WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapid ethnographic study

  1. Rapid ethnographic assessment of breastfeeding practices in periurban Mexico City

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guerrero, M L; Morrow, R C; Calva, J J; Ortega-Gallegos, H; Weller, S C; Ruiz-Palacios, G M; Morrow, A L

    1999-01-01

    Before carrying out a breastfeeding promotion programme in a periurban area of Mexico City, we conducted a rapid ethnographic study to determine the factors associated with absence of exclusive breastfeeding...

  2. A rapid ethnographic study of breastfeeding in the North and South of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passamonte Raquel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The past ten years have witnessed a rising trend in the prevalence and duration of breastfeeding in Italy, but breastfeeding rates increase in an unequal way; they are higher in the North of Italy than in the South. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences, expectations and beliefs of a sample of mothers, and to identify differences, if any, between the North and the South of Italy. Methods The study was conducted in two regions of Italy, Friuli Venezia Giulia in the Northeast and Basilicata in the South. Two hundred and seventy-nine mothers of infants and children 6 to 23 months of age were interviewed using an 85-item questionnaire including closed and open questions on infant feeding experiences and beliefs, sources of information and support, reasons for intended and actual choices and practices, and some demographic and social variables. Face-to-face interviews were conducted between May 2001 and September 2002. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used for data analysis. Results The distribution of the mothers by age, education, employment and parity did not differ from that of the general population of the two regions. The reported rates of initiation and duration of breastfeeding were also similar: 95% started breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding was 32% at three and 9% at six months, with 64% and 35% of any breastfeeding, respectively. Some differences were reported in the rates of full breastfeeding, reflecting different ages of introduction of non-nutritive fluids. These, as well as nutritive fluids – including infant formula – and complementary foods, were introduced far too early. Advice on infant feeding was generally provided by health professionals and often was not based on up-to-date recommendations. Mothers were generally aware of the advantages of breastfeeding, but at the same time reported problems that they were not able to solve alone or through social and health system

  3. A rapid ethnographic study of breastfeeding in the North and South of Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Romero, Sofia; Bernal, Rosa; Barbiero, Chiara; Passamonte, Raquel; Cattaneo, Adriano

    2006-01-01

    Background The past ten years have witnessed a rising trend in the prevalence and duration of breastfeeding in Italy, but breastfeeding rates increase in an unequal way; they are higher in the North of Italy than in the South. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences, expectations and beliefs of a sample of mothers, and to identify differences, if any, between the North and the South of Italy. Methods The study was conducted in two regions of Italy, Friuli Venezia Giulia in the Northeast and Basilicata in the South. Two hundred and seventy-nine mothers of infants and children 6 to 23 months of age were interviewed using an 85-item questionnaire including closed and open questions on infant feeding experiences and beliefs, sources of information and support, reasons for intended and actual choices and practices, and some demographic and social variables. Face-to-face interviews were conducted between May 2001 and September 2002. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used for data analysis. Results The distribution of the mothers by age, education, employment and parity did not differ from that of the general population of the two regions. The reported rates of initiation and duration of breastfeeding were also similar: 95% started breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding was 32% at three and 9% at six months, with 64% and 35% of any breastfeeding, respectively. Some differences were reported in the rates of full breastfeeding, reflecting different ages of introduction of non-nutritive fluids. These, as well as nutritive fluids – including infant formula – and complementary foods, were introduced far too early. Advice on infant feeding was generally provided by health professionals and often was not based on up-to-date recommendations. Mothers were generally aware of the advantages of breastfeeding, but at the same time reported problems that they were not able to solve alone or through social and health system support. Most mothers would

  4. Rapid ethnographic assessment of breastfeeding practices in periurban Mexico City.

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, M.L.; Morrow, R C; Calva, J.J.; Ortega-Gallegos, H.; Weller, S. C.; Ruiz-Palacios, G M; Morrow, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    Before carrying out a breastfeeding promotion programme in a periurban area of Mexico City, we conducted a rapid ethnographic study to determine the factors associated with absence of exclusive breastfeeding. The responses to pilot interviews were used to develop a standardized questionnaire regarding reasons for infant feeding choice, sources of advice, and barriers to breastfeeding. We interviewed a random sample of 150 mothers with a child < 5 years of age; 136 (91%) of them had initiated ...

  5. Lean leadership: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aij, Kjeld Harald; Visse, Merel; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a critical analysis of contemporary Lean leadership in the context of a healthcare practice. The Lean leadership model supports professionals with a leading role in implementing Lean. This article presents a case study focusing specifically on leadership behaviours and issues that were experienced, observed and reported in a Dutch university medical centre. This ethnographic case study provides auto-ethnographic accounts based on experiences, participant observation, interviews and document analysis. Characteristics of Lean leadership were identified to establish an understanding of how to achieve successful Lean transformation. This study emphasizes the importance for Lean leaders to go to the gemba, to see the situation for one's own self, empower health-care employees and be modest. All of these are critical attributes in defining the Lean leadership mindset. In this case study, Lean leadership is specifically related to healthcare, but certain common leadership characteristics are relevant across all fields. This article shows the value of an auto-ethnographic view on management learning for the analysis of Lean leadership. The knowledge acquired through this research is based on the first author's experiences in fulfilling his role as a health-care leader. This may help the reader examining his/her own role and reflecting on what matters most in the field of Lean leadership.

  6. Rapid ethnographic assessment of breastfeeding practices in periurban Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, M L; Morrow, R C; Calva, J J; Ortega-Gallegos, H; Weller, S C; Ruiz-Palacios, G M; Morrow, A L

    1999-01-01

    Before carrying out a breastfeeding promotion programme in a periurban area of Mexico City, we conducted a rapid ethnographic study to determine the factors associated with absence of exclusive breastfeeding. The responses to pilot interviews were used to develop a standardized questionnaire regarding reasons for infant feeding choice, sources of advice, and barriers to breastfeeding. We interviewed a random sample of 150 mothers with a child health, growth, and hygiene were the main reasons for the type of feeding selected; cost, comfort, and the husband's opinion were less important. Physicians were ranked as the most important source of advice. Reduction or cessation of breastfeeding occurred on the doctor's advice (68%); or when the mothers encountered local folk illnesses such as "coraje" (52%) or "susto" (54%), which are associated with anger or fright; or had "not enough milk" (62%) or "bad milk" (56%); or because of illness of the mother (56%) or child (43%). During childhood illnesses and conditions, breastfeeding was reduced and the use of supplementary foods was increased. This study emphasizes the importance of cultural values in infant feeding choices, defines specific barriers to breastfeeding, and provides a basis for interventions to promote exclusive breastfeeding in the study population.

  7. Development of Deaf Identity: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Guy; Storbeck, Claudine

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study explores the identity development of 9 deaf participants through the narratives of their educational experiences in either mainstream or special schools for the Deaf. This exploration goes beyond a binary conceptualization of deaf identity that allows for only the medical and social models and proposes a bicultural…

  8. Expatriate Compound Living: An Ethnographic Field Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    ethnographic field-work methodology, including interviews and participant observation during a period of three months, this exploratory study investigated 16 Danish business expatriates of a large Danish corporation and their families living in the same compound in Saudi Arabia. They shared their spare time...

  9. Lean leadership: an ethnographic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aij, K.H.; Visse, M.A.; Widdershoven, G.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to provide a critical analysis of contemporary Lean leadership in the context of a healthcare practice. The Lean leadership model supports professionals with a leading rolein implementing Lean.This article presents a case study focusing specifcally on

  10. Ethnographic Fieldwork: Studying Journalists at Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Line Hassall

    2014-01-01

    to participate in some of the newsroom work by taking part in discussions, holding a camera or helping journalists with practical tasks. My previous work in journalism gave me unique access to the people whom I studied. However, the fact that I had been a part of the group studied could also mean that my...... and challenges of this particular method for studying journalists specifically. This case focuses particularly on the challenges of limiting the field of research and of studying a group to which the researcher already belongs.......I had been working as a journalist for almost 10 years when I began questioning the way we journalists worked. Having a degree in anthropology, I began to think of the newsroom as a place that one could study. To me, it seemed that methods of ethnographic fieldwork derived from anthropology would...

  11. Nature's Classroom: An Ethnographic Case Study of Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Dorothea Jody

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic case study examines the dynamic relationship between culture and environmental education within the context of a specific Florida-based public education program. The School District of Hillsborough County (SDHC) offers the program through a three-day field trip to the study site, Nature's Classroom, and accompanying classroom…

  12. Personal Library Curation: An Ethnographic Study of Scholars' Information Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonijevic, Smiljana; Cahoy, Ellysa Stern

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings of a Mellon Foundation-funded study conducted at Penn State University in University Park during Fall 2012 that explored scholars' information practices across disciplines encompassing the sciences, humanities, and social sciences. Drawing on results of the Web-based survey and ethnographic interviews, we present…

  13. Researching My Own Backyard: Inquiries into an Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfikar, Teuku

    2014-01-01

    Ethnography is a prominent research methodology in the recent times. It is popular not only in the field of Anthropology but also in many other social sciences. My doctorate thesis was also conducted through an ethnographic study examining the ways in which young Muslims of Indonesian background living in Australia construct their identity. In…

  14. Ethnographic study of diarrhoeal diseases among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    selected for the study by using lottery method. " Once the study communities were selected, a . quick inventory of households was made to identify and record children under five years of age in these communities. Accordingly, it was found out that a total of 848 children under the age of five years were recorded. A decision.

  15. Ethnographic study of diarrhoeal diseases among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environment and economic status were shown to have important correlation with the incidence of diarrhoeal diseases. Besides, KAP studies concluded that the majority of caretakers lacked proper knowledge and use of. ORT (Oral Rehydration Therapy) (5). It is an established fact that human beings inter-alia are conscious ...

  16. Cultural Issues in Adverse Event Reporting - An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Christopher D; Nøhr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Adverse event reporting is a frequently used mechanism to establish a learning cycle to avoid future errors. However a precondition is that the potential - as well as the occurred adverse events is reported. This study explores two comparable internal medicine departments to find possible explanations on a differing frequency of adverse event reporting. Ethnographic methods - observation and interviews - are applied to collect data. The analysis reveals specific, but common ways of doing task prioritization and rating of adverse event severity. The interpesonal relationships, however, show significant differences in the two departments and can be the most plausible explanation of the difference in adverse event reporting.

  17. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AMONG INTENSIVE CARE NURSES: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Abbas; Najar, Ali Vafaee; Bakhshi, Mahmoud

    2015-12-01

    Nurses are the main users of supplies and equipment applied in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) which are high-priced and costly. Therefore, understanding ICU nurses' experiences about resource management contributes to the better control of the costs. This study aimed to investigate the culture of nurses' working environment regarding the resource management in the ICUs in Iran. In this study, a focused ethnographic method was used. Twenty-eight informants among ICU nurses and other professional individuals were purposively selected and interviewed. As well, 400 hours of ethnographic observations as a participant observer was used for data gathering. Data analysis was performed using the methods described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Two main themes describing the culture of ICU nurses regarding resource management included (a) consumption monitoring and auditing, and (b) prudent use. The results revealed that the efforts for resource management are conducted in the conditions of scarcity and uncertainty in supply. ICU nurses had a sense of futurism in the supply and use of resources in the unit and do the planning through taking the rules and guidelines as well as the available resources and their values into account. Improper storage of some supplies and equipment was a reaction to this uncertain condition among nurses. To manage the resources effectively, improvement of supply chain management in hospital seems essential. It is also necessary to hold educational classes in order to enhance the nurses' awareness on effective supply chain and storage of the items in the unit stock.

  18. An ethnographic study of participant roles in school bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumpel, Thomas P; Zioni-Koren, Vered; Bekerman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    An ethnographic study in a 10th grade remedial class was undertaken in order to discern patterns of school bullying. Twenty 10th graders were observed over the course of one academic year as they interacted with their peers and teachers. The observations helped us identify dispositional and situational factors which influenced participant roles. In-depth interviews of students involved in school bullying showed how participants interpreted and explained their classroom behaviors. The analysis of the data gathered allowed the identification of four main actor roles recognized in the existing literature on bullying-the pure victim, the pure bully, the provocative-victim, and the bystander-as well as the differentiation between aggressive bullies and the bully managers. Most roles fluctuated according to specific circumstances and often appeared to be moderated by the teacher's management style and contextual variables. Some pupils assumed different roles in different contexts, sometimes changing roles within or between episodes. Teacher personality and style also had an impact on the frequencies and types of aggression and victimization. The use of an ethnographic research paradigm is discussed as an important supplement to positivistic studies of school bullying. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. An Ethnographic Study of New Venture and New Sector Legitimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Fraser, Norman

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the process of legitimation of international new ventures from an emerging economy and the effect such ventures have on the process of creation and legitimation of a new industry in that economy. It is a longitudinal ethnographic case study. Following an inductive theory...... not exist to a final condition in which it is institutionalized. The model addresses the case where the initial catalyst is the formation of an international new venture that is the seed for the birth of the industry. Since both the new venture and the new industry lack cognitive and socio-political...... building approach, data were collected over an eleven year period via in-depth interviews, participant observations, and unobtrusive data. The study puts forward a process model of new industry legitimation. The model theorizes the process of change from an initial condition in which an industry does...

  20. Religious networking organizations and social justice: an ethnographic case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nathan R

    2012-09-01

    The current study provides an innovative examination of how and why religious networking organizations work for social justice in their local community. Similar to a coalition or community coordinating council, religious networking organizations are formal organizations comprised of individuals from multiple religious congregations who consistently meet to organize around a common goal. Based on over a year and a half of ethnographic participation in two separate religious networking organizations focused on community betterment and social justice, this study reports on the purpose and structure of these organizations, how each used networking to create social capital, and how religion was integrated into the organizations' social justice work. Findings contribute to the growing literature on social capital, empowering community settings, and the unique role of religious settings in promoting social justice. Implications for future research and practice also are discussed.

  1. Coping with traumatic stress in journalism: a critical ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Marla; Keats, Patrice

    2011-04-01

    Journalists who witness trauma and disaster events are at risk for physical, emotional, and psychological injury. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a critical ethnographic study among 31 Canadian journalists and photojournalists with regard to coping strategies used to buffer the effects of being exposed to trauma and disaster events and work-related stress. The findings are the result of in-depth individual interviews and six workplace observations with journalists across Canada. The most commonly reported coping strategies were: avoidance strategies at work, use of black humor, controlling one's emotions and memories, exercise and other physical activities, focusing on the technical aspects, and using substances. Recommendations for addressing the effects of work-related stress within this population are provided.

  2. Privacy, boundaries and smart homes for health: An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Alison; Coyle, David; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2018-02-08

    This article explores how people negotiate borders and boundaries within the home, in the context of health and the introduction of new technologies. We draw on an ethnographic study involving a socially diverse group of people, which included people with experience of telecare or smart home energy systems. Participants engaged in various strategies to regulate the borders of their home, even though new technologies have begun to change the nature of these borders. Participants managed health conditions but also their use of technology through boundary work that permitted devices to be more or less visible and integrated within the home. Findings highlight that if smart healthcare technologies are to be accepted in the home then there is a need for mechanisms that allow people to control the interpretation of data and flow of information generated about them and their households. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Ethnographic studies as a requirement gathering process for the design of context aware middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kristian Ellebæk

    2007-01-01

    As a preparation for building service oriented, context aware middleware for agriculture, we have employed ethnographic field studies as a mean in the requirements gathering process.......As a preparation for building service oriented, context aware middleware for agriculture, we have employed ethnographic field studies as a mean in the requirements gathering process....

  4. Buddhism in the United States: an Ethnographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyeon Choe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on Buddhism in America, an neglected area of inquiry in anthropological study. There is a need for modern ethnographic studies to shed light on historical issues, paradigms for comparative inquiry, and thus, explore the impact of Buddhism on modern American society (Glazier, 1997. The enormous growth of Buddhism in the last quarter century (Smith, 2002 makes this an especially pertinent topic in American anthropology. We utilize Glazier’s model to add Buddhism as a topic in the area of modernity studies. This is a preliminary study of the nature of Buddhism in America. We conducted participant observation with a Buddhist meditation group in a north eastern state in the US for four months in the spring of 2010. Based on our preliminary ethnographic data, we believe that a unique perspectives of Buddhism in America can be identified: non-religious and therapeutic involvement or use of Buddhism. Also, new forms of practice become evident, for example, ‘walking meditation’ and ‘bowing to other Buddhists,’ are identified as characteristics of Buddhism in America. It is interesting to note that at the end of meditation sessions, participants not only bow to the Buddha statue, but also bow to each other. This is a unique ritual dynamic which appears to be consistent with the worldview of American people - being equal and individual. The meditation group also practiced ‘walking meditation’ which is easy to do in everyday life. Additionally, we observed that American meditation rooms provide additional cushions to sit on which are a further element, along with walking meditation, which help American beginners to meditate more easily. These study observations shed light on the current situation by providing new lenses from which to understand and focus on different ritual performances/interpretations of Buddhism, and their meanings and functions in society. The most important reflection is that religious change is not an

  5. Community paramedicine model of care: an observational, ethnographic case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Peter; Stirling, Christine; Ruest, Michel; Martin, Angela

    2016-02-02

    Community paramedicine programs have emerged throughout North America and beyond in response to demographic changes and health system reform. Our aim was to identify and analyse how community paramedics create and maintain new role boundaries and identities in terms of flexibility and permeability and through this develop and frame a coherent community paramedicine model of care that distinguish the model from other innovations in paramedic service delivery. Using an observational ethnographic case study approach, we collected data through interviews, focus groups and field observations. We then applied a combination of thematic analysis techniques and boundary theory to develop a community paramedicine model of care. A model of care that distinguishes community paramedicine from other paramedic service innovations emerged that follows the mnemonic RESPIGHT: Response to emergencies; Engaging with communities; Situated practice; Primary health care; Integration with health, aged care and social services; Governance and leadership; Higher education; Treatment and transport options. Community engagement and situated practice distinguish community paramedicine models of care from other paramedicine and out-of-hospital health care models. Successful community paramedicine programs are integrated with health, aged care and social services and benefit from strong governance and paramedic leadership.

  6. Faith based aviation: An ethnographic study of missionary flights international

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Joseph H.

    The development of faith-based missionary aviation is a post-World War II phenomenon. The war effort demonstrated the value, utility, and global reach of aviation to remote, underdeveloped areas of the world. With the beginnings of a worldwide infrastructure for aviation, Christian aviators realized aviation could increase the range and effectiveness of their efforts to reach the world for Christ (Mellis, 2006). Although individual organizations provide statistical information and data about flight operations there is a lack of external evidence and relevant research literature confirming the scope and value of these faith based aviation organizations and operations. A qualitative, ethnographic study was conducted to document the activities of one faith-based aviation organization to gain an understanding of this little known aspect of civilian aviation. The study was conducted with Missionary Flights International (MFI) of Fort Pierce, FL which has been involved in faith-based, missionary aviation since its inception in 1964. As an aviation organization "MFI strives to offer affiliated missions the kind of efficient service and professionalism expected of an airline operation" (Missionary Flights International, 2013, p.1). MFI is a lifeline for missionaries to Haiti and the Dominican Republic, fulfilling their motto of "Standing in the Gap". MFI provides twice a week service to the island of Hispaniola and the Republic of Haiti. In this in-depth study insight and understanding was gained into the purpose of MFI, their daily routines and operations, and the challenges they face in maintaining their flight services to Haiti. This study provided documentation of the value and utility of such aviation efforts and of the individuals involved in this endeavor.

  7. Compassionate behaviours of clinical nurses in Iran: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, S; Taleghani, F; Kayvanara, M

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this research was to explore compassionate behaviour in Iranian nurses. Nurses provide high-quality care with compassion. It is useful to improve relationships between nurses and patients to give them more confidence in the care process. It is important to consider how compassion is demonstrated by nurses and to explore different compassionate behaviours in different cultures. This ethnographic study was conducted with 20 nurses and 12 patients in six medical and four surgical wards in Iran in 2014-2015. Data were collected through fieldwork observations and semi-structured deep interviews and field notes. We analysed data using constant comparison based on Strauss and Corbin method. Results of the present study showed four cultural themes; love expression and compassion in the form of non-verbal emotional behaviours, empathy with others, emotional supports of patients at bedside and non-caring behaviours. The findings of this study described compassionate behaviours in nurses. Compassionate behaviours of nurses are closely related to the culture issues. These are formed by communication between nurses and patients, and nurses and patients' families during nursing care. Thus improving compassionate behaviours is highly significant in nursing. Nurses, instructors and policy-makers can use the results of this study. They should consider compassionate care as an important component of patient-centred care. Compassion should be considered in nursing and practical educational programmes. To develop the compassionate care, it is vital to make changes in the dominant philosophy and culture of caring environments. Nurses should receive appropriate training with focus on holistic and patient-centred approaches. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  8. Engaging Chicago residents in climate change action: Results from Rapid Ethnographic Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynne M. Westphal; Jennifer. Hirsch

    2010-01-01

    Addressing climate change requires action at all levels of society, from neighborhood to international levels. Using Rapid Ethnography rooted in Asset Based Community Development theory, we investigated climate-friendly attitudes and behaviors in two Chicago neighborhoods in order to assist the City with implementation of its Climate Action Plan. Our research suggests...

  9. A Sociocultural Perspective on Young Deaf Children's Fingerspelling: An Ethnographic Study in a Signing Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Carin

    2014-01-01

    This study, which is part of a larger longitudinal ethnographic study of young deaf children, reports on deaf children's use of fingerspelling. The children observed were early signers using Swedish Sign Language (SSL) in communication with teachers and peers. This study centres on the functions of fingerspelling in the children's everyday…

  10. Native Hawaiian Ethnographic Study for the Hawaii Geothermal Project Proposed for Puna and Southeast Maui

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, J.K; Minerbi, L. [Cultural Advocacy Network for Developing Options (CANDO) (United States); Kanahele, P.; Kelly, M.; Barney-Campbell, N.; Saulsbury [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Trettin, L.D. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This report makes available and archives the background scientific data and related information collected for an ethnographic study of selected areas on the islands of Hawaii and Maui. The task was undertaken during preparation of an environmental impact statement for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. Information is included on the ethnohistory of Puna and southeast Maui; ethnographic fieldwork comparing Puna and southeast Maui; and Pele beliefs, customs, and practices.

  11. An Ethnographic Study of Elementary Teachers', Paraprofessionals', and Students' Language Exchanges during Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron-Stanton, Desiree

    2014-01-01

    This ethnographic study of language shows the importance of educators' appropriate use of linguistic, nonlinguistic, and paralinguistic communication techniques when working with elementary students within two classrooms who have behavioral and emotional disorders. This study focused on communication techniques used by teachers and…

  12. Understanding the Learning Process of Peer Feedback Activity: An Ethnographic Study of Exploratory Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunxian

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic study attempts to find, reveal and understand the learning possibilities, from the social learning perspective, in the process of peer feedback activity in a College English classroom for non-English majors in China. The study reveals the nature of Exploratory Practice (EP), and the investigation is guided by EP principles,…

  13. The Role of the Culture of Japanese Students in Acquisition of Academic English: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertin, Patricia Anne

    2014-01-01

    This ethnographic study examines the role of Japanese students' culture and its effects on the rate of acquisition of academic English. It is based on observation of classes in Japanese schools, both in Japan and Germany, as well as in an international school, together with interviews, questionnaires, student responses and case studies over a…

  14. Problematising Ethnography and Case Study: Reflections on Using Ethnographic Techniques and Researcher Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker-Jenkins, Marie

    2018-01-01

    This paper was prompted by the question, what do we mean by conducting "ethnography"? Is it in fact "case study" drawing on ethnographic techniques? My contention is that in many cases, researchers are not actually conducting ethnography as understood within a traditional sense but rather are engaging in case study, drawing on…

  15. Ethnographic Fieldwork in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene

    2014-01-01

    It is argued in the present article that ethnographic fieldwork can serve useful methodological ends within psychology and open the discipline to the cultural landscape of psychological phenomena in everyday life in social practices. Furthermore, a positive case is made for the soundness...... of ethnographic fieldwork. That is, rather than disputing the claim that qualitative methods can serve scientific ends, it is argued that ethnographic fieldwork is suitable for studying the constitution of psychological phenomena in social practices across time....

  16. An Ethnographic Study of Health Information Technology Use in Three Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Myles; Paradis, Elise; Gropper, Michael A; Kitto, Simon; Reeves, Scott; Pronovost, Peter

    2017-08-01

    To identify the impact of a full suite of health information technology (HIT) on the relationships that support safety and quality among intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians. A year-long comparative ethnographic study of three academic ICUs was carried out. A total of 446 hours of observational data was collected in the form of field notes. A subset of these observations-134 hours-was devoted to job-shadowing individual clinicians and conducting a time study of their HIT usage. Significant variation in HIT implementation rates and usage was noted. Average HIT use on the two "high-use" ICUs was 49 percent. On the "low-use" ICU, it was 10 percent. Clinicians on the high-use ICUs experienced "silo" effects with potential safety and quality implications. HIT work was associated with spatial, data, and social silos that separated ICU clinicians from one another and their patients. Situational awareness, communication, and patient satisfaction were negatively affected by this siloing. HIT has the potential to accentuate social and professional divisions as clinical communications shift from being in-person to electronically mediated. Socio-technically informed usability testing is recommended for those hospitals that have yet to implement HIT. For those hospitals already implementing HIT, we suggest rapid, locally driven qualitative assessments focused on developing solutions to identified gaps between HIT usage patterns and organizational quality goals. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. What Can Ethnographic Studies Tell Us about the Consequences of Literacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    The ethnographic literature on literacy is marked by a characteristic divide between 'ideological' and 'autonomous' positions, the former being associated with the sociocultural approach adopted within the 'New Literacy Studies' (NLS) and the work of Brian Street, and the latter with the work of Jack Goody. The polarization between the approaches…

  18. GoPro as an Ethnographic Tool: A Wayfinding Study in an Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsley, Kirsten M.; Schoonover, Dan; Spitler, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    In this study, researchers sought to capture students' authentic experience of finding books in the main library using a GoPro camera and the think-aloud protocol. The GoPro provided a first-person perspective and was an effective ethnographic tool for observing a student's individual experience, while also demonstrating what tools they use to…

  19. Competition between Public Supervision and Professional Management: An Ethnographic Study of School Governance Reforms in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangartner, Judith; Svaton, Carla Jana

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses insights from an ethnographic study of local governance practices in the Canton of Bern, Switzerland, under changing policy conditions. Recent reforms introduced and strengthened the position of head teachers, enhanced the responsibility of the municipalities and introduced new quality management procedures in local…

  20. The Cultural Ecology of Scholar-Practitioner Leaders: An Ethnographic Study of Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenlink, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this critical ethnographic study was to examine the nature and meaning of cultural ecology in relation to preparing scholar-practitioner leaders. The ethnography focused on how the discourses and practices within the disciplinary setting of leadership preparation shape the identity of social scholar-practitioner leaders. The…

  1. Young boys behind bars: An ethnographic study of violence and care in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauls, H.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is the result of an ethnographic study that delves into the world of boys, who are younger than 16 years old, awaiting trial behind bars in a secure care facility. In this thesis, the reader is introduced to some of these boys. We get to know who these boys are, where they come from, why

  2. Misery in Dark Shadows behind the High Achievement Scores in South Korean Schooling: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soonjung; Kristjánsson, Kristján; Walker, David I.

    2017-01-01

    This article explores some of the hidden background behind the highly praised school results in South Korea. An ethnographic case study is used to cast light on how schooling is actually experienced by South Korean students. Two main results are reported from these data. First, evidence is presented of damaging "cultural elements" such…

  3. On Becoming a Civic-Minded Instructional Designer: An Ethnographic Study of an Instructional Design Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusop, Farrah Dina; Correia, Ana-Paula

    2014-01-01

    This ethnographic study took place in a graduate course at a large research university in the Midwestern United States. It presents an in-depth examination of the experiences and challenges of a group of four students learning to be Instructional Design and Technology professionals who are concerned with the well-being of all members of a society,…

  4. Engaging Study Abroad Students in Intercultural Learning through Blogging and Ethnographic Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lina

    2012-01-01

    The study involved 16 American undergraduate students who used weekly blogs and conducted ethnographic interviews with native speakers to develop their intercultural competence over the course of one semester abroad. Selected blog entries, post-surveys, and final interviews were collected and analyzed to report the findings. The results show that…

  5. Muddling through School Life: An Ethnographic Study of the Subculture of "Deviant" Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Xie, Ailei

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of an eight-month ethnographic study of a small group of at-risk youths in a school of a southern coastal city in China. The process leading to the young students being marginalised by the school system and how they developed a "muddling through" subculture to counteract this marginalisation is revealed.…

  6. Diluting Education? An Ethnographic Study of Change in an Australian Ministry of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study captures the processes that led to change in an Australian public education system. The changes were driven by strong neo-liberal discourses which resulted in a shift from a shared understanding about leading educational change in schools by knowledge transfer to managing educational change as a process, in other words,…

  7. Patients "Embodied" and "As-a-Body" within Bedside Teaching Encounters: A Video Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Christopher; Challinor, Alexander; Monrouxe, Lynn V.

    2017-01-01

    Bedside teaching encounters (BTEs) involve doctor-patient-student interactions, providing opportunities for students to learn with, from and about patients. How the differing concerns of patient care and student education are balanced in situ remains largely unknown and undefined. This video ethnographic study explores "patient…

  8. Profiling Adult Literacy Facilitators in Development Contexts: An Ethnographic Study in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkineh, Turuwark Zalalam; Rogers, Alan; Danki, Tolera Negassa

    2018-01-01

    Teachers/facilitators in adult literacy learning programmes are recognised as being vital to successful learning outcomes. But little is known about them as a group. This small-scale research project comprising ethnographic-style case studies of five adult literacy facilitators (ALFs) in Ethiopia seeks to throw some light on these teachers, their…

  9. An Invitation to the Ethnographic Study of University Examination Behavior: Concepts, Methodology, and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albas, Cheryl; Albas, Dan

    1996-01-01

    Reports a series of ethnographic studies of student behavior concerning examinations, conducted in a Canadian university since the mid-1980s. Describes techniques of data gathering and the link between methodology and theory. Examines implications for higher education, including dealing with students' exam-related stress, factors influencing…

  10. Korean-American Student Perceptions on Literacy and Identity: Perspectives from an Ethnographic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeonghee; Godina, Heriberto; Ro, Yeon Sun

    2014-01-01

    This ethnographic case study examines perceptions of literacy and identity for a Korean-American student in a third-grade classroom. The researchers examine how teachers can misinterpret Asian identity in the classroom due to perceptions related to the "Model Minority Myth" and other stereotypical representations of Asian culture. By…

  11. Patterns of Indigenous Learning: An Ethnographic Study on How Kindergartners Learn in Mana, Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Yih; Sparks, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Technology has greatly impacted educational systems around the world, even in the most geographically isolated places. This study utilizes an ethnographic approach to examine the patterns of learning in a kindergarten in Mana, Fiji. Data comprised of interviews, observations and examination of related artifacts. The results provide baseline data…

  12. The Rhythms of Pedagogy: An Ethnographic Study of Parenting Education Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Educational research is increasingly turning to conceptual frameworks from a range of disciplines in order to enrich understandings of education, pedagogy and learning. This paper draws on the work of Henri Lefebvre, specifically rhythmanalysis, to explore the nature and the function of pedagogy. The context is an ethnographic study of parenting…

  13. Institutional ethical review and ethnographic research involving injection drug users: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Will; Maher, Lisa; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Ethnographic research among people who inject drugs (PWID) involves complex ethical issues. While ethical review frameworks have been critiqued by social scientists, there is a lack of social science research examining institutional ethical review processes, particularly in relation to ethnographic work. This case study describes the institutional ethical review of an ethnographic research project using observational fieldwork and in-depth interviews to examine injection drug use. The review process and the salient concerns of the review committee are recounted, and the investigators' responses to the committee's concerns and requests are described to illustrate how key issues were resolved. The review committee expressed concerns regarding researcher safety when conducting fieldwork, and the investigators were asked to liaise with the police regarding the proposed research. An ongoing dialogue with the institutional review committee regarding researcher safety and autonomy from police involvement, as well as formal consultation with a local drug user group and solicitation of opinions from external experts, helped to resolve these issues. This case study suggests that ethical review processes can be particularly challenging for ethnographic projects focused on illegal behaviours, and that while some challenges could be mediated by modifying existing ethical review procedures, there is a need for legislation that provides legal protection of research data and participant confidentiality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Birth Care Providers' Experiences and Practices in a Brazilian Alongside Midwifery Unit: An Ethnographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Michelly Christiny M; Reberte Gouveia, Luciana M; Reis-Queiroz, Jessica; Hoga, Luiza A K

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of a new birthing facility in a country such as Brazil requires an extensive in-depth analysis of the challenges faced. The aim of this study was to explore beliefs, values, experiences, and practices related to the provision of birthing and neonatal care with the implementation of a new birth care facility structure called alongside midwifery units in Brazil. The study utilizes an ethnographic method to evaluate members of a Brazilian public hospital's midwifery unit. The ethnographic study focuses on the cultural theme of "between the proposed and the possible": the following birthing care guidelines require overcoming numerous obstacles, and four other cultural subthemes toward revealing the analyzed birth care team's perspectives. The study found that prior training and preparation of all members of the care team, as well as the provision of adequate institutional infrastructure are essential for the implementation of a new and innovative birthing care center.

  15. An ethnographic study of children's talk about gaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Signe Hannibal

    ” through videogames they play on a regular basis. Spradley notes that: “ [d]escriptive questions aim to elicit a large sample of utterances in the informants native language” (1979, p. 49) and can provide “…a large sample of native terms” (p.50). The study describes the “native language/native terms...

  16. Causes of intravenous medication errors: an ethnographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Taxis, K; Barber, N

    2003-01-01

    Background: Intravenous (IV) medication errors are frequent events. They are associated with considerable harm, but little is known about their causes. Human error theory is increasingly used to understand adverse events in medicine, but has not yet been applied to study IV errors. Our aim was to investigate causes of errors in IV drug preparation and administration using a framework of human error theory.

  17. Undocumented Student Allies and Transformative Resistance: A Ethnographic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Angela Chuan-Ru; Rhoads, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines staff and faculty allies working to help meet the needs of undocumented students at a large research university in the western region of the U.S. Drawing on scholarly work rooted in critical race theory and ethnic studies, the authors highlight forms of transformative resistance. They focus on four key findings: (1) student…

  18. Sustainability in Secondary Education in England: An Ethnographic Study

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, Ciaran Francis

    2014-01-01

    This research sets out to establish both the extent to which and the ways in which English Secondary schools have a school culture focusing upon sustainability. I visited three case study schools for six weeks each: these were carefully selected to represent a range of progress towards becoming sustainable schools. I visited two other ‘benchmark’ schools for two days each: these were chosen on the recommendations of school sustainability experts, and visiting them helped me judge the progres...

  19. Exploring routine hospital antenatal care consultations - An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Diane; Pincombe, Jan; McKellar, Lois

    2017-09-29

    Listening to women as part of their antenatal care has been recognized as valuable in understanding the woman's needs. Conversations as part of routine antenatal interactions offer ideal opportunities for women to express themselves and for midwives to learn about the woman's issues and concerns. The antenatal visit and the convention of antenatal consultations for midwives have not been well explored or defined and much of what takes place replicate medical consultative processes. As a consequence, there is little to assist midwives construct woman-centred care consultations for their routine antenatal care practice. This study showed how some practices were better in promoting the woman's voice and woman-centred care in the hospital setting. Contemporary focused ethnography using both interview and observations, explored how midwives from six different public antenatal clinics in South Australia organized their antenatal care consultations with pregnant women. Thematic analysis of the data provided insights into professional interpretation of woman-centred practice. How midwives interacted with women during routine antenatal care events demonstrated that some practices in a hospital setting could either support or undermine a woman-centred philosophy. Individual midwives adopted practices according to their own perceptions of actions and behaviors that were considered to be in accordance with the philosophy of woman-centred care. Information arising from this study has shown ways midwives may arrange antenatal care consultations to maximize women's participation. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient and family perspectives on peritoneal dialysis at home: findings from an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jessica; Lankshear, Annette

    2015-01-01

    To discuss findings from an ethnographic study, considering the experiences of patients and families, using peritoneal dialysis at home in the United Kingdom. Peritoneal dialysis is a daily, life-preserving treatment for end-stage renal disease, undertaken in the patient's home. With ever-growing numbers of patients requiring treatment for this condition, the increased use of peritoneal dialysis is being promoted. While it is known that quality of life is reduced when using dialysis, few studies have sought to explore experiences of peritoneal dialysis specifically. No previous studies were identified that adopted an ethnographic approach. A qualitative design was employed, utilising ethnographic methodology. Ethical and governance approvals were gained in November 2010 and data were generated in 2011. Patients (n = 16) and their relatives (n = 9) were interviewed and observed using peritoneal dialysis in their homes. Thematic analysis was undertaken using Wolcott's (1994) three stage process: Description, Analysis and Interpretation. This article describes four themes: initiating peritoneal dialysis; the constraints of peritoneal dialysis due to medicalisation of the home environment and the imposition of rigid timetables; the uncertainty of managing crises and inevitable deterioration; and seeking freedom through creativity and hope of a kidney transplant. This study highlights the culture of patients and their families living with peritoneal dialysis. Despite the challenges posed by the treatment, participants were grateful they were able to self-manage at home. Furthermore, ethnographic methods offer an appropriate and meaningful way of considering how patients live with home technologies. Participants reported confusion about kidney transplantation and also how to identify peritonitis, and ongoing education from nurses and other healthcare professionals is thus vital. Opportunities for sharing experiences of peritoneal dialysis were valued by participants and

  1. ‘I mainly come for the pies’ An ethnographic study of contemporary football culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    This thesis endeavours to develop a more nuanced understanding of contemporary football culture. As such my research adopts a consumer-oriented cultural studies approach to analyse the ways in which modern ‘consumer’ fans negotiate their position within football culture and the power operating upon them as they do so. Drawing on data from unique ethnographic research I argue that modern fans engage in processes of complex discursive negotiation, constructing their identities at...

  2. Perception of parents about second hand smoke on the health of their children: an ethnographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiane Alves de Carvalho Ribeiro; Micaele Kedma Ribeiro de Moraes; Joyce Cristina de Morais Caixeta; Jullieth Nadja da Silva; Amanda Sanches Lima; Samara Lamounier Santana Parreira; Viviane Lemos Silva Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the perception of parents about secondhand smoking in their children's health. Methods: Ethnographic qualitative and quantitative study. We sought the point of view and understanding of the parents who were active smokers in relation to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and secondhand smoking. Mothers and fathers who are active smokers and that live with their children from seven different public schools in the city of Anápolis, Midwest Brazil, were interviewed in the f...

  3. Inside a secret software lab: an ethnographic study of a global software package producer

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, Christine Franziska

    2009-01-01

    This is an ethnographic study of the creation of a particular type of standard enterprise software package: Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems, which support wide-ranging organisational functions within large and medium sized enterprises. Drawing upon the Social Shaping of Technology perspective and recent related attempts to theorise the Biography of Artefacts, this thesis addresses the under-researched area of ERP system development and ERP system support. In provi...

  4. The Stigma Experienced by Terminally Ill Patients: Evidence From a Portuguese Ethnographic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hilário, Ana Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to offer an understanding of the ways in which terminally ill patients may face discrimination due to their visibly altered body. An ethnographic approach was adopted and fieldwork was conducted over 10 months in 2 inpatient hospice units in Portugal. Participant observation was complemented by 50 in-depth interviews with terminally ill patients, family members, and hospice staff. The stigma experienced by terminally ill patients derived mostly from the behavior of p...

  5. Plant identification credibility in ethnobotany: a closer look at Polish ethnographic studies

    OpenAIRE

    Łuczaj Łukasz J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper is an attempt to estimate the percentage of erroneously identified taxa in ethnographic studies concerning the use of plants and to propose a code for recording credibility of identification in historical ethnobotany publications. Methods A sample of Polish-language ethnobotanical literature (45 published sources from 1874-2005) and four collections of voucher specimens (from 1894-1975) were analyzed. Errors were detected in the publications by comparing the dat...

  6. The Role of Ethnographic Studies in Empirical Software Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Helen; Dittrich, Yvonne; Souza, Cleidson R. B. de

    2016-01-01

    of software engineering; to inform the design of software engineering tools; to improve method and process development; and to inform research programmes. This article introduces ethnography, explains its origin, context, strengths and weaknesses, and presents a set of dimensions that position ethnography......Ethnography is a qualitative research method used to study people and cultures. It is largely adopted in disciplines outside software engineering, including different areas of computer science. Ethnography can provide an in-depth understanding of the socio-technological realities surrounding...... everyday software development practice, i.e., it can help to uncover not only what practitioners do, but also why they do it. Despite its potential, ethnography has not been widely adopted by empirical software engineering researchers, and receives little attention in the related literature. The main goal...

  7. The Role of Ethnographic Studies in Empirical Software Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Helen; Dittrich, Yvonne; Souza, Cleidson R. B. de

    2016-01-01

    Ethnography is a qualitative research method used to study people and cultures. It is largely adopted in disciplines outside software engineering, including different areas of computer science. Ethnography can provide an in-depth understanding of the socio-technological realities surrounding...... everyday software development practice, i.e., it can help to uncover not only what practitioners do, but also why they do it. Despite its potential, ethnography has not been widely adopted by empirical software engineering researchers, and receives little attention in the related literature. The main goal...... of this paper is to explain how empirical software engineering researchers would benefit from adopting ethnography. This is achieved by explicating four roles that ethnography can play in furthering the goals of empirical software engineering: to strengthen investigations into the social and human aspects...

  8. Value Education on Pela Tradition (An Ethnographic Study of Ambonese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pendidikan Nilai dalam Tradisi Pela (Kajian Etnografis Masyarakat Ambon Abstract: The value that has meaning in pela tradition in Ambon society is something that has been handled as personally and can be internalized in human behaviour. The reality of pela tradition value order has been processing in institutionalized as the education direction of social values. The purpose of this qualitative research is to describe the values in the tradition of pela for educational value in Ambon community. The Exposure to the data, data explanation and understanding of discourse data tradition of pela is done in depth. The Study of pela discourse tradition with hermeneutics gives holistic-emic views of how the tradition of pela is able to package and legitimize the Ambonese community life philosophy. The results of the study describes the values in the tradition of pela include (1 the value of religion that regulates the dimensions of God in human life, (2 the value of the philosophy that is universal and will be impacted by the ending value and subjectivity, and (3 the value of ethical consequences of individual responsibility in achieving a moral obligation. Key Words: value education, culture, pela tradition Abstrak: Nilai yang memiliki arti dalam tradisi pela masyarakat Ambon adalah sesuatu yang telah diberikan sejak turun temurun secara pribadi dan dapat diinternalisasi dalam perilaku manusia. Pada kenyataannya, nilai pada tradisi pela telah dilembagakan menjadi arahan dalam pendidikan nilai-nilai sosial. Tujuan penelitian kualitatif ini adalah menggambarkan nilai-nilai yang terkandung dalam tradisi pela sebagai pendidikan nilai masyarakat Ambon. Paparan data, cara penjelasan data, dan pemahaman data wacana tradisi pela dilakukan secara mendalam. Kajian wacana tradisi pela dengan ancangan hermeneutika memberikan gambaran holistik-emik tentang bagaimana tradisi pela mampu mengemas dan melegitimasi falsafah hidup komunitas masyarakat Ambon. Hasil

  9. Mathematics teacher professional development in and through internet use: reflections on an ethnographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patahuddin, Sitti Maesuri

    2013-12-01

    This paper is a reflection on a model for mathematics teacher professional development with respect to technology. The model was informed by three interrelated concepts: (1) a theory of teacher professional development from analysis of the field, (2) the zone theory of teacher professional learning, and (3) ethnography as a method. The model was applied in a study that focused on the uses of the Internet for primary mathematics teacher professional development, particularly to exploit the potential of the Internet for professional learning and to use it in professional work. This is illustrated through selected critical events over an eight-month ethnographic intervention in a primary mathematics classroom in Australia. Though the model is theoretically grounded, it opens up questions about the power, potential, and challenges as well as its feasibility, with respect to not only the teacher but also the ethnographer.

  10. Barriers to health care in rural Mozambique: a rapid ethnographic assessment of planned mobile health clinics for ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitters, Amee; Lederer, Philip; Zilversmit, Leah; Gudo, Paula Samo; Ramiro, Isaias; Cumba, Luisa; Mahagaja, Epifanio; Jobarteh, Kebba

    2015-03-01

    In Mozambique, 1.6 million people are living with HIV, and over 60% of the population lives in rural areas lacking access to health services. Mobile health clinics, implemented in 2013 in 2 provinces, are beginning to offer antiretroviral therapy (ART) and basic primary care services. Prior to introduction of the mobile health clinics in the communities, we performed a rapid ethnographic assessment to understand barriers to accessing HIV care and treatment services and acceptability and potential use of the mobile health clinics as an alternative means of service delivery. We conducted assessments in Gaza province in January 2013 and in Zambezia Province in April-May 2013 in districts where mobile health clinic implementation was planned. Community leaders served as key informants, and chain-referral sampling was used to recruit participants. Interviews were conducted with community leaders, health care providers, traditional healers, national health system patients, and traditional healer patients. Interviewees were asked about barriers to health services and about mobile health clinic acceptance. In-depth interviews were conducted with 117 participants (Gaza province, n = 57; Zambezia Province, n = 60). Barriers to accessing health services included transportation and distance-related issues (reliability, cost, and travel time). Participants reported concurrent use of traditional and national health systems. The decision to use a particular health system depended on illness type, service distance, and lack of confidence in the national health system. Overall, participants were receptive to using mobile health clinics for their health care and ability to increase access to ART. Hesitations concerning mobile health clinics included potentially long wait times due to high patient loads. Participants emphasized the importance of regular and published visit schedules and inclusion of community members in planning mobile health clinic services. Mobile health clinics

  11. ´Island hopping`– doing ethnographic study following interprofessional teams of students across sectors and professions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cathrine Sand

    focusing the process of individual, interprofessional and (inter)organizational learning. The framework is a mixture of ethnographic methods. In mapping out the field the challenges for the fieldwork are to follow the interprofessional teams of students in diverse settings: on hospital wards, at home......The ethnographic study focuses the profession-oriented learning-context, following the case InBetween. InBetween is a collaboration project aimed at strengthens patient-centred, interprofessional skills among health professional students. The ethnographic aim is to explore the project in practice...

  12. Migrant women's experiences, meanings and ways of dealing with postnatal depression: A meta-ethnographic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Schmied

    Full Text Available To conduct a meta-ethnographic study of the experiences, meanings and ways of 'dealing with' symptoms or a diagnosis of postnatal depression amongst migrant women living in high income countries.Prevalence of postnatal depression is highest amongst women who are migrants. Yet many women do not seek help for their symptoms and health services do not always respond appropriately to migrant women's needs. Studies have reported migrant women's experiences of postnatal depression and it is timely to synthesise findings from these studies to understand how services can be improved.A meta-ethnographic synthesis of 12 studies reported in 15 papers.Five databases were searched for papers published between January 1999 and February 2016.The quality of included studies was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program tool. The synthesis process was guided by the seven steps of meta-ethnography outlined by Noblit and Hare.Four key metaphors were identified: "I am alone, worried and angry-this is not me!"; 'Making sense of my feelings' 'Dealing with my feelings' and 'What I need to change the way I feel!'. Primarily women related their feelings to their position as a migrant and as women, often living in poor socio-economic circumstances and they were exhausted keeping up with expected commitments. Many women were resourceful, drawing on their personal strengths and family / community resources. All the studies reported that women experienced difficulties in accessing appropriate services.The meta-ethnographic study demonstrates the impact of migration on perinatal mental health, particularly for women lacking family support, who have no employment, a precarious migration status and/or relationship conflict. Migrant women are resourceful and this requires support through appropriate services. Further research is needed to evaluate effective support strategies for migrant women in the perinatal period.

  13. Migrant women's experiences, meanings and ways of dealing with postnatal depression: A meta-ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Virginia; Black, Emma; Naidoo, Norell; Dahlen, Hannah G; Liamputtong, Pranee

    2017-01-01

    To conduct a meta-ethnographic study of the experiences, meanings and ways of 'dealing with' symptoms or a diagnosis of postnatal depression amongst migrant women living in high income countries. Prevalence of postnatal depression is highest amongst women who are migrants. Yet many women do not seek help for their symptoms and health services do not always respond appropriately to migrant women's needs. Studies have reported migrant women's experiences of postnatal depression and it is timely to synthesise findings from these studies to understand how services can be improved. A meta-ethnographic synthesis of 12 studies reported in 15 papers. Five databases were searched for papers published between January 1999 and February 2016. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program tool. The synthesis process was guided by the seven steps of meta-ethnography outlined by Noblit and Hare. Four key metaphors were identified: "I am alone, worried and angry-this is not me!"; 'Making sense of my feelings' 'Dealing with my feelings' and 'What I need to change the way I feel!'. Primarily women related their feelings to their position as a migrant and as women, often living in poor socio-economic circumstances and they were exhausted keeping up with expected commitments. Many women were resourceful, drawing on their personal strengths and family / community resources. All the studies reported that women experienced difficulties in accessing appropriate services. The meta-ethnographic study demonstrates the impact of migration on perinatal mental health, particularly for women lacking family support, who have no employment, a precarious migration status and/or relationship conflict. Migrant women are resourceful and this requires support through appropriate services. Further research is needed to evaluate effective support strategies for migrant women in the perinatal period.

  14. Ethnographic study of alternative sports by alternative means: list mining as a method of data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Gerald

    2011-06-01

    Increased usage and accessibility of the Internet has led to the rapid growth of cyber communities; typical of groups that have embraced this idea are those who participate in what have been termed alternative or lifestyle sports. Thus far, this online world has received little attention from ethnographers, but the potential for obtaining rich data in this area is huge, most notably through the practice of researching messages sent to Internet-based forums, known as list mining. The inclusion of list mining as a research method, however, is not without its problems and raises new ethical issues when conducting qualitative research. This paper examines in detail the ethical considerations concerning the use of list mining as a method of data collection within the alternative sporting subculture of Ultimate Frisbee.

  15. Challenges and opportunities of undertaking a video ethnographic study to understand medication communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Gerdtz, Marie; Manias, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    To examine the challenges and opportunities of undertaking a video ethnographic study on medication communication among nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients. Video ethnography has proved to be a dynamic and useful method to explore clinical communication activities. This approach involves filming actual behaviours and activities of clinicians to develop new knowledge and to stimulate reflections of clinicians on their behaviours and activities. However, there is limited information about the complex negotiations required to use video ethnography in actual clinical practice. Discursive paper. A video ethnographic approach was used to gain better understanding of medication communication processes in two general medical wards of a metropolitan hospital in Melbourne, Australia. This paper presents the arduous and delicate process of gaining access into hospital wards to video-record actual clinical practice and the methodological and ethical issues associated with video-recording. Obtaining access to clinical settings and clinician consent are the first hurdles of conducting a video ethnographic study. Clinicians may still feel intimidated or self-conscious in being video recorded about their medication communication practices, which they could perceive as judgements being passed about their clinical competence. By thoughtful and strategic planning, video ethnography can provide in-depth understandings of medication communication in acute care hospital settings. Ethical issues of informed consent, patient safety and respect for the confidentiality of patients and clinicians need to be carefully addressed to build up and maintain trusting relationships between researchers and participants in the clinical environment. By prudently considering the complex ethical and methodological concerns of using video ethnography, this approach can help to reveal the unpredictability and messiness of clinical practice. The visual data generated can stimulate clinicians

  16. The Applicability of the Concept of Recruitment to the Communications Study of a Nursing Home: An Ethnographic Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, Stuart J.

    1986-01-01

    Develops a perspective for studying institutional procedures for assigning incoming patients to available wards and for transferring patients between and among wards. Presents ethnographic data collected in one extended-care facility. Discusses staff-patient and patient-patient interactions surrounding ward assignments and transfers. (Author/ABB)

  17. Are nurse-led chemotherapy clinics really nurse-led? An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Carole; Walshe, Catherine; Molassiotis, Alex

    2017-04-01

    The number of patients requiring ambulatory chemotherapy is increasing year on year, creating problems with capacity in outpatient clinics and chemotherapy units. Although nurse-led chemotherapy clinics have been set up to address this, there is a lack of evaluation of their effectiveness. Despite a rapid expansion in the development of nursing roles and responsibilities in oncology, there is little understanding of the operational aspects of nurses' roles in nurse-led clinics. To explore nurses' roles within nurse-led chemotherapy clinics. A focused ethnographic study of nurses' roles in nurse-led chemotherapy clinics, including semi-structured interviews with nurses. Four chemotherapy units/cancer centres in the UK PARTICIPANTS: Purposive sampling was used to select four cancer centres/units in different geographical areas within the UK operating nurse-led chemotherapy clinics. Participants were 13 nurses working within nurse-led chemotherapy clinics at the chosen locations. Non-participant observation of nurse-led chemotherapy clinics, semi-structured interviews with nurse participants, review of clinic protocols and associated documentation. 61 nurse-patient consultations were observed with 13 nurses; of these 13, interviews were conducted with 11 nurses. Despite similarities in clinical skills training and prescribing, there were great disparities between clinics run by chemotherapy nurses and those run by advanced nurse practitioners. This included the number of patients seen within each clinic, operational aspects, nurses' autonomy, scope of practice and clinical decision-making abilities. The differences highlighted four different levels of nurse-led chemotherapy clinics, based on nurses' autonomy and scope of clinical practice. However, this was heavily influenced by medical consultants. Several nurses perceived they were undertaking holistic assessments, however they were using medical models/consultation styles, indicating medicalization of nurses' roles

  18. An ethnographic study of forensic nursing culture in an Australian prison hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashin, A; Newman, C; Eason, M; Thorpe, A; O'Discoll, C

    2010-02-01

    Forensic nurses are faced with unique challenges in their attempt to deliver nursing care in a custodial environment. * The impact of such challenges on the cultural dynamic of forensic nursing and consequently on healthcare delivery is largely unknown. * The aim of this ethnographic study was to explore the nursing culture within an Australian prison hospital and the migration of the culture over a 12-month period. * At the end of the study, the nursing culture was found to be one of hope, although with no clearly articulated vision of nurse-hood or patient-hood and model within which to practice nursing. * The ability to articulate practice is central to the development of mental health nursing in any context. Abstract Forensic nurses are faced with unique challenges in their attempt to deliver nursing care in a custodial environment. The impact of such challenges on the cultural dynamic of forensic nursing and consequently on healthcare delivery is largely unknown. The aim of this ethnographic study was to explore the nursing culture within an Australian prison hospital and the migration of the culture over a 12-month period. At the end of the study the nursing culture was found to be one of hope, although with no clearly articulated vision of nurse-hood or patient-hood and model within which to practice nursing.

  19. Doing the month in a Taiwanese postpartum nursing center: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yueh-Chen; St John, Winsome; Venturato, Lorraine

    2014-09-01

    Traditionally Chinese and Taiwanese postpartum women conducted postpartum ritual practices, called "doing the month," at home. Today, many Taiwanese women undertake this ritual in postpartum nursing centers. However, little is known about how the traditional practices are being transformed in relation to contemporary health care in Taiwan. In this ethnographic study observations were carried out in a large post-partum center attached to a major hospital in Taipei for nine months, and 27 postpartum women were interviewed. Data were analyzed using ethnographic approaches to extract codes and categories. Doing the month was reshaped by being relocated from the home to a healthcare setting. Midwives took on roles traditionally taken by family members, which had an impact on family roles and relationships. Some postpartum practices were maintained, based on traditional explanations. However, many were modified or challenged, based on explanations from contemporary scientific knowledge. Midwives need to be aware that there could be differences between their culture of care and the cultural values of the women they care for. This study informs culturally appropriate postpartum care and support for women with traditional and contemporary cultural beliefs and attitudes to doing the month in a range of healthcare contexts. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Use of ethnographic approaches to the study of health experiences in relation to natural landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Liz; Varley, Pete

    2012-11-01

    This paper discusses the use of ethnographic approaches to explore how engagement with natural landscapes might benefit people's health. Drawing on a selected review of empirical research we identified 30 relevant research papers that utilised qualitative methods to explore health issues and engagement with nature. Three examples of 'alternative' - i.e. non-mainstream qualitative approaches - are used to illustrate how different methods can be used to explore people's experiences of engaging with nature for health. While quantitative methods are dominant in health research, qualitative approaches are becoming more widely used. Approaches such as autoethnography can add value to nature and health studies by providing opportunities for researchers to be self-critical of their role as a researcher. Accompanied visits and visual ethnography can afford the researcher rich data about bodily movement, facial expressions and journeys, as well as dialogues associated with the meanings of nature for health. The paper concludes by suggesting that ethnographic methods can provide useful and important insights into why people engage with the natural environment and the range of health benefits they may gain from contact with nature.

  1. "Not worth doing prenatal care": an ethnographic study of a low-income community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Rosa, Patrícia L F; Hoga, Luiza A K; Reis-Queiroz, Jéssica

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the reasons why pregnant women do not seek prenatal care (PNC). The ethnographic method was used in a low-income Brazilian community. Ethnographic interviews were performed with 11 postpartum women who did not seek PNC in their last pregnancy. The cultural sub-themes used to express reasons for not seeking PNC included: "I found out I was pregnant too late and did not have enough time to receive PNC," "I did not receive PNC because I had to hide the pregnancy to avoid problems," "I had to address urgent issues and could not seek PNC," "The services are not good and going to the doctor when not ill is only for rich people," and cultural theme: "PNC is not worth pursuing: it is unnecessary and there are too many obstacles to receiving it." The main strategies that should be considered to increase adherence to PNC are better access and integrality through the use of adequate management criteria.

  2. Ethnographic Study at a Music Library Found Students Prefer Short Stopovers and Longer Solitary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To identify patterns of patron behaviour in the library in order to improve space utilization. Design – Ethnographic data-gathering, including observations and a qualitative survey. Setting – Music library of a large public university. Subjects – Library patrons, primarily music students but also music faculty, other students and faculty, and regional music professionals and amateurs. Methods – In the exploratory phase, complete (i.e., incognito participant observers recorded patron characteristics and behaviours in four zones of the library (the technology lab, the stacks, the reference area, and study carrels. They conducted a series of five-minute-long visual sweeps of these zones at five-minute intervals. Observers were not given any checklist, but were told to record anything they saw regarding the personal characteristics, behaviours, and activities of patrons. The data collected resulted in what the investigators called “flip books” (a series of images recorded in close succession, which, when flipped, could give the illusion of movement. The data was analyzed using the grounded theory approach, a qualitative method to identify recurring themes on space use. A statistical analysis based on these themes was then conducted. In the second, explanatory phase, observers conducted new “sweeps,” or observations of the same library zones, this time using checklists to indicate the occurrence of specific activities identified in the first phase (solo vs. group activity, social interaction vs. study discussion, and use of technology. In addition, observers recorded patron entry and exit on “time cards,” and had all exiting patrons answer five brief questions about the types and volume of activities they had conducted in the various zones of the library. Main Results – The vast majority of the patrons were students. Most (at least three-quarters engaged in solitary activity, and a large majority used electronic

  3. An Ethnographic Study of Chinese Heritage Language Education and Technological Innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjuan Wang

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has increasingly uncovered the cognitive, cultural, and economic advantages of bilingualism and the positive impact of heritage language on children's second language acquisition (M:cLaughlin, 1995. As one type of heritage language education organizations, Chinese language schools have been in existence for decades in the U.S., but their practices have remained informal and not readily accessible to people from other cultures. In order to bridge this gap, this ethnographic study illustrates family and community involvement in promoting language proficiency in heritage language populations and explores language education methods practiced in Chinese community language schools in an urban Southern California area. The study examines the intricate issues affecting heritage language learning and explores the potential uses of technology in assisting young learners in acquiring their heritage language (Chinese. In addition, the study generates guidelines for adapting existing technology-assisted language programs (e.g., the Chinese Cultural Crystals for instructional uses.

  4. The Stigma Experienced by Terminally Ill Patients: Evidence From a Portuguese Ethnographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilário, Ana Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to offer an understanding of the ways in which terminally ill patients may face discrimination due to their visibly altered body. An ethnographic approach was adopted and fieldwork was conducted over 10 months in 2 inpatient hospice units in Portugal. Participant observation was complemented by 50 in-depth interviews with terminally ill patients, family members, and hospice staff. The stigma experienced by terminally ill patients derived mostly from the behavior of peers, extended family members, and friends toward their visibly altered body. There was no evidence that these patients were discredited by their immediate family when they became visibly unwell; unlike what has been reported in previous studies. This finding could be related to the strong familial culture of Portuguese society.

  5. An Auto-Ethnographic Study of "Open Dialogue": The Illumination of Snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mary

    2015-12-01

    This auto-ethnographic study describes the changes in the author's thinking and clinical work connected to her first-hand experience of Open Dialogue, which is an innovative, psychosocial approach to severe psychiatric crises developed in Tornio, Finland. In charting this trajectory, there is an emphasis on three interrelated themes: the micropolitics of U.S. managed mental health care; the practice of "dialogicality" in Open Dialogue; and the historical, cultural, and scientific shifts that are encouraging the adaptation of Open Dialogue in the United States. The work of Gregory Bateson provides a conceptual framework that makes sense of the author's experience and the larger trends. The study portrays and underscores how family and network practices are essential to responding to psychiatric crises and should not be abandoned in favor of a reductionist, biomedical model. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  6. Nurses' experiences of ethnographic fieldwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Lucas Pereira; Stofel, Natália Sevilha; Gualda, Dulce Maria Rosa; de Campos, Edemilson Antunes

    2014-09-01

    To reflect on the experiences of nurses performing ethnographic fieldwork in three studies. The application of ethnography to nursing research requires discussion about nurses' experiences of ethnographic fieldwork. This article examines some of the dilemmas that arise during the research process. Three ethnographic studies conducted by the authors in the south and southeast of Brazil. Excerpts from field diaries created during each research are presented at the end of each topic discussed. This is a reflexive paper that explores the nurses' experience in ethnographic fieldwork. This article discusses the main tasks involved in ethnographic research, including defining the study aim, reading and understanding anthropological theoretical bases, and setting a timeframe for the study. The article also discusses the idiosyncrasies of the cultural contexts studied, the bureaucracy that may be confronted when gaining access to the field, the difficulty of transforming the familiar into the strange, why ethnocentric perspectives should be avoided, and the anthropological doubt that places the ethnographer in the position of apprentice. It also discusses the importance of listening to others, reflexivity and strategies to stay in the field. For researchers, ethnographic fieldwork can be a rite of passage, but one that provides invaluable experiences that emphasise the value of relationships based on dialogue, reflexivity and negotiation. The main tasks undertaken in ethnographic research discussed in this article could contribute to the nurse' experience of conducting ethnographic fieldwork.

  7. An ethnographic study of career aspirations amongst students studying level 3 sports courses at a further education college in England

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Daniel J.; Evans, Adam B.; Allen-Collinson, Jacquelyn

    2013-01-01

    There is currently a dearth of research into how sports students’ career aspirations are formed during their post-compulsory education. This paper is based on an ethnographic study of sport students’ habitus and career aspirations. Two first-year cohorts on two different courses at a Further Education College in England were selected to participate in the in-depth study. The paper provides an analysis of the contrasting subcultures emergent within these groups, and how specific cultural pract...

  8. Social ruptures and the everyday life of homeless people: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorati, Regina Célia; Carretta, Regina Yoneko Dakuzaku; Kebbe, Leonardo Martins; Cardoso, Beatriz Lobato; Xavier, Joab Jefferson da Silva

    2017-07-20

    To discover the generators of disruptions in social support networks and identify the everyday life and projects of life of homeless people. Ethnographic study conducted between 2012 and 2013 in Ribeirão Preto -SP, Brazil. The participants were fifteen homeless people. Data were collected through video-recorded interviews addressing histories of life and a field diary. Data analysis was based on Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action. Results revealed that the participants' families have faced inequalities for many generations and that everyday life is marked by violence and death, poverty and exclusion, disrupted social networks, loneliness, alcohol and drug consumption, and other socially determined diseases. The situation of living on the streets stems from several factors present in the organization of the Brazilian society and social determinants condition the life and health of homeless people.

  9. Building a Dignified Identity: An Ethnographic Case Study of LGBT Catholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojcic, Natasha

    2016-10-01

    This ethnographic case study offers insight into religiously devout sexual minorities and the reasons behind their continued participation in an anti-gay religious institution, the Roman Catholic Church. I demonstrate how members of Dignity, an organization for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Catholics, strategically use their identity as gay Catholics to initiate action, to build community, and to destigmatize other religious sexual minorities. Members leverage this unique identity to push for change and equality within the Church. At the same time, this identity also allows members to see their continued participation in the anti-gay Roman Catholic Church as activism, a positive and affirming identity, thereby alleviating potential conflict and contradiction between their sexuality and their spirituality as Roman Catholics.

  10. The Social Relations of a Health Walk Group: An Ethnographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gordon; Pollard, Nick; Allmark, Peter; Machaczek, Kasia; Ramcharan, Paul

    2017-09-01

    It is already well established that regular walks are conducive to health and well-being. This article considers the production of social relations of regular, organized weekly group walks for older people. It is based on an ethnographic study of a Walking for Health group in a rural area of the United Kingdom. Different types of social relations are identified arising from the walk experience. The social relations generated are seen to be shaped by organizational factors that are constitutive of the walks; the resulting culture having implications for the sustainability of the experience. As there appears to be no single uniting theory linking group walk experiences to the production of social relations at this time, the findings are considered against therapeutic landscape, therapeutic mobility, and social capital theorizing. Finally, implications for the continuance of walking schemes for older people and for further research are considered.

  11. Eating fruits and vegetables. An ethnographic study of American and French family dinners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer-Sadlik, Tamar; Morgenstern, Aliyah; Peters, Chloe; Beaupoil, Pauline; Caët, Stéphanie; Debras, Camille; le Mené, Marine

    2015-06-01

    The French eat more fruits and vegetables than Americans and have lower rates of childhood obesity. This ethnographic study compares various aspects of meal environment in sixteen households in LA, California and Paris, France, and offers insights on the relationship between local practices and preferences and children's consumption of fruits and vegetables. Our analysis of video-recorded naturalist data reveals that the consumption of fruits and vegetables is linked to the cultural organization of dinner--what, when and how food is served--and to local beliefs about children's eating practices. We also found that the French model for dinnertime prioritizes the eating of fruits and vegetables more than the American model does. We propose that local eating models should be taken into account in research on childhood obesity and in prevention programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. How journalism contributes to reproduce inequalities: an ethnographic study about news production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Veiga da Silva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the data originated in a research carried out in order to cast some light on the participation of journalism in shaping values that create stereotypes and social inequalities. The research investigated how these values are formed and how they evolve. Through an ethnographic method, all the stages of the news production of a news broadcast were monitored along 11 weeks. The program is regularly broadcast by RBS TV, which belongs to Grupo RBS, the biggest communication conglomerate in Southern Brazil. Analyzing the daily routine of the journalists, with focus on the relationships they keep among themselves, and also on the productive routines, the study reached the conclusion that heterosexuality was a normative pattern that guided their personal and professional values in the decision-taking process, which resulted in presentations marked by hegemonic social values that reinforce hierarchies and inequalities from some social markers

  13. Ethnographic journalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Anne Kirstine

    2016-01-01

    Accounting for emerging journalistic genres is a difficult endeavor not least because there is little agreement as to what constitutes journalism itself. Doing so, however, is essential if we are to recognize changing journalistic doxas. To capture such changes, we must include a holistic framework...... journalistic epistemology, changing it through practice. In turn, the analysis reveals how journalism practices can evolve its troubled philosophical position...... require more contextual reporting, ethnographic journalism emerges in American feature journalism. Analyzed holistically, this genre is characterized as the employment of immersion strategies adopted from social science for distinct storytelling purposes. These methods, however, transform conventional...

  14. Supervisors' pedagogical role at a clinical education ward - an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silén, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice is essential for health care students. The supervisor's role and how supervision should be organized are challenging issues for educators and clinicians. Clinical education wards have been established to meet these challenges and they are units with a pedagogical framework facilitating students' training in real clinical settings. Supervisors support students to link together theoretical and practical knowledge and skills. From students' perspectives, clinical education wards have shown potential to enhance students' learning. Thus there is a need for deeper understanding of supervisors' pedagogical role in this context. We explored supervisors' approaches to students' learning at a clinical education ward where students are encouraged to independently take care of patients. An ethnographic approach was used to study encounters between patients, students and supervisors. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital. Ten observations with ten patients, 11 students and five supervisors were included in the study. After each observation, individual follow-up interviews with all participants and a group interview with supervisors were conducted. Data were analysed using an ethnographic approach. Supervisors' pedagogical role has to do with balancing patient care and student learning. The students were given independence, which created pedagogical challenges for the supervisors. They handled these challenges by collaborating as a supervisory team and taking different acts of supervision such as allowing students their independence, being there for students and by applying patient-centredness. The supervisors' pedagogical role was perceived as to facilitate students' learning as a team. Supervisors were both patient- and student-centred by making a nursing care plan for the patients and a learning plan for the students. The plans were guided by clinical and pedagogical guidelines, individually adjusted and

  15. Ayahuasca's entwined efficacy: An ethnographic study of ritual healing from 'addiction'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talin, Piera; Sanabria, Emilia

    2017-06-01

    A range of studies has demonstrated the efficacy of the psychoactive Amazonian brew ayahuasca in addressing substance addiction. These have revealed that physiological and psychological mechanisms are deeply enmeshed. This article focuses on how interactive ritual contexts support the healing effort. The study of psychedelic-assisted treatments for addiction has much to gain from ethnographic analyses of healing experiences within the particular ecologies of use and care, where these interventions are rendered efficacious. This is an ethnographically grounded, qualitative analysis of addiction-recovery experiences within ayahuasca rituals. It draws on long-term fieldwork and participant observation in ayahuasca communities, and in-depth, semi-structured interviews of participants with histories of substance misuse. Ayahuasca's efficacy in the treatment of addiction blends somatic, symbolic and collective dimensions. The layering of these effects, and the direction given to them through ritual, circumscribes the experience and provides tools to render it meaningful. Prevailing modes of evaluation are ill suited to account for the particular material and semiotic efficacy of complex interventions such as ayahuasca healing for addiction. The article argues that practices of care characteristic of the ritual spaces in which ayahuasca is collectively consumed, play a key therapeutic role. The ritual use of ayahuasca stands in strong contrast to hegemonic understandings of addiction, paving new ground between the overstated difference between community and pharmacological interventions. The article concludes that fluid, adaptable forms of caregiving play a key role in the success of addiction recovery and that feeling part of a community has an important therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biosocial Conservation: Integrating Biological and Ethnographic Methods to Study Human-Primate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchell, Joanna M; Fairet, Emilie; Shutt, Kathryn; Waters, Siân; Bell, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Biodiversity conservation is one of the grand challenges facing society. Many people interested in biodiversity conservation have a background in wildlife biology. However, the diverse social, cultural, political, and historical factors that influence the lives of people and wildlife can be investigated fully only by incorporating social science methods, ideally within an interdisciplinary framework. Cultural hierarchies of knowledge and the hegemony of the natural sciences create a barrier to interdisciplinary understandings. Here, we review three different projects that confront this difficulty, integrating biological and ethnographic methods to study conservation problems. The first project involved wildlife foraging on crops around a newly established national park in Gabon. Biological methods revealed the extent of crop loss, the species responsible, and an effect of field isolation, while ethnography revealed institutional and social vulnerability to foraging wildlife. The second project concerned great ape tourism in the Central African Republic. Biological methods revealed that gorilla tourism poses risks to gorillas, while ethnography revealed why people seek close proximity to gorillas. The third project focused on humans and other primates living alongside one another in Morocco. Incorporating shepherds in the coproduction of ecological knowledge about primates built trust and altered attitudes to the primates. These three case studies demonstrate how the integration of biological and social methods can help us to understand the sustainability of human-wildlife interactions, and thus promote coexistence. In each case, an integrated biosocial approach incorporating ethnographic data produced results that would not otherwise have come to light. Research that transcends conventional academic boundaries requires the openness and flexibility to move beyond one's comfort zone to understand and acknowledge the legitimacy of "other" kinds of knowledge. It is

  17. Displays of authority in the clinical consultation: a linguistic ethnographic study of the electronic patient record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of computers into general practice settings has profoundly changed the dynamics of the clinical consultation. Previous research exploring the impact of the computer (in what has been termed the 'triadic' consultation) has shown that computer use and communication between doctor and patient are intricately coordinated and inseparable. Swinglehurst et al. have recently been critical of the ongoing tendency within health communication research to focus on 'the computer' as a relatively simple 'black box', or as a material presence in the consultation. By re-focussing on the electronic patient record (EPR) and conceptualising this as a complex collection of silent but consequential voices, they have opened up new and more nuanced possibilities for analysis. This orientation makes visible a tension between the immediate contingencies of the interaction as it unfolds moment-by-moment and the more standardised, institutional demands which are embedded in the EPR ('dilemma of attention'). In this paper I extend this work, presenting an in-depth examination of how participants in the consultation manage this tension. I used linguistic ethnographic methods to study 54 video recorded consultations from a dataset collected between 2007 and 2008 in two UK general practices, combining microanalysis of the consultation with ethnographic attention to the wider organisational and institutional context. My analysis draws on the theoretical work of Erving Goffman and Mikhail Bakhtin, incorporating attention to the 'here and now' of the interaction as well as an appreciation of the 'distributed' nature of the EPR, its role in hosting and circulating new voices, and in mediating participants' talk and social practices. It reveals - in apparently fleeting moments of negotiation and contestation - the extent to which the EPR shapes the dynamic construction, display and circulation of authority in the contemporary consultation. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by

  18. Usability Evaluation of Electronic Health Record System around Clinical Notes Usage-An Ethnographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Rubina F; Marquard, Jenna L; Hultman, Gretchen M; Adam, Terrence J; Harder, Kathleen A; Melton, Genevieve B

    2017-10-01

    Background A substantial gap exists between current Electronic Health Record (EHR) usability and potential optimal usability. One of the fundamental reasons for this discrepancy is poor incorporation of a User-Centered Design (UCD) approach during the Graphical User Interface (GUI) development process. Objective To evaluate usability strengths and weaknesses of two widely implemented EHR GUIs for critical clinical notes usage tasks. Methods Twelve Internal Medicine resident physicians interacting with one of the two EHR systems (System-1 at Location-A and System-2 at Location-B) were observed by two usability evaluators employing an ethnographic approach. User comments and observer findings were analyzed for two critical tasks: (1) clinical notes entry and (2) related information-seeking tasks. Data were analyzed from two standpoints: (1) usability references categorized by usability evaluators as positive, negative, or equivocal and (2) usability impact of each feature measured through a 7-point severity rating scale. Findings were also validated by user responses to a post observation questionnaire. Results For clinical notes entry, System-1 surpassed System-2 with more positive (26% vs. 12%) than negative (12% vs. 34%) usability references. Greatest impact features on EHR usability (severity score pertaining to each feature) for clinical notes entry were: autopopulation (6), screen options (5.5), communication (5), copy pasting (4.5), error prevention (4.5), edit ability (4), and dictation and transcription (3.5). Both systems performed equally well on information-seeking tasks and features with greatest impacts on EHR usability were navigation for notes (7) and others (e.g., looking for ancillary data; 5.5). Ethnographic observations were supported by follow-up questionnaire responses. Conclusion This study provides usability-specific insights to inform future, improved, EHR interface that is better aligned with UCD approach.

  19. Explaining adherence success in sub-Saharan Africa: an ethnographic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma C Ware

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa generally take more than 90% of prescribed doses of antiretroviral therapy (ART. This number exceeds the levels of adherence observed in North America and dispels early scale-up concerns that adherence would be inadequate in settings of extreme poverty. This paper offers an explanation and theoretical model of ART adherence success based on the results of an ethnographic study in three sub-Saharan African countries.Determinants of ART adherence for HIV-infected persons in sub-Saharan Africa were examined with ethnographic research methods. 414 in-person interviews were carried out with 252 persons taking ART, their treatment partners, and health care professionals at HIV treatment sites in Jos, Nigeria; Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; and Mbarara, Uganda. 136 field observations of clinic activities were also conducted. Data were examined using category construction and interpretive approaches to analysis. Findings indicate that individuals taking ART routinely overcome economic obstacles to ART adherence through a number of deliberate strategies aimed at prioritizing adherence: borrowing and "begging" transport funds, making "impossible choices" to allocate resources in favor of treatment, and "doing without." Prioritization of adherence is accomplished through resources and help made available by treatment partners, other family members and friends, and health care providers. Helpers expect adherence and make their expectations known, creating a responsibility on the part of patients to adhere. Patients adhere to promote good will on the part of helpers, thereby ensuring help will be available when future needs arise.Adherence success in sub-Saharan Africa can be explained as a means of fulfilling social responsibilities and thus preserving social capital in essential relationships.

  20. Ethnographic Study at a Music Library Found Students Prefer Short Stopovers and Longer Solitary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dominique Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objective – To identify patterns of patron behaviour in the library in order to improve space utilization. Design – Ethnographic data-gathering, including observations and a qualitative survey. Setting – Music library of a large public university. Subjects – Library patrons, primarily music students but also music faculty, other students and faculty, and regional music professionals and amateurs. Methods – In the exploratory phase, complete (i.e., incognito) participant ob...

  1. The Effect of School Culture on Science Education at an Ideologically Innovative Elementary Magnet School: An Ethnographic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Lori T.

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic case study investigated the science practices of teachers at one public elementary magnet school in light of how school culture influenced science curriculum design and instruction. The purpose of the study was to address how school culture impacted the school's overall treatment of science as a viable content area. Key informant…

  2. An Ethnographic Study of the Friendship Patterns of International Students in England: An Attempt to Recreate Home through Conational Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an ethnographic study into the adjustment experience of a group of postgraduate international students at a university in the South of England. Friendship emerged as a major theme in this study; of particular importance to students was the desire and need to mix with conational friends. This desire was driven by…

  3. De Facto Language Education Policy through Teachers' Attitudes and Practices: A Critical Ethnographic Study in Three Jamaican Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nero, Shondel J.

    2014-01-01

    Using Jamaica, a former British colony where Jamaican Creole (JC) is the mass vernacular but Standard Jamaican English is the official language, as an illustrative case, this critical ethnographic study in three Jamaican schools examines the theoretical and practical challenges of language education policy (LEP) development and implementation in…

  4. "Age-Appropriate Development" as Measure and Norm: An Ethnographic Study of the Practical Anthropology of Routine Paediatric Checkups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelle, Helga

    2010-01-01

    The article provides an ethnographic study of the logic of conducting routine paediatric checkups in children from birth to the age of 5 in Germany (U1 to U9). These checkups are meant as a continual evaluation of a child's developmental process and progress, and their outcomes inform decisions on children's careers in educational institutions.…

  5. Insights into freshman weight issues: An ethnographic study of how first-year college students make decisions about eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transition from high school to college represents a life turning point during which health behavior trajectories may be influenced. This study addresses the internal and external factors that guide students’ eating decisions as they are understood and relayed by students through ethnographic, qu...

  6. An Ethnographic Field Study of the Influence of Social Interactions during the School Day for Children Diagnosed with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Kim Michéle; Bak, Carsten Kronborg; Petersen, Kirsten Schultz; Vardinghus-Nielsen, Henrik; Kristiansen, Tine Mechlenborg

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this ethnographic field study was to investigate the influence of school-day social interactions on the well-being and social inclusion of children diagnosed with ADHD. The empirical data consisted of participant observations and informal interviews over a three-month period at a Danish primary school. Two ADHD-diagnosed 11-year-old…

  7. Cross-cultural aspects of ICT use by older people: preliminary results of a four-country ethnographical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blat, Josep; Sayago, Sergio; Kälviäinen, Mirja

    2011-01-01

    addresses this issue by drawing on an ethnographical study of ICT use conducted with over 120 people, aged 67-71, in four European countries: Finland, Denmark, Italy and Spain, over a 6-month period. The preliminary results show that making a social, independent and worth use of ICT are common aspects...

  8. How Do They Research? An Ethnographic Study of Final Year Undergraduate Research Behavior in an Irish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Siobhán

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify how, when, and where students research; the impact of learning environments on research productivity, and to recommend improved supports to facilitate research. An ethnographic approach that entailed following five students in the final six weeks of their program enabled deep level analysis. The study…

  9. I Did That Wrong and It Sounded Good: An Ethnographic Study of Vernacular Music Making in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezquerra, Victor N.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this ethnographic study was to examine vernacular music making in higher education. The participants, undergraduate music education majors (N = 23 for Fall, N = 10 for Spring), were investigated throughout the course of the 2012-2013 academic year. A constructivist philosophical framework was applied and data were collected using…

  10. Plant identification credibility in ethnobotany: a closer look at Polish ethnographic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczaj, Łukasz J

    2010-12-17

    This paper is an attempt to estimate the percentage of erroneously identified taxa in ethnographic studies concerning the use of plants and to propose a code for recording credibility of identification in historical ethnobotany publications. A sample of Polish-language ethnobotanical literature (45 published sources from 1874-2005) and four collections of voucher specimens (from 1894-1975) were analyzed. Errors were detected in the publications by comparing the data with existing knowledge on the distribution of plant names and species ranges. The voucher specimens were re-examined.A one-letter code was invented for quick identification of the credibility of data published in lists of species compiled from historical or ethnographic sources, according to the source of identification: voucher specimen, Latin binominal, botanical expert, obvious widespread name, folk name, mode of use, range, physical description or photograph. To test the use of the code an up-to-date list of wild food plants used in Poland was made. A significant difference between the ratio of mistakes in the voucher specimen collections and the ratio of detectable mistakes in the studies without herbarium documentation was found. At least 2.3% of taxa in the publications were identified erroneously (mean rate was 6.2% per publication), and in half of these mistakes even the genus was not correct. As many as 10.0% of voucher specimens (on average 9.2% per collection) were originally erroneously identified, but three quarters of the identification mistakes remained within-genus.The species of the genera Thymus, Rumex and Rubus were most often confused within the genus.Not all of the invented credibility codes were used in the list of wild food plants, but they may be useful for other researchers. The most often used codes were the ones signifying identification by: voucher specimen, botanical expert and by a common name used throughout the country. The results of this study support the rigorous use

  11. Plant identification credibility in ethnobotany: a closer look at Polish ethnographic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łuczaj Łukasz J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper is an attempt to estimate the percentage of erroneously identified taxa in ethnographic studies concerning the use of plants and to propose a code for recording credibility of identification in historical ethnobotany publications. Methods A sample of Polish-language ethnobotanical literature (45 published sources from 1874-2005 and four collections of voucher specimens (from 1894-1975 were analyzed. Errors were detected in the publications by comparing the data with existing knowledge on the distribution of plant names and species ranges. The voucher specimens were re-examined. A one-letter code was invented for quick identification of the credibility of data published in lists of species compiled from historical or ethnographic sources, according to the source of identification: voucher specimen, Latin binominal, botanical expert, obvious widespread name, folk name, mode of use, range, physical description or photograph. To test the use of the code an up-to-date list of wild food plants used in Poland was made. Results A significant difference between the ratio of mistakes in the voucher specimen collections and the ratio of detectable mistakes in the studies without herbarium documentation was found. At least 2.3% of taxa in the publications were identified erroneously (mean rate was 6.2% per publication, and in half of these mistakes even the genus was not correct. As many as 10.0% of voucher specimens (on average 9.2% per collection were originally erroneously identified, but three quarters of the identification mistakes remained within-genus. The species of the genera Thymus, Rumex and Rubus were most often confused within the genus. Not all of the invented credibility codes were used in the list of wild food plants, but they may be useful for other researchers. The most often used codes were the ones signifying identification by: voucher specimen, botanical expert and by a common name used throughout the

  12. The insight and challenge of reflexive practice in an ethnographic study of black traumatically injured patients in Philadelphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Sara F

    2017-07-01

    The integrity of critical ethnography requires engagement in reflexive practice at all phases of the research process. In this discussion paper, I explore the insights and challenges of reflexive practice in an ethnographic study of the recovery experiences of black trauma patients in a Philadelphia hospital. Observation and interviews were conducted with twelve patients who were admitted to trauma-designated units of the hospital over the course of a year. During fieldwork, I learned the ways that my background as a professional nurse structured my way of being in clinical space and facilitated a particular interpretation of clinical culture. In analysis, reflection on subjectivities through which I designed this ethnographic research allowed me to see beyond my preconceived and theoretically informed perspective to permit unexpected features of the field to emerge. Reflexive practice also guided my reconciliation of key practical and epistemological differences between clinical ethnographic research and the anthropologic tradition in which it is rooted. I conclude that with careful reflection to the subjectivities that influence the research process, interdisciplinary clinically relevant applied interpretations of critical ethnographic work can be used to generate detailed knowledge across contexts in clinical care, nursing practice, and patient experiences. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Family science: An ethnographic case study of the ordinary science and literacy experiences of one family

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Glenda M.

    Despite the copious research available on science learning, little is known about ways in which the public engages in free-choice science learning and even fewer studies have focused on how families engage in science to learn about the world around them. The same was true about studies of literacy development in the home until the 1980s when researchers (e.g. Bissex, 1980; Heath, 1983; Taylor, 1983) began documenting the literacy happenings and practices of young children in natural settings. Findings from intensive emergent literacy research studies have challenged traditional approaches to the teaching and learning of literacy, especially drawing attention to the active role children take in their own learning. Drawing upon those early literacy studies, this research project uses ethnographic case study methods along with a naturalistic inquiry approach, to document the daily explorations of one science-oriented family. Over a three year span, I have followed my own family, in our natural setting, through our day-to-day experiences with science and literacy as we seek to mediate and understand the world around us. In doing so, I have explored the ways we have shared knowledge and constructed learning through science books and read alouds, self-initiated inquiry learning, and communication. Throughout the three year research period, I have collected data and documented my own young children's understanding of the nature of science by observing their engagement with world around them.

  14. Patients’ approaches to students’ learning at a clinical education ward-an ethnographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that patients’ involvement in health care students’ learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students’ learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. Methods An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. Results The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students’ learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Conclusions Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between

  15. Patients' approaches to students' learning at a clinical education ward--an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silén, Charlotte

    2014-07-02

    It is well known that patients' involvement in health care students' learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students' learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students' learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between patients and students resulting in patients

  16. perspective: two ethnographic narratives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vations, interviews, informal conversations, and journal data. These field texts ... The way teachers see themselves as professionals and how they compose their identities in schools is the focus of this ethnographic inquiry. This study .... These two distinct sites formed the workplace of two teachers and as such were the ...

  17. On Teaching Ethnographic Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarfield, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    The author of this article, a developmental anthropologist, illustrates how the instructor can use ethnographic films to enhance the study of anthropology and override notions about the scope and efficacy of Western intervention in the Third World, provided the instructor places such films in their proper historical and cultural context. He…

  18. Contextual Facilitators and Maintaining of Compassion-Based Care: An Ethnographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Sima; Taleghani, Fariba; Keyvanara, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Compassion is an important part of nursing. It fosters better relationships between nurses and their patients. Moreover, it gives patients more confidence in the care they receive. Determining facilitators of compassion are essential to holistic care. The purpose of this study was to explore these facilitators. This ethnographic study was conducted in 2014-2015 with 20 nurses, 12 patients, and 4 family members in the medical and surgical wards. Data collection was done through observations and in-depth semi-structured interviews with purposive sampling. The study was carried out in 15 months. Data analysis was performed using constant comparison based on Strauss and Corbin. Data analysis defined three main themes and eight subthemes as the fundamentals of compassion-based care. Nurses' personal factors with subcategories of personality, attitudes, and values and holistic view; and socio-cultural factors with subcategories of kindness role model, religious, and cultural values are needed to elicit compassionate behaviors. Initiator factors, with subcategories of patient suffering, patient communication demands, and patient emotional and psychological necessity are also needed to start compassionate behaviors. The findings of this study showed that nurses' communication with patients is nurse's duty in order to understand and respect the needs of patients. Attention should be paid to issues relating to compassion in nursing and practice educational programs. Indeed, creating a care environment with compassion, regardless of any shortcomings in the work condition, would help in the development of effective nursing.

  19. An ethnographic study of communication challenges in maternity care for immigrant women in rural Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbottom, Gina M A; Safipour, Jalal; Yohani, Sophie; O'Brien, Beverley; Mumtaz, Zubia; Paton, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    many immigrant and ethno-cultural groups in Canada face substantial barriers to accessing health care including language barriers. The negative consequences of miscommunication in health care settings are well documented although there has been little research on communication barriers facing immigrant women seeking maternity care in Canada. This study identified the nature of communication difficulties in maternity services from the perspectives of immigrant women, health care providers and social service providers in a small city in southern Alberta, Canada. a focused ethnography was undertaken incorporating interviews with 31 participants recruited using purposive and snowball sampling. A community liaison and several gatekeepers within the community assisted with recruitment and interpretation where needed (n=1). All interviews were recorded and audio files were transcribed verbatim by a professional transcriptionist. The data was analysed drawing upon principles expounded by Roper and Shapira (2000) for the analysis of ethnographic data, because of (1) the relevance to ethnographic data, (2) the clarity and transparency of the approach, (3) the systematic approach to analysis, and (4) the compatibility of the approach with computer-assisted qualitative analysis software programs such as Atlas.ti (ATLAS.ti Scientific Software Development GmbH, Germany). This process included (1) coding for descriptive labels, (2) sorting for patterns, (3) identification of outliers, (4) generation of themes, (5) generalising to generate constructs and theories, and (6) memoing including researcher reflections. four main themes were identified including verbal communication, unshared meaning, non-verbal communication to build relationships, and trauma, culture and open communication. Communication difficulties extended beyond matters of language competency to those encompassing non-verbal communication and its relation to shared meaning as well as the interplay of underlying pre

  20. Clinical ethics issues in HIV care in Canada: an institutional ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaposy, Chris; Greenspan, Nicole R; Marshall, Zack; Allison, Jill; Marshall, Shelley; Kitson, Cynthia

    2017-02-06

    This is a study involving three HIV clinics in the Canadian provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, and Manitoba. We sought to identify ethical issues involving health care providers and clinic clients in these settings, and to gain an understanding of how different ethical issues are managed by these groups. We used an institutional ethnographic method to investigate ethical issues in HIV clinics. Our researcher conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews, compiled participant observation notes, and studied health records in order to document ethical issues in the clinics, and to understand how health care providers and clinic clients manage and resolve these issues. We found that health care providers and clinic clients have developed work processes for managing ethical issues of various types: conflicts between client-autonomy and public health priorities ("treatment as prevention"), difficulties associated with the criminalization of nondisclosure of HIV positive status, challenges with non-adherence to HIV treatment, the protection of confidentiality, barriers to treatment access, and negative social determinants of health and well-being. Some ethical issues resulted from structural disadvantages experienced by clinic clients. The most striking findings in our study were the negative social determinants of health and well-being experienced by some clinic clients - such as experiences of violence and trauma, poverty, racism, colonization, homelessness, and other factors affecting well-being such as problematic substance use. These negative determinants were at the root of other ethical issues, and are themselves of ethical concern.

  1. Computer templates in chronic disease management: ethnographic case study in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Roberts, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate how electronic templates shape, enable and constrain consultations about chronic diseases. Design Ethnographic case study, combining field notes, video-recording, screen capture with a microanalysis of talk, body language and data entry—an approach called linguistic ethnography. Setting Two general practices in England. Participants and methods Ethnographic observation of administrative areas and 36 nurse-led consultations was done. Twenty-four consultations were directly observed and 12 consultations were video-recorded alongside computer screen capture. Consultations were transcribed using conversation analysis conventions, with notes on body language and the electronic record. The analysis involved repeated rounds of viewing video, annotating field notes, transcription and microanalysis to identify themes. The data was interpreted using discourse analysis, with attention to the sociotechnical theory. Results Consultations centred explicitly or implicitly on evidence-based protocols inscribed in templates. Templates did not simply identify tasks for completion, but contributed to defining what chronic diseases were, how care was being delivered and what it meant to be a patient or professional in this context. Patients’ stories morphed into data bytes; the particular became generalised; the complex was made discrete, simple and manageable; and uncertainty became categorised and contained. Many consultations resembled bureaucratic encounters, primarily oriented to completing data fields. We identified a tension, sharpened by the template, between different framings of the patient—as ‘individual’ or as ‘one of a population’. Some clinicians overcame this tension, responding creatively to prompts within a dialogue constructed around the patient's narrative. Conclusions Despite their widespread implementation, little previous research has examined how templates are actually used in practice. Templates do not simply document the

  2. Belonging to a community-based football team: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynard, Lorrae; Howie, Linsey; Collister, Laura

    2009-08-01

    This study considered the benefits derived from participation in a community-based Australian Rules Football league in Melbourne, Australia. The RecLink league deliberately tackles the social and occupational disadvantages associated with mental illness, addictions, unemployment and homelessness. An ethnographic methodology was used to study one team from the RecLink football league throughout an entire season. Fieldnotes were written following participant observation at training, games and events, and five in-depth interviews were conducted and transcribed. A constant comparative approach to data analysis was adopted. Three major themes were identified: a spirit of inclusion, team-building and meaning of team involvement. The first describes how members were accepted, welcomed and given the opportunity for team involvement, with the expectation that they 'had a go', and 'tried their best'. The second illustrates how the team collectively fostered a culture of friendship, cooperation and support. The third examines the significance of being part of the team, incorporating personal contributions and gains, and meanings attributed to team involvement. These findings demonstrated how football can be used as non-clinical, community-based occupational therapy: enabling participation in a personally meaningful and culturally valued occupation. Occupational therapists are challenged to explore further how such community-based sports programs may complement existing clinical and welfare-based approaches to social disadvantage.

  3. Living with the world heritage. An ethnographic study of the ancient city of Nessebar, Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luleva Ana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid-1950s the Ancient city of Nessebar has had the status of national cultural heritage; in 1983 it was inscribed in the World heritage list of UNESCO. The article makes an attempt to study the regimes of using of and living in the city - world cultural heritage in two different political and economic contexts. The pressure of the tourism industry on the value, which was visible even in the years of the late state socialism, became irresistible after 1989 in the context of the liberalised market economy, the interests of the private investors and the accepted as part of the "normal" market order corrupt practices of the institutions that are responsible for the safeguarding and management of the cultural heritage. The ethnographic study argues that intertwined in a Gordian knot around the central question for the residents of the ancient city of Nessebar, viz. the occupation of the city, which has been declared a world heritage site, are issues like trust and distrust in the institutions, the experience of abiding by formal and informal rules for operation with private property, the notions of social justice, local identity, the use of the cultural heritage as symbolic capital by different social actors and its transformation into economic one, with the conflicting interconnection between tourist industry and cultural heritage.

  4. Profiling adult literacy facilitators in development contexts: An ethnographic study in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkineh, Turuwark Zalalam; Rogers, Alan; Danki, Tolera Negassa

    2017-11-01

    Teachers/facilitators in adult literacy learning programmes are recognised as being vital to successful learning outcomes. But little is known about them as a group. This small-scale research project comprising ethnographic-style case studies of five adult literacy facilitators (ALFs) in Ethiopia seeks to throw some light on these teachers, their backgrounds and what they bring to their teaching, with a view to improving the effectiveness of their work. The researchers found that all of the ALFs had high levels of commitment, but none of the ALFs received much in the way of training, and professional support for their role was in some cases missing. The degree (and their perception) of their own literacy practices varied greatly among them, even in their common use of mobile phones. It also emerged that while they had all fought very hard for their own education, one of the main reasons all of them stated for going into literacy teaching was not a general belief in the value of education but their priority need of a regular income. Another insight is that the female ALFs struggled more than their male counterparts in engaging learners; the women were criticised more excessively than the men. This research reveals something of the diversity of facilitators, and concludes that further such studies are needed in different contexts.

  5. The culture of general palliative nursing care in medical departments: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Jarlbaek, Lene; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-04-01

    In many countries, approximately half of the population dies in hospital, making general palliative nursing care (GPNC) a core nursing task. GPNC in the hospital setting is described as challenging, however little is known about its actual practice. To explore the GPNC culture in medical departments. An ethnographic study, using Spradley's 12-step method, with observational field studies and interviews with nurses from three medical departments in a Danish regional hospital. Three cultural themes emerged from the analysis, focusing on the setting, the practice and the nurses' reflections on GPNC: (1) GPNC provided in a treatment setting, (2) transition to loving care and the licence to perform palliative care (PC) and (3) potential for team improvement. GPNC as a culture in medical departments seemed to be embedded in a setting not suited for dying patients. Palliative care was still practised according to the transition model of care, sharply dividing curative from palliative care, and was inappropriately conducted in a fragmented and individual-based way. The term 'loving care' was used as a 'gate-opener' to provide palliative care for the dying; however, the content of this term was not defined or expressed among the health professionals. Practical and professional nursing skills are not sufficient to improve GPNC in the hospital department. Leaders on all levels need also to address the culture in which palliative care is embedded.

  6. After a child's acquired brain injury (ABI): An ethnographic study of being a parent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Marghalara; Goez, Helly R; Caine, Vera; Yager, Jerome Y; Joyce, Anthony S; Newton, Amanda S

    2016-11-30

    To explore the meanings associated with being a parent of a child with an aquired brain injury (ABI). An ethnographic study was conducted with parents of children aged 3 to 10 years who had acquired a severe brain injury. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit parents from the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta. Data collection involved participant observation, fieldwork and semi-structured interviews. Field notes and interviews transcriptions were analysed using a thematic analysis framework and informed by symbolic interactionism theory. Six parent dyads (mothers and fathers) and 4 mothers participated in the study.Parents' meanings of `parenting' a child with severe brain injury were shaped by the injury, wide range of familial dynamics, and interactions. Six main themes related to parental meanings emerged from our data: (1) Getting `back to normal'; (2) Relying on a support system; (3) Worrying something bad may happen after the injury; (4) Going through a range of emotions following the injury; (5) Changing family dynamics after the injury; and (6) Ongoing performativity. Parents' meanings of `parenting' a child are extensively impacted by their child's functioning after the ABI. Having a greater appreciation of these experiences may be beneficial for medical professionals.

  7. Nursing assistants matters-An ethnographic study of knowledge sharing in interprofessional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh Falk, Annika; Hult, Håkan; Hammar, Mats; Hopwood, Nick; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine

    2017-08-03

    Interprofessional collaboration involves some kind of knowledge sharing, which is essential and will be important in the future in regard to the opportunities and challenges in practices for delivering safe and effective health care. Nursing assistants are seldom mentioned as a group of health care workers that contribute to interprofessional collaboration in health care practice. The aim of this ethnographic study was to explore how the nursing assistants' knowledge can be shared in a team on a spinal cord injury rehabilitation ward. Using a sociomaterial perspective on practice, we captured different aspects of interprofessional collaboration in health care. The findings reveal how knowledge was shared between professionals, depending on different kinds of practice architecture. These specific cultural-discursive, material-economic, and social-political arrangements enabled possibilities through which nursing assistants' knowledge informed other practices, and others' knowledge informed the practice of nursing assistants. By studying what health care professionals actually do and say in practice, we found that the nursing assistants could make a valuable contribution of knowledge to the team. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Purposeful Travel to Nepal: An Ethnographic Study of the Eudemonic and Hedonistic Experiences of Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtin Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purposeful travel is apparent in relatively new modes of tourism and particularly in volunteer holidays where tourists are searching for meaningful experiences which provide a sense of physical, emotional or spiritual fulfilment. The positive outcomes of volunteer holidays on destinations is heavily debated from questioning the morals and merits of a growing profit-making sector to whether destinations have little or no long term benefit from such travel. Whilst the author acknowledges the wealth of literature in this regard, she concentrates on the notion that volunteering is not just about helping other people or worthy causes but also about personal self-development and social egoism. She concludes that these two features have eudemonic outcomes and that these are worthy of investigation. Based on an ethnographic study, this paper analyses the experiences of participants on an elephant conservation expedition to Bardia National Park, Nepal. In its evaluation it conveys the close relationship between altruism and egoism as well as the eudemonic outcomes that purposeful travel can sometimes provide.

  9. Between Two Worlds: an Ethnographic Study of Gay Consumer Culture in Rio de Janeiro

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    Severino Joaquim Nunes Pereira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It is not easy to study socially marginalized groups such as gays, ethnic minorities, and others. This is, however,an extremely relevant topic in the consumer behavior area since the status of members of a modern consumersociety is largely denied to stigmatized social groups (Barbosa, 2006. The objective of this work is to shed lighton how gay men in Rio de Janeiro use the discourse associated with their possessions to build and maintain thesymbolic and hierarchical boundaries between the gay and heterosexual worlds, as well as to investigate the roleconsumption plays in this boundary setting. An ethnographic observation of a group of gay men in Rio deJaneiro was conducted, along with 20 semi-structured interviews with openly gay men between 2005 and 2008.The results suggest that: (a the world culturally built by gays seems to be divided into a gay world and aheterosexual world, where the division between these two worlds not only happens in their minds, but also intheir possessions and purchasing decisions; (b the meaning of gay mens’ places of consumption range fromprofane to sacred along their lives; and (c in the gay world, the body is seen both as a cultural construction andas an asset.

  10. Immigration experience of Latin American working women in Alicante, Spain: an ethnographic study 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Juárez, Liliana; Noreña-Peña, Ana Lucía

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to describe the experience of Latin American working women regarding immigration, taking into account the expectations and conditions in which this process takes place. METHOD: ethnographic qualitative study. Data collection was performed by means of semi-structured interviews with 24 Latin American immigrant women in Spain. The information collected was triangulated through two focal groups. RESULTS: the expectations of migrant women focus on improving family living conditions. Social support is essential for their settling and to perform daily life activities. They declare they have adapted to the settlement country, although they live with stress. They perceive they have greater sexual freedom and power with their partners but keep greater responsibility in childcare, combining that with the role of working woman. CONCLUSIONS: migrant women play a key role in the survival of households, they build and create new meanings about being a woman, their understanding of life, their social and couple relationships. Such importance is shaped by their expectations and the conditions in which the migration process takes place, as well as their work integration. PMID:25493683

  11. Immigration experience of Latin American working women in Alicante, Spain: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Juárez, Liliana; Noreña-Peña, Ana Lucía; Cibanal-Juan, Luis

    2014-10-01

    To describe the experience of Latin American working women regarding immigration, taking into account the expectations and conditions in which this process takes place. Ethnographic qualitative study. Data collection was performed by means of semi-structured interviews with 24 Latin American immigrant women in Spain. The information collected was triangulated through two focal groups. The expectations of migrant women focus on improving family living conditions. Social support is essential for their settling and to perform daily life activities. They declare they have adapted to the settlement country, although they live with stress. They perceive they have greater sexual freedom and power with their partners but keep greater responsibility in childcare, combining that with the role of working woman. Migrant women play a key role in the survival of households, they build and create new meanings about being a woman, their understanding of life, their social and couple relationships. Such importance is shaped by their expectations and the conditions in which the migration process takes place, as well as their work integration.

  12. Immigration experience of Latin American working women in Alicante, Spain: an ethnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana González-Juárez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to describe the experience of Latin American working women regarding immigration, taking into account the expectations and conditions in which this process takes place.METHOD: ethnographic qualitative study. Data collection was performed by means of semi-structured interviews with 24 Latin American immigrant women in Spain. The information collected was triangulated through two focal groups.RESULTS: the expectations of migrant women focus on improving family living conditions. Social support is essential for their settling and to perform daily life activities. They declare they have adapted to the settlement country, although they live with stress. They perceive they have greater sexual freedom and power with their partners but keep greater responsibility in childcare, combining that with the role of working woman.CONCLUSIONS: migrant women play a key role in the survival of households, they build and create new meanings about being a woman, their understanding of life, their social and couple relationships. Such importance is shaped by their expectations and the conditions in which the migration process takes place, as well as their work integration.

  13. Remote community-based public health nursing during a disaster: an ethnographic case study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mari; Atogami, Fumi; Nakamura, Yasuka; Kusaka, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Toyoko

    2014-08-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake that occurred on March 11, 2011 generated a tsunami that directly struck Japan. Public health nurses (PHNs) played important roles in this disaster response and community recovery. This research identified a PHN's experience in an affected area. An ethnographic case study approach was used to obtain in-depth information regarding the experiences of one PHN, using semi-structured interviews, participant observation, and statistical documents. Six themes were identified and explored, including that the PHN undertook overwhelming responsibilities to protect the local residents, made several autonomous decisions, and had a strong sense of mission. These were based on the relationship-building that occurred with the local residents due to the geographical characteristics and her own preparations. The findings encourage PHNs to participate in simulations of disasters in preparation for major catastrophes and establish good collaborative efforts with residents by being a part of the community. Copyright © 2014 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Health seeking and access to care for children with suspected dengue in Cambodia: An ethnographic study

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    Manderson Lenore

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continuing contribution of dengue fever to the hospitalization and deaths in hospital of infants and small children in Cambodia is associated with delays in presentation for medical attention, diagnosis and appropriate care. It is important to identify the reasons that influence these delays, in order to develop appropriate interventions to redress the impact of dengue. Methods Data on health seeking were collected during an ethnographic study conducted in two villages in the eastern province of Kampong Cham, Cambodia in 2004. Interviews were conducted with mothers whose children had been infected with suspected dengue fever, or who had been sick for other reasons, in 2003 and 2004. Results Women selected a therapeutic option based on perceptions of the severity of the child's condition, confidence in the particular modality, service or practitioner, and affordability of the therapy. While they knew what type of health care was required, poverty in combination with limited availability and perceptions of the poor quality of care at village health centers and public referral hospitals deterred them from doing so. Women initially used home remedies, then sought advice from public and private providers, shifting from one sector to another in a pragmatic response to the child's illness. Conclusion The lack of availability of financial resources for poor people and their continuing lack of confidence in the care provided by government centres combine to delay help seeking and inappropriate treatment of children sick with dengue.

  15. Accomplishing professional jurisdiction in intensive care: An ethnographic study of three units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xyrichis, Andreas; Lowton, Karen; Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports an ethnographic study examining health professional jurisdictions within three intensive care units (ICUs) in order to draw out the social processes through which ICU clinicians organised and delivered life-saving care to critically ill patients. Data collection consisted of 240 h observation of actual practice and 27 interviews with health professionals. The research was conducted against a backdrop of international political and public pressure for national healthcare systems to deliver safe, quality and efficient healthcare. As in many Western health systems, for the English Department of Health the key to containing these challenges was a reconfiguration of responsibilities for clinicians in order to break down professional boundaries and encourage greater interprofessional working under the guise of workforce modernisation. In this paper, through the analysis of health professional interaction, we examine the properties and conditions under which professional jurisdiction was negotiated and accomplished in day-to-day ICU practice. We discuss how staff seniority influenced the nature of professional interaction and how jurisdictional boundaries were reproduced and reconfigured under conditions of routine and urgent work. Consequently, we question theorisation that treats individual professions as homogenous groups and overlooks fluctuation in the flow and intensity of work; and conclude that in ICU, urgency and seniority have a part to play in shaping jurisdictional boundaries at the level of day-to-day practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Physiognomy and teeth: an ethnographic study among young and middle-aged Hong Kong adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, C; Liu, K S; Lam, C W

    2002-05-11

    To determine knowledge and beliefs about traditional physiognomy (judging an individual's character from their facial appearance) concerning teeth among young (17-26) and middle-aged (35-44) Hong Kong adults. In a cross sectional ethnographical telephone survey, 400 adults were interviewed about 16 traditional physiognomy concerning teeth (in consultation with a Feng Shui specialist). Most completed the interview (93%, 373). Over half the study group (63%, 234) claimed they had heard of aspects of physiognomy concerning teeth, and a quarter (24%, 88) believed in such ideologies. Variations in knowledge and beliefs were apparent among people of different age (P < 0.01), gender (P < 0.05), educational attainment (P < 0.01), economic status (P < 0.01), place of birth (P < 0.01) and religion (P < 0.01). Their knowledge and belief in aspects of physiognomy concerning teeth was also associated with reported use of dental services (P < 0.01). Among young and middle-aged adults in Hong Kong, knowledge and beliefs concerning traditional physiognomy regarding teeth is strong, and socio-demographic variations exist in these perceptions. These findings have implications for all those involved in the delivery of dental care in multicultural societies and in raising cultural awareness about traditional health beliefs.

  17. Everyday practices at the medical ward: a 16-month ethnographic field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Axel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern hospital care should ostensibly be multi-professional and person-centred, yet it still seems to be driven primarily by a hegemonic, positivistic, biomedical agenda. This study aimed to describe the everyday practices of professionals and patients in a coronary care unit, and analyse how the routines, structures and physical design of the care environment influenced their actions and relationships. Methods Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted over a 16-month period (between 2009 and 2011 by two researchers working in parallel in a Swedish coronary care unit. Observations, informal talks and formal interviews took place with registered nurses, assistant nurses, physicians and patients in the coronary care unit. The formal interviews were conducted with six registered nurses (five female, one male including the chief nurse manager, three assistant nurses (all female, two cardiologists and three patients (one female, two male. Results We identified the structures that either promoted or counteracted the various actions and relationships of patients and healthcare professionals. The care environment, with its minimalistic design, strong focus on routines and modest capacity for dialogue, restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This resulted in feelings of guilt, predominantly on the part of the registered nurses. Conclusions The care environment restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This may result in increased moral stress among those in multi-professional teams who work in the grey area between biomedical and person-centred care.

  18. 'Holding on to life': An ethnographic study of living well at home in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir, Kristin

    2017-12-13

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to how older people living at home can remain independent and manage their illness themselves, while less attention has been given to those who have become frail and need assistance with challenges of everyday life. In this article, I drew on Latimer's formulation of care for frail older people as relational and world-making and on Foucault's work related to the care of the self in developing an understanding of how frail older persons manage to live well at home in the final years of their lives. I use data from an ethnographic study of home care nursing in the homes of 15 frail older people to develop an understanding of how their care at home can be developed. The participants were holding on to life, which reflected their vitality and vulnerability as well as agency in continuing to explore ways to preserve and build their world at home. With declining ability and stamina relations with material things, relatives and official care workers become of central importance in holding on to life. Home care services can be thought of as part of life, as world-forming, where workers contribute to daily activities that support living well at home. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Struggles, strengths, and strategies: an ethnographic study exploring the experiences of adolescents living with an ostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Theresa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents with IBD requiring ostomy surgery experience perioperative needs that may exceed those of patients experiencing other major abdominal surgery 1. This procedure requires ongoing and vigilant daily care and management. Gastrointestinal symptoms and complications impose psychological and social stresses on young patients 2, and the procedure results in body image changes and daily regimens of self-care. This study aimed to explore adolescents' experiences and quality of life following ostomy surgery. Methods Ethnographic interviews and a subsequent focus group were conducted with 20 adolescents with an ostomy or j-pouch being treated at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to theme generation. Results Findings suggest that adolescents are profoundly affected by their ostomy. Adolescents convey strength as well as adjustment struggles. Identified impacts include body intrusion and body image changes, decreased independence, secrecy about the ostomy, adjustment over time, challenges for the family, and strategies for constructively moving forward. Conclusion Implications address the importance of ensuring meaningful opportunities to understand and reframe the stresses of illness. An ongoing clinical challenge involves the promotion of a healthy self-esteem and psychosocial adjustment for these adolescents and their families. Finding effective ways to minimize stress and embarrassment and reframe personal shame, constitute important clinical priorities. Opportunities for peer support and family dialogue may assist in clarifying worries and easing the burden carried by these young persons. Flexible and adequately funded resources are advocated in fostering quality of life.

  20. Perception of parents about second hand smoke on the health of their children: an ethnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Alves de Carvalho Ribeiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the perception of parents about secondhand smoking in their children's health. Methods: Ethnographic qualitative and quantitative study. We sought the point of view and understanding of the parents who were active smokers in relation to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS and secondhand smoking. Mothers and fathers who are active smokers and that live with their children from seven different public schools in the city of Anápolis, Midwest Brazil, were interviewed in the first semester of in a reserved room in the schools. A descriptive and qualitative analysis was carried out through the ethnography. Results: 58 parents with an average time of smoking of 15.3 years and an average quantity of cigarettes smoked per day of 2 were interviewed. Among them, 59% did not know what ETS was, and 60% stated knowing what a secondhand smoker was. However, when questioned about their children as secondhand smokers, 52% did not consider them to be. Some parents knew some of the effects of secondhand smoking in the health of their children. However, the majority (52% of them did not believe that their children would suffer any respiratory impairment or did not know about these impairments. Conclusions: Children were exposed to environmental tobacco pollution in their residence if one considers parental duration of smoking and average of cigarettes smoked per day. There was a lack of knowledge of the parents about ETS, secondhand smoking and the evils that cigarettes could cause in the health of their children.

  1. Struggles, strengths, and strategies: an ethnographic study exploring the experiences of adolescents living with an ostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, David B; Swan, Sylvia R; Gerstle, Ted J; Allan, Theresa; Griffiths, Anne Marie

    2008-01-01

    Background Adolescents with IBD requiring ostomy surgery experience perioperative needs that may exceed those of patients experiencing other major abdominal surgery [1]. This procedure requires ongoing and vigilant daily care and management. Gastrointestinal symptoms and complications impose psychological and social stresses on young patients [2], and the procedure results in body image changes and daily regimens of self-care. This study aimed to explore adolescents' experiences and quality of life following ostomy surgery. Methods Ethnographic interviews and a subsequent focus group were conducted with 20 adolescents with an ostomy or j-pouch being treated at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to theme generation. Results Findings suggest that adolescents are profoundly affected by their ostomy. Adolescents convey strength as well as adjustment struggles. Identified impacts include body intrusion and body image changes, decreased independence, secrecy about the ostomy, adjustment over time, challenges for the family, and strategies for constructively moving forward. Conclusion Implications address the importance of ensuring meaningful opportunities to understand and reframe the stresses of illness. An ongoing clinical challenge involves the promotion of a healthy self-esteem and psychosocial adjustment for these adolescents and their families. Finding effective ways to minimize stress and embarrassment and reframe personal shame, constitute important clinical priorities. Opportunities for peer support and family dialogue may assist in clarifying worries and easing the burden carried by these young persons. Flexible and adequately funded resources are advocated in fostering quality of life. PMID:19091104

  2. [One in five surgeons do not wash hands after visiting a toilet - an ethnographic field study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Alamili, Mahdi; Danielsen, Anne Kjærgaard; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-12-08

    Non-compliance with regard to hand hygiene is a major problem in the health-care system especially among surgeons and anaesthetists. The purpose of this study was to examine the hand hygiene routines after toilet visits among participants attending an international surgical congress. An observational study was conducted at the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Clinical Congress 2012 and at the American Medical Writers Association (AMWA) Congress 2012 as comparison. The study was performed as an ethnographic field study. A standardized observational matrix was developed for observing whether hand washing (as a surrogate measure of hand hygiene) was performed after toilet visits by observers. Frequencies were compared using Fisher's exact test. A total of 100 persons were observed (80% males). Of the 50 males observed at the ACS meeting, ten males did not use hand hygiene in relation to toilet visits (20%), while only one person at the AMWA meeting out of the 50 observed did not use hand hygiene (2%), p = 0.008. At both congresses only males did not use hand hygiene in relation to toilet visits. One in five surgeons did not wash hands after visiting a toilet. Even though the observed surgeons were not observed in an operating theatre or in a setting that required a distinct degree of hand hygiene, it does reveal a worrying behaviour. It is not known whether this was a conscious act, the result of business, or if it was due to lack of knowledge about the effects of hand hygiene on bacterial transmission. not relevant. This study was neither registered at the National Committee of Health Research nor at Clinical Trials since it did not meet the requirements of registration.

  3. Who, what and where in Kista Galleria. An ethnographically inspired study of a shopping mall and mobile life within

    OpenAIRE

    Rudström, Åsa

    2003-01-01

    An ethnographically inspired study was performed in the Kista Galleria shopping mall. The objective was to provide input to the design of a mobile social service running on mobile telephones. User behaviour was observed indicating opportunities for a service to manifest itself on a user's mobile phone without being too obtrusive: phone walking, glancing, and logging on and off. The study also provided insight as to places in the mall where people tend to gather and stop for some time span: wa...

  4. Dual Value Creation and Business Model Design: An Ethnographic Study of an Internationalizing NGO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    This ethnographic research explores the process of business model design in the context of an NGO internationalizing to an emerging market. It contributes to the business model literature by investigating how this NGO - targeting multiple key stakeholders - was experimenting (1) with value...

  5. "Rewind the World!": An Ethnographic Study of Inner-City African American Children's Perceptions of Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Donna Penn

    1996-01-01

    Reports findings and conclusions from taped discussions with third- and sixth-grade African-American, inner-city students concerning their response to violent events in their communities. By using the triangulated methodology of ethnographers, it reveals how these experiences affected children's school performance, behaviors, and aspirations. (GR)

  6. Introducing the nurse practitioner into the surgical ward: an ethnographic study of interprofessional teamwork practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvarnström, Susanne; Jangland, Eva; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine

    2017-08-22

    The first nurse practitioners in surgical care were introduced into Swedish surgical wards in 2014. Internationally, organisations that have adopted nurse practitioners into care teams are reported to have maintained or improved the quality of care. However, close qualitative descriptions of teamwork practice may add to existing knowledge of interprofessional collaboration when introducing nurse practitioners into new clinical areas. The aim was to report on an empirical study describing how interprofessional teamwork practice was enacted by nurse practitioners when introduced into surgical ward teams. The study had a qualitative, ethnographic research design, drawing on a sociomaterial conceptual framework. The study was based on 170 hours of ward-based participant observations of interprofessional teamwork practice that included nurse practitioners. Data were gathered from 2014 to 2015 across four surgical sites in Sweden, including 60 interprofessional rounds. The data were analysed with an iterative reflexive procedure involving inductive and theory-led approaches. The study was approved by a Swedish regional ethics committee (Ref. No.: 2014/229-31). The interprofessional teamwork practice enacted by the nurse practitioners that emerged from the analysis comprised a combination of the following characteristic role components: clinical leader, bridging team colleague and ever-present tutor. These role components were enacted at all the sites and were prominent during interprofessional teamwork practice. The participant nurse practitioners utilised the interprofessional teamwork practice arrangements to enact a role that may be described in terms of a quality guarantee, thereby contributing to the overall quality and care flow offered by the entire surgical ward team. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. What Counts? An Ethnographic Study of Infection Data Reported to a Patient Safety Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Woods, Mary; Leslie, Myles; Bion, Julian; Tarrant, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Context Performance measures are increasingly widely used in health care and have an important role in quality. However, field studies of what organizations are doing when they collect and report performance measures are rare. An opportunity for such a study was presented by a patient safety program requiring intensive care units (ICUs) in England to submit monthly data on central venous catheter bloodstream infections (CVC-BSIs). Methods We conducted an ethnographic study involving ∼855 hours of observational fieldwork and 93 interviews in 17 ICUs plus 29 telephone interviews. Findings Variability was evident within and between ICUs in how they applied inclusion and exclusion criteria for the program, the data collection systems they established, practices in sending blood samples for analysis, microbiological support and laboratory techniques, and procedures for collecting and compiling data on possible infections. Those making decisions about what to report were not making decisions about the same things, nor were they making decisions in the same way. Rather than providing objective and clear criteria, the definitions for classifying infections used were seen as subjective, messy, and admitting the possibility of unfairness. Reported infection rates reflected localized interpretations rather than a standardized dataset across all ICUs. Variability arose not because of wily workers deliberately concealing, obscuring, or deceiving but because counting was as much a social practice as a technical practice. Conclusions Rather than objective measures of incidence, differences in reported infection rates may reflect, at least to some extent, underlying social practices in data collection and reporting and variations in clinical practice. The variability we identified was largely artless rather than artful: currently dominant assumptions of gaming as responses to performance measures do not properly account for how categories and classifications operate in the

  8. Patients embodied and as-a-body within bedside teaching encounters: a video ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Christopher; Challinor, Alexander; Monrouxe, Lynn V

    2017-03-01

    Bedside teaching encounters (BTEs) involve doctor-patient-student interactions, providing opportunities for students to learn with, from and about patients. How the differing concerns of patient care and student education are balanced in situ remains largely unknown and undefined. This video ethnographic study explores patient involvement during a largely student-centric activity: 'feedback sequences' where students learn clinical and practical skills. Drawing on a data subset from a multi-site study, we used Conversation Analysis to investigate verbal and non-verbal interactional practices to examine patients' inclusion and exclusion from teaching activities across 25 BTEs in General Practice and General Surgery and Medicine with 50 participants. Through analysis, we identified two representations of the patient: the patient embodied (where patients are actively involved) and the patient as-a-body (when they are used primarily as a prop for learning). Overall, patients were excluded more during physical examination than talk-based activities. Exclusion occurred through physical positioning of doctor-patient-student, and through doctors and students talking about, rather than to, patients using medical jargon and online commentaries. Patients' exclusion was visibly noticeable through eye gaze: patients' middle-distance gaze coincided with medical terminology or complex wording. Inclusory activities maintained the patient embodied during teaching activities through doctors' skilful embedding of teaching within their care: including vocalising clinical reasoning processes through students, providing patients with a 'warrant to listen', allocating turns-at-talk for them and eye-contact. This study uniquely demonstrates the visible nature patient exclusion, providing firm evidence of how this affects patient empowerment and engagement within educational activities for tomorrow's doctors.

  9. The impact of nursing leadership and management on the control of HIV/AIDS: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawafleh, Hani; Francis, Karen; Chapman, Ysanne

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports on an aspect of a larger ethnographic study that sought to investigate the impact of HIV/AIDS on the practice of primary care nurses in Jordan. Nursing leadership and the style of management adopted by senior nursing and medical administrators at the Ministry of Heath were identified as factors impacting on the practice of the nurses and their capacity to raise community awareness and contribute to the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS. The study was undertaken in three rural and three urban primary health care centres (PHCC). Data collection included participant observation, key informant interviews, and document analysis. These data informed the development of descriptive ethnographic accounts that allowed for the subsequent identification of common and divergent themes reflective of factors recognized as influencing the practice of the nurse participants.

  10. An ethnographic study: Becoming a physics expert in a biophysics research group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Idaykis

    Expertise in physics has been traditionally studied in cognitive science, where physics expertise is understood through the difference between novice and expert problem solving skills. The cognitive perspective of physics experts only create a partial model of physics expertise and does not take into account the development of physics experts in the natural context of research. This dissertation takes a social and cultural perspective of learning through apprenticeship to model the development of physics expertise of physics graduate students in a research group. I use a qualitative methodological approach of an ethnographic case study to observe and video record the common practices of graduate students in their biophysics weekly research group meetings. I recorded notes on observations and conduct interviews with all participants of the biophysics research group for a period of eight months. I apply the theoretical framework of Communities of Practice to distinguish the cultural norms of the group that cultivate physics expert practices. Results indicate that physics expertise is specific to a topic or subfield and it is established through effectively publishing research in the larger biophysics research community. The participant biophysics research group follows a learning trajectory for its students to contribute to research and learn to communicate their research in the larger biophysics community. In this learning trajectory students develop expert member competencies to learn to communicate their research and to learn the standards and trends of research in the larger research community. Findings from this dissertation expand the model of physics expertise beyond the cognitive realm and add the social and cultural nature of physics expertise development. This research also addresses ways to increase physics graduate student success towards their PhD. and decrease the 48% attrition rate of physics graduate students. Cultivating effective research

  11. Spiritual end-of-life care in Dutch nursing homes: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsberts, Marie-José H E; van der Steen, Jenny T; Muller, Martien T; Hertogh, Cees M P M; Deliens, Luc

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore if and how spiritual needs are assessed and if spiritual care is provided to Dutch nursing home residents, including residents suffering from dementia, and if and how caregivers communicate and collaborate regarding the residents' spiritual needs. Two researchers conducted an ethnographic participatory study in a Dutch nursing home between April 2010 and June 2011, on a psychogeriatric unit (mostly dementia) and a somatic unit for residents suffering from physical disabilities. Inductive thematic analysis was used to identify patterns and trends and to interpret the data. The physicians did not actively address spiritual issues, nor was it part of the official job of care staff. There was no communication between the physicians and the spiritual counselor. When a resident was about to die, the nurses started an informal care process aimed at (spiritual) well-being, including cuddling, rituals, and music. This was not mentioned in the care plan or the medical chart. The nurses even supported the residents outside their professional role in their spare time. Furthermore, we identified different occupational subcultures (eg, nurses and physicians), in which behavior of residents was given different meaning, depending on the frame of reference within the subculture. Spiritual issues were addressed only informally and were not part of the formal care process, either for residents suffering from dementia or for those with physical disabilities. Our results raise questions about how the lack of communication about spiritual end-of-life care between disciplines, and the informal and formal care processes affect spiritual well-being. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acceptability of Salt Fluoridation in a Rural Latino Community in the United States: An Ethnographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Judith C; Guerra, Claudia; Gonzalez-Vargas, M Judy; Hoeft, Kristin S

    2016-01-01

    Compared to other population groups in the United States, caries (tooth decay) is a disproportionately prevalent disease among Latino populations, especially among low-income and rural sub-groups and children under five years of age. Fluoride is a primary preventive for caries. While water fluoridation is a major and effective public health means for delivering fluoride on a mass scale, it does not reach many rural areas or population groups such as Latinos who eschew drinking water from municipal sources. This study examines the acceptability to such groups of salt fluoridation, an alternate means of delivering fluoride long used on a global scale. An ethnographic study in California's rural Central Valley was performed. Thirty individual interviews and 5 focus groups (N = 61) were conducted in Spanish to investigate low-income Latino migrant caregivers' experiences, views and understandings of domestic salt, oral health, caries prevention and fluoride. Audio data were transcribed, translated, coded and thematically analyzed. Table salt was readily available and frequently consumed. Both adult and child daily sodium consumption was high. Despite a general feeling that it was good, and present in dentifrices or dietary supplements, most participants had little knowledge about fluoride. Concerns were raised about cardio-vascular and other possibly deleterious effects if an increase in salt consumption occurred because fluoridated salt was viewed as having 'extra' benefits. Once informed about fluoride's safety and role in caries prevention, most participants expressed willingness to use fluoridated salt, especially if it benefitted children. Reassurance about its safety and benefits, and demonstration of its taste, were important aspects of acceptance. Taste was paramount. Participants would not consume more fluoridated salt than their current salt as that would result in unpleasant changes in food flavor and taste. While salt fluoridation is acceptable, the

  13. Strategies for diversity: medical clowns in dementia care - an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämgård, Margareta; Carlson, Elisabeth; Mangrio, Elisabeth

    2016-08-18

    As nursing homes become increasingly diverse, dementia care needs a wider range of culturally responsive strategies for individual and collective social interactions. While previous studies conclude that medical clowns have positive effects on verbal and non verbal social interactions, research is lacking from the perspective of residents' cultural background. The aim of this study was to identify interaction strategies employed by medical clowns in culturally diverse dementia care settings. An ethnographic approach was used and data were collected through observation of interactions between medical clowns and residents with dementia in two nursing homes during a ten week period. The observations showed that the medical clowns interacted with residents by being tuned in and attentive to the residents as individuals with a unique life-history, confirming each person´s sense of self. The clowns used sensory triggers, encouragement and confirmation in culturally responsive ways to bond socially with the residents in their personal spaces. The clowns involved objects in the daily environment that were meaningful for the residents, and paid attention to significant places and habits in the past. The clowns further contributed to joint interaction in the common spaces in the nursing homes, using music and drama. The strategies employed by medical clowns in activities with older people with dementia appear to support social interaction. The medical clowns used the social and material environment in culturally responsive ways to strengthen individuals' sense of self, while contributing to a sense of togetherness and interaction among residents in the common spaces. Findings suggest that both verbal and non-verbal cultural content affected social interaction. The non-demanding encouraging way the clowns tuned in to the residents as individuals could help nurses and staff members improve ways of communication in social activities inside the nursing home.

  14. Manoeuvring along the edge of breathlessness: an ethnographic case study of two nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellington, Maria Omel; Overgaard, Dorthe; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

    2016-01-01

    There appears to be divergence between nurses' and patients' perceptions of dyspnoea onset and on how help should be given. This may affect how nurses understand and assess their patients' anxiety and the severity of dyspnoea, potentially diminishing their chances of relieving patients' dyspnoea. The aim of this study was to explore nurse-patient interaction in situations where patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are experiencing acute or worsened dyspnoea in a hospital setting. An ethnographic study using participant observation of two nurses' interactions with six patients, followed by qualitative in-depth interviews with the nurses. Data were analysed in three steps. First, they were coded for identification of preliminary themes. Second, data were regrouped into preliminary themes for focused analysis which led to formulation of themes and subthemes. Third, hermeneutical principles were used as all data were interpreted from the viewpoint of each theme. Three themes were identified: Manoeuvring along the edge; Dyspnoea within the pattern; and Dyspnoea outside the pattern. They were encompassed by the main finding: Manoeuvring along the edge of breathlessness. The nurses attempted to navigate between implicit and explicit care approaches and to create a sphere for relieving or avoiding further worsening of dyspnoea. Depending on the identified pattern for a particular dyspnoeic episode, nurses attributed different significance to the dyspnoea. Interacting in dyspnoeic situations places nurses in a dilemma: an implicit approach risk, deriving from exclusion of patients and performing hesitantly; or an explicit negotiation risk, where patients are exhausted and removed from focusing and breathing. The dilemma weakens nurses' opportunities to relieve or avoid a worsening of the dyspnoea. Likewise, the divergence between nurses' and patients' assessment of dyspnoea as within or outside the pattern appears to jeopardize the efficiency of care. Our

  15. A complex endeavour: an ethnographic study of the implementation of the Sepsis Six clinical care bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Carolyn; O'Donnell, Barbara; Martin, Graham; Bion, Julian; Hunter, Alison; Rooney, Kevin D

    2016-11-16

    Implementation of the 'Sepsis Six' clinical care bundle within an hour of recognition of sepsis is recommended as an approach to reduce mortality in patients with sepsis, but achieving reliable delivery of the bundle has proved challenging. There remains little understanding of the barriers to reliable implementation of bundle components. We examined frontline clinical practice in implementing the Sepsis Six. We conducted an ethnographic study in six hospitals participating in the Scottish Patient Safety Programme Sepsis collaborative. We conducted around 300 h of non-participant observation in emergency departments, acute medical receiving units and medical and surgical wards. We interviewed a purposive sample of 43 members of hospital staff. Data were analysed using a constant comparative approach. Implementation strategies to promote reliable use of the Sepsis Six primarily focused on education, engaging and motivating staff, and providing prompts for behaviour, along with efforts to ensure that equipment required was readily available. Although these strategies were successful in raising staff awareness of sepsis and engagement with implementation, our study identified that completing the bundle within an hour was not straightforward. Our emergent theory suggested that rather than being an apparently simple sequence of six steps, the Sepsis Six actually involved a complex trajectory comprising multiple interdependent tasks that required prioritisation and scheduling, and which was prone to problems of coordination and operational failures. Interventions that involved allocating specific roles and responsibilities for completing the Sepsis Six in ways that reduced the need for coordination and task switching, and the use of process mapping to identify system failures along the trajectory, could help mitigate against some of these problems. Implementation efforts that focus on individual behaviour change to improve uptake of the Sepsis Six should be supplemented

  16. Interdisciplinary medication decision making by pharmacists in pediatric hospital settings: An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Ellie; Kinney, Sharon; Weiner, Carlye; Newall, Fiona; Williams, Allison; Cranswick, Noel; Wong, Ian; Borrott, Narelle; Manias, Elizabeth

    2017-03-22

    Children are particularly vulnerable to experiencing medication incidents in hospitals. Making sound medication decisions is therefore of paramount importance. Prior research has principally described pharmacists' role in reducing medication errors. There is a dearth of information about pharmacists' interactions with pediatric hospital staff across disciplines in resolving medication issues. The aim of this study was to examine interdisciplinary medication decision making by pharmacists in pediatric hospital settings. An ethnographic design was undertaken comprising observations, semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Audio-recorded data were analyzed thematically. The study was conducted in three wards of an Australian pediatric tertiary teaching hospital, comprising general surgical, gastroenterology, endocrinology, neurology, adolescent and rehabilitation settings. Pharmacists, registered nurses and doctors were recruited from diverse clinical wards following information sessions. Pharmacists were central to complex pediatric medication decision making, intervening about dosage, administration, drug interactions and authorities. Pharmacists proactively contacted doctors and nurses about prescribing issues; conversely, staff routinely approached pharmacists for medication advice. Pharmacists were perceived as medication experts, their extensive knowledge valued in resolving complex issues: when off-label medications were prescribed, when protocols were absent or ambiguous, where tension existed between protocol adherence and patient safety, and where patients on multiple medications were at risk of medication error. Pharmacists had strong relationships with doctors and nurses, which had a bearing on pharmacists' input in interventions. Furthermore, pharmacists identified prescribing errors through strategies, such as case note review and medication reconciliation, although the lack of emergency department pharmacists and limited after-hours staffing posed

  17. An ethnographic study of diabetes health beliefs and practices in Sri Lankan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekara, A A T D; Fongkaew, W; Turale, S; Wimalasekara, S W; Chanprasit, C

    2014-12-01

    Globally, type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent; however, unique cultural contexts in each country might affect these diabetes control behaviours. Diabetes is a serious health issue in Sri Lanka and little is known about the impact of sociocultural context on diabetes health behaviours. This first-time qualitative Sri Lankan study explored the health beliefs and practices of adults with diabetes to enhance current nursing care and medical treatment. An ethnographic approach was used to collect data through participant observations, in-depth interviews with 14 key informants in their homes and field notes. Data were analysed by thematic analysis. Findings revealed unique, informative insights into sociocultural worlds of the participants from three Sinhalese, Tamils and Moor ethnic groups. Findings are described under five themes: gaining religious support, changing food habits is a struggle, exercising is challenging, Western medicine causes long-term consequences and Ayurveda/traditional treatments can cure. In Sri Lankans, the impact of sociocultural context on glycaemic control behaviours is significant and should be taken in consideration when health professionals provide care, treatment and health education. Study informants were selected from three ethnic groups and just two communities. Further in-depth research is required using both qualitative and quantitative approaches in individual groups. Culturally relevant policies and protocols for community care and treatment of people with diabetes are urgently required in Sri Lanka to enhance cultural treatment and care and reduce the epidemic of diabetes. These policies need to take into account traditional beliefs and practices of various ethnic groups. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  18. Alternatives to the face-to-face consultation in general practice: focused ethnographic case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Helen; Brant, Heather; Ziebland, Sue; Bikker, Annemieke; Campbell, John; Gibson, Andy; McKinstry, Brian; Porqueddu, Tania; Salisbury, Chris

    2018-01-29

    NHS policy encourages general practices to introduce alternatives to the face-to-face consultation, such as telephone, email, e-consultation systems, or internet video. Most have been slow to adopt these, citing concerns about workload. This project builds on previous research by focusing on the experiences of patients and practitioners who have used one or more of these alternatives. To understand how, under what conditions, for which patients, and in what ways, alternatives to face-to-face consultations present benefits and challenges to patients and practitioners in general practice. Focused ethnographic case studies took place in eight UK general practices between June 2015 and March 2016. Non-participant observation, informal conversations with staff, and semi-structured interviews with staff and patients were conducted. Practice documents and protocols were reviewed. Data were analysed through charting and the 'one sheet of paper' mind-map method to identify the line of argument in each thematic report. Case study practices had different rationales for offering alternatives to the face-to-face consultation. Beliefs varied about which patients and health issues were suitable. Co-workers were often unaware of each other's practice; for example, practice policies for use of e-consultations systems with patients were not known about or followed. Patients reported benefits including convenience and access. Staff and some patients regarded the face-to-face consultation as the ideal. Experience of implementing alternatives to the face-to-face consultation suggests that changes in patient access and staff workload may be both modest and gradual. Practices planning to implement them should consider carefully their reasons for doing so and involve the whole practice team. © British Journal of General Practice 2018.

  19. A meta-ethnographic synthesis on phenomenographic studies of patients’ experiences of chronic illness

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    Marta Röing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenomenography is a qualitative research approach developed within an educational framework, focusing on the qualitative experience of learning. It is also being used, to a lesser degree, in healthcare research. In the present study, we conducted a meta-ethnographic synthesis of phenomenographic studies on chronic illness, in order to give a broader perspective of how chronic illness can be experienced. Our aim was not to describe patients’ various individual experiences of illness, but instead to identify the different ways chronic illness can be experienced by patients. Our synthesis and phenomenographic interpretation of 12 selected articles found that patients’ experiences of chronic illness can be described in terms of a different lived body, a struggle with threat to identity and self-esteem, a diminished lifeworld, and a challenging reality. These experiences relate to each other in a process of recurring loops, where the different ways of experiencing continue to influence each other over time. According to these findings, the use of phenomenography as a research approach has the potential to add to the understanding of how chronic illness can be experienced. Patients may benefit from seeing that their illness can be experienced in many different ways and that it has many aspects, which then can lead to a better understanding and coping with their illness. We suggest that it may be worthwhile to expand the scope of phenomenography outside pedagogics. This presupposes a revision of the application to include a wider and more comprehensive description, for instance, of the different ways illness and healthcare phenomena can be experienced, and how these different ways are related to each other, with less focus on hierarchical relations.

  20. What's so great about rehabilitation teams? An ethnographic study of interprofessional collaboration in a rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Lynne B; Lingard, Lorelei A; Mohabeer, Ravindra N

    2009-07-01

    To explore team structures, team relationships, and organizational culture constituting interprofessional collaboration (IPC) in a particular rehabilitation setting; to develop a description of IPC practice that may be translated, adapted, and operationalized in other clinical environments. An ethnographic study involving: Field observations: 40 hours, over 4 weeks, daily activities, 7 interprofessional meetings, 3 care planning meetings, 1 business meeting, and 3 family meetings; Individual observations: a physiotherapist, an occupational therapist, and a social worker individually observed for 45 minutes to an hour; and Interviews: 19 participants, 11 professions, 27 informal, 5 formal interviews. Data analysis consisted of an iterative process involving coding field notes for themes by 3 members of the research team by qualitative analysis software. Single inpatient spinal cord rehabilitation care unit in a Canadian urban academic rehabilitation hospital. Purposive convenience sample of core team, more than 40 professionals: physiatrist, over 21 nurses, 3 physiotherapists, 3 occupational therapists, 2 social workers, chaplain, psychologist, therapeutic recreationist, program assistant, program manager, pharmacist, advanced practice leader, 6 students (1 pharmacy, 4 registered nurse, and 1 psychology), and on-site community organizations. After university and hospital ethical approvals, all staff members were recruited to participate in the study. Not applicable. Not applicable. Recurrent examples of IPC fit 2 dominant themes: team culture (divided into leadership, care philosophy, relationships, and the context of practice) and communication structures (both formal and informal). IPC practice in rehabilitation care is supported by clinical, cultural, and organizational factors. This understanding of daily IPC work may guide initiatives to promote IPC in other clinical team settings.

  1. An ethnographic study of barriers to cancer pain management and opioid availability in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebaron, Virginia; Beck, Susan L; Maurer, Martha; Black, Fraser; Palat, Gayatri

    2014-05-01

    The world's global cancer burden disproportionally affects lower income countries, where 80% of patients present with late-stage disease and have limited access to palliative care and effective pain-relieving medications, such as morphine. Consequently, millions die each year with unrelieved pain. Objective. The objective of this study was to examine barriers to opioid availability and cancer pain management in India, with an emphasis on the experiences of nurses, who are often the front-line providers of palliative care. Methods. Fifty-nine participants were recruited using a purposive, snowball sampling strategy. Ethnographic data collection included in-depth, semistructured interviews (n = 54), 400+ hours of participant observation, and review of documents over 9 months at a government cancer hospital in South India. Systematic qualitative analysis led to identification of key barriers that are exemplified by representative quotes. Results. Morphine is more available at this study site than in most of India, but access is limited to patients seen by the palliative care service, and significant gaps in supply still occur. Systems to measure and improve pain outcomes are largely absent. Key barriers related to pain management include the role of nursing, opioid misperceptions, bureaucratic hurdles, and sociocultural/infrastructure challenges. Implications. Interventions must streamline process details of morphine procurement, work within the existing sociocultural infrastructure to ensure opioids reach patients most in need, target unexpected audiences for symptom management education, and account for role expectations of health care providers. Conclusion. Macro- and micro-level policy and practice changes are needed to improve opioid availability and cancer pain management in India.

  2. Acceptability of Salt Fluoridation in a Rural Latino Community in the United States: An Ethnographic Study.

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    Judith C Barker

    Full Text Available Compared to other population groups in the United States, caries (tooth decay is a disproportionately prevalent disease among Latino populations, especially among low-income and rural sub-groups and children under five years of age. Fluoride is a primary preventive for caries. While water fluoridation is a major and effective public health means for delivering fluoride on a mass scale, it does not reach many rural areas or population groups such as Latinos who eschew drinking water from municipal sources. This study examines the acceptability to such groups of salt fluoridation, an alternate means of delivering fluoride long used on a global scale. An ethnographic study in California's rural Central Valley was performed. Thirty individual interviews and 5 focus groups (N = 61 were conducted in Spanish to investigate low-income Latino migrant caregivers' experiences, views and understandings of domestic salt, oral health, caries prevention and fluoride. Audio data were transcribed, translated, coded and thematically analyzed. Table salt was readily available and frequently consumed. Both adult and child daily sodium consumption was high. Despite a general feeling that it was good, and present in dentifrices or dietary supplements, most participants had little knowledge about fluoride. Concerns were raised about cardio-vascular and other possibly deleterious effects if an increase in salt consumption occurred because fluoridated salt was viewed as having 'extra' benefits. Once informed about fluoride's safety and role in caries prevention, most participants expressed willingness to use fluoridated salt, especially if it benefitted children. Reassurance about its safety and benefits, and demonstration of its taste, were important aspects of acceptance. Taste was paramount. Participants would not consume more fluoridated salt than their current salt as that would result in unpleasant changes in food flavor and taste. While salt fluoridation is

  3. Nursing in Times of Neoliberal Change: An Ethnographic Study of Nurses’ Experiences of Work Intensification

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    Rebecca Selberg

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Through an ethnographic study of nurses’ experiences of work intensification, this article shows how nurses respond to and act upon neoliberal transformations of work. The article identifies and explores those transformations considered by the informants, nurses working in public sector hospital wards, as central to changing conditions of work and experiences of work intensifications. It further analyzes nurses’ responses toward these transformations and locates these responses within a particular form of femininity evolving from rationalities of care, nurses’ conditions within the organization, and classed and gendered experiences of care work. The article illustrates that in times of neoliberal change and public sector resource depletion, nurses respond to women’s traditional caring responsibilities as well as to professional commitments and cover for the organization. Maintaining the level of frontline service is contingent on increased exploitation and performance control of ward nurses, and their ability and willingness to sacrifice their own time and health for the sake of their patients. The article argues that in the case of ward nurses in the Swedish public sector, work intensification is a multilayered process propelled by three intersecting forces: austerity ideology linked to the neoliberal transformation of the welfare state and public sector retrenchment; explicit care rationalities impelled by aspirations of the nursing profession to establish, render visible, and expand the nursing field both in relation to the medical profession and in relation to so-called unskilled care work performed by assistant nurses and auxiliaries; and the progressive aspect of New Public Management, which challenges the power and authority of the professions and contributes to strengthening the positions of clients and patients.

  4. Neurofibromatosis type 1 and the "elephant man's" disease: the confusion persists: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Claire-Marie; Charpentier-Côté, Catherine; Drouin, Régen; Bouffard, Chantal

    2011-02-09

    In 1986, two Canadian geneticists had demonstrated that Joseph Merrick, better known as the Elephant Man, suffered from the Proteus syndrome and not from neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), as was alleged by dermatologist Parkes in 1909. Despite this and although the two diseases differ at several levels: prevalence, diagnostic criteria, clinical manifestations and transmission, the confusion between NF1 and the "elephant man's" disease continues in medical and social representations by current linguistic usage, and in some media reports. With this article, we want to 1) document the persistence and extent of this fallacy, 2) identify certain critical factors that contribute to its persistence, and 3) evaluate its impact on the health and well being of patients with NF1 and their family members. Participant observation in the course of an ethnographic study on intergenerational dialogue between individuals with neurofibromatosis and their parents - Analysis of the scientific literature and of pinpoint articles in the print and online news media. Our findings show that because physicians have little knowledge about NF1, several print and online news media and a lot of physicians continue to make the confusion between NF1 and the disease the "elephant man". This misconception contributes to misinformation about the disease, feeding prejudices against affected patients, exacerbating the negative impacts of the disease on their quality of life, their cognitive development, their reproductive choices, as well as depriving them of proper care and appropriate genetic counseling. If family physicians and pediatricians were properly informed about the disease, they could refer their patients with NF1 to NF clinics and to specialists. Thus, patients and their family members would benefit from better-tailored clinical management of their cases, perhaps even optimal management. [corrected

  5. Newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources in clinical decision-making: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voldbjerg, Siri Lygum; Grønkjaer, Mette; Wiechula, Rick; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

    2017-05-01

    To explore which knowledge sources newly graduated nurses' use in clinical decision-making and why and how they are used. In spite of an increased educational focus on skills and competencies within evidence-based practice, newly graduated nurses' ability to use components within evidence-based practice with a conscious and reflective use of research evidence has been described as being poor. To understand why, it is relevant to explore which other knowledge sources are used. This may shed light on why research evidence is sparsely used and ultimately inform approaches to strengthen the knowledgebase used in clinical decision-making. Ethnographic study using participant-observation and individual semistructured interviews of nine Danish newly graduated nurses in medical and surgical hospital settings. Newly graduates use of knowledge sources was described within three main structures: 'other', 'oneself' and 'gut feeling'. Educational preparation, transition into clinical practice and the culture of the setting influenced the knowledge sources used. The sources ranged from overt easily articulated knowledge sources to covert sources that were difficult to articulate. The limited articulation of certain sources inhibited the critical reflection on the reasoning behind decisions. Reflection is a prerequisite for an evidence-based practice where decisions should be transparent in order to consider if other evidentiary sources could be used. Although there is a complexity and variety to knowledge sources used, there is an imbalance with the experienced nurse playing a key role, functioning both as predominant source and a role model as to which sources are valued and used in clinical decision-making. If newly graduates are to be supported in an articulate and reflective use of a variety of sources, they have to be allocated to experienced nurses who model a reflective, articulate and balanced use of knowledge sources. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Visiting nurses' posthospital medication management in home health care: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollerup, Mette Geil; Curtis, Tine; Schantz Laursen, Birgitte

    2017-08-03

    Medication management is the most challenging component of a successful transition from hospital to home, a challenge of growing complexity as the number of older persons living with chronic conditions grows, along with increasingly specialised and accelerated hospital treatment plans. Thus, many patients are discharged with complex medication regimen instructions, accentuating the risk of medication errors that may cause readmission, adverse drug events and a need for further health care. The aim of this study was to explore visiting nurses' medication management in home health care after hospital discharge and to identify key elements in patient medication for improved patient safety. Inspired by the ethnographic research cycle, participant observations and informal interviews were conducted at 12 initial visits by a nurse in a patient's home after hospital discharge. Data consisted of field notes and photographs from the patients' homes, medication lists and medical records. Field notes were analysed in four steps. The analysis showed 12 stages in medication management in which nurses strove to adjust medication management to the patients' actual health status by mediating on knowledge of the patient, information to the patient and on rules and regulations and by establishing order in medication lists and medications in the home. The nurse-patient relationship, the integration of care and the context of care challenged patient safety in visiting nurses' medication management in patients' homes after hospital discharge. The implications for practice were the following: to ensure nurses' opportunities to continuously evolve their observation skills and skills in making sound clinical judgements; to establish interprofessional working processes which support the continuous assessment of patients' needs and the adjustment of care and treatment; to clarify expectations to nurses' responsibility and patients' privacy. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Neurofibromatosis type 1 and the "elephant man's" disease: the confusion persists: an ethnographic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire-Marie Legendre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 1986, two Canadian geneticists had demonstrated that Joseph Merrick, better known as the Elephant Man, suffered from the Proteus syndrome and not from neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, as was alleged by dermatologist Parkes in 1909. Despite this and although the two diseases differ at several levels: prevalence, diagnostic criteria, clinical manifestations and transmission, the confusion between NF1 and the "elephant man's" disease continues in medical and social representations by current linguistic usage, and in some media reports. With this article, we want to 1 document the persistence and extent of this fallacy, 2 identify certain critical factors that contribute to its persistence, and 3 evaluate its impact on the health and well being of patients with NF1 and their family members. METHODOLOGY: Participant observation in the course of an ethnographic study on intergenerational dialogue between individuals with neurofibromatosis and their parents - Analysis of the scientific literature and of pinpoint articles in the print and online news media. FINDINGS: Our findings show that because physicians have little knowledge about NF1, several print and online news media and a lot of physicians continue to make the confusion between NF1 and the disease the "elephant man". This misconception contributes to misinformation about the disease, feeding prejudices against affected patients, exacerbating the negative impacts of the disease on their quality of life, their cognitive development, their reproductive choices, as well as depriving them of proper care and appropriate genetic counseling. CONCLUSION: If family physicians and pediatricians were properly informed about the disease, they could refer their patients with NF1 to NF clinics and to specialists. Thus, patients and their family members would benefit from better-tailored clinical management of their cases, perhaps even optimal management. [corrected

  8. [Perception of parents about second hand smoke on the health of their children: an ethnographic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Ribeiro, Fabiane Alves; de Moraes, Micaele Kedma Ribeiro; de Morais Caixeta, Joyce Cristina; da Silva, Jullieth Nadja; Lima, Amanda Sanches; Parreira, Samara Lamounier Santana; Fernandes, Viviane Lemos Silva

    2015-12-01

    To analyze the perception of parents about secondhand smoking in their children's health. Ethnographic qualitative and quantitative study. We sought the point of view and understanding of the parents that were active smokers in relation to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and secondhand smoking. Mothers and fathers who are active smokers and that live with their children from seven different public schools in the city of Anápolis, Midwest Brazil, were interviewed in the first semester of in a reserved room in the schools. A descriptive and qualitative analysis was carried out through the ethnography. 58 parents with an average time of smoking of 15.3 years and an average quantity of cigarettes smoked per day of 2 were interviewed. Among them, 59% didn't know what ETS was, and 60% stated knowing what a secondhand smoker was. However, when questioned about their children as secondhand smokers, 52% didn't consider them to be. Some parents knew some of the effects of secondhand smoking in the health of their children. However, the majority (52%) of them did not believe that their children would suffer any respiratory impairment or did not know about these impairments. Children were exposed to Environmental Tobacco Pollution in their residence if one considers parental duration of smoking and average of cigarettes smoked per day. There was a lack of knowledge of the parents about ETS, secondhand smoking and the evils that cigarettes could cause in the health of their children. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Medication communication between nurses and doctors for paediatric acute care: An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrott, Narelle; Kinney, Sharon; Newall, Fiona; Williams, Allison; Cranswick, Noel; Wong, Ian; Manias, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    To examine how communication between nurses and doctors occurred for managing medications in inpatient paediatric settings. Communication between health professionals influences medication incidents' occurrence and safe care. An ethnographic study was undertaken. Semi-structured interviews, observations and focus groups were conducted in three clinical areas of an Australian tertiary paediatric hospital. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using the Medication Communication Model. The actual communication act revealed health professionals' commitment to effective medication management and the influence of professional identities on medication communication. Nurses and doctors were dedicated to providing safe, effective medication therapy for children, within their scope of practice and perceived role responsibilities. Most nurses and junior doctors used tentative language in their communication while senior doctors tended to use direct language. Irrespective of language style, nurses actively engaged with doctors to promote patients' needs. Yet, the medical hierarchical structure, staffing and attendant expectations influenced communication for medication management, causing frustration among nurses and doctors. Doctors' lack of verbal communication of documented changes to medication orders particularly troubled nurses. Nurses persisted in their efforts to acquire appropriate orders for safe medication administration to paediatric patients. Collaborative practice between nurses and doctors involved complex, symbiotic relationships. Their dedication to providing safe medication therapy to paediatric patients facilitated effective medication management. At times, shortcomings in interdisciplinary communication impacted on potential and actual medication incidents. Understanding of the complexities affecting medication communication between nurses and doctors helps to ensure interprofessional respect for each other's roles and inherent demands

  10. Emotional Testimonies:An Ethnographic Study of Emotional Suffering Related to Migration from Mexico to Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eCrocker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly argued that social and economic inequity poorly affect overall health. One of the means through which these inequities are translated to the body is via negative emotions, which carry known psychological and physiological responses. This paper examines migration-related psychosocial stressors impacting first generation Mexican immigrants in southern Arizona, and reports on the primary emotional experiences immigrants associate with these stressors. Data were drawn from a qualitative, ethnographic study conducted over the course of 14 months during 2013-2014 with first generation Mexican immigrants (N=40 residing in Tucson Arizona and service providers working directly in the immigrant community (N=32. Results indicate that the primary structural vulnerabilities that cause emotional hardship amongst immigrants are pre-migration stressors and adversity, dangerous border crossings, detention and deportation, undocumented citizenship status, family separation, and extreme poverty. Many of these factors have intensified over the past decade due to increased border security and state level anti-immigrant legislation in Arizona. Immigrants connected these hardships to the emotions of trauma (50%, fear (65%, depression (75%, loneliness (75%, sadness (80%, and stress (85%, and most respondents reported suffering from three or more of these emotions. Given the heavy emotional toll of migration and the direct impact that regional legislation and border security had on well-being, this paper argues that emotion be considered an important mechanism for health declines in the immigrant community. In order to stem the frequency and intensity of emotional stress in the Mexican immigrant community in Tucson, it is imperative to support organizations and policies that promote community building and support networks and also expand access to and availability of mental health services for immigrants regardless of documentation status.

  11. Emotional Testimonies: An Ethnographic Study of Emotional Suffering Related to Migration from Mexico to Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly argued that social and economic inequities poorly affect overall health. One of the means through which these inequities are translated to the body is via negative emotions, which carry known psychological and physiological responses. This paper examines migration-related psychosocial stressors impacting first-generation Mexican immigrants in southern Arizona, and reports on the primary emotional experiences immigrants associate with these stressors. Data were drawn from a qualitative, ethnographic study conducted over the course of 14 months during 2013-2014 with first-generation Mexican immigrants (N = 40) residing in Tucson Arizona and service providers working directly in the immigrant community (N = 32). Results indicate that the primary structural vulnerabilities that cause emotional hardship among immigrants are pre-migration stressors and adversity, dangerous border crossings, detention and deportation, undocumented citizenship status, family separation, and extreme poverty. Many of these factors have intensified over the past decade due to increased border security and state level anti-immigrant legislation in Arizona. Immigrants connected these hardships to the emotions of trauma (50%), fear (65%), depression (75%), loneliness (75%), sadness (80%), and stress (85%), and most respondents reported suffering from three or more of these emotions. Given the heavy emotional toll of migration and the direct impact that regional legislation and border security had on well-being, this paper argues that emotion be considered an important mechanism for health declines in the immigrant community. In order to stem the frequency and intensity of emotional stress in the Mexican immigrant community in Tucson, it is imperative to support organizations and policies that promote community building and support networks and also expand access to and availability of mental health services for immigrants regardless of documentation status.

  12. A critical ethnographic study of encounters between midwives and breast-feeding women in postnatal wards in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Fiona

    2005-09-01

    To explore the nature of interactions between midwives and breast-feeding women within postnatal wards. A critical ethnographic study using participant observation and focused interviews. Two maternity units in Northern England, UK. 61 postnatal women and 39 midwives. The interactions between midwives and women were encompassed by the global theme of 'taking time and touching base'. However, most encounters were characterised by an absence of 'taking time' or 'touching base'. This related to midwives' experiences of temporal pressure and inability to establish relationality with women due to their working patterns. The global theme was underpinned by five organising themes: 'communicating temporal pressure'; 'routines and procedures'; 'disconnected encounters'; 'managing breast feeding'; and 'rationing information'. The organisational culture within the postnatal wards contributed to midwives experiencing profound temporal pressures and an inability to establish relationality with women. Within this context, the needs of breast-feeding women for emotional, esteem, informational and practical support were largely unmet. Transformative action is required to dramatically reorganise the provision of hospital-based, postnatal ward midwifery care in parts of the UK. This should include a re-conceptualisation of caring time, with recognition that midwives need sufficient time in order to give time to others. This, in turn, requires recognition that caring time is cyclical and rhythmical, allowing for relationality, sociability, mutuality and reciprocity. The midwifery staffing structure in postnatal wards needs to be reviewed, as it is unacceptable to midwives and service users for staff to be rapidly relocated according to other demands within the institution. Most radically, it is argued that now is the time to reconsider the suitability of the hospital as the place and space within which women commence their breast-feeding journey.

  13. Glocalization and Transnationalization in (neo-Mayanization Processes: Ethnographic Case Studies from Mexico and Guatemala

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    Manéli Farahmand

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author focuses on the field of neo-Mayanity and its current transformations. She analyzes these transformations using a historico-ethnographic approach, which includes two phases. The first one consists in reconstructing the historical development of the “Mayan” category in two different social contexts. The second one focuses on current narrative and imageries produced around this category, stemming from ethnographic fieldwork in Mexico and Guatemala. Since the “2012 phenomenon”, in both countries, the accelerating transnationalization of the religious leaders has triggered a resignification of contents through various logics of rearrangement, innovation, cohabitation and glocalization. Finally, she demonstrates that the variations in the different ethnographies are linked with the religious leaders’ biographies and the modes of signification of the “Mayan” category—influenced by the socio-historical contexts of production.

  14. In Testing Times: Conducting an Ethnographic Study of UK Animal Rights Protesters

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    Andrew Upton

    2011-01-01

    This article reflects upon the experience of conducting research into a UK-based, though internationally-renowned, animal rights group. The article firstly rationalizes the ethnographic research methodology used to approach Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC). Secondly, it describes the effect of unforeseen factors (from adverse media attention to ongoing criminal investigations) on the Author's ability to forge research relationships with informants within the movement, and how these chall...

  15. Talking about persons--thinking about patients: An ethnographic study in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Chris; Coombs, Maureen; Gobbi, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Nursing involves caring for the 'whole person' and it is considered inappropriate for nurses to think or talk about patients in objectifying or dehumanising ways. Objectifying discourses can dominate within the arena of critical care, and critical care nurses can experience moral distress as they struggle to think about patients as persons. No previous study has examined the role played by 'impersonal' talk in the delivery of nursing care. This paper reports a study which examined the relationship between nursing practice and the way(s) in which critical care nurses think and talk about patients. The study objectives were to (1) identify and characterise the ways in which critical care nurses think and talk about patients; and (2) describe patterns of nursing practice associated with these different ways of thinking. An ethnographic study was undertaken within one critical care unit in the United Kingdom. Data were collected over 8 months through 92h of participant observation and 13 interviews. Seven critical care nurses participated in the study. Data analysis adopted the perspective of linguistic ethnography. Analysis of these data led to the identification of seven Discourses, each of which was characterised by a particular way of talking about patients, a particular way of thinking about patients, and a particular pattern of practice. Four of these seven Discourses were of particular significance because participants characterised it as 'impersonal' to think and talk about patients as 'routine work', as a 'body', as '(un)stable' or as a 'medical case'. Although participants frequently offered apologies or excuses for doing so, these 'impersonal' ways of thinking and talking were associated with practice that was essential to delivering safe effective care. Critical care practice requires nurses to think and talk about patients in many different ways, yet nurses are socialised to an ideal that they should always think and talk about patients as whole persons

  16. "This does my head in". Ethnographic study of self-management by people with diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-management is rarely studied 'in the wild'. We sought to produce a richer understanding of how people live with diabetes and why self-management is challenging for some. Method Ethnographic study supplemented with background documents on social context. We studied a socio-economically and ethnically diverse UK population. We sampled 30 people with diabetes (15 type 1, 15 type 2) by snowballing from patient groups, community contacts and NHS clinics. Participants (aged 5-88, from a range of ethnic and socio-economic groups) were shadowed at home and in the community for 2-4 periods of several hours (total 88 visits, 230 hours); interviewed (sometimes with a family member or carer) about their self-management efforts and support needs; and taken out for a meal. Detailed field notes were made and annotated. Data analysis was informed by structuration theory, which assumes that individuals' actions and choices depend on their dispositions and capabilities, which in turn are shaped and constrained (though not entirely determined) by wider social structures. Results Self-management comprised both practical and cognitive tasks (e.g. self-monitoring, menu planning, medication adjustment) and socio-emotional ones (e.g. coping with illness, managing relatives' input, negotiating access to services or resources). Self-management was hard work, and was enabled or constrained by economic, material and socio-cultural conditions within the family, workplace and community. Some people managed their diabetes skilfully and flexibly, drawing on personal capabilities, family and social networks and the healthcare system. For others, capacity to self-manage (including overcoming economic and socio-cultural constraints) was limited by co-morbidity, cognitive ability, psychological factors (e.g. under-confidence, denial) and social capital. The consequences of self-management efforts strongly influenced people's capacity and motivation to continue them. Conclusion Self

  17. "This does my head in". Ethnographic study of self-management by people with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinder Susan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-management is rarely studied 'in the wild'. We sought to produce a richer understanding of how people live with diabetes and why self-management is challenging for some. Method Ethnographic study supplemented with background documents on social context. We studied a socio-economically and ethnically diverse UK population. We sampled 30 people with diabetes (15 type 1, 15 type 2 by snowballing from patient groups, community contacts and NHS clinics. Participants (aged 5-88, from a range of ethnic and socio-economic groups were shadowed at home and in the community for 2-4 periods of several hours (total 88 visits, 230 hours; interviewed (sometimes with a family member or carer about their self-management efforts and support needs; and taken out for a meal. Detailed field notes were made and annotated. Data analysis was informed by structuration theory, which assumes that individuals' actions and choices depend on their dispositions and capabilities, which in turn are shaped and constrained (though not entirely determined by wider social structures. Results Self-management comprised both practical and cognitive tasks (e.g. self-monitoring, menu planning, medication adjustment and socio-emotional ones (e.g. coping with illness, managing relatives' input, negotiating access to services or resources. Self-management was hard work, and was enabled or constrained by economic, material and socio-cultural conditions within the family, workplace and community. Some people managed their diabetes skilfully and flexibly, drawing on personal capabilities, family and social networks and the healthcare system. For others, capacity to self-manage (including overcoming economic and socio-cultural constraints was limited by co-morbidity, cognitive ability, psychological factors (e.g. under-confidence, denial and social capital. The consequences of self-management efforts strongly influenced people's capacity and motivation to continue them

  18. Ethnographic case study of a high school science classroom: Strategies in stem education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Lucinda N.

    Historically, science education research has promoted that learning science occurs through direct physical experiences. In recent years, the need for best practices and student motivation have been highlighted in STEM research findings. In response to the instructional challenges in STEM education, the National Research Council has provided guidelines for improving STEM literacy through best practices in science and mathematics instruction. A baseline qualitative ethnographic case study of the effect of instructional practices on a science classroom was an opportunity to understand how a teacher and students work together to learn in an International Baccalaureate life science course. This study was approached through an interpretivist lens with the assumption that learning science is socially constructed. The following were the research questions: 1.) How does the teacher implement science instruction strategies in the classroom? 2.) In what ways are students engaged in the classroom? 3.) How are science concepts communicated in the classroom? The total 35 participants included a high school science teacher and two classes of 11th grade students in the International Baccalaureate program. Using exploratory qualitative methods of research, data was collected from field notes and transcripts from a series of classroom observations, a single one-on-one interview with the teacher and two focus groups with students from each of the two classes. Three themes emerged from text coded using initial and process coding with the computer assisted qualitative data analysis software, MAXQDA. The themes were: 1.) Physical Forms of Communication Play Key Role in Instructional Strategy, 2.) Science Learning Occurs in Casual Environment Full of Distractions, and 3.) Teacher Persona Plays Vital Role in Classroom Culture. The findings provided insight into the teacher's role on students' motivation to learn science. The recommendation for STEM programs and new curriculum is a

  19. A complex endeavour: an ethnographic study of the implementation of the Sepsis Six clinical care bundle

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    Carolyn Tarrant

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation of the ‘Sepsis Six’ clinical care bundle within an hour of recognition of sepsis is recommended as an approach to reduce mortality in patients with sepsis, but achieving reliable delivery of the bundle has proved challenging. There remains little understanding of the barriers to reliable implementation of bundle components. We examined frontline clinical practice in implementing the Sepsis Six. Methods We conducted an ethnographic study in six hospitals participating in the Scottish Patient Safety Programme Sepsis collaborative. We conducted around 300 h of non-participant observation in emergency departments, acute medical receiving units and medical and surgical wards. We interviewed a purposive sample of 43 members of hospital staff. Data were analysed using a constant comparative approach. Results Implementation strategies to promote reliable use of the Sepsis Six primarily focused on education, engaging and motivating staff, and providing prompts for behaviour, along with efforts to ensure that equipment required was readily available. Although these strategies were successful in raising staff awareness of sepsis and engagement with implementation, our study identified that completing the bundle within an hour was not straightforward. Our emergent theory suggested that rather than being an apparently simple sequence of six steps, the Sepsis Six actually involved a complex trajectory comprising multiple interdependent tasks that required prioritisation and scheduling, and which was prone to problems of coordination and operational failures. Interventions that involved allocating specific roles and responsibilities for completing the Sepsis Six in ways that reduced the need for coordination and task switching, and the use of process mapping to identify system failures along the trajectory, could help mitigate against some of these problems. Conclusions Implementation efforts that focus on individual

  20. Ethnographic Contributions to Method Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leander, Anna

    2016-01-01

    of IR—Critical Security Studies. Ethnographic research works with what has been termed a “strong” understanding of objectivity. When this understanding is taken seriously, it must lead to a refashioning of the processes of gathering, analyzing, and presenting data in ways that reverse many standard...... of research in the ethnographic tradition. However, it would also require rethinking standard methods instructions and the judgments they inform....

  1. Understanding organizational and cultural premises for quality of care in nursing homes: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrem, Sigrid

    2015-11-13

    Internationally, there are concerns about the quality of care in nursing homes. The concept of 'corporate culture' as an internal variable could be seen as the means to improve quality of care and quality of life for the residents. The aim of this article was to describe the nursing home culture from the staff's perspective and to include how the residents describe quality of care. An ethnographic design was employed. A purposive sample of four municipal public nursing homes in Norway with long-term care residents was included in the study. Data were collected by participant observation including informal conversation with the staff, and in-depth interviews with 15 residents using a narrative approach. The main findings were that organizational cultures could be seen as relatively stable corporate cultures described as 'personalities' with characteristics that were common for all nursing homes (conformity) and typical traits that were present in some nursing homes, but that they were also like no other nursing home (distinctiveness). Conformity ('Every nursing home is like all other nursing homes') meant that nursing home organizations formed their services according to a perception of what residents in general need and expect. Trait ('Every nursing home is like some other nursing homes') expressed typologies of nursing homes: residency, medical, safeguard or family orientation. The distinctness of each nursing home ('Every nursing home is like no other nursing home') was expressed in unique features of the nursing home; the characteristics of the nursing home involved certain patterns of structure, cultural assumptions and interactions that were unique in each nursing home. Nursing home residents experienced quality of care as 'The nursing home as my home' and 'Interpersonal care quality'. The resident group in the different types of nursing homes were unique, and the experience of quality of care seemed to depend on whether their unique needs and expectations

  2. Enhancing health care equity with Indigenous populations: evidence-based strategies from an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Annette J; Varcoe, Colleen; Lavoie, Josée; Smye, Victoria; Wong, Sabrina T; Krause, Murry; Tu, David; Godwin, Olive; Khan, Koushambhi; Fridkin, Alycia

    2016-10-04

    Structural violence shapes the health of Indigenous peoples globally, and is deeply embedded in history, individual and institutional racism, and inequitable social policies and practices. Many Indigenous communities have flourished, however, the impact of colonialism continues to have profound health effects for Indigenous peoples in Canada and internationally. Despite increasing evidence of health status inequities affecting Indigenous populations, health services often fail to address health and social inequities as routine aspects of health care delivery. In this paper, we discuss an evidence-based framework and specific strategies for promoting health care equity for Indigenous populations. Using an ethnographic design and mixed methods, this study was conducted at two Urban Aboriginal Health Centres located in two inner cities in Canada, which serve a combined patient population of 5,500. Data collection included in-depth interviews with a total of 114 patients and staff (n = 73 patients; n = 41 staff), and over 900 h of participant observation focused on staff members' interactions and patterns of relating with patients. Four key dimensions of equity-oriented health services are foundational to supporting the health and well-being of Indigenous peoples: inequity-responsive care, culturally safe care, trauma- and violence-informed care, and contextually tailored care. Partnerships with Indigenous leaders, agencies, and communities are required to operationalize and tailor these key dimensions to local contexts. We discuss 10 strategies that intersect to optimize effectiveness of health care services for Indigenous peoples, and provide examples of how they can be implemented in a variety of health care settings. While the key dimensions of equity-oriented care and 10 strategies may be most optimally operationalized in the context of interdisciplinary teamwork, they also serve as health equity guidelines for organizations and providers working in

  3. Feeding by numbers: an ethnographic study of how breastfeeding women understand their babies' weight charts

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    Dykes Fiona

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weighing breastfed babies has been the subject of some controversy as the previous international growth chart was largely based on data from infants fed infant formula. The concern that professionals may be misled by the charts into suggesting to mothers that they supplement unnecessarily was a major impetus for the World Health Organization's investment in a new growth chart. Evidence of interpretation in practice has been scant. Methods An ethnographic study was conducted in a town in the Northwest of England to investigate this issue. In the first phase, women and health visitors were observed in the well-child clinic during clinic sessions and breastfeeding group meetings. In the second phase, longitudinal interviews with 14 women were conducted. Each woman was interviewed up to three times in the first six months after the birth of her baby, with a total of 35 interviews. Results Mothers and health visitors focussed on weight gain with frequent weighing and attention to even minor fluctuations of the plotted line being evident. Women felt it important to ensure their baby's weight followed a centile, and preferred for this to be the fiftieth centile. Interventions included giving infant formula and solids as well as changing what the mother ate and drank. Women also described how they worried about their baby's weight. Little effective support by health professionals with breastfeeding technique was observed. Conclusion Babies were weighed more often than officially recommended, with weighing and plotting being at the core of each clinic visit. The plotted weight chart exerted a powerful influence on both women's and health visitors' understanding of the adequacy of breastfeeding. They appeared to rate the regular progression of weight gains along the chart centiles more highly than continued or exclusive breastfeeding. Thus weighing and visual charting of weight constituted a form of surveillance under the medical gaze

  4. Migrant women’s experiences, meanings and ways of dealing with postnatal depression: A meta-ethnographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Emma; Naidoo, Norell; Dahlen, Hannah G.; Liamputtong, Pranee

    2017-01-01

    Aim To conduct a meta-ethnographic study of the experiences, meanings and ways of ‘dealing with’ symptoms or a diagnosis of postnatal depression amongst migrant women living in high income countries. Background Prevalence of postnatal depression is highest amongst women who are migrants. Yet many women do not seek help for their symptoms and health services do not always respond appropriately to migrant women’s needs. Studies have reported migrant women’s experiences of postnatal depression and it is timely to synthesise findings from these studies to understand how services can be improved. Design A meta-ethnographic synthesis of 12 studies reported in 15 papers Data sources Five databases were searched for papers published between January 1999 and February 2016 Review methods The quality of included studies was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program tool. The synthesis process was guided by the seven steps of meta-ethnography outlined by Noblit and Hare. Findings Four key metaphors were identified: “I am alone, worried and angry—this is not me!”; ‘Making sense of my feelings’ ‘Dealing with my feelings’ and ‘What I need to change the way I feel!’. Primarily women related their feelings to their position as a migrant and as women, often living in poor socio-economic circumstances and they were exhausted keeping up with expected commitments. Many women were resourceful, drawing on their personal strengths and family / community resources. All the studies reported that women experienced difficulties in accessing appropriate services. Conclusion The meta-ethnographic study demonstrates the impact of migration on perinatal mental health, particularly for women lacking family support, who have no employment, a precarious migration status and/or relationship conflict. Migrant women are resourceful and this requires support through appropriate services. Further research is needed to evaluate effective support strategies for migrant

  5. THE DYNAMICS OF REPRESSIVE HABITUS LAWS: ETHNOGRAPHIC CASE STUDY IN UNWIMA

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    Teddy Asmara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research describes repressive legal habitus Unwima community by focusing on the issue of why they create a legal cognition such manner and how to empower them in the public domain when facing a lawsuit in court and examination process in higher education office. The results of the research with ethnographic methods and interpretative analysis, First, that repressive legal habitus is a part of the neo-feudalistic thinking in education management. Second, the empowerment of repressive legal habitus in the public domain potentially generate a legal behavior of impulsive that tends to a manipulative, coercive, veiled, and other immorality practices.

  6. "We need somewhere to smoke crack": An ethnographic study of an unsanctioned safer smoking room in Vancouver, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Ryan; Kerr, Thomas; Lampkin, Hugh; Small, Will

    2015-07-01

    Many cities around the globe have experienced substantial increases in crack cocaine use. Public health programmes have begun to address crack smoking, primarily through the distribution of safer crack use equipment, but their impacts have been limited. More comprehensive safer environmental interventions, specifically safer smoking rooms (SSR), have been implemented only in select European cities. However, none have been subjected to rigorous evaluation. This ethnographic study was undertaken at an 'unsanctioned' SSR operated by a drug user-led organization in Vancouver, Canada, to explore how this intervention shaped crack smoking practices, public crack smoking, and related harms. Ethnographic fieldwork was undertaken at this SSR from September to December 2011, and included approximately 50 hours of ethnographic observation and 23 in-depth interviews with people who smoke crack. Data were analyzed by drawing on the 'Risk Environment' framework and concepts of 'symbolic', 'everyday', and 'structural' violence. Our findings illustrate how a high demand for SSRs was driven by the need to minimize exposure to policing (structural violence), drug scene violence (everyday violence), and stigma (symbolic violence) that characterized unregulated drug use settings (e.g., public spaces). Although resource scarcity and social norms operating within the local drug scene (e.g., gendered power relations) perpetuated crack pipe-sharing within unregulated drug use settings, the SSR fostered harm reduction practices by reshaping the social-structural context of crack smoking and reduced the potential for health harms. Given the significant potential of SSRs in reducing health and social harms, there is an urgent need to scale up these interventions. Integrating SSRs into public health systems, and supplementing these interventions with health and social supports, has potential to improve the health and safety of crack-smoking populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  7. “WE NEED SOMEWHERE TO SMOKE CRACK”: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC STUDY OF AN UNSANCTIONED SAFER SMOKING ROOM IN VANCOUVER, CANADA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Ryan; Kerr, Thomas; Lampkin, Hugh; Small, Will

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many cities around the globe have experienced substantial increases in crack cocaine use. Public health programmes have begun to address crack smoking, primarily through the distribution of safer crack use equipment, but their impacts have been limited. More comprehensive safer environmental interventions, specifically safer smoking rooms (SSR), have been implemented only in select European cities. However, none have been subjected to rigorous evaluation. This ethnographic study was undertaken at an ‘unsanctioned’ SSR operated by a drug user-led organization in Vancouver, Canada, to explore how this intervention shaped crack smoking practices, public crack smoking, and related harms. Methods Ethnographic fieldwork was undertaken at this SSR from September to December 2011, and included approximately 50 hours of ethnographic observation and 23 in-depth interviews with people who smoke crack. Data were analyzed by drawing on the ‘Risk Environment’ framework and concepts of ‘symbolic’, ‘everyday’, and ‘structural’ violence. Findings Our findings illustrate how a high demand for SSRs was driven by the need to minimize exposure to policing (structural violence), drug scene violence (everyday violence), and stigma (symbolic violence) that characterized unregulated drug use settings (e.g., public spaces). Although resource scarcity and social norms operating within the local drug scene (e.g., gendered power relations) perpetuated crack pipe-sharing within unregulated drug use settings, the SSR fostered harm reduction practices by reshaping the social-structural context of crack smoking and reduced the potential for health harms. Conclusion Given the significant potential of SSRs in reducing health and social harms, there is an urgent need to scale up these interventions. Integrating SSRs into public health systems, and supplementing these interventions with health and social supports, has potential to improve the health and safety of crack

  8. Professional caregivers' experiences with the Liverpool Care Pathway in dementia: An ethnographic study in a Dutch nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos Dekker, Natashe; Gysels, Marjolein; van der Steen, Jenny T

    2017-07-11

    There are few studies on how professional caregivers apply the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) in nursing home care for people with dementia. Further, despite critiques in the United Kingdom, the LCP continues to be used in the Netherlands, while, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have been conducted since its implementation. The purpose of the present study was to analyze professional caregivers' experiences with the LCP in this context. This article draws on an ethnographic study. Data collection was based on 4 months of ethnographic fieldwork in 2015 in 11 psychogeriatric units of a nursing home in a rural area of the Netherlands. Data collection included participant observation and 25 semistructured audiotaped interviews with specialist elderly care physicians, nursing staff, and a nurse practitioner. We found that professional caregivers appreciate the LCP as a communication tool and as a reminder of care goals. However, the document was deemed too complicated and to cause duplication of work. It was also reported that the LCP did not cover the complexity of care needs that emerge in practice. Actual care needs were prioritized over the LCP, which calls its contribution into question. Overall, the LCP does not match the context of dementia care in the nursing home. While it could be argued that the LCP does not intend to replace good care, its benefits as a reminder and a communication tool need continued consideration in relation to the amount of work it requires as a bureaucratic obligation.

  9. The Social Context of the Chinese Food System: An Ethnographic Study of the Beijing Seafood Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fabinyi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available China’s role in the global food system has expanded immensely in recent years. In the seafood sector, it is now the largest consumer of seafood products in the world, making the Chinese market highly significant for global fisheries. Drawing on ethnographic- and interview-based research in the largest seafood market in Beijing, this paper analyzes the social context of Chinese consumption and trade. We broadly conceive of this social context as encompassing a range of social norms and practices that include culturally and historically generated consumer preferences, and distinctive forms of governance and business practice. We find that the social context of China is a key driver of patterns of consumption and trade, and provides challenges and opportunities to improve governance for environmental sustainability. We highlight the need for greater policy and academic attention to these characteristics of seafood consumption and trade within China.

  10. The functions and roles of questioning during nursing handovers in specialty settings: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixon, Sascha; Braaf, Sandra; Williams, Allison; Liew, Danny; Manias, Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    Nursing handovers are an important component of patient safety and quality in communicating across transitions of care. To determine the functions and roles of questions in nursing handovers, and of how questions contribute to handover quality improvement in specialty settings of an Australian tertiary hospital. An ethnographic research design was employed. Participant observations were conducted which were audiorecorded and transcribed. Question-response sequences and the roles of questions in the handovers were coded. Questions served many functions, and included: requests for information, requests for confirmation, other initiations of repair, outloud utterances, understanding checks, requests for action and agreement, and knowledge checks. Questioning was mostly used to transmit patient-related information, and nurses could use questioning to jointly construct understandings about patients. Future research should examine how questions function in diverse clinical environments, such as rural and regional hospitals, and how questioning occurs in multidisciplinary handover situations.

  11. Migrant caregiving for family members with mild cognitive impairment: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Siena C; Montayre, Jed; Egli, Victoria; Holroyd, Eleanor

    2017-06-01

    Migrant families caring for family members with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) face considerable socioeconomic burden and isolation. To examine the cultural needs, beliefs and health seeking behaviours of migrant Turkish family member caregivers. An ethnographic approach was used employing in depth interviews. Turkish caregivers residing in Melbourne, Australia were purposively sampled. Ten participants undertook face-to-face interviews in Turkish and English, followed by coding, transcription and thematic analysis. Common themes were: (i) characteristics of MCI; (ii) care complicates our lives; (iii) beneficial coping strategies; (iv) adherence to cultural beliefs; (v) an uncertain future; (vi) interfacing with community health providers: need to understand Turkish culture (vii) need for long-term support. Migrant caregivers voiced undergoing considerable stress exacerbated by their cultural obligations. Establishing ethnically appropriate community support groups and advocating for a health workforce tier of representative migrant health care workers is recommended as a new role for community nurses.

  12. Development of psychiatric risk evaluation checklist and routine for nurses in a general hospital: ethnographic qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Ana Luiza Lourenço Simões; Maluf Neto, Alfredo; Colman, Fátima Tahira; Citero, Vanessa de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    There is high prevalence of mental and behavioral disorders in general hospitals, thus triggering psychiatric risk situations. This study aimed to develop a psychiatric risk assessment checklist and routine for nurses, the Psychiatric Risk Evaluation Check-List (PRE-CL), as an alternative model for early identification and management of these situations in general hospitals. Ethnographic qualitative study in a tertiary-level private hospital. Three hundred general-unit nurses participated in the study. Reports were gathered through open groups conducted by a trained nurse, at shift changes for two months. The questions used were: "Would you consider it helpful to discuss daily practice situations with a psychiatrist? Which situations?" The data were qualitatively analyzed through an ethnographic approach. The nurses considered it useful to discuss daily practice situations relating to mental and behavioral disorders with a psychiatrist. Their reports were used to develop PRE-CL, within the patient overall risk assessment routine for all inpatients within 24 hours after admission and every 48 hours thereafter. Whenever one item was present, the psychosomatic medicine team was notified. They went to the unit, gathered data from the nurses, patient files and, if necessary, attending doctors, and decided on the risk management: guidance, safety measures or mental health consultation. It is possible to develop a model for detecting and intervening in psychiatric and behavioral disorders at general hospitals based on nursing team observations, through a checklist that takes these observations into account and a routine inserted into daily practice.

  13. Factors influencing medication adherence in South Asian people with cardiac disorders: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ens, T A; Seneviratne, C C; Jones, C; King-Shier, K M

    2014-11-01

    South Asians experience higher rates of cardiovascular disease than any other ethnic group. Some evidence suggests that South Asians may be less adherent to cardiac medication regimens than Whites residing in Canada. Identification of the key factors contributing to adherence may assist this growing population to optimize their cardiac health. To explore key factors associated with adherence to cardiac medications among South Asian people with cardiac disease. Ethnography was used to highlight population specific themes and domains related to medication adherence. Ethnographic observations were undertaken of patients, as well as their family (primary care) physicians and pharmacists (including their staff), while in physician offices and pharmacies. A purposive sample of patients (n=8), as well as physicians (n=3) and pharmacists (n=2) underwent in-depth interviews. Field note and interview data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using ethnographic domain and thematic analysis. The patients relied on family members for instrumental support in remaining adherent with their medications. Relationships with healthcare professionals who demonstrated clear communication and cultural awareness was associated with enhanced medication adherence. Memory mechanisms needed to be individualized and were generally 'low technology'. While prepackaging of medications enhanced adherence, patients who used them were less knowledgeable about their medications. Healthcare providers should understand the importance of including family members in the care of South Asian people with heart disease. They also need to appreciate that the quality of provider-patient relationships are important to South Asian patients and will influence adherence to healthcare regimens. Expanding the role of nurse in the primary healthcare team could provide a cost-effective means of enhancing medication adherence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Interprofessional care in intensive care settings and the factors that impact it: results from a scoping review of ethnographic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Gropper, Michael A; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Kitto, Simon; Reeves, Scott

    2013-12-01

    At the heart of safe cultures are effective interactions within and between interprofessional teams. Critical care clinicians see severely ill patients who require coordinated interprofessional care. In this scoping review, we asked: "What do we know about processes, relationships, organizational and contextual factors that shape the ability of clinicians to deliver interprofessional care in adult ICUs?" Using the 5-stage process established by Levac et al. (2010), we reviewed 981 abstracts to identify ethnographic articles that shed light on interprofessional care in the intensive care unit. The quality of selected articles is assessed using best practices in ethnographic research; their main insights evaluated in light of an interprofessional framework developed by Reeves et al (Interprofessional Teamwork for Health and Social Care. San Francisco, CA: Wiley-Blackwell; 2010). Overall, studies were of mixed quality, with an average (SD) score of 5.8 out of 10 (1.77). Insights into intensive care unit cultures include the importance of paying attention to workflow, the nefarious impact of hierarchical relationships, the mixed responses to protocols imposed from the top down, and a general undertheorization of sex and race. This review highlights several lessons for safe cultures and argues that more needs to be known about the context of critical care if quality and safety interventions are to succeed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Community of practice and student interaction at an acute medical ward: An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg-Martinell, A; Hult, H; Henriksson, P; Kiessling, A

    2016-08-01

    A deeper understanding is needed of the acute medical care setting as a learning environment for students. To explore workplace culture of an acute medical ward and students' interactions within this community. An ethnographic design was applied. Medical and nurse students' interactions were observed and informal questioning performed. Field notes were transcribed and analysed qualitatively, inspired by Wengers' "Community of practice" theory. We identified four characteristics that regulated how students adapt and interact in the community of practice. Complex and stressful situations were stabilized by routines and carriers of culture. Variable composition and roles of community members were a part of the daily routine but did not seam obvious to students. Transitions through community boundaries were confusing especially for new students. Levels of importance and priority: Hierarchies and orders of priority were present as regulators of roles, routines and interactions, and of how staff approach different patient groups. The culture shaped a pattern for, and created prerequisites that challenged students' adaptation and created a space for learning. Students' task on arrival was to enter the semipermeable membrane of the community of practice and to understand and adapt to its culture, and try to become accepted.

  16. The application of ethnographic method in the study of digital media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Capobianco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Digital media raise methodological issues of some relevance. The following article tries to be a contribution to the qualitative analysis of Social Networks through the use of media ethnography. We deal with issues such as time and space and with how these dimension get transformed in digital environments; the very definition of environment and social network; an effective communication; the constant flow between online and off-line activities; the role of the “digital” researcher, his/her influence on the subjects’ actions, his/her actual competence about the media and the balance of the management of situations that cross online and off-line environments, ethics and the protection of privacy. The figure of the ethnographic researcher changes, while ethnography represents – perhaps – one of the most effective methods for a research that maintains a phenomenological basis, helping to understand the meaning and value that certain tools, used for specific purposes, can take on for the youngest users.

  17. Perceptions of food and eating among Chinese patients with cancer: findings of an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Kirsten; Lee, Joyce; Ristovski-Slijepcevic, Svetlana

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the ways that participants in a Chinese cancer support group talk about food, diet, and eating. An ethnographic research design was used, including participant observation at a Chinese cancer support group over an 8-month period and key informant interviews with 7 members of the group. Food, eating, and diet were a recurrent focus of discussion at support group meetings throughout the fieldwork period. The ways in which support group participants talked about food centered on 3 distinct but interconnected themes: the prevalence of eating issues as an adverse effect of cancer and its treatment, the importance of eating ability, and questions and concerns connected with the differing and often contradictory cultural models of diet that they were exposed to. Culturally specific understandings of the relationship between food and health informed Chinese patients' experience of eating issues during cancer treatments and their ongoing concern with food and nutrition after the completion of treatment. Health professionals need to pay more attention to the meanings and attributes of food and eating beyond their physiological properties, and further research needs to be conducted with other immigrant populations with culturally distinct understandings of food.

  18. Identifying interventions to help rural Kenyan mothers cope with food insecurity: results of a focused ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto, Gretel H; Armar-Klemesu, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    An ethnographic study was conducted in two areas in southern and western Kenya to identify potential interventions to improve the quality, availability and affordability of foods consumed by infants and young children. A cultural-ecological model of determinants of nutrition identified the sectors of information for data collection related to infant and young child (IYC) diet and feeding-related behaviours, and the focused ethnographic study manual was used to guide the research. The results provide qualitative evidence about facilitators and constraints to IYC nutrition in the two geographical areas and document their inter-connections. We conclude with suggestions to consider 13 potential nutrition-sensitive interventions. The studies provide empirical ethnographic support for arguments concerning the importance of combining nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive interventions through a multi-sectoral, integrated approach to improve the nutrition of infants and young children in low-income, resource-constrained populations. They also document the value of ethnography as a component of landscape analysis in nutrition programme and policy planning. Key messages In addition to constraints on infant and young child diet that originate in environmental and technological conditions in both agro-ecological zones, other factors that affect feeding practices include features of social organisation, household access to social support, caregivers income-earning activities and their own health. The results of the ethnographies, which highlight the importance of obtaining the knowledge and perspectives of caregivers of infants and young children, reveal the interactions of the multiple factors that affect child nutrition and the need for simultaneous nutrition-sensitive interventions to complement nutrition-specific intervention actions. Most caregivers in both areas not only understood the importance of diet and food quality for child survival, they also regarded it as

  19. Youth Studies and Timescapes: Insights from an Ethnographic Study of "Young Night Drifters" in Hong Kong's Public Housing Estates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Julian M.; Ho, Wai-Yip; Siu, Kaxton

    2012-01-01

    This article draws on insights from the sociology of time to examine how scheduling influences social interaction and identity among young people and those who work with them. Drawing on an ethnographic analysis of "Young Night Drifters" and youth outreach social workers in Hong Kong's public housing estates, we create a framework to…

  20. The challenges in caring for morbidly obese patients in Intensive Care: A focused ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Caz; Coombs, Maureen; de Vries, Kay

    2017-03-17

    Critically ill morbidly obese patients pose considerable healthcare delivery and resource utilisation challenges. However little is known about the care of these patients in intensive care. To explore medical and nursing practices and attitudes in intensive care when caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients. A focused ethnographic approach was adopted. Participant observation of care practices and interviews with intensive care doctors and nurses were undertaken over a four month period. Qualitative analysis was conducted using constant comparison. An 18 bedded tertiary intensive care unit in New Zealand. Sixty-seven intensive care nurses and 13 intensive care doctors involved with the care and management of seven critically ill patients with a body mass index ≥40kg/m2. Morbidly obese patients present significant physical and language challenges for intensive care practice. The physical shape of morbidly obese patients did not appropriately fit the different equipment used. Staff used specific knowledge of the patient's body size and shape to adapt care practices and keep patients safe and comfortable. There were also specific language challenges where staff expressed concern about what words were most appropriate to use to describe body mass when in the presence of morbidly obese patients. Bariatric care pathways need to be developed that use more suitable body measurements to inform the use of bariatric equipment. Intensive care staff need to engage in debate about what is acceptable, respectful, and appropriate language in the delivery of bariatric patient care. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of psychiatric risk evaluation checklist and routine for nurses in a general hospital: ethnographic qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Lourenço Simões Camargo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE:There is high prevalence of mental and behavioral disorders in general hospitals, thus triggering psychiatric risk situations. This study aimed to develop a psychiatric risk assessment checklist and routine for nurses, the Psychiatric Risk Evaluation Check-List (PRE-CL, as an alternative model for early identification and management of these situations in general hospitals.DESIGN AND SETTING:Ethnographic qualitative study in a tertiary-level private hospital.METHOD:Three hundred general-unit nurses participated in the study. Reports were gathered through open groups conducted by a trained nurse, at shift changes for two months. The questions used were: "Would you consider it helpful to discuss daily practice situations with a psychiatrist? Which situations?" The data were qualitatively analyzed through an ethnographic approach.RESULTS:The nurses considered it useful to discuss daily practice situations relating to mental and behavioral disorders with a psychiatrist. Their reports were used to develop PRE-CL, within the patient overall risk assessment routine for all inpatients within 24 hours after admission and every 48 hours thereafter. Whenever one item was present, the psychosomatic medicine team was notified. They went to the unit, gathered data from the nurses, patient files and, if necessary, attending doctors, and decided on the risk management: guidance, safety measures or mental health consultation.CONCLUSION:It is possible to develop a model for detecting and intervening in psychiatric and behavioral disorders at general hospitals based on nursing team observations, through a checklist that takes these observations into account and a routine inserted into daily practice.

  2. Medication-taking behaviours in chronic kidney disease with multiple chronic conditions: a meta-ethnographic synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett Ellis, Rebecca J; Welch, Janet L

    2017-03-01

    To identify behaviours associated with taking medications and medication adherence reported in qualitative studies of adults with chronic kidney disease and coexisting multiple chronic conditions. To inform medication adherence interventions, information is needed to clarify the nature of the relationships between behaviours that support medication-taking and medication adherence in multiple chronic conditions. Meta-ethnographic review and synthesis. CINAHL Complete, MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched. Five qualitative studies met the inclusion criteria. A meta-ethnographic approach was used for synthesis. Medication-taking behaviours were abstracted from study findings and synthesised according to the contexts in which they occur and interpreted within a new developing framework named the Medication-taking Across the Care Continuum and Adherence-related Outcomes. Twenty categories of medication-taking behaviours occurred in three main contexts: (1) patient-provider clinical encounters, (2) pharmacy encounters and (3) day-to-day management. These behaviours are distinctly different, multilevel and interrelated. Together they represent a process occurring across a continuum. Future medication adherence research should consider using a multilevel ecological view of medication management. Clinical practice and policy development can benefit from further understanding socio-contextual behaviours that occur across the continuum. Nurses should have greater presence in chronic disease management and be positioned to support the day-to-day home management of patients' medications. Healthcare professionals can partner with patients to elucidate how these behaviours are enacted across the care continuum and in day-to-day management to identify opportunities to intervene on specific behaviours and promote medication adherence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The role of locally-designed organizational artifacts in supporting nurses’ work: an ethnographic study on the wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Alessandra; Mellini, Barbara; Barbieri, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to describe how nurses' planning and coordination work is performed through the use of locally designed tools (i.e., diaries, planners, reminders, and organizers). These tools are investigated as the materialization of organizational work, thus offering a complementary perspective on nursing practice to that proposed by the professional mandate and supported by official artifacts in use. Ethnographic study. By analyzing locally designed artifacts, the rationale that enables nurses to make the flow of activities work is highlighted and explained. Evidence is provided by a description of how nurses' tacit knowledge is reified and embedded into objects produced by the nurses themselves. Implications for the design of digital systems supporting nursing practice are discussed. The analysis of these artifacts has allowed an understanding of practices used by the nurses to manage the workflow in the wards.

  4. Viewing Places: Students as Visual Ethnographers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a micro-ethnographic study that took place during a summer research course for six undergraduate and four graduate students majoring in the disciplines of architecture, art education, geography, landscape architecture and an integrative arts program. The research sought to implement ethnographic, visual methods as a means to…

  5. Socialization into science: An ethnographic study in a field research station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calovini, Theresa Ann

    While the place of language in building the tasks and activities of the science classroom has received attention in the education literature, how students do the work of affiliation building through language remains poorly understood. This dissertation is based on ethnographic research in an apprenticeship learning situation at a biological field research station. I carried out this research with five undergraduates apprentices. I focus on how the language used in this apprenticeship situation positioned the apprentices with science. Issues of access and diversity in science education have motivated this research but this point can be missed because the five apprentices were all fairly successful in university science. They had all secured their job for the summer as paid research assistants. Yet, even with these successful students, science had a complicated place in their lives. I draw on Gee's (1999) notion of Discourse to understand this complexity. I focus on four Discourses--- Science, Knowing about the Animals, Senior Projects and RAships, and Relationships ---which were important in the apprentices' learning about and socialization with science. I try to understand the inter-workings of these four Discourses through a detailed analysis of three conversations involving one of the participants, Michelle. Michelle's use of narrative emerged as a linguistic resource which she used to explore dilemmas she experienced in the tensions between these four Discourses. Michelle was in many ways an ideal apprentice. She did her job well and she sought and received expert advice on her Senior project. Nonetheless, Michelle faced obstacles in her pursuit of a career in science and these obstacles related to language use and her use of narrative. I show how her use of narrative either facilitated or impeded her learning, depending on the context of the interaction. My analysis of Discourse points to important issues in language use by both students and teachers, with

  6. Mothers, medicine and morality in rural Mali: an ethnographic study of therapy management of pregnancy and children’s illness episodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holten, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    How to understand the simultaneity of parental love and care with a lack of taking action when a child is ill? This question inspired Lianne Holten to conduct the ethnographic study presented in this book. She worked and lived in the isolated village of Farabako (Mali) to help establish a maternity

  7. Exploring the Role of TPACK and Teacher Self-Efficacy: An Ethnographic Case Study of Three iPad Language Arts Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudelli, Mary Gene; Ciampa, Katia

    2016-01-01

    This ethnographic research study investigated three elementary teachers' perceived self-efficacy beliefs and their attitudes toward mobile technology-enhanced instruction. Using technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) as a guiding theory, the authors sought to determine whether and how the three knowledge components that form the…

  8. Generating ethnographic research questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    ? By drawing on the conceptual history of anthropology, the aim of this article is to generate ethnographic-oriented research questions concerned with higher education. The first part of the article provides an ethnographic background, while the second part focuses on Paul Willis's reasoning on ethnographic...... imagination, as a prerequisite for generating alternative research questions. The third part makes explicit anthropologist Maurice Godelier's theoretical imagination, carving out some specific theoretical parts which may be used in the generating process. The conclusion then suggests a number of questions...

  9. Establishing a faith-based organisation nursing school within a national primary health care programme in rural Tanzania: an auto-ethnographic case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, the Tanzanian government called for improvements in its primary health care services. Part of this initiative was to accelerate the training rate for nurses qualified to work in rural areas. The aim of this study was to reflect on the issues experienced whilst establishing and implementing a faith-based organisation (FBO) nursing school and make recommendations for other similar initiatives. This paper describes an auto-ethnographic case study design to identify the key difficulties involved with establishing and implementing a new nursing school, and which factors helped the project achieve its goals. Six themes emerged from the experiences that shaped the course of the project: 1) Motivation can be sustained if the rationale of the project is in line with its aims. Indeed, the project's primary health care focus was to strengthen the nursing workforce and build a public-private partnership with an FBO. All these were strengths, which helped in the midst of all the uncertainties. 2) Communication was an important and often underrated factor for all types of development projects. 3) Managing the unknown and 4) managing expectations characterised the project inception. Almost all themes had to do with 5) handling conflicts. With so many participants having their own agendas, tensions were unavoidable. A final theme was 6) the need to adjust to ever-changing targets. This retrospective auto-ethnographic manuscript serves as a small-scale case study, to illustrate how issues that can be generalised to other settings can be deconstructed to demonstrate how they influence health development projects in developing countries. From this narrative of experiences, key recommendations include the following: 1) Find the right ratio of stakeholders, participants, and agendas, and do not overload the project; 2) Be alert and communicate as much as possible with staff and do not ignore issues hoping they will solve themselves; 3) Think flexibly and do not stubbornly

  10. Cultural perceptions and health behaviors related to safe motherhood among village women in Eastern Sudan: Ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serizawa, A; Ito, K; Algaddal, A H; Eltaybe, R A M

    2014-04-01

    Meeting the health needs of Sudanese women, especially those living in village areas, is imperative and cannot be accomplished without understanding the cultural perceptions and health behaviors related to safe motherhood. Nevertheless, there is little literature exploring these perspectives through qualitative study, as most of the studies performed in Sudan applied quantitative methods and focused on urban areas. This study aims to explore cultural perceptions and behaviors relevant to safe motherhood among Sudanese village women. A qualitative method using an ethnographic approach was applied for the study. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with six village women of reproductive age living in a village in Gadarif State, Eastern Sudan. The thematic content analysis revealed socio-economic factors, religious values and local beliefs shaping the village women's perceptions of their behaviors related to motherhood safety. Particular concerns included responses to health problems, preference for birth with traditional birth attendants, female genital mutilation/female genital cutting and a lack of utilizing family planning. An implication arising from this study is that maternal services should develop a collaboration between village midwives and traditional birth attendants. This study further suggests that educational messages must be delivered to family relatives with consideration of the cultural influences highlighted by the village women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ante Natal Care (ANC seeking behavior among women living in an urban squatter settlement: results from an ethnographic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabeena Jalal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Pakistan’s population is estimated to be 160,943,000. It ranks third among the ten high burden
    countries and accounts for up to 7% of worldwide neonatal deaths. According to the Pakistan’s World Health Oganization (WHO 2010 health profile, only 28% of Pakistani women have used ante natal care services (4 plus visits, whilst 39% of reported births in Pakistan had used skilled birth attendant services, whereas 59% fell within the WHO’s regional average. There is also a significant disparity, reported by the WHO, in terms of inequity between the poor and the rich in the use of skilled birth attendant services: 16% and 77 % respectively.

    Objective: This ethnographic study explores the perceptions about the need for antenatal care (ANC in a disadvantaged population in Pakistan.

    Method: This is an Ethnographic study which makes use of standard methods such as non-participant observation, semi structured interviews, and documentary review. Data was collected over 14 months and was analyzed thematically. Key informants assisted in understanding the community norms. Open ended answer options were used in the questionnaire.

    Setting: The community in this case was an urban squatter settlement by the name of Ghazi Goth, which is the neighborhood of the poor people.

    Results: We found that 41% of the women did not receive ANC because of lack of financial support. 33% said that family did not support the decision. In 43% of the cases, the husband was the decision maker regarding where the delivery of the baby should take place. 31% of the respondents also reported that their mother-inlaws were the decision makers for the baby’s delivery. Only 3% reported a self decision.

    Conclusions: This a qualitative study which helps explore perceptions and attitudes of women towards ANC, through contextual data. The

  12. CAPABILITY LEARNING ON SPEAKING IN ARABIC (An Ethnographic Study at Arabic Department Of FITK UIN Syarifhidayatullah Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmal Walad Ahkas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to obtain an extensive understanding regarding to learning ability on to speak in Arabic at Department of Arabic Education Faculty of Tarbiyah and Teacher Training UIN SyarifHidayatullah Jakarta. This study involves qualitative method comprehending ethnographic method by Spradley model. This study lasted from November 2015 to June 2016. The data was obtained from participatory observation, interview, documentary analysis, and audio-visual material. This study proves that: (1. the learning objective is considered by the level of Muhâdatsahthat is divided into level 1, level 2, and level 3. (2. Curriculum applies on KKNI basis (National Education Quality Standard. And the syllabus applies Functional Syllabus. (3. Scenario of the learning material covers themes on conversation, vocabulary, the maqala concerning to the most recent development and attractive topic on argumentative debate relating to educational issues. (4. The method involves Eclectic Method that organises Grammar-Translation method, Direct Method, Audio-Lingual Method, and Debating Method. (5. The media of learning is equipped by powerpoint presentation, video (native speaker, and printed materials. (6 the evaluation is conducted on the performance basis to assess the ability on Arabic through communicative activity, orally and in writing. (7 the lingual environment is supported by formal and informal environment.

  13. Making Visible the Complexities of Problem Solving: An Ethnographic Study of a General Chemistry Course in a Studio Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalainoff, Melinda Zapata

    Studio classrooms, designed such that laboratory and lecture functions can occur in the same physical space, have been recognized as a promising contributing factor in promoting collaborative learning in the sciences (NRC, 2011). Moreover, in designing for instruction, a critical goal, especially in the sciences and engineering, is to foster an environment where students have opportunities for learning problem solving practices (NRC, 2012a). However, few studies show how this type of innovative learning environment shapes opportunities for learning in the sciences, which is critical to informing future curricular and instructional designs for these environments. Even fewer studies show how studio environments shape opportunities to develop problem solving practices specifically. In order to make visible how the learning environment promotes problem solving practices, this study explores problem solving phenomena in the daily life of an undergraduate General Chemistry studio class using an ethnographic perspective. By exploring problem solving as a sociocultural process, this study shows how the instructor and students co-construct opportunities for learning in whole class and small group interactional spaces afforded in this studio environment and how the differential demands on students in doing problems requires re-conceptualizing what it means to "apply a concept".

  14. Intersecting Cultures in Deaf Mental Health: An Ethnographic Study of NHS Professionals Diagnosing Autism in D/deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenman, Natassia F; Hiddinga, Anja; Wright, Barry

    2017-02-27

    Autism assessments for children who are deaf are particularly complex for a number of reasons, including overlapping cultural and clinical factors. We capture this in an ethnographic study of National Health Service child and adolescent mental health services in the United Kingdom, drawing on theoretical perspectives from transcultural psychiatry, which help to understand these services as a cultural system. Our objective was to analyse how mental health services interact with Deaf culture, as a source of cultural-linguistic identity. We ground the study in the practices and perceptions of 16 professionals, who have conducted autism assessments for deaf children aged 0-18. We adopt a framework of intersectionality to capture the multiple, mutually enforcing factors involved in this diagnostic process. We observed that professionals working in specialist Deaf services, or with experience working with the Deaf community, had intersectional understandings of assessments: the ways in which cultural, linguistic, sensory, and social factors work together to produce diagnoses. Working with a diagnostic system that focuses heavily on 'norms' based on populations from a hearing culture was a key source of frustration for professionals. We conclude that recognising the intersectionality of mental health and Deaf culture helps professionals provide sensitive diagnoses that acknowledge the multiplicity of D/deaf experiences.

  15. An ethnographic study of the incentives and barriers to lifestyle interventions for people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Seren Haf; Bailey, Jois Elisabeth

    2013-11-01

    To explore incentives and barriers to an educational lifestyle intervention for people with severe mental illness. Social and lifestyle factors along with long-term antipsychotic therapy contribute to poorer physical health in people with severe mental illness. Behavioural lifestyle interventions for this clinical group have shown some benefit. Evidence relating to the incentives and barriers to interventions is limited. An ethnographic qualitative study was undertaken. Data collection was carried out through participant observations and semi-structured interviews with eight mental health service users attending, or previously attended, a group-based lifestyle intervention. Interview data were collected between September 2008-April 2009 and observation data were collected between September-December 2009. Participant observation highlighted environment, facilitator style, group ownership, group cohesion, information and learning, incentives and barriers as important. Participant interviews identified weight management, social networking, information and communication, role of healthcare professionals and perceived benefits as key themes. This study provides evidence about the incentives and barriers to lifestyle interventions from service users' perspective, which should inform developments to improve the delivery of lifestyle interventions for this group. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. The best of both worlds--parents' motivations for using an alongside birth centre from an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburn, Mary

    2012-02-01

    An ethnographic study was undertaken in a birth centre to explore the model of care provided there from the perspectives of midwives and parents. A five birthing-room, alongside, inner-city, birth centre in England, situated one floor below the hospital labour ward, separately staffed by purposively recruited midwives. Around 114 hours were spent at the birth centre observing antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal care; 11 in-depth interviews were recorded with parents after their baby's birth (four with women; seven with women and men together), including three interviews with women who transferred to the labour ward, and 11 with staff (nine midwives and two maternity assistants). Most women and men using the birth centre perceived it as offering the 'best of both worlds' based on its proximity to and separation from the labour ward. It seemed to offer a combination of biopsychosocial safety, made evident by the calm, welcoming atmosphere, the facilities, engaging, respectful care from known midwives and a clear commitment to normal birth, and obstetric safety particularly because of its close proximity to the labour ward. This alongside birth centre provided a social model of care and appealed strongly to a group of parents; similar birth centres should be widely available throughout the NHS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ethical and Safety Issues in Doing Sex Work Research: Reflections From a Field-Based Ethnographic Study in Kolkata, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sunny

    2017-05-01

    While much has been said about the risks and safety issues experienced by female sex workers in India, there is a considerable dearth of information about the difficulties and problems that sex work researchers, especially female researchers, experience when navigating the highly political, ideological, and stigmatized environment of the Indian sex industry. As noted by scholars, there are several methodological and ethical issues involved with sex work research, such as privacy and confidentiality of the participants, representativeness of the sample, and informed consent. Yet, there has been reluctance among scholars to comment on their research process, especially with regard to how they deal with the protocols for research ethics when conducting social and behavioral epidemiological studies among female sex workers in India and elsewhere. Drawing on my 7 months of field-based ethnographic research with "flying" or non-brothel-based female sex workers in Kolkata, India, I provide in this article a reflexive account of the problems encountered in implementing the research process, particularly the ethical and safety issues involved in gaining access and acceptance into the sex industry and establishing contact and rapport with the participants. In doing so, it is my hope that future researchers can develop the knowledge necessary for the design of ethical and non-exploitative research projects with sex workers.

  18. Entry into Nursing: An Ethnographic Study of Newly Qualified Nurses Taking on the Nursing Role in a Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Skancke Bjerknes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition from student to working nurse has long been recognized as challenging. This paper presents the findings of research into the opportunities and limitations encountered by newly qualified nurses when taking on the nursing role. The study had an ethnographic design. Observation, interviews, and document analysis were used to gain insight into nurses' daily work from the perspective of recently graduated nurses. Thirteen nurses were monitored closely during their first year in a hospital setting in Norway. These new nurses generally entered the field with empathy for their patients, enthusiasm for the profession, and readiness to learn more about being a good nurse. However, their more experienced colleagues seemed to neither respect nor nurture this attitude. The new nurses experienced heavier responsibilities than expected, fragmentation of patient care, and stressful interactions with colleagues. The lack of a supportive work environment and role models increased the new nurses' experience of overwhelming responsibility in their daily work situations. The nurses learned to cope the hard way, despite the organizational culture, not because of it. Adjusting the profession's expectations of new nurses, and offering good role models and more comprehensive support programmes, would markedly ease the transition for new nurses.

  19. Contextual barriers to implementation in primary care: an ethnographic study of a programme to improve chronic kidney disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Natalie; Herbert, Georgia; Brewster, Liz

    2016-08-01

    Context is important in implementation-we know that what works in one setting may not work in the same way elsewhere. Primary care has been described as a unique context both in relation to the care delivered and efforts to carry out research and implementation of new evidence. To explore some of the distinctive features of the primary care environment that may influence implementation. We conducted an ethnographic study involving observations, interviews and documentary analysis of the ENABLE-CKD project, which involved general practices implementing a chronic kidney disease care bundle and offering self-management support tools to patients. Analysis was based on the constant comparative method. Four elements of the primary care environment emerged as important influences on the extent to which implementation was successful. First, the nature of delivering care in this setting meant that prioritizing one condition over others was problematic. Second, the lack of alignment with financial and other incentives affected engagement. Third, the project team lacked mechanisms through which engagement could be mandated. Fourth, working relationships within practices impacted on engagement. Those seeking to implement interventions in primary care need to consider the particular context if they are to secure successful implementation. We suggest that there are particular kinds of interventions, which may be best suited to the primary care context. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. "In our community, a friend is a psychologist": An ethnographic study of informal care in two Bhutanese refugee communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Liana; Sapkota, Ram P

    2017-06-01

    The recent rise in suicide among Bhutanese refugees has been linked to the erosion of social networks and community supports in the ongoing resettlement process. This paper presents ethnographic findings on the role of informal care practiced by relatives, friends, and neighbors in the prevention and alleviation of mental distress in two Bhutanese refugee communities: the refugee camps of eastern Nepal and the resettled community of Burlington, Vermont, US. Data gathered through interviews ( n = 40, camp community; n = 22, resettled community), focus groups (four, camp community), and participant observation (both sites) suggest that family members, friends, and neighbors were intimately involved in the recognition and management of individual distress, often responding proactively to perceived vulnerability rather than reactively to help-seeking. They engaged practices of care that attended to the root causes of distress, including pragmatic, social, and spiritual interventions, alongside those which targeted feelings in the "heart-mind" and behavior. In line with other studies, we found that the possibilities for care in this domain had been substantially constrained by resettlement. Initiatives that create opportunities for strengthening or extending social networks or provide direct support in meeting perceived needs may represent fruitful starting points for suicide prevention and mental health promotion in this population. We close by offering some reflections on how to better understand and account for informal care systems in the growing area of research concerned with identifying and addressing disparities in mental health resources across diverse contexts.

  1. When care situations evoke difficult emotions in nursing staff members: an ethnographic study in two Norwegian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvoll, Anne Marie; Grov, Ellen Karine; Kristoffersen, Kjell; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Caring practice in nursing homes is a complex topic, especially the challenges of meeting the basic needs of residents when their behaviour evokes difficult emotions. Cognitive and physical changes related to aging and disability can contribute to behaviours considered to be unacceptable. For example, resident behaviours such as spitting, making a mess with food or grinding teeth are behaviours that most people do not want to see, hear or experience. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of how nursing home staff members deal with such behaviours in care situations. This article draws on ethnographic data to describe how nursing home staff members manage unpleasant resident behaviours. The study was based on two long-term units in two Norwegian public nursing homes. The Region's Medical Ethics Committee and the Norwegian Social Science Data Services granted approval. In total, 45 participants (37 nursing aides and eight nurses) agreed to participate in this study. Ten of the participants were interviewed at the end of the field study. This study indicates that nursing home staff members experience difficult emotions related to some residents' behaviours. However, they found these feelings difficult to express and rarely verbalized them openly. In addition, they were characterized by a strong obligation to help all residents, despite their own feelings. Therefore, it appears that an inner struggle occurs as a part of everyday practice. Despite these difficult emotions, nursing staff members believed that they needed to manage their responses and continued to offer good care to all residents. These findings extend our understanding of this unarticulated part of nursing home practice.

  2. The Profitable Adventure of Threatened Middle-Class Families: An Ethnographic Study on Homeschooling in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Deok-Hee

    2009-01-01

    South Korean society in the late 1990s was confronted with socio-economic setbacks and discursive turbulence concerning the quality of education being provided. It was at such a particular historical juncture of South Korean society that I conducted ethnographic research on homeschooling families. Based on field data collected from four…

  3. Reel Science: An Ethnographic Study of Girls' Science Identity Development In and Through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Rachel L.

    This dissertation study contributes to the research on filmmaking and identity development by exploring the ways that film production provided unique opportunities for a team of four girls to engage in science, to develop identities in science, and to see and understand science differently. Using social practice, identity, and feminist theory and New Literacies Studies as a theoretical lens and grounded theory and multimodality as analytic frameworks, I present findings that suggest that girls in this study authored identities and communicated and represented science in and through film in ways that drew on their social, cultural, and embodied resources and the material resources of the after-school science club. Findings from this study highlight the affordances of filmmaking as a venue for engaging in the disciplinary practices of science and for accessing and authoring identities in science.

  4. Towards a geography of fitness: an ethnographic case study of the gym in British bodybuilding culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Gavin J; Sudwell, Mark I; Sparkes, Andrew C

    2005-02-01

    During recent years, research in health geography has engaged with peoples' health as well as diseases, an interest reflected by therapeutic geographies and geographies of public health. At the same time, studies have focused on micro-contexts such as the body, reflected in geographies of diseased and disadvantaged bodies. However, little research has combined elements of the two approaches and engaged in research on active healthy bodies and fitness. Equally the sub-discipline of sports geography provides little insight into fitness activities because this research has tended to focus on elite sports, their fans and facilities. Given these contexts, a detailed case study is presented to demonstrate the potential for geographical research on fitness. Through an observational study of a specialist gym facility, the study investigates how bodybuilding culture and place are co-produced. Indeed, the gym provides a narrative resource and a crucial setting for individual body projects and collective body culture which involve social conflicts, cohesions and hierarchies, illegal and potentially health harming activities, as well as personal comfort and therapeutic attachments. It is argued that beyond this case study, many activities crosscut health maintenance, or conversely risks to health, and the enjoyment of sports and fitness. A greater emphasis therefore at the sub-disciplinary interface of sports and health geography on hybrid 'fitness geographies' may help researchers towards a more comprehensive understanding, and coverage, of health issues in society.

  5. Learning Cultures and the Conservatoire: An Ethnographically-Informed Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Rosie

    2013-01-01

    Educational institutions, conservatoires remain largely unresearched and, crucially, relatively unchallenged. In particular, research has paid little attention to in-depth studies of culture, so that not enough is known of the cultural practices that characterise and shape a conservatoire education. This article addresses this gap through seeking…

  6. Reel Science: An Ethnographic Study of Girls' Science Identity Development in and through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Rachel L.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation study contributes to the research on filmmaking and identity development by exploring the ways that film production provided unique opportunities for a team of four girls to engage in science, to develop identities in science, and to see and understand science differently. Using social practice, identity, and feminist theory and…

  7. Book Clubs: An Ethnographic Study of an Innovative Reading Practice in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Álvarez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The most innovative reading practices currently rely on the paradigm of dialogic reading. Book clubs, literary gatherings and study circles are emerging in different social spaces to promote reading and literary discussion amongst adults, and libraries, bookshops, cultural centres, etc. are increasingly developing strategies in this direction.…

  8. Instrument-Making as Music-Making: An Ethnographic Study of "Shakuhachi" Students' Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunobu, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Instrument-making is a powerful way to teach and learn music, especially world music. This case study looks at adult music learners whose engagement in music involves instrument-making and the long lasting practice of music. A case in point is Japanese and North American practitioners of Japanese bamboo flutes, especially the end-blown…

  9. An Ethnographic Approach to the Study of Linguistic Varieties Used by Young Latin Americans in Barcelona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Víctor

    2017-01-01

    This chapter explains part of a broader study. To be specific, it is based on the research the author has been conducting in the city of Barcelona from 2005 through to the present day on what it means to "be Latino" in a youth- and school-based context. The work was essentially inspired by the ethnography of communication and the…

  10. Migrating Children, Households, and the Post-Socialist State: An ethnographic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B.C. Huijsmans (Roy)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMaterial Abstract: Against a background of processes of rural change that are on the brink of unfolding in the Lao PDR and triggered by capitalist expansion and agendas of regional integration, the rural population has become increasingly mobile. Studies have shown that it is

  11. Strategie di rifuto in Italiano: uno studio etnografico (Refusal Strategies in Italian: An Ethnographic Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frescura, Marina

    1997-01-01

    After reviewing previous research on speech acts, this article describes a study that analyzed the behavior of speakers of standard Italian in refusing an offer of food. The importance of "face" is explained, and the refusal strategies are classified into four categories: explicit, tactical, decisive, and conclusive. (CFM)

  12. Interprofessional Rhetoric and Operational Realities: An Ethnographic Study of Rounds in Four Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Gropper, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Morning interprofessional rounds (MIRs) are used in critical care medicine to improve team-based care and patient outcomes. Given existing evidence of conflict between and dissatisfaction among rounds participants, this study sought to better understand how the operational realities of care delivery in the intensive care unit (ICU) impact the…

  13. [AN ETHNOGRAPHIC STUDY OF MEDICAL PRACTICES AND KNOWELEDGE IN THE NAHUA CONTEST ( NAUPAN, PUEBLA, MEXICO)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    In the last thirty years, the improvement of biomedical acculturate had influenced the medical tradition of Nauha, in souther-eastern Mexico. The study analyses how the constituent elements of biomedical tradition are incorporated into new rhetorical, diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, mixed with languages and symbols typical of local tradition.

  14. An Ethnographic Study of Stigma and Ageism in Residential Care or Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Debra; Eckert, J. Kevin; Rubinstein, Bob; Keimig, Lynn; Clark, Leanne; Frankowski, Ann Christine; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored aspects of stigmatization for older adults who live in residential care or assisted living (RC-AL) communities and what these settings have done to address stigma. Design and Methods: We used ethnography and other qualitative data-gathering and analytic techniques to gather data from 309 participants (residents, family…

  15. Patients' Experiences After CKD Diagnosis: A Meta-ethnographic Study and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, Emma J; Leydon, Geraldine; Fraser, Simon; Roderick, Paul; Taal, Maarten W; Tonkin-Crine, Sarah

    2017-07-29

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often asymptomatic at first diagnosis, and awareness of CKD is low in the general population. Thus, individuals who are unexpectedly identified as having CKD may struggle to adjust to living with this diagnosis. This study aims to synthesize qualitative research exploring patients' views and experiences of a CKD diagnosis and how they adjust to it. Systematic review and meta-ethnography. Adult patients with CKD stages 1 to 5. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Embase, and Web of Science were searched from the earliest date available to November 2015. Qualitative studies were selected that explored patients' views and experiences of a CKD diagnosis and their adjustment. Meta-ethnography was adopted to synthesize the findings. 10 studies involving 596 patients with CKD from secondary-care settings were included. 7 key themes were identified: a challenging diagnosis, diverse beliefs about causation, anticipated concerns about progression, delaying disease progression, unmet informational needs, psychosocial impact of CKD, and adjustment to life with CKD. Limited to views and experiences of participants in included studies, which were mostly conducted in high-income countries. Studies not written in English were excluded. Transferability of findings to other populations may be limited. This review highlights variation in patients' understanding of CKD, an overall lack of information on the trajectory of CKD, and a need for psychosocial support, especially in later stages, to help patients adjust to living with CKD. Future research that acknowledges CKD as a condition with diverse complicating morbidities and explores how patients' information and psychosocial needs vary according to severity and comorbid conditions would be beneficial. This will support delivery of easily understandable, timely, and targeted information about CKD, as well as practical advice about recommended lifestyle changes. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc

  16. Medical students' opportunities to participate and learn from activities at an internal medicine ward: an ethnographic study.

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    Hägg-Martinell, A; Hult, H; Henriksson, P; Kiessling, A

    2017-02-14

    To optimise medical students' early clerkship is a complex task since it is conducted in a context primarily organised to take care of patients. Previous studies have explored medical students' perceptions of facilitation and hindrance of learning. However, the opportunities for medical student to learn within the culture of acute medicine care have not been fully investigated. This study aimed to explore how medical students approach, interact and socialise in an acute internal medicine ward context, and how spaces for learning are created and used in such a culture. Ethnographic observations were performed of medical students' interactions and learning during early clerkship at an acute internal medicine care ward. Field notes were taken, transcribed and analysed qualitatively. Data analysis was guided by Wenger's theory of communities of practice. 21 medical students and 30 supervisors participated. Two themes were identified: Nervousness and curiosity-students acted nervously and stressed, especially when they could not answer questions. Over time curiosity could evolve. Unexplored opportunities to support students in developing competence to judge and approach more complex patient-related problems were identified. Invited and involved-students were exposed to a huge variation of opportunities to learn, and to interact and to be involved. Short placements seemed to disrupt the learning process. If and how students became involved also depended on supervisors' activities and students' initiatives. This study shed light on how an acute internal medicine ward culture can facilitate medical students' possibilities to participate and learn. Medical students' learning situations were characterised by questions and answers rather than challenging dialogues related to the complexity of presented patient cases. Further, students experienced continuous transfers between learning situations where the potential to be involved differed in a wide variety of ways. Published

  17. Rhetoric or reality? What nurse practitioners do to provide self-management support in outpatient clinics: an ethnographic study.

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    Ter Maten-Speksnijder, Ada J; Dwarswaard, Jolanda; Meurs, Pauline L; van Staa, AnneLoes

    2016-11-01

    To describe how nurse practitioners enact their role in outpatient consultations, and how this compares to their perception of their responsibility for patients with chronic conditions. Nurse practitioners working with patients with chronic conditions seek to support them in self-managing their diseases. An ethnographic study. Episodic participant observations (in total 48 hours) were carried out combined with formal interviews. The study population consisted of a purposive sample of nurse practitioners working in five outpatient clinics related to chronic care in one university medical centre in the Netherlands. Two different types of clinics were selected, namely (1) for patients with episodic flare-ups and (2) for patients with diseases requiring life-saving procedures. The nurse practitioners perceived the monitoring of patients' treatment as their main professional responsibility. Four monitoring strategies could be distinguished: 'assessing health conditions', 'connecting with patients', 'prioritising treatment in daily living' and 'educating patients'. While nurse practitioners considered building a relationship with their patients of utmost importance, their consultations were mostly based on a conventional medical model of medical history taking. Little attention was paid to the social, psychological and behavioural dimensions of illness. Nurse practitioners in this study seemed quite successful in their extension into medical territory, but moving patients' illness perceptions to the background was not conducive to self-management support. By their medical subspecialty expertise, nurse practitioners have a major role in the longitudinal process of the management of chronic diseases' treatment. Supporting patients to reduce the impact of the disease and its complications requires nurse practitioners to develop new coaching strategies designed to meet patients' individual needs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Tensions in learning professional identities - nursing students' narratives and participation in practical skills during their clinical practice: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertsson, Mona; Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta; Allvin, Renée; Blomberg, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Clinical practice is a pivotal part of nursing education. It provides students with the opportunity to put the knowledge and skills they have acquired from lectures into practice with real patients, under the guidance of registered nurses. Clinical experience is also essential for shaping the nursing students' identity as future professional nurses. There is a lack of knowledge and understanding of the ways in which students learn practical skills and apply knowledge within and across different contexts, i.e. how they apply clinical skills, learnt in the laboratory in university settings, in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how nursing students describe, and use, their prior experiences related to practical skills during their clinical practice. An ethnographic case study design was used. Fieldwork included participant observations (82 h), informal conversations, and interviews (n = 7) that were conducted during nursing students' (n = 17) clinical practice at an emergency department at a university hospital in Sweden. The overarching theme identified was "Learning about professional identities with respect to situated power". This encompasses tensions in students' learning when they are socialized into practical skills in the nursing profession. This overarching theme consists of three sub-themes: "Embodied knowledge", "Divergent ways of assessing and evaluating knowledge" and "Balancing approaches". Nursing students do not automatically possess the ability to transfer knowledge from one setting to another; rather, their development is shaped by their experiences and interactions with others when they meet real patients. The study revealed different ways in which students navigated tensions related to power differentials. Reflecting on actions is a prerequisite for developing and learning practical skills and professional identities. This highlights the importance of both educators' and the preceptors' roles for socializing

  19. 'I accept it [staff assistance]; no choice': an ethnographic study of residents' attitudes towards mobility within nursing homes.

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    Taylor, Janice; Sims, Jane; Haines, Terry P

    2014-12-01

    Mobility contributes to the quality of life and independence of residents in nursing homes. To perform resident-centred mobility care, staff need to understand residents' physical capacity and perspectives of care. The aim of the study was to explore residents' perspectives of intrinsic factors influencing their mobility and associations between these factors with a view to informing resident mobility care practice improvements. The study was part of a larger ethnographic project exploring safe resident mobility care in nursing homes. Semi-structured interviews with nursing home residents supplemented by non-participant observations were conducted over a 20-month period from July 2010. Fifteen residents consented to be interviewed in three nursing homes in Melbourne, Australia. Unobtrusive observations of 46 mobility events took place in three nursing homes over 5 months from September, 2011. Participants identified intrinsic factors that influence their mobility including mobility capacity, strategies to cope with mobility loss, motivation and efforts to remain mobile. Three themes related to resident attitudes and responses to mobility loss emerged: acceptance of mobility loss and staff assistance; motivation to remain mobile; and acquiescence and loss of control during mobility events. A conceptual model developed from the study outlined associations between resident attitudes and mobility and quality of life outcomes. Discussion was framed by theories of ageing and adaptation: selection, optimisation and compensation; learned dependency; and learned helplessness. Resident acceptance of mobility loss, and required staff assistance and realistic determination to remain mobile contribute to residents' quality of life. Mobility care based on considerations of resident choice, autonomy and the value of mobility is important. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Reasons for prolonged bottle-feeding and iron deficiency among Mexican-American toddlers: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotanek, Jane M; Schroer, Damon; Valentyn, Lee; Tomany-Korman, Sandy; Flores, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that prolonged bottle-feeding is associated with iron deficiency. Mexican-American toddlers are the racial/ethnic group at greatest risk for prolonged bottle-feeding and iron deficiency, yet no studies have examined reasons for prolonged bottle-feeding in Mexican-American toddlers. The objective of this study was to assess infant feeding beliefs, knowledge, and behaviors among Mexican-American parents. Ethnographic interviews were conducted of parents of Mexican-American toddlers 15 to 48 months old at 3 community sites. A 31-question moderator's guide addressed 4 domains: knowledge and cultural beliefs; sources of nutritional information; anticipatory guidance; and suggestions for ways to change infant feeding practices. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using grounded theory. Thirty-nine parents were interviewed; the mean parental age was 29 years, and mean child age, 2.2 years. Parents cited convenience as a reason for prolonged bottle-feeding, and believed that they should give toddlers as much milk as they want. Many parents lacked essential knowledge regarding infant feeding practices and iron deficiency, including when to stop bottle-feeding, health problems caused by prolonged bottle-feeding, the quantity of milk to give a child >1 year old, and iron deficiency as a complication of prolonged bottle-feeding. Parents reported not receiving enough education from physicians, and they supported educational interventions on healthy infant feeding practices, including refrigerator magnet charts, videos, brochures, and teaching by physicians. Parents of Mexican-American toddlers often are unaware of the adverse consequences of prolonged bottle-feeding and developmental problems associated with iron deficiency. Parents supported educational interventions, including videos, brochures, and refrigerator magnet charts on healthy infant feeding practices.

  1. Physics teaching in a public school: an ethnographic case study with an epistemological bias

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    Neusa T. Massoni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a classroom ethnography. Ethnography in a research strategy that attempts to comprehensively describe a culture, in this case the culture of a physics classroom in the 12th grade of a public high school in Porto Alegre, Brazil. This study is part of a larger scope study designed to investigate the contributions of contemporary views of the nature of science to the improvement of physics teaching. It is in sense that this paper assumes an epistemological perspective. The physics teacher that was observed had conceptions partially aligned to those epistemological views, however, although our initial intention was to search for relationships between her conceptions an her teaching practices we ended up with a detailed interpretative description of the classroom reality that revealed relevant aspects to the comprehension of such a culture and to the teaching and learning process in physics. This interpretative description is what we present here.

  2. An ethnographic study of the social context of migrant health in the United States.

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    Seth M Holmes

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migrant workers in the United States have extremely poor health. This paper aims to identify ways in which the social context of migrant farm workers affects their health and health care. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This qualitative study employs participant observation and interviews on farms and in clinics throughout 15 months of migration with a group of indigenous Triqui Mexicans in the western US and Mexico. Study participants include more than 130 farm workers and 30 clinicians. Data are analyzed utilizing grounded theory, accompanied by theories of structural violence, symbolic violence, and the clinical gaze. The study reveals that farm working and housing conditions are organized according to ethnicity and citizenship. This hierarchy determines health disparities, with undocumented indigenous Mexicans having the worst health. Yet, each group is understood to deserve its place in the hierarchy, migrant farm workers often being blamed for their own sicknesses. CONCLUSIONS: Structural racism and anti-immigrant practices determine the poor working conditions, living conditions, and health of migrant workers. Subtle racism serves to reduce awareness of this social context for all involved, including clinicians. The paper concludes with strategies toward improving migrant health in four areas: health disparities research, clinical interactions with migrant laborers, medical education, and policy making.

  3. An ethnographic study of the social context of migrant health in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Seth M

    2006-10-01

    Migrant workers in the United States have extremely poor health. This paper aims to identify ways in which the social context of migrant farm workers affects their health and health care. This qualitative study employs participant observation and interviews on farms and in clinics throughout 15 months of migration with a group of indigenous Triqui Mexicans in the western US and Mexico. Study participants include more than 130 farm workers and 30 clinicians. Data are analyzed utilizing grounded theory, accompanied by theories of structural violence, symbolic violence, and the clinical gaze. The study reveals that farm working and housing conditions are organized according to ethnicity and citizenship. This hierarchy determines health disparities, with undocumented indigenous Mexicans having the worst health. Yet, each group is understood to deserve its place in the hierarchy, migrant farm workers often being blamed for their own sicknesses. Structural racism and anti-immigrant practices determine the poor working conditions, living conditions, and health of migrant workers. Subtle racism serves to reduce awareness of this social context for all involved, including clinicians. The paper concludes with strategies toward improving migrant health in four areas: health disparities research, clinical interactions with migrant laborers, medical education, and policy making.

  4. Improving Quality and Safety of Care Using “Technovigilance”: An Ethnographic Case Study of Secondary Use of Data from an Electronic Prescribing and Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Woods, Mary; Redwood, Sabi; Leslie, Myles; Minion, Joel; Martin, Graham P; Coleman, Jamie J

    2013-01-01

    Context “Meaningful use” of electronic health records to improve quality of care has remained understudied. We evaluated an approach to improving patients’ safety and quality of care involving the secondary use of data from a hospital electronic prescribing and decision support system (ePDSS). Methods We conducted a case study of a large English acute care hospital with a well-established ePDSS. Our study was based on ethnographic observations of clinical settings (162 hours) and meetings (28 hours), informal conversations with clinical staff, semistructured interviews with ten senior executives, and the collection of relevant documents. Our data analysis was based on the constant comparative method. Findings This hospital's approach to quality and safety could be characterized as “technovigilance.” It involved treating the ePDSS as a warehouse of data on clinical activity and performance. The hospital converted the secondary data into intelligence about the performance of individuals, teams, and clinical services and used this as the basis of action for improvement. Through a combination of rapid audit, feedback to clinical teams, detailed and critical review of apparent omissions in executive-led meetings, a focus on personal professional responsibility for patients’ safety and quality care, and the correction of organizational or systems defects, technovigilance was—based on the hospital's own evidence—highly effective in improving specific indicators. Measures such as the rate of omitted doses of medication showed marked improvement. As do most interventions, however, technovigilance also had unintended consequences. These included the risk of focusing attention on aspects of patient safety made visible by the system at the expense of other, less measurable but nonetheless important, concerns. Conclusions The secondary use of electronic data can be effective for improving specific indicators of care if accompanied by a range of interventions to

  5. STUDENTS’ LEARNING STYLES: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC CASE STUDY AT UIN WALISONGO SEMARANG

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    Muhammad Nafi Annury

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed to know what kinds of learning preferences are students intended most? And how many types of learners’ characteristics appear in ELT classrooms? This research was conducted through qualitative approach. This means that the data are collected not in the form of numbers, the data are taken from questionnaires, documentation, and observation. The results of this study are as follows: students of ELT program at UIN Walisongo Semarang tend to study by various kind of learning. It can be proved that First, regarding to the description of 2A class which has 11.2% visual students, 16.02% of audio-lingual, 5% kinaesthetic and 14.11% are others, would use multimedia which is available in the classroom. Whereas, the description of 2B class has shown that 13% students are visual learners, 11% audio-lingual learners, 6.72% kinaesthetic and 13,72% are others. Last but not least, there are 12% visual learners, 11.17% audio-lingual, 7.25 kinaesthetic and the rest 14% others. Furthermore, there are four characteristics which appear from the research, they are as follows: visual learners, auditory learners, kinaesthetic learners, and other characteristics.

  6. 'Keeping your body and mind active': an ethnographic study of aspirations for healthy ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guell, Cornelia; Shefer, Guy; Griffin, Simon; Ogilvie, David

    2016-01-07

    To describe and explore perceptions, practices and motivations for active living in later life. Qualitative study with semistructured interviews and 'semistructured' participant observations of participant-selected activities, such as exercise classes, private or organised walks, shopping and gardening. 27 participants (65-80 years) from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer Norfolk study, purposefully selected by gender, age, occupational class, living status and residential location; 19 of the participants agreed to be accompanied for observed activities. Participants' homes, neighbourhoods, places of leisure activities and workplaces in Norfolk, England. All participants regarded a positive attitude as important for healthy ageing; this included staying active, both physically and mentally through sedentary activities such as reading and crosswords. 'Getting out of the house', being busy, or following a variety of interests were regarded as both important motivators and descriptions of their 'activeness'. Purposeful activities formed an important part of this, for example, still being engaged in paid or voluntary work, having caring responsibilities, or smaller incidental activities such as helping neighbours or walking for transport. Many also reported adapting previous, often lifelong, activity preferences and habits to their ageing body, or replacing them altogether with lower impact activities such as walking. This included adapting to the physical limitations of partners and friends which dictated the intensity and frequency of shared activities. The social context of activities could thus form a barrier to active living, but could also encourage it through companionship, social responsibilities and social pressures. Promoting and maintaining physical activity among older people may require more attention to activeness as an attitude and way of life as well as to its social context, and initiatives encouraging broader activity habits rather

  7. TB perspectives among a sample of Mexicans in the United States: results from an ethnographic study.

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    Joseph, Heather A; Waldman, K; Rawls, C; Wilce, M; Shrestha-Kuwahara, R

    2008-04-01

    A study was conducted to describe the sociocultural aspects of tuberculosis (TB) among Mexicans in the U.S. and to provide TB programs with practical recommendations for serving this population. In-depth, structured, open-ended interviews were conducted with 50 persons from Mexico living in the U.S. Local bilingual, bicultural researchers conducted the interviews with respondents recruited from TB clinics and surrounding communities. Both qualitative and quantitative strategies were used to analyze the data. We found diverse TB perceptions and attitudes, but few were associated with specific participant characteristics. We detected widespread misperceptions about TB transmission and low perceptions of risk. Anticipated TB stigma among those with no history of disease was qualitatively greater than reported stigma among those who had TB disease. We also detected missed opportunities for TB education. Reported barriers to care included lack of transportation, limited clinic hours, cost of services, inconvenient clinic location, and communication problems with staff. To address the diverse needs of Mexican-born clients, we recommend that TB programs provide culturally-appropriate, patient-centered care. We suggest several strategies aimed at raising risk awareness and reducing stigma. Finally, we encourage programs to facilitate access by providing language-appropriate services, extending clinic hours, and facilitating transportation.

  8. Reciprocal peer review for quality improvement: an ethnographic case study of the Improving Lung Cancer Outcomes Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveling, Emma-Louise; Martin, Graham; Jiménez García, Senai; Martin, Lisa; Herbert, Georgia; Armstrong, Natalie; Dixon-Woods, Mary; Woolhouse, Ian

    2012-12-01

    Peer review offers a promising way of promoting improvement in health systems, but the optimal model is not yet clear. We aimed to describe a specific peer review model-reciprocal peer-to-peer review (RP2PR)-to identify the features that appeared to support optimal functioning. We conducted an ethnographic study involving observations, interviews and documentary analysis of the Improving Lung Cancer Outcomes Project, which involved 30 paired multidisciplinary lung cancer teams participating in facilitated reciprocal site visits. Analysis was based on the constant comparative method. Fundamental features of the model include multidisciplinary participation, a focus on discussion and observation of teams in action, rather than paperwork; facilitated reflection and discussion on data and observations; support to develop focused improvement plans. Five key features were identified as important in optimising this model: peers and pairing methods; minimising logistic burden; structure of visits; independent facilitation; and credibility of the process. Facilitated RP2PR was generally a positive experience for participants, but implementing improvement plans was challenging and required substantial support. RP2PR appears to be optimised when it is well organised; a safe environment for learning is created; credibility is maximised; implementation and impact are supported. RP2PR is seen as credible and legitimate by lung cancer teams and can act as a powerful stimulus to produce focused quality improvement plans and to support implementation. Our findings have identified how RP2PR functioned and may be optimised to provide a constructive, open space for identifying opportunities for improvement and solutions.

  9. Do organisational constraints explain the use of restraint? A comparative ethnographic study from three nursing homes in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øye, Christine; Jacobsen, Frode Fadnes; Mekki, Tone Elin

    2017-07-01

    To investigate (1) what kind of restraint is used in three nursing homes in Norway and (2) how staff use restraint under what organisational conditions. Restraint use in residents living with dementia in nursing homes is controversial, and at odds with fundamental human rights. Restraint is a matter of hindering residents' free movement and will by applying either interactional, physical, medical, surveillance or environmental restraint. Previous research has identified use of restraint related to individual resident characteristics such as agitation, aggressiveness and wandering. This model is embedded in an overall mixed-method education intervention design study called Modelling and evaluating evidence-based continuing education program in dementia care (MEDCED), applying ethnography postintervention to examine the use of restraint in 24 nursing homes in Norway. Based on restraint diversity measured in the trial, ethnographic investigation was carried out in three different nursing homes in Norway over a 10-month period to examine restraint use in relation to organisational constraints. Several forms of restraint were observed; among them, interactional restraint was used most frequently. We identified that use of restraint relates to the characteristics of individual residents, such as agitation, aggressiveness and wandering. However, restraint use should also be explained in relation to organisational conditions such as resident mix, staff culture and available human resources. A fluctuating and dynamic interplay between different individual and contextual factors determines whether restraint is used - or not in particular situations with residents living with dementia. Educational initiatives targeting staff to reduce restraint must be sensitive towards fluctuating organisational constraints. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Making sense of frailty: An ethnographic study of the experience of older people living with complex health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilbeck, Julie Kathryn; Arthur, Antony; Seymour, Jane

    2017-10-09

    To explore how older people with complex health problems experience frailty in their daily lives. A better understanding of the personal experience of frailty in the context of fluctuating ill-health has the potential to contribute to the development of personalised approaches to care planning and delivery. An ethnographic study of older people, living at home, receiving support from a community matron service in a large city in the North of England. Up to six care encounters with each of ten older people, and their community matron, were observed at monthly intervals, over a period of time ranging from 4 to 11 months. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the older participants in their own homes. Fieldwork took place over a 4-year period. Data analysis was undertaken using the constant comparative method. The experience of frailty was understood through the construction of four themes: Fluctuating ill-health and the disruption of daily living; Changes to the management of daily living; Frailty as fear, anxiety and uncertainty; Making sense of changes to health and daily living. Older people work hard to shape and maintain daily routines in the context of complicated and enduring transitions in health and illness. However, they experience episodic moments of frailty, often articulated as uncertainty, where daily living becomes precarious and their resilience is threatened. Developing an understanding of the personal experiences of frail older people in the context of transition has the potential to inform nursing practice in person-centred care . Nurses need to support frail older people to maintain independence and continuity of personhood in the context of daily routines. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Older People Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A focused ethnographic study of Alberta cattle veterinarians' decision making about diagnostic laboratory submissions and perceptions of surveillance programs.

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    Kate Sawford

    Full Text Available The animal and public health communities need to address the challenge posed by zoonotic emerging infectious diseases. To minimize the impacts of future events, animal disease surveillance will need to enable prompt event detection and response. Diagnostic laboratory-based surveillance systems targeting domestic animals depend in large part on private veterinarians to submit samples from cases to a laboratory. In contexts where pre-diagnostic laboratory surveillance systems have been implemented, this group of veterinarians is often asked to input data. This scenario holds true in Alberta where private cattle veterinarians have been asked to participate in the Alberta Veterinary Surveillance Network-Veterinary Practice Surveillance, a platform to which pre-diagnostic disease and non-disease case data are submitted. Consequently, understanding the factors that influence these veterinarians to submit cases to a laboratory and the complex of factors that affect their participation in surveillance programs is foundational to interpreting disease patterns reported by laboratories and engaging veterinarians in surveillance. A focused ethnographic study was conducted with ten cattle veterinarians in Alberta. Individual in-depth interviews with participants were recorded and transcribed to enable thematic analysis. Laboratory submissions were biased toward outbreaks of unknown cause, cases with unusual mortality rates, and issues with potential herd-level implications. Decreasing cattle value and government support for laboratory testing have contributed to fewer submissions over time. Participants were willing participants in surveillance, though government support and collaboration were necessary. Changes in the beef industry and veterinary profession, as well as cattle producers themselves, present both challenges and opportunities in surveillance.

  12. Imagining Independence: An Ethnographic Study of Values and Actions in Scottish Nationalism and the Scottish Independence Movement

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    Berg, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Based on an 8-month ethnographic fieldwork in Edinburgh, this thesis explores the relationship between ideas, values, actions and social practices in the Scottish independence movement, as a component part of Scottish nationalism. The recent proliferation and rejuvenation of Scottish nationalism has contributed to an emergence of a public discourse on Scottish sovereignty which manifested most tangibly in the referendum on Scottish independence in September 2014, but also greatly aff...

  13. An interactional ethnographic study of the construction of literate practices of science and writing in a university science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Nuno Afonso De Freitas Lopes De

    An interactional ethnographic study informed by a sociocultural perspective was conducted to examine how a professor and students discursively and interactionally shaped the basis for engaging in the work of a community of geologists. Specifically, the study examined the role the Question of the Day, an interactive writing activity in the lecture, in affording students opportunities for learning the literate practices of science and how to incorporate them in thinking critically. A writing-intensive, introductory oceanography course given in the Geological Sciences Department was chosen because the professor designed it to emphasize writing in the discipline and science literacy within a science inquiry framework. The study was conducted in two phases: a pilot in 2002 and the current study in the Spring Quarter of 2003. Grounded in the view that members in a classroom construct a culture, this study explored the daily construction of the literate practices of science and writing. This view of classrooms was informed by four bodies of research: interactional ethnography, sociolinguistics sociology of science and Writing In the Disciplines. Through participant observation, data were collected in the lecture and laboratory settings in the form of field notes, video, interviews, and artifacts to explore issues of science literacy in discourse, social action, and writing. Examination of participation in the Question of the Day interactive writing activity revealed that it played a key role in initiating and supporting a view of science and inquiry. As the activity permitted collaboration, it encouraged students to engage in the social process to critically explore a discourse of science and key practices with and through their writing. In daily interaction, participants were shown to take up social positions as scientist and engage in science inquiry to explore theory, examine data, and articulately reformulate knowledge in making oral and written scientific arguments

  14. Perceptions and experiences of using a nipple shield among parents and staff - an ethnographic study in neonatal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flacking, Renée; Dykes, Fiona

    2017-01-03

    Preterm infants have an immature sucking behavior and the capacity to be exclusively breastfed may be reduced for a period of weeks or months, depending on gestational age. Nipple shields have been used, not only as a device to help mothers with sore nipples, but also to facilitate the infant's latch on to the breast. However, the benefits of using nipple shields have been debated. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions and experiences of using a nipple shield among parents and staff in neonatal units in Sweden and England. An ethnographic study was undertaken where observations and interviews were conducted in four neonatal units in Sweden and England. The data were analyzed using a thematic networks analysis. The global theme was developed and named, 'Nipple shield in a liminal time'. This comprised of two organizing themes: 'Relational breastfeeding' and 'Progression'. 'Relational breastfeeding' was underpinned by the basic themes, 'good enough breast', 'something in between' and 'tranquil moment'. 'Progression' was underpinned by the basic themes, 'learning quicker', 'short-term solution' and 'rescue remedy'. Although breastfeeding was seen primarily as a nutritive transaction, the relational aspects of breastfeeding were of crucial importance. These two organizing themes show the tension between acknowledging the relational aspects of breastfeeding and yet facilitating or supporting the progression of breastfeeding in the period from tube feeding or cup feeding to breastfeeding. It is a liminal time as mothers and their infants are "in between" phases and the outcome, in terms of breastfeeding, is yet to be realized. This study demonstrates parents' and staffs' perceptions of the nipple shield as a short term solution to help initiation of breastfeeding but also as a barrier between the mother and infant. It is important that the mother and baby's own particular needs are taken into account, in a person-centred way and on an ongoing basis

  15. What are the roles and valued attributes of a Trial Steering Committee? Ethnographic study of eight clinical trials facing challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daykin, Anne; Selman, Lucy E; Cramer, Helen; McCann, Sharon; Shorter, Gillian W; Sydes, Matthew R; Gamble, Carrol; Macefield, Rhiannon; Lane, J Athene; Shaw, Alison

    2016-07-01

    Clinical trials oversight by a Trial Steering Committee (TSC) is mandated by Good Clinical Practice. This study used qualitative methods to explore the role and valued attributes of the TSC to inform planned updates of Medical Research Council guidance and TSC terms of reference. An ethnographic study was conducted during 2013-2014. TSC and Trial Management Group meetings from eight trials were observed and audio-recorded, and semi-structured interviews conducted with purposively sampled key informants: independent and non-independent TSC members, trial sponsor representatives, funder representatives and chief investigators. The selected trials were currently recruiting and dealing with challenging scenarios. Data were analysed thematically and findings triangulated and integrated to give a multi-perspective account of the role and valued attributes of a TSC. Eight TSC meetings and six Trial Management Group meetings were observed. Sixty-five interviews were conducted with 51 informants. The two main roles played by the TSC were quality assurance and patient advocacy. Quality assurance involved being a 'critical friend' or a provider of 'tough love'. Factors influencing the ability of the TSC to fulfil this role included the TSC Chair, other independent TSC members and the model of the TSC and its fit with the trial subject. The role of the TSC as an advocate for patient well-being was perceived as paramount. Two attributes of TSC members emerged as critical: experience (of running a trial, trial oversight or in a clinical/methodological area) and independence. While independence was valued for giving impartiality, the lack of consensus about its definition and strict requirements of some funders made it difficult to operationalise. We found tensions and ambiguities in the roles expected of TSCs and the attributes valued of TSC members. In particular, the requirements of independence and experience could conflict, impacting the TSCs' quality assurance role

  16. An Ethnographic Observational Study to Evaluate and Optimize the Use of Respiratory Acoustic Monitoring in Children Receiving Postoperative Opioid Infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görges, Matthias; West, Nicholas C; Christopher, Nancy A; Koch, Jennifer L; Brodie, Sonia M; Lowlaavar, Nasim; Lauder, Gillian R; Ansermino, J Mark

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory depression in children receiving postoperative opioid infusions is a significant risk because of the interindividual variability in analgesic requirement. Detection of respiratory depression (or apnea) in these children may be improved with the introduction of automated acoustic respiratory rate (RR) monitoring. However, early detection of adverse events must be balanced with the risk of alarm fatigue. Our objective was to evaluate the use of acoustic RR monitoring in children receiving opioid infusions on a postsurgical ward and identify the causes of false alarm and optimal alarm thresholds. A video ethnographic study was performed using an observational, mixed methods approach. After surgery, an acoustic RR sensor was placed on the participant's neck and attached to a Rad87 monitor. The monitor was networked with paging for alarms. Vital signs data and paging notification logs were obtained from the central monitoring system. Webcam videos of the participant, infusion pump, and Rad87 monitor were recorded, stored on a secure server, and subsequently analyzed by 2 research nurses to identify the cause of the alarm, response, and effectiveness. Alarms occurring within a 90-second window were grouped into a single-alarm response opportunity. Data from 49 patients (30 females) with median age 14 (range, 4.4-18.8) years were analyzed. The 896 bedside vital sign threshold alarms resulted in 160 alarm response opportunities (44 low RR, 74 high RR, and 42 low SpO2). In 141 periods (88% of total), for which video was available, 65% of alarms were deemed effective (followed by an alarm-related action within 10 minutes). Nurses were the sole responders in 55% of effective alarms and the patient or parent in 20%. Episodes of desaturation (SpO2 10 bpm in 6 of 9 patients. Based on all RR samples observed, the default alarm thresholds, to serve as a starting point for each patient, would be a low RR of 6 (>10 years of age) and 10 (4-9 years of age). In this study

  17. An ethnographic study of Latino preschool children's oral health in rural California: Intersections among family, community, provider and regulatory sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horton Sarah B

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Latino children experience a higher prevalence of caries than do children in any other racial/ethnic group in the US. This paper examines the intersections among four societal sectors or contexts of care which contribute to oral health disparities for low-income, preschool Latino1 children in rural California. Methods Findings are reported from an ethnographic investigation, conducted in 2005–2006, of family, community, professional/dental and policy/regulatory sectors or contexts of care that play central roles in creating or sustaining low income, rural children's poor oral health status. The study community of around 9,000 people, predominantly of Mexican-American origin, was located in California's agricultural Central Valley. Observations in homes, community facilities, and dental offices within the region were supplemented by in-depth interviews with 30 key informants (such as dental professionals, health educators, child welfare agents, clinic administrators and regulatory agents and 47 primary caregivers (mothers of children at least one of whom was under 6 years of age. Results Caregivers did not always recognize visible signs of caries among their children, nor respond quickly unless children also complained of pain. Fluctuating seasonal eligibility for public health insurance intersected with limited community infrastructure and civic amenities, including lack of public transportation, to create difficulties in access to care. The non-fluoridated municipal water supply is not widely consumed because of fears about pesticide pollution. If the dentist brought children into the clinic for multiple visits, this caused the accompanying parent hardship and occasionally resulted in the loss of his or her job. Few general dentists had received specific training in how to handle young patients. Children's dental fear and poor provider-parent communication were exacerbated by a scarcity of dentists willing to serve rural

  18. The Meaning of Social Participation for Daily Mobility in Later Life: an Ethnographic Case Study of a Senior Project in a Swedish Urban Neighbourhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjernborg, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an ethnographic case study that aims to understand the meaning of social participation in a neighbourhood for daily mobility in later life. In the study, the mobility of the participants of a senior-citizen project was monitored over 18 months. The project was founded as a result of a municipal district's targeting of social sustainability. The results show that social participation had positive effects on the daily mobility of the participants. The implementation of broad-minded thinking from the municipality and the cooperation of various municipal actors were shown to be essential for the positive outcome of this project.

  19. Ecopsychosocial Aspects of Human-Tiger Conflict: An Ethnographic Study of Tiger Widows of Sundarban Delta, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Arabinda N; Mondal, Ranajit; Brahma, Arabinda; Biswas, Mrinal K

    2016-01-01

    Human-tiger conflict (HTC) is a serious public health issue in Sundarban Reserve Forest, India. HTC is a continued concern for the significant mortality and morbidity of both human and tiger population. This is the first comprehensive report on Sundarban tiger-human conflicts and its impact on widows whose husbands were killed by tigers. The study attempts to explore the situation analysis of HTC and the aftermath of the incident including bereavement and coping, the cultural stigma related to being killed by a tiger and the consequent discrimination, deprivation, and social rejection, and the impact on the mental health of the tiger-widows. This is a three-phase ethnographic research with a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. In the first phase, a door-to-door village survey (3,084 households) was carried out in two villages of Sundarban, which are adjacent to the Reserve Forest, in which the incidents of human-animal conflicts and the 65 tiger-widows identified were documented. In the second phase, the 65 tiger-widows were studied to explore the ecodemography of tiger attacks and tiger-widows alongside the stigma issue by using a stigma questionnaire (n = 49). The stigma burden was compared with normal widows (n = 21) and snake-bite widows (n = 18). In the third phase, the psychosocial and cultural dimensions related to tiger attacks were studied by using in-depth interviews (IDI) of the tiger-widows, focus-group discussions (FGD), and participatory mapping in the community. Clinical examinations of the mental health of the widows were also carried out in this phase. The mean age of the 65 widows was 43.49 ± 9.58 years. Of this, 12.3% of the widows had remarried and only 4.6% of the widows were literate. In all, 67.2% of all tiger attacks occurred as a result of illegal forest entry. The main livelihood of the former husbands of the widows were 43.8% wood cutting, 28.1% fishing, 10.9% crab catching, 9.4% tiger prawn seed (juvenile prawn), and 4.7% honey

  20. Rapid Capability Fielding Toolbox Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    skipped  or  attenuated, depending on the specific effort) are as follows:   The  process  is  initiated  with  the  identification  and  careful ...O.L., “Modeling Methods and Conceptual Design Principles for Reconfigurable Systems”,  Journal  of Mechanical Design, 139, 101102, October 2008.  15...Motorola  Dennis Roberson is Vice Provost and Executive Director of the Institute of Business and  Interprofessional   Studies, as well as Acting

  1. Macrocognition in the Healthcare Built Environment (mHCBE): A Focused Ethnographic Study of "Neighborhoods" in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Susan; Klar, Robin Toft; Patterson, Emily S; Morris, Nancy; Ascenzi, Judy; Fackler, James C; Perry, Donna J

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to describe the interactions (formal and informal), in which macrocognitive functions occur and their location on a pediatric intensive care unit, to describe challenges and facilitators of macrocognition using space syntax constructs (openness, connectivity, and visibility), and to analyze the healthcare built environment (HCBE) using those constructs to explicate influences on macrocognition. In high reliability, complex industries, macrocognition is an approach to develop new knowledge among interprofessional team members. Although macrocognitive functions have been analyzed in multiple healthcare settings, the effect of the HCBE on those functions has not been directly studied. The theoretical framework, "macrocognition in the healthcare built environment" (mHCBE) addresses this relationship. A focused ethnographic study was conducted including observation and focus groups. Architectural drawing files used to create distance matrices and isovist field view analyses were compared to panoramic photographs and ethnographic data. Neighborhoods comprised of corner configurations with maximized visibility enhanced team interactions as well as observation of patients, offering the greatest opportunity for informal situated macrocognitive interactions (SMIs). Results from this study support the intricate link between macrocognitive interactions and space syntax constructs within the HCBE. These findings help increase understanding of how macrocognition in the HCBE can improve physical space by designing new spaces, refining existing spaces, or adapting interprofessional team practices to maximize formal and informal SMI opportunities to improve safety and quality for interprofessional teams, patient, and family care.

  2. Ethnographic nexus analysis in clinical nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/aim(s): Internationally, student nurses' attrition after clinical practice is an increasing problem (Hamshire, Willgoss, & Wibberley, 2012; Pilegård Jensen, 2006). A better understanding of 'becoming a nurse' as situated practice in the hospital wards might help avoid pitfalls...... be improved after insights obtained through ethnographic research. Methods: Using nexus analysis (Scollon & Scollon, 2004, 2007) as an ethnographic framework in four Danish hospital wards, a study of the development of a professional identity among student nurses in Denmark was conducted. Scollon and Scollon...... in the clinical practice. Thus a thorough insight into the field is necessary in order to change it. The purpose of this paper is to show and discuss how it is possible methodologically to do ethnographic research in clinical education and how the field of clinical nursing education in the hospital wards might...

  3. Ecopsychosocial Aspects of Human–Tiger Conflict: An Ethnographic Study of Tiger Widows of Sundarban Delta, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Arabinda N.; Mondal, Ranajit; Brahma, Arabinda; Biswas, Mrinal K.

    2016-01-01

    AIMS Human–tiger conflict (HTC) is a serious public health issue in Sundarban Reserve Forest, India. HTC is a continued concern for the significant mortality and morbidity of both human and tiger population. This is the first comprehensive report on Sundarban tiger–human conflicts and its impact on widows whose husbands were killed by tigers. The study attempts to explore the situation analysis of HTC and the aftermath of the incident including bereavement and coping, the cultural stigma related to being killed by a tiger and the consequent discrimination, deprivation, and social rejection, and the impact on the mental health of the tiger-widows. METHODS This is a three-phase ethnographic research with a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. In the first phase, a door-to-door village survey (3,084 households) was carried out in two villages of Sundarban, which are adjacent to the Reserve Forest, in which the incidents of human–animal conflicts and the 65 tiger-widows identified were documented. In the second phase, the 65 tiger-widows were studied to explore the ecodemography of tiger attacks and tiger-widows alongside the stigma issue by using a stigma questionnaire (n = 49). The stigma burden was compared with normal widows (n = 21) and snake-bite widows (n = 18). In the third phase, the psychosocial and cultural dimensions related to tiger attacks were studied by using in-depth interviews (IDI) of the tiger-widows, focus-group discussions (FGD), and participatory mapping in the community. Clinical examinations of the mental health of the widows were also carried out in this phase. RESULTS The mean age of the 65 widows was 43.49 ± 9.58 years. Of this, 12.3% of the widows had remarried and only 4.6% of the widows were literate. In all, 67.2% of all tiger attacks occurred as a result of illegal forest entry. The main livelihood of the former husbands of the widows were 43.8% wood cutting, 28.1% fishing, 10.9% crab catching, 9.4% tiger prawn seed

  4. Analyzing Ethnographic Data--Strategies and Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter-Gehrie, Cynthia; Crowson, Robert L.

    Using ethnographic data, this study explores the behavior of urban principals at work. The event analysis summary (appended) was based on Mintzberg's classification of on-the-job characteristics and role behavior and then modified to reflect the data obtained. "Key incidents" rather than case studies serve as the basis for organizing descriptive…

  5. From the teachers' eyes: An ethnographic-case study on developing models of Informal Formative Assessments (IFA) and understanding the challenges to effective implementation in science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezen, Asli

    The emphasis on socio-cultural theories of learning has required the understanding of multi-dimensional, dynamic and social nature of acquiring the scientific knowledge and practices. Recent policy documents suggest a focus on formative and dynamic assessment practices that will help understand and improve the complex nature of scientific learning in classrooms. This study focuses on teachers' use of "Informal Formative Assessments (IFA)" aimed at improving students' learning and teachers' frequent recognition of students' learning process. The study was designed as an ethnographic case study of four middle school teachers and their students at a local charter school. The data of the study included (a) teachers' responses to history of teaching questionnaire (b) video and audio records of teachers' assessment practices during two different scientific projects (c) video and audio records of ethnographic interviews with teachers during their reflections on their practices, and (d) field notes taken by the researcher to understand the assessment culture of the school. The analytical tools from sociolinguistics (e.g., transcripts and event maps) were prepared and discourse analysis based in an ethnographic perspective was used to analyze the data. Moreover, Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) was also introduced as an alternative data analysis framework for understanding the role of division of labor among the elements of the community on the challenges and the outcomes of IFA practices. The findings from the analysis of the classroom discourse showed three different types of IFA cycles: connected, non-connected, and repeating. The analysis of the teachers' reflections showed that the effectiveness of these cycles did not only depend on whether the cycles were connected, but also on other variables such as the phase of the lessons and student's identities and abilities. Teachers' reflections during researcher-teacher meetings on the concept and the aims of IFA

  6. Vaginal Delivery vs. Cesarean Section: A Focused Ethnographic Study of Women's Perceptions in The North of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakerihamidi, Maryam; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Merghati Khoei, Effat

    2015-01-01

    Cesarean section (C-section) in the North of Iran accounts for 70% of childbirths, which is higher than the national average of 55%. Understanding women's perceptions towards modes of delivery in different cultures can pave the way for promoting programs and policies in support of vaginal delivery. We aimed to investigate women's perceptions towards modes of delivery in the North of Iran. Using a focused ethnographic approach and purposive sampling, 12 pregnant women, 10 women with childbirth experience, nine non-pregnant women, seven midwives, and seven gynecologists were selected from hospitals, healthcare centers, and clinics of Tonekabon and Chaloos, Mazandaran, Iran, during 2012-2014. Data were collected through in-depth interviews and participant observation. Data analysis was performed using thematic analysis using MAXqda software. Two major themes emerged from the data including: "vaginal delivery, a facilitator of women's physical and mental health promotion", and "C-section, a surgical intervention associated with decreased labor pain". Six sub-themes subsumed within these major themes were: vaginal delivery as a safe mode of delivery, fullfilment of maternal instinct, a natural process with a pleasant ending, and C-section as a procedure associated with future complications, a surgical intervention and sometimes a life saving procedure, and a painless mode of delivery. In the North of Iran, women's justified cultural beliefs overshadow their micsconceptions, so it is hopped that through implementing appropriate training programs for raising awarness and correcting miscomceptions, vaginal delivery could be promoted even in regions with high rates of cesarean section.

  7. Ethnographic Case Study of a Community Day Center for Asylum Seekers as Early Stage Mental Health Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Liana E; Rousseau, Cécile

    2017-06-15

    Clinical guidelines in refugee mental health increasingly advocate phased approaches to intervention that foreground the provision of pragmatic and social support in contexts of ongoing instability. However, the impact of such interventions has rarely been explored from the perspective of refugees themselves. We conducted ethnographic research on the experiences and perceptions of users of an intervention embodying this approach: a community Day Center for asylum seekers in Montreal. Data comprising 15 interviews and field notes from 50 participant observation visits were analyzed using an established theoretical framework to identify mechanisms supporting self-perceived wellbeing among users in the domains of safety, social networks, justice, identity/roles, and existential meaning. Results shed light on how this nonspecific buffering intervention responds to the threats and pressures asylum seekers themselves identify as most salient in the immediate postflight context. These findings are discussed in relation to emerging theoretical frameworks in refugee mental health that emphasize agency, justice, and the role of local ecologies. We conclude that the Day Center shows significant promise as an innovative early stage mental health intervention for precarious status migrants and merits further research and evaluation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. The experience of the illness and of the treatment for the person with systemic arterial hypertension: an ethnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Maria Coelho Leite Fava

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to interpret the meanings of the experience of the condition and of the treatment among people with arterial hypertension. METHOD: the authors adopted the frames of reference of interpretive and medical anthropology and of the ethnographic method. 22 people with arterial hypertension, and 10 Family Health Strategy health workers, all from Minas Gerais, participated. The authors used interviews, participant observation, focus groups, field diaries and analysis of medical records. Ethical precepts were respected. RESULTS: two nuclei of meaning emerged: "The condition as an expression of way of living", and "The perspective of the cure of the condition". Nervous problems represent the nosological and symptomatic categories, caused by the urban way of living. The participants are supported by the belief of the curing of the problem. The family, spirituality and religion constitute social support networks. The therapeutic routes interpenetrate for the cure of the problem. The 'folk' health subsystem constitutes an important route because it provides better well-being and remission of the symptoms. CONCLUSION: the gaps evidenced between the points of view of the health professionals and the interviewees allow one to re-think the praxis so as to provide comprehensive, contextualized and humanized care, which encourages the people's potential for living, for empowerment, and for self-care.

  9. Exploring Unprotected Anal Intercourse among Newly Diagnosed HIV Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men in China: An Ethnographic Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haochu Li

    Full Text Available Unprotected anal intercourse (UAI is a major pathway towards secondary HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM. We explored the socio-cultural environment and individual beliefs and experiences conducive to UAI in the context of Southern China.We employed an ethnographic approach utilizing a socio-ecological framework to conduct repeated in-depth interviews with thirty one newly diagnosed HIV positive MSM as well as participant observations in Shenzhen based healthcare settings, MSM venues and NGO offices.Some men (6/31 reported continuing to practice UAI after an initial diagnosis of being HIV positive. For MSM who had existing lovers or stable partners, the fear of losing partners in a context of non-serostatus disclosure was testified to be a major concern. MSM with casual partners reported that anonymous sexual encounters and moral judgments played a significant role in their sexual risk behaviors. Simultaneously, self-reported negative emotional and psychological status, perception and idiosyncratic risk interpretation, as well as substance abuse informed the intrapersonal context for UAI.UAI among these HIV positive MSM was embedded in an intrapersonal context, related to partner type, shaped by anonymous sexual encounters, psychological status, and moral judgments. It is important that prevention and intervention for secondary HIV transmission among newly diagnosed HIV positive MSM in China take into account these contextual factors.

  10. Ethnographic Video as Design Specs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Fraser, Euan; Oinonen, Soila

    2010-01-01

    Ethnographic video is used extensively in some industrial corporations to document field studies and to convey an understanding of what is 'out there' to HCI designers and developers of new technologies. The basic assumption is that ethnography through questioning the prevailing conceptions...... and recommendations is surely ideal and appropriate in many cases, there are situations, in which a bolder engagement is called for to ensure an impact on the development process. In this paper we explore how video can function to initiate 'requirement specs' discussions rather than just as inspiration or field data....... We investigate how video specs can support an engineering development process, and help set clear limitations for which solutions might work, and which might not, while retaining some of the richness of the field studies....

  11. An Ethnographic Descriptive Approach to Video Microanalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2007-01-01

    In the ethnographically informed approach to observational research one studies everyday settings, and seeks to understand actions and meanings in their social context (Silverman 1993; Wolcott 1990). This approach is a strong tool for investigating interactions of a more or less implicit character...

  12. Ethnographic Findings in the Organizational Theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Torquet, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    the outcome of ethnographic ‘user studies’ to industry and academia. In a project on indoor climate control with five company partners, the field studies brought about controversial findings, like ‘Indoor comfort is what people make’ – as opposed to something fully controlled by technology and ‘provided...

  13. Mental well-being of patients from ethnic minority groups during critical care: a qualitative ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Keer, Rose Lima; Deschepper, Reginald; Huyghens, Luc; Bilsen, Johan

    2017-09-27

    To investigate the state of the mental well-being of patients from ethnic minority groups and possible related risk factors for the development of mental health problems among these patients during critical medical situations in hospital. Qualitative ethnographic design. Oneintensive care unit (ICU) of a multiethnic urban hospital in Belgium. 84 ICU staff members, 10 patients from ethnic-minority groups and their visiting family members. Patients had several human basic needs for which they could not sufficiently turn to anybody, neither to their healthcare professionals, nor to their relatives nor to other patients. These needs included the need for social contact, the need to increase comfort and alleviate pain, the need to express desperation and participate in end-of-life decision making. Three interrelated risk factors for the development of mental health problems among the patients included were identified: First, healthcare professionals' mainly biomedical care approach (eg, focus on curing the patient, limited psychosocial support), second, the ICU context (eg, time pressure, uncertainty, regulatory frameworks) and third, patients' different ethnocultural background (eg, religious and phenotypical differences). The mental state of patients from ethnic minority groups during critical care is characterised by extreme emotional loneliness. It is important that staff should identify and meet patients' unique basic needs in good time with regard to their mental well-being, taking into account important threats related to their own mainly biomedical approach to care, the ICU's structural context as well as the patients' different ethnocultural background. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Vaginal Delivery vs. Cesarean Section: A Focused Ethnographic Study of Women’s Perceptions in The North of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakerihamidi, Maryam; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Merghati Khoei, Effat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cesarean section (C-section) in the North of Iran accounts for 70% of childbirths, which is higher than the national average of 55%. Understanding women’s perceptions towards modes of delivery in different cultures can pave the way for promoting programs and policies in support of vaginal delivery. We aimed to investigate women’s perceptions towards modes of delivery in the North of Iran. Methods: Using a focused ethnographic approach and purposive sampling, 12 pregnant women, 10 women with childbirth experience, nine non-pregnant women, seven midwives, and seven gynecologists were selected from hospitals, healthcare centers, and clinics of Tonekabon and Chaloos, Mazandaran, Iran, during 2012-2014. Data were collected through in-depth interviews and participant observation. Data analysis was performed using thematic analysis using MAXqda software. Results: Two major themes emerged from the data including: “vaginal delivery, a facilitator of women’s physical and mental health promotion”, and “C-section, a surgical intervention associated with decreased labor pain”. Six sub-themes subsumed within these major themes were: vaginal delivery as a safe mode of delivery, fullfilment of maternal instinct, a natural process with a pleasant ending, and C-section as a procedure associated with future complications, a surgical intervention and sometimes a life saving procedure, and a painless mode of delivery. Conclusion: In the North of Iran, women’s justified cultural beliefs overshadow their micsconceptions, so it is hopped that through implementing appropriate training programs for raising awarness and correcting miscomceptions, vaginal delivery could be promoted even in regions with high rates of cesarean section. PMID:25553333

  15. Ingroup identity as an obstacle to effective multiprofessional and interprofessional teamwork: findings from an ethnographic study of healthcare assistants in dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V Lloyd, Joanne; Schneider, Justine; Scales, Kezia; Bailey, Simon; Jones, Rob

    2011-09-01

    Rising dementia incidence is likely to increase pressures on healthcare services, making effective well coordinated care imperative. Yet, barriers to this care approach exist which, we argue, might be understood by focussing on identity dynamics at the frontlines of care. In this article, we draw upon findings from an ethnographic study of healthcare assistants (HCAs) from three dementia wards across one National Health Service mental health trust. Data revealed that the HCAs are a close-knit 'in-group' who share low group status and norms and, often highlight their own expertise in order to promote self worth. HCAs' social identity is considered as a barrier to effective teamwork with strong ingroup behaviour suggested as a consequence of their marginalisation. We explore these findings with reference to social identity theory (Tajfel, 1974; Turner, 1978 ) and discuss implications for delivering multiprofessional and interprofessional care.

  16. The cup-versus-bottle debate: a theme from an ethnographic study of the supplementation of breastfed infants in hospital in the United kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloherty, Michele; Alexander, Jo; Holloway, Immy; Galvin, Kate; Inch, Sally

    2005-05-01

    This article reports 1 theme from an ethnographic study that aimed to describe the experiences, expectations, and beliefs of mothers and health care professionals concerning supplementation in a UK maternity unit. Observation was conducted on the postnatal ward and the newborn infant unit, and 30 mothers, 17 midwives, 4 neonatal nurses, 3 health care assistants, 3 senior house officers, and 3 senior pediatricians gave in-depth interviews during a 9-month period in 2002. One of the major themes that emerged was the cup-versus-bottle debate. There were 3 categories strongly linked to this theme: difficulties returning to the breast, ease of use, and necessary skills and knowledge. It appears there is an urgent need to determine which is the best method of giving supplementary feeds, so that full, accurate information can be given to mothers, appropriate policies be devised, and the necessary resources and staff training be provided.

  17. MRT letter: Human bloodstains on antique aboriginal weapons: a guiding low-vacuum SEM study of erythrocytes in experimental samples on ethnographically documented biological raw materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortolà, Policarp

    2012-08-01

    The aboriginal use of reed and bone as raw materials for knives and daggers, respectively, has been well-documented ethnographically in some geographical areas of Melanesia. Because of the significant role that these weapons played in inter- and intra-ethnic aggression, they can potentially have retained smears from the contact with human blood. To carry out a guiding low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of specific interest to ethnography, the outsides of a fragment of stalk of giant cane (Arundo donax) and tibial diaphysis of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) were smeared with peripheral human blood. No biological specimen preparation was applied to the samples. After just over 1 month, bloodstain boundaries and their neighboring inner areas were examined via secondary electrons by a variable-pressure SEM (VP-SEM) working in low-vacuum mode. On both substrates, bloodstains exhibited micro-scales. No janocyte (erythrocyte negative replica) was observed in the examined areas. However, erythrocytes were seen crowded together as grain-shaped corpuscles in the smear on reed, and several hecatocytes (moon-like shaped erythrocytes) were evidenced in the smear on bone. The results of this study suggest that a VP-SEM working in low-vacuum mode can be used fruitfully to detect blood remains in medium-sized reed and bone antique aboriginal artifacts. This procedure can prospectively help to ethnographic museum curators and aboriginal-art surveyors as an easy guiding test in the valuation of antique traditional weapons prior to acquisition, when the real use of a piece has been claimed by the supplier. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Social and traditional practices and their implications for family planning: a participatory ethnographic study in Renk, South Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmusharaf, Khalifa; Byrne, Elaine; O'Donovan, Diarmuid

    2017-01-17

    Understanding what determines family size is crucial for programmes that aim to provide family planning services during and after conflicts. Recent research found that development agents in post conflict settings do not necessarily take time to understand the context adequately, translate their context understanding into programming, or adjust programming in the light of changes. South Sudan, a country that has been suffering from war for almost 50 years, has one of the highest maternal death rates and the lowest contraceptive utilization rates in the world. This research used Participatory Ethnographic Evaluation and Research (PEER) to provide a contextualised understanding of social and traditional practices and their implications for family planning. Fourteen women were recruited from 14 villages in Renk County in South Sudan in the period 2010-2012. They were trained to design research instruments, conduct interviews, collect narratives and stories and analyse data to identify, prioritize and address their maternal health concerns. As a result of wars, people are under pressure to increase their family sizes and thus increase the nation's population. This is to compensate for the men perished in war and the high child death rates. Large family size is regarded as a national obligation. Women are caught up in a vicious cycle of high fertility and a high rate of child mortality. Determinants of large family size include: 1) Social and cultural practices, 2) Clan lineage and 3) Compensation for loss of family members. Three strategies are used to increase family size: 1) Marry several women, 2) Husbands taking care of women, and 3) Financial stability. Consequences of big families include: 1) Financial burden, 2) Fear of losing children, 3) Borrowing children and 4) Husband shirking responsibility. The desire to have a big family will remain in South Sudan until families realise that their children will live longer, that their men will not be taken by the war

  19. Consumer demand for caesarean sections in Brazil: informed decision making, patient choice, or social inequality? A population based birth cohort study linking ethnographic and epidemiological methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhague, Dominique P; Victora, Cesar G; Barros, Fernando C

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To investigate why some women prefer caesarean sections and how decisions to medicalise birthing are influenced by patients, doctors, and the sociomedical environment. Design Population based birth cohort study, using ethnographic and epidemiological methods. Setting Epidemiological study: women living in the urban area of Pelotas, Brazil who gave birth in hospital during the study. Ethnographic study: subsample of 80 women selected at random from the birth cohort. Nineteen medical staff were interviewed. Participants 5304 women who gave birth in any of the city's hospitals in 1993. Main outcome measures Birth by caesarean section or vaginal delivery. Results In both samples women from families with higher incomes and higher levels of education had caesarean sections more often than other women. Many lower to middle class women sought caesarean sections to avoid what they considered poor quality care and medical neglect, resulting from social prejudice. These women used medicalised prenatal and birthing health care to increase their chance of acquiring a caesarean section, particularly if they had social power in the home. Both social power and women's behaviour towards seeking medicalised health care remained significantly associated with type of birth after controlling for family income and maternal education. Conclusions Fear of substandard care is behind many poor women's preferences for a caesarean section. Variables pertaining to women's role in the process of redefining and negotiating medical risks were much stronger correlates of caesarean section rates than income or education. The unequal distribution of medical technology has altered concepts of good and normal birthing. Arguments supporting interventionist birthing for all on the basis of equal access to health care must be reviewed. What is already known on this topicWomen's preferences for caesarean sections are understood to result from lack of knowledge and psychological aptitude to

  20. Caring for the patient, caring for the record: an ethnographic study of 'back office' work in upholding quality of care in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2015-04-23

    The quality of information recorded about patient care is considered key to improving the overall quality, safety and efficiency of patient care. Assigning codes to patients' records is an important aspect of this documentation. Current interest in large datasets in which individual patient data are collated (e.g. proposed NHS care.data project) pays little attention to the details of how 'data' get onto the record. This paper explores the work of summarising and coding records, focusing on 'back office' practices, identifying contributors and barriers to quality of care. Ethnographic observation (187 hours) of clinical, management and administrative staff in two UK general practices with contrasting organisational characteristics. This involved observation of working practices, including shadowing, recording detailed field notes, naturalistic interviews and analysis of key documents relating to summarising and coding. Ethnographic analysis drew on key sensitizing concepts to build a 'thick description' of coding practices, drawing these together in a narrative synthesis. Coding and summarising electronic patient records is complex work. It depends crucially on nuanced judgements made by administrators who combine their understanding of: clinical diagnostics; classification systems; how healthcare is organised; particular working practices of individual colleagues; current health policy. Working with imperfect classification systems, diagnostic uncertainty and a range of local practical constraints, they manage a moral tension between their idealised aspiration of a 'gold standard' record and a pragmatic recognition that this is rarely achievable in practice. Adopting a range of practical workarounds, administrators position themselves as both formally accountable to their employers (general practitioners), and informally accountability to individual patients, in a coding process which is shaped not only by the 'facts' of the case, but by ongoing working

  1. Using ethnographic methods in software engineering research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Helen, C.; Dittrich, Yvonne; De Souza, Cleidson

    2010-01-01

    This tutorial provides an overview of the role of ethnography in Software Engineering research. It describes the use of ethnographic methods as a means to provide an in-depth understanding of the socio-technological realities surrounding everyday software development practice. The knowledge gained...... can be used to improve processes, methods and tools as well as develop observed industrial practices. The tutorial begins with a brief historical account of ethnography in the fields of Software Engineering, CSCW, Information Systems and other related areas. This sets the stage for a more in......-depth discussion of methods for data collection and analysis used in ethnographic studies. It then describes how these methods can be and have been used by software engineering researchers to understand developers' work practices, to inform the development of processes, methods and tools and to evaluate...

  2. Fostering reflective trust between mothers and community health nurses to improve the effectiveness of health and nutrition efforts: An ethnographic study in Ghana, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackatia-Armah, Nana M; Addy, Nii Antiaye; Ghosh, Shibani; Dubé, Laurette

    2016-06-01

    As the global health agenda shifts from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the need for effective preventive health efforts has gained prominence, particularly in low-income regions with poor health and nutrition outcomes. To address needs in communities with limited access to health services and personnel, it is important to develop strategies that can improve the effectiveness of nurses as they interact with the populations they serve. We contribute to informing such strategies by explaining how mothers' "reflective trust" in community health nurses develops as a key influencer in their health-related decision-making and behavior. Between December 2012 and June 2013, our ethnographic study gathered data in three adjacent rural and semi-rural communities in Ghana's Eastern Region, using interviews with 39 nursing mothers, three focus groups - with mothers, health-workers, and community leaders - as well as 941 h of participant observation. We focused on interactions between mothers and nurses, highlighting tensions between communities' traditions and messages that nurses bring, which are often based on modern science. We also investigated how mothers come to exhibit reflective trust in the nurses to make sense of traditional and scientific knowledge on infant feeding, and integrate them into their own feeding decisions. Our findings have global implications for effectively sustaining and scaling health and nutrition efforts through community approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. ["It sure ain't easy!": an ethnographic study of primary health care for patients with hypertension and/or diabetes in Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Maximiliano Loiola Ponte de; Garnelo, Luíza

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the results of an evaluative study in the city of Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil, on primary health care for patients with hypertension and/or diabetes. The ethnographic approach used access to services and comprehensiveness of health care as core analytical categories, comparing the health practices developed by Family Health Program (FHP) units with traditional non-FHP primary care units. Access to family health care units in low-income communities is limited by the precarious surrounding urban infrastructure. The main barrier to access to primary care units is distance. The lack of a referral system between the various levels of complexity jeopardizes patients' access to tests and specialists. The care supplied by the two units is limited to patient conditions that can be treated pharmacologically, thus compromising the comprehensiveness of care. The health professionals display a limited capacity to hear problems outside the immediate focus of the program activity. The paper highlights the potential for using ethnography in evaluative research on health systems and services.

  4. Parental distress around supplementing breastfed babies using nasogastric tubes on the post-natal ward: a theme from an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alison M; Cloherty, Michele; Alexander, Jo; Holloway, Immy; Galvin, Kathleen; Inch, Sally

    2009-04-01

    There is abundant evidence of the benefits of breastfeeding. In the UK, supplementation in hospital has consistently been shown to be associated with shortened duration of breastfeeding. This paper reports on a subset of the data from an ethnographic study that explored the expectations, beliefs and experiences of mothers and health professionals concerning supplementation, using a variety of methods, of breastfed babies in an English maternity unit in 2002. This paper aims to describe the expectations, beliefs and experiences of mothers and health professionals concerning supplementation by nasogastric (NG) tube on the post-natal ward. Participant observation was carried out on day and night shifts and at weekends over 9 months. Mothers, midwives, neonatal nurses, health care assistants and senior paediatricians were interviewed. Categories and themes were generated. The researchers' constructs of 'the essential method', when the tube was the method needed for medical reasons, and 'the chosen method', when other methods of oral feeding should have been possible, emerged. The latter included time pressures and the avoidance of any form of oral activity that might perhaps make return to the breast more difficult. The data concerning the use of NG tubes for supplementation yielded the specific theme of parental distress. In the absence of evidence that supplementation by NG tube on the post-natal ward is associated with greater breastfeeding success than other methods, the use of the tube to avoid any form of 'oral confusion' should be discontinued. Its use primarily to save time should not be considered acceptable.

  5. Could In-Home Sensors Surpass Human Observation of People with Parkinson’s at High Risk of Falling? An Ethnographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Stack

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-report underpins our understanding of falls among people with Parkinson’s (PwP as they largely happen unwitnessed at home. In this qualitative study, we used an ethnographic approach to investigate which in-home sensors, in which locations, could gather useful data about fall risk. Over six weeks, we observed five independently mobile PwP at high risk of falling, at home. We made field notes about falls (prior events and concerns and recorded movement with video, Kinect, and wearable sensors. The three women and two men (aged 71 to 79 years having moderate or severe Parkinson’s were dependent on others and highly sedentary. We most commonly noted balance protection, loss, and restoration during chair transfers, walks across open spaces and through gaps, turns, steps up and down, and tasks in standing (all evident walking between chair and stairs, e.g.. Our unobtrusive sensors were acceptable to participants: they could detect instability during everyday activity at home and potentially guide intervention. Monitoring the route between chair and stairs is likely to give information without invading the privacy of people at high risk of falling, with very limited mobility, who spend most of the day in their sitting rooms.

  6. Popularizing folklore and ethnographic subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina K. Krylova

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Launching new techniques and approaches in museum work based on folklore and ethnographical data for people in all walks of life through interactive, educational and entertainment programs. Staging workshops on a variety of creative arts, organizing contests and celebrations of Peasants’ Calendar with the aim of preserving the best of the cultural legacy in the open-air Kosromskaya Sloboda Museum.

  7. Ethnographic methods for language and gender research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besnier, N.; Philips, S.U.; Ehrlich, S.; Meyerhoff, M.; Holmes, J.

    2014-01-01

    Ethnographic approaches to language and gender emphasize the complex yet richly textured relationship between linguistic practices observed in their naturalistic form and their social, cultural, and political context. The relationship between language and gender became the object of ethnographically

  8. Permission-Seeking as an Agentive Tool for Transgressive Teaching: An Ethnographic Study of Teachers Organizing for Curricular Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Doyle, Kira J.; Gustavson, Leif

    2016-01-01

    This study describes how a group of teachers in a US public school developed and used permission-seeking moves as strategic and agentic tools to change their school curriculum and challenge norms of teaching. Although the notion of asking permission is typically considered disempowering in educational contexts, this study demonstrates that certain…

  9. Making Sense of Video Games: An Ethnographic Case Study on the Meaning-Making Practices of Asian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chia Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Despite the growing number of studies on video games, there are still gaps in video game research, especially when it comes to describing the situated (in situ) actions of gameplay. The study explores the locally-produced meaning-making practices of video game players, and analyzes gameplay as it occurs, not as a post hoc, reconstructed event, but…

  10. Challenges and Possibilities of Holocaust Education and Critical Citizenship: An Ethnographic Study of a Fifth-Grade Bilingual Class Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Louise B.

    2010-01-01

    This classroom ethnography examines the engagement of fifth-grade children in a year-long study of rights, respect, and responsibility, which culminated in a focused study of tolerance and intolerance organized around literature regarding the Holocaust. A close examination of one teacher's approach to teaching about the Holocaust, the study…

  11. Stakeholders' views on maternity care shortcomings in rural Ghana: An ethnographic study among women, providers, public, and quasiprivate policy sector actors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanore, Martin Amogre; Pavlova, Milena; Biesma, Regien; Groot, Wim

    2017-04-06

    Access to skilled provider and emergency obstetric care is not universal across all districts in Ghana. The lived experiences of 3 stakeholder groups on maternity care shortcomings in 3 rural Ghanaian districts are examined in this study. We applied an ethnographic study approach where field data were collected between March to May 2015 in 3 rural districts of northern Ghana. Data were collected among women with recent births experiences (n = 90), health care providers (n = 16), and policy actors (n = 6). Transcripts were read through to identify similar and divergent stakeholders' views. Significant expressions and experiences of stakeholders on maternity care shortcomings were extracted and evaluated to define key themes. Four themes emerged: social/community factors, payments for health care, facility level factors, and policy level factors. The results show that traditional women's roles divest time for maternity care. Poor transport arrangements, insufficient health workforce, health funding gaps, insurance reimbursements delays, and catastrophic health expenditures on travel and drugs are attested as major barriers across all stakeholder groups in all districts studied. The discussion of the study findings suggests it is important to ascertain the scale of informal payments and their impacts on health access. Investments in health workforce and reliable ambulatory service systems could help address poor referral difficulties in rural areas of the country. Social support for community initiatives that pool funds could provide extra resources and relieve cost access-related challenges for using maternity care in rural settings in Ghana. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Understanding Drama Teaching in Compulsory Education in Iceland: A Micro-Ethnographic Study of the Practices of Two Drama Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorkelsdóttir, Rannveig Björk

    2016-01-01

    The rationale for this study is that drama was included in the national curriculum framework in Iceland for the first time in 2013. As a result, there were considerable tensions connected with how Icelandic schools could or should embrace this newcomer to the curriculum, whether the necessary competence existed to teach the subject and what kind…

  13. An Ethnographic Study of the Policing of Internal Borders in the Netherlands : Synergies Between Criminology and Anthropology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaers, P.

    2014-01-01

    Tense contact between the police and migrants in Western societies remains to be an important topic in police scholarship. In sociological studies of the police, this matter is ascribed to the discretionary authority of individual officers that is sanctioned by their departments—not to official

  14. Radiographic images and the emergence of optimism about recovery in patients with small cell lung cancer : an ethnographic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, AM; Hak, T; Koeter, G; van der Wal, G

    Background: In a previous study, patients with small cell lung cancer showed "false optimism" about their recovery. Because patients' ideas about prognosis affect the choices they make regarding their treatment and end of life care, we explored the reasons why patients showed this optimism. Methods:

  15. Achieving Equity through Critical Science Agency: An Ethnographic Study of African American Students in a Health Science Career Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun-Frank, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential of a High School Health Science Career Academy to support African American students' science career trajectories. I used three key theoretical tools---critical science agency (Basu, 2007; Calabrese Barton & Tan, 2008), power (Nespor, 1994), and cultural production (Carlone, 2004; Eisenhart &…

  16. Bridging the Implementation Gap: An Ethnographic Study of English Teachers' Implementation of the Curriculum Reform in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunmei; He, Chuanjun

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study of secondary English teachers' perceptions of and implementation of the New English Curriculum Reform in China initiated in 2009. Ethnography and triangulated data collection methods were employed to gather information about three senior secondary English teachers' interpretations of the New Curriculum and their…

  17. How Tracking Structures Attitudes towards Ethnic Out-Groups and Interethnic Interactions in the Classroom: An Ethnographic Study in Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praag, Lore; Boone, Simon; Stevens, Peter A. J.; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the ethnic composition of schools on interethnic relations and attitudes has been studied extensively and has received ample interest from policy makers. However, less attention has been paid to the structures and processes inside schools that organize interethnic relations and attitudes. In Flanders (Belgium), secondary education…

  18. Inherent illnesses and attacks: an ethnographic study of interpretations of childhood Acute Respiratory Infections (ARIs) in Manhiça, southern Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a leading cause of childhood hospitalisation and child mortality in Africa. This study explores local interpretations of Acute Respiratory Infections (ARIs), focusing on caretakers of children under five in the context of hospital care seeking. Methods The study took place in Manhiça, southern Mozambique and used Focused Ethnographic Study tools (FES) including field exercises and interviews. Results Understandings of terms used to describe ARIs differed between caretakers and hospital staff. Children's sicknesses that hospital staff diagnosed as ARIs were interpreted by caretakers as intermittent "attacks" of xifuva, a permanent, inherent and incurable chest illness. Caretakers thought that it was possible to manage and treat the attacks, which were caused by immediate natural factors such as food or the weather, but not the underlying illness, which was seen as having more indirect and social causes. Explanations of illness could not be neatly separated into pluralistic categories, but were characterised by syncretism, with "lay" and "biomedical" terms and concepts intermingling in practical care-seeking interactions between caretakers and health staff. Conclusions Health promotion should take into account the syncretism involved in explanations of ARIs in the context of practical care seeking for children. In doing so, it should draw upon lay interpretations and terminologies in order to stress the importance of seeking hospital care for all xifuva-type illnesses as well as seeking care for any subsequent attacks of an already diagnosed xifuva. However, this should be undertaken with awareness that the meanings of the terms used in practical care-seeking interactions may change over time. Health communication about ARIs should therefore be ongoing and evidence-based, even if ARIs appear to be well understood. PMID:21752260

  19. Inherent illnesses and attacks: an ethnographic study of interpretations of childhood Acute Respiratory Infections (ARIs in Manhiça, southern Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pell Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia is a leading cause of childhood hospitalisation and child mortality in Africa. This study explores local interpretations of Acute Respiratory Infections (ARIs, focusing on caretakers of children under five in the context of hospital care seeking. Methods The study took place in Manhiça, southern Mozambique and used Focused Ethnographic Study tools (FES including field exercises and interviews. Results Understandings of terms used to describe ARIs differed between caretakers and hospital staff. Children's sicknesses that hospital staff diagnosed as ARIs were interpreted by caretakers as intermittent "attacks" of xifuva, a permanent, inherent and incurable chest illness. Caretakers thought that it was possible to manage and treat the attacks, which were caused by immediate natural factors such as food or the weather, but not the underlying illness, which was seen as having more indirect and social causes. Explanations of illness could not be neatly separated into pluralistic categories, but were characterised by syncretism, with "lay" and "biomedical" terms and concepts intermingling in practical care-seeking interactions between caretakers and health staff. Conclusions Health promotion should take into account the syncretism involved in explanations of ARIs in the context of practical care seeking for children. In doing so, it should draw upon lay interpretations and terminologies in order to stress the importance of seeking hospital care for all xifuva-type illnesses as well as seeking care for any subsequent attacks of an already diagnosed xifuva. However, this should be undertaken with awareness that the meanings of the terms used in practical care-seeking interactions may change over time. Health communication about ARIs should therefore be ongoing and evidence-based, even if ARIs appear to be well understood.

  20. Effects of transnational migration on drug use: an ethnographic study of Nepali female heroin users in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wai-Man

    2015-01-01

    Past studies of female drug users in South Asia tend to focus on their plights, for instance, how they have been driven to drug use and encounter more problems than their male counterparts, such as HIV/AIDS and sexual abuse. Few studies focus on their active role--how they actively make use of resources in the external environment to construct their desired femininity through drug consumption. Furthermore, little is known about the situation of female South Asian drug users who are living overseas. This paper is a study of transnational migration, drug use and gender--how transnational migration influences the drug use of female transnational migrants. An 18-month ethnography has been carried out in a Nepali community in Hong Kong and 13 informants were interviewed. Data were coded and analyzed by using the grounded-theory approach. Themes related to the drug use of the female Nepali heroin users were identified. The findings show that there are three important themes that significantly affect the drug use of female Nepali heroin users, which include (1) their relationships with intimate partners, (2) their means of support, and (3) their legal status in migration. The findings are consistent with the concept of post-structuralism in gender and transnationalism theories. Female Nepali heroin users in Hong Kong are neither active agents nor passive victims; their active/passive role is largely dependent on their reconfigured opportunities and constraints in transnational migration. Thus, transnationalism should be taken as an important perspective to study the situation of female drug users in a globalized context. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. An ethnographic study of strategies to support discussions with family members on end-of-life care for people with advanced dementia in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Geena; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Davis, Sarah; Kupeli, Nuriye; Harrington, Jane; Leavey, Gerard; Nazareth, Irwin; Jones, Louise; Moore, Kirsten J

    2016-07-07

    Most people with advanced dementia die in nursing homes where families may have to make decisions as death approaches. Discussions about end-of-life care between families and nursing home staff are uncommon, despite a range of potential benefits. In this study we aimed to examine practices relating to end-of-life discussions with family members of people with advanced dementia residing in nursing homes and to explore strategies for improving practice. An ethnographic study in two nursing homes where the Compassion Intervention was delivered. The Compassion Intervention provides a model of end-of-life care engaging an Interdisciplinary Care Leader to promote integrated care, educate staff, support holistic assessments and discuss end of life with families. We used a framework approach, undertaking a thematic analysis of fieldwork notes and observations recorded in a reflective diary kept by the Interdisciplinary Care Leader, and data from in-depth interviews with 23 informants: family members, GPs, nursing home staff, and external healthcare professionals. Four major themes described strategies for improving practice: (i) educating families and staff about dementia progression and end-of-life care; (ii) appreciating the greater value of in-depth end-of-life discussions compared with simple documentation of care preferences; (iii) providing time and space for sensitive discussions; and (iv) having an independent healthcare professional or team with responsibility for end-of-life discussions. The Interdisciplinary Care Leader role offers a promising method for supporting and improving end-of-life care discussions between families of people with advanced dementia and nursing home staff. These strategies warrant further evaluation in nursing home settings.

  2. A Micro-Ethnographic Study of the Communication/Language Development in a Japanese Child with Profound Hearing Loss Before and After Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Kretschmer

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study described the communication and spoken language development of a Japanese girl with profound hearing loss who used a cochlear implant from 19 months of age. The girl, Akiko, was born in Belgium where her family was living at that time. After she was identified as deaf at birth, she and her parents were provided with support services. The family relocated to Japan when Akiko was 1 year 5 months of age. When she was 1 year 6 months of age Akiko underwent cochlear implantation. The cochlear implant device was activated when Akiko was 1 year 7 months of age. The parents routinely made video recordings of Akiko interacting with family members and teachers at home and at school. The video recordings taken by the parents used as the data for this study contained scenes of Akiko from the time she was 3 months of age until she was 4 years 11 months of age. Micro-ethnographic methods were used to analyze the dynamics and development of selected communicative interactions over this age span of Şfty-six months. The original pool of video recordings contained 213 scenes. As a result of video viewing and editing, Akiko’s communication development was found to follow expected patterns of development as described by other child language researchers of children with normal hearing. There were seven demarcations that represent Akiko’s communication and spoken language development: 1 perlocutionary, 2 transition of perlocutionary to illocutionary, 3 illocutionary, 4 transition of illocutionary to locutionary, 5 locutionary, 6 dialogue, and 7 narrative

  3. A Micro-Ethnographic Study of the Communication/Language Development in a Japanese Child with Profound Hearing Loss Before and After Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Kretschmer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study described the communication and spoken language development of a Japanese girl with profound hearing loss who used a cochlear implant from 19 months of age. The girl, Akiko, was born in Belgium where her family was living at that time. After she was identified as deaf at birth, she and her parents were provided with support services. The family relocated to Japan when Akiko was 1 year 5 months of age. When she was 1 year 6 months of age Akiko underwent cochlear implantation. The cochlear implant device was activated when Akiko was 1 year 7 months of age. The parents routinely made video recordings of Akiko interacting with family members and teachers at home and at school. The video recordings taken by the parents used as the data for this study contained scenes of Akiko from the time she was 3 months of age until she was 4 years 11 months of age. Micro-ethnographic methods were used to analyze the dynamics and development of selected communicative interactions over this age span of fifty-six months. The original pool of video recordings contained 213 scenes.As a result of video viewing and editing, Akiko’s communication development was found to follow expected patterns of development as described by other child language researchers of children with normal hearing. There were seven demarcations that represent Akiko’s communication and spoken language development: 1 perlocutionary, 2 transition of perlocutionary to illocutionary, 3 illocutionary, 4 transition of illocutionary to locutionary, 5 locutionary, 6 dialogue, and 7 narrative.

  4. The value of uncertainty in critical illness? An ethnographic study of patterns and conflicts in care and decision-making trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, I J; Rumble, C; Shipman, C; Koffman, J; Sleeman, K E; Morgan, M; Hopkins, P; Noble, J; Bernal, W; Leonard, S; Dampier, O; Prentice, W; Burman, R; Costantini, M

    2016-02-09

    With increasingly intensive treatments and population ageing, more people face complex treatment and care decisions. We explored patterns of the decision-making processes during critical care, and sources of conflict and resolution. Ethnographic study in two Intensive Care Units (ICUs) in an inner city hospital comprising: non-participant observation of general care and decisions, followed by case studies where treatment limitation decisions, comfort care and/or end of life discussions were occurring. These involved: semi-structured interviews with consenting families, where possible, patients; direct observations of care; and review of medical records. Initial non-participant observation included daytime, evenings, nights and weekends. The cases were 16 patients with varied diagnoses, aged 19-87 years; 19 family members were interviewed, aged 30-73 years. Cases were observed for uncertainty. Conflict occurred most commonly in the trajectories with oscillating curative and comfort care. Conflict also occurred inside clinical teams. Families were most often involved in decision-making regarding care outcomes and seemed to find it easier when patients switched definitively from curative to comfort care. We found eight categories of decision-making; three related to the care outcomes (aim, place, response to needs) and five to the care processes (resuscitation, decision support, medications/fluids, monitoring/interventions, other specialty involvement). Decision-making in critical illness involves a web of discussions regarding the potential outcomes and processes of care, across the whole disease trajectory. When measures oscillate between curative and comfort there is greatest conflict. This suggests a need to support early communication, especially around values and preferred care outcomes, from which other decisions follow, including DNAR. Offering further support, possibly with expert palliative care, communication, and discussion of 'trial of treatment' may be

  5. ‘We all want to succeed, but we’ve also got to be realistic about what is happening’: an ethnographic study of relationships in trial oversight and their impact

    OpenAIRE

    Daykin, Anne; Selman, Lucy E.; Cramer, Helen; McCann, Sharon; Shorter, Gillian W.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Gamble, Carrol; Macefield, Rhiannon; Lane, J. Athene; Shaw, Alison

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundThe oversight and conduct of a randomised controlled trial involves several stakeholders, including a Trial Steering Committee (TSC), Trial Management Group (TMG), Data Monitoring Committee (DMC), funder, and sponsor. We aimed to examine how the relationships between these stakeholders affect the trial oversight process and its rigour, to inform future revision of Good Clinical Practice guidelines.MethodsUsing an ethnographic study design, we observed the oversight processes of eigh...

  6. Disclosure of domestic violence and sexual assault within the context of abortion: meta-ethnographic synthesis of qualitative studies protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainey, Lydia; Taylor, Annabel; Baird, Kathleen; O'Mullan, Catherine

    2017-12-15

    One third of women will have an abortion in their lifetime (Kerr, QUT Law Rev 14:15, 2014; Aston and Bewley, Obstetrician & Gynaecologist 11:163-8, 2009). These women are more likely to have experienced domestic violence or sexual assault than women who continue with their pregnancies. Frontline health personnel involved in the care of women seeking abortions are uniquely positioned to support patients who choose to disclose their violence. Yet, the disclosure of domestic violence or sexual assault within the context of abortion is not well understood. To enhance service provision, it is important to understand the disclosure experience, that is, how frontline health personnel manage such disclosures and how victims/survivors perceive this experience. This review aims to provide a systematic synthesis of qualitative literature to increase understanding of the phenomena and identify research gaps. A meta-ethnography of qualitative evidence following PRISMA-P recommendations for reporting systematic reviews will be performed to better understand the experiences of domestic violence and sexual assault disclosure from the perspective of frontline health personnel providing support and women seeking an abortion. A three-stage search strategy including database searching, citation searching and Traditional Pearl Growing will be applied starting with the terms "domestic violence", "sexual assault", "disclosure" and "abortion", their common synonyms and MeSH terms. The database search will include CINAHL, MEDLINE, Embase and PsycINFO. Published studies from 1970, written in English and from all countries will be included. Two reviewers will screen titles and abstracts and if suitable will then perform a full-text review. To attribute weight to each study, two reviewers will perform the critical appraisal using a modified version of the "Guidelines for Extracting Data and Quality Assessing Primary Studies in Educational Research". Data extraction and coding will occur using

  7. Getting a taste for food waste: a mixed methods ethnographic study into hospital food waste before patient consumption conducted at three New Zealand foodservice facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonan, Sarah; Mirosa, Miranda; Spence, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Foodservice organizations, particularly those in hospitals, are large producers of food waste. To date, research on waste in hospitals has focused primarily on plate waste and the affect of food waste on patient nutrition outcomes. Less focus has been placed on waste generation at the kitchen end of the hospital food system. We used a novel approach to understand reasons for hospital food waste before consumption and offer recommendations on waste minimization within foodservices. A mixed methods ethnographic research approach was adopted. Three New Zealand hospital foodservices were selected as research sites, all of which were contracted to an external foodservice provider. Data collection techniques included document analyses, observations, focus groups with kitchen staff, and one-on-one interviews with managers. Thematic analysis was conducted to generate common themes. Most food waste occurred during service and as a result of overproduction. Attitudes and habits of foodservice personnel were considered influential factors of waste generation. Implications of food waste were perceived differently by different levels of staff. Whereas managers raised discussion from a financial perspective, kitchen staff drew upon social implications. Organizational plans, controls, and use of pre-prepared ingredients assisted in waste minimization. An array of factors influenced waste generation in hospital foodservices. Exploring attitudes and practices of foodservice personnel allowed an understanding of reasons behind hospital food waste and ways in which it could be minimized. This study provides a foundation for further research on sustainable behavior within the wider foodservice sector and dietetics practice. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Kikiskawâwasow - prenatal healthcare provider perceptions of effective care for First Nations women: an ethnographic community-based participatory research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Richard T; Bruno, Grant; Montour, Margaret; Roasting, Matilda; Lightning, Rick; Rain, Patricia; Graham, Bonny; Mayan, Maria J; Toth, Ellen L; Bell, Rhonda C

    2016-08-11

    Pregnant Indigenous women suffer a disproportionate burden of risk and adverse outcomes relative to non-Indigenous women. Although there has been a call for improved prenatal care, examples are scarce. Therefore, we explored the characteristics of effective care with First Nations women from the perspective of prenatal healthcare providers (HCPs). We conducted an ethnographic community-based participatory research study in collaboration with a large Cree First Nations community in Alberta, Canada. We carried out semi-structured interviews with 12 prenatal healthcare providers (HCPs) that were recorded, transcribed, and subjected to qualitative content analysis. According to the participants, relationships and trust, cultural understanding, and context-specific care were key features of effective prenatal care and challenge the typical healthcare model. HCPs that are able to foster sincere, non-judgmental, and enjoyable interactions with patients may be more effective in treating pregnant First Nations women, and better able to express empathy and understanding. Ongoing HCP cultural understanding specific to the community served is crucial to trusting relationships, and arises from real experiences and learning from patients over and above relying only on formal cultural sensitivity training. Consequently, HCPs report being better able to adapt a more flexible, all-inclusive, and accessible approach that meets specific needs of patients. Aligned with the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, improving prenatal care for First Nations women needs to allow for genuine relationship building with patients, with enhanced and authentic cultural understanding by HCPs, and care approaches tailored to women's needs, culture, and context.

  9. Advancing beyond the system: telemedicine nurses' clinical reasoning using a computerised decision support system for patients with COPD - an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barken, Tina Lien; Thygesen, Elin; Söderhamn, Ulrika

    2017-12-28

    Telemedicine is changing traditional nursing care, and entails nurses performing advanced and complex care within a new clinical environment, and monitoring patients at a distance. Telemedicine practice requires complex disease management, advocating that the nurses' reasoning and decision-making processes are supported. Computerised decision support systems are being used increasingly to assist reasoning and decision-making in different situations. However, little research has focused on the clinical reasoning of nurses using a computerised decision support system in a telemedicine setting. Therefore, the objective of the study is to explore the process of telemedicine nurses' clinical reasoning when using a computerised decision support system for the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The factors influencing the reasoning and decision-making processes were investigated. In this ethnographic study, a combination of data collection methods, including participatory observations, the think-aloud technique, and a focus group interview was employed. Collected data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. When telemedicine nurses used a computerised decision support system for the management of patients with complex, unstable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, two categories emerged: "the process of telemedicine nurses' reasoning to assess health change" and "the influence of the telemedicine setting on nurses' reasoning and decision-making processes". An overall theme, termed "advancing beyond the system", represented the connection between the reasoning processes and the telemedicine work and setting, where being familiar with the patient functioned as a foundation for the nurses' clinical reasoning process. In the telemedicine setting, when supported by a computerised decision support system, nurses' reasoning was enabled by the continuous flow of digital clinical data, regular video-mediated contact and shared decision

  10. Ethnographic Interventions: A Strategy And Experiments In Mapping Sociospatial Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mounajjed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing awareness exists of the possibilities of architectural research adopting working methods used by artists. Many artists have adapted ethnographic methodologies to map site specificity and issues related to community and sociospatial practices. This paper draws on related examples of art practice to formulate a specific research strategy: ethnographic intervention. Ethnographic intervention has three characteristics: (a ethnographic mapping of spatial practices on site, (b the possibility of a horizontal replication of the study, and (c an intervention protocol. We define ethnographic mapping as a critical process directed towards a specific cultural, social, or architectural situation. This involves re-presenting the situation through observing, documenting, videorecording, and photography. We explore the necessity of horizontal replication for producing reliable studies. Finally, we discuss the development of a multi-stage intervention protocol as a creative and flexible instrument, involving design and preparation, data collection, interpretation, and narration. Three case studies illustrate how this strategy has been conceived, applied, and developed at architectural sites. The article concludes with a discussion of the outcomes, usefulness, and possible applications of this strategy in other disciplines.

  11. The second life of ethnographic fieldnotes

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    Robert Leopold

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available La deuxième vie des notes de terrain ethnographique. Créées dès 1879 sous le nom d’Archives du Bureau of American Ethnology, les National Anthropological Archives ont pour mission de collecter et d’assurer la sauvegarde des notes de terrain et, plus généralement, de l’ensemble des matériaux ethnographiques. Ces notes, photographies, archives sonores et images animées sont consultées très régulièrement par des anthropologues. Certains se consacrent à l’écriture de biographies, d’autres travaillent sur l’histoire de la discipline, d’autres encore sont désireux de revisiter les archives d’ethnologues les ayant précédés sur le même terrain. Ces matériaux sont également de plus en plus souvent consultés par des non-anthropologues, parmi lesquels on compte des membres de sociétés étudiées soucieux de mieux connaitre leur héritage. Ce texte présente quelques uns des défis que pose la collecte de ces archives et plus encore leur mise à disposition du public sur place ou en ligne. Il prend particulièrement en compte le rôle de l’archiviste vis-à-vis des sociétés-sources pour tout ce qui concerne les problèmes éthiques posés par l’utilisation de ces matériaux si sensibles.The second life of ethnographic fieldnotes. The National Anthropological Archives has been collecting and preserving ethnographic field notes and related materials since its founding as the Archives of the Bureau of American Ethnology in 1879. Each year, these field notes, photographs, sound recordings and moving images are consulted by anthropologists writing biographies and intellectual histories, conducting comparative research, and reviewing the work of anthropologists who conducted research in the same ethnographic region. These field materials are also increasingly consulted by non-anthropologists, particularly native peoples studying their own cultural heritage. This text discusses some of the challenges involved in

  12. Writing and Retelling Multiple Ethnographic Tales of a Soup Kitchen for the Homeless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dana L.; Creswell, John W.; Olander, Lisa

    An ethnographic study narrated three tales about a soup kitchen for the homeless and the near-homeless. To provide a cultural, ethnographic analysis, and share fieldwork experiences the study began with realist and confessional tales. These two tales emerged from the initial writing and presenting of the soup kitchen ethnography to qualitative…

  13. Efficacy of Ethnographic Research in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajan, K. S.; Sindhu, M.

    2014-01-01

    Ethnographic research is an emerging research technique in the field of education. Ethnographic research was a procedure usually used in anthropology but now it is getting popular in educational field. This kind of research relies on qualitative data, its perspective is holistic and its procedures of data analysis involve contextualization. Data…

  14. Ethnographic Methods in Academic Libraries: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Bryony

    2016-01-01

    Research in academic libraries has recently seen an increase in the use of ethnographic-based methods to collect data. Primarily used to learn about library users and their interaction with spaces and resources, the methods are proving particularly useful to academic libraries. The data ethnographic methods retrieve is rich, context specific, and…

  15. Teaching Consumer-Oriented Ethnographic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrew D.; Wu, Lan

    2012-01-01

    Despite an increasing demand for marketing researchers familiar with ethnographic methods, ethnographic consumer research has received little coverage in current marketing curricula. The innovation discussed in the present paper addresses this problem: it introduces the notion of "cultural relativism" and gives students hands-on experience in…

  16. Ethnographic Contributions to Method Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leander, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to common assumptions, there is much to be learned about methods from constructivist/post-structuralist approaches to International Relations (IR) broadly speaking. This article develops this point by unpacking the contributions of one specific method—ethnography—as used in one subfield...... assumptions and instructions pertaining to “sound methods.” Both in the context of observation and in that of justification, working with “strong objectivity” requires a flexibility and willingness to shift research strategies that is at odds with the usual emphasis on stringency, consistency, and carefully...... of research in the ethnographic tradition. However, it would also require rethinking standard methods instructions and the judgments they inform....

  17. Methodological decolonization and interculturality. Reflexions from the ethnographic research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Puentes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I explain some methodological crosslinks between the decolonial option, subaltern studies and postcolonial studies. In addition, I highlight certains limitations they present in their ethnographic research. Finally, I suggest some guidelines that could help us carry out a research comprising an extended intercultural horizon

  18. Voices in the classroom : On being caught between pupils;'inventiveness and ethnographic naivety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spotti, M.

    2014-01-01

    The article, part of a larger ethnographic study on immigrant minority pupils and primary education, draws a number of considerations on linguistic ethnography and the interface between the ethnographer, the object of knowing and the known. It advocates for an interest in the mundane construction of

  19. Vignettes of interviews to enhance an ethnographic account

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel Jacobsen, Alice

    2014-01-01

    This article explores challenges of applying an ethnographic approach, combining participant observation and interviews, to a study of organizational change. The exploration is connected to reform changes, as they are constructed in the interaction between managers and teachers, in a Danish Upper...

  20. Ethnographic Discourse Analysis and Social Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicitas Macgilchrist

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on the perspectives of ethnography and discourse analysis, this paper first gives an overview of the emerging body of research bringing together the epistemologies and the methods of these two perspectives. It then presents a novel analytical framework for computer-assisted ethnographic discourse analysis. The paper outlines how close analysis of discursive practices—in this case journalistic writing practices—can provide insights into struggles over meaning and hegemony in contemporary knowledge work. The case study explores the production of a financial news story about the supply of gas to French consumers, and the way the practices in question subtly write Russia as a threat. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1101183

  1. Rapid sulfur capture studies at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, G.A.; Lawson, W.F.; Maloney, D.J.; Shaw, D.W.

    1990-12-01

    Determine conditions that would reproduce optimum sulfur capture ( super-equilibrium'') behavior. No attempt was made to extract kinetic data for calcination or sulfur capture, as might be done in a comprehensive study of sorbent behavior. While some interesting anomalies are present in the calcination data and in the limited surface area data, no attempt was made to pursue those issues. Since little sulfur capture was observed at operating conditions where super-equilibrium'' might be expected to occur, tests were stopped when the wide range of parameters that were studied failed to produce significant sulfur capture via the super-equilibrium mechanism. Considerable space in this report is devoted to a description of the experiment, including details of the GTRC construction. This description is included because we have received requests for a detailed description of the GTRC itself, as well as the pressurized dry powder feed system. In addition, many questions about accurately sampling the sulfur species from a high-temperature, high-pressure reactor were raised during the course of this investigation. A full account of the development of the gas and particulate sampling train in thus provided. 8 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. YOLANDA’S PORTRAIT: A STORY OF TRIQUI LINGUISTIC RESISTANCE MEDIATED BY ENGLISH AND ETHNOGRAPHIC COEVALNESS IN OAXACA, MEXICO

    OpenAIRE

    Clemente, Ángeles; Higgins, Michael J.; Merino-López, Yolanda; Sughrua, William

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic study provides insights into the social contradictions of everyday language use in the multicultural context of Oaxaca, México. Following a coeval perspective (Fabian, 2007), the researchers, along with the participant, co-construct or co-perform the ethnographic encounter. Based on a larger ethnographic study on how Oaxacan university students perform English with a ‘postcolonial accent,’ the authors explore Yolanda’s use of English, along with Spanish and Triqui, as a se...

  3. Using an ethnographic approach to understand the adjustment journey of international students at a university in England

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from an ethnographic study of international student adjustment. It also recommends the use of ethnography as a way to research the experiences of tourists and migrants to build up a body of knowledge on the outcome of cross-cultural contact for these two groups. The aim of my ethnographic study was to capture the adjustment journey of a group of international postgraduate students at a university in the South of England. The ethnographic approach involved regula...

  4. Review Essay: Zur Relevanz des ethnografischen Blicks bei der sozial- und kulturwissenschaftlichen Erforschung von Orten und Räumen [Researching Place and Space in the Social Sciences and Cultural Studies: The Relevance of the Ethnographic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Siebeck

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the so-called "spatial turn" in the social sciences and cultural studies, social geographers have rightfully been cautioning against positivist notions of space and place: We cannot simply deduce the social from spatial reality—on the contrary, this reality is in every respect itself socially constituted and mediated. In her highly recommended study on the esthetical and socio-political reshaping of Alexanderplatz in Berlin after 1990, Gisa WESZKALNYS has shown how a radical constructivist concept of place and space can be transformed into practical research. This review essay argues that an ethnographic research perspective is of particular relevance both epistemologically as well as methodologically if the aim is to reconstruct places and spaces beyond their perceived "actuality" in terms of a fundamentally contingent social and essentially political practice. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1103203

  5. A review of rapid solidification studies of intermetallic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A review of rapid solidification studies of high-temperature ordered intermetallic compounds is presented. Emphasis is on the nickel - and iron- aluminides which are of potential interest as structural materials. The nickel-base aluminides which have been rapidly solidified exhibit changes in grain size, compositional segregation, and degree of long range order (as reflected in APB size and distribution) which markedly affect mechanical properties. Some experiments indicate the formation of a metastable L1(2) phase in rapidly solidified Fe-(Ni,Mn)-Al-C alloys, while other work observes only a metastable fcc phase in the same composition range. The metastable phases and/or microstructures in both nickel and iron aluminides are destroyed by annealing at temperatures above 750 K, with subsequent degradation of mechanical properties. Rapid solidification studies of several other intermetallic compounds are briefly noted.

  6. The good-enough science-and-politics of anthropological collaboration with evidence-based clinical research: Four ethnographic case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messac, Luke; Ciccarone, Dan; Draine, Jeffrey; Bourgois, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    The apolitical legitimacy of "evidence-based medicine" offers a practical means for ethnography and critical social-science-and-humanities-of-health theory to transfer survival resources to structurally vulnerable populations and to engage policy and services audiences with urgent political problems imposed on the urban poor in the United States that harm health: most notably, homelessness, hyperincarceration, social service cut-backs and the War on Drugs. We present four examples of collaborations between ethnography and clinical research projects that demonstrate the potentials and limits of promoting institutional reform, political debate and action through distinct strategies of cross-methodological dialog with epidemiological and clinical services research. Ethnographic methods alone, however, are simply a technocratic add-on. They must be informed by critical theory to contribute effectively and transformatively to applied health initiatives. Ironically, technocratic, neoliberal logics of cost-effectiveness can sometimes render radical service and policy reform initiatives institutionally credible, fundable and capable of generating wider political support, even though the rhetoric of economic efficacy is a double-edged sword. To extend the impact of ethnography and interdisciplinary theories of political-economic, cultural and disciplinary power relations into applied clinical and public health research, anthropologists - and their fellow travelers - have to be able to strategically, but respectfully learn to see through the positivist logics of clinical services research as well as epidemiological epistemology in order to help clinicians achieve - and extend - their applied priorities. In retrospect, these four very differently-structured collaborations suggest the potential for "good-enough" humble scientific and political strategies to work for, and with, structurally vulnerable populations in a punitive neoliberal era of rising social inequality

  7. The Good-Enough Science-and-Politics of Anthropological Collaboration with Evidence-Based Clinical Research: Four Ethnographic Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messac, Luke; Ciccarone, Dan; Draine, Jeffrey; Bourgois, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The apolitical legitimacy of "evidence-based medicine" offers a practical means for ethnography and critical social-science-and-humanities-of-health theory to transfer survival resources to structurally vulnerable populations and to engage policy and services audiences with urgent political problems imposed on the urban poor in the United States that harm health: most notably, homelessness, hyperincarceration, social service cut-backs and the War on Drugs. We present four examples of collaborations between ethnography and clinical research projects that demonstrate the potentials and limits of promoting institutional reform, political debate and action through distinct strategies of cross-methodological dialogue with epidemiological and clinical services research. Ethnographic methods alone, however, are simply a technocratic add-on. They must be informed by critical theory to contribute effectively and transformatively to applied health initiatives. Ironically, technocratic, neoliberal logics of cost-effectiveness can sometimes render radical service and policy reform initiatives institutionally credible, fundable and capable of generating wider political support, even though the rhetoric of economic efficacy is a double-edged sword. To extend the impact of ethnography and interdisciplinary theories of political-economic, cultural and disciplinary power relations into applied clinical and public health research, anthropologists--and their fellow travelers--have to be able to strategically, but respectfully learn to see through the positivist logics of clinical services research as well as epidemiological epistemology in order to help clinicians achieve--and extend--their applied priorities. In retrospect, these four very differently-structured collaborations suggest the potential for "good-enough” humble scientific and political strategies to work for, and with, structurally vulnerable populations in a punitive neoliberal era of rising social inequality

  8. Inadequate environment, resources and values lead to missed nursing care: A focused ethnographic study on the surgical ward using the Fundamentals of Care framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangland, Eva; Teodorsson, Therese; Molander, Karin; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa

    2017-09-28

    To explore the delivery of care from the perspective of patients with acute abdominal pain focusing on the contextual factors at system level using the Fundamentals of Care framework. The Fundamentals of Care framework describes several contextual and systemic factors that can impact the delivery of care. To deliver high-quality, person-centred care, it is important to understand how these factors affect patients' experiences and care needs. A focused ethnographic approach. A total of 20 observations were performed on two surgical wards at a Swedish university hospital. Data were collected using participant observation and informal interviews and analysed using deductive content analysis. The findings, presented in four categories, reflect the value patients place on the caring relationship and a friendly atmosphere on the ward. Patients had concerns about the environment, particularly the high-tempo culture on the ward and its impact on their integrity, rest and sleep, access to information and planning, and need for support in addressing their existential thoughts. The observers also noted that missed nursing care had serious consequences for patient safety. Patients with acute abdominal pain were cared for in the high-tempo culture of a surgical ward with limited resources, unclear leadership and challenges to patients' safety. The findings highlight the crucial importance of prioritising and valuing the patients' fundamental care needs for recovery. Nursing leaders and nurses need to take the lead to reconceptualise the value of fundamental care in the acute care setting. To improve clinical practice, the value of fundamentals of care must be addressed regardless of patient's clinical condition. Providing a caring relationship is paramount to ensure a positive impact on patient's well-being and recovery. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Rapid HIV-1 testing during labor: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulterys, Marc; Jamieson, Denise J; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Cohen, Mardge H; Maupin, Robert; Nesheim, Steven; Webber, Mayris P; Van Dyke, Russell; Wiener, Jeffrey; Branson, Bernard M

    2004-07-14

    Timely testing of women in labor with undocumented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status could enable immediate provision of antiretroviral prophylaxis. To determine the feasibility and acceptance of rapid HIV testing among women in labor and to assess rapid HIV assay performance. The Mother-Infant Rapid Intervention At Delivery (MIRIAD) study implemented 24-hour counseling and voluntary rapid HIV testing for women in labor at 16 US hospitals from November 16, 2001, through November 15, 2003. A rapid HIV-1 antibody test for whole blood was used. Acceptance of HIV testing; sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the rapid test; time from blood collection to patient notification of results. There were 91,707 visits to the labor and delivery units in the study, 7381 of which were by eligible women without documentation of HIV testing. Of these, 5744 (78%) women were approached for rapid HIV testing and 4849 (84%) consented. HIV-1 test results were positive for 34 women (prevalence = 7/1000). Sensitivity and specificity of the rapid test were 100% and 99.9%, respectively; positive predictive value was 90% compared with 76% for enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Factors independently associated with higher test acceptance included younger age, being black or Hispanic, gestational age less than 32 weeks, and having had no prenatal care. Lower acceptance was associated with being admitted between 4 pm and midnight, particularly on Friday nights, but this may be explained in part by fewer available personnel. Median time from blood collection to patient notification of result was 66 minutes (interquartile range, 45-120 minutes), compared with 28 hours for EIA (PHIV testing is feasible and delivers accurate and timely test results for women in labor. It provides HIV-positive women prompt access to intrapartum and neonatal antiretroviral prophylaxis, proven to reduce perinatal HIV transmission, and may be particularly applicable to higher-risk populations.

  10. Reflecting Upon Interculturality in Ethnographic Filmmaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Catalán Eraso

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Ethnographic filmmaking captures a language that is different from that of written ethnography and as such constitutes an important research medium. However, written and spoken forms of qualitative research still overshadow the visual realm and the paper addresses this gap by arguing that the language of ethnographic filmmaking is central to our understanding of otherness. It demonstrates the role of film in illuminating the "intercultural" dynamics between minority (participant and majority (researcher and in challenging the traditional power relations between the researcher and his/her "subjects". Ethnographic filmmaking is a research technique that has evolved considerably since its early colonial usage (based largely around disempowered and stereotyped representations of otherness. This evolution began to take hold in the 1970's, with a wave of self-criticism and theoretical reflection about the role and impact of the ethnographic film. The result, today, is a great deal of reflexivity and inter-subjectivity and a more nuanced appreciation of interculturality within qualitative research. It is this relatively recent and growing personal and theoretical reflection—allied with the fact that the ethnographic film is still very much an under-utilised research technique—that provides the basis for the paper. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs060369

  11. Dialogues through design: ethnographic explorations of creative process

    OpenAIRE

    Braithwaite, N

    2016-01-01

    Ethnography has traditionally examined fashion in the context of consumption. This aligns with material culture's inclination for examining the meaning of objects through consumption rather than design, which should be considered the actual starting point of their meaningfulness. In spite of the wealth of perspectives interrogating fashion, there is a marked absence of literature exploring how it is actually created. Using an ethnographic study of women's shoe designers, this paper unpacks th...

  12. The Embodied Ethnographer: Journeys in a Health Care Subculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Kay Gale MA, PhD

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a reflective account of conducting ethnographic research in training institutions for alternative and complementary medical (CAM practitioners. In it the author (a seeks to extend the methodological literature in embodied sociology through reflection on conducting research in this context and discussion of particular events and processes and (b offers an example of her attempt to strike the fine balance between respect and integration of previous scholarly work and her own emerging academic voice, while trying to avoid a sterility in the delivery that would belie her attempts to undertake an embodied sociology. By concentrating on three cross-cutting and nonlinear aspects of the research process—motivation, immersion, and expression—she draws out the conceptual links between theory, praxis, and ethics in ethnographic research as well as shedding light on the direction that the study took and the claims to validity of her findings.

  13. Comparative study of blood smears microscopy and rapid test strips ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To evaluate two of the currently available assay methods, specimen from 200 patients admitted on provisional diagnosis of malaria were screened in this study and compared with the smear microscopy method. Our results showed a statistical significant difference (p< 0.05) between the two rapid strip methods of ACON and ...

  14. Experimental Study of Cloud Formation from Rapidly Opened Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, C.E. [Stanford Research Institute; Amaro, A.J. [Stanford Research Institute; Kier, R.J. [Stanford Research Institute

    1969-08-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of droplet size emanating from a rapidly-opened container of volatile liquid, of the internal dynamics of the cavitation process inside such a container, & of the evaporation time of propane drops.

  15. Ethnographic research in immigrant-specific drug abuse recovery houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Anna; Lee, Juliet P; García, Victor; Recarte, Carlos

    2017-10-16

    Access to study populations is a major concern for drug use and treatment researchers. Spaces related to drug use and treatment have varying levels of researcher accessibility based on several issues, including legality, public versus private settings, and insider/outsider status. Ethnographic research methods are indispensable for gaining and maintaining access to hidden or "hard-to-reach" populations. Here, we discuss our long-term ethnographic research on drug abuse recovery houses created by and for Latino migrants and immigrants in Northern California. We take our field work experiences as a case study to examine the problem of researcher access and how ethnographic strategies can be successfully applied to address it, focusing especially on issues of entrée, building rapport, and navigating field-specific challenges related to legality, public/private settings, and insider/outsider status. We conclude that continued funding support for ethnography is essential for promoting health disparities research focused on diverse populations in recovery from substance use disorders.

  16. Slovene Ethnographic Museum Web Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Špiček

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACT:Are you interested in the night view of Ljubljana or in the view on the Ljubljana skyscraper in the 30- ies of the 20th century? What did Cerknica look like in that time? What did a typical alpine house look like? What beds were used fifty years ago? Are you a sports fan interested in the training of Yugoslav athletic team in 1953? Is it true that Anton Codelli and his colleague Leo Poljanec set up the first wireless telegraph station for the company Telefunken in the West African German colony of Togo? What is a Palm Sunday bundle? Is a duel between a woman of Carinthia and Carniola really painted on a wooden bee hive panel? What on earth is an object called »roš«? What chimneys were built on the roofs of the Artiže village? The answers to these unusual questions can be found on the SEM (Slovene Ethnographic Museum website. The SEM documentation comprises numerous collections of photographs which are of interest to ethnologists as well as to the general public. To facilitate the access to them SEM bought the first scanner and started to scan individual photos in 1997. In 2007 SEM continued with systematic digitisation of the most frequently used collections of photos. In 2009 the activities were continued (partly in cooperation with external partners and we joined the Athena EU project. In order to be promoted the entire collections were published on the SEM website and made accessible to a broad audience. The MINOK software enabling the creation of html catalogues was used. As static catalogues were unsuitable for inclusion on the website, a new application using dynamic html was designed to create the gallery view of museum objects and photos, photo slide show, keyword filter, geolocation filter, display of geolocation on a map, and to offer the possibility of advanced searching. The Galerist software was designed by an external partner. It enables html catalogue import, sorting and editing XML files; it is possible to

  17. Employing an ethnographic approach: key characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Veronica; Glacken, Michele; McCarron, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Nurses are increasingly embracing ethnography as a useful research methodology. This paper presents an overview of some of the main characteristics we considered and the challenges encountered when using ethnography to explore the nature of communication between children and health professionals in a children's hospital. There is no consensual definition or single procedure to follow when using ethnography. This is largely attributable to the re-contextualisation of ethnography over time through diversification in and across many disciplines. Thus, it is imperative to consider some of ethnography's trademark features. To identify core trademark features of ethnography, we collated data following a scoping review of pertinent ethnographic textbooks, journal articles, attendance at ethnographic workshops and discussions with principle ethnographers. This is a methodological paper. Essentially, ethnography is a field-orientated activity that has cultural interpretations at its core, although the levels of those interpretations vary. We identified six trademark features to be considered when embracing an ethnographic approach: naturalism; context; multiple data sources; small case numbers; 'emic' and 'etic' perspectives, and ethical considerations. Ethnography has an assortment of meanings, so it is not often used in a wholly orthodox way and does not fall under the auspices of one epistemological belief. Yet, there are core criteria and trademark features that researchers should take into account alongside their particular epistemological beliefs when embracing an ethnographic inquiry. We hope this paper promotes a clearer vision of the methodological processes to consider when embarking on ethnography and creates an avenue for others to disseminate their experiences of and challenges encountered when applying ethnography's trademark features in different healthcare contexts.

  18. YOLANDA’S PORTRAIT: A STORY OF TRIQUI LINGUISTIC RESISTANCE MEDIATED BY ENGLISH AND ETHNOGRAPHIC COEVALNESS IN OAXACA, MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente, Ángeles

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This ethnographic study provides insights into the social contradictions of everyday language use in the multicultural context of Oaxaca, México. Following a coeval perspective (Fabian, 2007, the researchers, along with the participant, co-construct or co-perform the ethnographic encounter. Based on a larger ethnographic study on how Oaxacan university students perform English with a ‘postcolonial accent,’ the authors explore Yolanda’s use of English, along with Spanish and Triqui, as a series of multilingual social and cultural performances (Clemente and Higgins, 2008. This study takes place within the B.A. program in the Teaching of English as a Foreign Language (TEFL at the Language Centre of the state university of Oaxaca. Here, Yolanda becomes the sole focus within the coeval ethnographic perspective; that is, Yolanda is the co-performer of the ethnographic encounter.

  19. An ethnographic action research study to investigate the experiences of Bindjareb women participating in the cooking and nutrition component of an Aboriginal health promotion programme in regional Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilson, Caroline; Kearing-Salmon, Karrie-Anne; Morrison, Paul; Fetherston, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the experiences of women participating in a cooking and nutrition component of a health promotion research initiative in an Australian Aboriginal regional community. Weekly facilitated cooking and nutrition classes were conducted during school terms over 12 months. An ethnographic action research study was conducted for the programme duration with data gathered by participant and direct observation, four yarning groups and six individual yarning sessions. The aim was to determine the ways the cooking and nutrition component facilitated lifestyle change, enabled engagement, encouraged community ownership and influenced community action. Regional Bindjareb community in the Nyungar nation of Western Australia. A sample of seventeen Aboriginal women aged between 18 and 60 years from the two kinships in two towns in one shire took part in the study. The recruitment and consent process was managed by community Elders and leaders. Major themes emerged highlighting the development of participants and their recognition of the need for change: the impact of history on current nutritional health of Indigenous Australians; acknowledging shame; challenges of change around nutrition and healthy eating; the undermining effect of mistrust and limited resources; the importance of community control when developing health promotion programmes; finding life purpose through learning; and the need for planning and partnerships to achieve community determination. Suggested principles for developing cooking and nutrition interventions are: consideration of community needs; understanding the impact of historical factors on health; understanding family and community tensions; and the engagement of long-term partnerships to develop community determination.

  20. A participatory action research pilot study of urban health disparities using rapid assessment response and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David Richard; Hernández, Agueda; Saint-Jean, Gilbert; Evans, Siân; Tafari, Ida; Brewster, Luther G; Celestin, Michel J; Gómez-Estefan, Carlos; Regalado, Fernando; Akal, Siri; Nierenberg, Barry; Kauschinger, Elaine D; Schwartz, Robert; Page, J Bryan

    2008-01-01

    Healthy People 2010 made it a priority to eliminate health disparities. We used a rapid assessment response and evaluation (RARE) to launch a program of participatory action research focused on health disparities in an urban, disadvantaged Black community serviced by a major south Florida health center. We formed partnerships with community members, identified local health disparities, and guided interventions targeting health disparities. We describe the RARE structure used to triangulate data sources and guide intervention plans as well as findings and conclusions drawn from scientific literature and epidemiological, historic, planning, clinical, and ethnographic data. Disenfranchisement and socioeconomic deprivation emerged as the principal determinants of local health disparities and the most appropriate targets for intervention.

  1. Tackling complexities in understanding the social determinants of health: the contribution of ethnographic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Mridula

    2011-11-25

    The complexities inherent in understanding the social determinants of health are often not well-served by quantitative approaches. My aim is to show that well-designed and well-conducted ethnographic studies have an important contribution to make in this regard. Ethnographic research designs are a difficult but rigorous approach to research questions that require us to understand the complexity of people's social and cultural lives. I draw on an ethnographic study to describe the complexities of studying maternal health in a rural area in India. I then show how the lessons learnt in that setting and context can be applied to studies done in very different settings. I show how ethnographic research depends for rigour on a theoretical framework for sample selection; why immersion in the community under study, and rapport building with research participants, is important to ensure rich and meaningful data; and how flexible approaches to data collection lead to the gradual emergence of an analysis based on intense cross-referencing with community views and thus a conclusion that explains the similarities and differences observed. When using ethnographic research design it can be difficult to specify in advance the exact details of the study design. Researchers can encounter issues in the field that require them to change what they planned on doing. In rigorous ethnographic studies, the researcher in the field is the research instrument and needs to be well trained in the method. Ethnographic research is challenging, but nevertheless provides a rewarding way of researching complex health problems that require an understanding of the social and cultural determinants of health.

  2. Tackling complexities in understanding the social determinants of health: the contribution of ethnographic research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandyopadhyay Mridula

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The complexities inherent in understanding the social determinants of health are often not well-served by quantitative approaches. My aim is to show that well-designed and well-conducted ethnographic studies have an important contribution to make in this regard. Ethnographic research designs are a difficult but rigorous approach to research questions that require us to understand the complexity of people’s social and cultural lives. Approach I draw on an ethnographic study to describe the complexities of studying maternal health in a rural area in India. I then show how the lessons learnt in that setting and context can be applied to studies done in very different settings. Results I show how ethnographic research depends for rigour on a theoretical framework for sample selection; why immersion in the community under study, and rapport building with research participants, is important to ensure rich and meaningful data; and how flexible approaches to data collection lead to the gradual emergence of an analysis based on intense cross-referencing with community views and thus a conclusion that explains the similarities and differences observed. Conclusion When using ethnographic research design it can be difficult to specify in advance the exact details of the study design. Researchers can encounter issues in the field that require them to change what they planned on doing. In rigorous ethnographic studies, the researcher in the field is the research instrument and needs to be well trained in the method. Implication Ethnographic research is challenging, but nevertheless provides a rewarding way of researching complex health problems that require an understanding of the social and cultural determinants of health.

  3. Ethnographic Stories as Generalizations that Intervene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Brit Ross; Verran, Helen

    2012-01-01

    partners in a development aid project; it tells about the seemingly magic actions of a database used for monitoring. We use the note for discussing why we think it is important, in a situation where ethnographic stories are bought and sold as products, to name some of the ontological commitments that go......In this paper, we show why we think the notion of instrumental ethnography should be revived (compared to Steve Woolgar's 1982 use of the term). We see instrumental ethnography as a particular form of ethnography that recognizes ethnographic stories as agential through their capacity to work...... as generalizations. We outline two different logics of generalizing (one-many and whole-parts) and show how these logics can be identified in a note from fieldwork that one of the authors is currently involved in. The field note displays how a project worker in a large environmental NGO engage in monitoring her...

  4. Technologies of the Self and Ethnographic Praxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodwin, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The authors contributing to this special issue draw on Foucault's notion of technologies of the self: the means by which people operate on their own bodies and souls in pursuit of self-transformation, always according to particular regimes of value. Foucault's notion remains attractive to anthropology: the technologies are ethnographically visible, and they illustrate how power affects the intimate realms of social life. The authors in this issue take up three problems: (1) the process by which people craft new subjectivities, (2) the genealogy of the new technologies of the self now circulating in East Asia, and (3) the forms of governance and political rationality that they justify. The articles as a whole testify to the fruitful encounter between ethnographic praxis and Foucault's philosophical project. They also show how transnational movement and hybrid cultural forms inflect the strategies of governance associated with modern technologies of the self, especially those allied with biomedicine.

  5. Anthropological and Ethnographic Methods and Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Constance

    2018-01-01

    For scholars of African history, anthropology offers a number of valuable and invigorating methodological avenues, from engaging directly in ethnographic fieldwork to analyzing anthropological data compiled by others. Given the asymmetries of written documents and the biases of archival material for Africa, anthropological methods and sources offer a different type of access to those who, for various reasons, tend not to appear in other forms of documentary record. But using anthropology is a...

  6. Examining organizational change in primary care practices: experiences from using ethnographic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Grant; Advocat, Jenny; Geneau, Robert; Farrell, Barbara; Thille, Patricia; Ward, Natalie; Evans, Samantha

    2012-08-01

    Qualitative methods are an important part of the primary care researcher's toolkit providing a nuanced view of the complexity in primary care reform and delivery. Ethnographic research is a comprehensive approach to qualitative data collection, including observation, in-depth interviews and document analysis. Few studies have been published outlining methodological issues related to ethnography in this setting. This paper examines some of the challenges of conducting an ethnographic study in primary care setting in Canada, where there recently have been major reforms to traditional methods of organizing primary care services. This paper is based on an ethnographic study set in primary care practices in Ontario, Canada, designed to investigate changes to organizational and clinical routines in practices undergoing transition to new, interdisciplinary Family Health Teams (FHTs). The study was set in six new FHTs in Ontario. This paper is a reflexive examination of some of the challenges encountered while conducting an ethnographic study in a primary care setting. Our experiences in this study highlight some potential benefits of and difficulties in conducting an ethnographic study in family practice. Our study design gave us an opportunity to highlight the changes in routines within an organization in transition. A study with a clinical perspective requires training, support, a mixture of backgrounds and perspectives and ongoing communication. Despite some of the difficulties, the richness of this method has allowed the exploration of a number of additional research questions that emerged during data analysis.

  7. Learning to become a member of a community of scientists: An ethnographic study of student participation in weather research in two middle school classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Candice Michelle

    2000-11-01

    This research project involves the investigation of the opportunities to learn science and about science through an extended year-long weather project in two middle school science classrooms. The theoretical framework draws together two compatible but as yet unconnected bodies of literature. From studies of scientific practices, the importance of the ways science is learned through practice in authentic settings are considered. Studies of situated cognition are examined as well to discern how students learn in context-specific ways. This empirical research is unique in three important ways. First, the research took place in two different middle school classrooms and utilized extensive participant observation over the course of the entire academic year and focus group interviews with students. One of the classes was mostly Hispanic students of lower socioeconomic status. The other class was primarily Caucasian students of middle socioeconomic status. Second, the teachers in the study participated in a multi-year service program coordinated by the local university. The teachers worked with their students to complete a year-long weather project that involves data collection, representation, analysis, and interpretation. Third, the project involves long-term study of weather data. As a result, students participating in the research over the year began to challenge the claims of their peers. Few classroom studies of earth science have been conducted and published and even fewer involved student managed school science research projects. The findings from this study can be used as a model for how long-term research projects in science can be incorporated into middle school science classes. This project is thus very important in the field of science education for understanding ways to make science accessible and appealing to a variety of students.

  8. Going to the doctor with enhancement in mind – An ethnographic study of university students’ use of prescription stimulants and their moral ambivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Margit Anne; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Traulsen, Janine Marie

    2015-01-01

    these students use doctors as easy access to study drugs, and legitimize their use of stimulants because they were prescribed. The second theme, “A good cause”, shows that the purpose is what counts as a measure for whether stimulant use is considered morally acceptable or not. The third theme, “Being...

  9. Healthcare provider views on the health effects of biomass fuel collection and use in rural Eastern Cape, South Africa: an ethnographic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinga, Margaret Njirambo; Annegarn, Harold J.; Clancy, Joy S.

    2013-01-01

    Policymakers at global level recognise that household biomass use in developing countries has significant health consequences. However, it is unclear how local-level health professionals perceive and respond to such health effects. This paper which is derived from the findings of a larger study on

  10. Dimensiones del cuidado familiar en la depresión: Un estudio etnográfico Dimensions of family care during depression: An ethnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carme Ferré Grau

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad, entre las enfermedades con una mayor incidencia se encuentran los trastornos depresivos. Por ello la participación de la familia en la atención de las personas que la han padecido es de gran relevancia para el cuidado integral del paciente en su entorno familiar. El objetivo general de este artículo es profundizar en el conocimiento de la dinámica que se establece entre las personas que tienen la responsabilidad familiar del cuidado del paciente depresivo y especialmente de las relaciones entre la persona que cuida y la que es cuidada por un trastorno depresivo. Se trata de un estudio cualitativo, prospectivo y observacional. La investigación se llevó a cabo en un Centro de Salud Mental de Tarragona (Cataluña. La muestra la constituyen un total de cincuenta familiares de pacientes depresivos. El análisis de los datos se realizó mediante un proceso inductivo del contenido de las entrevistas y visitas domiciliarias que permitió objetivar las tareas del cuidar y el rol del cuidador familiar, las necesidades, motivaciones, dificultades de los familiares de pacientes depresivos desde una perspectiva evolutiva.At the present time, among the illnesses with a bigger incidence are the depressive dysfunctions. In and of itself the participation of the family in the attention of people that you/they have suffered it is of great relevance for the patient's integral care in its family environment. The general objective of this I articulate it is to deepen in the knowledge of the dynamics that settles down among people that have the family responsibility of the care of the depressive patient and especially of the relationships among the person that takes care and the one of that it is taken care by a depressive dysfunction. It is a qualitative, prospective and observational study. The investigation is carried out in a Center of Mental Health of Tarragona (Catalonia. The sample constitutes it a total of fifty relatives of patient

  11. The state of Danish nursing ethnographic research: flowering, nurtured or malnurtured

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Martinsen, Bente; Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup

    2017-01-01

    : This review critically examines the current state of the use of ethnographic methodology in the body of knowledge from Danish nursing scholars. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in relevant databases from 2003 to 2016. The studies included were critically appraised by all authors......BACKGROUND: Nursing was established in Denmark as a scholarly tradition in the late nineteen eighties, and ethnography was a preferred method. No critical review has yet summarised accomplishments and gaps and pointing at directions for the future methodological development and research herein. AIM...... sections in many studies illustrated that ethnographical methodology is nurtured by references such as Hammersley and Atkinson or Spradley. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence exists that Danish nursing scholars' body of knowledge nurtures the ethnographic methodology mainly by the same few authors; however, whether...

  12. Detection of rapid-eye movements in sleep studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajeev; Takeuchi, Tomoka; Laroche, Suzie; Gotman, Jean

    2005-08-01

    One of the key features of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep is the presence of bursts of REMs. Sleep studies routinely use REMs to classify sleep stages. Moreover, REM count or density has been used in studies involving learning and various psychiatric disorders. Most of these studies have been based on the visual identification of REMs, which is generally a very time-consuming task. This and the varying definitions of REMs across scorers have warranted the development of automatic REM detection methodologies. In this paper, we present a new detection scheme that combines many of the intrinsic properties of REMs and requires minimal parameter adjustments. In the proposed method, a single parameter can be used to control the REM detection sensitivity and specificity tradeoff. Manually scored training data are used to develop the method. We assess the performance of the method against manual scoring of individual REM events and present validation results using a separate data set. The ability of the method to discriminate fast horizontal ocular movement in REM sleep from other types of events is highlighted. A key advantage of the presented method is the minimal a priori information requirement. The results of training data (recordings from five subjects) show an overall sensitivity of 78.8% and specificity of 81.6%. The performance on the testing data (recording from five subjects different from the training data) showed overall sensitivity of 67.2% and specificity of 77.5%.

  13. Rapidly improving stroke symptoms: a pilot, prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, Clotilde; Bianchi, Riccardo; Ramkishun, Charles; Weedon, Jeremy; Law, Susan; Szarek, Michael; Rojas-Soto, Diana; Tariq, Sara; Levine, Steven R

    2015-06-01

    Rapidly improving stroke symptoms (RISSs) are a controversial exclusion for intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We estimated the frequency of 4 prespecified RISS definitions and explored their relationship to clinical outcome. Pilot, prospective study of AIS patients admitted within 4.5 hours of symptom onset. Serial assessments using National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were performed every 20 ± 5 minutes until a rt-PA treatment decision was made, independent of the study. Improvement was calculated as the difference between baseline NIHSS and treatment decision NIHSS. RISS was defined as a 4-point or greater improvement, 25% or greater, 50% or greater, and according to the previously reported TREAT (The Re-examining Acute Eligibility for Thrombolysis) criteria. Unfavorable outcome was defined as modified Rankin Scale score more than 1 at 90 days after stroke. Logistic regression determined if RISS definition(s) related to the outcome. Fifty patients with AIS were enrolled: mean age 65 years; median baseline NIHSS score 5 (interquartile range, 2-11). RISS frequencies were 10%-22% based on definition. Median treatment decision NIHSS score is 5 (interquartile range, 2-9). Twenty-three (46%) patients received rt-PA. None of the 3 non-TREAT RISS definitions was independently associated with the outcome. Five of fifty (10%) were RISS according to the TREAT criteria, all 5 had good outcome without rt-PA. A Serial NIHSS assessment before treatment decision is feasible and may help determine the frequency and magnitude of RISS. This is the first prospective estimate of RISS frequency and outcome according to various prespecified definitions. The TREAT RISS frequency as a more restrictive definition may better predict good outcome of RISS in future, larger studies. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 'We all want to succeed, but we've also got to be realistic about what is happening': an ethnographic study of relationships in trial oversight and their impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daykin, Anne; Selman, Lucy E; Cramer, Helen; McCann, Sharon; Shorter, Gillian W; Sydes, Matthew R; Gamble, Carrol; Macefield, Rhiannon; Lane, J Athene; Shaw, Alison

    2017-12-22

    The oversight and conduct of a randomised controlled trial involves several stakeholders, including a Trial Steering Committee (TSC), Trial Management Group (TMG), Data Monitoring Committee (DMC), funder and sponsor. We aimed to examine how the relationships between these stakeholders affect the trial oversight process and its rigour, to inform future revision of Good Clinical Practice guidelines. Using an ethnographic study design, we observed the oversight processes of eight trials and conducted semi-structured interviews with members of the trials' TSCs and TMGs, plus other relevant informants, including sponsors and funders of trials. Data were analysed thematically, and findings triangulated and integrated to give a multi-perspective account of current oversight practices in the UK. Eight TSC and six TMG meetings from eight trials were observed and audio-recorded, and 66 semi-structured interviews conducted with 52 purposively sampled key informants. Five themes are presented: (1) Collaboration within the TMG and role of the CTU; (2) Collaboration and conflict between oversight committees; (3) Priorities; (4) Communication between trial oversight groups and (5) Power and accountability. There was evidence of collaborative relationships, based on mutual respect, between CTUs, TMGs and TSCs, but also evidence of conflict. Relationships between trial oversight committees were influenced by stakeholders' priorities, both organisational and individual. Good communication following specific, recognised routes played a central role in ensuring that relationships were productive and trial oversight efficient. Participants described the possession of power over trials as a shifting political landscape, and there was lack of clarity regarding the roles and accountability of each committee, the sponsor and funder. Stakeholders' perceptions of their own power over a trial, and the power of others, influenced relationships between those involved in trial oversight. Recent

  15. The Collection of Questionnaires Concerning Wild Plants on the Digital Platform of the Polish Ethnographic Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Pieńczak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The specificity of the Polish Ethnographic Atlas (PEA research work and the potentialities of applying atlas materials have been largely discussed over the last few years. What should be reminded here is that the research activity of the PEA is based on two mainstays: the documentary one (collecting fieldwork materials, museum and library search and the interpretative one (elaborating appropriate systematics which take into account various forms and varieties of the investigated phenomena, preparing maps and concluding on the basis of the spatial ethnographic image. The first stage has been already completed – therefore, the Cieszyn Atlas Unit has rich ethnographic archives, the only one of such a size in Poland. The collection comprises several thousand interview questionnaires, surveys, fieldwork photographs and other archival materials, obtained by Polish ethnologists in the second half of the 20th century nearly all over Poland. The second mainstay of the atlas activity concerns the elaboration of the collected source materials in the form of maps and some corresponding commentaries as well as in the form of special electronic catalogues. What the article aims at is presenting the specificity of the Polish Ethnographic Atlas in the context of documentation, preservation and popularization of cultural heritage of the Polish countryside. Source materials of the Atlas constitute a unique source of rural history and, in contrast to other ethnographic studies, they comprise the whole territory of Poland. Arduously collected over the decades, the Atlas sources are a precious part of the material cultural heritage. Presenting and popularizing them is needed e.g. by local communities, which turn to their cultural roots to build their local/regional/national identity. Currently, the Polish Ethnographic Atlas is starting long-term documentary work concerning scientific processing and popularization of source materials essential for conducting and

  16. Living Theory: Principles and Practices for Teaching Social Theory Ethnographically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Chris; Rosaldo, Manuel; Seim, Josh; Shestakofsky, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This article details the principles and practices animating an "ethnographic" method of teaching social theory. As opposed to the traditional "survey" approach that aims to introduce students to the historical breadth of social thought, the primary objective of teaching ethnographically is to cultivate students as participant…

  17. Finding a Way out of the Ethnographic Paradigm Jungle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhadip; Banerjee, Pratyush

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to develop a hybrid ethnographic paradigm, taking the best points from the different approaches of ethnographic research. The pioneering proponents of ethnography differed in their conceptualization of the method, resulting in the development of three distinct schools of thought-holistic, semiotic and…

  18. Return Interviews and Long Engagements with Ethnographic Informants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Joseph; Hayashi, Akiko

    2017-01-01

    This paper uses examples from research conducted in preschools in Japan, China, and the United States to illustrate the features and virtues of return interviews with informants with whom ethnographers have long research engagements. Return interviews and long research engagements are powerful research strategies that help the ethnographers ask…

  19. Runne-Beana: Dog Herds Ethnographer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrdene Anderson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Saami society in Lapland (now often called Saapmi, particularly the seasonally-nomadic reindeer-breeding sector, is predicated upon mobility and autonomy of its actors. Runne-Beana, a talented reindeer-herding dog, exhibited both mobility and autonomy when allocating to himself a peripatetic ethnographer, on the first day of five years of doctoral dissertation fieldwork in arctic Norway in 1972. That family’s and the wider community’s reactions to Runne-Beana’s behavior, and mine, highlight the tensions when mobility and autonomy compound with ideologies of ownership and control. At the same time, his companionship profoundly shaped all field relationships, engendering an understanding of dog culture as it is manifest in the herder/herding dog/reindeer triad and in the interpenetration of assumptions concerning child/dog enculturation.

  20. The Contribution (or Not) of UN Higher Education to Peacebuilding: An Ethnographic Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the role of United Nations (UN) peace academics in teaching for peace within the UN higher education system, and questions what contribution, if any, UN peacebuilding education makes to the broader field of peace and conflict studies education, and in the lives of the people it touches. The study draws on ethnographic data…

  1. [The diagnostic disclosure of dementia: an ethnographic exploration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijngaarden, Els; Broekhuis, Gert; van Leussen, Carolien; Kamper, Ad; The, Anne-Mei

    2017-09-01

    Giving adequate diagnostic information is considered to be fundamental in dementia care. An important question is how the diagnostic disclosure in dementia actually takes place. The aim of this explorative ethnographic study was therefore to provide insight into the disclosure practice of medical specialists. For this study, 22 interviews performed by seven medical specialists were analyzed.The results of this study show that the observed doctors are direct and explicit in disclosing the diagnosis. Actual (medical) information about the diagnosis and the performed investigations is provided. The main areas for improvement are involving the patient in the conversation, align your language to the lifeworld of the patient and his/her significant other(s), avoiding the use of medical jargon, discussing the consequences of the diagnosis for daily life, and explicitly recognizing the emotional and existential challenges associated with the disclosure. In providing further information, doctors could discuss emotional and existential support more specifically.

  2. The state of Danish nursing ethnographic research: flowering, nurtured or malnurtured - a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Martinsen, Bente; Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

    2017-08-09

    Nursing was established in Denmark as a scholarly tradition in the late nineteen eighties, and ethnography was a preferred method. No critical review has yet summarised accomplishments and gaps and pointing at directions for the future methodological development and research herein. This review critically examines the current state of the use of ethnographic methodology in the body of knowledge from Danish nursing scholars. We performed a systematic literature search in relevant databases from 2003 to 2016. The studies included were critically appraised by all authors for methodological robustness using the ten-item instrument QARI from Joanna Briggs Institute. Two hundred and eight studies met our inclusion criteria and 45 papers were included; the critical appraisal gave evidence of studies with certain robustness, except for the first question concerning the congruity between the papers philosophical perspective and methodology and the seventh question concerning reflections about the influence of the researcher on the study and vice versa. In most studies (n = 34), study aims and arguments for selecting ethnographic research are presented. Additionally, method sections in many studies illustrated that ethnographical methodology is nurtured by references such as Hammersley and Atkinson or Spradley. Evidence exists that Danish nursing scholars' body of knowledge nurtures the ethnographic methodology mainly by the same few authors; however, whether this is an expression of a deliberate strategy or malnutrition in the form of lack of knowledge of other methodological options appears yet unanswered. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. Using the Learners-as-Ethnographers Approach to Enhance Intercultural Learning among American College Students Learning Chinese as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Minhui

    2012-01-01

    This study explored how the learners-as-ethnographers (LAE) approach facilitated intercultural learning among American students learning Chinese as a foreign language. Two research questions addressed the effectiveness of the LAE approach and students' learning experiences in a non-immersion context. I designed six ethnographic tasks for the…

  4. Organizational Perspectives on Rapid Response Team Structure, Function, and Cost: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia L; McSweeney, Jean

    Understanding how an organization determines structure and function of a rapid response team (RRT), as well as cost evaluation and implications, can provide foundational knowledge to guide decisions about RRTs. The objectives were to (1) identify influencing factors in organizational development of RRT structure and function and (2) describe evaluation of RRT costs. Using a qualitative, ethnographic design, nurse executives and experts in 15 moderate-size hospitals were interviewed to explore their decision-making processes in determining RRT structure and function. Face-to-face interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and verified for accurateness. Using content analysis and constant comparison, interview data were analyzed. Demographic data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The sample included 27 participants from 15 hospitals in 5 south-central states. They described a variety of RRT responders and functions, with the majority of hospitals having a critical care charge nurse attending all RRT calls for assistance. Others described a designated RRT nurse with primary RRT duties as responder to all RRT calls. Themes of RRT development from the data included influencers, decision processes, and thoughts about cost. It is important to understand how hospitals determine optimal structure and function to enhance support of quality nursing care. Determining the impact of an RRT on costs and benefits is vital in balancing patient safety and limited resources. Future research should focus on clarifying differences between team structure and function in outcomes as well as the most effective means to estimate costs and benefits.

  5. Dream Interpretation as a Component of Researcher's Reflexivity within an Ethnographic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miškolci, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Researchers' "reflexivity" about how they shape the phenomena that they study within the data collection process is often presented as a crucial component of ethnographic research methodology. Nevertheless, academic literature about ethnography is mostly silent around whether researchers' dreams are relevant to the research process and…

  6. Formal and Informal Safety Management : The Importance of Ethnographic Research for Safety Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Mascini (Peter); Y. Bacharias; I. Abaaziz

    2007-01-01

    textabstractSafety surveys normally focus on the influence of formal safety management (bureaucracy) on safety performances, while neglecting the impact of informal coping strategies (craftsman-ship) that are the main topic of ethnographic safety studies. Based on a survey in a Dutch en-ergy company

  7. Understanding Teacher Identity from a Symbolic Interactionist Perspective: Two Ethnographic Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Brigitte; Fritz, Elzette

    2008-01-01

    In this ethnographic inquiry we portray two teacher narratives reflecting educational change in the context of two South African schools. The study was conducted as part of a larger inquiry into ten schools in urban South Africa. A decade of democracy begs some attention to educational progress and reform, from the viewpoint of teachers and with…

  8. A Potentially Heteroglossic Policy Becomes Monoglossic in Context: An Ethnographic Analysis of Paraguayan Bilingual Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Ethnographic and discursive approaches to educational language policy (ELP) that explore how policy is appropriated in context are important for understanding policy success/failure in meeting goals of educational equity for language-minoritized students. This study describes how Paraguayan national policy for universal bilingual education…

  9. [Mediation practices in epidemiological research from an ethnographic perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luís Augusto Vasconcelos

    2009-01-01

    During 1998 I accompanied a cultural communication network in the production of epidemiological data, which used an ethnographic approach to studies of science. Inserted in the daily activities of an epidemiological research group, I registered some aspects of the scientific production process, such as the strategies and negotiations involved in the maintenance and circulation of the data produced. This paper describes the trajectory of epidemiological research and the interaction network of its actors, including the participation of technicians in the negotiation of the scientific practices. In addition to highlighting the continuous activity of negotiation and transformation of epidemiological data and information, I analyze the separation of science and politics or of nature and culture-society, and emphasize the collective participation in the process of scientific production.

  10. Feasibility study of rapid opioid rotation and titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmazsky, Marina; Ghandehari, Javid; Sanchez, Angela; Lin, Hung-Mo; Lin, Huong-Mo; Pappagallo, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Opioid guidelines recommend opioid rotation and switching for patients who do not achieve adequate pain relief or who experience intolerable adverse events (AEs) with their current opioid. However, specific recommendations and protocols for opioid rotation are lacking, making the practice time consuming and difficult for primary care physicians to accomplish independently or coordinate with a pain specialist. To assess the safety and feasibility of using 24-hour intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) to achieve rapid opioid rotation and titration (RORT). Open-label pilot study. Hospital research center. At admission, patients (aged ≥ 18 years) with treatment-refractory chronic pain who were taking morphine or oxycodone for ≥ 3 months and had pain scores ≥ 4 on a 10-point scale, underwent opioid rotation to oral oxymorphone extended release (ER). They also received IV-PCA oxymorphone for 24 hours as needed. At discharge, the participants were taking oral oxymorphone ER with oxymorphone immediate release (IR) as needed based on their total 24-hour oral plus IV-PCA oxymorphone use. During a 2-week follow-up, their oxymorphone usage was titrated as needed. Main outcome measures were AEs, Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC), Brief Pain Inventory (0 = no pain/interference, 10 = worst pain/complete interference), treatment satisfaction, and change in oxymorphone dose. Twelve patients enrolled and completed the 24-hour IV-PCA; 10 completed the 2-week follow-up post-24-hour IV-PCA. PGIC status improved by 12 hours (odds ratio [OR], 0.19, 95% CI, 0.08 - 0.44; P < 0.001), and both PGIC status and activity scores improved by 24 hours (OR, 0.23, 95% CI, 0.09 - 0.55; P = 0.001; OR, 0.49, 95% CI, 0.25 - 0.96; P = 0.04, respectively) and 2 weeks (OR, 0.14, 95% CI, 0.04 - 0.46; P = 0.001; OR, 0.21, 95% CI, 0.06 - 0.72; P = 0.01) versus 6 hours. During the 24-hour IV-PCA time period, 6 of 10 patients accomplished ≥ 50% of their overall dose titration. At 2

  11. The Ethnographic Use of Facebook in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    New social media have become indispensable to people all over the world as platforms for communication, with Facebook being the most popular. Hence, platforms such as Facebook are also becoming crucial tools for ethnographers because much social life now exists ‘online’. What types of field...... play an important role even in ethnographic work concerned with questions other than how Facebook works as a social medium. Most importantly it allows the ethnographer to keep up-to-date with the field. I argue that ethnography is already in possession of the methodological tools critically to assess...

  12. Ethnographic research with adolescent students: situated fieldwork ethics and ethical principles governing human research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, Annette

    2009-12-01

    This paper explores ethical dilemmas in situated fieldwork ethics concerning ethnographic studies of adolescent students. While consequentialist and deontological ethics form the basis of the ethical stances shared by ethnographers and research ethics committees, the interpretation of those principles may diverge in school-based ethnography with adolescent students because of the particular role of the adult ethnographer vis-à-vis developmentally immature adolescents not held legally responsible for many of their actions. School ethnographers attempt to build trust with adolescent participants in order to learn about their hidden cultural worlds, which may involve activities that are very harmful to the youths involved. They face many difficult and sometimes unexpected choices, including whether to intervene and how to represent events and adolescents in published findings. Scenarios with examples drawn from research conducted in public high schools are used to illustrate and explicate dilemmas in formal research and latent insider/outsider roles and relations involving harmful adolescent behaviors, advocacy, and psychological trauma. Also examined are analytical procedures used to construct interpretations leading to representations of research participants in the resulting publication.

  13. Big Data and Small: Collaborations between ethnographers and data scientists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ford, Heather

    2014-01-01

    In the past three years, Heather Ford—an ethnographer and now a PhD student—has worked on ad hoc collaborative projects around Wikipedia sources with two data scientists from Minnesota, Dave Musicant and Shilad Sen...

  14. A mixed-methods study on perceptions towards use of Rapid Ethical Assessment to improve informed consent processes for health research in a low-income setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addissie, Adamu; Davey, Gail; Newport, Melanie J; Addissie, Thomas; MacGregor, Hayley; Feleke, Yeweyenhareg; Farsides, Bobbie

    2014-05-02

    Rapid Ethical Assessment (REA) is a form of rapid ethnographic assessment conducted at the beginning of research project to guide the consent process with the objective of reconciling universal ethical guidance with specific research contexts. The current study is conducted to assess the perceived relevance of introducing REA as a mainstream tool in Ethiopia. Mixed methods research using a sequential explanatory approach was conducted from July to September 2012, including 241 cross-sectional, self-administered and 19 qualitative, in-depth interviews among health researchers and regulators including ethics committee members in Ethiopian health research institutions and universities. In their evaluation of the consent process, only 40.2% thought that the consent process and information given were adequately understood by study participants; 84.6% claimed they were not satisfied with the current consent process and 85.5% thought the best interests of study participants were not adequately considered. Commonly mentioned consent-related problems included lack of clarity (48.1%), inadequate information (34%), language barriers (28.2%), cultural differences (27.4%), undue expectations (26.6%) and power imbalances (20.7%). About 95.4% believed that consent should be contextualized to the study setting and 39.4% thought REA would be an appropriate approach to improve the perceived problems. Qualitative findings helped to further explore the gaps identified in the quantitative findings and to map-out concerns related to the current research consent process in Ethiopia. Suggestions included, conducting REA during the pre-test (pilot) phase of studies when applicable. The need for clear guidance for researchers on issues such as when and how to apply the REA tools was stressed. The study findings clearly indicated that there are perceived to be correctable gaps in the consent process of medical research in Ethiopia. REA is considered relevant by researchers and stakeholders

  15. Sexuality, vulnerability to HIV, and mental health: an ethnographic study of psychiatric institutions Sexualidade e vulnerabilidade ao HIV em saúde mental: um estudo de base etnográfica de instituições psiquiátricas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana de Souza Pinto

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents data from the ethnographic based formative phase of the Interdisciplinary Project on Sexuality, Mental Health, and AIDS (PRISSMA, sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH and carried out in two psychiatric institutions in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Results from ethnographic observations, focus groups, and key informant interviews with different groups of mental health care providers and day hospital and outpatient mental health clients regarding conceptions of sexuality and HIV vulnerability are described. The results suggest a diversity of notions about sexuality by both groups and point out the high HIV sexual risk in this psychiatric population. This formative phase has served as the basis for the cultural adaptation and creation of a Brazilian intervention for HIV prevention in the severely mentally ill, the feasibility of which has been successfully evaluated in the pilot phase.Este artigo apresenta dados da fase formativa, de base etnográfica, do Projeto Interdisciplinar em Sexualidade, Saúde Mental e AIDS (PRISSMA patrocinado pelo National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH e desenvolvido em duas instituições psiquiátricas da cidade do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. São descritos e discutidos os resultados obtidos nas observações etnográficas, grupos focais e entrevistas com informantes-chave realizados com diferentes grupos de profissionais de saúde mental e usuários de saúde mental do hospital-dia e/ou em tratamento ambulatorial, relativos às concepções de sexualidade e vulnerabilidade para o HIV. Os resultados sugerem uma diversidade de relatos e noções sobre o exercício da sexualidade por ambos os grupos e aponta para o alto risco sexual para o HIV nessa população psiquiátrica. Esta fase formativa embasou a adaptação cultural e a criação de uma intervenção brasileira para prevenção desse vírus em portadores de transtornos mentais graves cuja viabilidade foi avaliada

  16. Expertise and talent development in rugby refereeing: an ethnographic enquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollis, Stewart; Macpherson, Alan; Collins, Dave

    2006-03-01

    We explore how expertise is obtained in the domain of rugby refereeing. The research data are qualitative and are drawn from an 18 month period working in collaboration with the Rugby Football Union Elite Referee Unit. Adopting an ethnographic mode of enquiry, the study combined long-term participant observation with in-depth interviewing, indirect observations and the collection of artefacts including existing protocol, coach feedback forms and strategic reports. The diversity of methodologies allowed us to examine how expertise is developed across various domains of analysis, including the intrapersonal, interpersonal, group and social perspectives. Building on expertise studies in "deliberate practice", further prerequisites for expertise, at least in this domain and with these participants, incorporated "deliberate experience" and "transfer of skills". Additionally, a key issue in the findings concerns a shift from "descriptive" towards a "non-linear processes"-oriented model of development. We conclude by identifying opportunities and limitations associated with the adoption of ethnography as a method for studying expertise.

  17. Exploring Multiple Identities as a Health Care Ethnographer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Ledger MPhil, RMT

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous discussions about the role of the ethnographer have weighed the advantages and disadvantages of occupying insider or outsider positions, or dual practitioner-researcher identities. In the author's experience, additional identities can come to the fore when a seasoned health professional returns to the field as a novice ethnographer. In this article she reflects on ways in which she shifted between the identities of researcher, therapist, friend, and student in her ethnography about music therapy service development. These experiences are presented to reveal the inherent complexity of the researcher role and to encourage health care ethnographers to consider ways in which they can hold multiple identities in their own research.

  18. The Ethnographic Use of Facebook in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    New social media have become indispensable to people all over the world as platforms for communication, with Facebook being the most popular. Hence, platforms such as Facebook are also becoming crucial tools for ethnographers because much social life now exists ‘online’. What types of field...... relations stem from such social media-driven ethnography? And what kinds of data do these relations present to the ethnographer? These questions must be considered in order to understand the challenges Facebook and other social media pose to ethnographic methodology. This article focuses on how Facebook may...... the validity and value of data gathered or produced via Facebook including issues such as authenticity which are also pertinent to digital ethnography....

  19. A beginner's guide to ethnographic observation in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Tiffany

    2017-03-22

    Background Observation is mentioned in most ethnographic textbooks, but specific details about how it should be conducted and the practicalities to be considered in ethnographic nursing research are not always explicit. This paper explores the experiences of and challenges faced by a novice nurse researcher who used observation to collect data. Aim To provide a novice researcher's perspective of observation in ethnographic nursing research and to highlight the associated challenges. Discussion Challenges that arose in observation began with determining which perspective to take, followed by rehearsing observation, developing and maintaining a constructive relationship with the observation site, being aware of the influence of the observer, managing interactions between the observed and the observer, and responding to ethical issues. Conclusion Novice nurse researchers considering using observation to collect data should be aware of the potential challenges they might encounter. Implications for practice The information presented in this paper will enable novice researchers to anticipate these issues and develop strategies to prevent or address them.

  20. Study on rapid evacuation in high-rise buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available More and more high rising buildings emerged in modern cities, but emergency evacuation of tall buildings has been a worldwide difficult problem. In this paper, a new evacuation device for high rising buildings in fire accident was proposed and studied. This device mainly consisted of special spiral slideway and shunt valve. People in this device could fast slide down to the first floor under gravity without any electric power and physical strength, which is suitable for various emergency evacuation including mobility-impaired persons. The plane simulation test has shown that human being in alternative clockwise and counterclockwise movement will not become dizzy. The evacuated people should wear protection pad, which can prevent slider from being injured by surface friction with the slide, and eliminate the friction coefficient difference caused by different clothes and slide surface. The calculation results show that the evacuation speed of the new device is much faster than traditional staircases. Moreover, such new evacuation device can also be used as a means of vertical transportation in high-rise buildings partly. People can take it from any floor to ground floor directly, which not only save time for waiting for the lifts but also save the power. The new evacuation system is of simple structure, easy to use, and suitable for evacuation and partly used as vertical downwards traffic, which shows light on solving world-wide difficulties on fast evacuation in high-rise buildings.

  1. Ethnographic research in Russia in the 19th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerimova Marina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic and structured ethnographic data collection started in Russia with the formation of the Emperor’s Academy of Science and in 1765 the Emperor’s Economic Society. In the beginning of the 18th century, the Academy had supported numerous expeditions and scientific research in Siberia. A handbook was introduced, with questions regarding peoples in the region, their customs, borders, languages and rituals. Later on, at the time of foundation of the Emperor’s Russian geographic society, in 1845, several special ethnographic programs were formulated, with the idea to facilitate data collection about many aspects of everyday life, customs and various questions related to the exclusively Russian population of the Russian Empire. In this process, a significant role was played by the Department of Ethnography and its head, the anthropologist K.M. Ber and later on, a famous publicist, art historian and ethnographer, N.I. Nadeždin. The program suggested in 1852 by N.I. Nadeždin was incorporated in “the handbook collection for Kamtchatka expedition”, undertaken by the Russian geographic society. Afterwards, many other departments and individuals had successfully continued to improve ethnographic program and design of the various data collection. For example, in the 19th century, a private ethnographic practice by prince Vjačeslav N. Tenjišev was very active, by collecting data on all life aspects among the rural population. The practice had 348 employees of various status and background. Today, the collected data and sources are being kept in the archive of the Russian Ethnographic Museum in St. Petersburg.

  2. Big Data and Small: Collaborations between ethnographers and data scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Ford

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past three years, Heather Ford—an ethnographer and now a PhD student—has worked on ad hoc collaborative projects around Wikipedia sources with two data scientists from Minnesota, Dave Musicant and Shilad Sen. In this essay, she talks about how the three met, how they worked together, and what they gained from the experience. Three themes became apparent through their collaboration: that data scientists and ethnographers have much in common, that their skills are complementary, and that discovering the data together rather than compartmentalizing research activities was key to their success.

  3. Ethnographic Approaches to Understanding Social Sustainability in Small-scale Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutich, A.

    2011-12-01

    Social sustainability is an important, but often neglected, aspect of determining the success of small-scale water systems. This paper reviews ethnographic approaches for understanding how indigenous knowledge enhances social sustainability of small-scale water systems, particularly in small-scale water systems threatened by water scarcity. After reviewing the literature on common-pool and traditional resource management strategies, the paper will focus on the case of a community-managed small-scale water system in Cochabamba, Bolivia. This study uses ethnographic evidence to demonstrate how indigenous institutions can be used to manage a small-scale urban water system sustainably. Several factors were crucial to the institution's success. First, indigenous residents had previous experience with common management of rural irrigation systems which they were able to adapt for use in an urban environment. Second, institutional rules were designed to prioritize the conservation of the water source. Third, indigenous Andean social values of uniformity, regularity, and transparency ensured that community members perceived the system as legitimate and complied with community rules. Fourth, self-governance enabled community members to quickly adapt to changing environmental conditions, such as seasonal scarcity and groundwater overdraft. The paper concludes with a discussion of the promise and limitations of ethnographic approaches and indigenous knowledge for understanding social sustainability in small-scale water systems.

  4. Theology as an Ethnographic Object: An Anthropology of Eastern Christian Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Carroll

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws upon over three years’ research among Eastern Orthodox (principally Antiochian and Greek communities in London and Mount Athos, Greece. This research came to engage theology quite heavily as part of the ethnographic facts of the fieldsites. This paper reviews some of the existing ways that theology (as both discipline and practice relate to ethnographic enquiry, particularly as it has arisen in the dialogue with the Anthropology of Christianity and frames this in light of the historical development of Anthropology and its relationship to theology and Christianity. The paper then advances a methodological argument, in favour of further means of relation, specifically in terms of theology as a cultural artefact. Drawing on local practices of liturgical theology and Eastern Orthodox forms of allegorical interpretation, I argue for the inclusion of theological insight and practice within the social scientific study of religion. Working in an Orthodox setting requires the investigation of liturgical theology and brings to light important aspects of the relationship between temporal and sempiternal domains of action. Particularly as it relates to liturgical theology and the practices of interpretation, ethnographic enquiry into Orthodox theology asks for a reconsideration of social scientific methods of analysis and representation.

  5. Ethnographic Decision Tree Modeling: A Research Method for Counseling Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kirk A.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes ethnographic decision tree modeling (EDTM; C. H. Gladwin, 1989) as a mixed method design appropriate for counseling psychology research. EDTM is introduced and located within a postpositivist research paradigm. Decision theory that informs EDTM is reviewed, and the 2 phases of EDTM are highlighted. The 1st phase, model…

  6. An Outsider's Ethnographic Thoughts about Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agar, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article gives Michael Agar's email responses to two questions put by Gavin Melles: "What are your thoughts on the advantages and dangers of developments in applied anthropology for ethnographic and anthropology practice?" and "What are your impressions of the potential and actual use of ethnography in design?" The…

  7. Cultural, Ethnographical and Religious Context of Georgian Folklore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jijelava, Badri; Holbrook, Jarita; Simonia, Irakli

    2017-05-01

    The culture of Georgia is rooted in the ancient religions which is traceable in the ethnographic data of the present day. The people who inhabited this area worshipped the star Arcturus in the Bootes constellation. This connection to Arcturus is reflected in the local folklore about the ploughman, oxen, dog and wolf.

  8. Use of Ethnographic Fiction in Social Justice Graduate Counselor Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Rita Chi-Ying; Bemak, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Ethnographic fiction is a technique for educating counseling students about the relationship of social justice to counseling practice. Preliminary data indicate it is an effective tool, with counseling students (N = 48) reporting an increased understanding and appreciation of clients' life experiences from a holistic perspective. Furthermore,…

  9. Patient participation in palliative care decisions: An ethnographic discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Rodríguez, Charo; Groleau, Danielle; Légaré, France; MacDonald, Mary Ellen; Marchand, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The participation of patients in making decisions about their care is especially important towards the end of life because palliative care decisions involve extensive uncertainty and are heavily influenced by personal values. Yet, there is a scarcity of studies directly observing clinical interactions between palliative patients and their health care providers. In this study, we aimed to understand how patient participation in palliative care decisions is constructed through discourse in a community hospital-based palliative care team. This qualitative study combined ethnographic observations of a palliative care team with discourse analysis. Eighteen palliative care patients with cancer diagnoses, six family physicians, and two nurses were involved in the study. Multiple interactions were observed between each patient and health care providers over the course of 1 year, for a total of 101 consultations, 24 of which were audio-recorded. The analysis consisted in looking for the interpretive repertoires (i.e., familiar lines of argument used to justify actions) that were used to justify patient participation in decision-making during clinical interactions, as well as exploring their implications for decision roles and end-of-life care. Patients and their health care providers seldom addressed their decision-making roles explicitly. Rather, they constructed patient participation in palliative care decisions in a covert manner. Four interpretive repertoires were used to justify patient participation: (1) exposing uncertainty, (2) co-constructing patient preferences, (3) affirming patient autonomy, and finally (4) upholding the authority of health care providers. The results demonstrate how patients and health care providers used these arguments to negotiate their respective roles in decision-making. In conclusion, patients and health care providers used a variety of interpretive repertoires to covertly negotiate their roles in decision-making, and to legitimize

  10. Patient participation in palliative care decisions: An ethnographic discourse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Bélanger

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The participation of patients in making decisions about their care is especially important towards the end of life because palliative care decisions involve extensive uncertainty and are heavily influenced by personal values. Yet, there is a scarcity of studies directly observing clinical interactions between palliative patients and their health care providers. In this study, we aimed to understand how patient participation in palliative care decisions is constructed through discourse in a community hospital-based palliative care team. This qualitative study combined ethnographic observations of a palliative care team with discourse analysis. Eighteen palliative care patients with cancer diagnoses, six family physicians, and two nurses were involved in the study. Multiple interactions were observed between each patient and health care providers over the course of 1 year, for a total of 101 consultations, 24 of which were audio-recorded. The analysis consisted in looking for the interpretive repertoires (i.e., familiar lines of argument used to justify actions that were used to justify patient participation in decision-making during clinical interactions, as well as exploring their implications for decision roles and end-of-life care. Patients and their health care providers seldom addressed their decision-making roles explicitly. Rather, they constructed patient participation in palliative care decisions in a covert manner. Four interpretive repertoires were used to justify patient participation: (1 exposing uncertainty, (2 co-constructing patient preferences, (3 affirming patient autonomy, and finally (4 upholding the authority of health care providers. The results demonstrate how patients and health care providers used these arguments to negotiate their respective roles in decision-making. In conclusion, patients and health care providers used a variety of interpretive repertoires to covertly negotiate their roles in decision-making, and to

  11. Total dural irradiation: RapidArc versus static-field IMRT: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Paul J., E-mail: paulj.kelly@hse.ie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mannarino, Edward; Lewis, John Henry; Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Hacker, Fred L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional fixed-gantry angle intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with RapidArc for total dural irradiation. We also hypothesize that target volume-individualized collimator angles may produce substantial normal tissue sparing when planning with RapidArc. Five-, 7-, and 9-field fixed-gantry angle sliding-window IMRT plans were generated for comparison with RapidArc plans. Optimization and normal tissue constraints were constant for all plans. All plans were normalized so that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 100% of the dose. RapidArc was delivered using 350 Degree-Sign clockwise and counterclockwise arcs. Conventional collimator angles of 45 Degree-Sign and 315 Degree-Sign were compared with 90 Degree-Sign on both arcs. Dose prescription was 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions. PTV metrics used for comparison were coverage, V{sub 107}%, D1%, conformality index (CI{sub 95}%), and heterogeneity index (D{sub 5}%-D{sub 95}%). Brain dose, the main challenge of this case, was compared using D{sub 1}%, Dmean, and V{sub 5} Gy. Dose to optic chiasm, optic nerves, globes, and lenses was also compared. The use of unconventional collimator angles (90 Degree-Sign on both arcs) substantially reduced dose to normal brain. All plans achieved acceptable target coverage. Homogeneity was similar for RapidArc and 9-field IMRT plans. However, heterogeneity increased with decreasing number of IMRT fields, resulting in unacceptable hotspots within the brain. Conformality was marginally better with RapidArc relative to IMRT. Low dose to brain, as indicated by V5Gy, was comparable in all plans. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed no clinically meaningful differences. The number of monitor units was lower and delivery time was reduced with RapidArc. The case-individualized RapidArc plan compared favorably with the 9-field conventional IMRT plan. In view of lower monitor unit requirements and shorter delivery time, Rapid

  12. A Rapid Compression Expansion Machine (RCEM) for studying chemical kinetics: Experimental principle and first applications

    CERN Document Server

    Werler, Marc; Maas, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    A novel extension of a rapid compression machine (RCM), namely a Rapid Compression Expansion Machine (RCEM), is described and its use for studying chemical kinetics is demonstrated. Like conventional RCMs, the RCEM quickly compresses a fuel/air mixture by pushing a piston into a cylinder; the resulting high temperatures and pressures initiate chemical reactions. In addition, the machine can rapidly expand the compressed gas in a controlled way by pulling the piston outwards again. This freezes chemical activity after a pre-defined reaction duration, and therefore allows a convenient probe sampling and ex-situ gas analysis of stable species. The RCEM therefore is a promising instrument for studying chemical kinetics, including also partially reacted fuel/air mixtures. The setup of the RCEM, its experimental characteristics and its use for studying chemical reactions are outlined in detail. To allow comparisons of RCEM results with predictions of chemical reaction mechanisms, a simple numerical model of the RCE...

  13. Old age and vulnerability between first, second and third person perspectives. Ethnographic explorations of aging in contemporary Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøn, Lone

    2016-12-01

    This paper is based on an ethnographic fieldwork aimed at exploring ethnographically how vulnerability in old age is perceived and experienced in contemporary Denmark. The fieldwork showed remarkable differences between two phases of the fieldwork: the first addressing vulnerability from the "outside" through group interviews with professionals, leaders and older people who were not (yet) vulnerable; and the second from the "inside" through more in depth fieldwork with older people who in diverse ways could be seen as vulnerable. After a short introduction to anthropological and social gerontological literature on characteristics of "Western" aging: medicalization, successful, healthy and active aging, I present findings from both phases of this ethnographic fieldwork arguing that the ethnographic approach reveals the composite and complex nature of vulnerability in old age and the constant interactions between first, second and third person perspectives. Through these methodological and analytical moves a complex and empirically tenable understanding of vulnerability in old age has emerged which 1. moves beyond rigid dichotomies that have characterized the study of old age, 2. integrates individual experience, social interaction and the structural and discursive context into the analysis, and 3. reveals the complex interplay between vulnerability and agency in diverse situations and settings of old age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The challenges facing ethnographic design research: A proposed methodological solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cash, Philip; Hicks, Ben; Culley, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Central to improving and maintaining high levels of performance in emerging ethnographic design research is a fundamental requirement to address some of the problems associated with the subject. In particular seven core issues are identified and include the complexity of test development, variabi......Central to improving and maintaining high levels of performance in emerging ethnographic design research is a fundamental requirement to address some of the problems associated with the subject. In particular seven core issues are identified and include the complexity of test development...... of the dataset and the stratification of the research context. The paper then examines the fundamental requirements of this scheme and how these relate to a Design Observatory approach. Following this, the proposed solution is related back to the initial problem set and potential issues are discussed. Finally...

  15. "All against pedophilia": ethnographic notes about a contemporary moral crusade

    OpenAIRE

    Lowenkron,Laura

    2013-01-01

    Based on an ethnographic fieldwork carried out within the Brazilian Senate's inquiry committee on Pedophilia and in the Federal Police Department, the aim of this paper is to analyze the strategies and the effects of the conceptualization and the combat of the phenomenon of sexual violence against children as "pedophilia" and with focus on child pornography on the internet. The text consists of a historical approach to the emergence of the problem, an analysis of the political strategies of t...

  16. Machinima and ethnographic research in three-dimensional virtual worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Leitão, Débora Krischke; GOMES , Laura Graziela

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose to share our experience of ethnographic research in the virtual world Second Life. We intend to narrate our experience producing machinima the method we used to enter the field and interact with residents. The production of films from the software and or hardware of video games or other real-time 3D graphics programs is called machinima. Our goal here is to discuss the possibility of using machinima as a technique for obtaining, presenting and interpreting ethnographi...

  17. Ethnographic notes about the communitarian soccer

    OpenAIRE

    Rigo, LC; Jahnecka, L; da Silva, IC

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe and analyze the current state of communitarian soccer (neighborhood amanteur soccer) in Pelotas, Brazil. Through a interpretative ethnography, observations (notes and photos), semi-structured interviews and the analysis of documents, a careful study about the beach and city championships, the two main competitions in the Pelotense amateur soccer league (LPFA), was carried out. It was concluded that in Pelotas, communitarian soccer is far from getting to an end. Rei...

  18. Eduscape: Comparative and Ethnographic Education Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ulla Ambrosius

    by negotiating identities between the past, represented by teachers, parents, and inherited habits and routines, and the future, manifested in terms of the promises of progress and modernity that are attached to education. This study provides a picture of young people across national and cultural contexts who...

  19. Beyond Lawrence: Ethnographic Intelligence for USSOCOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Frake, C. O. (1964b). Notes on queries in ethnography. American Anthropologist, 66(3), 132–145. Retrieved May 13, 2009 from JSTOR database ...from JSTOR database . 68 Seligman, A. (1997). The problem of trust. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Simons, A. and Tucker, D...battlefield development plans, automated and hardcopy databases , arms proliferation and military power studies related to the weapons acquisition strategies

  20. A rapid assay for on-site monitoring of infliximab trough levels: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.; Fidder, Herma H.; Wiesmeijer, Karien C.; de Dood, Claudia J.; Rispens, Theo; Wolbink, Gert-Jan; Hommes, Daniel W.; Tanke, Hans J.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring levels of biologicals against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been suggested to improve therapeutic outcomes in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). This pilot study describes a rapid lateral flow (LF)-based assay for on-site monitoring of serum trough levels of humanized monoclonal

  1. Ethnography as relation: the significance of the French Caribbean in the ethnographic writing of Michel Leiris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Celia

    2012-01-01

    This article considers two kinds of connection between Leiris and the French Caribbean that between his ideas on ethnography and Martinican Édouard Glissant’s concept of Relation; and the impact that his encounter with the French Caribbean had on those ideas. In 1950 Leiris develops a conception of ethnography as a partnership between Western and non-Western societies in which the ethnographer is not only politically involved in the societies she or he studies, but also trains native ethnographers so that the discipline can become a dialogue — or Relation — between the perspectives of ‘self’ and ‘other’ on the self’s and the other’s cultures. In two important articles on Leiris, Glissant comments approvingly on Leiris’s formulation of the difference between his earlier phantasy of identification with the colonized and his new politicized stance. In fact, however, the difference is less clear-cut: Leiris’s writing continues to express a complex imbrication of the personal and the political; the political commitment can be seen as a ‘sublimated’ version of the original emotional investment. Leiris moves from a desire to achieve ‘contact vrai’ with the black other to a sublimated desire to study societies that are themselves made up of contacts with other cultures; and the Caribbean provides the ideal example. But the importance of the Caribbean for Leiris lies also in the greater possibilities it offers, compared with Africa, for making his own personal ‘contacts’, through his friendship with Césaire, with politically active Antillean intellectuals, and hence laying the foundations for interactive ethnographic partnerships.

  2. The use of rapid review methods in health technology assessments: 3 case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenthaler, Eva; Cooper, Katy; Pandor, Abdullah; Martyn-St James, Marrissa; Chatters, Robin; Wong, Ruth

    2016-08-26

    Rapid reviews are of increasing importance within health technology assessment due to time and resource constraints. There are many rapid review methods available although there is little guidance as to the most suitable methods. We present three case studies employing differing methods to suit the evidence base for each review and outline some issues to consider when selecting an appropriate method. Three recently completed systematic review short reports produced for the UK National Institute for Health Research were examined. Different approaches to rapid review methods were used in the three reports which were undertaken to inform the commissioning of services within the NHS and to inform future trial design. We describe the methods used, the reasoning behind the choice of methods and explore the strengths and weaknesses of each method. Rapid review methods were chosen to meet the needs of the review and each review had distinctly different challenges such as heterogeneity in terms of populations, interventions, comparators and outcome measures (PICO) and/or large numbers of relevant trials. All reviews included at least 10 randomised controlled trials (RCTs), each with numerous included outcomes. For the first case study (sexual health interventions), very diverse studies in terms of PICO were included. P-values and summary information only were presented due to substantial heterogeneity between studies and outcomes measured. For the second case study (premature ejaculation treatments), there were over 100 RCTs but also several existing systematic reviews. Data for meta-analyses were extracted directly from existing systematic reviews with new RCT data added where available. For the final case study (cannabis cessation therapies), studies included a wide range of interventions and considerable variation in study populations and outcomes. A brief summary of the key findings for each study was presented and narrative synthesis used to summarise results for each

  3. Rapid elemental analysis and provenance study of Blumea balsamifera DC using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaona; Zhang, Qiao; Wu, Zhisheng; Shi, Xinyuan; Zhao, Na; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2014-12-31

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to perform a rapid elemental analysis and provenance study of Blumea balsamifera DC. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were implemented to exploit the multivariate nature of the LIBS data. Scores and loadings of computed principal components visually illustrated the differing spectral data. The PLS-DA algorithm showed good classification performance. The PLS-DA model using complete spectra as input variables had similar discrimination performance to using selected spectral lines as input variables. The down-selection of spectral lines was specifically focused on the major elements of B. balsamifera samples. Results indicated that LIBS could be used to rapidly analyze elements and to perform provenance study of B. balsamifera.

  4. Effect of a rapid maxillary expansion on snoring and sleep in children: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannasi, Lilian Chrystiane; Santos, Israel Reis; Alfaya, Thays Almeida; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Leitão-Filho, Fernando Studart; de Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of the McNamara rapid palatal expansion device for the treatment of sleep disorders in children. The sample enrolled 12 children aged 4-11 years. Children with snoring and bruxism whose parents did not agree to tonsil surgery were included in the study. During the initial evaluation, a questionnaire addressing sleep was administered, and plaster models were made for the construction of the McNamara rapid maxillary expansion device. The expansion period was 7-15 days, and the McNamara device was removed after 6-8 months. The same questionnaire was administered again after 30 days of use of the orthopedic appliance. The data were analyzed using the McNemar test, with the level of significance set to 5% (Pmaxillary expansion, can be an effective treatment for snoring and other undesirable sleep behaviors in children.

  5. Rapid Elemental Analysis and Provenance Study of Blumea balsamifera DC Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS was applied to perform a rapid elemental analysis and provenance study of Blumea balsamifera DC. Principal component analysis (PCA and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA were implemented to exploit the multivariate nature of the LIBS data. Scores and loadings of computed principal components visually illustrated the differing spectral data. The PLS-DA algorithm showed good classification performance. The PLS-DA model using complete spectra as input variables had similar discrimination performance to using selected spectral lines as input variables. The down-selection of spectral lines was specifically focused on the major elements of B. balsamifera samples. Results indicated that LIBS could be used to rapidly analyze elements and to perform provenance study of B. balsamifera.

  6. Mystic esoteric tourism in Uritorco Zone (Cordoba, Argentina: ethnographical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Otamendi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to synthesize the social construction and changes held in symbolic representations of Capilla del Monte dwellers, during the last two decades at that tourist area in Cordoba Province, Argentina. It will also describe from an ethnographic perspective how esoteric tourists, newcomers from the last migration waves and local authorities collaborated in its own way for the Uritorco Zone development, at the Uritorco Hill, where a peculiar mystic-esoteric discourse has been born combined with narratives of supernatural, ethnic, natural and extra terrestrial issues.

  7. Writing Therapies—An Ethnographic Approach to Transcultural Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesine Sturm

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an ethnographic research in the ethnopsychoanalytic tradition about a specific type of therapy, which was developed in France: the transcultural therapy in a "multicultural group setting." The authors detail the construction of their methodological approach, which relies on the French and the Swiss tradition of ethnopsychoanalytic research. This research buttresses the argument that the work on the therapeutic alliance, mediation and the construction of new meanings are central for this type of work. They also describe this setting as a space for profoundly creative encounters and the development of new meanings coming "from the margins" of French society. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs100319

  8. Media Ethnographic Methods targeting students in a technical education (Medialogy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Eva; Kofoed, Lise B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the process of designing, executing and evaluating a Bachelor “soft” skills based course, Media Ethnographic Methods targeting students in a technical education (Medialogy). The course was designed as a creative workshop encouraging innovation, group dynamics...... and participation. The multimodal form of examination facilitated different logics of presentation and discussion. In the examination, 80 percentages of the students were able to discuss and reflect upon theories and methods. It was important to link the new theories and methods, which can be fuzzy, in framing...... activities together with something technical that the students know and are interested in....

  9. Theoretical basics of the communicative- ethnographic approach to teaching a foreign language and culture

    OpenAIRE

    SYSOYEV PAVEL V.

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes theoretical basics of the communicative-ethnographic approach to teaching a foreign language and culture. The author a) states the importance of the problem; b) defines key concepts of the research "ethnography", "communicative competence", "intercultural competence", "communicative-ethnographic approach"; c) describes the content of teaching intercultural communication; d) defines methods of the communicative-ethnographic approach to teaching a foreign language and cultur...

  10. Colorimetric deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization assay for rapid screening of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiale, M S; Klatt, M J; Mozola, M A

    1990-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed in 11 laboratories to validate a colorimetric DNA hybridization (DNAH) method for rapid detection of Salmonella in foods. The method was compared to the standard culture method for detection of Salmonella in nonfat dry milk, milk chocolate, soy isolate, dried whole egg, ground black pepper, and raw ground turkey. Samples inoculated with high (0.4-2 cells/g) and low (0.04-0.2 cells/g) levels of Salmonella and uninoculated control samples were included in each food group analyzed. There was no significant difference in the proportion of samples positive by DNAH and culture procedure for any of the 6 foods. The colorimetric DNA hybridization assay screening method has been adopted official first action as a rapid screening method for detection of Salmonella in all foods.

  11. Fluorescent enzyme immunoassay for rapid screening of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, R S; Klatt, M J; Keelan, S L; Swaminathan, B; Gehle, W D; Chandonnet, H E

    1989-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed in 13 laboratories to validate an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) procedure for rapid detection of Salmonella in foods. The EIA was compared with the standard culture procedure for detection of Salmonella in 6 food types: ground black pepper, soy flour, dried whole eggs, milk chocolate, nonfat dry milk, and raw deboned turkey. Uninoculated and inoculated samples were included in each food group analyzed. There was no significant difference in the proportion of samples positive by the EIA and culture procedures at the 5% level for any of the 6 foods. The enzyme immunoassay screening method has been adopted official first action as a rapid screening method for detection of Salmonella.

  12. Relationship of red splenic arteriolar hyaline with rapid death: a clinicopathological study of 82 autopsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Manabe, Sho; Ishida, Tokiko; Kawai, Chihiro; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2012-12-31

    Little is known about the relationship between splenic arteriolar hyaline and cause of death. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinicopathological significance of splenic arteriolar hyaline in autopsy cases and estimate the applicability of hyaline for diagnosing the cause and rapidity of death. Archival data and histological slides from 82 cases were reviewed retrospectively. One section of each spleen was evaluated microscopically. The tinctorial pattern of splenic arteriolar hyaline was examined with Heidenhain's Azan trichrome stain, and the relationships between this pattern and age, cause of death, and rapidity of death were investigated. Fifty-four cases demonstrated hyaline change, with 3 different tinctorial patterns: red, blue, and a combination of red and blue. The 3 patterns coexisted in various proportions in each tissue section. Frequency of the blue pattern increased with age (P virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1132441651796836.

  13. Frightening music triggers rapid changes in brain monoamine receptors: a pilot PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Qiaozhen; Du, Fenglei; Hu, Yanni; Chao, Fangfang; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Frightening music can rapidly arouse emotions in listeners that mimic those from actual life-threatening experiences. However, studies of the underlying mechanism for perceiving danger created by music are limited. We investigated monoamine receptor changes induced by frightening music using (11)C-N-methyl-spiperone ((11)C-NMSP) PET. Ten healthy male volunteers were included, and their psychophysiologic changes were evaluated. Compared with the baseline condition, listening to frightening music caused a significant decrease in (11)C-NMSP in the right and left caudate nuclei, right limbic region, and right paralimbic region; a particularly significant decrease in the right anterior cingulate cortex; but an increase in the right frontal occipital and left temporal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Transient fright triggers rapid changes in monoamine receptors, which decrease in the limbic and paralimbic regions but increase in the cerebral cortex.

  14. Interviewee and Vessel Characteristics from Ethnographic Interviews of New England Groundfish Fishermen on Adaptation and Transition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Database of fisherman and vessel characteristics selected from ethnographic interviews of New England groundfish fishermen on adaptation and transition

  15. Ethnographic research through a liberationist lens: Ethical reflections on fieldwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hankela, Elina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with four research-related ethical questions that stem from the authors experiences in fieldwork. The author employs the liberationist tradition as a sounding board in her reflection. This tradition gives rise to the ethical questions that she deals with, among other influences, and also works as a lens through which she navigates the ethical dilemmas. She argues that such ethical reflection is timely because of the increasing interest in ethnographic methods in theology and theological ethics. The liberationist lens which is consciously biased in its choice of socially marginalised people and groups as interlocutors and is geared towards just social transformation offers a useful approach to interrogating fieldwork ethics, also for scholars operating outside of the field of (liberation theology. Besides the key contribution of the article, that is, reflecting on the relevant ethical questions related to the research, the author suggests that a wider and more systematic usage of ethnographic tools could benefit the liberationist tradition, which indeed emphasises the importance of lived experience, at this point in time, when many of those writing in the liberationist tradition are full-time academics.

  16. Peasants on display: the Czechoslavic Ethnographic Exhibition of 1895.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipová, Marta

    2011-01-01

    In the increasingly modernized Central Europe of the late nineteenth century, folk culture, with its alleged ancient character, was still understood by some scholars as the bearer of national identity. The Czechoslavic [sic] Ethnographic Exhibition, which took place in Prague in 1895, aimed to promote the idea of the ethnically unified, but at the same time regionally diverse, identity of the Czech-speaking people living in Bohemia, Moravia and Slovakia. Having to negotiate their identity with the ethnic Germans of Bohemia, the Czechs consciously excluded them from the event both as organizers and as exhibitors. The exhibition could therefore be seen as a symptom of its time—in the late nineteenth century Central Europe, locating national heritage was crucial and folk culture played an important role in the national politics, and not only for the Czechs. This article focuses mainly on the ethnographic exhibit entitled ‘the Exhibition Village’, which consisted of an eclectic selection of village houses and their imitations from Bohemia, Moravia and Slovakia. On this basis, it explores the political intentions behind the display of folk culture to both urban and rural audiences and brings attention to the question of integration of the diverse regional objects in a utopian national whole. The article thus also aims to demonstrate issues related to the use of folk artefacts for the purposes of cultural nationalism in Austria-Hungary in the late nineteenth century.

  17. Understanding teacher identity from a symbolic interactionist perspective: two ethnographic narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Smit

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this ethnographic inquiry we portray two teacher narratives reflecting educational change in the context of two South African schools. The study was conducted as part of a larger inquiry into ten schools in urban South Africa.¹ A decade of democracy begs some attention to educational progress and reform, from the viewpoint of teachers and with the culture of their schools as the inquiry's landscape. We present two ethnographic narratives, crafted of a typical 'township/rural' school, and an established Afrikaans school, with two teachers as the main social actors. Data were sourced from passive observations, interviews, informal conversations, and journal data. These field texts were analysed for content and narrative using, as methodological frame, the 'Clandininian' "metaphorical three-dimensional inquiry space". Three data themes, teacher authority, commitment to the profession in terms of staying or leaving, and multitasking are theorised from a symbolic interactionist framework, using constructs such as situational, social and personal identity. The major finding of this inquiry speaks to the power of the working context, the educational landscape, which appears to be a much stronger force in the development of teacher identity than national educational policies.

  18. Punk Rock and the Value of Auto-ethnographic Writing about Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Attfield

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Why do many of the books on punk rock and hardcore punk come with punk attitude? Why are a good number of the books written from a personal perspective? What kind of value do the diary entries of Nils Stevenson in 'Vacant: A Diary of the Punk Years 1976-79' have compared to an article on the rhetoric of class by David Simonelli in the journal 'Contemporary British History'? In some respects scholarly writing on punk rock seems like a contradiction. How can music so rooted in anti-establishment sentiment be appropriated into an institutional setting? The auto-ethnographic approach found in many of the studies of punk might be an answer to this question. The writers have used their own experiences as musicians and fans to reflect on and analyse the music and scenes which arguably provides the reader with a more immediate insight. This paper argues for an auto-ethnographic approach to the writing of punk and hardcore punk and suggests that this style of writing about music offers the reader an ‘authentic’ insight into these particular music scenes.

  19. Work-Identity in Ethnographic Research: Developing Field Roles in a Demanding Workplace Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunilla Jansson PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we problematize our field roles as two linguistic ethnographers who aim to study the communication and documentation practices drawn upon by care workers in elderly care facilities in Sweden. Our field roles are discussed in relation to the complex nature of care workers' knowledge and competence, which results from three different aspects of their work-identities: institutional, professional, and individual. As researchers, we found ourselves in constant dialogue with the research participants, and our field roles were continuously shaped and reshaped according to the individuals and the situations in which we became involved. Even aspects of our own identities taken into the field, such as our background and personal qualities, proved to be important in establishing good relations with the care staff. Coming closer to the participants' professional identity proved to be of utmost importance for interpreting their choices and decisions in the workplace. Identity negotiation is presented here as a constructive way of discussing ethnographic field roles in the research field.

  20. Relationship of red splenic arteriolar hyaline with rapid death: a clinicopathological study of 82 autopsy cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotani Hirokazu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the relationship between splenic arteriolar hyaline and cause of death. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinicopathological significance of splenic arteriolar hyaline in autopsy cases and estimate the applicability of hyaline for diagnosing the cause and rapidity of death. Methods Archival data and histological slides from 82 cases were reviewed retrospectively. One section of each spleen was evaluated microscopically. The tinctorial pattern of splenic arteriolar hyaline was examined with Heidenhain’s Azan trichrome stain, and the relationships between this pattern and age, cause of death, and rapidity of death were investigated. Results Fifty-four cases demonstrated hyaline change, with 3 different tinctorial patterns: red, blue, and a combination of red and blue. The 3 patterns coexisted in various proportions in each tissue section. Frequency of the blue pattern increased with age (P P  Conclusions Estimation of splenic arteriolar hyaline with Heidenhain’s Azan trichrome stain is useful for assessment of the cause and rapidity of death. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1132441651796836

  1. Rapid extraction of lexical tone phonology in Chinese characters: a visual mismatch negativity study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In alphabetic languages, emerging evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging studies shows the rapid and automatic activation of phonological information in visual word recognition. In the mapping from orthography to phonology, unlike most alphabetic languages in which there is a natural correspondence between the visual and phonological forms, in logographic Chinese, the mapping between visual and phonological forms is rather arbitrary and depends on learning and experience. The issue of whether the phonological information is rapidly and automatically extracted in Chinese characters by the brain has not yet been thoroughly addressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We continuously presented Chinese characters differing in orthography and meaning to adult native Mandarin Chinese speakers to construct a constant varying visual stream. In the stream, most stimuli were homophones of Chinese characters: The phonological features embedded in these visual characters were the same, including consonants, vowels and the lexical tone. Occasionally, the rule of phonology was randomly violated by characters whose phonological features differed in the lexical tone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that the violation of the lexical tone phonology evoked an early, robust visual response, as revealed by whole-head electrical recordings of the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN, indicating the rapid extraction of phonological information embedded in Chinese characters. Source analysis revealed that the vMMN was involved in neural activations of the visual cortex, suggesting that the visual sensory memory is sensitive to phonological information embedded in visual words at an early processing stage.

  2. Study on rapid bio-drying technology of cow dung with CaO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaotian; Qu, Guangfei; Liu, Shugen; Xie, Ruosong; He, Yanhua

    2017-05-01

    Effect of CaO2 on cow dung rapid bio-drying technology was researched. A static aerobic composting system was applied to this experiment which combining natural ventilation with Turing in the process of composting. The physical characteristics of cow dung was observed and the compost temperature, moisture content, organic matter, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, potassium content was determined which in order to study the effect of CaO2 on rapid drying of cattle in the compost. In the initial stage of compost, adding CaO2 groups compared with the control group, the temperature rise faster, 4-6 days in advance to the thermophilic phase; at the end of composting, the CaO2 composition and moisture content decreased significantly to below 30%. The addition of CaO2 in fertilizer was shorten the composting time, extend the thermophilic phase, to provide sufficient oxygen meeting the growth needs of aerobic microorganisms. It convinced that the rapid bio-drying of dairy manure has a good effect and provided a new idea for the effective treatment of cow dung.

  3. Rapid extraction of lexical tone phonology in Chinese characters: a visual mismatch negativity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, A-Ping; Wu, Yin-Yuan; Wang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    In alphabetic languages, emerging evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging studies shows the rapid and automatic activation of phonological information in visual word recognition. In the mapping from orthography to phonology, unlike most alphabetic languages in which there is a natural correspondence between the visual and phonological forms, in logographic Chinese, the mapping between visual and phonological forms is rather arbitrary and depends on learning and experience. The issue of whether the phonological information is rapidly and automatically extracted in Chinese characters by the brain has not yet been thoroughly addressed. We continuously presented Chinese characters differing in orthography and meaning to adult native Mandarin Chinese speakers to construct a constant varying visual stream. In the stream, most stimuli were homophones of Chinese characters: The phonological features embedded in these visual characters were the same, including consonants, vowels and the lexical tone. Occasionally, the rule of phonology was randomly violated by characters whose phonological features differed in the lexical tone. We showed that the violation of the lexical tone phonology evoked an early, robust visual response, as revealed by whole-head electrical recordings of the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN), indicating the rapid extraction of phonological information embedded in Chinese characters. Source analysis revealed that the vMMN was involved in neural activations of the visual cortex, suggesting that the visual sensory memory is sensitive to phonological information embedded in visual words at an early processing stage.

  4. Study of a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron to replace the CERN PS Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Hanke, K; Angoletta, M E; Balhan, B; Bartmann, W; Benedikt, M; Borburgh, J; Bozzini, D; Carli, C; Dahlen, P; Dobers, T; Fitterer, M; Garoby, R; Gilardoni, S; Goddard, B; Hansen, J; Hermanns, T; Lopez-Hernandez, L A; Hourican, M; Jensen, S; Kosmicki, A; Meddahi, M; Mikulec, B; Newborough, A; Nonis, M; Olek, S; Paoluzzi, M; Pittet, S; Puccio, B; Raginel, V; Ruehl, I; Schönauer, H; Sermeus, L; Steerenberg, R; Tan, J; Tückmantel, J; Vretenar, M; Widorski, M

    2011-01-01

    CERN’s proton injector chain is undergoing a massive consolidation and upgrade program in order to deliver beams meeting the needs of the LHC Luminosity Upgrade. As an alternative to the upgrade of the existing Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), the construction of a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) has been studied. This machine would replace the PSB and deliver beams to the LHC as well as to CERN’s rich fixed-target physics program. This paper summarizes the outcome of the feasibility study along with a tentative RCS design.

  5. Performance of an oral fluid rapid HIV-1/2 test: experience from four CDC studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Kevin P; Branson, Bernard M; Uniyal, Apurva; Kerndt, Peter R; Keenan, Patrick A; Jafa, Krishna; Gardner, Ann D; Jamieson, Denise J; Bulterys, Marc

    2006-08-01

    To evaluate the performance of a rapid HIV antibody test used with whole blood and oral fluid in settings where the test is likely to be used. In four separate studies, we compared the accuracy of the rapid test performed on whole blood and oral fluid specimens with the results of conventional HIV tests. Oral fluid and whole blood from persons of unknown HIV status recruited from clinics, labor and delivery units, and outreach venues were tested with the OraQuick Advance rapid HIV-1/2 antibody test. Sensitivity and specificity were compared with results of the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and Western blot algorithm used by the study sites. OraQuick sensitivity was 99.7% with whole blood and 99.1% with oral fluid from 327 persons who were HIV antibody positive by the conventional algorithm. OraQuick specificity was 99.9% with whole blood and 99.6% with oral fluid from 12 010 HIV-negative persons; EIA specificity was 99.7%. A cluster of 16 false-positive oral fluid tests occurred in one study, in which specificity was lower (99.0%) than in the other three studies (99.6-99.8%). In diverse settings in four studies, the OraQuick test showed high sensitivity and specificity for HIV antibody in whole blood and oral fluid specimens. Slightly more false-positive and false-negative results occurred with oral fluid than with whole blood, but performance with both specimen types was similar to, or better than, that of conventional EIAs.

  6. Women Sociability in the outskirts: an ethnographic essay about gender relations in a football tournament in Porto Alegre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Myskiw

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8042.2016v28n49p114 This article addresses the issue of gender relations in the world of sports practices, specifically in football. It focuses on ‘women’s’ sociabilities in matches of a football tournament in the outskirts of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. It seeks to present elements for understanding the place of ‘women in the outskirts’. It is based on a multi-site ethnographic study conducted between February 2009 and December 2011, marked by situations experienced while circulating and staying with groups of ‘men’. Practices and ethnographic experiences resulted in interpretations that emphasize immersion and tensions in/between homogender and heterogender sociabilities related to positions and engagements in the outskirts tournament.

  7. “Are You From The Police, Or What?” Critical Remarks On Ethnographic Fieldwork Among (Disadvantaged) Urban Youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, David Thore; Frostholm, Peter Hornbæk

    2016-01-01

    “Are You From The Police, Or What?” Critical Remarks On Ethnographic Fieldwork Among (Disadvantaged) Urban Youth As pointed out by Hammersley and Atkinson (2007) the field observer can experience being perceived as a spy and feeling undeniably unwelcome, especially in the beginning of observation...... studies. In the fall of 2014 we carried out ethnographic fieldwork (Hastrup 2010, Spradley 1980) in the city of Horsens in Denmark in relation to our research on unstructured socialization among urban youth in urban public spaces. Despite our efforts to explain the young people about our field work...... & Adair 2007) among urban youth and questioned whether we communicated our objectives thoroughly. Key words in this process proved to be time and conversation - openness and demystification and a repeated negotiation of consent from our informants in the urban sites. In this light, one can’t reduce...

  8. Ethnographic video narratives inviting various personal and professional interpretations in the area of care for older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørtoft, Kamilla Pernille Johansen; Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft

    her medicine and the way Benny moves and talks make the research participants draw on embodied knowledge and professional values and goals in various ways depending on their professional background and personal experiences. When they meet each other’s interpretation of the video narratives......The purpose of this paper is to discuss the potential of ethnographic video narratives to initiate informal interdisciplinary learning by exposing the diversity in how different professionals interpret the same situation. In the paper we draw on data from a pilot study in Denmark in which we showed...... two ethnographic video narratives to interdisciplinary focus groups with health care professionals at 3 care centres. The video narratives are about Bodil in her home and Benny in a senior centre. When the participants had watched the video narratives they were asked to write down their impressions...

  9. Experimental Study of Disruption of Columnar Grains During Rapid Solidification in Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manogharan, Guha; Yelamanchi, Bharat; Aman, Ronald; Mahbooba, Zaynab

    2016-03-01

    Over the years, many studies have been conducted to study and analyze the grain structures of metal alloys during additive manufacturing to improve mechanical properties. In particular, columnar grains are observed predominantly during rapid solidification of molten metal. This leads to lower mechanical properties and requires expensive secondary heat-treatment processes. This study is aimed at disrupting the formation of columnar grain growth during rapid solidification using ultrasonic vibration and analyzes the effects on grain structure and mechanical properties. A gas-metal arc welder mounted on a Rep-Rap-based low-cost metal 3 Dimension printer was used to deposit ER70S-6 mild steel layers on a plate. A contact-type ultrasonic transducer with a control system to vary the frequency and power of the vibration was used. The effects of ultrasonic vibration were determined from the statistical analysis of microstructure and micro-indentation techniques on the deposited layer and heat-affected zone. It was found that both frequency and interaction between frequency and power had significant impact on the refinement of average grain size up to 10.64% and increased the number of grains by approximately 41.78%. Analysis of micro-indentation tests showed that there was an increase of approximately 14.30% in micro-hardness due to the applied frequency during rapid solidification. A pole diagram shows that application of vibration causes randomization of grain orientation. Along with the results from this study, further efforts in modeling and experimentation of multi-directional vibrations would lead to a better understanding of disrupting columnar grains in applications that use mechanical vibrations, such as welding, directed energy deposition, brazing, etc.

  10. Enabling rapid behavioral ecotoxicity studies using an integrated lab-on-a-chip systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yushi; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-12-01

    Behavioral ecotoxicity tests are gaining an increasing recognition in environmental toxicology. Behavior of sensitive bioindicator species can change rapidly in response to an acute exposure to contaminants and thus has a much higher sensitivity as compared to conventional LC50 mortality tests. Furthermore, behavioral endpoints seems to be very good candidates to develop early-warning biomonitoring systems needed for rapid chemical risk assessment. Behavioral tests are non-invasive, fast, do not harm indicator organisms (behavioural changes are very rapid) and are thus fully compatible with 3R (Replacement - Reduction - Refinement) principle encouraging alternatives to conventional animal testing. These characteristics are essential when designing improved ecotoxicity tests for chemical risk assessment. In this work, we present a pilot development of miniaturized Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices for studying toxin avoidance behaviors of small aquatic crustaceans. As an investigative tool, LOCs represent a new direction that may miniaturize and revolutionize behavioral ecotoxicology. Specifically our innovative microfluidic prototype: (i) enables convening "caging" of specimens for real-time videomicroscopy; (ii) eliminates the evaporative water loss thus providing an opportunity for long-term behavioral studies; (iii) exploits laminar fluid flow under low Reynolds numbers to generate discrete domains and gradients enabling for the first time toxin avoidance studies on small aquatic crustaceans; (iv) integrates off-the-chip mechatronic interfaces and video analysis algorithms for single animal movement analysis. We provide evidence that by merging innovative bioelectronic and biomicrofluidic technologies we can deploy inexpensive and reliable systems for culture, electronic tracking and complex computational analysis of behavior of bioindicator organisms.

  11. Rapid Canine Retraction with Dentoalveolar Distraction Osteogenesis: An in vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allwin Benjamin Raj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this clinical study is to assess the effectiveness of a new technique of rapid canine retraction through distraction osteogenesis. The effects of dentoalveolar distraction on the dentofacial structures, the dental changes that has been produced by dentoalveolar distraction and the vitality of the distracted canine immediately after distraction and 3 months postdistraction using pulp vitality test were also evaluated. Custom made canine distractors were used for distraction. Pre and postdistraction lateral cephalogram, OPG, Model analysis and electrical pulp vitality testing is carried out and results were evaluated.

  12. Rapid Detection of Land Cover Changes Using Crowdsourced Geographic Information: A Case Study of Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Meng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Land cover change (LCC detection is a significant component of sustainability research including ecological economics and climate change. Due to the rapid variability of natural environment, effective LCC detection is required to capture sufficient change-related information. Although such information has been available through remotely sensed images, the complicated image processing and classification make it time consuming and labour intensive. In contrast, the freely available crowdsourced geographic information (CGI contains easily interpreted textual information, and thus has the potential to be applied for capturing effective change-related information. Therefore, this paper presents and evaluates a method using CGI for rapid LCC detection. As a case study, Beijing is chosen as the study area, and CGI is applied to monitor LCC information. As one kind of CGI which is generated from commercial Internet maps, points of interest (POIs with detailed textual information are utilised to detect land cover in 2016. Those POIs are first classified into land cover nomenclature based on their textual information. Then, a kernel density approach is proposed to effectively generate land cover regions in 2016. Finally, with GlobeLand30 in 2010 as baseline map, LCC is detected using the post-classification method in the period of 2010–2016 in Beijing. The result shows that an accuracy of 89.20% is achieved with land cover regions generated by POIs, indicating that POIs are reliable for rapid LCC detection. Additionally, an LCC detection comparison is proposed between remotely sensed images and CGI, revealing the advantages of POIs in terms of LCC efficiency. However, due to the uneven distribution, remotely sensed images are still required in areas with few POIs.

  13. Conceptualising the Use of Facebook in Ethnographic Research: As Tool, as Data and as Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sally

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes a three-part conceptualisation of the use of Facebook in ethnographic research: as a tool, as data and as context. Longitudinal research with young adults at a time of significant change provides many challenges for the ethnographic researcher, such as maintaining channels of communication and high rates of participant…

  14. The Inventory and Classification of types of Damage to Objects from Ethnographic Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doina-Maria Creangă

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article includes part of the research carried out within the project ‘Complex techniques of investigation, evaluation, conservation and restoration of collagenic ethnographic materials’, financed by the National Centre of Management Programs. The main causes of deterioration, factors in degradation and types of damage affecting ethnographic collagenic heritage are presented.

  15. Rare models: Roger Casement, the Amazon, and the ethnographic picturesque.

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    Wylie, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    In 1910 Roger Casement was sent by the British government to investigate the alleged humanitarian abuses of the Peruvian Amazon Company in the Putumayo, a disputed border zone in North West Amazonia. Casement brought more than verbal and written testimony back to London. On 26 June, some six months after he returned from the Amazon, Casement collected two Amerindian boys - Omarino and Ricudo - from Southampton docks. This paper will reconstruct the brief period that these young men spent in Britain in the summer of 1911 and assess, in particular, to what extent they were treated as 'exhibits' by Casement, who not only introduced them to leading members of the British establishment but also arranged for them to be painted and photographed following contemporary ethnographic conventions.

  16. Ethnographic study of diarrhoeal diseases among under-five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional design was employed to identify the local cosmology of childhood diarrhoea and its local treatment procedures. A total of 848 under-five children were identified by a quick inventory of randomly selected kebeles. Trained enumerators administered a pre-tested questionnaire in order to identify the ...

  17. An ethnographic study of tourist psychological states: Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychologists have no consensus on how many types of emotions people have. Some propose a short list, such as, happiness, sadness, anger, fear, disgust, and surprise. Others add contempt, interest, frustration, love, embarrassment and boredom. Many consider surprise as an emotion which occurs when events do not ...

  18. Sustaining a Nepali Telecenter: An Ethnographic Study Using Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeffrey; Sparks, Paul

    2014-01-01

    While advances have made it possible for the average Nepali to access mobile phones, computers, and digital cameras, barriers continue to impede access. Like other governments, Nepal responded in 2004 by creating about 80 telecenters to push sustainable technology to its people. Five years later, most telecenters struggle with sustainability. This…

  19. an ethnographic study of a South African home school

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    1999-11-23

    Nov 23, 1999 ... schooling [sic] is one of the most significant social trends of the past half century." Growing interest ... South Africa. The main research question was formulated as follows: ... feelings of isolation, stress and burnout, which are often encountered .... A recent survey of home schoolers in South Africa (De Waal, ...

  20. Resisting stigma, embracing solidarity: An ethnographic study of shopaholics anonymous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Demerling

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, an increased interest in the phenomenon of compulsive buying, which is better known as “shopaholism”, has occurred. This behaviour has been conceptualized as being an uncontrollable urge to purchase things which is pleasurable for an individual or relieves their distress and which results in negative consequences for that individual. This article examines the experiences of individuals within a Shopaholics Anonymous group to understand why individuals decide to join a support group and explore the dynamics of interaction among participants and how that shapes the outcome of their addiction.

  1. An ethnographic study of tourist psychological states: Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even so, if a destination aims to stage an event/festival, then they must to it properly otherwise the negative impact on the attendees' emotional state may influence adversely their perception even towards the destination as a whole. Interestingly, the emotion of “frustration” was found to lead towards a revisit intention, ...

  2. Lessons Learned from Applying Design Thinking in a NASA Rapid Design Study in Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria; Bakula, Casey; Castner, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    In late 2015, NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) funded an experiment in rapid design and rapid teaming to explore new approaches to solving challenging design problems in aeronautics in an effort to cultivate and foster innovation. This report summarizes several lessons learned from the rapid design portion of the study. This effort entailed learning and applying design thinking, a human-centered design approach, to complete the conceptual design for an open-ended design challenge within six months. The design challenge focused on creating a capability to advance experimental testing of autonomous aeronautics systems, an area of great interest to NASA, the US government as a whole, and an entire ecosystem of users and developers around the globe. A team of nine civil servant researchers from three of NASA's aeronautics field centers with backgrounds in several disciplines was assembled and rapidly trained in design thinking under the guidance of the innovation and design firm IDEO. The design thinking process, while used extensively outside the aerospace industry, is less common and even counter to many practices within the aerospace industry. In this report, several contrasts between common aerospace research and development practices and design thinking are discussed, drawing upon the lessons learned from the NASA rapid design study. The lessons discussed included working towards a design solution without a set of detailed design requirements, which may not be practical or even feasible for management to ascertain for complex, challenging problems. This approach allowed for the possibility of redesigning the original problem statement to better meet the needs of the users. Another lesson learned was to approach problems holistically from the perspective of the needs of individuals that may be affected by advances in topic area instead of purely from a technological feasibility viewpoint. The interdisciplinary nature of the design team also

  3. Exploring interprofessional practices in rapid response systems: a case study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Emily; Jackson, Debra; Elliott, Doug

    2015-01-01

    To describe the development of a proposed case study protocol investigating interprofessional relationships in a rapid response system (RRS) in a socioculturally complex clinical environment. Suboptimal care of deteriorating ward patients remains a concern for many acute healthcare organisations. Despite the advent of RRSs, emergency response teams are not always used to their full potential. How and why interprofessional relationships influence practices associated with the care and management of ward patients at risk of clinical deterioration requires investigation. Theoretical and empirical literature describing case study research and RRSs. Review methods An integrative review approach of the literature, focusing on key terms relating to 'case study research' and 'rapid response system', provided context and informed development of the study protocol. A single-site mixed-method instrumental case study protocol was developed using methodological triangulation and a multi-level model to examine interprofessional relationships between a broad range of stakeholders. Concurrent data collection and analysis will occur using document review of clinical scenarios, non-participant observations and semi-structured interviews. Case study research is an effective method for investigating socioculturally complex clinical environments. A strength of this approach is the flexibility in the choice of methods, which allows the researcher to build the design most suitable for the subjects or phenomena being investigated. Although this flexibility may be considered a potential weakness, rigour can be achieved by application of the strategies described. Findings from this research will provide rich descriptive insights into RRS relationships and healthcare professional practices during day-to-day management of acute ward patients at risk of or experiencing clinical deterioration. Description of this structured case study research approach will also inform other researchers.

  4. DNA methylation profile associated with rapid decline in kidney function: findings from the CRIC Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Maria R.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Joffe, Marshall M.; Xie, Dawei; Feldman, Harold I.; Dominic, Elizabeth A.; Guzman, Nicolas J.; Ramezani, Ali; Susztak, Katalin; Herman, James G.; Cope, Leslie; Harmon, Brennan; Kwabi-Addo, Bernard; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Go, Alan S.; He, Jiang; Lash, James P.; Kusek, John W.; Raj, Dominic S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epigenetic mechanisms may be important in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We studied the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern associated with rapid loss of kidney function using the Infinium HumanMethylation 450 K BeadChip in 40 Chronic Renal Insufficiency (CRIC) study participants (n = 3939) with the highest and lowest rates of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate. Results The mean eGFR slope was 2.2 (1.4) and −5.1 (1.2) mL/min/1.73 m2 in the stable kidney function group and the rapid progression group, respectively. CpG islands in NPHP4, IQSEC1 and TCF3 were hypermethylated to a larger extent in subjects with stable kidney function (P-values of 7.8E−05 to 9.5E−05). These genes are involved in pathways known to promote the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and renal fibrosis. Other CKD-related genes that were differentially methylated are NOS3, NFKBIL2, CLU, NFKBIB, TGFB3 and TGFBI, which are involved in oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways (P-values of 4.5E−03 to 0.046). Pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that gene networks related to cell signaling, carbohydrate metabolism and human behavior are epigenetically regulated in CKD. Conclusions Epigenetic modifications may be important in determining the rate of loss of kidney function in patients with established CKD. PMID:24516231

  5. Ethnographic Exploration of Empowerment to Improve Elderly Residents' Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Zia; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Hamzah, Azimi Bin Hj; Rezaeian, Mohsen; Kamrani, Mahnaz Akbari

    2017-01-01

    Evidence underscores that empowerment is central to improve the elderly residents' quality of life. In truth, empowerment is a process through which individuals gain better control over their life. The aim of this study was to explore how perceived empowerment influence on the quality of life among elderly Malay residents. A focus ethnographic approach was employed in a Malaysian residential home between May 2011 and January 2012. Data were gathered from participant observations, field notes, in-depth interviews, and exploring related documents. The analysis of the data gathered in the current study resulted in the development of three themes - social life and its requirements, caregivers' skills empowerment, and listening and supporting. Findings of the study provide new insights that are useful in charting new guideline for care providers and policy makers to improve the elderly residents' quality of life.

  6. A meta-ethnographic synthesis of fathers' experiences of complicated births that are potentially traumatic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmir, Rakime; Schmied, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    birth is a natural and for many, life enhancing phenomenon. In rare circumstances however birth can be accompanied with complications that may place the mother and infant at risk of severe trauma or death. Witnessing birth complications or obstetric emergencies can be distressing and potentially traumatic for the father. the aim of this paper is to report on the findings of a meta-ethnographic synthesis of father's experiences of complicated births that are potentially traumatic. databases searched included CINAHL, Scopus, PubMed and PsycINFO with Full Text. The search was conducted in February and March 2013 and revised in February 2015 for any new papers, and the search was limited to papers published in English, full text and peer-reviewed journals published between January 2000 to December 2013. studies were included if they focused on fathers/men's experiences of witnessing a birth with complications including a caesarean section or an adverse obstetric event. Studies included needed to use qualitative or mixed methods research designs with a substantial qualitative component. ANALYTIC STRATEGY: a meta-ethnographic approach was used using methods of reciprocal translation guided by the work of Noblit and Hare (1988) on meta-ethnographic techniques. Quality appraisal was undertaken using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) tool. eight qualitative studies with a total of 100 participants were included in the final sample. The men ranged in age from 19 to 50 years. Four major themes were identified: 'the unfolding crisis', 'stripped of my role: powerless and helpless', 'craving information' and 'scarring the relationship'. Participants described the fear and anxiety they felt as well as having a sense of worthlessness and inadequacy. Men did not receive sufficient information about the unfolding events and subsequently this birth experience impacted on some men's interactions and relationships with their partners. witnessing a complicated or unexpected

  7. Optical Coherence Tomography in the UK Biobank Study - Rapid Automated Analysis of Retinal Thickness for Large Population-Based Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearse A Keane

    Full Text Available To describe an approach to the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging in large, population-based studies, including methods for OCT image acquisition, storage, and the remote, rapid, automated analysis of retinal thickness.In UK Biobank, OCT images were acquired between 2009 and 2010 using a commercially available "spectral domain" OCT device (3D OCT-1000, Topcon. Images were obtained using a raster scan protocol, 6 mm x 6 mm in area, and consisting of 128 B-scans. OCT image sets were stored on UK Biobank servers in a central repository, adjacent to high performance computers. Rapid, automated analysis of retinal thickness was performed using custom image segmentation software developed by the Topcon Advanced Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (TABIL. This software employs dual-scale gradient information to allow for automated segmentation of nine intraretinal boundaries in a rapid fashion.67,321 participants (134,642 eyes in UK Biobank underwent OCT imaging of both eyes as part of the ocular module. 134,611 images were successfully processed with 31 images failing segmentation analysis due to corrupted OCT files or withdrawal of subject consent for UKBB study participation. Average time taken to call up an image from the database and complete segmentation analysis was approximately 120 seconds per data set per login, and analysis of the entire dataset was completed in approximately 28 days.We report an approach to the rapid, automated measurement of retinal thickness from nearly 140,000 OCT image sets from the UK Biobank. In the near future, these measurements will be publically available for utilization by researchers around the world, and thus for correlation with the wealth of other data collected in UK Biobank. The automated analysis approaches we describe may be of utility for future large population-based epidemiological studies, clinical trials, and screening programs that employ OCT imaging.

  8. Emotional noun processing: an ERP study with rapid serial visual presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengnan Yi

    Full Text Available Reading is an important part of our daily life, and rapid responses to emotional words have received a great deal of research interest. Our study employed rapid serial visual presentation to detect the time course of emotional noun processing using event-related potentials. We performed a dual-task experiment, where subjects were required to judge whether a given number was odd or even, and the category into which each emotional noun fit. In terms of P1, we found that there was no negativity bias for emotional nouns. However, emotional nouns elicited larger amplitudes in the N170 component in the left hemisphere than did neutral nouns. This finding indicated that in later processing stages, emotional words can be discriminated from neutral words. Furthermore, positive, negative, and neutral words were different from each other in the late positive complex, indicating that in the third stage, even different emotions can be discerned. Thus, our results indicate that in a three-stage model the latter two stages are more stable and universal.

  9. Palliative care making a difference in rural Uganda, Kenya and Malawi: three rapid evaluation field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Liz; Brown, Judith; Leng, Mhoira; Bettega, Nadia; Murray, Scott A

    2011-05-12

    Many people live and die in pain in Africa. We set out to describe patient, family and local community perspectives on the impact of three community based palliative care interventions in sub-Saharan Africa. Three palliative care programmes in Uganda, Kenya and Malawi were studied using rapid evaluation field techniques in each country, triangulating data from three sources: interviews with key informants, observations of clinical encounters and the local health and social care context, and routine data from local reports and statistics. We interviewed 33 patients with advanced illness, 27 family carers, 36 staff, 25 volunteers, and 29 community leaders and observed clinical care of 12 patients. In each site, oral morphine was being used effectively. Patients valued being treated with dignity and respect. Being supported at home reduced physical, emotional and financial burden of travel to, and care at health facilities. Practical support and instruction in feeding and bathing patients facilitated good deaths at home.In each country mobile phones enabled rapid access to clinical and social support networks. Staff and volunteers generally reported that caring for the dying in the face of poverty was stressful, but also rewarding, with resilience fostered by having effective analgesia, and community support networks. Programmes were reported to be successful because they integrated symptom control with practical and emotional care, education, and spiritual care. Holistic palliative care can be delivered effectively in the face of poverty, but a public health approach is needed to ensure equitable provision.

  10. Microfluidic device for rapid solution exchange to study kinetics of cell physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Howard; Honnatti, Meghana; Gillis, Kevin

    2006-11-01

    Exchanging the extracellular solution of the cell rapidly (less than 10ms) is an important requirement in study the kinetics of cell physiology. A microfluidic device is developed to exchange the solution around the cells as they flow through a junction at the intersection of two microfluidic channels. The solution exchange time is measured experimentally by fluorescently labeling the cell surface membranes with a styryl dye, FM1-43 or FM 2-10, and then observing the time course of cell fluorescence decay following the rapid drop in the extracellular concentration of the FM dye that occurs as the cell flows past the fluidic junction. A numerical model is developed to guide the experimental design of microfluidic device. In the model, the motion of a single cell through a fluid junction is simulated and the mixing process of the solutions is solved. The model also includes the kinetics of departitioning of FM dyes from the cell membrane. The departitioning time constants for the FM dyes are determined from fitting the measured data of the cell fluorescence decay. This departitioning kinetics is important as FM dyes are commonly used to label cell membranes for the purpose of measuring the release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles via exocytosis and the subsequent reuptake of vesicular membrane by endocytosis.

  11. Three stages of emotional word processing: an ERP study with rapid serial visual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; He, Weiqi; Wang, Ting; Luo, Wenbo; Zhu, Xiangru; Gu, Ruolei; Li, Hong; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2014-12-01

    Rapid responses to emotional words play a crucial role in social communication. This study employed event-related potentials to examine the time course of neural dynamics involved in emotional word processing. Participants performed a dual-target task in which positive, negative and neutral adjectives were rapidly presented. The early occipital P1 was found larger when elicited by negative words, indicating that the first stage of emotional word processing mainly differentiates between non-threatening and potentially threatening information. The N170 and the early posterior negativity were larger for positive and negative words, reflecting the emotional/non-emotional discrimination stage of word processing. The late positive component not only distinguished emotional words from neutral words, but also differentiated between positive and negative words. This represents the third stage of emotional word processing, the emotion separation. Present results indicated that, similar with the three-stage model of facial expression processing; the neural processing of emotional words can also be divided into three stages. These findings prompt us to believe that the nature of emotion can be analyzed by the brain independent of stimulus type, and that the three-stage scheme may be a common model for emotional information processing in the context of limited attentional resources. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Palliative care making a difference in rural Uganda, Kenya and Malawi: three rapid evaluation field studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettega Nadia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many people live and die in pain in Africa. We set out to describe patient, family and local community perspectives on the impact of three community based palliative care interventions in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Three palliative care programmes in Uganda, Kenya and Malawi were studied using rapid evaluation field techniques in each country, triangulating data from three sources: interviews with key informants, observations of clinical encounters and the local health and social care context, and routine data from local reports and statistics. Results We interviewed 33 patients with advanced illness, 27 family carers, 36 staff, 25 volunteers, and 29 community leaders and observed clinical care of 12 patients. In each site, oral morphine was being used effectively. Patients valued being treated with dignity and respect. Being supported at home reduced physical, emotional and financial burden of travel to, and care at health facilities. Practical support and instruction in feeding and bathing patients facilitated good deaths at home. In each country mobile phones enabled rapid access to clinical and social support networks. Staff and volunteers generally reported that caring for the dying in the face of poverty was stressful, but also rewarding, with resilience fostered by having effective analgesia, and community support networks. Conclusions Programmes were reported to be successful because they integrated symptom control with practical and emotional care, education, and spiritual care. Holistic palliative care can be delivered effectively in the face of poverty, but a public health approach is needed to ensure equitable provision.

  13. End mill tools integration in CNC machining for rapid manufacturing processes: simulation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Nafis Osman Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer numerical controlled (CNC machining has been recognized as a manufacturing process that is capable of producing metal parts with high precision and reliable quality, whereas many additive manufacturing methods are less capable in these respects. The introduction of a new layer-removal methodology that utilizes an indexing device to clamp the workpiece can be used to extend CNC applications into the realm of rapid manufacturing (CNC-RM processes. This study aims to improve the implementation of CNC machining for RM by formulating a distinct approach to integrate end mill tools during finishing processes. A main objective is to enhance process efficiency by minimizing the staircasing effect of layer removal so as to improve the quality of machined parts. In order to achieve this, different types of end mill tools are introduced to cater for specific part surfaces during finishing operations. Virtual machining simulations are executed to verify the method and the implications. The findings indicate the advantages of the approach in terms of cutting time and excess volume left on the parts. It is shown that using different tools for finishing operations will improve the capabilities of CNC machining for rapid manufacturing applications.

  14. Micro Ethnographic Research as a Method for Informing Educational Technology Design in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Vanderlinde, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    Objectives and purposes. This paper describes research on how micro ethnographic classroom studies (Mehan, 1979) of the integration of technology can inform researchers understanding of teachers and children’s situated acts with technology. Hence, the objective of this paper is to show stories...... of the integration of technology from the teachers and children’s perspective. The central research question of the study is: how can researchers of educational technology represent the local and situated action of teachers and children to inform future technologies? Theoretical frameworks. Integrating technology...... in classrooms can be approached at many different levels. From a curriculum perspective, these levels refer to the macro, meso, micro, and the nano level (Akker, Kuiper, & Hameyer, 2003). At every level there seems to be a gap between researcher and practitioners, even at the nano level. Hence, educational...

  15. TECRA Unique test for rapid detection of Salmonella in food: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D; Dailianis, A E; Hill, L; McIntyre, D A; Anderson, A

    2001-01-01

    The TECRA Unique Salmonella test uses the principle of immunoenrichment to allow rapid detection of Salmonellae in food. A collaborative study was conducted to compare the TECRA Salmonella Unique test with the reference culture method given in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual. Three food types (milk powder, pepper, and soy flour) were analyzed in Australia and 2 food types (milk chocolate and dried egg) were analyzed in the United States. Forty-one collaborators participated in the study. For each of the 5 foods at each of the 3 levels, a comparison showed no significant differences (p > or = 0.05) in the proportion of positive test samples for Unique and that for the reference method using the Chi-square test for independence with continuity correction.

  16. Flow-Based Systems for Rapid and High-Precision Enzyme Kinetics Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supaporn Kradtap Hartwell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme kinetics studies normally focus on the initial rate of enzymatic reaction. However, the manual operation of steps of the conventional enzyme kinetics method has some drawbacks. Errors can result from the imprecise time control and time necessary for manual changing the reaction cuvettes into and out of the detector. By using the automatic flow-based analytical systems, enzyme kinetics studies can be carried out at real-time initial rate avoiding the potential errors inherent in manual operation. Flow-based systems have been developed to provide rapid, low-volume, and high-precision analyses that effectively replace the many tedious and high volume requirements of conventional wet chemistry analyses. This article presents various arrangements of flow-based techniques and their potential use in future enzyme kinetics applications.

  17. Strategic Uses for Ethnographic Stories: Using What Your Customers Do, Feel, and Say to Transform Your Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnould, Eric; Cayla, Julien; Beers, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Ethnographic stories offer executives an empathic understanding of how consumers live, work and play through gritty and detailed descriptions. What you learn from ethnographic stories may surprise you — and change your company’s strategy.......Ethnographic stories offer executives an empathic understanding of how consumers live, work and play through gritty and detailed descriptions. What you learn from ethnographic stories may surprise you — and change your company’s strategy....

  18. A meta-ethnographic synthesis of midwives' and nurses' experiences of adverse labour and birth events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmir, Rakime; Pangas, Jackie; Dahlen, Hannah; Schmied, Virginia

    2017-12-01

    Health professionals are frequently exposed to traumatic events due to the nature of their work. While traumatic and adverse labour and birth events experienced by women are well researched, less attention has been given to midwives' and nurses' experiences of these events and the impact it has on their lives. To undertake a meta-ethnographic study of midwives' and nurses' experiences of adverse labour and birth events. Scopus, CINHAL PLUS, MEDLINE and PUBMED databases were searched using subject headings and keywords. The search was limited to papers published in peer-reviewed journals from 2004-October 2016. Quality appraisal was undertaken using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. Papers had to be qualitative or have a substantial qualitative component. Studies were included if they primarily focused on midwives' or nurses' perspectives or experiences of complicated, traumatic or adverse labour and birth events. A meta-ethnographic approach was used incorporating methods of reciprocal translation guided by the work of Noblit and Hare (1988, Meta-Ethnography: Synthesizing qualitative studies (Vol. 11). Newbury Park: Sage publications). Eleven qualitative studies were included in the final sample. Four major themes were (i) feeling the chaos; (ii) powerless, responsible and a failure; (iii) "It adds another scar to my soul"; and (iv) finding a way to deal with it. Midwives and nurses feel relatively unprepared when faced with a real-life labour and birth emergency event. While many of the midwives and nurses were traumatised by the experience, some were able to view their encounter as an opportunity to develop their emergency response skills. Witnessing and being involved in a complicated or adverse labour and birth event can be traumatic for nurses and midwives. Organisational and collegial support needs to be available to enable these health professionals to talk about their feelings and concerns. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. An Ethnographic Portrait of Translingual/Transcultural Navigation among Immigrant Children and Youth: Voices during Sunday School at a Latino Church

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñalva, Stacy L.

    2017-01-01

    This ethnographic study aims to foreground the voices of 34 first through twelfth graders who belong to first-generation immigrant families from Mexico and Central America and attend Nueva Vida Church (fictitious name) in a Midwestern US city. They insightfully reflect upon their language, culture and citizenship during Sunday school class focus…

  20. Compelled to Be Connected: An Ethnographic Exploration of Organizational Culture, Work-Life Balance, and the Use of Mobile Workplace Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kristopher J.

    2013-01-01

    This study is an ethnographic exploration of organizational culture, work-life balance, and the use of information and communication technology ("ICT") in the work and home settings. The researcher was embedded for nine weeks within the Information Technology ("IT") department at the corporate headquarters of a mid-sized…

  1. The Social Status of the Social Rehabilitation Pedagogue in Qualitative Ethnographic Research Methodological and Ethical Dilemmas in a “Difficult Field”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Michel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to show certain ethical difficulties and problems, as well as moral dilemmas that the qualitative researcher encounters in field studies. The issns raised are the author’s own reflections after conducting ethnographic research in the city from the perspective of social rehabilitation pedagogy.

  2. Physician counseling of young adults with rapid weight gain: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Jason

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of weight gain is highest during young adulthood. Our study aims to describe weight gain patterns among young adults and to evaluate physician recognition of and counseling for rapid weight gain. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients ages 18-35 at an academic internal medicine clinic between 2004-2008. We conducted chart reviews to determine weight change over time, whether weight gain greater than 3 lbs/year was documented, whether counseling was provided, and whether patients became overweight. We categorized weight gain documentation by location on the problem list, encounter diagnosis, or note text. We categorized counseling as weight-specific or general diet and exercise counseling. We used Chi-square tests to evaluate the relationship between weight change over time and the following variables: gender, diagnosis of weight gain, and counseling for weight gain. Fisher's Exact test was used to test for an association between diagnosis and counseling category. Results The study included 365 patients. Weight gain was greater than 3 lbs/year for 24% (90/365 of patients, of whom 56 (15% gained 3-5.9 lbs/year, and 34 (9% gained more than 6 lbs/year. Among patients gaining more than 3 lbs/year, physicians documented weight gain as a problem in only 10% (9/90. Of the 9 patients for whom weight gain was documented, physicians provided weight-specific counseling in three, and general diet and exercise counseling in four. Of the 81 individuals with no documented diagnosis of weight gain, 63% had no documented counseling, but 34% received general diet and exercise counseling. Among patients with over 180 days of follow-up, 8% (10/126 became overweight. Conclusions Physicians infrequently recognize or counsel for weight gain among young adult patients. Improving identification of patients with rapid weight gain can provide an opportunity for tailored weight-related counseling.

  3. Deconstructing fatalism: ethnographic perspectives on women's decision making about cancer prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Elaine M; Schoenberg, Nancy E

    2011-06-01

    Researchers have long held that fatalism (the belief in a lack of personal power or control over destiny or fate) constitutes a major barrier to participation in positive health behaviors and, subsequently, adversely affects health outcomes. In this article, we present two in-depth, ethnographic studies of rural women's health decisions surrounding cancer treatments to illustrate the complexity and contestability of the long-established fatalism construct. Narrative analyses suggest that for these women, numerous and complex factors--including inadequate access to health services, a legacy of self-reliance, insufficient privacy, combined with a culturally acceptable idiom of fatalism--foster the use of, but not necessarily a rigid conviction in, the notion of fatalism.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of structural and dynamical properties of rapidly quenched Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, B.; Liu, C. Y.; Jia, Y.; Yue, G. Q.; Ke, F. S.; Zhao, H. B.; Chen, L. Y.; Wang, S. Y.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    The structural and dynamical properties of rapidly quenched Al are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The pair-correlation function of high temperature liquid Al agrees well with the experimental results. Different cooling rates are applied with high cooling rates leading to glass formation, while low cooling rates leading to crystallization. The local structures are characterized by Honeycutt–Andersen indices and Voronoi tessellation analysis. The results show that for high cooling rates, the local structures of the liquid and glassy Al are predominated by icosahedral clusters, together with considerable amount of face-centered cubic and hexagonal close packed short-range orders. These short-range order results are further confirmed using the recently developed atomic cluster alignment method. Moreover, the atomic cluster alignment clearly shows the crystal nucleation process in supercooled liquid of Al. Finally, the mean square displacement for the liquid is also analyzed, and the corresponding diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature is calculated.

  5. Experimental study on fragmental behavior of coals and biomasses during rapid pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tongmin; Xu, Jianliang; Fan, Wenke; Chang, Qinghua; Yu, Guangsuo; Wang, Fuchen

    2016-12-01

    In order to study the primary fragmentation behavior of coals and biomasses, experiments of rapid pyrolysis were carried out. This work focused on the devolatilization and fragmentation characteristics including the solid/gas yield, particle density/morphology, particle size and fragmental probability (S f ). The effects of temperature, time and solid property were investigated. The viscous flow model was employed to characterize the pressure difference (ΔP), which was considered as the driving force of diffusion and fragmentation. The Ohm principle was used to establish the linear relation of devolatilization rate and fragmentation rate. The result showed that temperature and time have positive contribution to the fragmentation. The occurrence of fragmentation was observed more apparently with the decreasing of the ash content in the biomass. The pressure difference has a positive correlation with the fragmental rate, which shows the validity of application Ohm principle in the prediction of fragmenting process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Heavy flavor studies at forward and backward rapidities in Cu+Au collisions with PHENIX detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cesar; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetric Cu+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV performed at RHIC in 2012 open an opportunity to study particle yields in the presence of different mixtures of initial and final state nuclear effects by using probes measured from negative to positive rapidity regions. Heavy flavor yields may be affected by initial state effects on gluons and energy loss in the final state hot medium. The 2012 run was the first where the Forward Vertex Detector (FVTX) was operating. This detector allows the identification of D and B mesons from displaced vertex measurements. Results on B-meson nuclear modification through its J/ ψ decay channel will be presented along with the status of the analysis of semi-leptonic decays of charm and bottom yields.

  7. New insights from coral growth band studies in an era of rapid environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Janice M.; Cooper, Timothy F.

    2011-10-01

    The rapid formation of calcium carbonate coral skeletons (calcification) fuelled by the coral-algal symbiosis is the backbone of tropical coral reef ecosystems. However, the efficacy of calcification is measurably influenced by the sea's physico-chemical environment, which is changing rapidly. Warming oceans have already led to increased frequency and severity of coral bleaching, and ocean acidification has a demonstrable potential to cause reduced rates of calcification. There is now general agreement that ocean warming and acidification are attributable to human activities increasing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere, and the large part of the extra carbon dioxide (the main greenhouse gas) that is absorbed by oceans. Certain massive corals provide historical perspectives on calcification through the presence of dateable annual density banding patterns. Each band is a page in an environmental archive that reveals past responses of growth (linear extension, skeletal density and calcification rate) and provides a basis for prediction of future of coral growth. A second major line of research focuses on the measurement of various geochemical tracers incorporated into the growth bands, allowing the reconstruction of past marine climate conditions (i.e. palaeoclimatology). Here, we focus on the structural properties of the annual density bands themselves (viz. density; linear extension), exploring their utility in providing both perspectives on the past and pointers to the future of calcification on coral reefs. We conclude that these types of coral growth records, though relatively neglected in recent years compared to the geochemical studies, remain immensely valuable aids to unravelling the consequences of anthropogenic climate change on coral reefs. Moreover, an understanding of coral growth processes is an essential pre-requisite for proper interpretation of studies of geochemical tracers in corals.

  8. Rapid spread of complex change: a case study in inpatient palliative care

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    Filipski Marta I

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on positive findings from a randomized controlled trial, Kaiser Permanente's national executive leadership group set an expectation that all Kaiser Permanente and partner hospitals would implement a consultative model of interdisciplinary, inpatient-based palliative care (IPC. Within one year, the number of IPC consultations program-wide increased almost tenfold from baseline, and the number of teams nearly doubled. We report here results from a qualitative evaluation of the IPC initiative after a year of implementation; our purpose was to understand factors supporting or impeding the rapid and consistent spread of a complex program. Methods Quality improvement study using a case study design and qualitative analysis of in-depth semi-structured interviews with 36 national, regional, and local leaders. Results Compelling evidence of impacts on patient satisfaction and quality of care generated 'pull' among adopters, expressed as a remarkably high degree of conviction about the value of the model. Broad leadership agreement gave rise to sponsorship and support that permeated the organization. A robust social network promoted knowledge exchange and built on an existing network with a strong interest in palliative care. Resource constraints, pre-existing programs of a different model, and ambiguous accountability for implementation impeded spread. Conclusions A complex, hospital-based, interdisciplinary intervention in a large health care organization spread rapidly due to a synergy between organizational 'push' strategies and grassroots-level pull. The combination of push and pull may be especially important when the organizational context or the practice to be spread is complex.

  9. Studi Bahaya Erosi Tanah Dengan Metode Pemetaan Cepat (Rapid Mapping di Sub DAS Cimanuk Hulu

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    Rahmat Razali

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Erosi tanah merupakan salah satu isu ekosistem lingkungan yang banyak menjadi perhatian, dimana manusia berperan merubah lingkungan yang ada di pegunungan seperti kondisi saat ini Sub DAS Cimanuk Hulu cukup memprihatinkan apabila tidak dilakukan penanganan dan pengendalian pemanfaatan ruangnya. Kaitannya dalam memperoleh informasi pendugaan erosi, metode kualitatif dimana dalam analisisanya dibantu menggunakan Sistem Informasi Geografi (SIG lebih fleksibel dibandingkan model erosi lainnya dan penerapannya dapat disesuaikan dengan karakteristik daerah kajian dan ketersediaan data. Penelitian ini menggunakan Metode Pemetaan Cepat (Rapid Mapping untuk mengidentifikasi persebaran bahaya erosi berdasarkan faktor-faktor yang mempengaruhi erosi seperti penutupan lahan, prosentase tanah terbuka dan kemiringan lereng diturunkan dari analisis Citra dan DEM. Hasil menunjukkan bahwa dengan memanfaatkan analisis Citra dan DEM cukup efektif untuk mengetahui persebaran bahaya erosi dan dapat digunakan untuk menentukan arahan teknik konservasi tanah.   ABSTRACT Soil erosion is one of the issues that many ecosystems of concern, where people act to change the environment in the mountains as the current conditions sub watershed Cimanuk Hulu quite alarming if not the handling and control of the use of space. Relation to erosion prediction information, qualitative methods which aided in analyze using Geographic Information System (GIS is more flexible than other erosion models and their application can be tailored to the characteristics of the study area and data availability. This study used the Fast Mapping (Rapid Mapping to identify the distribution of erosion based on factors that affect erosion as land cover, percentage of bareland and slope derived from the analysis of the image and DEM.Results show that by using image analysis and DEM effectively enough to know of erosion hazard and the distribution can be used to determine the soil conservation

  10. Chronic Disease and Self-Injection: Ethnographic Investigations into the Patient Experience During Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Michael; Saunderson, Shane; Mountian, Irina; Hartley, Paul

    2017-09-27

    Drug administration by self-injection provides an option to treat chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD). However, a negative self-injection experience for patients may reduce patient adherence to the recommended treatment regimen. In this study, a holistic approach was used to identify common themes along the treatment pathway and at self-injection that, if changed, could improve patient experience and treatment outcomes. Two ethnographic studies were conducted: Field Insights CODE (FI[CODE]) examined the treatment pathway within the context of the experience of living with RA or CD, and Injection Mission 2020 (IM2020) focused on the moment of self-injection. FI(CODE) used an open ethnographic approach to interview 62 patients and 10 healthcare professionals (HCPs) from the US and UK. IM2020 included a review of over 50 injection device design information sources from the sponsor, and interviews with 9 patients, 8 HCPs, and 5 medical device designers from the US, UK, Canada, and Japan. FI(CODE) identified suboptimal treatment practices along the treatment pathway in four key areas: treatment team communication, treatment choice, patient empowerment, and treatment delivery. Patients with more treatment options and greater disease understanding were less likely to struggle with the treatment process. IM2020 demonstrated that five related components influenced the self-injection experience: delivery process, emotional state, social perception, educational level, and ritualization of the self-injection process. These analyses highlight several potential areas for improvement, including aligning the device more to patients' needs to improve treatment adherence, better accessibility to educational resources to increase patient disease understanding, and guidance to empower patients to develop an optimal personalized self-injection ritual. UCB Pharma.

  11. Información e incertidumbre en la trayectoria de vida con VIH: estudio etnográfico con personas con VIH de Lima, Perú Information and Uncertainty in Lives With HIV: Ethnographic Study With People With HIV in Lima, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César R. Nureña

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La infección por VIH define formas particulares de manejo de información entre las personas afectadas por esta condición de salud. Este artículo presenta los resultados de un estudio realizado desde una aproximación etnográfica e interpretativa con el objetivo de determinar cómo se forman y se expresan las necesidades de información y las conductas de búsqueda en una muestra de personas con VIH de Lima, Perú. Luego de explorar el rol de diversas formas de incertidumbre presentes en diferentes momentos de las vidas de estas personas, se elaboró un modelo teórico explicativo que postula un continuum en cuya base se encuentran múltiples experiencias de incertidumbre, algunas de las cuales generan necesidades de información específicas que se pueden expresar en conductas de búsqueda de información dependiendo de las etapas que atraviesan las personas en sus trayectorias de vida y de varios factores del entorno sociocultural. Los hallazgos del estudio sostienen una propuesta de análisis centrada en las experiencias humanas, las relaciones sociales, los elementos contextuales y las trayectorias de vida en las que se inscriben los flujos de información. En ese sentido, esta propuesta tiene algunas implicancias para la teoría, la investigación social y la práctica profesional en Ciencias de la Información.HIV infection defines particular ways of information management among people affected by this health condition. This article presents the results of a study aimed to determine how the information needs and information-seeking behaviours are generated and expressed in a sample of people with HIV from Lima, Peru, essaying an ethnographic, interpretative approach to explore the role of different forms of uncertainty present in different moments of their lives. The results inform an explanatory theoretical model which establish a continuum with a base formed by people's multiple experiences of uncertainty, from where some specific

  12. Participação paterna no cuidado de crianças pequenas: um estudo etnográfico com famílias de camadas populares Paternal involvement in the care of small children: an ethnographic study of low-income families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Bustamante

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo focaliza a participação paterna no cuidado da saúde de crianças menores de seis anos em famílias de camadas populares. Trata-se de um estudo de cunho etnográfico desenvolvido mediante observação participante e entrevistas. Visitamos famílias de um bairro de periferia de uma capital nordestina, durante um período de nove meses, e encontramos que ter filhos constitui uma dimensão fundamental na vida de homens e mulheres, constituindo causa comum da formação de novos núcleos familiares. A participação paterna é sintetizada em três dimensões: a educação, em que o pai é fundamental; os cuidados corporais, entendidos como atribuição feminina; e a preservação da integridade, considerada dever de todos os membros da família. Embora persista a identificação com papéis de gênero tradicionais, ao contrastarmos discursos com práticas, percebemos que em todas as famílias, e mais intensamente nas nucleares, existem dimensões nas que os homens participam ativamente, evidenciando proximidade física e emocional com os filhos.The present study focused on father's involvement in the health care of small children (under six years in low-income families. An ethnographic study was performed with interviews and participatory observation. We visited families in an outlying low-income urban neighborhood in Northeast Brazil, for nine months. Children appeared as a fundamental dimension in the lives of men and women, constituting a common reason for forming a family nucleus. The paternal role involved three key dimensions: education, in which the father was essential; body care, usually considered a female attribution; and preservation of integrity, considered an obligation for all family members. Despite the fact that traditional identification of gender roles still persists, based on contrasting discourses and practices, in all families (and especially in nuclear ones there were dimensions in which men participated

  13. Implicit affectivity and rapid processing of affective body language: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslow, Thomas; Ihme, Klas; Quirin, Markus; Lichev, Vladimir; Rosenberg, Nicole; Bauer, Jochen; Bomberg, Luise; Kersting, Anette; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Lobsien, Donald

    2015-10-01

    Previous research has revealed affect-congruity effects for the recognition of affects from faces. Little is known about the impact of affect on the perception of body language. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship of implicit (versus explicit) affectivity with the recognition of briefly presented affective body expressions. Implicit affectivity, which can be measured using indirect assessment methods, has been found to be more predictive of spontaneous physiological reactions than explicit (self-reported) affect. Thirty-four healthy women had to label the expression of body postures (angry, fearful, happy, or neutral) presented for 66 ms and masked by a neutral body posture in a forced-choice format while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants' implicit affectivity was assessed using the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test. Measures of explicit state and trait affectivity were also administered. Analysis of the fMRI data was focused on a subcortical network involved in the rapid perception of affective body expressions. Only implicit negative affect (but not explicit affect) was correlated with correct labeling performance for angry body posture. As expected, implicit negative affect was positively associated with activation of the subcortical network in response to fearful and angry expression (compared to neutral expression). Responses of the caudate nucleus to affective body expression were especially associated with its recognition. It appears that processes of rapid recognition of affects from body postures could be facilitated by an individual's implicit negative affect. © 2015 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Studies on the Process Parameters of Rapid Prototyping Technique (Stereolithography for the Betterment of Part Quality

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    Raju Bangalore Singe Gowda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid prototyping (RP has evolved as frontier technology in the recent times, which allows direct transformation of CAD files into functional prototypes where it tremendously reduces the lead time to produce physical prototypes necessary for design verification, fit, and functional analysis by generating the prototypes directly from the CAD data. Part quality in the rapid prototyping process is a function of build parameters such as hatch cure depth, layer thickness, orientation, and hatch spacing. Thus an attempt was made to identify, study, and optimize the process parameters governing the system which are related to part characteristics using Taguchi experimental design techniques quality. The part characteristics can be divided into physical part and mechanical part characteristics. The physical characteristics are surface finish, dimensional accuracy, distortion, layer thickness, hatch cure, and hatch file, whereas mechanical characteristics are flexural strength, ultimate tensile strength, and impact strength. Thus, this paper proposes to characterize the influence of the physical build parameters over the part quality. An L9 orthogonal array was designed with the minimum number of experimental runs with desired parameter settings and also by analysis tools such as ANOVA (analysis of variance. Establishment of experimentally verified correlations between the physical part characteristics and mechanical part characteristics to obtain an optimal process parameter level for betterment of part quality is obtained. The process model obtained by the empirical relation can be used to determine the strength of the prototype for the given set of parameters that shows the dependency of strength, which are essential for designers and RP machine users.

  15. Rapid, easy, and cheap randomization: prospective evaluation in a study cohort

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    Parker Melissa J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When planning a randomized controlled trial (RCT, investigators must select randomization and allocation procedures based upon a variety of factors. While third party randomization is cited as being among the most desirable randomization processes, many third party randomization procedures are neither feasible nor cost-effective for small RCTs, including pilot RCTs. In this study we present our experience with a third party randomization and allocation procedure that utilizes current technology to achieve randomization in a rapid, reliable, and cost-effective manner. Methods This method was developed by the investigators for use in a small 48-participant parallel group RCT with four study arms. As a nested study, the reliability of this randomization procedure was prospectively evaluated in this cohort. The primary outcome of this nested study was the proportion of subjects for whom allocation information was obtained by the Research Assistant within 15 min of the initial participant randomization request. A secondary outcome was the average time for communicating participant group assignment back to the Research Assistant. Descriptive information regarding any failed attempts at participant randomization as well as costs attributable to use of this method were also recorded. Statistical analyses included the calculation of simple proportions and descriptive statistics. Results Forty-eight participants were successfully randomized and group allocation instruction was received for 46 (96% within 15 min of the Research Assistant placing the initial randomization request. Time elapsed in minutes until receipt of participant allocation instruction was Mean (SD 3.1 +/− 3.6; Median (IQR 2 (2,3; Range (1–20 for the entire cohort of 48. For the two participants for whom group allocation information was not received by the Research Assistant within the 15-min pass threshold, this information was obtained following a second

  16. Sexualidad, experiencias corporales y género: un estudio etnográfico entre personas viviendo con VIH en el Área Metropolitana de Buenos Aires, Argentina Sexuality, bodily experiences, and gender: an ethnographic study of persons living with HIV in Greater Metropolitan Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Grimberg

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A partir de los resultados de un estudio etnográfico sobre la experiencia cotidiana de vivir con VIH en el Área Metropolitana de Buenos Aires, Argentina, este artículo discute enfoques de comportamiento que reducen la sexualidad de las personas viviendo con VIH a un problema de seguridad y protección. Combina las categorías de construcción social y hegemonía para abordar la sexualidad como un proceso de construcción a la vez individual y social, que supone intercambios complejos modelados por relaciones de poder y dispositivos de regulación social. Argumento que la experiencia de vivir con VIH pone al descubierto dimensiones de la subjetividad y contextos de vida atravesados por desigualdades sociales y violencias, y conjuntos sociales sujetos a relaciones históricas de subalternidad y continuas formas de estigmatización y discriminación social. En este entramado de desigualdades y estigmatizaciones, la sexualidad se configura más como dominio de peligro, restricción y represión, que de exploración y placer. Finalmente, que la confrontación cotidiana con metáforas sociales tensa relaciones, prácticas e identificaciones de género.Based on the results of an ethnographic study on daily experience with HIV in Greater Metropolitan Buenos Aires, Argentina, the article discusses behavioral approaches that reduce the sexuality of persons living with HIV to an issue of safety and protection. By articulating a social construction perspective and the notion of hegemony, the author proposes that sexuality can be understood as a process of individual and social construction shaped by power relations and social regulations. The analysis of the experiences of living with HIV in marginalized populations shows how chronic social inequality, violence, discrimination, and stigmatization generate particular characteristics of sexual issues. These social processes become driving forces that shape sexual experience as a field of danger, repression

  17. As dimensões do cuidado em uma unidade de queimados: um estudo etnográfico Las dimensiones del cuidado en una unidad de quemados: un estudio etnográfico The dimensions of the care in a burn unit: an ethnographic study

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    Elaine Carvalho Fernandes Braga Costa

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo etnográfico teve como objetivo compreender as perspectivas culturais dos profissionais de enfermagem que atuam em uma Unidade de Queimados sobre cuidado do paciente vítima de queimaduras. Os dados foram coletados por meio de observação e entrevistas e interpretados de acordo com a perspectiva de Bourdieu, que utiliza os conceitos de habitus e campo para compreender os comportamentos que expressam o que está interiorizado pelas pessoas que fazem parte de um grupo social. Para desempenhar o cuidado, os profissionais agem de acordo com formas que já interiorizaram, como sofrer junto, ser firme e, ao mesmo tempo, atencioso e carinhoso.Este estudio etnográfico tuvo como objetivo comprender las perspectivas culturales de profesionales de enfermería, que actúan en una Unidad de Quemados, sobre el cuidado del cliente que sufrió quemaduras. Los datos fueron obtenidos por medio de observación y entrevistas e interpretados de acuerdo con la perspectiva de Bourdieu, que utiliza los conceptos de habitus y campo para comprender los comportamientos que expresan lo interiorizado por personas que hacen parte de un grupo social. Para desempeñar el cuidado, los profesionales actúan de acuerdo a formas ya interiorizadas tales como: sufrir junto, ser firme y al mismo tiempo atento y cariñoso.This aim of this ethnographic study is to understand a nursing staff's cultural perspectives throughout the care of a burned client in a burn unit. Data were collected through observation and interviews and interpreted in accordance with Bourdieu's perspective, that uses the habitus concepts and field to understand the behaviors that express what is internalized by people that belong to a social group. To carry out these dimensions of care, the professionals act in agreement with the forms that already internalized, and they expressed in their depositions: to suffer together, to act firmly, and at the same time, to be kind and affectionate.

  18. When Ghosts Can Talk: Informant Reality and Ethnographic Policy

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    James M Nyce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that researchers doing ethnography can fail in their commitment to take what their informants say seriously. This often occurs, despite ethnographers’ best intentions, when informant statements depart radically from Western distinctions between what is real and what is imaginary. When informants talk about things like ghosts, witches and magic, there is a tendency to apply analytic strategies which translate these informant statements about the world so they conform to Western understandings about what is possible in the world and what is not. This article describes for example some commonly applied interpretive moves used in dealing with informant statements about other-than-human persons. The analytic models and categories we use in these cases are equivalent to often tacit and taken-for-granted Western strategies for dealing with ‘non-existent things’ and these make it impossible to take native statements at face value. We could turn the situation around in ethnographic analyses if we put under the microscope our own Western taken-for-granted assumptions and did so by taking definitions of reality, community, and the person radically different from our own seriously.

  19. Study of Jet Transverse Momentum and Jet Rapidity Dependence on Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarthula, Kiran [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In a collision experiment involving highly energetic particles such as hadrons, processes at high momentum transfers can provide information useful for many studies involving Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One way of analyzing these interactions is through angular distributions. In hadron-hadron collisions, the angular distribution between the two leading jets with the largest transverse momentum (pT ) is affected by the production of additional jets. While soft radiation causes small differences in the azimuthal angular distribution of the two leading jets produced in a collision event, additional hard jets produced in the event have more pronounced influence on the distribution of the two leading jets produced in the collision. Thus, the dijet azimuthal angular distribution can serve as a variable that can be used to study the transition from soft to hard QCD processes in a collision event. This dissertation presents a triple-differential study involving the azimuthal angular distribution and the jet transverse momenta, and jet rapidities of the first two leading jets. The data used for this research are obtained from proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions occurring at a center of mass energy of 1.96TeV, using the DØ detector in Run II of the Tevatron Collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Illinois, USA. Comparisons are made to perturbative QCD (pQCD) predictions at next-to-leading order (NLO).

  20. A simple and rapid approach for screening of SARS-coronavirus genotypes: an evaluation study

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    Jin Yongjie

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS was a newly emerged infectious disease which caused a global epidemic in 2002–2003. Sequence analysis of SARS-coronavirus isolates revealed that specific genotypes predominated at different periods of the epidemic. This information can be used as a footprint for tracing the epidemiology of infections and monitor viral evolution. However, direct sequencing analysis of a large number of clinical samples is cumbersome and time consuming. We present here a simple and rapid assay for the screening of SARS-coronavirus genotypes based on the use of fluorogenic oligonucleotide probes for allelic discrimination. Methods Thirty SARS patients were recruited. Allelic discrimination assays were developed based on the use of fluorogenic oligonucleotide probes (TaqMan. Genotyping of the SARS-coronavirus isolates obtained from these patients were carried out by the allelic discrimination assays and confirmed by direct sequencing. Results Genotyping based on the allelic discrimination assays were fully concordant with direct sequencing. All of the 30 SARS-coronavirus genotypes studied were characteristic of genotypes previously documented to be associated with the latter part of the epidemic. Seven of the isolates contained a previously reported major deletion but in patients not epidemiologically related to the previously studied cohort. Conclusion We have developed a simple and accurate method for the characterization and screening of SARS-coronavirus genotypes. It is a promising tool for the study of epidemiological relationships between documented cases during an outbreak.

  1. Weight restoration therapy rapidly reverses cortical thinning in anorexia nervosa: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardoni, Fabio; King, Joseph A; Geisler, Daniel; Stein, Elisa; Jaite, Charlotte; Nätsch, Dagmar; Tam, Friederike I; Boehm, Ilka; Seidel, Maria; Roessner, Veit; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-04-15

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging studies have documented reduced gray matter in acutely ill patients with anorexia nervosa to be at least partially reversible following weight restoration. However, few longitudinal studies exist and the underlying mechanisms of these structural changes are elusive. In particular, the relative speed and completeness of brain structure normalization during realimentation remain unknown. Here we report from a structural neuroimaging study including a sample of adolescent/young adult female patients with acute anorexia nervosa (n=47), long-term recovered patients (n=34), and healthy controls (n=75). The majority of acutely ill patients were scanned longitudinally (n=35): at the beginning of standardized weight restoration therapy and again after partial weight normalization (>10% body mass index increase). High-resolution structural images were processed and analyzed with the longitudinal stream of FreeSurfer software to test for changes in cortical thickness and volumes of select subcortical regions of interest. We found globally reduced cortical thickness in acutely ill patients to increase rapidly (0.06 mm/month) during brief weight restoration therapy (≈3 months). This significant increase was predicted by weight restoration alone and could not be ascribed to potentially mediating factors such as duration of illness, hydration status, or symptom improvements. By comparing cortical thickness in partially weight-restored patients with that measured in healthy controls, we confirmed that cortical thickness had normalized already at follow-up. This pattern of thinning in illness and rapid normalization during weight rehabilitation was largely mirrored in subcortical volumes. Together, our findings indicate that structural brain insults inflicted by starvation in anorexia nervosa may be reversed at a rate much faster than previously thought if interventions are successful before the disorder becomes chronic. This provides

  2. Cross-sectional study of possible association between rapid eating and high body fat rates among female Japanese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi-Tanaka, Yuri; Kawagoshi, Yumiko; Sasaki, Satoshi; Fukao, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of excessive body fat among young Japanese females with a normal BMI, which is referred to as normal weight obesity (NWO), has recently increased. Some studies have associated eating rates with BMI. However, an association between body fat rate and dietary habits has not been proven. We compared differences in dietary habits between 72 female Japanese junior college students with normal (Eating rapidly was significantly associated with body fat ratios. Our findings suggest that eating rapidly increases body fat ratios.

  3. Sanitation investments in Ghana: An ethnographic investigation of the role of tenure security, land ownership and livelihoods

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    Y. Awunyo-Akaba

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ghana’s low investment in household sanitation is evident from the low rates of improved sanitation. This study analysed how land ownership, tenancy security and livelihood patterns are related to sanitation investments in three adjacent rural and peri-urban communities in a district close to Accra, Ghana’s capital. Methods Qualitative data was gathered for this comparative ethnographic study over seven months, (June, 2011-January, 2012 using an average of 43 (bi-weekly participant observation per community and 56 in-depth interviews. Detailed observational data from study communities were triangulated with multiple interview material and contextual knowledge on social structures, history of settlement, land use, livelihoods, and access to and perceptions about sanitation. Results This study shows that the history of settlement and land ownership issues are highly correlated with people’s willingness and ability to invest in household sanitation across all communities. The status of being a stranger i.e. migrant in the area left some populations without rights over the land they occupied and with low incentives to invest in sanitation, while indigenous communities were challenged by the increasing appropriation of their land for commercial enterprises and for governmental development projects. Interview responses suggest that increasing migrant population and the high demand for housing in the face of limited available space has resulted in general unwillingness and inability to establish private sanitation facilities in the communities. The increasing population has also created high demand for cheap accommodation, pushing tenants to accept informal tenancy agreements that provided for poor sanitation facilities. In addition, poor knowledge of tenancy rights leaves tenants in no position to demand sanitation improvements and therefore landlords feel no obligation or motivation to provide and maintain domestic

  4. Combined momentum collimation studies in a high-intensity rapid cycling proton synchrotron

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    Jing-Yu Tang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Momentum collimation in a high-intensity rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS is a very important issue. Based on the two-stage collimation principle, a combined momentum collimation method is proposed and studied in detail here. The method makes use of the combination of secondary collimators in both the longitudinal and transverse planes. The primary collimator is placed at a high-dispersion location of an arc, and the longitudinal and transverse secondary collimators are in the same arc and in the adjacent downstream dispersion-free long straight section, respectively. The particles with positive momentum deviations will be scattered and degraded by a carbon scraper and then collected mainly by the transverse collimators, whereas the particles with negative momentum deviations will be scattered by a tantalum scraper and mainly collected by the longitudinal secondary collimators. This is to benefit from the different effects of protons passing through a high atomic number material and a low atomic number material, as the former produces relatively more scattering than the latter for the same energy loss. The studies also reveal that momentum collimation is strongly dependent on the transverse beam correlation that comes from the injection painting. The relevant requirements on the lattice design are also discussed, especially for compact rings. The multiparticle simulations using both TURTLE and ORBIT codes are presented to show the physical images of the collimation method, which was carried out with the input of the RCS of China Spallation Neutron Source.

  5. A STUDY ON THE INTRODUCTION OF BUS RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM IN ASIAN DEVELOPING CITIES

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    Thaned SATIENNAM

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bus Rapid Transit (BRT has increasingly become an attractive urban transit alternative in many Asian developing cities due to its cost-effective and flexible implementation. However, it still seems to be difficult to introduce BRT to these cities because almost all of their city structures have been developed under solely a road transport development city plan and weakness of land use control gives rise to many problems, such as urban sprawl, traffic congestion, and air pollution. The purpose of this study was to introduce several strategies to support BRT implementation in Asian developing cities, such as a strategy to appropriately integrate the paratransit system into BRT system as being a feeder along a BRT corridor to supply demand. These proposed strategies were evaluated by applying demand forecasting and emission models to the BRT project plan of Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA in Thailand. It was demonstrated that the proposed strategies could effectively improve the BRT ridership, traffic conditions, and air pollution emission of the entire system in Bangkok. This study could be further extended to include strategy recommendation if a BRT system were to be introduced to other Asian developing cities.

  6. Combustion Chemistry of Ethanol: Ignition and Speciation Studies in a Rapid Compression Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza-Botet, Cesar L; Wagnon, Scott W; Wooldridge, Margaret S

    2016-09-29

    Ethanol remains the most important alternative fuel for the transportation sector. This work presents new experimental data on ethanol ignition, including stable species measurements, obtained with the University of Michigan rapid compression facility. Ignition delay times were determined from pressure histories of ignition experiments with stoichiometric ethanol-air mixtures at pressures of ∼3-10 atm. Temperatures (880-1150 K) were controlled by varying buffer gas composition (Ar, N2, CO2). High-speed imaging was used to record chemiluminescence during the experiments, which showed homogeneous ignition events. The results for ignition delay time agreed well with trends on the basis of previous experimental measurements. Speciation experiments were performed using fast gas sampling and gas chromatography to identify and quantify ethanol and 11 stable intermediate species formed during the ignition delay period. Simulations were carried out using a chemical kinetic mechanism available in the literature, and the agreement with the experimental results for ignition delay time and the intermediate species measured was excellent for the majority of the conditions studied. From the simulation results, ethanol + HO2 was identified as an important reaction at the experimental conditions for both the ignition delay time and intermediate species measurements. Further studies to improve the accuracy of the rate coefficient for ethanol + HO2 would improve the predictive understanding of intermediate and low-temperature ethanol combustion.

  7. Rapid L2 Word Learning through High Constraint Sentence Context: An Event-Related Potential Study

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    Baoguo Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found quantity of exposure, i.e., frequency of exposure (Horst et al., 1998; Webb, 2008; Pellicer-Sánchez and Schmitt, 2010, is important for second language (L2 contextual word learning. Besides this factor, context constraint and L2 proficiency level have also been found to affect contextual word learning (Pulido, 2003; Tekmen and Daloglu, 2006; Elgort et al., 2015; Ma et al., 2015. In the present study, we adopted the event-related potential (ERP technique and chose high constraint sentences as reading materials to further explore the effects of quantity of exposure and proficiency on L2 contextual word learning. Participants were Chinese learners of English with different English proficiency levels. For each novel word, there were four high constraint sentences with the critical word at the end of the sentence. Learners read sentences and made semantic relatedness judgment afterwards, with ERPs recorded. Results showed that in the high constraint condition where each pseudoword was embedded in four sentences with consistent meaning, N400 amplitude upon this pseudoword decreased significantly as learners read the first two sentences. High proficiency learners responded faster in the semantic relatedness judgment task. These results suggest that in high quality sentence contexts, L2 learners could rapidly acquire word meaning without multiple exposures, and L2 proficiency facilitated this learning process.

  8. Our Journey to Becoming Ethnographers: An Exploration of Rhetorical Structures as Lived Experience

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    Heather Blair PhD

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article, originally written as a performative piece, presents the experiences and perceptions of five graduate students and one professor as they reflect on and write about becoming ethnographers throughout a graduate-level research course. Data sources include reflective journals, synthesis papers, and academic literature. Following the completion of the course, the group came together and applied grounded theory to analyze the data and write collectively about their experiences, feelings, and insights on ethnographic work. They present the data as a readers theatre that incorporates portions of a children's book with the group's reflections. Like authors of other academic literature the group discusses the challenges and benefits of ethnographic research. Their collaborative writing reflects their polyvocality as they negotiated their journeys toward becoming ethnographers.

  9. Proxy-produced ethnographic work: what are the problems, issues, and dilemmas arising from proxy ethnography?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Marie Louise; Højbjerg, Karin; Tamborg, Andreas Lindenskov

    2018-01-01

    and positions arising from such a setup between the teacher/researcher and the proxy ethnographer/student are found to have implications for the ethnographies produced. This article’s main focus is to show how these relations and positions have not distorted the ethnographic work and the ethnographies but......This article addresses the implications of research-student cooperation in the production of empirical material. For the student to replace the experienced researcher and work under the researcher’s supervision, we call such work proxy-produced ethnographic work. The specific relations...... the research process. These ethnographic distortions will be generated and described within a framework drawn primarily on the work of sociologist Pierre Bourdieu....

  10. Tensions in Creating Possibilities for Youth Voice in School Choice: An Ethnographer's Reflexive Story of Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Megan Cotnam-Kappel

    2014-01-01

    The following article relates a reflexive ethnographic research project that focuses on youth voice in relation to the process of choosing a high school and a language of instruction in Ontario, Canada...

  11. Workflow in Clinical Trial Sites & Its Association with Near Miss Events for Data Quality: Ethnographic, Workflow & Systems Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo de Carvalho, Elias Cesar; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Claudino, Wederson; Lima Reis, Luiz Fernando; Schmerling, Rafael A.; Shah, Jatin; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Background With the exponential expansion of clinical trials conducted in (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) and VISTA (Vietnam, Indonesia, South Africa, Turkey, and Argentina) countries, corresponding gains in cost and enrolment efficiency quickly outpace the consonant metrics in traditional countries in North America and European Union. However, questions still remain regarding the quality of data being collected in these countries. We used ethnographic, mapping and computer simulation studies to identify/address areas of threat to near miss events for data quality in two cancer trial sites in Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings Two sites in Sao Paolo and Rio Janeiro were evaluated using ethnographic observations of workflow during subject enrolment and data collection. Emerging themes related to threats to near miss events for data quality were derived from observations. They were then transformed into workflows using UML-AD and modeled using System Dynamics. 139 tasks were observed and mapped through the ethnographic study. The UML-AD detected four major activities in the workflow evaluation of potential research subjects prior to signature of informed consent, visit to obtain subject́s informed consent, regular data collection sessions following study protocol and closure of study protocol for a given project. Field observations pointed to three major emerging themes: (a) lack of standardized process for data registration at source document, (b) multiplicity of data repositories and (c) scarcity of decision support systems at the point of research intervention. Simulation with policy model demonstrates a reduction of the rework problem. Conclusions/Significance Patterns of threats to data quality at the two sites were similar to the threats reported in the literature for American sites. The clinical trial site managers need to reorganize staff workflow by using information technology more efficiently, establish new standard procedures and manage

  12. Rapid genetic diversification within dog breeds as evidenced by a case study on Schnauzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streitberger, K; Schweizer, M; Kropatsch, R; Dekomien, G; Distl, O; Fischer, M S; Epplen, J T; Hertwig, S T

    2012-10-01

    As a result of strong artificial selection, the domesticated dog has arguably become one of the most morphologically diverse vertebrate species, which is mirrored in the classification of around 400 different breeds. To test the influence of breeding history on the genetic structure and variability of today's dog breeds, we investigated 12 dog breeds using a set of 19 microsatellite markers from a total of 597 individuals with about 50 individuals analysed per breed. High genetic diversity was noted over all breeds, with the ancient Asian breeds (Akita, Chow Chow, Shar Pei) exhibiting the highest variability, as was indicated chiefly by an extraordinarily high number of rare and private alleles. Using a Bayesian clustering method, we detected significant genetic stratification within the closely related Schnauzer breeds. The individuals of these three recently differentiated breeds (Miniature, Standard and Giant Schnauzer) could not be assigned to a single cluster each. This hidden genetic structure was probably caused by assortative mating owing to breeders' preferences regarding coat colour types and the underlying practice of breeding in separate lineages. Such processes of strong artificial disruptive selection for different morphological traits in isolated and relatively small lineages can result in the rapid creation of new dog types and potentially new breeds and represent a unique opportunity to study the evolution of genetic and morphological differences in recently diverged populations. © 2011 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2011 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  13. Defining impact of a rapid response team: qualitative study with nurses, physicians and hospital administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benin, Andrea L; Borgstrom, Christopher P; Jenq, Grace Y; Roumanis, Sarah A; Horwitz, Leora I

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to qualitatively describe the impact of a Rapid Response Team (RRT) at a 944-bed, university-affiliated hospital. We analysed 49 open-ended interviews with administrators, primary team attending physicians, trainees, RRT attending hospitalists, staff nurses, nurses and respiratory technicians. Themes elicited were categorised into the domains of (1) morale and teamwork, (2) education, (3) workload, (4) patient care, and (5) hospital administration. Positive implications beyond improved care for acutely ill patients were: increased morale and empowerment among nurses, real-time redistribution of workload for nurses (reducing neglect of non-acutely ill patients during emergencies), and immediate access to expert help. Negative implications were: increased tensions between nurses and physician teams, a burden on hospitalist RRT members, and reduced autonomy for trainees. The RRT provides advantages that extend well beyond a reduction in rates of transfers to intensive care units or codes but are balanced by certain disadvantages. The potential impact from these multiple sources should be evaluated to understand the utility of any RRT programme.

  14. Republished: Defining impact of a rapid response team: qualitative study with nurses, physicians and hospital administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benin, Andrea L; Borgstrom, Christopher P; Jenq, Grace Y; Roumanis, Sarah A; Horwitz, Leora I

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to qualitatively describe the impact of a Rapid Response Team (RRT) at a 944-bed, university-affiliated hospital. We analysed 49 open-ended interviews with administrators, primary team attending physicians, trainees, RRT attending hospitalists, staff nurses, nurses and respiratory technicians. Themes elicited were categorised into the domains of (1) morale and teamwork, (2) education, (3) workload, (4) patient care, and (5) hospital administration. Positive implications beyond improved care for acutely ill patients were: increased morale and empowerment among nurses, real-time redistribution of workload for nurses (reducing neglect of non-acutely ill patients during emergencies), and immediate access to expert help. Negative implications were: increased tensions between nurses and physician teams, a burden on hospitalist RRT members, and reduced autonomy for trainees. The RRT provides advantages that extend well beyond a reduction in rates of transfers to intensive care units or codes but are balanced by certain disadvantages. The potential impact from these multiple sources should be evaluated to understand the utility of any RRT programme.

  15. Periodontal and dental effects of surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion, assessed by using digital study models

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    Danilo Furquim Siqueira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study assessed the maxillary dental arch changes produced by surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME. METHODS: Dental casts from 18 patients (mean age of 23.3 years were obtained at treatment onset (T1, three months after SARME (T2 and 6 months after expansion (T3. The casts were scanned in a 3D scanner (D-250, 3Shape, Copenhagen, Denmark. Maxillary dental arch width, dental crown tipping and height were measured and assessed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. RESULTS: Increased transversal widths from T1 and T2 and the maintenance of these values from T2 and T3 were observed. Buccal teeth tipping also showed statistically significant differences, with an increase in all teeth from T1 to T2 and a decrease from T2 to T3. No statistically significant difference was found for dental crown height, except for left first and second molars, although clinically irrelevant. CONCLUSION: SARME proved to be an effective and stable procedure, with minimum periodontal hazards.

  16. Rapid Elimination of Blood Alcohol Using Erythrocytes: Mathematical Modeling and In Vitro Study

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    Yuliya G. Alexandrovich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythrocytes (RBCs loaded with alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD can metabolize plasma ethanol and acetaldehyde but with low efficiency. We investigated the rate-limiting factors in ethanol oxidation by these enzymes loaded into RBCs. Mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments on human RBCs loaded simultaneously with ADH and ALD (by hypoosmotic dialysis were performed. The simulation showed that the rate of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ generation in RBC glycolysis, but not the activities of the loaded enzymes, is the rate-limiting step in external ethanol oxidation. The rate of oxidation could be increased if RBCs are supplemented by NAD+ and pyruvate. Our experimental data verified this theoretical conclusion. RBCs loaded with the complete system of ADH, ALD, NAD+, and pyruvate metabolized ethanol 20–40 times faster than reported in previous studies. The one-step procedure of hypoosmotic dialysis is the optimal method to encapsulate ADH and ALD in RBCs after cell recovery, encapsulation yield, osmotic resistance, and RBC-indexes. Consequently, transfusion of the RBCs loaded with the complete metabolic system, including ADH, ALD, pyruvate, and NAD+ in the patients with alcohol intoxication, may be a promising method for rapid detoxification of blood alcohol based on metabolism.

  17. Melanin binding study of clinical drugs with cassette dosing and rapid equilibrium dialysis inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkonen, Laura; Tengvall-Unadike, Unni; Ruponen, Marika; Kidron, Heidi; Del Amo, Eva M; Reinisalo, Mika; Urtti, Arto

    2017-11-15

    Melanin pigment is a negatively charged polymer found in pigmented human tissues. In the eye, iris, ciliary body, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are heavily pigmented. Several drug molecules are known to bind to melanin, but larger sets of drugs have not been compared often in similar test conditions. In this study, we introduce a powerful tool for screening of melanin binding. The binding of a set of 34 compounds to isolated porcine RPE melanin was determined by cassette (n-in-one) dosing in rapid equilibrium dialysis inserts and the binding was quantitated with LC-MS/MS analytics. The compounds represented large variety in melanin binding (from 8.6%, ganciclovir) to over 95% bound (ampicillin and ciprofloxacin). The data provides information on melanin binding of small molecular weight compounds that are used for ocular (e.g. brinzolamide, ganciclovir) and systemic (e.g. tizanidine, indomethacin) therapy. Interestingly, competition among compounds was seen for melanin binding and the binding did not show any correlation with plasma protein binding. These results increase the understanding of melanin binding of ocular drugs and can be further exploited to predict pharmacokinetics in the eye. Pigment binding provides an interesting option for improved drug distribution to retina and choroid that are difficult target tissues in drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Studying the Technology of Creating Cortical Electrode Instruments using the Rapid Prototyping Technology

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    Ablyaz T. R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the results of studying the technology of manufacturing cortical electrode-instruments (EI with the use of indirect methods of the Rapid Prototyping technology. Functional EI prototypes were made by layered synthesis of the photopolymer material with the use of the stereolithography technology (SLA - Stereo Lithography Apparatus. The article is focused on two methods of indirect EI manufacturing. One of the EI prototypes was used for making a molded wax model for hot investment casting, followed by applying copper coating. The second prototype was used for applying copper plating to a prepared current-conductive layer. As a result of EDMing a steel workpiece, both EIs reached the desired depth, which is 1 mm. The copper plating applied to the EI preserves its integrity. Through the use of the casting technology, there is a possibility to cut the economic costs by 35%. Using a prototype with preliminarily applied conductive coating makes it possible to make geometrically-complex EIs.

  19. Rapid assessment procedures in environmental sanitation research: a case study from the northern border of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Enrique; Alamo, Urinda; Kendall, Tamil; Brunkard, Joan; Scrimshaw, Susan

    2006-01-01

    There is a need to enhance the quality and sustainability of environmental health programs in Mexico. What socio-cultural factors influenced the adoption or rejection of Clean Water in Homes programs in this population? We applied rapid appraisal procedures (RAP) to evaluate these community-based programs. Qualitative study conducted in communities along Mexico's northern border. We conducted informal dialogues, semi-structured interviews, field notes and observations. Home visits used a checklist to observe: sources of water, handwashing, as well as human waste and garbage disposal patterns. Data analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti, which facilitated comparison and illustration of discrepancies, the elaboration of emerging issues and relationships between them. Community members perceived that the Clean Water program was a top-down intervention. Water is perceived as a political issue and a matter of corruption. Inequity also limits solidarity activities involved in environmental sanitation. Migration to the United States of America (US) contributes to community fragmentation, which in turn dilutes communal efforts to improve water and sanitation infrastructure. While targeting women as program "recipients", the Clean Water program did not take gendered spheres of decision-making into account. Community members and authorities discussed the main results in "assemblies", particularly addressing the needs of excluded groups. The oversight of not exploring community members' needs and priorities prior to program implementation resulted in interventions that did not address the structural (economic, infrastructure) and socio-cultural barriers faced by community members to undertake the health-promoting behaviour change, and provoked resentment.

  20. A Study of Postural Loading in Malaysian Mining Industry using Rapid Entire Body Assessment

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    Norhidayah M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ergonomics and environment factors have been the core issue for the mining industry for many years, and its profiles are rising. To ensure an ergonomics work environment, it is possible to require specific attention especially in this industries sector. It is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore the essential issue in Malaysia due to lack of ergonomics knowledge and low awareness among the engineers in the mining sector. The focus of this study is to evaluate and validate the physical risk factor associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSDs by using Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA among mining industry workers. All the physical risk factors involved the main body regions such as upper arm, lower arm, wrist, trunk, neck and leg that has been identified associated with WMSDs. There were 18 subjects were selected to involve in this study. Those subjects were chosen according to their job task. To increase the reliability of the result, each subject was evaluated thrice in the trials. From the analysis, the average of final score of the REBA is 8.24 indicates high risk and calls for engineering/or work method changes to reduce or eliminate muscular disorder risk. The results of the analysis were used to improve the process of work, design of workstation and also improving the work posture to enhance the comfort level of operators. This study is crucial among the mining industry that is a lack of the information and research about the ergonomics issues in the industry. The overall finding indicated that the whole process of selected work task will contribute to musculoskeletal disorder either for a short or long time exposure.