors. Soil disturbance by segregation ice leads to a marked decrease in soil bulk density, and presumably in soil strength though this change has not been quantitatively defined. However, this does not lead to wind erosion of the soil at the study site because that surface is more influenced by the vegetation cover than by the soil characteristics.

  3. Penetration of chlorides in hardened concrete during frost salt scaling cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moral N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sixty samples from three concrete mixes (same components were prepared and subjected to frost salt scaling cycles. A set of 20 samples from the same mix was tested according to the French standard XP P18-420. Another set was exposed to different chloride concentrations. Different numbers of freeze/thaw cycles were applied to the last set. The mass of scaled-off particles follows a lognormal distribution. Despite high standard deviation, this scaling test enables to separate high resistant from very low resistant concrete. A combined analysis reveals that the scaling and the chloride penetration front are independent from a phenomenological point of view and that the chloride concentration on the exposed surface directly influences the amount of scaled mass according to the typical pessimum effect. These results raise two main questions: is the amount of chloride on the surface solution a direct or indirect parameter and what happens to this pessimum effect if we take into account the scaling test dispersion?

  4. Psychometric proprieties of the portuguese version of the frost multidimensional perfectionism scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Estêvão Coreia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfectionism is defined as the desire to achieve the highest standards of performance, in combination with unduly critical evaluations of one’s performance. This study was designed to analyse the psychometric proprieties of the Portuguese version of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale through confirmatory factor analysis in two different samples (calibration with 350 adolescent athletes and validation with 206 adolescent athletes. The confirmatory factor analysis suggested that after dropping items with low factor loadings, the six-factor model showed good fit (χ 2 = 292.83, B-S p < 0.001; χ 2/d f = 1.693, PCFI = 0.79, PGFI = 0.70, CFI = 0.96, GFI = 0.93, RMSEA = 0.045. All constructs presented good internal consistency, convergent and discriminant validity. A multi-group analysis exposed the cross validity of the model. The correlations between perfectionism, fear of failure and sport anxiety measures revealed evidence of its concurrent validity, providing evidence for the proposed model. Overall, the results of the present study provided evidence for these instruments’ validity and reliability, however further investigations are required.

  5. Ground-Penetrating Radar Evaluation of Moisture and Frost across Typical Saskatchewan Road Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis Berthelot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of soil type, moisture content, and the presence of frost on road substructure permittivity. Permittivity sensitivity of typical road soils was characterized in the laboratory to provide baseline dielectric constant values which were compared to field ground penetrating radar (GPR survey results. Both laboratory devices, the complex dielectric network analyzer and the Adek Percometer, as well as the field GPR system were used in this study to measure the dielectric constant of soils. All three systems differentiated between coarse-grained and fine grained soils. In addition, at temperatures below freezing, all three systems identified an increase in water content in soils; however, when frozen, the sensitivity of dielectric constant across soil type and moisture content was significantly reduced. Based on the findings of this study, GPR technology has the ability to characterize in situ substructure soil type and moisture content of typical Saskatchewan road substructure soils. Given the influence of road soil type and moisture content on in-service road performance, this ability could provide road engineers with accurate estimates of in situ structural condition of road structures for preservation and rehabilitation planning and optimization purposes.

  6. A preliminary synoptic assessment of soil frost on Marion Island and the possible consequences of climate change in a maritime sub-Antarctic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Nel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Located in the sub-Antarctic, Marion Island (46° 54′ S, 37° 45′ E has a distinct periglacial environment that is sensitive to climate change. Diurnal soil frost is the most important geomorphic process occurring on the island and this paper aims to understand the synoptic weather circulation pattern associated with summer soil frost occurrence in a sub-Antarctic environment. Preliminary results from automated microclimate measurements in the interior of Marion Island show that summer soil frost is dependent on Antarctic air mass circulation. This occurs exclusively during post-cyclonic airflow after the passage of a cold front connected to a mid-latitudinal cyclone and subsequent ridging in of the South Atlantic Anticyclone behind the cold front, or when a series of low pressure systems passes over the island. The duration and intensity of soil frost cycles are dependent on the duration of post-cyclonic Antarctic air mass circulation. Summer soil frost on Marion Island is driven by a complex interaction between the latitudinal position of the passing cyclone, the latitudinal position of the ridging anticyclone as well as the trajectory of the air mass circulation. The data suggest that predicted trends in synoptic climate change in the sub-Antarctic may lead to non-linear responses in soil frost dynamics.

  7. Atmospheric circulation associated with extreme generalized frosts persistence in central-southern South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Gabriela V. [Centro de Investigaciones Cientificas y Transferencia de Tecnologia a la Produccion, Diamante (CICYTTTP-CONICET), Diamante, Entre Rios (Argentina); Berri, Guillermo J. [Servicio Meteorologico Nacional - CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-03-15

    Generalized frosts (GF) in central-southern South America have a strong impact due to their spatial extension, and they are especially important when they become persistent. This paper aims at identifying the atmospheric circulation features that determine the extreme GF persistence, i.e. very persistent and without persistence, and the differences between them, during the 1961-1990 winters. Since the GF without persistence group outnumbers the other one, two subgroups are composed with events selected from winters with maximum and minimum frequency of GF occurrence, respectively. Additionally, the individual event of July 1988 within the very persistent GF group is analyzed due to its exceptional persistence. GF persistence is mainly conditioned by two large-scale dynamic factors. One is the Rossby wave train propagation across the Pacific Ocean, and the other one is the location with respect to the continent and the magnitude of the confluence in the jet entrance region in subtropical latitudes. A predominantly meridional Rossby wave train propagation with a confluence region to the west of the continent prior to the event favors GF with intermediate (null) persistence depending on the greater (lesser) jet acceleration. This is conditioned by the magnitude of the confluence, which, in turn, depends on the disposition of the wave train propagation pattern. Instead, an essentially zonal propagation with a confluence region to the east of the continent favors the GF persistence for several days, yet if there is no confluence the event does not persist. The greatest persistence of an event combines the confluence/diffluence of the jet entrance/exit region, which depends on the disposition with respect to the continent of the zonally propagating Rossby wave trains. (orig.)

  8. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder stratospheric water vapor measurements by the NOAA frost point hygrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Dale F; Lambert, Alyn; Read, William G; Davis, Sean M; Rosenlof, Karen H; Hall, Emrys G; Jordan, Allen F; Oltmans, Samuel J

    2014-02-16

    Differences between stratospheric water vapor measurements by NOAA frost point hygrometers (FPHs) and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are evaluated for the period August 2004 through December 2012 at Boulder, Colorado, Hilo, Hawaii, and Lauder, New Zealand. Two groups of MLS profiles coincident with the FPH soundings at each site are identified using unique sets of spatiotemporal criteria. Before evaluating the differences between coincident FPH and MLS profiles, each FPH profile is convolved with the MLS averaging kernels for eight pressure levels from 100 to 26 hPa (~16 to 25 km) to reduce its vertical resolution to that of the MLS water vapor retrievals. The mean FPH - MLS differences at every pressure level (100 to 26 hPa) are well within the combined measurement uncertainties of the two instruments. However, the mean differences at 100 and 83 hPa are statistically significant and negative, ranging from -0.46 ± 0.22 ppmv (-10.3 ± 4.8%) to -0.10 ± 0.05 ppmv (-2.2 ± 1.2%). Mean differences at the six pressure levels from 68 to 26 hPa are on average 0.8% (0.04 ppmv), and only a few are statistically significant. The FPH - MLS differences at each site are examined for temporal trends using weighted linear regression analyses. The vast majority of trends determined here are not statistically significant, and most are smaller than the minimum trends detectable in this analysis. Except at 100 and 83 hPa, the average agreement between MLS retrievals and FPH measurements of stratospheric water vapor is better than 1%.

  9. Analysis of likely Frost Events and day-to-night Variability in near-surface Water Vapor at Gale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G.; Fischer, E.; Renno, N. O.; Sebastian, E.; Kemppinen, O.; Bridges, N.; Borlina, C.; Meslin, P. Y.; Genzer, M.; Harri, A. M.; Vicente-Retortillo, A.; de la Torre-Juárez, M.; Ramos, M.; Gomez, F.; Gomez-Elvira, J.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze REMS simultaneous measurements of relative humidity and ground temperature with the highest confidence to identify frost events at Gale crater during the first 1000 sols of the MSL mission. The relative humidity sensor has recently been recalibrated (June 2015), providing relative humidity values slightly lower than those in the previous release (Dec 2014). Here we only use relative humidity data obtained with the latest recalibration parameters. We find that the most likely frost events occurred at four different locations: Dingo Gap during sols 529-535, an unnamed place during sols 554-560, Kimberley during sols 609-617, and an unnamed place during sols 673-676. At these four locations, the terrain features thermal inertia of ~200 SI units, a value much lower than that of 365 ± 50 SI units obtained from satellite measurements at the landing ellipse. We estimate a maximum thickness of the frost layer likely developed at these four locations of the order of tenths of μm, with the precipitable water content (PWC) showing values of a few pr-μm. Since water vapor pressure values derived from REMS measurements present high uncertainties during the daytime, the day-to-night variability in the near-surface water content at Gale cannot be analyzed using only REMS products. By comparing the nighttime PWC values obtained from REMS with the daytime PWC values obtained from satellite, we estimate a day-to-night ratio of the near-surface water vapor pressure at Gale of about 5.

  10. Agricultural losses related to frost events: use of the 850 hPa level temperature as an explanatory variable of the damage cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannaki, K.; Lagouvardos, K.; Kotroni, V.; Papagiannakis, G.

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study is the analysis of damaging frost events in agriculture, by examining the relationship between the daily minimum temperature in the lower atmosphere (at an isobaric level of 850 hPa) and crop production losses. Furthermore, the study suggests a methodological approach for estimating agriculture risk due to frost events, with the aim of estimating the short-term probability and magnitude of frost-related financial losses for different levels of 850 hPa temperature. Compared with near-surface temperature forecasts, temperature forecasts at the level of 850 hPa are less influenced by varying weather conditions or by local topographical features; thus, they constitute a more consistent indicator of the forthcoming weather conditions. The analysis of the daily monetary compensations for insured crop losses caused by weather events in Greece shows that, during the period 1999-2011, frost caused more damage to crop production than any other meteorological phenomenon. Two regions of different geographical latitudes are examined further, to account for the differences in the temperature ranges developed within their ecological environment. Using a series of linear and logistic regressions, we found that minimum temperature (at an 850 hPa level), grouped into three categories according to its magnitude, and seasonality, are significant variables when trying to explain crop damage costs, as well as to predict and quantify the likelihood and magnitude of damaging frost events.

  11. Dehydration and osmotic adjustment in apple stem tissue during winter as it relates to the frost resistance of buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramsohler, Manuel; Neuner, Gilbert

    2013-08-01

    In deciduous trees, measurement of stem water potential can be difficult during the leafless period in winter. By using thermocouple psychrometry, osmotic water potentials (Ψo; actual Ψo: Ψo(act); Ψo at full saturation: Ψo(sat)) of expressed sap of bark and bud tissue were measured in order to test if the severity of winter desiccation in apple stems could be sufficiently assessed with Ψo. Water potentials were related to frost resistance and freezing behaviour of buds. The determination of Ψo reliably allowed winter desiccation and osmotic adjustments in apple stem tissue to be assessed. In winter in bark tissue, a pronounced decrease in Ψo(act) and Ψo(sat) was found. Decreased Ψo(sat) indicates active osmotic adjustment in the bark as observed earlier in the leaves of evergreen woody plants. In terminal bud meristems, no significant osmotic adjustments occurred and dehydration during winter was much less. Osmotic water potentials, Ψo(act) and Ψo(sat), of bud tissue were always less negative than in the bark. To prevent water movement and dehydration of the bud tissue via this osmotic gradient, it must be compensated for either by a sufficiently high turgor pressure (Ψp) in bark tissue or by the isolation of the bud tissue from the bark during midwinter. During freezing of apple buds, freeze dehydration and extra-organ freezing could be demonstrated by significantly reduced Ψo(act) values of bud meristems that had been excised in the frozen state. Infrared video thermography was used to monitor freezing patterns in apple twigs. During extracellular freezing of intact and longitudinally dissected stems, infrared differential thermal analysis (IDTA) images showed that the bud meristem remains ice free. Even if cooled to temperatures below the frost-killing temperature, no freezing event could be detected in bud meristems during winter. In contrast, after bud break, terminal buds showed a second freezing at the frost-killing temperature that indicates

  12. Effect of Louver Angle on Performance of Heat Exchanger With Serpentine Fins and Flat Tubes in Periodic Frosting

    OpenAIRE

    Hrnjak, Predrag S.; Zhang, Ping; Rennels, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the air-side pressure drop and overall heat transfer coefficient characteristics for serpentine-louvered-fin, microchannel heat exchanger in periodic frosting. It focuses on quantification of the effects of louver angle on heat transfer and pressure drop and on defrost and refrost times. Nine heat exchangers differing in louver angle and fin pitch (i.e. louver angle 15º to 39º and fin pitch 15 to 18 fpi) are studied. The face velocit...

  13. Change of AOX1a Expression, Encoding Mitochondrial Alternative Oxidase, Influence on the Frost-Resistance of Arabidopsis Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga I. Grabelnych

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh (Columbia ecotype plants: Col-0 line (wild type, AS-12 line (plants transformed with the construct carrying the AOX1a gene under control of the CAMV 35S promoter in the antisense orientation and line XX-2 (plants transformed with the AOX1a gene construct in the sense orientation (Umbach et al., 2005, to action of subzero temperature has been studied. It is shown that change of the AOX1a expression is accompanied by change of the AOX contribution in respiration and increase of the base frost-resistance of Arabidopsis plants. In the leaves of plants with overexpression of АОХ1а was reduced activity of total superoxide dismutase (SOD, but was increased activity of guaiacol peroxidase and was less content of hydrogen peroxide. It was found that cold hardening during 7 days at 5°C increases the resistance of plants to the subsequent action of subzero temperature regardless of АОХ1а expression degree. The hardening lead to activation of respiration, increase of the contribution of AOX in the respiration, a significant increase of the water-soluble carbohydrates content and increase of the activity SOD and total guaiacol peroxidases in leaves of all lines the plants. In hardened plants of Arabidopsis wild type and AOX1a transformants were detected differences in the contents of individual types of reactive oxygen species and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. The trend to decrease of hydrogen peroxide content in lines with altered expression of AOX1a was observed, but content of superoxide anion radical (SAR was significantly lower in the AS-12 line compared with the Col-0 and XX-2 plants after hardening. The low content of SAR in leaves of AS-12 line was partly caused by increase of activity total SOD. Thus, we have identified differences in the basic frost-resistance of Arabidopsis plants with altered AOX1a expression, but significant differences in frost-resistance of hardened plants of

  14. The interplay between inner and outer frost damage and its implication for accelerated freeze-thaw testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2014-01-01

    In the present project salt frost scaling was registered during an accelerated freeze-thaw test (CEN/TS 12390-9). After the test, inner damage was evaluated by observing the crack patterns on fluorescence impregnated plane sections. The results indicate that the developments of inner and outer...... damage are linked processes. The link is related to the moisture transport in the concrete, as both inner cracking and scaling change if a moisture barrier is implemented parallel to the test surface, 25 mm below the test surface....

  15. A Comparative Study of the Short Term Cold Resistance Response in Distantly Related Drosophila Species: The Role of regucalcin and Frost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Micael; Vieira, Cristina P.; Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Aguiar, Bruno; Rocha, Hélder; Schlötterer, Christian; Vieira, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The molecular basis of short term cold resistance (indexed as chill-coma recovery time) has been mostly addressed in D. melanogaster, where candidate genes (Dca (also known as smp-30) and Frost (Fst)) have been identified. Nevertheless, in Drosophila, the ability to tolerate short term exposure to low temperatures evolved several times independently. Therefore, it is unclear whether variation in the same candidate genes is also responsible for short term cold resistance in distantly related Drosophila species. It should be noted that Dca is a candidate gene for cold resistance in the Sophophora subgenus only, since there is no orthologous gene copy in the Drosophila subgenus. Here we show that, in D. americana (Drosophila subgenus), there is a north-south gradient for a variant at the 5′ non-coding region of regucalcin (a Dca-like gene; in D. melanogaster the proteins encoded by the two genes share 71.9% amino acid identities) but in our D. americana F2 association experiment there is no association between this polymorphism and chill-coma recovery times. Moreover, we found no convincing evidence that this gene is up-regulated after cold shock in both D. americana and D. melanogaster. Size variation in the Fst PEST domain (putatively involved in rapid protein degradation) is observed when comparing distantly related Drosophila species, and is associated with short term cold resistance differences in D. americana. Nevertheless, this effect is likely through body size variation. Moreover, we show that, even at two hours after cold shock, when up-regulation of this gene is maximal in D. melanogaster (about 48 fold expression change), in D. americana this gene is only moderately up-regulated (about 3 fold expression change). Our work thus shows that there are important differences regarding the molecular basis of cold resistance in distantly related Drosophila species. PMID:21991316

  16. Identification and frequency of atmospheric circulation patterns causing spring frost in the northern French vineyards using the objective version of the Hess-Brezowsky classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quénol, H.; Planchon, O.; Wahl, L.

    2009-04-01

    The possible impacts of climate change at small spatial scales are still very little known. The knowledge of the climate risks at small scales is yet essential for agricultural activities and productions like vine growing, because of their serious economic impacts. Because of their relatively high latitude, the vineyards of the northern Half of France are subjected to spring frost, which can cause serious damages e.g. in the Champagne area on April the 8th, 2003. A detailed study of the variability and frequency of spring frost events in four vineyards (Loire Valley, Champagne, Burgundy and Alsace) was carried out within the framework of the RICLIM-CNRS 2663 multidisciplinary Research Group "Climate Risks" and was supported by the research program TERVICLIM (ANR-JC07-194103) and by the MAIF Foundation (program about air-mass circulation dynamics and climate risks). The northern Half of France is included in the Cfb type of climate (according to the Köppen's classification) of northwestern and central Europe. However, the combined effects of the latitude, the continentality and the topography involve varied regional climates. Among the four studied wine-producing areas, the Loire Valley area is the warmest, the Champagne area is the coolest in summer, and eastern Burgundy and especially Alsace are the most subjected to the continentality effect (highest annual temperature oscillation and highest rainfall amounts in summer). Therefore, these areas are not equally subjected to the frost risk. Spring is a key season for the vine growing and during frost-producing weather patterns, northern France is subjected to a high spatial variability of temperature at regional and local scales. During the period 1960-2007, the number of spring frost day events was three times as high in Colmar (Alsace) than in Saumur (Loire Valley). Among the four wine-producing areas, Alsace records the most hard and frequent frosts in early spring, while the Champagne area records the latest

  17. Genetic susceptibility of periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, M.L.; Crielaard, W.; Loos, B.G.

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we explore and summarize the peer-reviewed literature on putative genetic risk factors for susceptibility to aggressive and chronic periodontitis. A comprehensive literature search on the PubMed database was performed using the keywords ‘periodontitis’ or ‘periodontal

  18. Fourie susceptible.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    a number of cultivars exhibited field resistance to halo blight and bacterial brown spot, all cultivars were more or less susceptible to .... Cerillos. Alubia. I. 91. 57. Kranskop. Red speckled sugar. II. 97. 63. OPS-RS1. Red speckled sugar. II. 96. 63. OPS-RS2. Red speckled sugar. I. 100. 61. OPS-RS3. Red speckled sugar. II. 97.

  19. "The Great Cataract" Effects of Late Holocene Debris Flows on Lava Falls Rapid, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    taken by the original photographers: Bryan Brown, Kent Frost, Barry Goldwater, Don Harris, Les Jones, Martin Litton, Gretchen Luepke, Tad Nichols, P.T...1981; Schmidt, 1990; Schmidt and Graf, 1990; Schmidt and Rubin , 1995). The unregulated Colorado River periodically widened constricted rapids by...Canyon National Park, Arizona: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1493, 74 p. Schmidt, J.C., and Rubin , D.M., 1995, Regulated streamflow, fine

  20. Counselling framework for moderate-penetrance cancer-susceptibility mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Tung, Nadine; Domchek, Susan M.; Stadler, Zsofia; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Couch, Fergus; Garber, Judy E.; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    The use of multigene panels for the assessment of cancer susceptibility is expanding rapidly in clinical practice, particularly in the USA, despite concerns regarding the uncertain clinical validity for some gene variants and the uncertain clinical utility of most multigene panels. So-called ?moderate-penetrance? gene mutations associated with cancer susceptibility are identified in approximately 2?5% of individuals referred for clinical testing; some of these mutations are potentially action...

  1. Role of Changes in Cell Fatty Acids Composition in the Increasing of Frost Resistance of Winter Wheat Suspension Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Lyubushkina

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Influences of low temperatures (4 and 8 ° С on the frost tolerance and fatty acid compositions of cells in a winter wheat suspension culture have been studied. It has been found that treatment of the culture with 4 °C (7 days did not protect cells from subsequent freezing temperature action (-8 °С, 6 h and was not accompanied significant changes in the fatty acid composition. On the contrary, the treatment of the culture with the temperature 8 °C (7 days prevented the death caused by freezing temperature and the content of saturated fatty acids decreased: pentadecanoic acid (by 35,0%, palmitic acid (by 19,9% and stearic acid (by 65,4%, and the content of α-linolenic acid increased by 94%. That was the cause of the double bond index (DBI increase by 16%. The role of fatty acids composition changes in the process of increasing frost tolerance in plants are discussed.

  2. A model for predicting the thermal-hydraulic performance of louvered-fin, flat-tube heat exchangers under frosting conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Y.; Jacobi, A.M. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Correlations and a model are developed to predict the time-varying performance of folded-louvered-fin, microchannel heat exchangers. The model utilizes the correlations developed from the experimental data and incorporates a sub-model for frost properties. The model successfully predicts the heat transfer performance of the heat exchangers studied, but its ability to predict the pressure-drop behavior needs further improvement. The model can be used to evaluate geometry effects on the frosting behavior of the louvered-fin, microchannel heat exchangers, and can be easily generalized to other applications with simultaneous heat and mass transfer. (author)

  3. The influence of KJ, CuSO4, and Mg(ClO32 on defoliation and subsequent frost resistance and growth of apple trees in nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Basak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In most cases 2-year-old trees of 3 cultivars responded better to defoliants than 1-year-old ones. Spraying with defoliants on September 25 - 28 was more effective than spraying 10 days earlier. There was also more bark injury in the autumn, and more frost injury on trees defoliated on the ealier date. Mg(ClO32 seemed to be the best defoliant but markedly decreased the frost resistance of McIntosh trees. Defoliants investigated may be applied to limited extent to 2-year-old trees but not to 1-year-old ones.

  4. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  5. Effects of summer frost exposures on the cold tolerance strategy of a sub-Antarctic beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, J S.; Worland, M R.; Block, W

    2001-09-01

    was highest in larvae with SCPs of -2 to -3 degrees C on day one and which froze at this level on all 10 occasions. The results indicate that in larvae in which the SCP is lowered following sub-zero exposure, the depression of the SCP is greatest in individuals that do not actually freeze. Further, the data suggest that after successive frost exposures in early winter the larval population may become segregated into two sub-populations with different overwintering strategies. One group consists of larvae that freeze consistently in the temperature range from -1 to -3 degrees C and can survive multiple freeze-thaw cycles. A second group with lower initial SCPs (around -6 degrees C), or which fall to this level or lower (down to -12 degrees C) after freezing on one or more occasions, are less likely to freeze through extended supercooling, but more likely to die if freezing occurs.

  6. Greenhouse gas fluxes in a drained peatland forest during spring frost-thaw event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Pihlatie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluxes of greenhouse gases (GHG carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O were measured during a two month campaign at a drained peatland forest in Finland by the eddy covariance (EC technique (CO2 and N2O, and automatic and manual chambers (CO2, CH4 and N2O. In addition, GHG concentrations and soil parameters (mineral nitrogen, temperature, moisture content in the peat profile were measured. The aim of the measurement campaign was to quantify the GHG fluxes during freezing and thawing of the top-soil, a time period with potentially high GHG fluxes, and to compare different flux measurement methods. The forest was a net CO2 sink during the two months and the fluxes of CO2 dominated the GHG exchange. The peat soil was a small sink of atmospheric CH4 and a small source of N2O. Both CH4 oxidation and N2O production took place in the top-soil whereas CH4 was produced in the deeper layers of the peat, which were unfrozen throughout the measurement period. During the frost-thaw events of the litter layer distinct peaks in CO2 and N2O emissions were observed. The CO2 peak followed tightly the increase in soil temperature, whereas the N2O peak occurred with a delay after the thawing of the litter layer. CH4 fluxes did not respond to the thawing of the peat soil. The CO2 and N2O emission peaks were not captured by the manual chambers and hence we conclude that high time-resolution measurements with automatic chambers or EC are necessary to quantify fluxes during peak emission periods. Sub-canopy EC measurements and chamber-based fluxes of CO2 and N2O were comparable, although the fluxes of N2O measured by EC were close to the detection limit of the system. We conclude

  7. Real-Time Optical Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Klaus R.; Jørgensen, Erik; Droce, Aida; Olesen, Tom; Jensen, Bent B.; Rosenvinge, Flemming S.; Sondergaard, Teis E.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in high demand in health care fields as antimicrobial-resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here, we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope) which, based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time, introduces real-time detection of bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility with imaging material to support the automatically generated graphs. Automated antibiotic susceptibility tests of a monoculture showed statistically significant antibiotic effects within 6 min and within 30 min in complex samples from pigs suffering from catheter-associated urinary tract infections. The oCelloScope system provides a fast high-throughput screening method for detecting bacterial susceptibility that might entail an earlier diagnosis and introduction of appropriate targeted therapy and thus combat the threat from multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. The oCelloScope system can be employed for a broad range of applications within bacteriology and might present new vistas as a point-of-care instrument in clinical and veterinary settings. PMID:23596243

  8. Sequence Alignment to Predict Across Species Susceptibility ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation of a molecular target across species can be used as a line-of-evidence to predict the likelihood of chemical susceptibility. The web-based Sequence Alignment to Predict Across Species Susceptibility (SeqAPASS) tool was developed to simplify, streamline, and quantitatively assess protein sequence/structural similarity across taxonomic groups as a means to predict relative intrinsic susceptibility. The intent of the tool is to allow for evaluation of any potential protein target, so it is amenable to variable degrees of protein characterization, depending on available information about the chemical/protein interaction and the molecular target itself. To allow for flexibility in the analysis, a layered strategy was adopted for the tool. The first level of the SeqAPASS analysis compares primary amino acid sequences to a query sequence, calculating a metric for sequence similarity (including detection of candidate orthologs), the second level evaluates sequence similarity within selected domains (e.g., ligand-binding domain, DNA binding domain), and the third level of analysis compares individual amino acid residue positions identified as being of importance for protein conformation and/or ligand binding upon chemical perturbation. Each level of the SeqAPASS analysis provides increasing evidence to apply toward rapid, screening-level assessments of probable cross species susceptibility. Such analyses can support prioritization of chemicals for further ev

  9. Marijuana Usage and Hypnotic Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Louis R.; McDonald, Roy D.

    1973-01-01

    Anonymous self-reported drug usage data and hypnotic susceptibility scores were obtained from 282 college students. Frequent marijuana users (more than 10 times) showed greater susceptibility to hypnosis than nonusers. (Author)

  10. Susceptibility profiles of Nocardia isolates based on current taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaberg, Robert; Fisher, Mark A; Hanson, Kimberley E

    2014-01-01

    The genus Nocardia has undergone rapid taxonomic expansion in recent years, and an increasing number of species are recognized as human pathogens. Many established species have predictable antimicrobial susceptibility profiles, but sufficient information is often not available for recently described organisms. Additionally, the effectiveness of sulfonamides as first-line drugs for Nocardia has recently been questioned. This led us to review antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for a large number of molecularly identified clinical isolates. Susceptibility results were available for 1,299 isolates representing 39 different species or complexes, including 11 that were newly described, during a 6-year study period. All tested isolates were susceptible to linezolid. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) was rare (2%) except among Nocardia pseudobrasiliensis (31%) strains and strains of the N. transvalensis complex (19%). Imipenem susceptibility varied for N. cyriacigeorgica and N. farcinica, as did ceftriaxone susceptibility of the N. nova complex. Resistance to more than one of the most commonly used drugs (amikacin, ceftriaxone, TMP-SMX, and imipenem) was highest for N. pseudobrasiliensis (100%), N. transvalensis complex (83%), N. farcinica (68%), N. puris (57%), N. brasiliensis (51%), N. aobensis (50%), and N. amikacinitolerans (43%). Thus, while antimicrobial resistance can often be predicted, susceptibility testing should still be considered when combination therapy is warranted, for less well characterized species or those with variable susceptibility profiles, and for patients with TMP-SMX intolerance.

  11. Frost Grape Polysaccharide (FGP), an emulsion-forming arabinogalactan gum from the stems of native North American grape species Vitis riparia Michx

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new arabinogalactan is described that is produced in large quantity from the cut stems of the North American grape species Vitis riparia (Frost grape). The sugar composition consists of L-arabinofuranose (L-Araf, 55.2 %) and D-galactopyranose (D-Galp 30.1%), with smaller components of D-xylose (11...

  12. Short-term exposure to atmospheric ammonia does not affect frost hardening of needles from three- and five-year-old Scots pine trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clement, J.M A M; van Hasselt, P.R; van Eerden, L.J.M.; Dueck, T.A.

    The effect of atmospheric ammonia on frost hardening of needles from 3- and 5-year-old Scots pine trees was investigated. Trees were exposed to various concentrations of NH(3) during different hardening stages under laboratory conditions and in experiments with open-top chambers under a natural

  13. Estimation of Frost Resistance of the Tile Adhesive on a Cement Based with Application of Amorphous Aluminosilicates as a Modifying Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovna Loganina, Valentina; Vladimirovna Zhegera, Christina

    2017-10-01

    In the article given information on the possibility of using amorphous aluminosilicates as a modifying additive in the offered tile cement adhesive. In the article, the data on the preparation of an additive based on amorphous aluminosilicates, on its microstructure and chemical composition. Presented information on the change in the porosity of cement stone when introduced of amorphous aluminosilicates in the his composition. The formulation of a dry building mix on a cement base is proposed with use of an additive based on amorphous aluminosilicates as a modifying additive. Recipe of dry adhesive mixes include Portland cement M400, mineral aggregate in proportion fraction 0.63-0.315:0.315-0.14 respectively 80:20 (%) and filling density of 1538.2 kg/m3, a plasticizer Kratasol, redispersible powder Neolith P4400 and amorphous alumnosilicates. The developed formulation can be used as a tile adhesive for finishing walls of buildings and structure with tiles. Presented results of the evaluation of frost resistance of adhesives based on cement with using of amorphous aluminosilicates as a modifying additive. Installed the mark on the frost resistance of tile glue and frost resistance of the contact zone of adhesive. Established, that the adhesive layer based on developed formulation dry mixture is crack-resistant and frost-resistant for conditions city Penza and dry humidity zone – zone 3 and climatic subarea IIB (accordance with Building codes and regulations 23-01-99Ȋ) cities Russia’s.

  14. The Influence of the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO on Cold Waves and Occurrence of Frosts in the State of Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maikon Passos A. Alves

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the relationship between the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO, cold waves and occurrence of frosts in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, during the winter quarter. Research on this topic can assist different spheres of society, such as public health and agriculture, since cold waves can influence and/or aggravate health problems and frosts can inflict economic losses especially in the agricultural sector. For the purpose of this paper, cold wave is considered as the event in which the daily average surface air temperature was at least two standard deviations below the average value of the series on the day and for two consecutive days or more. The data on the average air temperature and frost occurrences are provided by the Company of Agricultural Research and Rural Extension of Santa Catarina/Center for Environmental Information and Hydrometeorology (EPAGRI/CIRAM. The AAO was subjected to statistical analysis using significance tests for the averages (Student’s t-test and variances (F-test with a significance level of α = 5%. The results show that cold waves are unevenly distributed in the agroecological zones of Santa Catarina. It is found that the AAO is associated with the occurrence of frosts (in the agroecological zones represented by the municipalities of Itajaí and São José in the state of Santa Catarina.

  15. Water frost and ice - The near-infrared spectral reflectance 0.65-2.5 microns. [observed on natural satellites and other solar system objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of water frost and frost on ice as a function of temperature and grain size is presented with 1-1/2% spectral resolution in the 0.65- to 2.5-micron wavelength region. The well-known 2.0-, 1.65-, and 1.5-micron solid water absorption bands are precisely defined along with the little studied 1.25-micron band and the previously unidentified (in reflectance) 1.04-, 0.90-, and 0.81-micron absorption bands. The 1.5-microns band complex is quantitatively analyzed using a nonlinear least squares algorithm to resolve the band into four Gaussian components as a function of grain size and temperature. It is found that the 1.65-micron component, which was thought to be a good temperature sensor, is highly grain-size dependent and poorly suited to temperature sensing. Another Gaussian component appears to show a dependence of width on grain size while being independent of temperature. The relative apparent band depths are different for frost layers on ice than for thick layers of frost and may explain the apparent band depths seen in many planetary reflectance spectra.

  16. TuBaFrost 6: virtual microscopy in virtual tumour banking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teodorovic, I.; Isabelle, M.; Carbone, A.; Passioukov, A.; Lejeune, S.; Jaminé, D.; Therasse, P.; Gloghini, A.; Dinjens, W. N. M.; Lam, K. H.; Oomen, M. H. A.; Spatz, A.; Ratcliffe, C.; Knox, K.; Mager, R.; Kerr, D.; Pezzella, F.; van Damme, B.; van de Vijver, M.; van Boven, H.; Morente, M. M.; Alonso, S.; Kerjaschki, D.; Pammer, J.; Lopez-Guerrero, J. A.; Llombart Bosch, A.; van Veen, E.-B.; Oosterhuis, J. W.; Riegman, P. H. J.

    2006-01-01

    Many systems have already been designed and successfully used for sharing histology images over large distances, without transfer of the original glass slides. Rapid evolution was seen when digital images could be transferred over the Internet. Nowadays, sophisticated Virtual Microscope systems can

  17. Lidar observations of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, 1988 - Signature of small, solid particles above the frost point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, L. R.; Osborn, M. T.; Hunt, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents recent (January 1988) Arctic airborne lidar data which suggest that Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are composed of small solid particles with radii on the order of 0.5 micron. PSCs were observed remotely in the 21-24 km altitude range north of Greenland during a round-trip flight from Andenes, Norway on January 29, 1988, aboard the NASA Wallops Flight Facility P-3 Orion aircraft. Synoptic analyses at the 30-mb level show local temperatures of 191-193 K, which are well above the estimated frost point temperature of 185 K; this suggests that the PSCs were probably of the binary HNO3-H2O (Type I) class.

  18. Air-side performance evaluation of three types of heat exchangers in dry, wet and periodic frosting conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ping [Zhejiang Vocational College of Commerce, Hangzhou, Binwen Road 470 (China); Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hrnjak, P.S. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The performances of three types of heat exchangers that use the louver fin geometry: (1) parallel flow parallel fin with extruded flat tubes heat exchanger (PF{sup 2}), (2) parallel flow serpentine fin with extruded flat tubes heat exchanger (PFSF) and (3) round tube wave plate fin heat exchanger (RTPF) have been experimentally studied under dry, wet and frost conditions and results are presented. The parameters quantified include air-side pressure drop, water retention on the surface of the heat exchanger, capacity and overall heat transfer coefficient for air face velocity 0.9, 2 and 3 m/s, air humidity 70% and 80% and different orientations. The performances of three types of heat exchanger are compared and the results obtained are presented. The condensate drainage behavior of the air-side surface of these three heat exchanger types was studied using both the dip testing method and wind tunnel experiment. (author)

  19. Plasma-chemical synthesis of carbon nanotubes and fullerenes to create frost-resistant composite building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, A. P.; Smirnyagina, N. N.; Tsyrenov, B. O.; Dasheev, D. E.; Khaltarov, Z. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper considers a method of synthesis fullerenes and carbon nanotubes at atmospheric pressure. Carbon evaporates into the plasma arc. The paper discusses the method of synthesis of helium at a pressure of 105 Pa. We show the dependence yield of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes from the buffer gas pressure. It has been found that the fullerene yield increased with increasing pressure. The obtained fullerenes and nanotubes find their application in the modification of construction materials. The use of carbon nanomodifiers in the modification of the construction is promising since their introduction significantly improves the physico-mechanical properties using a small quantity of additives. With the introduction of the carbon nanomodifier decrease the porosity of cement stone, which leads to high strength and frost-resistant indicators of the modified cement.

  20. Effect of some geometric parameters on performance of PF{sup 2} heat exchangers in periodic frosting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ping [Zhejiang Vocational College of Commerce, Hangzhou, Binwen Road 470 (China); Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hrnjak, P.S. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    The thermal performance under conditions of initial frost growth and subsequent refrosting after a defrost is experimentally studied for the parallel flow parallel fin (PF{sup 2}) heat exchanger, a new style of heat exchanger that uses louvered bent fins on flat tubes to enhance water drainage when the flat tubes are horizontal (typically outdoor heat exchanger in heat pump operation). This paper focuses on quantification of the effects of geometry (i.e. fin pitch 12-22 fpi and louver pitch 1.4-2.8 mm) on defrost and refrost times. Eight heat exchangers differing in louver pitch and fin spacing are studied. A series of tests are conducted in search for the best geometry. The effects of geometry on heat transfer (thermal performance) and pressure drop for air face velocities of 0.9, 2, and 3 m/s are determined and used for comparison. Characteristics of initial heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop during the first frosting cycle are reported in terms of Colburn j{sub 0} factor and Fanning friction f{sub 0} factor, as a function of Re{sub L{sub p}} and geometry. The newly developed air-side correlations for PF{sup 2} heat exchangers (Colburn j{sub 0} factor and Fanning friction f{sub 0} factor) predict the test data within rms error of {+-}10%, and with mean deviation of 2.95% and 4.98%, respectively. The correlations are base on a very low Reynolds numbers in the range of 100-620, and 8 PF{sup 2} heat exchangers using 48 experimental data. (author)

  1. Intercropping frost-sensitive legume crops with winter oilseed rape reduces weed competition, insect damage, and improves nitrogen use efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadoux Stéphane

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mixing plant species in agroecosystems is highlighted as an agroecological solution to reduce pesticides and fertilizers while maintaining profitability. In the French context, intercropping frost-sensitive legume crops with winter oilseed rape is potentially interesting and began to be implemented by farmers. In this study we aimed at measuring the services and disservices of this intercrop with three different legume mixtures, in terms of growth and yield for rapeseed, ground cover of weeds in autumn and damage caused by rape winter stem weevil. The experiment was carried out at four sites from 2011 to 2014. We showed higher total aerial dry weights and total aerial nitrogen contents in the intercrops compared to sole winter oilseed rape in November. The companion plants contributed to the control of weeds and the mitigation of rape winter stem weevil damage, notably through the increase in the total aerial weight. In spring, after destruction of the companion plants, the intercrops had partially compensated a reduction in the N fertilization rate (–30 kg per hectare in terms of aerial nitrogen content in rapeseed, with no consequences on the yield which was maintained or even increased. There were probably other interactions such as an improvement in rapeseed root exploration. The consequences were an increase in the nitrogen use efficiency in intercrops. The intercrop with faba bean and lentil showed the best results in terms of autumn growth, weed control, reduction in rape winter stem weevil damage, and rapeseed N content in spring and yield. Intercropping frost-sensitive legume crops with winter oilseed rape is thus a promising way to reconcile yield and reduction in pesticides and fertilizer use and perhaps to benefit more widely to the cropping system.

  2. Magnetic susceptibilities of minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Sam; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic separation of minerals is a topic that is seldom reported in the literature for two reasons. First, separation data generally are byproducts of other projects; and second, this study requires a large amount of patience and is unusually tedious. Indeed, we suspect that most minerals probably are never investigated for this property. These data are timesaving for mineralogists who concentrate mono-mineralic fractions for chemical analysis, age dating, and for other purposes. The data can certainly be used in the ore-beneficiation industries. In some instances, magnetic-susceptibility data may help in mineral identification, where other information is insufficient. In past studies of magnetic separation of minerals, (Gaudin and Spedden, 1943; Tille and Kirkpatrick, 1956; Rosenblum, 1958; Rubinstein and others, 1958; Flinter, 1959; Hess, 1959; Baker, 1962; Meric and Peyre, 1963; Rojas and others, 1965; and Duchesne, 1966), the emphasis has been on the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ranges of extraction. For readers interested in the history of magnetic separation of minerals, Krumbein and Pettijohn (1938, p. 344-346) indicated nine references back to 1848. The primary purpose of this paper is to report the magnetic-susceptibility data on as many minerals as possible, similar to tables of hardness, specific gravity, refractive indices, and other basic physical properties of minerals. A secondary purpose is to demonstrate that the total and best extraction ranges are influenced by the chemistry of the minerals. The following notes are offered to help avoid problems in separating a desired mineral concentrate from mixtures of mineral grains.

  3. Alcohol increases hypnotic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmens-Wheeler, Rebecca; Dienes, Zoltán; Duka, Theodora

    2013-09-01

    One approach to hypnosis suggests that for hypnotic experience to occur frontal lobe activity must be attenuated. For example, cold control theory posits that a lack of awareness of intentions is responsible for the experience of involuntariness and/or the subjective reality of hypnotic suggestions. The mid-dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex and the ACC are candidate regions for such awareness. Alcohol impairs frontal lobe executive function. This study examined whether alcohol affects hypnotisability. We administered 0.8 mg/kg of alcohol or a placebo to 32 medium susceptible participants. They were subsequently hypnotised and given hypnotic suggestions. All participants believed they had received some alcohol. Participants in the alcohol condition were more susceptible to hypnotic suggestions than participants in the placebo condition. Impaired frontal lobe activity facilitates hypnotic responding, which supports theories postulating that attenuation of executive function facilitates hypnotic response, and contradicts theories postulating that hypnotic response involves enhanced inhibitory, attentional or other executive function. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Susceptibility of blackberry flowers to freezing temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injury of tight buds, open flowers and green fruit often occur in fruit crops during spring frost events. In this study, freezing tolerance of ‘Triple Crown’ blackberry flowers at different reproductive stages of development (tight bud to green drupe) was determined using two methods. One method i...

  5. suitability of vitek 2 system in identification and susceptibility testing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-01

    Apr 1, 2014 ... Infection of the bloodstream remains a life-threatening occurrence. Blood cultures and their microbiological analysis are essential for the diagnosis of this infection. (1,2). Rapid detection, identification, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of bacteria from blood are crucial in patient management.

  6. antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of vibrio cholerae 01 strains

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-07-07

    Jul 7, 2000 ... Literature on the antibiotic susceptibility of cholera organisms from most developing countries is patchy. Worldwide, V. cholerae 01 strains resistant to tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole and ampicillin are common(6-10). In many of these studies, the main reasons for the rapid rise in antimicrobial ...

  7. Graphene susceptibility in Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Nano Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We study the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the temperature dependence of the orbital magnetic susceptibility of monolayer graphene. We use the linear response theory and Green's function formalism within the Holstein Hamiltonian model. The results show that the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene sheet have different behaviors in two temperature regions. In the low temperature region, susceptibility increases when the electron-phonon coupling strength increases. On the other hand, the susceptibility reduces with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength in the high temperature region. - Highlights: Effect of electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene is studied. Linear response theory and Green's function technique in Holstein model are used. Effect of electron-phonon on susceptibility has different behaviors in two temperature regions.

  8. Topological susceptibility from slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Distrito Federal, C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Forcrand, Philippe de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zürich,CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); CERN, Physics Department, TH Unit, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gerber, Urs [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Distrito Federal, C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo,Edificio C-3, Apdo. Postal 2-82, Morelia, Michoacán, C.P. 58040 (Mexico)

    2015-12-14

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility χ{sub t}. In principle it seems straightforward to measure χ{sub t} by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure χ{sub t} even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of χ{sub t}, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear σ-models.

  9. Topological Susceptibility from Slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Gerber, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility chi_t. In principle it seems straightforward to measure chi_t by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure chi_t even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of chi_t, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear sigma-models.

  10. Genetic architecture of intrinsic antibiotic susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany S Girgis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic exposure rapidly selects for more resistant bacterial strains, and both a drug's chemical structure and a bacterium's cellular network affect the types of mutations acquired.To better characterize the genetic determinants of antibiotic susceptibility, we exposed a transposon-mutagenized library of Escherichia coli to each of 17 antibiotics that encompass a wide range of drug classes and mechanisms of action. Propagating the library for multiple generations with drug concentrations that moderately inhibited the growth of the isogenic parental strain caused the abundance of strains with even minor fitness advantages or disadvantages to change measurably and reproducibly. Using a microarray-based genetic footprinting strategy, we then determined the quantitative contribution of each gene to E. coli's intrinsic antibiotic susceptibility. We found both loci whose removal increased general antibiotic tolerance as well as pathways whose down-regulation increased tolerance to specific drugs and drug classes. The beneficial mutations identified span multiple pathways, and we identified pairs of mutations that individually provide only minor decreases in antibiotic susceptibility but that combine to provide higher tolerance.Our results illustrate that a wide-range of mutations can modulate the activity of many cellular resistance processes and demonstrate that E. coli has a large mutational target size for increasing antibiotic tolerance. Furthermore, the work suggests that clinical levels of antibiotic resistance might develop through the sequential accumulation of chromosomal mutations of small individual effect.

  11. Microfluidics for Antibiotic Susceptibility and Toxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major concern for worldwide policy makers as very few new antibiotics have been developed in the last twenty-five years. To prevent the death of millions of people worldwide, there is an urgent need for a cheap, fast and accurate set of tools and techniques that can help to discover and develop new antimicrobial drugs. In the past decade, microfluidic platforms have emerged as potential systems for conducting pharmacological studies. Recent studies have demonstrated that microfluidic platforms can perform rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests to evaluate antimicrobial drugs’ efficacy. In addition, the development of cell-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip platforms have enabled the early drug testing, providing more accurate insights into conventional cell cultures on the drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity, at the early and cheaper stage of drug development, i.e., prior to animal and human testing. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of microfluidic platforms for rapid antibiotics susceptibility testing, investigating bacterial persistence and non-growing but metabolically active (NGMA bacteria, evaluating antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms and combinatorial effect of antibiotics, as well as microfluidic platforms that can be used for in vitro antibiotic toxicity testing.

  12. THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF MICE TO BACTERIAL ENDOTOXINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Russell W.; Dubos, Rene J.

    1961-01-01

    Albino mice (Rockefeller NCS strain) raised and maintained free of ordinary bacterial pathogens, as well as of intestinal Escherichia coli and of Proteus bacilli, were found to be highly resistant to the lethal effect of bacterial endotoxins. When newborn mice of this NCS colony were nursed by foster mothers from another colony raised under ordinary conditions (SS colony from which the NCS colony was derived), they acquired the intestinal flora of the latter animals and became susceptible to the lethal effects of endotoxins. NCS adult mice could be rendered susceptible to the lethal effect of endotoxins by vaccination with heat killed Gram-negative bacilli. The susceptibility thus induced exhibited a certain degree of specificity for the bacterial strain used in vaccination. Although untreated NCS mice were resistant to the lethal effect of endotoxins, they proved exquisitively susceptible to the infection-enhancing effect of these materials. For example, 1 µg. or less of endotoxin was found sufficient to help establish a rapidly fatal septicemia with Staphylococcus aureus. Small amounts of endotoxin (1 µg. or less), administered alone, caused a marked but transient loss of weight. Vaccination with heat-killed Gram-negative bacilli or with killed BCG increased the resistance of NCS mice to the infection-enhancing effect of small amounts of endotoxin. This protective effect exhibited a certain degree of specificity for the bacterial strain from which the toxin used in the infection-enhancing test was derived. These various findings can be explained by assuming that the pathological effects of endotoxins involve at least two unrelated mechanisms; (a) a primary toxicity illustrated in this study by the loss of weight and enhancement of infection resulting from the injection of small doses of toxin; (b) an immunological reaction with lethal consequences which became manifest only in animals sensitized to the endotoxin by prior exposure to Gram-negative bacilli. PMID

  13. Microwave susceptibility experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConaghy, C.

    1984-05-29

    In certain experimental environments, systems can be affected or damaged by microwave pulses. I have conducted tests at LLNL to understand the phenomenology of microwave susceptibility of system components and subsystem components. To date, my experiments have concentrated on bipolar transistors, similar to what might be used in discrete analog circuits, and on CMOS RAM chips, which might be used in a computer memory system. I observed a decrease in failure energies for both the transistor and the integrated curcuit as I shortened the microwave pulse width. An S band (2.86 GHz) transmit/receive (T/R) tube has also been tested both at S band and at X band (8.16 GHz). The S band pulse had limitations in rise-time from zero power, which had an effect on the amount of power that could be transmitted through the T/R tube, as much as 0.7% of the incident power passed through the tube. All tests were conducted in closed-waveguide or coax test-fixtures, in contrast to the anechoic chambers utilized by other experimenters. I have used both S band and X band Klystron generators. For very high power (greater than 1 MW), I used an additional pulse-compression cavity at S band. Other subsystem components such as an X band mixer and an X band T/R tube will be tested in the future. 8 references.

  14. [Antimicrobial susceptibility cumulative reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut-Blasco, Andrés; Calvo, Jorge; Rodríguez-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Cumulative reports on antimicrobial susceptibility tests data are important for selecting empirical treatments, as an educational tool in programs on antimicrobial use, and for establishing breakpoints defining clinical categories. These reports should be based on data validated by clinical microbiologists using diagnostic samples (not surveillance samples). In order to avoid a bias derived from including several isolates obtained from the same patient, it is recommended that, for a defined period, only the first isolate is counted. A minimal number of isolates per species should be presented: a figure of >=30 isolates is statistically acceptable. The report is usually presented in a table format where, for each cell, information on clinically relevant microorganisms-antimicrobial agents is presented. Depending on particular needs, multiple tables showing data related to patients, samples, services or special pathogens can be prepared. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple phase transitions of the susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model on complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mata, Angélica S

    2014-01-01

    We show that the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic dynamics running on the top of networks with a power law degree distribution can exhibit multiple phase transitions. Three main transitions involving different mechanisms responsible by sustaining the epidemics are identified: A short-term epidemics concentrated around the most connected vertex; a long-term (asymptotically stable) localized epidemics with a vanishing threshold; and an endemic phase occurring at a finite threshold. The different transitions are suited through different mean-field approaches. We finally show that the multiple transitions are due to the activations of different domains of the network that are observed in rapid (singular) variations of both stationary density of infected vertices and the participation ratio against the infection rate.

  16. Influence of environmental factors on the frost resistance of concrete : a contribution to the BRITE/EURAM project BREU-CT92-0591 "The Residual Service Life of Concrete Structures"

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerlund, Göran

    1994-01-01

    This report investigates how the ability of a concrete to withstand frost attack depends not only of the concrete itself but also on the internal and external climatic factors. All those internal and external factors and their interaction are discussed.

  17. Snippets from the past: the evolution of Wade Hampton Frost's epidemiology as viewed from the American Journal of Hygiene/Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    Wade Hampton Frost, who was a Professor of Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University from 1919 to 1938, spurred the development of epidemiologic methods. His 6 publications in the American Journal of Hygiene, which later became the American Journal of Epidemiology, comprise a 1928 Cutter lecture on a theory of epidemics, a survey-based study of tonsillectomy and immunity to Corynebacterium diphtheriae (1931), 2 papers from a longitudinal study of the incidence of minor respiratory diseases (1933 and 1935), an attack rate ratio analysis of the decline of diphtheria in Baltimore (1936), and a 1936 lecture on the age, time, and cohort analysis of tuberculosis mortality. These 6 American Journal of Hygiene /American Journal of Epidemiology papers attest that Frost's personal evolution mirrored that of the emerging "early" epidemiology: The scope of epidemiology extended beyond the study of epidemics of acute infectious diseases, and rigorous comparative study designs and their associated quantitative methods came to light.

  18. Contribution of geophysical studies on detection of the Petrified Frost Qattamiya, Cairo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Awad Sultan Araffa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Different geophysical tools such as resistivity, seismic refraction, and magnetic survey have been applied to delineate the subsurface stratigraphy and structural elements, which controlled the distribution and origin of the Petrified wood in Qattamiya, Cairo, Egypt. Land magnetic survey was carried out in the study area through two stages, the first stage includes all area by measuring 11,674 stations and the second stage was carried out in the detailed area that was located at the southeastern part of the all area including 9441 stations. All measurements have been corrected for diurnal variation and reduced to the north magnetic pole. The results of magnetic interpretation indicated that the area dissected by different structural elements trend toward NE–SW, NW–SE, N–S and E–W directions. Twenty-eight samples have been collected from the detailed area to analyze for magnetic susceptibility values. Four electrical resistivity tomography (ERT profiles were measured by using dipole–dipole configuration to estimate the vertical and lateral variation of the subsurface sequence. Results of quantitative interpretation of the ERT data indicate that the subsurface sequence consists of different geoelectric units; the first unit is characterized by high resistivity values upto 1000 ohm m corresponding to sand, gravel and Petrified wood at the surface and extends to a depth of a few meters. The second geoelectric unit is corresponding to sandy clay which exhibits moderate resistivity (few hundred ohm m values with thickness ranging from 6 to10 m. The third geoelectric unit is characterized by very low resistivity corresponding to clay of depth ranging from 10 to 30 m overlaying the fourth unit which reached to a depth ranging from 30 to 56 m and characterized by very high resistivity (8000 ohm m corresponding to limestone. Three shallow seismic refraction spreads of geophone spacing 7.5 m were measured to investigate the subsurface

  19. Ground-Penetrating-Radar Profiles of Interior Alaska Highways: Interpretation of Stratified Fill, Frost Depths, Water Table, and Thaw Settlement over Ice-Rich Permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Interpretation of Stratified Fill, Frost Depths, Water Table, and Thaw Settlement over Ice-Rich Permafrost Co ld R eg io ns R es ea rc h an d En...within the discontinuous permafrost zone ............................................................. 7 4 (A) 1958 surficial geology map (Péwé...looking north and reveals that the valley walls are not steep. Figure 4. (A) 1958 surficial geology map (Péwé 1958) showing that the Elliott

  20. A GIS analysis of the relationship between sinkholes, dry-well complaints and groundwater pumping for frost-freeze protection of winter strawberry production in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurit, Mark D; Peterson, Robert O; Blanford, Justine I

    2013-01-01

    Florida is riddled with sinkholes due to its karst topography. Sometimes these sinkholes can cause extensive damage to infrastructure and homes. It has been suggested that agricultural practices, such as sprinkler irrigation methods used to protect crops, can increase the development of sinkholes, particularly when temperatures drop below freezing, causing groundwater levels to drop quickly during groundwater pumping. In the strawberry growing region, Dover/Plant City, Florida, the effects have caused water shortages resulting in dry-wells and ground subsidence through the development of sinkholes that can be costly to maintain and repair. In this study, we look at how frost-freeze events have affected West Central Florida over the past 25 years with detailed comparisons made between two cold-years (with severe frost-freeze events) and a warm year (no frost-freeze events). We analyzed the spatial and temporal correlation between strawberry farming freeze protection practices and the development of sinkholes/dry well complaints, and assessed the economic impact of such events from a water management perspective by evaluating the cost of repairing and drilling new wells and how these compared with using alternative crop-protection methods. We found that the spatial distribution of sinkholes was non-random during both frost-freeze events. A strong correlation between sinkhole occurrence and water extraction and minimum temperatures was found. Furthermore as temperatures fall below 41°F and water levels decrease by more than 20 ft, the number of sinkholes increase greatly (N >10). At this time alternative protection methods such as freeze-cloth are cost prohibitive in comparison to repairing dry wells. In conclusion, the findings from this study are applicable in other agricultural areas and can be used to develop comprehensive water management plans in areas where the abstraction of large quantities of water occur.

  1. A GIS analysis of the relationship between sinkholes, dry-well complaints and groundwater pumping for frost-freeze protection of winter strawberry production in Florida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Aurit

    Full Text Available Florida is riddled with sinkholes due to its karst topography. Sometimes these sinkholes can cause extensive damage to infrastructure and homes. It has been suggested that agricultural practices, such as sprinkler irrigation methods used to protect crops, can increase the development of sinkholes, particularly when temperatures drop below freezing, causing groundwater levels to drop quickly during groundwater pumping. In the strawberry growing region, Dover/Plant City, Florida, the effects have caused water shortages resulting in dry-wells and ground subsidence through the development of sinkholes that can be costly to maintain and repair. In this study, we look at how frost-freeze events have affected West Central Florida over the past 25 years with detailed comparisons made between two cold-years (with severe frost-freeze events and a warm year (no frost-freeze events. We analyzed the spatial and temporal correlation between strawberry farming freeze protection practices and the development of sinkholes/dry well complaints, and assessed the economic impact of such events from a water management perspective by evaluating the cost of repairing and drilling new wells and how these compared with using alternative crop-protection methods. We found that the spatial distribution of sinkholes was non-random during both frost-freeze events. A strong correlation between sinkhole occurrence and water extraction and minimum temperatures was found. Furthermore as temperatures fall below 41°F and water levels decrease by more than 20 ft, the number of sinkholes increase greatly (N >10. At this time alternative protection methods such as freeze-cloth are cost prohibitive in comparison to repairing dry wells. In conclusion, the findings from this study are applicable in other agricultural areas and can be used to develop comprehensive water management plans in areas where the abstraction of large quantities of water occur.

  2. [Ability of winter wheat plants to become hardened against frost related to peculiarities of carbon dioxide exchange, biomass synthesis, and various forms of water-soluble carbohydrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, S V; Burakhanova, E A; Alieva, G P; Suvorova, T A

    2010-01-01

    The donor-acceptor relation (DAR) in a plant under cold exposure to frost was studied in the plants of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Mironovskaya 808 cultivar and its allocytoplasmatic hybrid containing alien cytoplasm of goat grass (Aegilops ovata L.) and grown in a water culture until phenophase, from two leaves until branching. The alteration of DAR was processed by treatment of plant with solutions of diuron and paraquat the photosynthesis inhibitors, keeping plants in the dark, changing from mixotrophic to autotrophic nutrient, and also through the exchange of nutrient solution to distillate water. Determination of frost-resistance on the basis of survival percentage among frozen plants is more significant (R = 0.701-0.999) and related to the frost-resistance of leaves, the correlation P/Rd between speeds of true photosynthesis at light saturation (P) and plant dark respiration (Rd), the approximate speed of dry plant biomass alteration, the total content of water-soluble sugars, and the ratio of di- and monosaccharides (sucrose, glucose + fructose) in leaves. The importance of all the indexes mentioned above for acquiring resistance to low temperatures in plants is discussed in the present article.

  3. Rule-based Mamdani-type fuzzy modelling of thermal performance of fintube evaporator under frost conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozen Dilek Nur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frost formation brings about insulating effects over the surface of a heat exchanger and thereby deteriorating total heat transfer of the heat exchanger. In this study, a fin-tube evaporator is modeled by making use of Rule-based Mamdani-Type Fuzzy (RBMTF logic where total heat transfer, air inlet temperature of 2 °C to 7 °C and four different fluid speed groups (ua1=1; 1.44; 1.88 m s-1, ua2=2.32; 2.76 m s-1, ua3=3.2; 3.64 m s-1, ua4=4.08; 4.52; 4.96 m s-1 for the evaporator were taken into consideration. In the developed RBMTF system, outlet parameter UA was determined using inlet parameters Ta and ua. The RBMTF was trained and tested by using MATLAB® fuzzy logic toolbox. R2 (% for the training data and test data were found to be 99.91%. With this study, it has been shown that RBMTF model can be reliably used in determination of a total heat transfer of a fin-tube evaporator.

  4. Digital Image Sensor-Based Assessment of the Status of Oat (Avena sativa L. Crops after Frost Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Villegas-Romero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to classify the land covered with oat crops, and the quantification of frost damage on oats, while plants are still in the flowering stage. The images are taken by a digital colour camera CCD-based sensor. Unsupervised classification methods are applied because the plants present different spectral signatures, depending on two main factors: illumination and the affected state. The colour space used in this application is CIELab, based on the decomposition of the colour in three channels, because it is the closest to human colour perception. The histogram of each channel is successively split into regions by thresholding. The best threshold to be applied is automatically obtained as a combination of three thresholding strategies: (a Otsu’s method, (b Isodata algorithm, and (c Fuzzy thresholding. The fusion of these automatic thresholding techniques and the design of the classification strategy are some of the main findings of the paper, which allows an estimation of the damages and a prediction of the oat production.

  5. Digital image sensor-based assessment of the status of oat (Avena sativa L.) crops after frost damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo-Cruz, Antonia; Pajares, Gonzalo; Santos, Matilde; Villegas-Romero, Isidro

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to classify the land covered with oat crops, and the quantification of frost damage on oats, while plants are still in the flowering stage. The images are taken by a digital colour camera CCD-based sensor. Unsupervised classification methods are applied because the plants present different spectral signatures, depending on two main factors: illumination and the affected state. The colour space used in this application is CIELab, based on the decomposition of the colour in three channels, because it is the closest to human colour perception. The histogram of each channel is successively split into regions by thresholding. The best threshold to be applied is automatically obtained as a combination of three thresholding strategies: (a) Otsu's method, (b) Isodata algorithm, and (c) Fuzzy thresholding. The fusion of these automatic thresholding techniques and the design of the classification strategy are some of the main findings of the paper, which allows an estimation of the damages and a prediction of the oat production.

  6. [Antimicrobial susceptibility in Chile 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-D, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; García, Patricia; Bello, Helia; Briceño, Isabel; Calvo-A, Mario; Labarca, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria antimicrobial resistance is an uncontrolled public health problem that progressively increases its magnitude and complexity. The Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia, formed by a join of experts that represent 39 Chilean health institutions has been concerned with bacteria antimicrobial susceptibility in our country since 2008. In this document we present in vitro bacterial susceptibility accumulated during year 2012 belonging to 28 national health institutions that represent about 36% of hospital discharges in Chile. We consider of major importance to report periodically bacteria susceptibility so to keep the medical community updated to achieve target the empirical antimicrobial therapies and the control measures and prevention of the dissemination of multiresistant strains.

  7. Effect of soil frost on growing season nitrogen uptake by fine roots of mature trees in northern hardwood forests of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socci, A. M.; Templer, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Forests of the northeastern United States are predicted to experience a decrease in the depth and duration of the winter snowpack over the next 100 years. Even when coupled with warmer winter air temperatures, the absence of snow as insulation can increase soil frost during the winter months. Past research has determined that there are species-level effects of soil frost on dominant forest trees. For example, in stands dominated by sugar maple (Acer saccharum), induced soil frost led to increased fine root mortality and soil nitrate leaching. Soil frost also increased fine root mortality in stands dominated by yellow birch (Betula allegheniensis), but there was no significant change in leaching of soil nitrate. We hypothesized that greater nitrogen (N) losses from stands dominated by sugar maple may be due to reduced N uptake by fine roots of this tree species. To determine the impact of increased soil freezing on fine root uptake of N, we established a snow manipulation experiment in mixed sugar maple/American beech (Fagus grandifolia) forests at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire (n=4 paired snow-removal and reference plots; each 13m X 13m). Snow removal occurred during the first six weeks of winter over two years. During each growing season following snow removal, we used the N depletion technique to measure in situ rates of uptake of ammonium and nitrate by fine roots of sugar maple during the early, peak and late growing season. Among all sampling dates and plots, we observed significantly lower uptake of N as nitrate compared to ammonium. During the first growing season, at moderate ammonium availability (35 μM N) we observed significantly less uptake of ammonium by fine roots of sugar maple in the snow removal plots relative to the reference plots during the early growing season (April-May), with no significant differences in uptake of ammonium during the peak (July) and late (September) growing season. We observed no differences in

  8. Hypnotic susceptibility and dream characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamore, N; Barrett, D

    1989-11-01

    This study examined the relationship of hypnotic susceptibility to a variety of dream characteristics and types of dream content. A Dream Questionnaire was constructed synthesizing Gibson's dream inventory and Hilgard's theoretical conceptions of hypnosis. Employing the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility and the Field Inventory for evaluating hypnotic response, several dream dimensions correlated significantly with hypnotizability. For subjects as a whole, the strongest correlates were the frequency of dreams which they believed to be precognitive and out-of-body dreams. Ability to dream on a chosen topic also correlated significantly with hypnotic susceptibility for both genders. For females only, there was a negative correlation of hypnotic susceptibility to flying dreams. Absorption correlated positively with dream recall, ability to dream on a chosen topic, reports of conflict resolution in dreams, creative ideas occurring in dreams, amount of color in dreams, pleasantness of dreams, bizarreness of dreams, flying dreams and precognitive dreams.

  9. Ancestral susceptibility to colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huhn, S.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodička, Pavel (ed.); Hemminki, K.; Försti, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2012), s. 197-204 ISSN 0267-8357 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/1430; GA ČR GAP304/10/1286 Grant - others:EU FP7(XE) HEALTH-F4-2007-200767 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : cancer susceptibility * molecular epidemiology * genetic susceptibility Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.500, year: 2012

  10. Map showing landslide susceptibility in Prince Georges County, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomeroy, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Prince Georges County was identified during a statewide investigation of landslide susceptibility (MF-2048) as the county with the most serious slope-stability problems. This map uses a ranking system ranging from 1 (nil to very low susceptibility) to 4 (moderate to severe susceptibility). Geologic factors and precipitation are major elements in the initiation of landslides in the county. The Potomac Group and the Marlboro Clay are the most slideprone units. This map should enable users to make a rapid, generalized evaluation of the potential for mass movement. Planners, engineers, soil scientists, geologist, university faculty, and elected officials should find it useful in the assessment of slope hazards for county-wide analyses.

  11. Predisposition testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzone, K A

    1997-05-01

    To provide an overview of breast cancer predisposition syndromes and the breast and Ovarian cancer susceptibility genes identified to date. To describe the clinical implications of genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility. Published research and educational manuscripts, books, conference proceedings, and personal experiences. Nurses must become knowledgeable of predisposition genetic testing for inherited breast cancer risk including: understanding of the gene being analyzed and associated cancer risks, indications for testing, the limitations of the test, the management options for mutation carriers, risks and benefits of testing, and the long-term psychosocial sequelae. Predisposition testing for alterations in breast cancer susceptibility genes is rapidly moving into the general oncology and primary care community where nurses will play a major role in the provision of genetic services. The role of nursing in cancer genetics includes practice and education, nursing research, and policy initiatives.

  12. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association study (GWAS). More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWAS. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Many susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in the development of vitiligo. PMID:26870082

  13. Automated sliding susceptibility mapping of rock slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Günther

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a suite of extensions for ARCVIEW GIS™ (ESRI that allows to map the spatial distribution of first-order mechanical slope-properties in hard rock terrain, e.g. for large slope areas like water reservoir slopes. Besides digital elevation data, this expert-system includes regional continuous grid-based data on geological structures that might act as potential sliding or cutoff planes for rockslides. The system allows rapid automated mapping of geometrical and kinematical slope properties in hard rock, providing the basis for spatially distributed deterministic sliding-susceptibility evaluations on a pixel base. Changing hydrostatic slope conditions and rock mechanical parameters can be implemented and used for simple predictive static stability calculations. Application is demonstrated for a study area in the Harz Mts., Germany.

  14. Non-stationary temporal characterization of the temperature profile of a soil exposed to frost in south-eastern Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Anctil

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to compare time and frequency fluctuations of air and soil temperatures (2-, 5-, 10-, 20- and 50-cm below the soil surface using the continuous wavelet transform, with a particular emphasis on the daily cycle. The analysis of wavelet power spectra and cross power spectra provided detailed non-stationary accounts with respect to frequencies (or periods and to time of the structure of the data and also of the relationships that exist between time series. For this particular application to the temperature profile of a soil exposed to frost, both the air temperature and the 2-cm depth soil temperature time series exhibited a dominant power peak at 1-d periodicity, prominent from spring to autumn. This feature was gradually damped as it propagated deeper into the soil and was weak for the 20-cm depth. Influence of the incoming solar radiation was also revealed in the wavelet power spectra analysis by a weaker intensity of the 1-d peak. The principal divergence between air and soil temperatures, besides damping, occurred in winter from the latent heat release associated to the freezing of the soil water and the insulation effect of snowpack that cease the dependence of the soil temperature to the air temperature. Attenuation and phase-shifting of the 1-d periodicity could be quantified through scale-averaged power spectra and time-lag estimations. Air temperature variance was only partly transferred to the 2-cm soil temperature time series and much less so to the 20-cm soil depth.

  15. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4 and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg. Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity.

  16. Inherited susceptibility and radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.B. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    There is continuing concern that some people in the general population may have genetic makeups that place them at particularly high risk for radiation-induced cancer. The existence of such a susceptible subpopulation would have obvious implications for the estimation of risks of radiation exposure. Although it has been long known that familial aggregations of cancer do sometimes occur, recent evidence suggests that a general genetic predisposition to cancer does not exist; most cancers occur sporadically. On the other hand, nearly 10% of the known Mendelian genetic disorders are associated with cancer. A number of these involve a familial predisposition to cancer, and some are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to the induction of cancer by various physical and chemical carcinogens, including ionizing radiation. Such increased susceptibility will depend on several factors including the frequency of the susceptibility gene in the population and its penetrance, the strength of the predisposition, and the degree to which the cancer incidence in susceptible individuals may be increased by the carcinogen. It is now known that these cancer-predisposing genes may be responsible not only for rare familial cancer syndromes, but also for a proportion of the common cancers. Although the currently known disorders can account for only a small fraction of all cancers, they serve as models for genetic predisposition to carcinogen-induced cancer in the general population. In the present report, the author describes current knowledge of those specific disorders that are associated with an enhanced predisposition to radiation-induced cancer, and discusses how this knowledge may bear on the susceptibility to radiation-induced cancer in the general population and estimates of the risk of radiation exposure.

  17. pitting corrosion susceptibility pitting corrosion susceptibility of aisi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Abstract. The susceptibility of austenitic (AISI 301) stainless steel to pitting corrosion was evaluated in sodium chloride. (NaCl) solutions ... AISI 301 steel suffers from pitting corrosion in all the investigated solutions. AISI 301 steel suffers from ..... [1] Ijeomah, M.N.C. Elements of Corrosion and Protection. Theory, Auto Century ...

  18. Magnetic Susceptability Measurements in Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jason; Mallory, Kendall; Seim, Ryan

    2000-04-01

    A new undergraduate research facility in magnetic susceptability measurements on superconductors is being developed at the University of Northern Colorado. Initial data measurements of the magnetic susceptability of various superconductors will be presented. These measurements were obtained with a liquid helium/nitrogen dewar that was reassembled for use in this project. The cryostat consists of two separate dewars, the first of which contains liquid nitrogen, the second, liquid helium. The liquid nitrogen dewar is used to keep the helium bath from evaporating off too quickly. Data on the evaporation rates of the two liquids will also be presented.

  19. Long-term enhanced winter soil frost alters growing season CO2 fluxes through its impact on vegetation development in a boreal peatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junbin; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B

    2017-08-01

    At high latitudes, winter climate change alters snow cover and, consequently, may cause a sustained change in soil frost dynamics. Altered winter soil conditions could influence the ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and, in turn, provide feedbacks to ongoing climate change. To investigate the mechanisms that modify the peatland CO2 exchange in response to altered winter soil frost, we conducted a snow exclusion experiment to enhance winter soil frost and to evaluate its short-term (1-3 years) and long-term (11 years) effects on CO2 fluxes during subsequent growing seasons in a boreal peatland. In the first 3 years after initiating the treatment, no significant effects were observed on either gross primary production (GPP) or ecosystem respiration (ER). However, after 11 years, the temperature sensitivity of ER was reduced in the treatment plots relative to the control, resulting in an overall lower ER in the former. Furthermore, early growing season GPP was also lower in the treatment plots than in the controls during periods with photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) ≥800 μmol m-2  s-1 , corresponding to lower sedge leaf biomass in the treatment plots during the same period. During the peak growing season, a higher GPP was observed in the treatment plots under the low light condition (i.e. PPFD 400 μmol m-2  s-1 ) compared to the control. As Sphagnum moss maximizes photosynthesis at low light levels, this GPP difference between the plots may have been due to greater moss photosynthesis, as indicated by greater moss biomass production, in the treatment plots relative to the controls. Our study highlights the different responses to enhanced winter soil frost among plant functional types which regulate CO2 fluxes, suggesting that winter climate change could considerably alter the growing season CO2 exchange in boreal peatlands through its effect on vegetation development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. LOREF: Air cooler optimisation with reduction of ice and frost formation - Optimisation of lamella air-coolers/evaporators of air/water heat pumps - Part 2: mathematical-physical simulation of the lamella air-coolers with condensate and frost formation; LOREF: Luftkuehler-Optimierung mit Reduktion von Eis- und Frostbildung - Optimierung des Lamellenluftkuehlers/Verdampfers von Luft/Wasser-Waermepumpen - Teil 2: mathematisch-physikalische Simulation des Lamellenluftkuehlers mit Kondensat- und Frostbildung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahinagic, R.; Gasser, L.; Wellig, B.; Hilfiker, K.

    2008-04-15

    The average coefficient of performance (COP) of air/water heat pumps shall be further improved over the next decade. Its success will strongly depend on two measures: by altering the characteristic of the heat pump through continuous operation instead of on/off operation, and further, by reducing the formation of frost and ice. Frost significantly reduces the air flow, and consequently also the heat and mass transfer in the fin tube evaporator. The formation of frost and ice is influenced by a complex interaction between the fin tube evaporator, the characteristic of the fan and of the heat pump itself. An accurate prediction of these processes is required to optimize the design of the fin tube evaporator in combination with fan and heat pump to further improve the overall efficiency. Based on the theory of simultaneous heat and mass transfer combined with partial condensation and desublimation, a simulation program for the prediction of frost and ice formation has been developed, being valid over the wide range of the ambient air (from -10 {sup o}C to 15 {sup o}C and dry to saturated air). The humidity is deposited either as condensate, frost, ice or as a combination of them on the fins and tubes of the evaporator. It was a major challenge to create a correlation for the physical properties of the frost and ice layer in the unsteady processes. By numerous experiments, four regions of physical properties are distinguished, depending on the temperature at the boundary layer between air and frost or ice: condensate above -2.7 {sup o}C, condensate and ice between -3.5 {sup o}C to -2.7 {sup o}C, ice and frost between -5.2 {sup o}C to -3.5 {sup o}C and frost formed directly by desublimation below -5.2 {sup o}C. A high reliability has been obtained with the mathematical-physical simulation program proven over the entire applicable range of air temperature and humidity, temperature difference for heat transfer, air velocity and geometry of the fin tube evaporator. (author)

  1. Orchard floor management utilizing soil-applied coal dust for frost protection. Part II. Seasonal microclimate effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharratt, B.S.; Glenn, D.M.

    1988-07-01

    Orchard floor management has been found to affect the microclimate on radiation frost nights; however, long-term effects of management on the seasonal microclimate have not been studied. Comparisons were made of microclimatic factors in the spring of 1986 between two adjacent 1.4 ha peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) plots in the Shenandoah Valley of West Virginia. The orchard floor of one plot has grass maintained in both the 3-m-wide tree row and 3-m-wide grass alley (grass plot); the floor of the other plot was similar except that coal dust was applied to the soil surface of the tree row (coal dust plot). Net radiative (R/sub n/), soil heat (G), and sensible heat flux were greater during the daytime in the coal dust plot. Averaged over the 55-day period of this study, the daily R/sub n/ and G was 7 and 2 W m/sup -2/ greater in the coal dust plot, respectively. Thus, G accounted for 30% of R/sub n/ on a daily basis. Daily average tree-row air (to 195 cm) and soil (to 5 cm) temperatures were approx. 0.2 and 2.5 degrees C higher, respectively, in the coal dust plot. The cumulative differences found at the end of this study indicated that the coal dust plot absorbed 32 MJ more net radiant energy than the grass plot. Cumulative G differences accounted for 9 MJ (30%) of the R/sub n/ difference, with a greater heat flux into the soil in the coal dust plot. An approximate difference of 130 growing-degree-hours (GDH), which represented a 1% difference, was found at the end of the study. However, at the time of bloom, which required 4000 GDH, only a 40 GDH difference was found. These results indicate that microclimatic differences between management systems are cumulative and that differences for the site studied can develop by late spring. In years with greater cloud-free days, even larger microclimatic differences could develop than those reported in this study. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Topological susceptibility from the overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Pica, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    The chiral symmetry at finite lattice spacing of Ginsparg-Wilson fermionic actions constrains the renormalization of the lattice operators; in particular, the topological susceptibility does not require any renormalization, when using a fermionic estimator to define the topological charge. Theref...

  3. Metabolic Response of Soil Microorganisms to Frost: A New Perspective from Position-specific 13C Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, E. K.; Apostel, C.; Halicki, S.; Dippold, M. A.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Cold adapted organisms and their biomolecules have received considerable attention in the last few decades, particularly in light of the perceived biotechnological potential. Mostly, these studies are based on pure isolated cultures from permafrost or permafrost samples with inherently adapted microbes. However, microbial activities in agricultural soils that are predominantly exposed to freeze conditions during winter in temperate ecosystems remain unclear. To analyze microbial metabolism at low soil temperatures, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were incubated at three temperature; 5 (control), -5 -20 oC. Soils were sampled after 1, 3 and 10 days (and after 30 days for samples at -20 °C). 13C was quantifed in CO2, bulk soil, microbial biomass and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Highest 13C recovery in CO2 was obtained from C-1 position in control soil. Consequently, metabolic activity was dominated by pentose phosphate pathway at 5 °C. In contrast, metabolic behaviors switched towards a preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 position at -5 and -20 °C. High 13C recovery from C-4 position confirms previous studies suggesting that fermentation increases at subzero temperature. A 3-fold higher 13C recovery in microbial biomass at -5 °C than under control conditions points towards synthesis of intracellular antifreeze metabolites such as glycerol and ethanol and it is consistent with fermentative metabolism. A 5-fold higher 13C in bulk soil than microbial biomass at -20 °C does not reflect non-metabolized glucose because 13C recovery in DOC was less than 0.4% at day 1. Therefore, high 13C recovery in bulk soil at -20 °C was attributed to extracellular metabolites secreted to overcome frost. The shift in antifreeze mechanisms with temperature was brought about by shift in microbial community structure as indicated by incorporation into 13C into PLFA which was 2-fold higher in gram negative bacteria under control than frozen

  4. Synthesis of frost-like CuO combined graphene-TiO2 by self-assembly method and its high photocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cung Tien; Cho, Kwang-Youn; Oh, Won-Chun

    2017-08-01

    A novel material, frost-like CuO combined-graphene-TiO2 composite, was successfully synthesized using a self-assembly method. During the reaction, the loading of CuO and TiO2 nanoparticles on graphene sheets was achieved. The obtained CuO-graphene-TiO2 composite photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The frost-like CuO nanoparticles combined with the small TiO2 rods were successfully loaded on the transparent graphene sheets. The photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B (RhB), methylene blue trihydrate (MB), and reactive black B (RBB) in an aqueous solution under visible light irradiation was observed by UV spectrophotometry after measurement of the decrease of their concentrations. Through the photocatalytic test and TOC results, the CuO-graphene-TiO2 is expected to become a new potential material for photodegradation activity with excellent photodegradation. The scavenging experiments confirmed that rad OH and h+ play a major role in the photocatalytic reaction than O2rad - or both hydroxyl and holes are the active species responsible for the RBB degradation under visible light irradiation. After five repeated cycles to investigate the stability of photocatalytic performance, the CuO-graphene-TiO2 had high stability under visible light irradiation.

  5. Elevated CO{sub 2} and development of frost hardiness in Norway spruce (picea abies (L.) Karst.); Oekt CO{sub 2} og utvikling av frostherdighet i gran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalen, Lars Sandved

    1998-09-01

    This thesis discusses controlled laboratory experiments carried out to study the effects of CO{sub 2} pollution on Norwegian spruce. It was found that elevated CO{sub 2} increased height growth and biomass production. It slightly increased frost hardiness, but only at high nitrogen values. There was no evidence of adverse effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on the phenology of bud set and the development of frost hardiness. Although not statistically significant, there seemed to be a consistently higher concentration of soluble carbohydrates in one-season-old Norway spruce seedlings treated with elevated CO{sub 2}. This was not found in three-year-old seedlings grown in open top chambers, possibly indicating a down-regulation of photosynthesis or a transition from free to predetermined growth, and change in allocation of photosynthates with age. Treatment with high or low concentrations of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilizer did not affect apoplastic chitinolytic activity during cold acclimation, nor were there any effects on antifreeze activity in these apoplastic extracts from cold acclimated needles. 149 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Enrichment in Specific Soluble Sugars of Two Eucalyptus Cell-Suspension Cultures by Various Treatments Enhances Their Frost Tolerance via a Noncolligative Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travert, S.; Valerio, L.; Fouraste, I.; Boudet, A. M.; Teulieres, C.

    1997-08-01

    A cell-suspension culture obtained from the hybrid Eucalyptus gunnii/Eucalyptus globulus was hardened by exposure to lower temperatures, whereas in the same conditions cells from a hybrid with a more frost-sensitive genotype, Eucalyptus cypellocarpa/Eucalyptus globulus, were not able to acclimate. During the cold exposure the resistant cells accumulated soluble sugars, in particular fructose and sucrose, with a limited increase in cell osmolality. In contrast, the cell suspension that was unable to acclimate did not accumulate soluble sugars in response to the same cold treatment. To an extent similar to that induced after a cold acclimation, frost-hardiness of the cells increased after a 14-h incubation with specific soluble sugars such as sucrose, raffinose, fructose, and mannitol. Such hardening was also observed for long-term cultures in mannitol-enriched medium. This cryoprotective effect of sugars without exposure to lower temperatures was observed in both the resistant and the sensitive genotypes. Mannitol was one of the most efficient carbohydrates for the cryoprotection of eucalyptus. The best hardiness (a 2.7-fold increase in relative freezing tolerance) was obtained for the resistant cells by the cumulative effect of cold-induced acclimation and mannitol treatment. This positive effect of certain sugars on eucalyptus freezing tolerance was not colligative, since it was independent of osmolality and total sugar content.

  7. BILATERAL KEY COMPARISON SIM.T-K6.1 ON HUMIDITY STANDARDS IN THE DEW/FROST-POINT TEMPERATURE RANGE FROM −25 °C TO +20 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C.W.; Hill, K.D.

    2015-01-01

    A Regional Metrology Organization (RMO) Key Comparison of dew/frost point temperatures was carried out by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the National Research Council (NRC, Canada) between December 2014 and April, 2015. The results of this comparison are reported here, along with descriptions of the humidity laboratory standards for NIST and NRC and the uncertainty budget for these standards. This report also describes the protocol for the comparison and presents the data acquired. The results are analyzed, determining degree of equivalence between the dew/frost-point standards of NIST and NRC. PMID:26663952

  8. BILATERAL KEY COMPARISON SIM.T-K6.1 ON HUMIDITY STANDARDS IN THE DEW/FROST-POINT TEMPERATURE RANGE FROM -25 °C TO +20 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C W; Hill, K D

    A Regional Metrology Organization (RMO) Key Comparison of dew/frost point temperatures was carried out by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the National Research Council (NRC, Canada) between December 2014 and April, 2015. The results of this comparison are reported here, along with descriptions of the humidity laboratory standards for NIST and NRC and the uncertainty budget for these standards. This report also describes the protocol for the comparison and presents the data acquired. The results are analyzed, determining degree of equivalence between the dew/frost-point standards of NIST and NRC.

  9. Reducing Susceptibility to Courtesy Stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachleda, Catherine L; El Menzhi, Leila

    2017-04-19

    In light of the chronic shortage of health professionals willing to care for HIV/AIDS patients, and rising epidemics in many Muslim countries, this qualitative study examined susceptibility and resistance to courtesy stigma as experienced by nurses, doctors, and social workers in Morocco. Forty-nine in-depth interviews provided rich insights into the process of courtesy stigma and how it is managed, within the context of interactions with Islam, interactions within the workplace (patients, other health professionals), and interactions outside the workplace (the general public, friends, and family). Theoretically, the findings extend understanding of courtesy stigma and the dirty work literature. The findings also offer practical suggestions for the development of culturally appropriate strategies to reduce susceptibility to courtesy stigmatization. This study represents the first to explore courtesy stigma as a process experienced by health professionals providing HIV/AIDS care in an Islamic country.

  10. Antimycotics susceptibility testing of dermatophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić-Arsenijević Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatophytes are moulds that produce infections of the skin, hair and nails of humans and animals. The most common forms among these infections are onychomycosis and tinea pedis affecting 20% of world population. These infections are usually chronic. The treatment of dermatophytoses tends to be prolonged partly because available treatments are not very effective. Antifungal drug consumption and public health expenditure are high worldwide, as well as in Serbia. For adequate therapy, it is necessary to prove infection by isolation of dermatophytes and to test the antifungal susceptibility of isolates. Susceptibility testing is important for the resistance monitoring, epidemiological research and to compare in vitro activities of new antifungal agents. The diffusion and dilution methods of susceptibility tests are used, and technical issues of importance for the proper performance and interpretation of test results are published in the document E.DEF 9.1 (EUCAST and M38-A2 (CLSI. The aim of our paper is to promptly inform the public about technical achievements in this area, as well as the new organization of laboratory for medical mycology in our country. The formation of laboratory networks coordinated by the National Reference Laboratory for the cause of mycosis need to enable interlaboratory studies and further standardization of methods for antifungal susceptibility testing of dermatophytes, reproducibility of tests and clinical correlation monitoring (MIK values and clinical outcome of dermatophytosis. The importance of the new organization is expected efficient improvement in the dermatophytosis therapy at home, better quality of patient's life and the reduction of the cost of treatment.

  11. Back to the Future: Penicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Matthew P; René, Pierre; Cheng, Alexandre P; Lee, Todd C

    2016-12-01

    Widespread penicillin usage rapidly resulted in the emergence of penicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. However, new data suggest that penicillin susceptibility may be in a period of renaissance. The objective of our study was to quantify penicillin resistance in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia. We retrospectively reviewed all adult MSSA bacteremia from April 2010 to April 2015 at the McGill University Health Centre (Montreal, QC, Canada). Susceptibility to penicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) was determined in accordance with the Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. There were 324 unique episodes of MSSA bacteremia. Ninety (28%) isolates were susceptible to penicillin, 229 (71%) to erythromycin, 239 (74%) to clindamycin, and 317 (98%) to TMP-SMX. Isolates that were penicillin resistant were more likely to also be resistant to other antibiotics, but a statistically significant association was apparent only for erythromycin resistance (76/234, 32.2% vs 19/90, 21.1%, P = .04). The median age of patients was 67.5 years (interquartile range 52-78) and overall in-hospital 30-day mortality was 16.3% (53 deaths). After adjustment for patient age, there was no association between penicillin resistance and either intensive care unit admission or death. More than one-quarter of patients with MSSA bacteremia potentially could be treated with parenteral penicillin, which may offer pharmacokinetic advantages over other beta-lactam drugs and potentially improved outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotic susceptibility of Atopobium vaginae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verschraegen Gerda

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have indicated that a recently described anaerobic bacterium, Atopobium vaginae is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV. Thus far the four isolates of this fastidious micro-organism were found to be highly resistant to metronidazole and susceptible for clindamycin, two antibiotics preferred for the treatment of BV. Methods Nine strains of Atopobium vaginae, four strains of Gardnerella vaginalis, two strains of Lactobacillus iners and one strain each of Bifidobacterium breve, B. longum, L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii were tested against 15 antimicrobial agents using the Etest. Results All nine strains of A. vaginae were highly resistant to nalidixic acid and colistin while being inhibited by low concentrations of clindamycin (range: G. vaginalis strains were also susceptible for clindamycin ( 256 μg/ml but susceptible to clindamycin (0.023 – 0.125 μg/ml. Conclusion Clindamycin has higher activity against G. vaginalis and A. vaginae than metronidazole, but not all A. vaginae isolates are metronidazole resistant, as seemed to be a straightforward conclusion from previous studies on a more limited number of strains.

  13. Measurements of temperature dependence of 'localized susceptibility'

    CERN Document Server

    Shiozawa, H; Ishii, H; Takayama, Y; Obu, K; Muro, T; Saitoh, Y; Matsuda, T D; Sugawara, H; Sato, H

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of some rare-earth compounds is estimated by measuring magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of rare-earth 3d-4f absorption spectra. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility obtained by the MCD measurement is remarkably different from the bulk susceptibility in most samples, which is attributed to the strong site selectivity of the core MCD measurement.

  14. Methods for determining the antimicrobial susceptibility of mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, Fernando; Esteban, Jaime; González-Martin, Julià; Palacios, Juan-José

    2017-10-01

    Mycobacteria are a large group of microorganisms, multiple species of which are major causes of morbidity and mortality, such as tuberculosis and leprosy. At present, the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex are one of the most serious health problems worldwide. Furthermore, in contrast to M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are more frequently isolated and, in many cases, treatment is based on drug susceptibility testing. This article is a review of the different methods to determine the in vitro drug susceptibility of M. tuberculosis complex and the most relevant NTM isolates. The molecular techniques currently used for rapid detection of resistance of clinical specimens are also analysed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Bacterial Nanoscale Cultures for Phenotypic Multiplexed Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibull, Emilie; Antypas, Haris; Kjäll, Peter; Brauner, Annelie; Andersson-Svahn, Helene

    2014-01-01

    An optimal antimicrobial drug regimen is the key to successful clinical outcomes of bacterial infections. To direct the choice of antibiotic, access to fast and precise antibiotic susceptibility profiling of the infecting bacteria is critical. We have developed a high-throughput nanowell antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) device for direct, multiplexed analysis. By processing in real time the optical recordings of nanoscale cultures of reference and clinical uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains with a mathematical algorithm, the time point when growth shifts from lag phase to early logarithmic phase (Tlag) was identified for each of the several hundreds of cultures tested. Based on Tlag, the MIC could be defined within 4 h. Heatmap presentation of data from this high-throughput analysis allowed multiple resistance patterns to be differentiated at a glance. With a possibility to enhance multiplexing capacity, this device serves as a high-throughput diagnostic tool that rapidly aids clinicians in prescribing the optimal antibiotic therapy. PMID:24989602

  16. The Tebuconazole-based Protectant of Seeds “Bunker” Induces the Synthesis of Dehydrins During Cold Hardening and Increases the Frost Resistance of Wheat Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Korsukova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Triazole derivatives are widely used in agriculture for seed protectant of cereals against seed and soil infection. Triazole derivatives can have an effect on the biochemical and physiological functions of plants. The tebuconazole-based protectant of seeds «Bunker» (content of tebuconazole 60 grams per liter, g/L is a systemic fungicide of preventive and therapeutic action. The effect of the seed treatment by «Bunker» preparation on the shoot growth and cell viability coleoptile, synthesis of dehydrins in shoots and frost resistance etiolated winter and spring wheat seedlings has been studied. It has been shown that treatment of winter and spring wheat seed by «Bunker» preparation induces similar concentration-dependent inhibition of the coleoptiles length. At the recommended dose (0,5 liter per tonne of seeds, L/t growth inhibition was 28 - 30%, at a concentration of 1 L/t – 33 - 36%, at a concentration of 1,5 L/t – 40 - 42%, at a concentration of 3 L/t – 43 - 47%, at a concentration of 4 L/t – 48 - 51% and at 5 L/t – 53 - 56%. The treatment of wheat seed by «Bunker» preparation had no phytotoxic effect on coleoptile cells in any of the studied concentrations, on the contrary, with increasing concentration of preparation observed the increase in cell viability, as measured by recovery of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. We can assume that having retardant properties, tebuconazole not only inhibits the growth of plants, but also delays their aging. The treatment of seed protectant at a concentration of 1.5 L/t induced synthesis of the dehydrins with molecular masses about 19, 21, 22, 25 and 27 kD in winter wheat shoots and 18,6, 27 and 28,5 kD in spring wheat shoots during cold hardening. Among identified dehydrins the dehydrin of 27 kD is most significantly induced both in winter and spring wheat. The treatment of seed protectant «Bunker» in the same concentration increased the frost resistance of winter and spring wheat

  17. Synthesis of frost-like CuO combined graphene-TiO{sub 2} by self-assembly method and its high photocatalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cung Tien [Department of Advanced Materials Science & Engineering, Hanseo University, Seosan, Chungnam, 356-706 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwang-Youn [Korea Institutes of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Soho-ro, Jinju-Si, Gyeongsangnam-do (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Won-Chun, E-mail: wc_oh@hanseo.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Science & Engineering, Hanseo University, Seosan, Chungnam, 356-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • The frost-like CuO nanoparticles (3–5 nm) combined with the small TiO{sub 2} rods (50–100 nm) are expected to have a high charge transfer effect from TiO{sub 2} to CuO. • In this study, ·OH and h{sup +} play a major role in the photocatalytic reaction than O{sub 2}·{sup –} or both hydroxyl and holes are the active species responsible under visible light irradiation. • The photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B (RhB), methylene blue trihydrate (MB), and reactive black B (RBB) in an aqueous solution under visible light irradiation was observed by UV spectrophotometry after measurement of the decrease of their concentrations. CuO-graphene-TiO{sub 2} is expected to become a new potential material for photodegradation activity with excellent photodegradation. - Graphical abstract: TEM image of CuO-graphene (a and b), and CuO-graphene-TiO{sub 2} (c and d) composites. - Abstract: A novel material, frost-like CuO combined-graphene-TiO{sub 2} composite, was successfully synthesized using a self-assembly method. During the reaction, the loading of CuO and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on graphene sheets was achieved. The obtained CuO-graphene-TiO{sub 2} composite photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The frost-like CuO nanoparticles combined with the small TiO{sub 2} rods were successfully loaded on the transparent graphene sheets. The photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B (RhB), methylene blue trihydrate (MB), and reactive black B (RBB) in an aqueous solution under visible light irradiation was observed by UV spectrophotometry after measurement of the decrease of their concentrations. Through the photocatalytic test and TOC results, the CuO-graphene-TiO{sub 2} is expected to

  18. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  19. Simulating transmission and control of Taenia solium infections using a reed-frost stochastic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyvsgaard, Niels Chr.; Johansen, Maria Vang; Carabin, Hélène

    2007-01-01

    investigated using the model: (i) interventions affecting the transmission parameters such as use of latrines, meat inspection, and cooking habits; (ii) routine interventions including rapid detection and treatment of human carriers or pig vaccination; and (iii) treatment interventions of either humans or pigs...

  20. Preliminary indications for antibiotic susceptibility tests in less than six hour in positive blood cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesselina Kroumova

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A rapid determination of the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of pathogens responsible for sepsis represents a significant milestone for a timely correct antibiotic therapy.The system HB&L® (ALIFAX allows reduced time in the detection of bacterial growth and consequently is able to detect the growth or absence of certain microorganisms in the presence of a given antibiotic. In this study three system for rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests among bacteria isolated from blood were compared: HB&L® (ALIFAX,VITEK®2 (bioMérieux and essays Etest® (bioMérieux. Present findings indicate that HB&L® (ALIFAX is rapid reliable instrument that may support the clinician for a rapid and appropriate treatment, particularly in the critical patient.

  1. Rapid phenotyping of alfalfa root system architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root system architecture (RSA) influences the capacity of an alfalfa plant for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, nutrient uptake and water use efficiency, resistance to frost heaving, winterhardiness, and some pest and pathogen resistance. However, we currently lack a basic understanding of root system d...

  2. Bilateral intermediate uveitis with appearance of frosted branch angiitis and association with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsou, Artemis; Riga, Paraskevi; Samouilidou, Maria; Dimitrakos, Stavros; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented with acute bilateral visual loss following a mild upper respiratory tract infection. Clinical examination revealed bilateral severe peripheral retinal vasculitis with an appearance of frosted branch angiitis and cystoid macular edema. All tests for etiological diagnosis were negative, apart from positive IgM and IgG antibodies for Mycoplasma pneumoniae. She was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous corticosteroids. She responded to treatment, with dramatic improvement of her visual acuity, remission of angiitis, and a residual macular star formation. This is the first reported case of bilateral intermediate uveitis possibly associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Arctic microbial and next-generation sequencing approach for bacteria in snow and frost flowers: selected identification, abundance and freezing nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, R.; Attiya, S.; Ariya, P. A.

    2015-06-01

    During the spring of 2009, as part of the Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snowpack (OASIS) campaign in Barrow, Alaska, USA, we examined the identity, population diversity, freezing nucleation ability of the microbial communities of five different snow types and frost flowers. In addition to the culturing and gene-sequence-based identification approach, we utilized a state-of-the-art genomic next-generation sequencing (NGS) technique to examine the diversity of bacterial communities in Arctic samples. Known phyla or candidate divisions were detected (11-18) with the majority of sequences (12.3-83.1%) belonging to one of the five major phyla: Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Cyanobacteria. The number of genera detected ranged from, 101-245. The highest number of cultivable bacteria was observed in frost flowers (FFs) and accumulated snow (AS) with 325 ± 35 and 314 ± 142 CFU m L-1, respectively; and for cultivable fungi 5 ± 1 CFU m L-1 in windpack (WP) and blowing snow (BS). Morphology/elemental composition and ice-nucleating abilities of the identified taxa were obtained using high resolution electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and ice nucleation cold-plate, respectively. Freezing point temperatures for bacterial isolates ranged from -20.3 ± 1.5 to -15.7 ± 5.6 °C, and for melted snow samples from -9.5 ± 1.0 to -18.4 ± 0.1 °C. An isolate belonging to the genus Bacillus (96% similarity) had ice nucleation activity of -6.8 ± 0.2 °C. Comparison with Montreal urban snow, revealed that a seemingly diverse community of bacteria exists in the Arctic with some taxa possibly originating from distinct ecological environments. We discuss the potential impact of snow microorganisms in the freezing and melting process of the snowpack in the Arctic.

  4. Seasonal to Decadal Variations of Water Vapor in the Tropical Lower Stratosphere Observed with Balloon-Borne Cryogenic Frost Point Hygrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, M.; Voemel, H.; Hasebe, F.; Shiotani, M.; Ogino, S.-Y.; Iwasaki, S.; Nishi, N.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, K.; Nishimoto, E.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We investigated water vapor variations in the tropical lower stratosphere on seasonal, quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), and decadal time scales using balloon-borne cryogenic frost point hygrometer data taken between 1993 and 2009 during various campaigns including the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (March 1993), campaigns once or twice annually during the Soundings of Ozone and Water in the Equatorial Region (SOWER) project in the eastern Pacific (1998-2003) and in the western Pacific and Southeast Asia (2001-2009), and the Ticosonde campaigns and regular sounding at Costa Rica (2005-2009). Quasi-regular sounding data taken at Costa Rica clearly show the tape recorder signal. The observed ascent rates agree well with the ones from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) satellite sensor. Average profiles from the recent five SOWER campaigns in the equatorial western, Pacific in northern winter and from the three Ticosonde campaigns at Costa Rica (10degN) in northern summer clearly show two effects of the QBO. One is the vertical displacement of water vapor profiles associated with the QBO meridional circulation anomalies, and the other is the concentration variations associated with the QBO tropopause temperature variations. Time series of cryogenic frost point hygrometer data averaged in a lower stratospheric layer together with HALOE and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder data show the existence of decadal variations: The mixing ratios were higher and increasing in the 1990s, lower in the early 2000s, and probably slightly higher again or recovering after 2004. Thus linear trend analysis is not appropriate to investigate the behavior of the tropical lower stratospheric water vapor.

  5. Nanomechanical sensor applied to blood culture pellets: a fast approach to determine the antibiotic susceptibility against agents of bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupar, P; Opota, O; Longo, G; Prod'hom, G; Dietler, G; Greub, G; Kasas, S

    2017-06-01

    The management of bloodstream infection, a life-threatening disease, largely relies on early detection of infecting microorganisms and accurate determination of their antibiotic susceptibility to reduce both mortality and morbidity. Recently we developed a new technique based on atomic force microscopy capable of detecting movements of biologic samples at the nanoscale. Such sensor is able to monitor the response of bacteria to antibiotic's pressure, allowing a fast and versatile susceptibility test. Furthermore, rapid preparation of a bacterial pellet from a positive blood culture can improve downstream characterization of the recovered pathogen as a result of the increased bacterial concentration obtained. Using artificially inoculated blood cultures, we combined these two innovative procedures and validated them in double-blind experiments to determine the susceptibility and resistance of Escherichia coli strains (ATCC 25933 as susceptible and a characterized clinical isolate as resistant strain) towards a selection of antibiotics commonly used in clinical settings. On the basis of the variance of the sensor movements, we were able to positively discriminate the resistant from the susceptible E. coli strains in 16 of 17 blindly investigated cases. Furthermore, we defined a variance change threshold of 60% that discriminates susceptible from resistant strains. By combining the nanomotion sensor with the rapid preparation method of blood culture pellets, we obtained an innovative, rapid and relatively accurate method for antibiotic susceptibility test directly from positive blood culture bottles, without the need for bacterial subculture. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  7. GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE WITH APPLICATIONS IN SUSCEPTIBLE-INFECTIOUS-SUSCEPTIBLE MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, M; Turnea, M; Arotăriţei, D; Rotariu, Mariana; Popescu, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    Practical significance of understanding the dynamics and evolution of infectious diseases increases continuously in contemporary world. The mathematical study of the dynamics of infectious diseases has a long history. By incorporating statistical methods and computer-based simulations in dynamic epidemiological models, it could be possible for modeling methods and theoretical analyses to be more realistic and reliable, allowing a more detailed understanding of the rules governing epidemic spreading. To provide the basis for a disease transmission, the population of a region is often divided into various compartments, and the model governing their relation is called the compartmental model. To present all of the information available, a graphical user interface provides icons and visual indicators. The graphical interface shown in this paper is performed using the MATLAB software ver. 7.6.0. MATLAB software offers a wide range of techniques by which data can be displayed graphically. The process of data viewing involves a series of operations. To achieve it, I had to make three separate files, one for defining the mathematical model and two for the interface itself. Considering a fixed population, it is observed that the number of susceptible individuals diminishes along with an increase in the number of infectious individuals so that in about ten days the number of individuals infected and susceptible, respectively, has the same value. If the epidemic is not controlled, it will continue for an indefinite period of time. By changing the global parameters specific of the SIS model, a more rapid increase of infectious individuals is noted. Using the graphical user interface shown in this paper helps achieving a much easier interaction with the computer, simplifying the structure of complex instructions by using icons and menus, and, in particular, programs and files are much easier to organize. Some numerical simulations have been presented to illustrate theoretical

  8. Counselling framework for moderate-penetrance cancer-susceptibility mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Nadine; Domchek, Susan M; Stadler, Zsofia; Nathanson, Katherine L; Couch, Fergus; Garber, Judy E; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark E

    2016-09-01

    The use of multigene panels for the assessment of cancer susceptibility is expanding rapidly in clinical practice, particularly in the USA, despite concerns regarding the uncertain clinical validity for some gene variants and the uncertain clinical utility of most multigene panels. So-called 'moderate-penetrance' gene mutations associated with cancer susceptibility are identified in approximately 2-5% of individuals referred for clinical testing; some of these mutations are potentially actionable. Nevertheless, the appropriate management of individuals harbouring such moderate-penetrance genetic variants is unclear. The cancer risks associated with mutations in moderate-penetrance genes are lower and different than those reported for high-penetrance gene mutations (such as mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, and those associated with Lynch syndrome). The extrapolation of guidelines for the management of individuals with high-penetrance variants of cancer-susceptibility genes to the clinical care of patients with moderate-penetrance gene mutations could result in substantial harm. Thus, we provide a framework for clinical decision-making pending the development of a sufficient evidence base to document the clinical utility of the interventions for individuals with inherited moderate-penetrance gene mutations associated with an increased risk of cancer.

  9. Phylogenetic Relationships Matter: Antifungal Susceptibility among Clinically Relevant Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalreck, A. F.; Becker, K.; Fegeler, W.; Czaika, V.; Ulmer, H.; Lass-Flörl, C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was 2-fold: to evaluate whether phylogenetically closely related yeasts share common antifungal susceptibility profiles (ASPs) and whether these ASPs can be predicted from phylogeny. To address this question, 9,627 yeast strains were collected and tested for their antifungal susceptibility. Isolates were reidentified by considering recent changes in taxonomy and nomenclature. A phylogenetic (PHYLO) code based on the results of multilocus sequence analyses (large-subunit rRNA, small-subunit rRNA, translation elongation factor 1α, RNA polymerase II subunits 1 and 2) and the classification of the cellular neutral sugar composition of coenzyme Q and 18S ribosomal DNA was created to group related yeasts into PHYLO groups. The ASPs were determined for fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole in each PHYLO group. The majority (95%) of the yeast strains were Ascomycetes. After reclassification, a total of 23 genera and 54 species were identified, resulting in an increase of 64% of genera and a decrease of 5% of species compared with the initial identification. These taxa were assigned to 17 distinct PHYLO groups (Ascomycota, n = 13; Basidiomycota, n = 4). ASPs for azoles were similar among members of the same PHYLO group and different between the various PHYLO groups. Yeast phylogeny may be an additional tool to significantly enhance the assessment of MIC values and to predict antifungal susceptibility, thereby more rapidly initiating appropriate patient management. PMID:24366735

  10. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the smallest air passages of the lungs in children ( bronchiolitis ) Pneumonia or other lung infection Transient tachypnea of the newborn Anxiety and panic Other serious lung disease Home Care Rapid, shallow breathing should not be treated at home. It is ...

  11. Rapid Strep Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worse than normal. Your first thoughts turn to strep throat. A rapid strep test in your doctor’s office ... your suspicions.Viruses cause most sore throats. However, strep throat is an infection caused by the Group A ...

  12. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  13. Proteochemometric modeling of HIV protease susceptibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lapins, Maris; Eklund, Martin; Spjuth, Ola; Prusis, Peteris; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2008-01-01

    .... Therefore, we used proteochemometrics to model the susceptibility of HIV to protease inhibitors in current use, utilizing descriptions of the physico-chemical properties of mutated HIV proteases...

  14. RAPID3? Aptly named!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, J-M

    2014-01-01

    The RAPID3 score is the sum of three 0-10 patient self-report scores: pain, functional impairment on MDHAQ, and patient global estimate. It requires 5 seconds for scoring and can be used in all rheumatologic conditions, although it has mostly been used in rheumatoid arthritis where cutoffs for low disease activity (12/30) have been set. A RAPID3 score of ≤ 3/30 with 1 or 0 swollen joints (RAPID3 ≤ 3 + ≤ SJ1) provides remission criteria comparable to Boolean, SDAI, CDAI, and DAS28 remission criteria, in far less time than a formal joint count. RAPID3 performs as well as the DAS28 in separating active drugs from placebos in clinical trials. RAPID3 also predicts subsequent structural disease progression. RAPID3 can be determined at short intervals at home, allowing the determination of the area under the curve of disease activity between two visits and flare detection. However, RAPID3 should not be seen as a substitute for DAS28 and face to face visits in routine care. Monitoring patient status with only self-report information without a rheumatologist's advice (including joints and physical examination, and consideration of imaging and laboratory tests) may indeed be as undesirable for most patients than joint examination without a patient questionnaire. Conversely, combining the RAPID3 and the DAS28 may consist in faster or more sensitive confirmation that a medication is effective. Similarly, better enquiring of most important concerns of patients (pain, functional status and overall opinion on their disorder) should reinforces patients' confidence in their rheumatologist and treatments.

  15. AC susceptibility of the Fe(Al, Co) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Aljarayesh, I.; Al-Hussein, K.

    1993-08-01

    The temperature and field dependence of the low-field ac susceptibility of the FeAl 1- xCo x (for 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.45) system are studied in the temperature range 160-300 K. The results of the κ'- T curves show broad maxima for samples with x ≤ 0.3. The positions of the maxima for samples with x = 0.25 and 0.3 show a weak frequency dependence. For samples with x ≥ 0.3 the susceptibility continues to increase with temperature in the range studied. When an external transverse dc magnetic field is applied, κ' decreases rapidly with increasing the magnitude of the dc field for all studied samples. The obtained paramagnetic temperature θ p, increases rapidly with x. The results are discussed within the context of the Néel theory of superparamagnetism. The environmental effects on the magnetic moment of Fe and Co atoms are used to interpret the results.

  16. Susceptibility of Permafrost Soil Organic Carbon under Warming Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Liang, L.; Graham, D. E.; Gu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Degradation of soil organic carbon (SOC) that has been stored in permafrost is a key concern under warming climate because it could provide a positive feedback. Studies and conceptual models suggest that SOC degradation is largely controlled by the decomposability of SOC, but it is unclear exactly what portions of SOC are susceptible to rapid breakdown and what mechanisms may be involved in SOC degradation. Using a suite of analytical techniques, we examined the dynamic consumption and production of labile SOC compounds, including sugars, alcohols, and small molecular weight organic acids in incubation experiments (up to 240 days at either -2 or 8 °C) with a tundra soil under anoxic conditions, where SOC respiration and iron(III) reduction were monitored. We observe that sugars and alcohols are main components in SOC accounting for initial rapid release of CO2 and CH4 through anaerobic fermentation, whereas the fermentation products such as acetate and formate are subsequently utilized as primary substrates for methanogenesis. Iron(III) reduction is correlated to acetate production and methanogenesis, suggesting its important roles as an electron acceptor in tundra SOC respiration. These observations corroborate strongly with the glucose addition during incubation, in which rapid CO2 and CH4 production is observed concurrently with rapid production and consumption of organics such as acetate. Thus, the biogeochemical processes we document here are pertinent to understanding the accelerated SOC decomposition with temperature and could provide basis for model predicting feedbacks to climate warming in the Arctic.

  17. Single-step quantitative susceptibility mapping with variational penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatnuntawech, Itthi; McDaniel, Patrick; Cauley, Stephen F; Gagoski, Borjan A; Langkammer, Christian; Martin, Adrian; Grant, P Ellen; Wald, Lawrence L; Setsompop, Kawin; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Bilgic, Berkin

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) estimates the underlying tissue magnetic susceptibility from the gradient echo (GRE) phase signal through background phase removal and dipole inversion steps. Each of these steps typically requires the solution of an ill-posed inverse problem and thus necessitates additional regularization. Recently developed single-step QSM algorithms directly relate the unprocessed GRE phase to the unknown susceptibility distribution, thereby requiring the solution of a single inverse problem. In this work, we show that such a holistic approach provides susceptibility estimation with artifact mitigation and develop efficient algorithms that involve simple analytical solutions for all of the optimization steps. Our methods employ total variation (TV) and total generalized variation (TGV) to jointly perform the background removal and dipole inversion in a single step. Using multiple spherical mean value (SMV) kernels of varying radii permits high-fidelity background removal whilst retaining the phase information in the cortex. Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed single-step methods reduce the reconstruction error by up to 66% relative to the multi-step methods that involve SMV background filtering with the same number of SMV kernels, followed by TV- or TGV-regularized dipole inversion. In vivo single-step experiments demonstrate a dramatic reduction in dipole streaking artifacts and improved homogeneity of image contrast. These acquisitions employ the rapid three-dimensional echo planar imaging (3D EPI) and Wave-CAIPI (controlled aliasing in parallel imaging) trajectories for signal-to-noise ratio-efficient whole-brain imaging. Herein, we also demonstrate the multi-echo capability of the Wave-CAIPI sequence for the first time, and introduce an automated, phase-sensitive coil sensitivity estimation scheme based on a 4-s calibration acquisition. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley

  18. Demonstration cultivation of Salix in northern Sweden with a focus on frost resistance; Demonstrationsodling av Salix i Norrland med frosttolerans i fokus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederstroem, Yvonne

    2010-06-15

    This project is part of the Thermal Engineering Research Association's (Vaermeforsk) programme 'Crops from field to energy production' and the goal is to convince growers to begin cultivating Salix in the northern part of Sweden. The project will demonstrate whether it is possible to grow Salix and examine what type of Salix (the report refers to the different types as Tora, Karin and Gudrun) is most frost-resistant and resistant to insects, fungal infections and animals. The project is aimed primarily at landowners and energy companies. The results showed that growth at the demonstration plots was moderate and the establishment rate was considered good. Growth has been uneven across the fields. At Eriksgaard, about 75% of the plants survived the winter. Survival was determined by the number of plants missing and dead. Additional plants were planted at the sites in 2009. No major insect or leaf fungus attacks were noted at either Eriksgaard or Soergaard, but they both experienced grazing from deer and elk. The rating showed that the herbicide treatment was not sufficient on the demonstration fields. For this reason, a comparison of average lengths was performed of Gudrun in Bodum, where the weeds had not grown as much. The comparison showed that the difference in growth was not significant in the autumn 2008, but the plants in Bodum had grown more by autumn 2009. Topping was not performed in the spring 2009 so that the plants would have an opportunity to grow higher than the weeds and the plants would have an opportunity to have a growth spurt. A comparison of Tora, Karin and Gudrun in Roedoen showed moderate growth for the three types. There were variations in the rows and across the field, mostly for Tora and Karin. Gudrun had lower, but more consistent growth across the field. During the summer 2009, survival was rated for the plants in Roedoen. This rating showed that 90% of Tora, 60% of Karin and 70% of Gudrun had survived the winter. The Salix

  19. Search for new breast cancer susceptibility genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburg, Rogier Abel

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for new high-risk breast cancer susceptibility genes by linkage analysis. To date 20-25% of familial breast cancer is explained by mutations in the high-risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes. For the remaining families the genetic etiology is

  20. Mapping markers linked to porcine salmonellosis susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galina-Pantoja, L.; Siggens, K.; Schriek, van M.G.M.; Heuven, H.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify pig chromosomal regions associated with susceptibility to salmonellosis. Genomic DNA from pig reference populations with differences in susceptibility to Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis as quantified by spleen and liver bacterial colonization at day 7

  1. Crystal morphology change by magnetic susceptibility force

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuki, Aiko; Aibara, Shigeo; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-01-01

    We found a change in morphology when lysozyme crystals were grown in a magnetic field. The phenomenon was caused by the magnetic force derived from the magnetic susceptibility gradient. We propose that this force should be called the “magnetic susceptibility force".

  2. Digital Quantification of DNA Replication and Chromosome Segregation Enables Determination of Antimicrobial Susceptibility after only 15 Minutes of Antibiotic Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Schoepp, Nathan G.; Khorosheva, Eugenia M.; Schlappi, Travis S.; Curtis, Matthew S.; Humphries, Romney M.; Hindler, Janet A.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) would decrease misuse and overuse of antibiotics. The “holy grail” of AST is a phenotype-based test that can be performed within a doctor visit. Such a test requires the ability to determine a pathogen’s susceptibility after only a short antibiotic exposure. Herein, digital PCR (dPCR) was employed to test whether measuring DNA replication of the target pathogen through digital single-molecule counting would shorten the required time of antibiot...

  3. Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited genetic factors also play an important role, with approximately 5-10% of pancreatic cancer patients reporting family history of pancreatic cancer. While the genetic basis for the majority of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer remains unclear, several important pancreatic cancer genes have been identified. These consist of high penetrance genes including BRCA2 or PALB2, to more common genetic variation associated with a modest increase risk of pancreatic cancer such as genetic variation at the ABO blood group locus. Recent advances in genotyping and genetic sequencing have accelerated the rate at which novel pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been identified with several genes identified within the past few years. This review addresses our current understanding of the familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer, established pancreatic cancer susceptablity genes and how this knowledge informs risk assessment and screening for high-risk families. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Genetic Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited genetic factors also play an important role, with approximately 5–10% of pancreatic cancer patients reporting family history of pancreatic cancer. While the genetic basis for the majority of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer remains unclear, several important pancreatic cancer genes have been identified. These consist of high penetrance genes including BRCA2 or PALB2, to more common genetic variation associated with a modest increase risk of pancreatic cancer such as genetic variation at the ABO blood group locus. Recent advances in genotyping and genetic sequencing have accelerated the rate at which novel pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been identified with several genes identified within the past few years. This review addresses our current understanding of the familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer, established pancreatic cancer susceptablity genes and how this knowledge informs risk assessment and screening for high-risk families. PMID:22162228

  5. Fidelity susceptibility in the quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Lv, Xiao-Chen

    2018-01-01

    Quantum criticality usually occurs in many-body systems. Recently it was shown that the quantum Rabi model, which describes a two-level atom coupled to a single model cavity field, presents quantum phase transitions from a normal phase to a superradiate phase when the ratio between the frequency of the two-level atom and the frequency of the cavity field extends to infinity. In this work, we study quantum phase transitions in the quantum Rabi model from the fidelity susceptibility perspective. We found that the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility present universal finite-size scaling behaviors near the quantum critical point of the Rabi model if the ratio between frequency of the two-level atom and frequency of the cavity field is finite. From the finite-size scaling analysis of the fidelity susceptibility, we found that the adiabatic dimension of the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility of fourth order in the Rabi model are 4 /3 and 2, respectively. Meanwhile, the correlation length critical exponent and the dynamical critical exponent in the quantum critical point of the Rabi model are found to be 3 /2 and 1 /3 , respectively. Since the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility are the moments of the quantum noise spectrum which are directly measurable by experiments in linear response regime, the scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility in the Rabi model could be tested experimentally. The simple structure of the quantum Rabi model paves the way for experimentally observing the universal scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility at a quantum phase transition.

  6. Rapid small lot manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The direct connection of information, captured in forms such as CAD databases, to the factory floor is enabling a revolution in manufacturing. Rapid response to very dynamic market conditions is becoming the norm rather than the exception. In order to provide economical rapid fabrication of small numbers of variable products, one must design with manufacturing constraints in mind. In addition, flexible manufacturing systems must be programmed automatically to reduce the time for product change over in the factory and eliminate human errors. Sensor based machine control is needed to adapt idealized, model based machine programs to uncontrolled variables such as the condition of raw materials and fabrication tolerances.

  7. BILATERAL KEY COMPARISON SIM.T-K6.5 ON HUMIDITY STANDARDS IN THE DEW/FROST-POINT TEMPERATURE RANGE FROM -30 °C TO +20 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C W; Solano, A

    2016-01-01

    A Regional Metrology Organization (RMO) Key Comparison of dew/frost point temperatures over the range -30 °C TO +20 °C was carried out by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the Laboratorio Costarricense de Metrología (LACOMET, Costa Rica), between February 2015 and August 2015. The results of this comparison are reported here, along with descriptions of the humidity laboratory standards for NIST and LACOMET and the uncertainty budget for these standards. This report also describes the protocol for the comparison and presents the data acquired. The results are analyzed, determining the degree of equivalence between the dew/frost-point standards of NIST and LACOMET.

  8. BILATERAL KEY COMPARISON SIM.T-K6.5 ON HUMIDITY STANDARDS IN THE DEW/FROST-POINT TEMPERATURE RANGE FROM −30 °C TO +20 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C.W.; Solano, A.

    2016-01-01

    A Regional Metrology Organization (RMO) Key Comparison of dew/frost point temperatures over the range −30 °C TO +20 °C was carried out by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the Laboratorio Costarricense de Metrología (LACOMET, Costa Rica), between February 2015 and August 2015. The results of this comparison are reported here, along with descriptions of the humidity laboratory standards for NIST and LACOMET and the uncertainty budget for these standards. This report also describes the protocol for the comparison and presents the data acquired. The results are analyzed, determining the degree of equivalence between the dew/frost-point standards of NIST and LACOMET. PMID:28066029

  9. Rapid Cycling and Its Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Rapid Cycling and its Treatment What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar ... to Depression and Manic Depression . What is rapid cycling? Rapid cycling is defined as four or more ...

  10. Effects of spring frosts in selected apple and pear orchards in the Lublin region in the years 2000, 2005 and 2007. Part I. Experiment at EF Felin. Part II. Selected production orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Lipa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Data concerning the effect of spring frosts on the survival of flower buds of several apple and pear cultivars, as well as on the damage caused by spring frosts to apple fruit are presented in the present paper. Observations were conducted in experimental and commercial orchards in the Lublin area in the years 2000, 2005 and 2007. The lowest temperature in spring in the consecutive years occurred on the following dates: 2000 - 3rd and 4th May, 2005 - 1st April and 22nd May, and 2007 - 2nd and 4th May. The most serious damages of buds were found in apple trees of Red Boskoop, Rubin and Jonagold cvs. grown in the experimental orchard in Felin (Lublin (this was an average value for the years 2000 and 2007, whereas the buds of the late flowering cultivars of Golden Delicious Smoothee, Royal Gala and Ligol survived with significantly lesser damages. These observations generally confirmed those made in commercial orchards in 2005 and 2007, in which buds of cv. Elise also showed high resistance to spring frosts. Pear trees of cv. Concorde showed low damage to flower buds in 2007 and produced a reasonably good crop. Fruits of cv. Jonagold and its mutations Wilmuta, Jonica, Decosta and Rubinstar proved to be very sensitive to spring frosts, as well as fruits of cv. Lired. The positive influence of the Polish rootstock P60 on flower bud survival was observed in the year 2000. However, this was not confirmed in 2007, thus further observations are necessary to check these effects.

  11. Rapid manufacturing for microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . Microfluidics is at the forefront of developing solutions for drug discovery, diagnostics (from glucose tests to malaria and TB testing) and environmental diagnostics (E-coli monitoring of drinking water). In order to quickly implement new designs, a rapid...

  12. Rapid Prototyping in PVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PVSio is a conservative extension to the PVS prelude library that provides basic input/output capabilities to the PVS ground evaluator. It supports rapid prototyping in PVS by enhancing the specification language with built-in constructs for string manipulation, floating point arithmetic, and input/output operations.

  13. Rapid Prototyping Reconsidered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosier, James

    2011-01-01

    Continuing educators need additional strategies for developing new programming that can both reduce the time to market and lower the cost of development. Rapid prototyping, a time-compression technique adapted from the high technology industry, represents one such strategy that merits renewed evaluation. Although in higher education rapid…

  14. Characterization of biofilm growth and biocide susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium phlei using the MBEC assay system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardouniotis, E; Huddleston, W; Ceri, H; Olson, M E

    2001-09-25

    The importance of non-tuberculosis mycobacterial biofilm species in medicine, industry and the environment has recently gained attention. Our objectives were to characterize biofilm growth of Mycobacterium phlei M4, as a model of rapidly growing mycobacteria using the minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) and to compare biocide susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm organisms. Scanning electron microscopy was also carried out to observe biofilm morphology. With the exception of Sporicidin and Virkon the minimum bactericidal concentration values for all biocides tested were lower than the MBEC values. The MBEC assay system was seen to produce multiple and reproducible biofilms of M. phlei and to be a useful tool for susceptibility studies.

  15. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  16. GIS-Based Integration of Subjective and Objective Weighting Methods for Regional Landslides Susceptibility Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhua Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of landslide susceptibility maps is of great importance due to rapid urbanization. The purpose of this study is to present a method to integrate the subjective weight with objective weight for regional landslide susceptibility mapping on the geographical information system (GIS platform. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP, which is subjective, was employed to weight predictive factors’ contribution to landslide occurrence. The frequency ratio (FR method, which is objective, was used to derive subclasses’ frequency ratio with respect to landslides that indicate the relative importance of a subclass within each predictive factor. A case study was carried out at Tsushima Island, Japan, using a historical inventory of 534 landslides and seven predictive factors: elevation, slope, aspect, terrain roughness index (TRI, lithology, land cover and mean annual precipitation (MAP. The landslide susceptibility index (LSI was calculated using the weighted linear combination of factors’ weights and subclasses’ weights. The study area was classified into five susceptibility zones according to the LSI. In addition, the produced susceptibility map was compared with maps generated using the conventional FR and AHP method and validated using the relative landslide index (RLI. The validation result showed that the proposed method performed better than the conventional application of the FR method and AHP method. The obtained landslide susceptibility maps could serve as a scientific basis for urban planning and landslide hazard management.

  17. Seasonal differences in photosynthesis between the C3 and C4 subspecies of Alloteropsis semialata are offset by frost and drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Douglas G; Gilbert, Matthew E; Ripley, Brad S; Osborne, Colin P

    2008-07-01

    The regional abundance of C(4) grasses is strongly controlled by temperature, however, the role of precipitation is less clear. Progress in elucidating the direct effects of photosynthetic pathway on these climate relationships is hindered by the significant genetic divergence between major C(3) and C(4) grass lineages. We addressed this problem by examining seasonal climate responses of photosynthesis in Alloteropsis semialata, a unique grass species with both C(3) and C(4) subspecies. Experimental manipulation of rainfall in a common garden in South Africa tested the hypotheses that: (1) photosynthesis is greater in the C(4) than C(3) subspecies under high summer temperatures, but this pattern is reversed at low winter temperatures; and (2) the photosynthetic advantage of C(4) plants is enhanced during drought events. Measurements of leaf gas exchange over 2 years showed a significant photosynthetic advantage for the C(4) subspecies under irrigated conditions from spring through autumn. However, the C(4) leaves were killed by winter frost, while photosynthesis continued in the C(3) plants. Unexpectedly, the C(4) subspecies also lost its photosynthetic advantage during natural drought events, despite greater water-use efficiency under irrigated conditions. This study highlights previously unrecognized roles for climatic extremes in determining the ecological success of C(3) and C(4) grasses.

  18. Causes of false-positive HIV rapid diagnostic test results

    OpenAIRE

    Klarkowski, Derryck; O?Brien, Daniel P.; Shanks, Leslie; Singh, Kasha P.

    2014-01-01

    HIV rapid diagnostic tests have enabled widespread implementation of HIV programs in resource-limited settings. If the tests used in the diagnostic algorithm are susceptible to the same cause for false positivity, a false-positive diagnosis may result in devastating consequences. In resource-limited settings, the lack of routine confirmatory testing, compounded by incorrect interpretation of weak positive test lines and use of tie-breaker algorithms, can leave a false-positive diagnosis undet...

  19. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  20. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Extended Spectrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactamase (ESBL) producing gram-negative uropathogens in Sokoto, Nigeria. ... Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was determined using the modified Kirby Bauer method. Confirmation of ESBL phenotype was performed by Double-Disc Synergy Test ...

  1. antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of extended spectrum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JAMILU

    ABSTRACT. The emergence of resistant strains of urogenital extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing ... antimicrobial susceptibility test using CLSI recommended, WHO modified Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. ... Keywords: Extended Spectrum Beta-lactamases, Prevalence, Gram-negative urogenital isolates,.

  2. antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of salmonella species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Empirical treatment for enteric fevers should, therefore, be discouraged while quinolones, cefepime, carbapenem, azithromycin and third generation cephalosporins be given preference. KEY WORDS: Susceptibility, Antimicrobial, Salmonella species, Enteric fever. INTRODUCTION. In the 21st century, enteric fever in the.

  3. Human genetic susceptibility to Candida infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, T.S.; Johnson, M.D.; Scott, W.K.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Meer, J.W. van der; Perfect, J.R.; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Infections with Candida spp. have different manifestations in humans, ranging from mucosal to bloodstream and deep-seated disseminated infections. Immunocompromised patients have increased susceptibility to these types of infections, due to reduced capacity to elicit effective innate or adaptive

  4. Rapid manufacturing facilitated customisation

    OpenAIRE

    Tuck, Christopher John; Hague, Richard; Ruffo, Massimiliano; Ransley, Michelle; Adams, Paul Russell

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes the production of body-fitting customised seat profiles utilising the following digital methods: three dimensional laser scanning, reverse engineering and Rapid Manufacturing (RM). The seat profiles have been manufactured in order to influence the comfort characteristics of an existing ejector seat manufactured by Martin Baker Aircraft Ltd. The seat, known as Navy Aircrew Common Ejection Seat (NACES), was originally designed with a generic profile. ...

  5. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development

  6. Landslide susceptibility map: from research to application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Reichenbach, Paola; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Felicioni, Giulia; Antonini, Guendalina

    2014-05-01

    Susceptibility map is an important and essential tool in environmental planning, to evaluate landslide hazard and risk and for a correct and responsible management of the territory. Landslide susceptibility is the likelihood of a landslide occurring in an area on the basis of local terrain conditions. Can be expressed as the probability that any given region will be affected by landslides, i.e. an estimate of "where" landslides are likely to occur. In this work we present two examples of landslide susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region and for the Perugia Municipality. These two maps were realized following official request from the Regional and Municipal government to the Research Institute for the Hydrogeological Protection (CNR-IRPI). The susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region represents the development of previous agreements focused to prepare: i) a landslide inventory map that was included in the Urban Territorial Planning (PUT) and ii) a series of maps for the Regional Plan for Multi-risk Prevention. The activities carried out for the Umbria Region were focused to define and apply methods and techniques for landslide susceptibility zonation. Susceptibility maps were prepared exploiting a multivariate statistical model (linear discriminant analysis) for the five Civil Protection Alert Zones defined in the regional territory. The five resulting maps were tested and validated using the spatial distribution of recent landslide events that occurred in the region. The susceptibility map for the Perugia Municipality was prepared to be integrated as one of the cartographic product in the Municipal development plan (PRG - Piano Regolatore Generale) as required by the existing legislation. At strategic level, one of the main objectives of the PRG, is to establish a framework of knowledge and legal aspects for the management of geo-hydrological risk. At national level most of the susceptibility maps prepared for the PRG, were and still are obtained

  7. Tiber Personal Rapid Transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Carlo D'agostino

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The project “Tiber Personal Rapid Transit” have been presented by the author at the Rome City Vision Competition1 2010, an ideas competition, which challenges architects, engineers, designers, students and creatives individuals to develop visionary urban proposals with the intention of stimulating and supporting the contemporary city, in this case Rome. The Tiber PRT proposal tries to answer the competition questions with the definition of a provocative idea: a Personal Rapid transit System on the Tiber river banks. The project is located in the central section of the Tiber river and aims at the renewal of the river banks with the insertion of a Personal Rapid Transit infrastructure. The project area include the riverbank of Tiber from Rome Transtevere RFI station to Piazza del Popolo, an area where main touristic and leisure attractions are located. The intervention area is actually no used by the city users and residents and constitute itself a strong barrier in the heart of the historic city.

  8. Mold Susceptibility of Rapidly Renewable Building Materials Used in Wall Construction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cooper, Aaron M

    2007-01-01

    .... and around the world. These guidelines are skyrocketing in use due in part to two reasons: increased awareness of a need for reducing, reusing, and recycling in order to save resources and natural areas for future generations...

  9. Connecting network properties of rapidly disseminating epizoonotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel L Rivas

    Full Text Available To effectively control the geographical dissemination of infectious diseases, their properties need to be determined. To test that rapid microbial dispersal requires not only susceptible hosts but also a pre-existing, connecting network, we explored constructs meant to reveal the network properties associated with disease spread, which included the road structure.Using geo-temporal data collected from epizoonotics in which all hosts were susceptible (mammals infected by Foot-and-mouth disease virus, Uruguay, 2001; birds infected by Avian Influenza virus H5N1, Nigeria, 2006, two models were compared: 1 'connectivity', a model that integrated bio-physical concepts (the agent's transmission cycle, road topology into indicators designed to measure networks ('nodes' or infected sites with short- and long-range links, and 2 'contacts', which focused on infected individuals but did not assess connectivity.THE CONNECTIVITY MODEL SHOWED FIVE NETWORK PROPERTIES: 1 spatial aggregation of cases (disease clusters, 2 links among similar 'nodes' (assortativity, 3 simultaneous activation of similar nodes (synchronicity, 4 disease flows moving from highly to poorly connected nodes (directionality, and 5 a few nodes accounting for most cases (a "20:80" pattern. In both epizoonotics, 1 not all primary cases were connected but at least one primary case was connected, 2 highly connected, small areas (nodes accounted for most cases, 3 several classes of nodes were distinguished, and 4 the contact model, which assumed all primary cases were identical, captured half the number of cases identified by the connectivity model. When assessed together, the synchronicity and directionality properties explained when and where an infectious disease spreads.Geo-temporal constructs of Network Theory's nodes and links were retrospectively validated in rapidly disseminating infectious diseases. They distinguished classes of cases, nodes, and networks, generating information usable

  10. Identifying opportunities for cancer prevention during preadolescence and adolescence: puberty as a window of susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Frank M; Deardorff, Julianna

    2013-05-01

    Early life exposures during times of rapid growth and development are recognized increasingly to impact later life. Epidemiologic studies document an association between exposures at critical windows of susceptibility with outcomes as diverse as childhood and adult obesity, timing of menarche, and risk for hypertension or breast cancer. This article briefly reviews the concept of windows of susceptibility for providers who care for adolescent patients. The theoretical bases for windows of susceptibility is examined, evaluating the relationship between pubertal change and breast cancer as a paradigm, and reviewing the underlying mechanisms, such as epigenetic modification. The long-term sequela of responses to early exposures may impact other adult morbidities; addressing these exposures represents an important challenge for contemporary medicine. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert H.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains were more resistant to chlorine than were cells of the more rapidly growing strains. Water-grown cells were 10-fold more resistant than medium-grown cells. Disinfectant resistance may be one factor promoting the persistence of M. avium in drinking water. PMID:10742264

  12. Biological aspects and candidate biomarkers for rapid-cycling in bipolar disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoli, Massimiliano; Serati, Marta; Altamura, A Carlo

    2017-12-01

    Rapid-cycling bipolar disorder represents a frequent severe subtype of illness which has been associated with poor response to pharmacological treatment. Aim of the present article is to provide an updated review of biological markers associated with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder. A research in the main database sources has been conducted to identify relevant papers about the topic. Rapid-cycling bipolar disorder patients seem to have a more frequent family history for bipolar spectrum disorders (d range: 0.44-0.74) as well as an increased susceptibility to DNA damage or mRNA hypo-transcription (d range: 0.78-1.67) than non rapid-cycling ones. A susceptibility to hypothyroidism, which is exacerbated by treatment with lithium, is possible in rapid-cycling bipolar disorder, but further studies are needed to draw definitive conclusions. Rapid-cycling bipolar patients might have more insuline resistance as well as more severe brain changes in frontal areas (d range: 0.82-0.94) than non rapid-cycling ones. Many questions are still open about this topic. The first is whether the rapid-cycling is inheritable or is more generally the manifestation of a severe form of bipolar disorder. The second is whether some endocrine dysfunctions (diabetes and hypothyroidism) predispose to rapid-cycling or rapid-cycling is the consequence of drug treatment or medical comorbidities (e.g. obesity). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapidly variable relatvistic absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A.; Lohfink, A.; Buisson, D.; Alston, W.; Jiang, J.

    2017-10-01

    I will present results from the 1.5Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the most X-ray variable AGN, IRAS 13224-3809. We find a series of nine absorption lines with a velocity of 0.24c from an ultra-fast outflow. For the first time, we are able to see extremely rapid variability of the UFO features, and can link this to the X-ray variability from the inner accretion disk. We find a clear flux dependence of the outflow features, suggesting that the wind is ionized by increasing X-ray emission.

  14. Rapid prototype and test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  15. Right-Rapid-Rough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Craig

    2003-01-01

    IDEO (pronounced 'eye-dee-oh') is an international design, engineering, and innovation firm that has developed thousands of products and services for clients across a wide range of industries. Its process and culture attracted the attention of academics, businesses, and journalists around the world, and are the subject of a bestselling book, The Art of Innovation by Tom Kelley. One of the keys to IDEO's success is its use of prototyping as a tool for rapid innovation. This story covers some of IDEO's projects, and gives reasons for why they were successful.

  16. Métodos de proteção de mudas de abacate contra geada em diferentes cultivares Frost protection covers methods for avocado in different cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara Ribeiro Mindêllo Neto

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado na EMBRAPA Transferência de Tecnologia/SNT, localizado em Canoinhas-SC, Planalto Norte Catarinense. O objetivo foi avaliar a tolerância ao frio de oito cultivares de abacate (Choquette, Vitória, Herculano, Quintal, Linda, Tonnage, Fuerte e Ryan plantadas em maio de 2003, utilizando dois métodos de proteção da muda contra geadas (galhos de eucalipto e galhos de eucalipto + sombrite. Em setembro do mesmo ano, estes materiais que protegiam as mudas, foram retirados e foram atribuídas notas para avaliar o grau de dano nas plantas. Não houve diferença entre as cultivares de abacate em relação à tolerância ao frio, independentemente do tipo de proteção. Entretanto, comparados os dois métodos avaliados, a utilização de galhos de eucalipto associado ao uso de sombrite foi mais eficiente na proteção de plantas jovens de abacate quando comparado ao uso de galhos de eucalipto.The experiment was carried out at EMBRAPA Technology Transfer Office at Canoinhas, Santa Catarina State, Northern Highland area. The aim was to evaluate the tolerance for low temperature in eight varieties of avocado (Choquette, Vitória, Herculano, Quintal, Linda, Tonnage, Fuerte and Ryan planted in May of 2003 using two methods of covers for avocado maiden trees (eucalyptus branches and eucalyptus branches plus sombrite. In September, in the same year, the covers were removed and ranked by scores to evaluate the degree of frost injury on plants. There were no difference between avocado varieties in relation of covers methods. However, comparing the two covers methods, the use of eucalyptus branches plus sombrite was better than the use of eucalyptus branches, in young plants of avocado.

  17. PROTOCOL OF FACTORS ASSESSMENT INFLUENTIAL IN SUSCEPTIBILITY TO EROSION OF RIVER SLOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josita Soares Monteiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Actions to conserve rivers must be preceded by an environmental diagnosis, however, beyond the body of water, the adjacent atmosphere must also be characterized by ability of recognizing the human impacts and differentiate them of the natural variation of these ecosystems. This study aimed to develop a rapid assessment protocol (PAR, composed of seven parameters - vegetation, soil texture, part of the river, slope inclination slope gradient, soil depth in slope, stroke width of water course, use and land cover -, assigning them weights 0-4, in order to assess the influence of their categories in susceptibility to erosion of the river slope. The PAR was applied in 40 sampling unities (UA in the watershed of Arroio Val de Buia in Silveira Martins, RS. From the final result of the PAR it was created erosion susceptibility classes, "stable", "susceptible" and "instable". The t test showed significant differences between the evaluated units and the Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (AHA distinguished two classes of UA, according to the categories of susceptibility to erosion resulting from PAR. The basic parameters that determined the groupings were: soil, soil depth in slope, vegetation, the stretch of water course and, land use and land cover. We conclude that the PAR is presented as a good rapid assessment tool river, similar to the studied stream, being useful to the environmental planning considering the regional characteristics.

  18. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive blood culture isolates from briefly incubated solid medium cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestero-Téllez, Mónica; Recacha, Esther; de Cueto, Marina; Pascual, Álvaro

    2017-11-01

    Mass spectrometry Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) helps in the rapid identification of microorganisms causing blood stream infection. Rapid and reliable methods are required to decrease the turnaround time for reporting antimicrobial susceptibility results from blood culture isolates. An evaluation was performed on the reliability of a method for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive blood culture isolates from briefly incubated solid medium cultures. The agreement between the evaluated and standard methods was 99.3%. The major and minor error rates were 0.4% and 0.3%, respectively, and no very major errors were observed. The inoculation of briefly incubated solid medium cultures into antimicrobial susceptibility testing panels is an easy and reliable technique, and helps to decrease the turnaround time for reporting antimicrobial susceptibility results of positive blood cultures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid mineralocorticoid receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekle, M; Bretschneider, M; Meinel, S; Ruhs, S; Grossmann, C

    2014-03-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that physiologically regulates water-electrolyte homeostasis and controls blood pressure. The MR can also elicit inflammatory and remodeling processes in the cardiovascular system and the kidneys, which require the presence of additional pathological factors like for example nitrosative stress. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for pathophysiological MR effects remain(s) elusive. The inactive MR is located in the cytosol associated with chaperone molecules including HSP90. After ligand binding, the MR monomer rapidly translocates into the nucleus while still being associated to HSP90 and after dissociation from HSP90 binds to hormone-response-elements called glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) as a dimer. There are indications that rapid MR trafficking is modulated in the presence of high salt, oxidative or nitrosative stress, hypothetically by induction or posttranslational modifications. Additionally, glucocorticoids and the enzyme 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase may also influence MR activation. Because MR trafficking and its modulation by micro-milieu factors influence MR cellular localization, it is not only relevant for genomic but also for nongenomic MR effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1997-02-18

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Today markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies, to survive, have to be able to respond with quick-to-market, improved, high quality, cost efficient products. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies. The RRM project was established to leverage the expertise and resources of US private industries and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy new technologies that meet critical needs for effective product realization. The RRM program addressed a needed change in the US Manufacturing infrastructure that will ensure US competitiveness in world market typified by mass customization. This project provided the effort needed to define, develop and establish a customizable infrastructure for rapid response product development design and manufacturing. A major project achievement was the development of a broad-based framework for automating and integrating the product and process design and manufacturing activities involved with machined parts. This was accomplished by coordinating and extending the application of feature-based product modeling, knowledge-based systems, integrated data management, and direct manufacturing technologies in a cooperative integrated computing environment. Key technological advancements include a product model that integrates product and process data in a consistent, minimally redundant manner, an advanced computer-aided engineering environment, knowledge-based software aids for design and process planning, and new production technologies to make products directly from design application software.

  1. Adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta A. Schriber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence has been characterized as a period of heightened sensitivity to social contexts. However, adolescents vary in how their social contexts affect them. According to neurobiological susceptibility models, endogenous, biological factors confer some individuals, relative to others, with greater susceptibility to environmental influences, whereby more susceptible individuals fare the best or worst of all individuals, depending on the environment encountered (e.g., high vs. low parental warmth. Until recently, research guided by these theoretical frameworks has not incorporated direct measures of brain structure or function to index this sensitivity. Drawing on prevailing models of adolescent neurodevelopment and a growing number of neuroimaging studies on the interrelations among social contexts, the brain, and developmental outcomes, we review research that supports the idea of adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context for understanding why and how adolescents differ in development and well-being. We propose that adolescent development is shaped by brain-based individual differences in sensitivity to social contexts – be they positive or negative – such as those created through relationships with parents/caregivers and peers. Ultimately, we recommend that future research measure brain function and structure to operationalize susceptibility factors that moderate the influence of social contexts on developmental outcomes.

  2. Adolescent Neurobiological Susceptibility to Social Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriber, Roberta A.; Guyer, Amanda E.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence has been characterized as a period of heightened sensitivity to social contexts. However, adolescents vary in how their social contexts affect them. According to neurobiological susceptibility models, endogenous, biological factors confer some individuals, relative to others, with greater susceptibility to environmental influences, whereby more susceptible individuals fare the best or worst of all individuals, depending on the environment they encounter (e.g., high vs. low parental warmth). Until recently, research guided by these theoretical frameworks has not incorporated direct measures of brain structure or function to index this sensitivity. Drawing on prevailing models of adolescent neurodevelopment and a growing number of neuroimaging studies on the interrelations among social contexts, the brain, and developmental outcomes, we review research that supports the idea of adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context for understanding why and how adolescents differ in development and well-being. We propose that adolescent development is shaped in part by brain-based individual differences in sensitivity to social contexts – be they positive or negative – such as those created through relationships with parents/caregivers and peers. As such, we recommend that future research measure brain function and structure to operationalize susceptibility factors that moderate the influence of social contexts on developmental outcomes. PMID:26773514

  3. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF Listeria monocytogenes STRAINS ISOLATED FROM FOOD TO ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zanardi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of 40 L. monocytogenes strains isolated from seafood and processing environments to 19 antibiotics currently used in veterinary and human therapy. Susceptibility tests were performed by the automated system VITEK2. Apart from Penicillin, Ampicillin and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole, for which clinical breakpoint for Listeria susceptibility testing are defined according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI, in the present study the CLSI criteria for staphylococci were applied. This study shows that isolated L. monocytogenes strains are susceptible to the antibiotics commonly used in veterinary and human listeriosis treatment. Very few strains (7,5% showed a resistance behaviour towards Oxacillin, whereas a variable pattern was showed for Ciprofloxacin and Moxifloxacin. Moreover, an increase in tetracycline resistance, reported by several authors, can not be confirmed in this study, probably due to the different sources of strains isolation. At last, the VITEK2 system represents a rapid and easy-to-use means for antimicrobial susceptibility test of Listeria monocytogenes. In conclusion, because of the increase of antimicrobial resistance showed by L. monocytogenes, a continuous surveillance of emerging antimicrobial resistance among this pathogen is important to ensure effective treatment of human listeriosis. These data can be used for improve background data on antibiotic resistance of strains isolated from food and food environment, even considering the lack of clinical breakpoint provided by the CLSI.

  4. Susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemics on the complete graph and the star graph : Exact analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cator, E.A.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2013-01-01

    Since mean-field approximations for susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemics do not always predict the correct scaling of the epidemic threshold of the SIS metastable regime, we propose two novel approaches: (a) an ?-SIS generalized model and (b) a modified SIS model that prevents the

  5. Rapid Refresh (RAP) [13 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Rapid Refresh (RAP) numerical weather model took the place of the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) on May 1, 2012. Run by the National Centers for Environmental...

  6. Rapid Refresh (RAP) [20 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Rapid Refresh (RAP) numerical weather model took the place of the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) on May 1, 2012. Run by the National Centers for Environmental...

  7. Rapid chemical separations

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, N

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the progress of fast chemical separation procedures during the last few years. Fast, discontinuous separation techniques are illustrated by a procedure for niobium. The use of such techniques for the chemical characterization of the heaviest known elements is described. Other rapid separation methods from aqueous solutions are summarized. The application of the high speed liquid chromatography to the separation of chemically similar elements is outlined. The use of the gas jet recoil transport method for nuclear reaction products and its combination with a continuous solvent extraction technique and with a thermochromatographic separation is presented. Different separation methods in the gas phase are briefly discussed and the attachment of a thermochromatographic technique to an on-line mass separator is shown. (45 refs).

  8. Jasmonate signalling drives time-of-day differences in susceptibility of Arabidopsis to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, Robert A; Stoker, Claire; Stone, Wendy; Adams, Nicolette; Smith, Rob; Grant, Murray; Carré, Isabelle; Roden, Laura C; Denby, Katherine J

    2015-12-01

    The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping mechanism, allows plants to anticipate regular changes in the environment, such as light and dark, and biotic challenges such as pathogens and herbivores. Here, we demonstrate that the plant circadian clock influences susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. Arabidopsis plants show differential susceptibility to B. cinerea depending on the time of day of inoculation. Decreased susceptibility after inoculation at dawn compared with night persists under constant light conditions and is disrupted in dysfunctional clock mutants, demonstrating the role of the plant clock in driving time-of-day susceptibility to B. cinerea. The decreased susceptibility to B. cinerea following inoculation at subjective dawn was associated with faster transcriptional reprogramming of the defence response with gating of infection-responsive genes apparent. Direct target genes of core clock regulators were enriched among the transcription factors that responded more rapidly to infection at subjective dawn than subjective night, suggesting an influence of the clock on the defence-signalling network. In addition, jasmonate signalling plays a crucial role in the rhythmic susceptibility of Arabidopsis to B. cinerea with the enhanced susceptibility to this pathogen at subjective night lost in a jaz6 mutant. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Fidelity susceptibility as holographic PV-criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, Davood, E-mail: davoodmomeni78@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: mirfaizalmir@googlemail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia – Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada); Myrzakulov, Kairat, E-mail: kairatmyrzakul@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Myrzakulov, Ratbay, E-mail: rmyrzakulov@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan)

    2017-02-10

    It is well known that entropy can be used to holographically establish a connection among geometry, thermodynamics and information theory. In this paper, we will use complexity to holographically establish a connection among geometry, thermodynamics and information theory. Thus, we will analyze the relation among holographic complexity, fidelity susceptibility, and thermodynamics in extended phase space. We will demonstrate that fidelity susceptibility (which is the informational complexity dual to a maximum volume in AdS) can be related to the thermodynamical volume (which is conjugate to the cosmological constant in the extended thermodynamic phase space). Thus, this letter establishes a relation among geometry, thermodynamics, and information theory, using complexity.

  10. Middle Prut plain's erosion susceptibility evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor CASTRAVEȚ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The given article is dedicated to Middle Prut Plain’s erosion susceptibility evaluation  using factorial analysis and methodology of principal component analysis implemented byGeographical Informational System GRASS. Susceptibility evaluation is executed in a qualitative mode, and the results have preliminary character, for further quantitative andmore precise study. This type of natural hazards analysis offers information on probable localization and severity of erosion phenomena, as well as their manifestation probabilityin a given place.

  11. The Aging Kidney: Increased Susceptibility to Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhui Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Three decades have passed since a series of studies indicated that the aging kidney was characterized by increased susceptibility to nephrotoxic injury. Data from these experimental models is strengthened by clinical data demonstrating that the aging population has an increased incidence and severity of acute kidney injury (AKI. Since then a number of studies have focused on age-dependent alterations in pathways that predispose the kidney to acute insult. This review will focus on the mechanisms that are altered by aging in the kidney that may increase susceptibility to injury, including hemodynamics, oxidative stress, apoptosis, autophagy, inflammation and decreased repair.

  12. Landslide Susceptibility Mapping in Vertical Distribution Law of Precipitation Area: Case of the Xulong Hydropower Station Reservoir, Southwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Cao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on landslide susceptibility analysis mapping of the Xulong hydropower station reservoir, which is located in the upstream of Jinsha River, a rapidly uplifting region of the Tibetan Plateau region. Nine factors were employed as landslide conditioning factors in landslide susceptibility mapping. These factors included the slope angle, slope aspect, curvature, geology, distance-to-fault, distance-to-river, vegetation, bedrock uplift and annual precipitation. The rapid bedrock uplift factor was represented by the slope angle. The eight factors were processed with the information content model. Since this area has a significant vertical distribution law of precipitation, the annual precipitation factor was analyzed separately. The analytic hierarchy process weighting method was used to calculate the weights of nine factors. Thus, this study proposed a component approach to combine the normalized eight-factor results with the normalized annual precipitation distribution results. Subsequently, the results were plotted in geographic information system (GIS and a landslide susceptibility map was produced. The evaluation accuracy analysis method was used as a validation approach. The landslide susceptibility classes were divided into four classes, including low, moderate, high and very high. The results show that the four susceptibility class ratios are 12.9%, 35.06%, 34.11%and 17.92% of the study area, respectively. The red belt in the high elevation area represents the very high susceptibility zones, which followed the vertical distribution law of precipitation. The prediction accuracy was 85.74%, which meant that the susceptibility map was confirmed to be reliable and reasonable. This susceptibility map may contribute to averting the landslide risk in the future construction of the Xulong hydropower station.

  13. Influencia de 46 porta-injertos para cítricos en la precocidad o retardo de maduración de la naranja "Frost valencia" (Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caselles N. Álvaro A.

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available Of 46 graft carrier influence in citrics on ripe precocity or retardation from "Frost Valencia" Citrus sinensis (L Osbeck was studied looking for to guaranter a fruit constant supply toward market. Graft carrier influence was tested in orange blosson, fruiting ripeness season. Stock influence to induce early intermediate or later blossoms was observed, related with period and intensity so them same ocurr. Stock influence on solubles solids content, juici volume, ripeness index, ripe fruit, mantenence on tree also was found . Early of later yields are feasible to obtain using trifoliado x Ruby Or (1437 and "Garcia Valencia" stock markedly, or which highly significant ripeness gains were found with "Frost Valencia" Orange respectively.Se estudió la influencia de los portainjertos para cítricos buscando la obtención de producciones tempranas o tardías para garantizar un suministro continuo de fruta fresca al mercado. Se analizó por espacio de dos años la influencia de los porta-injertos en el período de floración, fructificación y maduración de la naranja. Se observó influencia del patrón para inducir floraciones precoces, intermedias o tardías haciendo referencia al período de intensidad con que ocurren las mismas. También se encontró influencia del patrón en contenido de sólidos solubles, volumen de jugo, acidez, índice de marez y mantenimiento de la fruta madura en el árbol. Es posible obtener producciones tempranas o tardías con la utilización de los patrones trifoliados x Ruby Or (1437 Y García Valencia, sobre las cuales se encontró adelantos altamente significativos de maduración de la naranja "Frost Valencia" respectivamente.

  14. Building a rapid response team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Lisa; Garolis, Salomeja; Wallace-Scroggs, Allyson; Stenstrom, Judy; Maunder, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The use of rapid response teams is a relatively new approach for decreasing or eliminating codes in acute care hospitals. Based on the principles of a code team for cardiac and/or respiratory arrest in non-critical care units, the rapid response teams have specially trained nursing, respiratory, and medical personnel to respond to calls from general care units to assess and manage decompensating or rapidly changing patients before their conditions escalate to a full code situation. This article describes the processes used to develop a rapid response team, clinical indicators for triggering a rapid response team call, topics addressed in an educational program for the rapid response team members, and methods for evaluating effectiveness of the rapid response team.

  15. Genetics of Asthma Susceptibility and Severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slager, Rebecca E.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Li, Xingnan; Postma, Dirkje S.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    This article summarizes major findings in genome-wide studies of asthma susceptibility and severity. Two large meta-analyses identified four chromosomal regions which were consistently associated with development of asthma. Genes that are associated with asthma subphenotypes such as lung function,

  16. Nutrition affects insect susceptibility to Bt toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Carrie A.; Behmer, Spencer T.; Tessnow, Ashley E.; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Sword, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Pesticide resistance represents a major challenge to global food production. The spread of resistance alleles is the primary explanation for observations of reduced pesticide efficacy over time, but the potential for gene-by-environment interactions (plasticity) to mediate susceptibility has largely been overlooked. Here we show that nutrition is an environmental factor that affects susceptibility to Bt toxins. Protein and carbohydrates are two key macronutrients for insect herbivores, and the polyphagous pest Helicoverpa zea self-selects and performs best on diets that are protein-biased relative to carbohydrates. Despite this, most Bt bioassays employ carbohydrate-biased rearing diets. This study explored the effect of diet protein-carbohydrate content on H. zea susceptibility to Cry1Ac, a common Bt endotoxin. We detected a 100-fold increase in LC50 for larvae on optimal versus carbohydrate-biased diets, and significant diet-mediated variation in survival and performance when challenged with Cry1Ac. Our results suggest that Bt resistance bioassays that use ecologically- and physiologically-mismatched diets over-estimate susceptibility and under-estimate resistance.

  17. Climate change and corn susceptibility to mycotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize is an essential part of the world’s grain supply, but climate change has the potential to increase maize susceptibility to mycotoxigenic fungal pathogens and reduce food security and safety. While rising atmospheric [CO2] is a driving force of climate change, our understanding of how elevated ...

  18. Why do Individuals Differ in Viral Susceptibility?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, van L.; Pijlman, G.P.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    Viral susceptibility and disease progression is determined by host genetic variation that underlies individual differences. Genetic polymorphisms that affect the phenotype upon infection have been well-studied for only a few viruses, such as HIV-1 and Hepatitis C virus. However, even for

  19. antimicrobial susceptibility and plasmids from escherichia coli

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-10-02

    Oct 2, 2001 ... 78 No. IO October 200]. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY AND PLASMIDS FROM ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM RATS. FM. Gakuya, BVM, MSc, Field Veterinarian, Kenya Wildlife Services, M.N. Kyule, BVM, ... Request for reprints to: Dr FM. ... profile index (API) 20E strips (Bio Merieux, Marcy~l?

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Salmonella typhi and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility testing patterns of Candida Albicans and Salmonella typhi isolates. Fifteen isolates of each microorganism were collected from three hospitals located in Dar es Salaam region within a 3-month period in the year 2005. Candida Albicans and Salmonella typhi ...

  1. Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus aureus amongst patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) in UBTH Benin City, Nigeria. ... (4.4%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.0%) and Candida albican (1.0%). No growth was recorded in 46.6% of cultures. The occurrence of S. aureus was found to be ...

  2. Short Communication Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern and Beta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The multiple drug resistance as evident in high MICs of the antibiotics tested could probably be due to abuse/misuse of antibiotics resulting in recurrence of furuncles in the patients. Keywords: Antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase, Recurrent furunculosis, Staphylococcus aureus. Received 08 August 2011/ Accepted 30 ...

  3. Prevalence and susceptibility pattern of methicillinresistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, recent reports describe methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) carriage in persons in the community. The study investigated its prevalence in urine of healthy women and its susceptibility pattern to other antibiotics. Urine samples collected from healthy women volunteers in Zaria were cultured and screened for S.

  4. Landslide susceptibility analysis using Probabilistic Certainty Factor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reports the use of a GIS based Probabilistic Certainty Factor method to assess the geo-environmental factors that contribute to landslide susceptibility in Tevankarai Ar sub-watershed,. Kodaikkanal. Landslide occurrences are a common phenomenon in the Tevankarai Ar sub-watershed,. Kodaikkanal owing to ...

  5. Estimation of bonding nature using diamagnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyasu, Keisuke; Sato, Toyoto; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-05-21

    A chemical bond includes both covalent and ionic characteristics. We develop an experimental method to estimate the degree of each contribution based on magnetic susceptibility measurements, in which Pascal's scheme for Larmor diamagnetism is combined with electronegativity. The applicability to metal hydrides is also shown.

  6. acetyltransferases: Influence on Lung Cancer Susceptibility

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lung cancer remains a major health challenge in the world. It is the commonest cause of cancer mortality in men, it has been suggested that genetic susceptibility may contribute to the major risk factor, with increasing prevalence of smoking. Lung cancer has reached epidemic proportions in India. Recently indoor air ...

  7. Susceptibility Pattern of Nasopharyngeal Isolates of Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: To determine the rate of nasopharyngeal colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae among nursery school children in Enugu urban and to determine their antibiotic susceptibility pattern particularly the penicillin resistant strains. Methods: Specimens were collected from the nasopharynx of 385 apparently healthy ...

  8. Susceptibility of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria ssp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, L.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility of four species of Naegleria amoebae to complement-mediated lysis was determined. The amoebicidal activity of normal human serum (NHS) and normal guinea pig serum (NGPS) for Naegleria amoebae was measured by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Release of radioactivity from amoebae labeled with {sup 3}H-uridine and visual observation with a compound microscope were used as indices of lysis. Susceptibility or resistance to complement-mediated lysis in vitro correlated with the in vivo pathogenic potential. Nonpathogenic Naegleria amoebae were lysed at a faster rate and at higher cell concentrations than were pathogenic amoebae. Electrophoretic analysis of NHS incubated with pathogenic or nonpathogenic Naegleria spp. demonstrated that amoebae activate the complement cascade resulting in the production of C3 and C5 complement cleavage products. Treatment with papain or trypsin for 1 h, but not with sialidase, increase the susceptibility of highly pathogenic, mouse-passaged N. fowleri to lysis. Treatment with actinomycin D, cycloheximide or various protease inhibitors for 4 h did not increase susceptibility to lysis. Neither a repair process involving de novo protein synthesis nor a complement-inactivating protease appear to account for the increase resistance of N. fowleri amoebae to complement-mediated lysis. A binding study with {sup 125}I radiolabeled C9 indicated that the terminal complement component does not remain stably bound to the membrane of pathogenic amoebae.

  9. Surveillance and insecticide susceptibility status of Culicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vector control programs in Nigeria are mostly targeted towards reducing the burden of malaria with less emphasis placed on other debilitating vector borne diseases such as dengue, yellow fever and filariasis. This study assessed the indoor resting densities and insecticide susceptibility status of Culex and Aedes ...

  10. Epidemiological and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of infectious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... isolation rates among different age groups, educational status, gender, water drank, use of chlorine, toilet use, exposure at home to .... with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin in the majority of .... Antibiotic and bacterial strain specific distribution of resistance in bacteria isolated from patients attending.

  11. Bacteriological Quality and antimicrobial susceptibility of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriological Quality and antimicrobial susceptibility of some isolates of Well Water used for Drinking in Jimma Town, Southwest Ethiopia. ... resistance against most of the antibiotics tested. In general, the well water samples analyzed in this study were found in unacceptable condition in terms of bacteriological quality.

  12. Susceptibility to methamphetamine dependence associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Khyber Saify

    2015-09-26

    Sep 26, 2015 ... Susceptibility to methamphetamine dependence associated with high transcriptional activity alleles of VNTR polymorphism in the promoter region of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). Khyber Saify, Mostafa Saadat*. Department of Biology, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454, Iran. Received ...

  13. Susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine anti-fungal susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans and. Cryptococcus gattii from environmental and clinical sources in Nairobi, Kenya. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Kenya Medical Research Institute, Mycology laboratory, Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: A total of 123 isolates were tested for their ...

  14. Susceptibility of Some Bacterial Contaminants Recovered from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Nine bacterial isolates recovered from various brands of commercially available cosmetics marketed in Jordan were tested for their susceptibility pattern against two paraben esters and two formaldehyde donors in addition to nine commonly used antibiotics. The biocidal effect for three preservatives was tested at ...

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility of organisms causing community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Demographic and clinical data were recorded and mid-stream urine (MSU) specimens were cultured. UTI pathogens were Gram-stained and identified to species level. Etest-based antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefixime, cefuroxime, ciprofloxacin, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, ...

  16. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Extended Spectrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of various bacterial pathogens including extended spectrum betalactamase (ESBL) producers in Kano, Nigeria. Method: A total of 604 consecutive clinical samples obtained from Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. (AKTH), Kano between January and July 2010 were ...

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility of staphylococci species from cow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus species isolated from foremilk samples. Setting: Milk was collected from five farms within a 70 km radius of Gaborone, Botswana. Subjects: Two hundred and twenty five staphylococci isolates from foremilk samples. Main outcome measures: ...

  18. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of methicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a multidrug resistant bacterium that threatens the continued effectiveness of antibiotics worldwide. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MRSA and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern in patients with burns and bedsore. This was a cross- sectional ...

  19. Assessment of antibiotic susceptibilities, genotypic characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibilities, genotypic characteristics and biofilm formation abilities of antibiotic-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus KACC 13236 (SAS), multiple antibiotic-resistant S. aureus CCARM 3080 (SAR), antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253 (STS) and ...

  20. Isolation, identifications and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2013 to April 2014 to isolate coagulase positive Staphylococcus (CPS) from subclinical mastitic (SCM) lactating cows, to establishing prevalence, to identify risk factors and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of CPS isolates in and around Haramaya.