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Sample records for rapid coliform count

  1. A Rapid Coliform Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC, in collaboration with Lucigen, proposes a rapid genetic detector for spaceflight water systems to enable real-time detection of E-coli with minimal...

  2. Evaluation of Coli-Count Samplers for Possible Use in Standard Counting of Total and Fecal Coliforms in Recreational Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Mary; Connor, Douglas A.

    1975-01-01

    Millipore Coli-Count Samplers were used to enumerate colonies of laboratory cultures of coliform bacteria. The samplers gave significantly lower counts than standard membrane-filter procedures for both total and fecal coliforms. Although the samplers are useful for semiquantitative analysis as indicated by the manufacturer, they are not suitable for standard examinations of recreational waters. PMID:1106326

  3. Suitability of total coliform â-d-galactosidase activity and CFU counts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total coliforms are a group of bacteria found in high numbers in mammalian intestines; hence their presence in water indicates the possible contamination with faecal material. Total and faecal coliform counts were monitored over a period of 18 months using mFC, m-Endo and CM1046 media together with enzymatic ...

  4. Enumeration of coliforms and Escherichia coli in frozen black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon by conventional and rapid methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwansonthichai, Sasithorn; Rengpipat, Sirirat

    2003-03-15

    Conventional (most probable number, MPN) and rapid methods-including Chromocult coliform agar (CCA), Fluorocult(R) LMX broth (LMX), and Petrifilm Escherichia coli count plates (PEC) for enumeration of coliforms and E. coli in frozen black tiger shrimp from Thailand were compared in order to assess the possibility of using one of the rapid methods for routine analysis. Enumeration of coliforms and E. coli from 18 samples of regular frozen black tiger shrimp and 156 samples of frozen black tiger shrimp experimentally contaminated with coliforms or E. coli at concentrations of approximately 10, approximately 10(2), and approximately 10(3) CFU g(-1) revealed that at the level of approximately 10 CFU g(-1), coliform numbers ranked as LMX>CCA>MPN=PEC and E. coli as MPN=LMX=PEC=CCA. At the level of approximately 10(2) CFU g(-1), coliform numbers ranked as LMX>MPN=PEC=CCA and E. coli as MPN=LMX>PEC=CCA. At the level of 10(3) CFU g(-1), coliforms ranked as LMX>MPN=CCA>PEC and E. coli as MPN>LMX>CCA>PEC. Agreements with the conventional MPN method for coliforms were LMX 108%, PEC 87.2%, and CCA 91.2% and agreements for E. coli were LMX 101%, PEC 95.7%, and CCA 96.3%. Sensitivities (%) ranked LMX>MPN>CCA=PEC for coliforms and E. coli, whereas equal specificities (100%) of all methods for coliforms and E. coli were demonstrated. Rankings for the other parameters compared were: convenience, PEC>CCA=LMX>MPN; time to detection, MPN>LMX=PEC=CCA; expense, MPN=PEC>CCA>LMX; labor, MPN>LMX=CCA>PEC; accuracy for coliforms, PEC>CCA>MPN>LMX; and accuracy for E. coli, PEC=CCA>LMX>MPN.

  5. Development of a thin tube cultivation method for determining coliform counts in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong-Hyun; Gray, Peter M

    2002-01-01

    A new rapid coliform-monitoring method using thin tube cultivation (TTC) was developed. One hundred microliters of modified selective medium (1.5% agar) and 100 microl of sample were mixed in thin cultivation tubes, yielding a semisolid mixture of 0.75% agar. The tubes were incubated at 37 degrees C and checked for a positive reaction (gas production from lactose fermentation and color changes from acid production) at 30-min intervals. The positive reaction times for TTC were compared with actual coliform numbers. The first experiment was performed to validate the TTC method using pure coliform cultures (the Escherichia coli group, the Enterobacter cloacae group. and the Klebsiella pneumoniae group). The results indicated that the TTC method saved about 10 to 14 h of incubation time compared with the conventional plating method. When coliforms were present in small numbers, such as I to 1.5 log10 CFU/ml, the TTC method detected their presence within 10 h. When highly contaminated samples were assayed (6 log10 CFU/ml), the TTC method detected the presence of coliforms within 4 to 5 h. In a food system experiment, pasteurized skim milk inoculated with a coliform mixture was assayed by the TTC method. The coliforms in the milk were quickly detected, resulting in a savings of 11 to 14 h compared with the conventional plating method. Cold-injured coliforms were studied to evaluate the TTC system. The recovery and estimation of injured coliforms by the TTC method strongly agree with those of the conventional plating method. The TTC system was also applied to ascertain the levels of natural coliforms in noninoculated milk. The TTC system reduced incubation times by about 11 to 14 h compared with the conventional plating method. According to these data, this method is a rapid, simple, accurate, and economical way to monitor and estimate total coliforms in milk.

  6. Automated electrical impedance technique for rapid enumeration of fecal coliforms in effluents from sewage treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, M P; Munoz, E F

    1979-01-01

    Fecal coliforms growing in a selective lactose-based broth medium at 44.5 degrees C generate a change in the electrical impedance of the culture relative to a sterile control when populations reach 10(6) to 10(7) per ml. The ratio of these changes was measured automatically, and the data were processed by computer. A linear relation was found between the log10 of the number of fecal coliforms in an inoculum and the time required for an electrical impedance ratio signal to be detected. Pure culture inocula consisting of 100 fecal coliforms in log phase or stationary phase were detected in 6.5 and 7.7 h, respectively. Standard curves of log10 fecal coliforms in wastewater inocula versus detection time, based on samples collected at a sewage treatment plant over a 4-month period, were found to vary from one another with time. Nevertheless, detection times were rapid and ranged from 5.8 to 7.9 h for 200 fecal coliforms to 8.7 to 11.4 h for 1 fecal coliform. Variations in detection times for a given number of fecal coliforms were also found among sewage treatment plants. A strategy is proposed which takes these variations into account and allows for rapid, automated enumeration of fecal coliforms in wastewater by the electrical impedance ratio technique. PMID:378128

  7. A new alginate-based rapid method for determining coliforms in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Su-sen; Gray, Peter M; Woo, Gun-Jo; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2003-11-01

    A new rapid method for monitoring coliforms was developed on the basis of the instant gelling effects of alginate and calcium. The effectiveness of this new method in the detection of coliforms was evaluated. Tests involving Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, total coliforms in milk, cold-injured coliforms, and total coliforms in raw milk were carried out. The bacterial samples were diluted in 0.2% peptone water containing 90 mM CaCl2 and added into test tubes containing modified purple broth base medium. Coliform concentrations were determined on the basis of the time of color change and gas production in the alginate tubes. All results obtained by the alginate method correlated strongly with those obtained by the conventional violet red bile agar (VRBA) plating method. The alginate method reduced detection time by 12 to 14 h compared with the conventional VRBA plating method. The alginate method can be applied in field studies more easily than melted-agar systems can. The results of this study indicate that the alginate method is an accurate, rapid, simple, and economical way to monitor and estimate concentrations of total coliforms in food.

  8. Rapid amperometric detection of coliforms based on MWNTs/Nafion composite film modified glass carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuxiao; Liu, Yajun; Huang, Jingjing; Xian, Yuezhong; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Zhonghai; Jin, Litong

    2008-03-15

    A multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)/Nafion modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was fabricated for the rapid amperometric detection of coliforms, represented by Escherichia coli (E. coli). In the bacterial solution, beta-galactosidase which was used as an indicator of coliforms reacted with substrate, p-aminophenol-beta-galactopyranoside (PAPG), and produced p-aminophenol (PAP). PAP was detected by MWNTs/Nafion modified GCE. Due to the cation-exchange capacity of Nafion and the electrocatalytic ability of MWNTs, the detection sensitivity of PAP was improved and the detection time of coliforms was shortened. The bacterial can be detected within 5h ranging from 10 to 10(4)cfu/mL. The MWNTs/Nafion modified GCE was easy to be constructed and regenerated. To our best knowledge, it was the first time to use MWNTs/Nafion modified GCE to detect the concentration of coliforms.

  9. RAPID MONITORING OF INDICATOR COLIFORMS IN DRINKING WATER BY AN ENZYMATIC ASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nikaeen ، A. Pejhan ، M. Jalali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Coliform group has been extensively used as an indicator of drinking water quality and historically led to the public health protection concept. Multiple tube fermentation technique has been currently used for assessment of the microbial quality of drinking water. This method, however, has limitations. Enzymatic assay constitute an alternative approach for detecting indicator bacteria, namely total coliforms and E.coli in various aquatic environments. This study compared the performance of LMX® broth as an enzymatic assay with the standard methods multiple tube fermentation technique and presence–absence test, for the detection of indicator coliforms in drinking water samples. In addition, the potential effect of water quality on the microbial detection method was assayed through measurement of some physicochemical parameters. From the 50 drinking water samples tested, 8 (16% and 7 (14% contained total coliforms and E.coli as indicated by all three techniques. Although on average the LMX recovered more total coliforms and E.Coli numbers comparing to multiple tube fermentation, but there was no significant difference. A significant difference existed between the level of residual chlorine for positive and negative samples. In conclusion, enzymatic assay showed a rapid and less labor method, allowing the simultaneous detection of total coliforms and E.coli. The method is particularly useful in the early warning of fecal pollution of drinking water.

  10. Coliform counts and Escherichia coli in raw commercial milk from dairy farmers in Kiambu District, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombui, J N; Kaburia, H F; Macharia, J K; Nduhiu, G

    1994-10-01

    The rate of contamination with coliforms and incidence of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in raw milk supplied by farmers to dairy cooperative societies for marketing was investigated. About forty two (42.2%) percent of the milk samples from farmers cans and 10.3% of samples from cooperative cans were found to be free of coliforms, while 89.5% of the samples from farmers cans and 50% samples from cooperative cans could be considered to be of good quality with no more than 50,000 coliforms/ml of milk. Forty two E. coli strains were isolated from milk samples, five of which were found to be enteropathogenic, while none was found to be of serogroup O157. The results indicated that a good number of farmers draw milk under satisfactory conditions, but awareness campaigns on clean milking, milk handling and storage practices should be stepped up in order to reach farmers who may not be informed. Again the study showed that raw milk can get contaminated with enteropathogenic strains of E. coli that can pose a potential risk to humans, thus calling for extra care when preparing milk and milk products that are to be consumed by human beings.

  11. Study on the Total Coliforms Count and Coli Titter in the Waters of Kardzhali Reservoir, Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Y. Todorov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine TC (total coliforms and coli titter from two sampling stations in the aquatory of Kardzhali Dam Lake and one station in River Arda, in August, 2011. The values of the TC index in the reservoir vary from 1900±674 cfu/100ml in station I, to 1293±194 cfu/100ml in station II, while the TC value of River Arda reaches 1698±134 cfu/100ml. In Reservoir Kardzhali, the smallest volume of water in which Escherichia coli cells were found, varies between 5 and 15 ml, while for the River Arda the value of coli titter is equal to 1. With highest percentage, regarding the presence of microbiological species in the reservoir waters, is the genus Klebsiella (70%, followed by Citrobacter (15%, Enterobacter (10% and Serratia (5%, respectively represented by the species Klebsiella oxytoca, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae and Serattia marcescens. In the river Arda two genuses were found - Serratia (50% and Salmonella (50%.

  12. Rapid, single-step most-probable-number method for enumerating fecal coliforms in effluents from sewage treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, E F; Silverman, M P

    1979-01-01

    A single-step most-probable-number method for enumerating fecal coliforms in sewage treatment plant effluents is described. The method requires the use of only one lactose-based medium and a single incubation temperature of 44.5 degrees C, and it can be completed in 18 h or less, as compared with up to 72 h for the standard most-probable-number method. The appearance of growth is the sole criterion used for designating positives, which can be determined either by increases in the electrical impedance ratio of inoculated medium, as compared to an uninoculated control using a Bactometer model 32, or by visual examination of inoculated medium for turbidity. In trials with 53 samples of unchlorinated sewage treatment plant effluent, fecal coliform counts by the single-step most-probable-number method, throughout a range of less than 10 to almost 10(7) fecal coliforms per 100 ml of effluent, were in excellent agreement with counts abtained by the standard most-probable-number procedure. Similar agreement was obtained in comparative trials with 31 chlorinated effluent samples from two sewage treatment plants. Overall, 87% of 452 positives were confirmed as containing fecal coliforms. The applicability of the single-step most-probable-number method to automated sewage treatment plant operations is discussed. PMID:378129

  13. Rapid detection of coliforms in drinking water of Arak city using multiplex PCR method in comparison with the standard method of culture (Most Probably Number)

    OpenAIRE

    fatemeh, Dehghan; Reza, Zolfaghari Mohammad; Mohammad, Arjomandzadegan; Salomeh, Kalantari; Reza, Ahmari Gholam; Hossein, Sarmadian; Maryam, Sadrnia; Azam, Ahmadi; Mana, Shojapoor; Negin, Najarian; Reza, Kasravi Alii; Saeed, Falahat

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyse molecular detection of coliforms and shorten the time of PCR. Methods: Rapid detection of coliforms by amplification of lacZ and uidA genes in a multiplex PCR reaction was designed and performed in comparison with most probably number (MPN) method for 16 artificial and 101 field samples. The molecular method was also conducted on isolated coliforms from positive MPN samples; standard sample for verification of microbial method certificated reference material; isolated...

  14. The association between bedding material and the bacterial counts of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis and coliform bacteria on teat skin and in teat canals in lactating dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduch, Jan-Hendrik; Mohr, Elmar; Krömker, Volker

    2013-05-01

    Several mastitis-causing pathogens are able to colonize the bovine teat canal. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the treatment of sawdust bedding with a commercial alkaline conditioner and the bacterial counts on teat skin and in the teat canal. The study used a crossover design. Ten lactating Holstein cows that were free of udder infections and mastitis were included in the study. The animals were bedded on either untreated sawdust or sawdust that had been treated with a hydrated lime-based conditioner. Once a day, fresh bedding material was added. After 3 weeks, the bedding material was removed from the cubicles, fresh bedding material was provided, and the cows were rotated between the two bedding material groups. Teat skin and teat canals were sampled using the wet and dry swab technique after weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, Escherichia coli and other coliform bacteria were detected in the resulting agar plate cultures. The treatment of the bedding material was associated with the teat skin bacterial counts of Str. uberis, Esch. coli and other coliform bacteria. An association was also found between the bedding material and the teat canal bacterial counts of coliform bacteria other than Esch. coli. For Staph. aureus, no associations with the bedding material were found. In general, the addition of a hydrated lime-based conditioner to sawdust reduces the population sizes of environmental pathogens on teat skin and in teat canals.

  15. Rapid detection of fluorescent and chemiluminescent total coliforms and Escherichia coli on membrane filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Poucke, S O; Nelis, H J

    2000-11-01

    The detection of fluorescent colonies of Escherichia coli/total coliforms (TC) on a membrane filter is currently carried out using 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glycosides as enzyme substrates and a UV-lamp for visualization. The most rapid procedures based on this approach for the demonstration of these indicator bacteria in water take 6-7.5 h to complete. As part of efforts to further reduce the detection time, an improved two-step procedure for the fluorescence or chemiluminescence labelling of microcolonies of E. coli/TC on a membrane filter has been developed. Essential features of this approach include a separation of the bacterial propagation and target enzyme induction from the actual enzymatic labelling, the use of improved fluorogenic, i.e., 4-trifluoromethylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glycosides and fluorescein-di-beta-D-glycosides, or chemiluminogenic (i.e., phenylglucuronic- or galactose-substituted adamantyl 1,2-dioxetanes) substrates for beta-glucuronidase/beta-galactosidase, of enzyme inducers, of special membrane filters and of polymyxin B to promote the cellular uptake of the substrate. This labelling procedure has been applied in conjunction with different detection devices including a UV-lamp, CCD-cameras, X-ray film and the ChemScan((R)) RDI. Using the former three, microcolonies of pure cultures could be detected within 5.5-6.5 h, but waterborne E. coli/TC may fail to form microcolonies in this short time period, thus yielding poor sensitivity and a high false-negative rate. In contrast, a quantitative enumeration was feasible in less than 4 h with the ChemScan((R)) RDI, owing to its ability to detect both microcolonies and non-dividing single cells.

  16. A rapid method for the detection of representative coliforms in water samples: polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jong-Tar; Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Huang, Hsiao-Han; Tsao, Chia-Fen; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2010-03-01

    Methods to detect the presence of coliform bacteria in drinking water usually involve a series of complex cultivating steps that are time-consuming and subject to external influences. For this reason, the new 16S rRNA probe has been developed in this study as an alternative detector PCR-ELISA technique that does not involve the culture of bacteria and that is able to detect, identify, and quantify the representative coliform species present in water samples. Our results indicate that this technique is both rapid (detection time of 4 h) and accurate (1.4% error rate). The limit of detection (LOD) was 5 CFU/100 ml for total coliforms, which meets the standards set by most countries for drinking water. Our comparative study demonstrated that this PCR-ELISA method is superior to current conventional methods in terms of detection time, LOD, and accuracy.

  17. Study of total count, E. coli and coliforms contamination of raw milk from letdown stage till delivery to factory in Lorestan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    behrouz Yarahmadi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Yarahmadi B1, Mahdavi HR2, Moaydinezhad A4 1. Research Instructor, Department of Animal Products, Lorstan Research Center of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Khorramabad, Iran 2. Research Assistant Professor, Department of Animal Products, Karaj Animal Science Research Institue, Karaj, Iran 3. MSc in Biotechnology, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Hamadan Bou Ali University, Hamadan, Iran Abstract Background: The primary quality of raw milk is affected by several factors including animal nutrition, animal health, milk components, and its bacterial activity and these factors are effective on the final products. Therefore, the quality of raw milk depends on time and milk condition from production to delivery. In Lorestan, 97% of the milk production is obtained from rural and small units. This study was carried out to determine the factors affecting the bacteriological quality of raw milk from letdown phase till delivery to factory and to find out the critical points of bacterial contamination in the years 2003 and 2004. Materials and methods: In this study, the collecting centers of raw milk with a capacity of more than 3 tons, between 1.5 to 3 tons, and fewer than 1.5 tons were included as the centers with high, moderate, and low capacity respectively. The sampling stages consisted of cow milk letdown, milk collecting equipment, milk collecting tankers, milk cooling tanks, and milk delivery to factory. Microbial experiments consisted of standard plate count (SPC, E. coli, and coliforms. All the collected samples were 45 ones in each month and 540 samples in a year. Being converted to Log10, the data were analyzed by the SPSS software (version 11.5 and GLM procedure was used to determine the effects of month, capacity of centers, and sampling stages. Results: Based on the results of the study, the average total count (TC in all seasons in Lorestan province was 6.43 0.37cfu/m. The effects of month, capacity of centers, and the sampling

  18. Rapid detection of coliforms in drinking water of Arak city using multiplex PCR method in comparison with the standard method of culture (Most Probably Number)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemeh, Dehghan; Reza, Zolfaghari Mohammad; Mohammad, Arjomandzadegan; Salomeh, Kalantari; Reza, Ahmari Gholam; Hossein, Sarmadian; Maryam, Sadrnia; Azam, Ahmadi; Mana, Shojapoor; Negin, Najarian; Reza, Kasravi Alii; Saeed, Falahat

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyse molecular detection of coliforms and shorten the time of PCR. Methods Rapid detection of coliforms by amplification of lacZ and uidA genes in a multiplex PCR reaction was designed and performed in comparison with most probably number (MPN) method for 16 artificial and 101 field samples. The molecular method was also conducted on isolated coliforms from positive MPN samples; standard sample for verification of microbial method certificated reference material; isolated strains from certificated reference material and standard bacteria. The PCR and electrophoresis parameters were changed for reducing the operation time. Results Results of PCR for lacZ and uidA genes were similar in all of standard, operational and artificial samples and showed the 876 bp and 147 bp bands of lacZ and uidA genes by multiplex PCR. PCR results were confirmed by MPN culture method by sensitivity 86% (95% CI: 0.71-0.93). Also the total execution time, with a successful change of factors, was reduced to less than two and a half hour. Conclusions Multiplex PCR method with shortened operation time was used for the simultaneous detection of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in distribution system of Arak city. It's recommended to be used at least as an initial screening test, and then the positive samples could be randomly tested by MPN. PMID:25182727

  19. Rapid detection of coliforms in drinking water of Arak city using multiplex PCR method in comparison with the standard method of culture (Most Probably Number).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemeh, Dehghan; Reza, Zolfaghari Mohammad; Mohammad, Arjomandzadegan; Salomeh, Kalantari; Reza, Ahmari Gholam; Hossein, Sarmadian; Maryam, Sadrnia; Azam, Ahmadi; Mana, Shojapoor; Negin, Najarian; Reza, Kasravi Alii; Saeed, Falahat

    2014-05-01

    To analyse molecular detection of coliforms and shorten the time of PCR. Rapid detection of coliforms by amplification of lacZ and uidA genes in a multiplex PCR reaction was designed and performed in comparison with most probably number (MPN) method for 16 artificial and 101 field samples. The molecular method was also conducted on isolated coliforms from positive MPN samples; standard sample for verification of microbial method certificated reference material; isolated strains from certificated reference material and standard bacteria. The PCR and electrophoresis parameters were changed for reducing the operation time. Results of PCR for lacZ and uidA genes were similar in all of standard, operational and artificial samples and showed the 876 bp and 147 bp bands of lacZ and uidA genes by multiplex PCR. PCR results were confirmed by MPN culture method by sensitivity 86% (95% CI: 0.71-0.93). Also the total execution time, with a successful change of factors, was reduced to less than two and a half hour. Multiplex PCR method with shortened operation time was used for the simultaneous detection of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in distribution system of Arak city. It's recommended to be used at least as an initial screening test, and then the positive samples could be randomly tested by MPN.

  20. Detection of the coliform bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. in water by a sensitive and rapid immunomagnetic electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.; Bruno, J.

    1995-10-01

    Hemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other fecal coliform bacteria, such as species of Salmonella, could pose a serious health threat in contaminated water resources. Traditional bacterial culture methods and ELISA based assays for identification of fecal coliforms are relatively slow and ambiguous. Polymerase chain reaction of extracted DNA from such bacteria and immunomagnetic separation (IMS) methods appear promising for this application. Although PCR can be a definitive identification technique, it is relatively time consuming when compared to IMS. In this work, the IMS technique has been coupled with an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technology to separate specific bacteria from their media and quantitatively detect the bacteria within one hour. The sensitivity of the IMS-ECL assay for E.coli O157 strain and Salmonella sp. is as low as 10 - 100 cells/mL in water samples. In addition, IMS was accomplished in dense washings of food and environmental samples followed by ECL assay. These results suggest strongly use of the IMS-ECL methodology for rapid and facile screening of various bacterial contaminations in water resources or other environmental samples for the low level presence of pathogenic coliforms.

  1. Rapid, single-step most-probable-number method for enumerating fecal coliforms in effluents from sewage treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, E. F.; Silverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    A single-step most-probable-number method for determining the number of fecal coliform bacteria present in sewage treatment plant effluents is discussed. A single growth medium based on that of Reasoner et al. (1976) and consisting of 5.0 gr. proteose peptone, 3.0 gr. yeast extract, 10.0 gr. lactose, 7.5 gr. NaCl, 0.2 gr. sodium lauryl sulfate, and 0.1 gr. sodium desoxycholate per liter is used. The pH is adjusted to 6.5, and samples are incubated at 44.5 deg C. Bacterial growth is detected either by measuring the increase with time in the electrical impedance ratio between the innoculated sample vial and an uninnoculated reference vial or by visual examination for turbidity. Results obtained by the single-step method for chlorinated and unchlorinated effluent samples are in excellent agreement with those obtained by the standard method. It is suggested that in automated treatment plants impedance ratio data could be automatically matched by computer programs with the appropriate dilution factors and most probable number tables already in the computer memory, with the corresponding result displayed as fecal coliforms per 100 ml of effluent.

  2. Enzyme characteristics of beta-D-galactosidase- and beta-D-glucuronidase-positive bacteria and their interference in rapid methods for detection of waterborne coliforms and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryland, I; Fiksdal, L

    1998-03-01

    Bacteria which were beta-D-galactosidase and beta-D-glucuronidase positive or expressed only one of these enzymes were isolated from environmental water samples. The enzymatic activity of these bacteria was measured in 25-min assays by using the fluorogenic substrates 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-galactoside and 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide. The enzyme activity, enzyme induction, and enzyme temperature characteristics of target and nontarget bacteria in assays aimed at detecting coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli were investigated. The potential interference of false-positive bacteria was evaluated. Several of the beta-D-galactosidase-positive nontarget bacteria but none of the beta-D-glucuronidase-positive nontarget bacteria contained unstable enzyme at 44.5 degrees C. The activity of target bacteria was highly inducible. Nontarget bacteria were induced much less or were not induced by the inducers used. The results revealed large variations in the enzyme levels of different beta-D-galactosidase- and beta-D-glucuronidase-positive bacteria. The induced and noninduced beta-D-glucuronidase activities of Bacillus spp. and Aerococcus viridans were approximately the same as the activities of induced E. coli. Except for some isolates identified as Aeromonas spp., all of the induced and noninduced beta-D-galactosidase-positive, noncoliform isolates exhibited at least 2 log units less mean beta-D-galactosidase activity than induced E. coli. The noncoliform bacteria must be present in correspondingly higher concentrations than those of target bacteria to interfere in the rapid assay for detection of coliform bacteria.

  3. An evaluation of potential interferences in a fluorimetric assay for the rapid detection of thermotolerant coliforms in sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C M; Apte, S C

    2000-02-01

    A 1-h fluorimetric assay of beta-D-galactosidase activity was evaluated for determining thermotolerant coliforms (TTC) in sewage samples. Above TTC concentrations of 2.3 x 103 colony-forming units (cfu) 100 ml-1, the assay response was related to TTC concentration. However, below this concentration, a large background signal was observed which was independent of TTC concentration. A separation scheme involving various filtration treatments and additions of a beta-D-galactosidase inhibitor was devised and used to quantify the sources of this anomalous assay response. The interferences encountered were largely due to the presence in sewage of non-specific cell-free enzymes or other cell-free substances that were capable of hydrolysing the fluorogenic substrate. Despite this apparent limitation, the fluorimetric enzyme assay has potential as an 'early warning' indicator of treatment process failure and gross sewage contamination and leakage in situations where TTC concentrations exceed 2.3 x 103 cfu 100 ml-1

  4. Detection of Coliforms in Drinking Water Using Skin Patches: A Rapid, Reliable Method that Does Not Require an External Energy Source

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Sehee; Kim, Min-Jeong; Park, Minsun; Kim, Nuri; Lee, Yu-Jin; Lee, Gyu-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    The detection of coliforms requires incubation in a laboratory, generally powered using electricity. In many parts of the developing world, however, external energy sources such as electricity are not readily available. To develop a fast, reliable method for detecting coliforms in water without an external energy source, we assessed the efficacy of six test kits for the identification of coliforms in water samples. To assess the possibility of using body temperature as the sole source of heat...

  5. A rapid method for counting nucleated erythrocytes on stained blood smears by digital image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, E.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    Measures of parasitemia by intraerythrocytic hematozoan parasites are normally expressed as the number of infected erythrocytes per n erythrocytes and are notoriously tedious and time consuming to measure. We describe a protocol for generating rapid counts of nucleated erythrocytes from digital micrographs of thin blood smears that can be used to estimate intensity of hematozoan infections in nonmammalian vertebrate hosts. This method takes advantage of the bold contrast and relatively uniform size and morphology of erythrocyte nuclei on Giemsa-stained blood smears and uses ImageJ, a java-based image analysis program developed at the U.S. National Institutes of Health and available on the internet, to recognize and count these nuclei. This technique makes feasible rapid and accurate counts of total erythrocytes in large numbers of microscope fields, which can be used in the calculation of peripheral parasitemias in low-intensity infections.

  6. Detection of coliforms in drinking water using skin patches: a rapid, reliable method that does not require an external energy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sehee; Kim, Min-jeong; Park, MinSun; Kim, Nuri; Lee, Yu-jin; Lee, Gyu-Cheol

    2014-02-01

    The detection of coliforms requires incubation in a laboratory, generally powered using electricity. In many parts of the developing world, however, external energy sources such as electricity are not readily available. To develop a fast, reliable method for detecting coliforms in water without an external energy source, we assessed the efficacy of six test kits for the identification of coliforms in water samples. To assess the possibility of using body temperature as the sole source of heat for incubation, bacterial samples were then mixed with the enzymatic test kit reagent and attached to the human body surface using a patch system. The patches were attached to the bodies of volunteers for 24 hours and the practicality and accuracy of the patches were assessed. Coliforms were detected within 24 hours in all patches. This innovation will facilitate the testing of water quality by researchers and by economically disadvantaged people without electricity.

  7. The Interaction between Heterotrophic Bacteria and Coliform, Fecal Coliform, Fecal Streptococci Bacteria in the Water Supply Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanidaz, Nazak; Zafarzadeh, Ali; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and coliform, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria in water supply networks. This study was conducted during 2013 on water supply distribution network in Aq Qala City, Golestan Province, Northern Iran and standard methods were applied for microbiological analysis. The surface method was applied to test the heterotrophic bacteria and MPN method was used for coliform, fecal coliform and fecal streptococci bacteria measurements. In 114 samples, heterotrophic bacteria count were over 500 CFU/ml, which the amount of fecal coliform, coliform, and fecal streptococci were 8, 32, and 20 CFU/100 ml, respectively. However, in the other 242 samples, with heterotrophic bacteria count being less than 500 CFU/ml, the amount of fecal coliform, coliform, and fecal streptococci was 7, 23, and 11 CFU/100ml, respectively. The relationship between heterotrophic bacteria, coliforms and fecal streptococci was highly significant (Pcoliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria being high, whenever the concentration of heterotrophic bacteria in the water network systems was high. Interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and coliform, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria in the Aq Qala City water supply networks was not notable. It can be due to high concentrations of organic carbon, bio-films and nutrients, which are necessary for growth, and survival of all microorganisms.

  8. ATP bioluminescence rapid detection of total viable count in soy sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shou-Lei; Miao, Su-Na; Deng, Shao-Ya; Zou, Min-Juan; Zhong, Fo-Sheng; Huang, Wen-Biao; Pan, Si-Yi; Wang, Qing-Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence rapid determination method may be useful for enumerating the total viable count (TVC) in soy sauce, as it has been previously used in food and beverages for sanitation with good precision. However, many factors interfere with the correlation between total aerobic plate counts and ATP bioluminescence. This study investigated these interfering factors, including ingredients of soy sauce and bacteria at different physiological stages. Using the ATP bioluminescence method, TVC was obtained within 4 h, compared to 48 h required for the conventional aerobic plate count (APC) method. Our results also indicated a high correlation coefficient (r = 0.90) between total aerobic plate counts and ATP bioluminescence after filtration and resuscitation with special medium. The limit of quantification of the novel detection method is 100 CFU/mL; there is a good linear correlation between the bioluminescence intensity and TVC in soy sauce in the range 1 × 10(2) -3 × 10(4) CFU/mL and even wider. The method employed a luminescence recorder (Tristar LB-941) and 96-well plates and could analyse 50-100 samples simultaneously at low cost. In this study, we evaluated and eliminated the interfering factors and made the ATP bioluminescence rapid method available for enumerating TVC in soy sauce. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Rapid detection of coliforms in drinking water of Arak city using multiplex PCR method in comparison with the standard method of culture (Most Probably Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghan fatemeh

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: Multiplex PCR method with shortened operation time was used for the simultaneous detection of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in distribution system of Arak city. It's recommended to be used at least as an initial screening test, and then the positive samples could be randomly tested by MPN.

  10. Release of Sediment-Bound Fecal Coliforms by Dredging1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Fecal coliform concentrations increased significantly (F test) in the immediate vicinity of a maintenance dredging operation in the Mississippi River navigation channel. Increased counts were attributed to the disturbance and relocation of bottom sediments by dredging and a concomitant release of sediment-bound fecal coliforms. PMID:1089160

  11. Validation of the MicroSnap Coliform and E. coli Test System for Enumeration and Detection of Coliforms and E. coli in a Variety of Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meighan, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The MicroSnap Coliform and E. coli system was devised to give rapid enumeration and detection of coliforms and/or Escherichia coli strains in a sample of food within an 8 h working shift. The method measures β-galactosidase and β-glucuronidase enzymes using novel bioluminogenic substrates which develop an output light signal proportional to the concentration of enzyme discovered. The assay uses two different phases to determine the enzyme concentration. The first phase is an enrichment of the sample in a nutrient-rich broth device at 37 ± 0.5°C. After 6 or 8 h, an aliquot is taken from the enrichment device and injected into the Coliform Detection Device, which is assayed in a luminometer after 10 min of incubation at 37 ± 0.5°C. Samples testing positive in the Coliform Detection Device can be subsequently assayed specifically for E. coli using the E. coli Detection Device. The relative light unit output from the detection device is proportional to the bacterial concentration when the incubation was initiated, which is proportional to the contamination level in the matrix being assessed. The MicroSnap Coliform and E. coli system was evaluated for both quantitative and qualitative analysis of coliforms and E. coli in a variety of foods. Three different luminometers were used in the analysis, each of which has different functionalities and different sensitivities. The MicroSnap method showed good correlation with the appropriate corresponding reference method for enumeration of coliforms and E. coli. A statistically significant difference was seen in detection of E. coli in milk, as reported by the independent laboratory. The reference method reported higher mean Log10 CFU counts than the MicroSnap method; however, no significant differences were seen between the MicroSnap system and reference methods for any of the other matrixes. Inclusivity testing was conducted on 25 different non-E. coli coliforms and 25 different E. coli strains, and exclusivity testing

  12. Revised Total Coliform Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) aims to increase public health protection through the reduction of potential pathways for fecal contamination in the distribution system of a public water system (PWS).

  13. Nutrient and Coliform Loading (NCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a database of available fecal coliform bacteria, fecal streptococci bacteria, and nutrient loading data. Loading for contaminants other than fecal coliform...

  14. Survival of faecal coliforms and hygiene risks in soils treated with municipal sewage sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y H; Luo, Y M; Wu, L H; Li, Z G; Song, J; Christie, P

    2006-01-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted to monitor effect of sewage sludge application on changes in numbers of faecal coliforms in soils over time after sludge application and evaluate the hygiene risks. Soil faecal coliform counts were made after 1, 7, 14, 28, 56 and 84 days of incubation. The faecal coliform counts in the sludge-treated soils decreased substantially with time and were similar to those in the untreated controls after incubation for 56 days. Land application of air-dried sludges increased the hygiene risks due to the re-growth of faecal coliforms, and the counts of faecal coliforms in soil treated with air dried sludge from Suzhou (91% DM) were 50 times higher than in soils with fresh dewatered sludge from Suzhou (15% DM) after 7 days of incubation. The main factors affecting the changes in faecal coliform counts were sludge type and incubation time. Sludge type determined the faecal coliform counts and the ability of the faecal coliforms to re-establish, and indigenous microorganisms competed with the faecal coliforms for nutrients during the incubation process.

  15. Validation of the MicroSnap Coliform and E. coli test system for enumeration and detection of coliforms and E. coli in a variety of foods. Performance Tested Method 071302.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meighan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The MicroSnap Coliform and E. coli system was devised to give rapid enumeration and detection of coliforms and/or Escherichia coli strains in a sample of food within an 8 h working shift. The method measures beta-galactosidase and beta-glucuronidase enzymes using novel bioluminogenic substrates which develop an output light signal proportional to the concentration of enzyme discovered. The assay uses two different phases to determine the enzyme concentration. The first phase is an enrichment of the sample in a nutrient-rich broth device at 37 +/- 0.5 degrees C. After 6 or 8 h, an aliquot is taken from the enrichment device and injected into the Coliform Detection Device, which is assayed in a luminometer after 10 min of incubation at 37 +/- 0.5 degrees C. Samples testing positive in the Coliform Detection Device can be subsequently assayed specifically for E. coli using the E. coli Detection Device. The relative light unit output from the detection device is proportional to the bacterial concentration when the incubation was initiated, which is proportional to the contamination level in the matrix being assessed. The MicroSnap Coliform and E. coli system was evaluated for both quantitative and qualitative analysis of coliforms and E. coli in a variety of foods. Three different luminometers were used in the analysis, each of which has different functionalities and different sensitivities. The MicroSnap method showed good correlation with the appropriate corresponding reference method for enumeration of coliforms and E. coli. A statistically significant difference was seen in detection of E. coli in milk, as reported by the independent laboratory. The reference method reported higher mean Log10 CFU counts than the MicroSnap method; however, no significant differences were seen between the MicroSnap system and reference methods for any of the other matrixes. Inclusivity testing was conducted on 25 different non-E. coli coliforms and 25 different E. coli strains, and

  16. Injured coliforms in drinking water.

    OpenAIRE

    McFeters, G A; Kippin, J S; LeChevallier, M W

    1986-01-01

    Coliforms were enumerated by using m-Endo agar LES and m-T7 agar in 102 routine samples of drinking water from three New England community water systems to investigate the occurrence and significance of injured coliforms. Samples included water collected immediately after conventional treatment, during the backwash cycle, at various points in the distribution system, and 1 week after the break and subsequent repair of a distribution main. Injured coliforms in these samples averaged greater th...

  17. Evaluation of Sanita-kun E. coli & coliform sheet medium for the enumeration of total coliforms and E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiyama, Masashi; Iwasaki, Mihoko

    2010-01-01

    The Sanita-kun E. coli & Coliform sheet medium consists of a transparent cover film, an adhesive sheet, a layer of nonwoven fabric, and a water-soluble compound film, including a culture medium formula for the enumeration of total coliforms and differentiation of Escherichia coli. The Sanita-kun E. coli & Coliform sheet is a chromogenic medium and contains X-Gal, which is hydrolyzed by beta-galactosidase from coliforms to produce a visible blue dye and Salmon-glucuronic acid, which is hydrolyzed by beta-glucuronidase from E. coli to produce a red-purple dye. It is easy to distinguish the difference between E. coli and coliform (other than E. coli) colonies. Total coliforms and E. coli can be enumerated by incubating the sheet medium at 35 + 1 degrees C for 21-24 h without further confirmation. The Sanita-kun E. coli & Coliform sheets were validated as a medium for the enumeration of E. coli and total coliform in meats and meat products using processed meat and two types of raw and frozen meats using stomacher and blender homogenization. In the stomacher homogenization, all 100 samples showed no significant difference between Sanita-kun sheet and AOAC Method 966.24. The linear correlation coefficients (r2) were calculated as 0.90 (coliform) and 0.79 (E. coli). In the blender homogenization, out of 100 samples tested, 99 showed no significant difference between Sanita-kun sheet and AOAC Method 966.24, but the count of total coliforms of Sanita-kun in one sample of uninoculated raw beef was significantly higher than that obtained by AOAC Method 966.24. The linear r2 values were calculated as 0.84 (coliform) and 0.86 (E. coli). The inclusivity and exclusivity study indicated an inclusivity rate of 100% and an exclusivity rate of 95.4%. The sensitivity study showed positive results when the homogenate or dilution contained 3 CFU/mL of coliform or E. coli. The performance of four different lots of the sheets was equivalent, and suggested no change of the performance at

  18. Improved method for coliform verification.

    OpenAIRE

    Diehl, J D

    1991-01-01

    Modification of a method for coliform verification presented in Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater is described. Modification of the method, which is based on beta-galactosidase production, involves incorporation of a lactose operon inducer in medium upon which presumptive coliform isolates are cultured prior to beta-galactosidase assay.

  19. Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Coliform Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mesner, Nancy; Daniels, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet provides information about coliform bacteria. Including sections about what coliform bacteria is, how it enters drinking water, health concerns from exposure, drinking water standards, and how to treat drinking water that contains coliforms.

  20. Estimation and Characterization of Coliforms in Vended Food and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty–six (66) food and ten (10) water samples from Nsukka metropolis were screened for the presence of coliforms using the Most probable number (MPN) technique and direct plate count on MacConkey agar/broth and Eosin Methylene Blue (EMB) agar for isolating those from both faecal and human origin. The isolates ...

  1. Detection and enumeration of Coliforms and Escherichia coli in water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water samples from eighteen different sources in Nairobi were analyzed for coliform and E. coli content using three microbiological techniques, namely: Multiple tube or Most Probable Number (MPN) technique, Defined Substrate Technique (DST) or Colilert technique and Petrifilm(TM) Plate Count Techniques. All the three ...

  2. INFLUENCE OF MEAT MATURATION TO THE PRESENCE OF COLIFORM BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomír Lopašovský

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK JA X-NONE The aim of our study was detection of coliforms bacteria and pH changes in the process of beef maturation. The number of coliforms bacteria were lower as 1 log cfu.g-1 in four samples and the highest coliforms bacteria count was 3.1 log cfu.g-1 after 1-st week of meat maturation. Average number of coliforms bacteria was lower as 1.43 log cfu.g-1.  The pH values of meat varied from 5.5 to 6.1 after 1-st week. Average value of pH was 5.75.  The number of coliforms bacteria were from 2.61 log cfu.g-1 to 3.35 log cfu.g-1 after 2-nd week of meat maturation. Average number of coliforms bacteria was 3.17 log cfu.g-1. The pH values of meat were from 6.0 to 6.2 after 2-nd week of meat maturation. Average value of pH was 6.05. doi:10.5219/181

  3. Occurrence of Coliform and Escherichia coli Contamination and Absence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on Romaine Lettuce from Retail Stores in the Upper Midwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Josephine D; Zietlow, Mark S; Miller, Kevin M; Ellingson, Jay L E

    2015-09-01

    A total of 720 whole, romaine lettuce heads were purchased from retail locations in the Upper Midwest and assessed for coliform and Escherichia coli contamination and for the presence of E. coli O157:H7. During a 16-month period (August 2010 through December 2011), coliform and E. coli counts were enumerated on Petrifilm, and the presence of E. coli O157:H7 and the virulence gene eae was evaluated by real-time PCR (qPCR). Over half (400 of 720) of the lettuce samples were processed with an immunomagnetic separation step before the qPCR assay. All retail lettuce samples were negative for E. coli O157:H7 when tested with the R.A.P.I.D. LT qPCR targeting a region of the O-antigen, and only two (0.28%) were positive for the eae gene when tested with LightCycler qPCR. On Petrifilm, coliform counts of most lettuce samples (96.4%) were between retail locations, specifically revealing the absence of E. coli O157:H7 and low levels of contamination with coliforms and other E. coli strains.

  4. Method for detecting coliform organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, K.; Nibley, D. A.; Jeffers, E. L.; Brooks, R. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the concentration of coliform bacteria in a sample. The sample containing the coliform bacteria is cultured in a liquid growth medium. The cultured bacteria produce hydrogen and the hydrogen is vented to a second cell containing a buffer solution in which the hydrogen dissolves. By measuring the potential change in the buffer solution caused by the hydrogen, as a function of time, the initial concentration of bacteria in the sample is determined. Alternatively, the potential change in the buffer solution can be compared with the potential change in the liquid growth medium to verify that the potential change in the liquid growth medium is produced primarily by the hydrogen gas produced by the coliform bacteria.

  5. Effect of tetracycline dose and treatment mode on selection of resistant coliform bacteria in nursery pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig...... by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracyclineresistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated...... with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaximeresistant strains...

  6. Comparison of media for enumeration of coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli in non-disinfected water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Tarja; Paakkari, Piia; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi; Paulin, Lars; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2007-03-01

    In this work alternative media for detection and enumeration of E. coli and coliform bacteria were compared to the reference method ISO 9308-1 (LTTC) using non-disinfected water samples with background flora. The alternative media included LES Endo agar medium (LES Endo), Colilert-18 with 51-well Quanti-tray (Colilert), Chromocult Coliform agar (CC), Harlequin E. coli/Coliform medium (HECM) and Chromogenic Escherichia coli/Coliform medium (CECM). A total of 110 samples of groundwater, bathing water and spiked water was used. Our results revealed that confirmation of coliform bacteria counts is necessary, not only on lactose-based LTTC and LES Endo media, but also on the chromogenic agar media tested, due to the growth of oxidase positive colonies. LTTC and CC media also allowed the growth of some morphologically typical coliform colonies containing gram-positive bacteria. The recovery of coliform bacteria was lower on LES Endo than on LTTC. In most cases Colilert, CC, HECM and CECM gave higher coliform counts than LTTC. The use of the LTTC medium led to higher E. coli counts than obtained with any of the alternative mediums. There are three explanations for this: (1) high sensitivity of LTTC, (2) false positives on LTTC or (3) false negatives especially with Colilert, but also with chromogenic agar media. Although LTTC was found to be a very sensitive medium, the high degree of background growth of non-disinfected waters disturbed substantially the use of it. In conclusion, our results suggest that Colilert, CC and CECM are potential alternative media for detection of coliform bacteria and E. coli from non-disinfected water.

  7. Total Coliform Rule (TCR) Federal Register Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provides the FR notice to 40 CFR Parts 141 and 142 Drinking Water: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; Total Coliforms (Including Fecal Coliforms and E. Coli); Final Rule (26 pp, 5 M).

  8. Automated electrochemical selection of coliforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. E.; Dill, W. P.; Jeffers, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Computer-controlled sensor system monitors and quantifies coliform organisms in waste water samples through molecular hydrogen detection techniques. System includes cleanup procedures, external sterilization of each sensor interface with working fluid as well as incubation cell interiors. Sensor system may also be operated manually.

  9. The Evolving Role of Coliforms As Indicators of Unhygienic Processing Conditions in Dairy Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicole H; Trmčić, Aljoša; Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Testing for coliforms has a long history in the dairy industry and has helped to identify raw milk and dairy products that may have been exposed to unsanitary conditions. Coliform standards are included in a number of regulatory documents (e.g., the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Grade "A" Pasteurized Milk Ordinance). As a consequence, detection above a threshold of members of this method-defined, but diverse, group of bacteria can result in a wide range of regulatory outcomes. Coliforms are defined as aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, Gram negative, non-sporeforming rods capable of fermenting lactose to produce gas and acid within 48 h at 32-35°C; 19 genera currently include at least some strains that represent coliforms. Most bacterial genera that comprise the coliform group (e.g., Escherichia, Klebsiella, and Serratia) are within the family Enterobacteriaceae, while at least one genus with strains recognized as coliforms, Aeromonas, is in the family Aeromonadaceae. The presence of coliforms has long been thought to indicate fecal contamination, however, recent discoveries regarding this diverse group of bacteria indicates that only a fraction are fecal in origin, while the majority are environmental contaminants. In the US dairy industry in particular, testing for coliforms as indicators of unsanitary conditions and post-processing contamination is widespread. While coliforms are easily and rapidly detected, and are not found in pasteurized dairy products that have not been exposed to post-processing contamination, advances in knowledge of bacterial populations most commonly associated with post-processing contamination in dairy foods has led to questions regarding the utility of coliforms as indicators of unsanitary conditions for dairy products. For example, Pseudomonas spp. frequently contaminate dairy products after pasteurization, yet they are not detected by coliform tests. This review will address the role that coliforms play in raw and finished

  10. The Evolving Role of Coliforms as Indicators of Unhygienic Processing Conditions in Dairy Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Helen Martin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Testing for coliforms has a long history in the dairy industry and has helped to identify raw milk and dairy products that may have been exposed to unsanitary conditions. Coliform standards are included in a number of regulatory documents (e.g., the U. S. Food and Drug Administration’s Grade A Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. As a consequence, detection above a threshold of members of this method-defined, but diverse, group of bacteria can result in a wide range of regulatory outcomes. Coliforms are defined as aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, Gram negative, non-sporeforming rods capable of fermenting lactose to produce gas and acid within 48 hours at 32-35°C; 19 genera currently include at least some strains that represent coliforms. Most bacterial genera that comprise the coliform group (e.g., Escherichia, Klebsiella and Serratia are within the family Enterobacteriaceae, while at least one genus with strains recognized as coliforms, Aeromonas, is in the family Aeromonadaceae. The presence of coliforms has long been thought to indicate fecal contamination, however, recent discoveries regarding this diverse group of bacteria indicates that only a fraction are fecal in origin, while the majority are environmental contaminants. In the US dairy industry in particular, testing for coliforms as indicators of unsanitary conditions and post-processing contamination is widespread. While coliforms are easily and rapidly detected, and are not found in pasteurized dairy products that have not been exposed to post-processing contamination, advances in knowledge of bacterial populations most commonly associated with post-processing contamination in dairy foods has led to questions regarding the utility of coliforms as indicators of unsanitary conditions for dairy products. For example, Pseudomonas spp. frequently contaminate dairy products after pasteurization, yet they are not detected by coliform tests. This review will address the role that coliforms play

  11. Fecal coliforms, caffeine and carbamazepine in stormwater collection systems in a large urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvé, Sébastien; Aboulfadl, Khadija; Dorner, Sarah; Payment, Pierre; Deschamps, Guy; Prévost, Michèle

    2012-01-01

    Water samples from streams, brooks and storm sewer outfall pipes that collect storm waters across the Island of Montréal were analyzed for caffeine, carbamazepine and fecal coliforms. All samples contained various concentrations of these tracers, indicating a widespread sanitary contamination in urban environments. Fecal coliforms and caffeine levels ranged over several orders of magnitude with a modest correlation between caffeine and fecal coliforms (R(2) value of 0.558). An arbitrary threshold of 400 ng caffeine L(-1) allows us to identify samples with an elevated fecal contamination, as defined by more than 200 colony-forming units per 100 mL (cfu 100 mL(-1)) of fecal coliforms. Low caffeine levels were sporadically related to high fecal coliform counts. Lower levels of caffeine and fecal coliforms were observed in the brooks while the larger streams and storm water discharge points contained over ten times more. The carbamazepine data showed little or no apparent correlation to caffeine. These data suggest that this storm water collection system, located in a highly urbanized urban environment, is widely contaminated by domestic sewers as indicated by the ubiquitous presence of fecal contaminants as well as caffeine and carbamazepine. Caffeine concentrations were relatively well correlated to fecal coliforms, and could potentially be used as a chemical indicator of the level of contamination by sanitary sources. The carbamazepine data was not significantly correlated to fecal coliforms and of little use in this dataset. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Analytical notes - Electrochemical method for early detection and monitoring of coliforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Boykin, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    An electrochemical method for detecting bacteria, based on a linear relationship between inoculum size and the time of hydrogen evolution, was tested for the early detection and monitoring of coliforms in naturally contaminated estuarine and fresh water samples. Standard methods for coliform analysis were performed on each sample, and membrane filtration counts were used to construct dose-response curves; relationships and results are discussed herein.

  13. 40 CFR 141.21 - Coliform sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coliform sampling. 141.21 Section 141... sampling. (a) Routine monitoring. (1) Public water systems must collect total coliform samples at sites... must collect at least one repeat sample from the sampling tap where the original total coliform...

  14. Evaluation of the 3M™ Petrifilm™ Rapid Yeast and Mold Count Plate for the Enumeration of Yeast and Mold in Food: Collaborative Study, First Action 2014.05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Patrick; Flannery, Jonathan; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James; Goins, David; Jechorek, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The 3M™ Petrifilm™ Rapid Yeast and Mold (RYM) Count Plate is a simple, ready-to-use chromogenic culture method for the rapid detection and enumeration of yeast and mold in food products. The 3M Petrifilm RYM Count Plate method was compared to the U. S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA BAM) Chapter 18, Yeasts, Molds and Mycotoxins and the ISO 21527:2008 Microbiology of Food and Animal Feeding Stuffs-Horizontal Method for the Enumeration for Yeast and Molds - Part 1: Colony Count Technique in Products with Water Activity Greater Than 0.95 and Part 2: Colony Count Technique in Products with Water Activity Less Than or Equal to 0.95 reference methods for raw almonds and raw frozen ground beef patties (77% lean). The 3M Petrifilm RYM Count Plate method was evaluated using a paired study design in a multi-laboratory collaborative study following the current AOAC Validation Guidelines. Three target contamination levels (low, 10-100 CFU/g; medium, 100-1000 CFU/g; high 1000-10 000 CFU/g) as well as an uninoculated control level (0 CFU/g) were evaluated for each matrix. Samples evaluated by the 3M Petrifilm RYM Count Plate method were prepared in duplicate and incubated at both 25°C and 28°C. Plates at both temperatures were enumerated after 48 and 60 h of incubation. No significant difference was observed between the 3M Petrifilm RYM Count Plate method and the FDA BAM or ISO 21527 reference methods for each contamination level. No statistical differences were observed between samples analyzed by the 3M Petrifilm RYM Count Plate method (at either 25°C or 28°C) and the reference methods. No statistical significant differences were observed between enumeration of colonies at 48 and 60 h on the 3M Petrifilm RYM Count Plate method and the reference methods.

  15. Enumeration of heterotrophs, fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli in water: comparison of 3M Petrifilm plates with standard plating procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraft, H; Watterworth, L A

    2005-03-01

    A total of 177 naturally contaminated water samples were analyzed by membrane filtration according to the Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater published by the American Public Health Association. Filters were incubated in parallel on mHPC-agar and 3M Petrifilm Aerobic Count Plates (Petrifilm AC plates) for heterotrophic counts. Fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli were enumerated on mFC-agar and 3M Petrifilm E. coli/Coliform Count Plates (Petrifilm EC plates). Typical colonies on each media type were confirmed following standard procedures. Heterotrophic counts were between 10(3) and 10(4) CFU/mL and the average log10 counts obtained on Petrifilm AC plates were about two-fold lower than on mHPC-agar. Counts for fecal coliforms and E. coli were between 10(2) and 10(3) CFU/mL. Average log10 counts for confirmed fecal coliforms obtained on Petrifilm EC plates were slightly lower than on mFC agar with a correlation coefficient of 0.949. The average log10 counts for confirmed E. coli on Petrifilm EC plates and on mFC agar were statistically not different (P=0.126) with a correlation coefficient of 0.879. Specificity of Petrifilm EC plates and mFC agar was evaluated by comparing typical colony counts with confirmed counts. On mFC agar, counts for typical colonies were by 2 log10 CFU higher than the actual confirmed counts. In contrast, on Petrifilm EC plates typical colony counts were almost identical to confirmed colony counts for both fecal coliforms and E. coli. This comparison illustrates the high specificity of Petrifilm EC plates for enumeration of both fecal coliforms and E. coli in water.

  16. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction as an alternative rapid method for enumeration of colony count in liveBrucellavaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Waleed S; Sayed, Mahmoud L; Samy, A A; Al-Sadek, Ghada Mohamed; El-Hamid, Gina Mohamed Mohamed Abd; Ali, Abdel Hakam M

    2017-06-01

    Brucellosis is a major bacterial zoonosis of global importance affecting a range of animal species and man worldwide. It has economic, public health, and bio-risk importance. Control and prevention of animal brucellosis mainly depend on accurate diagnostic tools and implementation of effective and safe animal vaccination program. There are three types of animal Brucella live vaccines - Brucella melitensis Rev-1 vaccine, Brucella abortus S19, and B . abortus RB51. Evaluation of these vaccines depends mainly on enumeration of Brucella viable count. At present, used colony count method is time consuming, costly and requires especial skills. Hence, the aim of this study is to use and standardize real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as an alternative, quantitative, sensitive, and rapid method to detect the colony count of Brucella in live Brucella vaccine. Four batches of different live Brucella vaccines were evaluated using of conventional bacterial count and RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) using BSCP31 gene specific primers and probe. Standard curve was generated from DNA template extracted from 10-fold serial dilution of living B. abortus RB51 vaccine to evaluate the sensitivity of RT-qPCR. Results revealed that three batches of living Brucella vaccines were acceptable for Brucella colony count when traditional bacterial enumeration method was used. Results of RT-qPCR were identical to that of conventional bacterial count. Results concluded that RT-qPCR was relatively sensitive compared to traditional bacterial colony count of these vaccines.

  17. Comparison of the quantitative dry culture methods with both conventional media and most probable number method for the enumeration of coliforms and Escherichia coli/coliforms in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramura, H; Sota, K; Iwasaki, M; Ogihara, H

    2017-07-01

    Sanita-kun™ CC (coliform count) and EC (Escherichia coli/coliform count), sheet quantitative culture systems which can avoid chromogenic interference by lactase in food, were evaluated in comparison with conventional methods for these bacteria. Based on the results of inclusivity and exclusivity studies using 77 micro-organisms, sensitivity and specificity of both Sanita-kun™ met the criteria for ISO 16140. Both media were compared with deoxycholate agar, violet red bile agar, Merck Chromocult™ coliform agar (CCA), 3M Petrifilm™ CC and EC (PEC) and 3-tube MPN, as reference methods, in 100 naturally contaminated food samples. The correlation coefficients of both Sanita-kun™ for coliform detection were more than 0·95 for all comparisons. For E. coli detection, Sanita-kun™ EC was compared with CCA, PEC and MPN in 100 artificially contaminated food samples. The correlation coefficients for E. coli detection of Sanita-kun™ EC were more than 0·95 for all comparisons. There were no significant differences in all comparisons when conducting a one-way analysis of variance (anova). Both Sanita-kun™ significantly inhibited colour interference by lactase when inhibition of enzymatic staining was assessed using 40 natural cheese samples spiked with coliform. Our results demonstrated Sanita-kun™ CC and EC are suitable alternatives for the enumeration of coliforms and E. coli/coliforms, respectively, in a variety of foods, and specifically in fermented foods. Current chromogenic media for coliforms and Escherichia coli/coliforms have enzymatic coloration due to breaking down of chromogenic substrates by food lactase. The novel sheet culture media which have film layer to avoid coloration by food lactase have been developed for enumeration of coliforms and E. coli/coliforms respectively. In this study, we demonstrated these media had comparable performance with reference methods and less interference by food lactase. These media have a possibility not only

  18. Performance comparison of the BioSys optical assay and the violet red bile agar method for detecting coliforms in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstenberg-Eden, Ruth; Foti, Debra; McDougal, Susan; Beck, Stephen

    2004-12-01

    Coliform counts in a variety of foods, including dairy products (raw milk, pasteurized milk, yogurt, butter, and ice cream), meats (pork sausage, ground beef, and raw chicken), raw eggs, and chocolate, were performed by the rapid automated BioSys optical assay and the conventional method with violet red bile agar (VRBA). The standard deviation (SD) among five replicate counts for the optical assay was similar to or better than that obtained with VRBA plates for all foods tested. The average SD for all foods tested was 0.21 for the optical assay and 0.30 for the VRBA plates. At very low concentrations of coliforms (1 to 10 CFU/ml for liquid products and 10 to 100 CFU/g for solid samples), the average SDs were 0.26 and 0.47, respectively. The optical assay was less susceptible to interference by noncoliform organisms. In naturally contaminated samples, bacteria such as Serratia liquefaciens, Pantoea spp., Vibrio fluvialis, Aeromonas hydrophilia, and Pseudomonas spp. formed typical colonies in VRBA, resulting in false-positive results or a need to verify colonies in brilliant green lactose broth. The optical assay appeared to be more selective than the VRBA conventional method, detecting fewer noncoliforms. There was close agreement in test results between the two methods, as indicated by correlation coefficients of 0.92 to 0.99 obtained for the regression analysis of the two methods. In most cases both methods distinguished accurately between positive samples containing coliforms and negative controls. All products tested using the automated BioSys Optical Assay for coliforms yielded results more quickly (typically 10 to 12 h) than did those tested with the conventional VRBA method (24 to 72 h with confirmation).

  19. Bacteria holding times for fecal coliform by mFC agar method and total coliform and Escherichia coli by Colilert®-18 Quanti-Tray® method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria holding-time experiments of up to 62 h were performed on five surface-water samples from four urban stream sites in the vicinity of Atlanta, GA, USA that had relatively high densities of coliform bacteria (Escherichia coli densities were all well above the US Environmental Protection Agency criterion of 126 colonies (100 ml) − 1 for recreational waters). Holding-time experiments were done for fecal coliform using the membrane filtration modified fecal coliform (mFC) agar method and for total coliform and E. coli using the Colilert®-18 Quanti-Tray® method. The precisions of these analytical methods were quantified. Precisions determined for fecal coliform indicated that the upper bound of the ideal range of counts could reasonably be extended upward and would improve precision. For the Colilert®-18 method, analytical precisions were similar to the theoretical precisions for this method. Fecal and total coliform densities did not change significantly with holding times up to about 27 h. Limited information indicated that fecal coliform densities might be stable for holding times of up to 62 h, whereas total coliform densities might not be stable for holding times greater than about 27 h. E. coli densities were stable for holding times of up to 18 h—a shorter period than indicated from a previous studies. These results should be applicable to non-regulatory monitoring sampling designs for similar urban surface-water sample types.

  20. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction as an alternative rapid method for enumeration of colony count in live Brucella vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed S. Shell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Brucellosis is a major bacterial zoonosis of global importance affecting a range of animal species and man worldwide. It has economic, public health, and bio-risk importance. Control and prevention of animal brucellosis mainly depend on accurate diagnostic tools and implementation of effective and safe animal vaccination program. There are three types of animal Brucella live vaccines - Brucella melitensis Rev-1 vaccine, Brucella abortus S19, and B. abortus RB51. Evaluation of these vaccines depends mainly on enumeration of Brucella viable count. At present, used colony count method is time consuming, costly and requires especial skills. Hence, the aim of this study is to use and standardize real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR as an alternative, quantitative, sensitive, and rapid method to detect the colony count of Brucella in live Brucella vaccine. Materials and Methods: Four batches of different live Brucella vaccines were evaluated using of conventional bacterial count and RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR using BSCP31 gene specific primers and probe. Standard curve was generated from DNA template extracted from 10-fold serial dilution of living B. abortus RB51 vaccine to evaluate the sensitivity of RT-qPCR. Results: Results revealed that three batches of living Brucella vaccines were acceptable for Brucella colony count when traditional bacterial enumeration method was used. Results of RT-qPCR were identical to that of conventional bacterial count. Conclusion: Results concluded that RT-qPCR was relatively sensitive compared to traditional bacterial colony count of these vaccines.

  1. Monitoring and spatial distribution of heterotrophic bacteria and fecal coliforms in the Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutterbach Márcia T. S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of heterothrophic bacteria and fecal coliforms was monitored at four sampling stations located near the shore of the Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon, in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Water samples were collected, monthly from October 1994 through September 1998. The highest heterothrophic count (6.5x10 7 CFU/100mL was recorded at stations 2 and 4 during August 1998 and the lowest (10 ³ CFU/100 mL at station 3 during February 1995. With respect to fecal coliforms, the highest and lowest counts were 1.6x10 5 coliforms/100mL at station 3 during March 1997 and <1 coliform/100mL at all the stations during February 1995 and September 1997 as well as station 3 during February 1998. The data indicated a percentage increase of the microorganisms surveyed over time at all the sampling stations studied.

  2. Validation and comparison of methods for enumeration of faecal coliforms and Escherichia coli in bivalve molluscs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman KA; Poelman M; Stegeman H; Warmerdam C; Teunis PFM; Roda Husman AM de; RIKILT; MGB

    2007-01-01

    The main result of the validation study to show the equivalence of two methods for the enumeration of faecal coliforms in bivalve molluscs is that the plate count method on Mac Conkey agar was indeed found to be equivalent to the MPN method. Meaning that the Netherlands fulfilled the demands as

  3. The Impact of Rainfall on Fecal Coliform Bacteria in Bayou Dorcheat (North Louisiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Fecal coliform bacteria are the most common pollutant in rivers and streams. In Louisiana, it has been reported that 37% of surveyed river miles, 31% of lakes, and 23% of estuarine water had some level of contamination. The objective of this research was to assess the effect of surface runoff amounts and rainfall amount parameters on fecal coliform bacterial densities in Bayou Dorcheat in Louisiana. Bayou Dorcheat has been designated by the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality as a waterway that has uses such as primary contact recreation, secondary contact recreation, propagation of fish and wildlife, agriculture and as being an outstanding natural resource water. Samples from Bayou Dorcheat were collected monthly and analyzed for the presence of fecal coliforms. Fecal coliforms isolated from these samples were identified to the species level. The analysis of the bacterial levels was performed following standard test protocols as described in Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. Information regarding the rainfall amounts and surface runoff amounts for the selected years was retrieved from the Louisiana Office of State Climatology. It was found that a significant increase in the fecal coliform numbers may be associated with average rainfall amounts. Possible sources of elevated coliform counts could include sewage discharges from municipal treatment plants and septic tanks, storm water overflows, and runoff from pastures and range lands. It can be concluded that nonpoint source pollution that is carried by surface runoff has a significant effect on bacterial levels in water resources.

  4. Evaluation of the Sanita-kun coliforms, a dehydrated medium sheet for coliform detection. Performance-Tested Method 100402.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hiroshi; Ushiyama, Masashi; Aoyama, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Mihoko

    2006-01-01

    The Sanita-kun Coliforms consists of a transparent cover film, an adhesive sheet, a layer of nonwoven fabric, and a water-soluble compound film, including a culture medium formula for the detection of coliforms. The medium sheet was validated with 26 food types belonging to 9 food categories (meat, poultry, fish and seafood, fruits and vegetable, dairy, chocolate or bakery, animal feeds, pasta, and miscellaneous) using violet red bile (VRB) agar method in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual as a reference according to the AOAC guideline. The medium sheet showed 100% inclusivity and exclusivity. Ruggedness study suggested allowances in the incubation temperature and time as 33-35 degrees C and 24 +/- 4 h, respectively. The performance of 3 different lots of the medium sheets was equivalent and suggested no change of the performance at least for 3 years. In the comparative recovery study, many samples (84.6%), which were inoculated with a coliform strain, showed no significant difference between the 2 methods. The linear correlation coefficient (r2) to the VRB agar was calculated as 0.94. In the repeatability study, the average relative standard deviation of total foods was 0.10 in the medium sheet. In the independent study, the medium sheet detected significantly more colonies than VRB plates in the frozen raw milk sample, while there was no significant difference between the 2 methods in raw ground beef sample. Comparative recovery study on foods, inoculated and then frozen, showed the medium sheet detected injured cells with better recovery than VRB agar. The analysts in the independent study wrote that the medium sheet was easy to use and read overall. The Sanita-kun sheet provides an alternative method to coliform count agar.

  5. Revised Total Coliform Rule Lab Sampling Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    This form should be completed when a water system collects any required Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) samples. It should also be used when collecting “Special” non-compliance samples for the RTCR.

  6. Revised Total Coliform Webinar for Primacy Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This webinar was created to assist Primacy Agencies in the implementation of the Revised Total Coliform Rule. It provides an overview of the requirements in the rule and implementation guidance for Primacy Agencies.

  7. Bacterial flora analysis of coliforms in sewage, river water, and ground water using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Niina, Kouki; Matsuwaki, Tomonori; Nukazawa, Kei; Iguchi, Atsushi

    2017-11-17

    The aim of this study was to rapidly and effectively analyze coliforms, which are the most fundamental indicators of water quality for fecal pollution, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Coliform bacteria were isolated from municipal sewage, river water, and groundwater. For each sample, 100 isolates were determined by MALDI-TOF MS. In addition, these same 100 isolates were also identified via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Obtained MALDI-TOF MS data were compared with the 16S rRNA sequencing analysis, and the validity of MALDI-TOF MS for classification of coliform bacteria was examined. The concordance rate of bacterial identification for the 100 isolates obtained by MALDI-TOF MS analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for sewage, river water, and ground water were 96%, 74%, and 62% at the genus level, respectively. Among the sewage, river water, and ground water samples, the coliform bacterial flora were distinct. The dominant genus of coliforms in sewage, river water, and groundwater were Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., and Serratia spp., respectively. We determined that MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid and accurate tool that can be used to identify coliforms. Therefore, without using conventional 16S rRNA sequencing, it is possible to rapidly and effectively classify coliforms in water using MALDI-TOF MS.

  8. Fecal Coliform Removal by River Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T.; Wollheim, W. M.; Stewart, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial pathogens are a major cause of water quality impairment in the United States. Freshwater ecosystems provide the ecosystem service of reducing pathogen levels by diluting and removing pathogens as water flows from source areas through the river network. However, the integration of field-scale monitoring data and watershed-scale hydrologic models to estimate pathogen loads and removal in varied aquatic ecosystems is still limited. In this study we applied a biogeochemical river network model (the Framework for Aquatic Modeling in the Earth System or FrAMES) and utilized available field data the Oyster R. watershed, a small (51.7 km2) draining coastal New Hampshire (NH, USA), to quantify pathogen removal at the river network scale, using fecal coliform as an indicator. The Oyster R. Watershed is comprised of various land use types, and has had its water quality monitored for fecal coliform, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity since 2001. Water samples were also collected during storm events to account for storm responses. FrAMES was updated to incorporate the dominant processes controlling fecal coliform concentrations in aquatic ecosystems: spatially distributed terrestrial loading, in-stream removal, dilution, and downstream transport. We applied an empirical loading function to estimate the terrestrial loading of fecal coliform across flow conditions. Data was collected from various land use types across a range of hydrologic conditions. The loading relationship includes total daily precipitation, antecedent 24-hour rainfall, air temperature, and catchment impervious surface percentage. Attenuation is due to bacterial "die-off" and dilution processes. Results show that fecal coliform input loads varied among different land use types. At low flow, fecal coliform concentrations were similar among watersheds. However, at high flow the concentrations were significantly higher in urbanized watersheds than forested watersheds. The mainstem had lower fecal coliform

  9. THAWING PROCEDURES FOR HOSPITAL-MADE ENTERAL FEEDINGS: SURVIVAL OF COLIFORM AND MESOPHILIC AEROBIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATHIA ROSSI ROLIM LOPES

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT: This study had the purpose to observe the effect of thawing procedures on survival of coliform and mesophilic aerobic bacteria in hospital-made enteral feedings. The samples are represented by three different lots. The tests were realized in three moments: immediately after the sample preparation and after freezing during 1 or 2 months. The thawing procedures were denominated convencional and alternative. The first, used by hospital, utilizes water bath at 50ºC, considering the time spent from the total thawing to its distribution in the infirmaries. The second was the fast thawing made by microwaving. The results showed that the reduction of the mesophiles and coliform was related to the time the samples were frozen. The results obtained indicate an advantage of the alternative method, which presented lower total and fecal coliform counts than the conventional one. KEYWORDS: Enteral feedings; thawing; food microbiology.

  10. Contamination of faecal coliforms in ice cubes sampled from food outlets in Kubang Kerian, Kelantan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor Izani, N J; Zulaikha, A R; Mohamad Noor, M R; Amri, M A; Mahat, N A

    2012-03-01

    The use of ice cubes in beverages is common among patrons of food outlets in Malaysia although its safety for human consumption remains unclear. Hence, this study was designed to determine the presence of faecal coliforms and several useful water physicochemical parameters viz. free residual chlorine concentration, turbidity and pH in ice cubes from 30 randomly selected food outlets in Kubang Kerian, Kelantan. Faecal coliforms were found in ice cubes in 16 (53%) food outlets ranging between 1 CFU/100mL to >50 CFU/ 100mL, while in the remaining 14 (47%) food outlets, in samples of tap water as well as in commercially bottled drinking water, faecal coliforms were not detected. The highest faecal coliform counts of >50 CFU/100mL were observed in 3 (10%) food outlets followed by 11-50 CFU/100mL and 1-10 CFU/100mL in 7 (23%) and 6 (20%) food outlets, respectively. All samples recorded low free residual chlorine concentration (coliforms was not detected in 47% of the samples, tap water and commercially bottled drinking water, it was concluded that (1) contamination by faecal coliforms may occur due to improper handling of ice cubes at the food outlets or (2) they may not be the water sources used for making ice cubes. Since low free residual chlorine concentrations were observed (coliforms in ice cubes also could not be ruled out. Therefore, a periodical, yet comprehensive check on the food outlets, including that of ice cube is crucial in ensuring better food and water for human consumption.

  11. Evaluation of Peel Plate™ EC for Determination of E. coli and Coliform or Total Coliform in Dairy Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Robert S; Durbin, Gregory W; Bird, Patrick; Fisher, Kiel; Crowley, Erin; Chen, Yi; Clark, Dorn; Ziemer, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Peel Plate™ EC is a low-profile plastic, 47 mm culture dish with an adhesive top that contains a dried medium with Gram-negative selective agents and with enzyme substrate indicators for β-galactosidase (coliform) and β-glucuronidase (Escherichia coli). The method provides a conventional quantitative coliform (red) and E. coli (blue/purple/black) count with simple rehydration and incubation for 24 ± 2 h at 35 ± 1°C, while providing a total coliform result, sum of E. coli, and coliform without color differential in dairy products at 32 ± 1°C for 24 ± 2 h. Dairy matrixes claimed and supported with total coliform data are whole milk, skim milk, chocolate milk (2% fat), heavy cream (35% fat), pasteurized whole goat milk, ultra-high-temperature pasteurized milk, powdered milk, lactose-reduced milk, strawberry milk, shredded cheddar cheese, raw cow milk, raw goat milk, raw sheep milk, sour cream, condensed milk, eggnog, vanilla ice cream, condensed whey, yogurt, and cottage cheese. Matrixes claimed for E. coli and total coliform detection are raw ground beef, mixed cellulose 0.45 μm filtered bottled water, environmental sponge of stainless steel, raw ground turkey, dry dog food, liquid whole pasteurized eggs, milk chocolate, leafy green (mixed greens) rinse/flume water, irrigation water, poultry carcass rinse, and large animal carcass sponge. The method has been independently evaluated for total coliform in whole milk, skim milk, chocolate milk, and heavy cream. The method was also independently evaluated for E. coli and coliform in ground beef, filtered bottled water, and sponge rinse from stainless steel surfaces. In inclusivity and exclusivity studies, the method detected 57 of 58 different strains of coliform and E. coli at 32 ± 1°C and 35 ± 1°C in and excluded 31 of 32 different noncoliform strains consisting of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In the matrix study, each matrix was assessed separately at each contamination level in comparison

  12. Evaluation of a new medium for the enumeration of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in Japanese surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaka, H; Mizuochi, S; Saito, M; Matsuoka, H

    2008-04-01

    A new medium, EC-Blue-10, containing chromogenic and fluorogenic substrates, KNO(3) and sodium pyruvate has been developed for the rapid simultaneous detection and enumeration of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in water. Two evaluations of EC-Blue-10 were carried out. Firstly, EC-Blue-10 was compared with Colilert-MPN for 96 water samples using MPN for total coliforms and E. coli. Secondly, the detection of coliforms and E. coli were compared using 2400 tubes of EC-Blue-10 and Colilert-MPN. The regression coefficients between EC-Blue-10 and Colilert-MPN for total coliforms and E. coli were 0.91 and 0.89, respectively. For the detection results, the Cohen's kappa values between the two media were 0.79 for coliforms and 0.72 for E. coli. EC-Blue-10 is almost same as Colilert-MPN for the detection of coliforms and E. coli in surface waters. Further evaluation for EC-Blue-10 is needed to verify in different geographical areas. EC-Blue-10 is useful method for the rapid and simultaneous detection of total coliforms and E. coli in water sample.

  13. Removal of total coliforms, thermotolerant coliforms, and helminth eggs in Swine production wastewater treated in anaerobic and aerobic reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacarias Sylvestre, Silvia Helena; Lux Hoppe, Estevam Guilherme; de Oliveira, Roberto Alves

    2014-01-01

    The present work evaluated the performance of two treatment systems in reducing indicators of biological contamination in swine production wastewater. System I consisted of two upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, with 510 and 209 L in volume, being serially arranged. System II consisted of a UASB reactor, anaerobic filter, trickling filter, and decanter, being also organized in series, with volumes of 300, 190, 250, and 150 L, respectively. Hydraulic retention times (HRT) applied in the first UASB reactors were 40, 30, 20, and 11 h in systems I and II. The average removal efficiencies of total and thermotolerant coliforms in system I were 92.92% to 99.50% and 94.29% to 99.56%, respectively, and increased in system II to 99.45% to 99.91% and 99.52% to 99.93%, respectively. Average removal rates of helminth eggs in system I were 96.44% to 99.11%, reaching 100% as in system II. In reactor sludge, the counts of total and thermotolerant coliforms ranged between 10(5) and 10(9) MPN (100 mL)(-1), while helminth eggs ranged from 0.86 to 9.27 eggs g(-1) TS.

  14. Removal of Total Coliforms, Thermotolerant Coliforms, and Helminth Eggs in Swine Production Wastewater Treated in Anaerobic and Aerobic Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacarias Sylvestre, Silvia Helena; Lux Hoppe, Estevam Guilherme; de Oliveira, Roberto Alves

    2014-01-01

    The present work evaluated the performance of two treatment systems in reducing indicators of biological contamination in swine production wastewater. System I consisted of two upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, with 510 and 209 L in volume, being serially arranged. System II consisted of a UASB reactor, anaerobic filter, trickling filter, and decanter, being also organized in series, with volumes of 300, 190, 250, and 150 L, respectively. Hydraulic retention times (HRT) applied in the first UASB reactors were 40, 30, 20, and 11 h in systems I and II. The average removal efficiencies of total and thermotolerant coliforms in system I were 92.92% to 99.50% and 94.29% to 99.56%, respectively, and increased in system II to 99.45% to 99.91% and 99.52% to 99.93%, respectively. Average removal rates of helminth eggs in system I were 96.44% to 99.11%, reaching 100% as in system II. In reactor sludge, the counts of total and thermotolerant coliforms ranged between 105 and 109 MPN (100 mL)−1, while helminth eggs ranged from 0.86 to 9.27 eggs g−1 TS. PMID:24812560

  15. The Establish of the Coliforms/cm2 on the Area of Cattle Carcass Air Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin Tibulca

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Coliforms present in 1 cm2 of carcass surface shows the degree of contamination during slaughtering as well as the hygienic condition of the air, the slaughtering hall, the equipment getting in contact with the carcasses, of the utensils, operators’ work equipment, of the operators’ hygiene. The indicator is determined by inoculating microorganisms from the carcasses surface in nutritional and selective environments, followed by their placing under heat control and counting of the microorganisms.

  16. Effects of repeated-low level sodium chlorate administration on ruminal and fecal coliforms in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzola, Claudio; Copado, Ramon; Epps, Sharon V R P; Rodriguez-Almeida, Felipe; Ruiz-Barrera, Oscar; Rodriguez-Muela, Carlos; Corral-Luna, Agustin; Castillo-Castillo, Yamicela; Diaz-Plascencia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral sodium chlorate administration on reducing total coliform populations in ewes. A 30% sodium chlorate product or a sodium chloride placebo was administered to twelve lactating Dorper X Blackbelly or Pelibuey crossbred ewes averaging 65 kg body weight. The ewes were adapted to diet and management. Ewes were randomly assigned (4/treatment) to one of three treatments which were administered twice daily by oral gavage for five consecutive days: a control (TC) consisting of 3 g sodium chloride/animal/d, a T3 treatment consisting of 1.8 g of sodium chlorate/animal/d, and a T9 treatment consisting of 5.4 g sodium chlorate/animal/d; the latter was intended to approximate a lowest known effective dose. Ruminal samples collected by stomach tube and freshly voided fecal samples were collected daily beginning 3 days before treatment initiation and for 6 days thereafter. Contents were cultured quantitatively to enumerate total coliforms. There were no significant differences in total coliform numbers (log10 cfu/g) in the feces between treatments (P = 0.832). There were differences (P coliform counts (log10 cfu/mL) between treatments (4.1, 4.3 and 5.0 log10/mL contents in TC, T3 and T9 Treatments, respectively) which tended to increase from the beginning of treatment until the 5th day of treatment (P coliform populations in the rumen contents in all treatments, there was an increase over the days. The opposite trend occurred in the feces, due mainly to differences among rumen contents and feces in ewes administered the T9 treatment (P = 0.06). These results suggest that the low chlorate doses used here were suboptimal for the control of coliforms in the gastrointestinal tract of ewes.

  17. Revised Total Coliform Rule Assessments and Corrective Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has developed the Revised Total Coliform Rule Assessment and Corrective Actions Guidance Manual for public water systems (e.g., owners and operators) to assist in complying with the requirements of the Revised Total Coliform Rule.

  18. Coliform Bacteria for Bioremediation of Waste Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Raw, domestic sewage of Kuwait City contained about 106 ml−1 colony forming units of Enterobacter hormaechei subsp. oharae (56.6%), Klebsiella spp. (36%), and Escherichia coli (7.4%), as characterized by their 16S rRNA-gene sequences. The isolated coliforms grew successfully on a mineral medium with crude oil vapor as a sole source of carbon and energy. Those strains also grew, albeit to different degrees, on individual n-alkanes with carbon chains between C9 and C36 and on the individual aromatic hydrocarbons, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and biphenyl as sole sources of carbon and energy. These results imply that coliforms, like other hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms, oxidize hydrocarbons to the corresponding alcohols and then to aldehydes and fatty acids which are biodegraded by β-oxidation to acetyl CoA. The latter is a well-known key intermediate in cell material and energy production. E. coli cells grown in the presence of n-hexadecane (but not in its absence) exhibited typical intracellular hydrocarbon inclusions, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Raw sewage samples amended with crude oil, n-hexadecane, or phenanthrene lost these hydrocarbons gradually with time. Meanwhile, the numbers of total and individual coliforms, particularly Enterobacter, increased. It was concluded that coliform bacteria in domestic sewage, probably in other environmental materials too, are effective hydrocarbon-biodegrading microorganisms. PMID:29082238

  19. RECOUNT OF COLIFORMS AND Escherichia coli IN CATTLE CARCASSES UNDER PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL TREATMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Javid Corpas Iguarán

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the recount of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in cattle carcasses submitted to different treatments which included combinations of the methods of washing, disinfecting and vaporizing, using the completely randomized design of a factor with 3 replications. Sampling was carried out by swab surface in three different areas of the simple. (back, chest and rump, which were subsequently analyzed by the plate count method. When applying sequentially microbial removal methods, was observed the progressive decrease in total coliform counts and E. coli, and variability of the data, mainly in treatments C, D y E. Multiple contrasts proof of Friedman revealed the no statistical differences between counts of the treatments C and E in the sample 2, indicating the inefficacy of vaporization as coadjuvant of the acidification to decrease counting of the microorganisms of study. Comparison tests on independent samples showed identical results to the Friedman test, except for counting of E. coli between treatments D y E, suggesting that vaporization has significant effect to enhance the diminution of count of microorganisms on carcasses.

  20. An analysis of wilderness water in Kings Canyon, Sequoia, and Yosemite national parks for coliform and pathologic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlet, Robert W; Carlson, James R

    2004-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of coliform and potentially pathogenic bacteria in remote backcountry alpine lakes and streams of national parks in the Sierra Nevada mountains. Water was sampled at 55 predetermined lakes and streams that would stratify the risk, based on sites used by backpackers, sites used by pack animals, and uncontaminated wild areas. Sites were distributed among Kings Canyon (15), Sequoia (17), and Yosemite (23). Water was collected using Millipore bacterial samplers, which provided specific counts of coliform and other bacteria in each water sample and also served as a transport media from the wilderness to the laboratory. On return to the laboratory, bacteria were harvested from the samplers and subjected to specific identification and qualitative analysis using standard microbiology techniques for the analysis of water. Coliform bacteria were detected in 22 of the 55 sites. All of these sites were below areas used by backpackers or pack animals. Thirty-three sites were free of coliforms. These sites included both those used lightly by backpackers and those with no human or domestic animal use. All samples contained expected amounts of normal aquatic bacteria including Pseudomonas, Rahnella aquatilis, Serratia spp, and nonpathogenic species of Yersinia. Most sampling sites in these national parks are free of coliform or pathogenic organisms. Low levels of coliform bacteria are found in some bodies of water where the watershed has been affected by human or pack animal travel.

  1. Adobe photoshop quantification (PSQ) rather than point-counting: A rapid and precise method for quantifying rock textural data and porosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Liu, Bo; Wang, Jieqiong; Zhang, Zhe; Shi, Kaibo; Wu, Shuanglin

    2014-08-01

    Commonly used petrological quantification methods are visual estimation, counting, and image analyses. However, in this article, an Adobe Photoshop-based analyzing method (PSQ) is recommended for quantifying the rock textural data and porosities. Adobe Photoshop system provides versatile abilities in selecting an area of interest and the pixel number of a selection could be read and used to calculate its area percentage. Therefore, Adobe Photoshop could be used to rapidly quantify textural components, such as content of grains, cements, and porosities including total porosities and different genetic type porosities. This method was named as Adobe Photoshop Quantification (PSQ). The workflow of the PSQ method was introduced with the oolitic dolomite samples from the Triassic Feixianguan Formation, Northeastern Sichuan Basin, China, for example. And the method was tested by comparing with the Folk's and Shvetsov's "standard" diagrams. In both cases, there is a close agreement between the "standard" percentages and those determined by the PSQ method with really small counting errors and operator errors, small standard deviations and high confidence levels. The porosities quantified by PSQ were evaluated against those determined by the whole rock helium gas expansion method to test the specimen errors. Results have shown that the porosities quantified by the PSQ are well correlated to the porosities determined by the conventional helium gas expansion method. Generally small discrepancies (mostly ranging from -3% to 3%) are caused by microporosities which would cause systematic underestimation of 2% and/or by macroporosities causing underestimation or overestimation in different cases. Adobe Photoshop could be used to quantify rock textural components and porosities. This method has been tested to be precise and accurate. It is time saving compared with usual methods.

  2. Coliform bacteria, fabrics, and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colclasure, Victoria J; Soderquist, Thomas J; Lynch, Thomas; Schubert, Nina; McCormick, Deirdre S; Urrutia, Erika; Knickerbocker, Corey; McCord, Devon; Kavouras, Jerry H

    2015-02-01

    People come into contact with coliform bacteria at recreational sites. Previous research on bacteria adhering to fabrics and surfaces focused on the viability of clinically significant microbes, but did not examine the quantity of bacteria. This study examined the viability and quantity of coliform bacteria adhered to common fabrics. The fabrics of 100% cotton, blended cotton, and silk were exposed to a mixture of environmental coliform isolates. Fabrics were incubated in the dark at 25°C or 37°C or in direct sunlight at room temperature for 30, 60, 90, and 120 days. The quantity and viability of the bacteria were determined by the Most Probable Number technique using Colilert reagent (IDEXX Laboratories, Westbrook, ME) and eosin methylene blue agar, respectively. The highest numbers of bacteria were detected for each type of fabric when stored in the dark at 25°C, whereas the lowest numbers of bacteria were detected when fabrics were stored in the dark at 37°C. Low numbers of bacteria were detected on silk and blended cotton exposed to sunlight at room temperature, but not 100% cotton. It appears that coliform bacteria can survive on fabrics longer than previous studies have reported. Coliform bacteria survive better in the dark, at lower temperatures, and on fabrics that can retain moisture. These findings can be applied directly to the viability of bacteria on clothing and potential human exposure to fecal pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Phenotypic and phylogenetic identification of coliform bacteria obtained from 12 USEPA approved coliform methods

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ya

    2015-06-26

    The current definition of coliform bacteria is method-dependent, and when different culture-based methods are used, discrepancies in results can occur and affect the accuracy in identifying true coliforms. This study used an alternative approach to identify true coliforms by combing the phenotypic traits of the coliform isolates and the phylogenetic affiliation of 16S rRNA gene sequences together with the use of lacZ and uidA genes. A collection of 1404 isolates from 12 US Environmental Protection Agency approved coliform-testing methods were characterized based on their phylogenetic affiliations and responses to their original isolation medium and Lauryl Tryptose broth, m-Endo and MI agar media. Isolates were phylogenetically classified into 32 true coliform or targeted Enterobacteriaceae (TE) groups, and 14 non-coliform or non-targeted Enterbacteriaceae (NTE) groups. It was statistically shown that detecting true-positive (TP) events is more challenging than detecting true-negative (TN) events. Furthermore, most false-negative (FN) events were associated with four TE groups (i.e., Serratia group I, Providencia, Proteus, and Morganella), and most false-positive (FP) events with two NTE groups, Aeromonas and Plesiomonas. In Escherichia coli testing, 18 out of 145 E. coli isolates identified by those enzymatic methods were validated as FNs. The reasons behind the FP and FN reactions could be explained through the analysis of the lacZ and uidA gene. Overall, combining the analyses of 16S rRNA, lacZ and uidA genes with the growth responses of TE and NTE on culture-based media is an effective way to evaluate the performance of coliform detection methods.

  4. The Interaction between Heterotrophic Bacteria and Coliform, Fecal Coliform, Fecal Streptococci Bacteria in the Water Supply Networks

    OpenAIRE

    AMANIDAZ, Nazak; Ali ZAFARZADEH; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and coliform, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria in water supply networks.Methods: This study was conducted during 2013 on water supply distribution network in Aq Qala City, Golestan Province, Northern Iran and standard methods were applied for microbiological analysis. The surface method was applied to test the heterotrophic bacteria and MPN method was used for coliform, fecal coliform and fecal stre...

  5. Antagonistic effect of Lactobacillus strains against gas-producing coliforms isolated from colicky infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Francesco; Cordisco, Lisa; Tarasco, Valentina; Locatelli, Emanuela; Di Gioia, Diana; Oggero, Roberto; Matteuzzi, Diego

    2011-06-30

    Infantile colic is a common disturb within the first 3 months of life, nevertheless the pathogenesis is incompletely understood and treatment remains an open issue. Intestinal gas production is thought to be one of the causes of abdominal discomfort in infants suffering from colic. However, data about the role of the amount of gas produced by infants' colonic microbiota and the correlation with the onset of colic symptoms are scanty. The benefit of supplementation with lactobacilli been recently reported but the mechanisms by which they exert their effects have not yet been fully defined. This study was performed to evaluate the interaction between Lactobacillus spp. strains and gas-forming coliforms isolated from stools of colicky infants. Strains of coliforms were isolated from stools of 45 colicky and 42 control breastfed infants in McConkey Agar and identified using PCR with species-specific primers, and the BBL™ Enterotube™ II system for Enterobacteriaceae. Gas-forming capability of coliforms was assessed in liquid cultures containing lactose as sole carbon source. The average count of total coliforms in colicky infants was significantly higher than controls: 5.98 (2.00-8.76) log10 vs 3.90 (2.50-7.10) CFU/g of faeces (p = 0.015). The following strains were identified: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae and Enterococcus faecalis. Then, 27 Lactobacillus strains were tested for their antagonistic effect against coliforms both by halo-forming method and in liquid co-cultures. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii DSM 20074 and L. plantarum MB 456 were able to inhibit all coliforms strains (halo-forming method), also in liquid co-cultures, thus demonstrating an antagonistic activity. This study shows that two out of 27 strains of Lactobacillus examined possess an antimicrobial effect against six species of gas-forming coliforms isolated from colicky infants. Our findings may stimulate

  6. Detection and enumeration of coliforms in drinking water: current methods and emerging approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompré, Annie; Servais, Pierre; Baudart, Julia; de-Roubin, Marie Renée; Laurent, Patrick

    2002-03-01

    The coliform group has been used extensively as an indicator of water quality and has historically led to the public health protection concept. The aim of this review is to examine methods currently in use or which can be proposed for the monitoring of coliforms in drinking water. Actually, the need for more rapid, sensitive and specific tests is essential in the water industry. Routine and widely accepted techniques are discussed, as are methods which have emerged from recent research developments.Approved traditional methods for coliform detection include the multiple-tube fermentation (MTF) technique and the membrane filter (MF) technique using different specific media and incubation conditions. These methods have limitations, however, such as duration of incubation, antagonistic organism interference, lack of specificity and poor detection of slow-growing or viable but non-culturable (VBNC) microorganisms. Nowadays, the simple and inexpensive membrane filter technique is the most widely used method for routine enumeration of coliforms in drinking water.The detection of coliforms based on specific enzymatic activity has improved the sensitivity of these methods. The enzymes beta-D galactosidase and beta-D glucuronidase are widely used for the detection and enumeration of total coliforms and Escherichia coli, respectively. Many chromogenic and fluorogenic substrates exist for the specific detection of these enzymatic activities, and various commercial tests based on these substrates are available. Numerous comparisons have shown these tests may be a suitable alternative to the classical techniques. They are, however, more expensive, and the incubation time, even though reduced, remains too long for same-day results. More sophisticated analytical tools such as solid phase cytometry can be employed to decrease the time needed for the detection of bacterial enzymatic activities, with a low detection threshold. Detection of coliforms by molecular methods is also

  7. Seal Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Database of seal counts from aerial photography. Counts by image, site, species, and date are stored in the database along with information on entanglements and...

  8. Counting carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet; Diabetes-counting carbohydrates ... Many foods contain carbohydrates (carbs), including: Fruit and fruit juice Cereal, bread, pasta, and rice Milk and milk products, soy milk Beans, legumes, ...

  9. An advanced PCR method for the specific detection of viable total coliform bacteria in pasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Takashi; Minami, Jun-ichi; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2012-07-01

    Pasteurized milk is a complex food that contains various inhibitors of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and may contain a large number of dead bacteria, depending on the milking conditions and environment. Ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA)-PCR is occasionally used to distinguish between viable and dead bacteria in foods other than pasteurized milk. EMA is a DNA-intercalating dye that selectively permeates the compromised cell membranes of dead bacteria and cleaves DNA. Usually, EMA-PCR techniques reduce the detection of dead bacteria by up to 3.5 logs compared with techniques that do not use EMA. However, this difference may still be insufficient to suppress the amplification of DNA from dead Gram-negative bacteria (e.g., total coliform bacteria) if they are present in pasteurized milk in large numbers. Thus, false positives may result. We developed a new method that uses real-time PCR targeting of a long DNA template (16S-23S rRNA gene, principally 2,451 bp) following EMA treatment to completely suppress the amplification of DNA of up to 7 logs (10(7) cells) of dead total coliforms. Furthermore, we found that a low dose of proteinase K (25 U/ml) removed PCR inhibitors and simultaneously increased the signal from viable coliform bacteria. In conclusion, our simple protocol specifically detects viable total coliforms in pasteurized milk at an initial count of ≥1 colony forming unit (CFU)/2.22 ml within 7.5 h of total testing time. This detection limit for viable cells complies with the requirements for the analysis of total coliforms in pasteurized milk set by the Japanese Sanitation Act (which specifies <1 CFU/2.22 ml).

  10. Performance validation of chromogenic coliform agar for the enumeration of Escherichia coli and coliform bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, B; Strathmann, M; Oßmer, R

    2013-12-01

    The performance of chromogenic coliform agar (CCA) for the enumeration of Escherichia coli and coliform bacteria was validated according to ENV ISO 13843 using pure cultures and naturally contaminated water samples. The results indicate that for the detection of E. coli and coliform bacteria, respectively, the method is sensitive (94 and 91%), specific (97 and 94%), selective (selectivity -0·78 and -0·32) and efficient (96 and 92%). Relative recovery of E. coli and coliform bacteria on CCA in comparison with tryptone soy agar (TSA) was good (104 and 94% in mean, >80 and >70% in all cases), and repeatability and reproducibility were sufficient. The linear working range was defined for 10-100 total target colonies per 47-mm membrane filter. A high precision of the method was confirmed by low overdispersion in comparison with Poisson distribution. The robustness of the method with respect to the variable incubation time of 21 ± 3 h was found to be low, because an incidental increase in presumptive colonies especially between 18 and 21 h was observed. In conclusion, the CCA method was proved as a reliable method for the quantification of E. coli and coliform bacteria. The international standard for the detection and enumeration of E. coli and coliform bacteria by membrane filtration (ISO 9308-1) is currently under revision and will be published in 2014. In the new standard, lactose-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) agar will be replaced by a CCA. A performance validation of this revised method according to ENV ISO 13843 is presented in this study to determine fundamental data on its applicability and to provide reference data for secondary validation by users of this method. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd Medi·Ca CC for Enumeration of Coliform Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Fumihiko; Shimizu, Mai; Suzuki, Takeo; Hamada, Chie; Iwase, Tatsuhiko; Okochi, Norihiko; Yamazaki, Mamoru; Kyotani, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    A ready-made dry medium method for coliform count, the Medi·Ca CC method, was compared to the Violet Red Bile Agar method (Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Chapter 4, Enumeration of Escherichia coli and the Coliform Bacteria, Section G) for nine raw foods from four food categories: raw ground pork, raw lamb, raw ground chicken, raw tuna fillet, raw salmon fillet, raw shrimp, fresh peeled banana, fresh cut pineapple, and fresh cut apple. The 95% confidence interval for the mean difference between the two methods at each contamination level for seven matrixes from all four categories fell within the range of -0.50 to 0.50, and no statistical difference was observed at all three contamination levels for four matrixes from three categories. These results demonstrated that the Medi·Ca CC method is a reasonable alternative to the reference method for raw meat, raw poultry, raw fish, and fresh fruits.

  12. The effects of oral and intramuscular administration and dose escalation of enrofloxacin on the selection of quinolone resistance among Salmonella and coliforms in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuff, C.; Lykkesfeldt, J.; Svendsen, O.

    2003-01-01

    the resistant and total number of coliforms and Salmonella in faeces of the pigs. High frequencies of fluoroquinolone resistance developed rapidly among the coliform flora independent of route of administration, dose or time of initiation of the treatment. Selection for resistance among the artificially...... introduced Salmonella was reduced by using the intramuscular route and by escalating the dose 3 or 6 times the recommended dose of 2.5 mg/kg bwt, which also resulted in shortening of the period, in which the pigs were shedding Salmonella. The resistance among the coliform flora persisted for at least 2 weeks...

  13. Use of beta-D-galactosidase and beta-D-glucuronidase activities for quantitative detection of total and fecal coliforms in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, I; Crop, P; Servais, P

    2001-07-01

    Two enzymatic methods based on the measurement of the beta-D-galactosidase activity of total coliforms and the beta-D-glucuronidase activity of Escherichia coli were used to assess coliform levels in wastewater alongside traditional culture-based techniques, which can be biased by the aggregation of bacteria or their attachment to particles. Enzymatic methods were precise (i.e., coefficients of variation were 9%-15%), rapid (response in 20 min), and correlated well (in log units) with traditional techniques for raw and treated sewage (r2 > 0.75). They were used for rapid assessment of coliform removal efficiency in two different wastewater treatments. These methods could be useful for the estimation of the abundance of coliforms in domestic sewage and their removal by wastewater treatment processes.

  14. [Coliform bacteria in raw and pasteurized milk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloianov, I; Gogov, I

    1977-01-01

    Studied were 360 samples of raw and 1404 samples of pasteurized milk, collected from three milk centers, for the presence of coliform bacteria. It was found that the coli titer of the raw milk varied from 10(-5) up to 10(-7), depending on the season. The regimes of pasteurization applied kill 100 per cent of the present coli organisms. After the thermic treatment the milk was additionally contaminated with coli forms from the containers and the equipment in dependence on the conditions of washing and disinfection. The coli titer of the pasteurized milk varied from 1 to 10(-3). A total of 602 strains of coliform bacteria were isolated from the pasteurized and the raw milk; the bacteria were differentiated by the scheme of Kauffmann. Most commonly encountered were the coli forms of the following genera:Citrobacter (35 per cent), Enterobacter (29.8 per cent), Klebsiella (23.9 per cent), and Escherichia (11.3 per cent). The following species were prevailing in raw milk: Kl. aerogenes, Ent. aerogenes, Ent. cloacae, C. freundi, and C. intermedium. In pasteurized milk dominating were Kl. aerogenes, C. freundi. Ent. aerogenes, and Ent. cloacae.

  15. Counting cormorants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Thomas; Carss, David N; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on Cormorant population counts for both summer (i.e. breeding) and winter (i.e. migration, winter roosts) seasons. It also explains differences in the data collected from undertaking ‘day’ versus ‘roost’ counts, gives some definitions of the term ‘numbers’, and presents two e...

  16. Determination of thermotolerant coliforms present in coconut water produced and bottled in the Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandbergue Santos Pereira

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Coconut water is considered to be a natural isotonic drink and its marketing is gradually increasing. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the microbiological quality of the coconut water produced and bottled in the Northeast of Brazil. Products form ten industries from different states in the Northeast of Brazil were analyzed. The most probable number (MPN method was used to quantify the coliforms. Samples showing positive for coliforms were seeded on ChromAgar Orient plates and the bacteria identified from isolated colonies using the automated system Vitek 2 (BioMérieux, according to the manufacturer's instructions for the preparation of the inoculum, incubation, reading and interpretation. The samples showed thermotolerant coliform counts between 6.0×102 and 2.6×104 MPN/100 mL. The presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Morganella morganii and Providencia alcalifaciens was observed. The implementation of preventive methods and monitoring of the water quality by the industries is required.

  17. Sampling method and location affect recovery of coliforms and Escherichia coli from broiler carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D P

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted, the first to determine whether numbers of recovered bacteria differed due to sampling method used or due to location on carcass sampled (breast or leg quarters) and the second to determine if numbers of bacteria differed between the front (ventral) and back (dorsal) side of the carcass. In both experiments, eviscerated broiler carcasses were obtained from a commercial processing plant just before the final inside-outside bird washer. In experiment 1, carcasses (3 in each of 4 replicate trials) were separated into leg quarters and breast quarters (n = 48) and either rinsed or ground and stomached for microbiological sampling. In experiment 2, for 3 replicate trials of 4 carcasses each, necks, wings, and legs were manually removed; the remaining trunks were cut through the sides to produce front (ventral) and back (dorsal) halves (n = 24); and then rinsed. For both experiments, coliforms and Escherichia coli were enumerated. In experiment 1, significantly higher numbers (P coliforms and E. coli were recovered by rinsing than by grinding from both breast and leg quarters. Leg quarters were found to have higher bacterial numbers than breasts from grind samples, but no quarter differences were found for rinse samples. In experiment 2, higher (P coliforms and E. coli were recovered from the dorsal carcass half compared with the ventral half. Bacterial counts of broiler carcasses are affected by both the sampling method used and by carcass location sampled.

  18. Multiplicity Counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  19. Escherichia coli and fecal coliforms in freshwater and estuarine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been known for some time that substantial populations of fecal coliforms and E. coli are harbored in freshwater bottom sediments, bank soils, and beach sands. However, the relative importance of sediments as bacterial habitats and as a source of water-borne fecal coliforms and E. coli has not...

  20. COMPOSITE SAMPLING FOR DETECTION OF COLIFORM BACTERIA IN WATER SUPPLY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low densities of coliform bacteria introduced into distribution systems may survive in protected habitats. These organisms may interfere with and cause confusion in the use of the coliforms as indicators of sewage contamination of drinking water. Methods of increasing the probabi...

  1. Repair and Enumeration of Injured Coliforms by a Plating Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, M. L.; Ray, B.; Read, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Surface plating of coliforms on Trypticase soy agar, followed by 1 to 2 h of incubation at 25 C and subsequent overlay with violet red bile agar, was found to be a useful method for the repair and enumeration of coliforms injured by freezing. PMID:1092266

  2. [A new method for the detection of coliforms and Escherichia coli in water intended for human consumption.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Lucia; Cataldo, Claudia; Chiaretti, Gianluca; Coccia, Annamaria; Semproni, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    The ISO reference method, defined by the European Drinking Water Directive for the enumeration of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in water intended for human consumption, has various limitations, especially related to discrepancies observed with the new taxonomic classification of the coliform group. A study was therefore performed to compare the above reference method with another rapid method, the DST/Colilert, and to evaluate the phenotypical characteristics of isolated microrganisms. The ISO reference method failed to detect a significant proportion of coliforms and E. coli in water and furthermore, it enumerated microrganisms belonging to other groups. The DST/Colilert method was found instead to be a suitable alternative method for the detection of bacterial indicators.

  3. Effects of oral orbifloxacin on fecal coliforms in healthy cats: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kazuki; Sasaki, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takae

    2016-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the effect of oral orbifloxacin (ORB) on antimicrobial susceptibility and composition of fecal coliforms in cats. Nine cats were randomized to two groups administered a daily oral dose of 2.5 and 5.0 mg ORB/kg for 7 days and a control group (three cats per group). Coliforms were isolated from stool samples and were tested for susceptibilities to ORB and 5 other drugs. ORB concentration in feces was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The coliforms were undetectable after 2 days of ORB administration, and their number increased in most cats after termination of the administration. Furthermore, only isolates of Escherichia coli were detected in all cats before administration, and those of Citrobacter freundii were detected after termination of the administration. E. coli isolates exhibited high ORB susceptibility [Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), ≤0.125 µg/ml] or relatively low susceptibility (MIC, 1-2 µg/ml) with a single gyrA mutation. C. freundii isolates largely exhibited intermediate ORB susceptibility (MIC, 4 µg/ml), in addition to resistance to ampicillin and cefazolin, and harbored qnrB, but not a gyrA mutation. HPLC revealed that the peaks of mean concentration were 61.3 and 141.0 µg/g in groups receiving 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, respectively. Our findings suggest that oral ORB may alter the total counts and composition of fecal coliform, but is unlikely to yield highly fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants of E. coli and C. freundii in cats, possibly because of the high drug concentration in feces.

  4. Tower counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Carol Ann; Johnson, D.H.; Shrier, Brianna M.; O'Neal, Jennifer S.; Knutzen, John A.; Augerot, Xanthippe; O'Neal, Thomas A.; Pearsons, Todd N.

    2007-01-01

    Counting towers provide an accurate, low-cost, low-maintenance, low-technology, and easily mobilized escapement estimation program compared to other methods (e.g., weirs, hydroacoustics, mark-recapture, and aerial surveys) (Thompson 1962; Siebel 1967; Cousens et al. 1982; Symons and Waldichuk 1984; Anderson 2000; Alaska Department of Fish and Game 2003). Counting tower data has been found to be consistent with that of digital video counts (Edwards 2005). Counting towers do not interfere with natural fish migration patterns, nor are fish handled or stressed; however, their use is generally limited to clear rivers that meet specific site selection criteria. The data provided by counting tower sampling allow fishery managers to determine reproductive population size, estimate total return (escapement + catch) and its uncertainty, evaluate population productivity and trends, set harvest rates, determine spawning escapement goals, and forecast future returns (Alaska Department of Fish and Game 1974-2000 and 1975-2004). The number of spawning fish is determined by subtracting subsistence, sport-caught fish, and prespawn mortality from the total estimated escapement. The methods outlined in this protocol for tower counts can be used to provide reasonable estimates ( plus or minus 6%-10%) of reproductive salmon population size and run timing in clear rivers. 

  5. Viability of sublethally injured coliform bacteria on fresh-cut cabbage stored in high CO2atmospheres following rinsing with electrolyzed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hidemi; Inoue, Ayano

    2018-02-02

    The extent of sublethally injured coliform bacteria on shredded cabbage, either rinsed or not rinsed with electrolyzed water, was evaluated during storage in air and high CO 2 controlled atmospheres (5%, 10%, and 15%) at 5°C and 10°C using the thin agar layer (TAL) method. Sublethally injured coliform bacteria on nonrinsed shredded cabbage were either absent or they were injured at a 64-65% level when present. Rinsing of shredded cabbage with electrolyzed water containing 25ppm available chlorine reduced the coliform counts by 0.4 to 1.1 log and caused sublethal injury ranging from 42 to 77%. Pantoea ananatis was one of the species injured by chlorine stress. When shredded cabbage, nonrinsed or rinsed with electrolyzed water, was stored in air and high CO 2 atmospheres at 5°C for 7days and 10°C for 5days, coliform counts on TAL plates increased from 3.3-4.5 to 6.5-9.0 log CFU/g during storage, with the increase being greater at 10°C than at 5°C. High CO 2 of 10% and 15% reduced the bacterial growth on shredded cabbage during storage at 5°C. Although injured coliform bacteria were not found on nonrinsed shredded cabbage on the initial day, injured coliforms at a range of 49-84% were detected on samples stored in air and high CO 2 atmospheres at 5°C and 10°C. Injured cells were detected more frequently during storage at both temperatures irrespective of the CO 2 atmosphere when shredded cabbage was rinsed with electrolyzed water. These results indicated that injured coliform bacteria on shredded cabbage, either rinsed or not rinsed with electrolyzed water, exhibited different degrees of injury during storage regardless of the CO 2 atmosphere and temperature tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Escherichia coli detection using mTEC agar and fluorescent antibody direct viable counting on coastal recreational water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, A M; Rebarchik, D M; Flowers, A R; Williams, J L; Grimes, D J

    2009-10-01

    Escherichia coli is the faecal indicator species recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for monitoring fresh recreational water. Viable but nonculturable (VBNC) E. coli are living cells that are dormant and not culturable using standard microbiological cultivation methods. This study reports a comparison between the mTEC culture method recommended by USEPA for E. coli enumeration and a fluorescent antibody-direct viable count (FA-DVC) method to visualize living E. coli cells with a microscope. Escherichia coli, faecal coliforms and Enterococcus were detected using standard methods recommended by the USEPA. VBNC E. coli was visualized with FA-DVC. Results were analysed with standard statistical methods (Pearson correlation; paired-sample t-test). Significantly higher numbers of E. coli were detected using the FA-DVC method than using the mTEC method. Escherichia coli results were also compared with faecal coliform (mFC broth) and Enterococcus (mEI agar) counts in the same samples. The results of this comparative study demonstrate that E. coli can be present in higher numbers than what are detected with standard culture methods. This study re-emphasizes the need for a rapid, accurate and precise method for detecting health risks to humans who use recreational waters.

  7. Coliform bacteria removal from sewage in constructed wetlands planted with Mentha aquatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelar, Fabiana F; de Matos, Antonio T; de Matos, Mateus P; Borges, Alisson C

    2014-08-01

    The present study evaluated the performance of the species Mentha aquatica in constructed wetlands of horizontal subsurface flow (CW-HSSF) with regard to the removal of coliforms bacteria in an effluent from the primary treatment of sewage as well as to obtain adjustment parameters of the bacterial decay kinetic model along the length of the CW-HSSF. Therefore, four CW-HSSFs measuring 24.0 m x 1.0 m x 0.35 m were built and filled with number 0 gravel as the support medium to a height of 0.20m. Two of the CW-HSSFs were planted with the species M. aquatica, while the other two remained uncultivated. Cultivation of M. aquatica in CW-HSSF resulted in total coliforms (TC) and Escherichia coli (EC) removals from 0.9 to 1.3 log units greater than those obtained in the uncultivated experimental plots, for the hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 4.5 and 6.0 days. For HRT ranged from 1.5 to 6.0 days, the highest removal efficiencies in counts of TC and EC were obtained when using longer HRT. The mathematical models evaluated showed good fit to average counts of TC and EC highlighting the modified first-order kinetic model with the inclusion of the power parameter in the HRT variable.

  8. Effect of Tetracycline Dose and Treatment Mode on Selection of Resistant Coliform Bacteria in Nursery Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Larsen, Inge; Holm, Anders; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Angen, Øystein; Ahmed, Shahana; Folkesson, Anders; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2017-06-15

    This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig herds were treated with oxytetracycline for Lawsonia intracellularis -induced diarrhea. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with a (i) high (20 mg/kg of body weight), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg), or (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dose, (iv) oral pen-wise (small-group) treatment (10 mg/kg), and (v) individual intramuscular injection treatment (10 mg/kg). All groups were treated once a day for 5 days. In all groups, treatment caused a rise in the numbers and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria right after treatment, followed by a significant drop by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaxime-resistant strains. In conclusion, the difference in the dose of oxytetracycline and the way in which the drug was applied did not cause significantly different levels of selection of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria under the conditions tested. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to human health. Treatment of livestock with antimicrobials has a direct impact on this problem, and there is a need to improve the ways that we use antimicrobials in livestock

  9. Effect of Tetracycline Dose and Treatment Mode on Selection of Resistant Coliform Bacteria in Nursery Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Larsen, Inge; Holm, Anders; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Angen, Øystein; Ahmed, Shahana

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig herds were treated with oxytetracycline for Lawsonia intracellularis-induced diarrhea. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with a (i) high (20 mg/kg of body weight), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg), or (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dose, (iv) oral pen-wise (small-group) treatment (10 mg/kg), and (v) individual intramuscular injection treatment (10 mg/kg). All groups were treated once a day for 5 days. In all groups, treatment caused a rise in the numbers and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria right after treatment, followed by a significant drop by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaxime-resistant strains. In conclusion, the difference in the dose of oxytetracycline and the way in which the drug was applied did not cause significantly different levels of selection of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria under the conditions tested. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to human health. Treatment of livestock with antimicrobials has a direct impact on this problem, and there is a need to improve the ways that we use antimicrobials in

  10. Counting Penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  11. Total Coliform Rule Distribution System Advisory Committee (TCRDSAC) Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provide information about the TCRDSAC, including its charter, processes and recommendations. The Agency used the Advisory Committee recommendations to develop proposed and final rules that revised the Total Coliform Rule.

  12. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria from Reflected Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  13. Phenotypic and Phylogenetic Identification of Coliform Bacteria Obtained Using 12 Coliform Methods Approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Ya; Hong, Pei-Ying; LeChevallier, Mark W; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2015-01-01

    The current definition of coliform bacteria is method dependent, and when different culture-based methods are used, discrepancies in results can occur and affect the accuracy of identification of true coliforms...

  14. Evaluation of the petrifilm plate method for the enumeration of aerobic microorganisms and coliforms in retailed meat samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y H; Seo, K S; Ahn, J S; Yoo, H S; Kim, S P

    2001-11-01

    This study was designed to compare the effectiveness and applicability of the Petrifilm plate method with the Association of Official Analytical Chemists' (AOAC) standard aerobic count method and violet red bile agar method for meat products. The comparison was carried out using 303 meat samples collected from various retailers: 110 pork samples, 87 chicken samples, and 107 beef samples. In the comparison of the correlation coefficient (R) between the conventional method and the Petrifilm plate method by a linear regression analysis, the correlation coefficient in total microorganisms was 0.99, 0.95, and 0.94 in pork, beef, and chicken samples, respectively. The correlation coefficient in coliform count was 0.83, 0.96, and 0.81 in pork, beef, and chicken samples, respectively. Based on the high correlation in the total microorganism count, it might be possible to replace the conventional methods with the Petrifilm plate method. For coliform counts, the Petrifilm plate method also showed a generally high correlation coefficient, except for pork samples, which are more subject to contamination. The Petrifilm plate method was simpler and less time-consuming in sample preparation and, in procedures, faster than the conventional method. These results suggested that the 3M Petrifilm plate method could replace the conventional methods in the analysis of microorganism contamination measurement in meat products.

  15. Survival and detection of coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, and gram-negative bacteria in Greek yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervert, C J; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2017-02-01

    Despite the widespread use of coliforms as indicator bacteria, increasing evidence suggests that the Enterobacteriaceae (EB) and total gram-negative groups more accurately reflect the hygienic status of high-temperature, short-time pasteurized milk and processing environments. If introduced into milk as postpasteurization contamination, these bacteria may grow to high levels and produce a wide range of sensory-related defects. However, limited information is available on the use and survival of bacterial hygiene indicators in dairy products outside of pasteurized fluid milk and cheese. The goal of this study was to (1) provide information on the survival of a diverse set of bacterial hygiene indicators in the low pH environment of Greek yogurt, (2) compare traditional and alternative detection methods for their ability to detect bacterial hygiene indicators in Greek yogurt, and (3) offer insight into optimal hygiene indicator groups for use in low-pH fermented dairy products. To this end, we screened 64 bacterial isolates, representing 24 dairy-relevant genera, for survival and detection in Greek yogurt using 5 testing methods. Before testing, isolates were inoculated into plain, 0% fat Greek yogurt (pH 4.35 to 4.65), followed by a 12-h hold period at 4 ± 1°C. Yogurts were subsequently tested using Coliform Petrifilm (3M, St. Paul, MN) to detect coliforms; Enterobacteriaceae Petrifilm (3M), violet red bile glucose agar and the D-Count (bioMérieux, Marcy-l'Étoile, France) to detect EB; and crystal violet tetrazolium agar (CVTA) to detect total gram-negative bacteria. Overall, the non-EB gram-negative isolates showed significantly larger log reductions 12 h after inoculation into Greek yogurt (based on bacterial numbers recovered on CVTA) compared with the coliform and noncoliform EB isolates tested. The methods evaluated varied in their ability to detect different microbial hygiene indicators in Greek yogurt. Crystal violet tetrazolium agar detected the highest

  16. Comparison of four β-glucuronidase and β-galactosidase-based commercial culture methods used to detect Escherichia coli and total coliforms in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, Andrée F; Dion-Dupont, Vanessa; Bouchard, Sébastien; Bisson, Marc-Antoine; Bergeron, Michel G; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2015-06-01

    The MI agar, Colilert(®), Chromocult coliform(®) agar, and DC with BCIG agar chromogenic culture-based methods used to assess microbiological quality of drinking water were compared in terms of their ubiquity, sensitivity, ease of use, growth of atypical colonies and affordability. For ubiquity, 129 total coliform (representing 76 species) and 19 Escherichia coli strains were tested. Then, 635 1-L well water samples were divided into 100 mL subsamples for testing by all four methods. Test results showed that 70.5, 52.7, 36.4, and 23.3% of the non-E. coli total coliform strains and 94.7, 94.7, 89.5, and 89.5% of the 19 E. coli strains yielded a positive signal with the four methods, respectively. They also yielded a total coliform positive signal for 66.5, 51.7, 64.9, and 55.0% and an E. coli positive signal for 16.1, 14.8, 17.3, and 13.4% of the 635 well water samples tested, respectively. Results showed that Colilert(®) is the most expensive method tested in terms of reactants, yet it is the easiest to use. Large numbers of atypical colonies were also often observed on Chromocult coliform(®) and DC with BCIG, thereby challenging the target microorganism count. Thus, the MI agar method seems to be the best option for the assessment of drinking water quality.

  17. Rapid method for determining Sr-89 and Sr-90 using Cherenkov and proportional counting; Schnellmethode zur Bestimmung von SR-89 und SR-90 durch Cerenkov- und Proportionalzaehlermessungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, S.; Wende, C.; Schwokowski, R.; Alisch-Mark, M.; Abraham, A.; Heinrich, T. [Staatliche Betriebsgesellschaft fuer Umwelt und Landwirtschaft, Radebeul (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A rapid method for determining Sr-89 and Sr-90 in water, milk and biological samples has been developed and tested. After sample preparation strontium is separated by extraction chromatography using Sr resin. Eluate is divided and transfered to LSC vial and filter paper by SrCO{sub 3} precipitation. A Hidex 300 SL TDCR liquid scintillation counter and Thermo Fisher low level proportional counter have been used. Chemical yield of Sr-85 tracer is determined by Gamma spectroscopy. Uncertainty budget, decision threshold and detection limit are calculated in accordance with GUM and ISO 11929.

  18. Counting Possibilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Tomasetta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Williamson supports the thesis that every possible entity necessarily exists and so he needs to explain how a possible son of Wittgenstein’s, for example, exists in our world:he exists as a merely possible object (MPO, a pure locus of potential. Williamson presents a short argument for the existence of MPOs: how many knives can be made by fitting together two blades and two handles? Four: at the most two are concrete objects, the others being merely possible knives and merely possible objects. This paper defends the idea that one can avoid reference and ontological commitment to MPOs. My proposal is that MPOs can be dispensed with by using the notion of rules of knife-making. I first present a solution according to which we count lists of instructions - selected by the rules - describing physical combinations between components. This account, however, has its own difficulties and I eventually suggest that one can find a way out by admitting possible worlds, entities which are more commonly accepted - at least by philosophers - than MPOs. I maintain that, in answering Williamson’s questions, we count classes of physically possible worlds in which the same instance of a general rule is applied.

  19. Resistência antimicrobiana de coliformes isolados de leite humano ordenhado Antimicrobial resistance of coliform isolates from expressed human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Reis Novak

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A veiculação de microrganismos potencialmente patogênicos, resistentes aos antibióticos, por meio de leite humano ordenhado, pode ser um fator de risco potencial. Este estudo teve como objetivo contribuir para um melhor conhecimento dos coliformes isolados de leite humano ordenhado (LHO e de seu perfil de resistência a antimicrobianos. Seguiu-se um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, utilizando 837 amostras de LHO, nas quais 71 (8,48% estavam contaminadas com coliformes totais, cuja contagem em nenhuma das amostras ultrapassava 1,0x10³NMP/ml. A maioria dos microrganismos isolados (91,6% pertencia a apenas duas espécies, Enterobacter cloacae e Klebsiella pneumoniae. As 71 cepas de coliformes apresentavam resistência a pelo menos um dos antimicrobianos testados. Conclui-se que o LHO coletado e armazenado sob condições higiênico-sanitárias insatisfatórias, pode apresentar coliformes, que desgastam os fatores de proteção, reduzem o valor nutricional e a qualidade do produto.The dispersion of potentially pathogenic, antibiotic-resistant microorganisms via expressed human milk can be considered a risk factor. The aim of this study was to contribute to a better understanding of coliform isolates from expressed human milk and their antimicrobial resistance profiles. The sampling scheme followed a totally randomized design, using 837 samples of expressed human milk. Of these, 71 (8.48% were identified as contaminated with total coliforms, although in none of the samples did the population exceed 1.0x10³ MPN/ml. Most of the microorganisms isolated (91.6% belonged to only two species, Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which when subjected to antibiograms, revealed that several strains showed prior resistance to some of the antimicrobials tested. Coliforms may grow in expressed human milk if it is improperly stored, depleting protection factors and reducing the milk's nutritional value.

  20. What do fecal coliforms indicate in tropical waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    High densities of total and fecal coliform bacteria have been detected in pristine streams and in ground water samples collected from many tropical parts of the world, even in epiphytic vegetation 10 m above ground in the rain forest of Puerto Rico. Nucleic acid (DNA) analyses of Escherichia coli from pristine tropical environs has indicated that they are identical to clinical isolates of E. coli. Many tropical source waters have been shown to have enteric pathogens in the complete absence of coliforms. Diffusion chamber studies with E. coli at several tropical sites reveal that this bacterium can survive indefinitely in most freshwaters in Puerto Rico. An evaluation of methods for the enumeration of fecal coliforms showed that currently used media have poor reliability as a result of large numbers of false positive and false negative results when applied to tropical water samples. Total and fecal coliform bacteria are not reliable indicators of recent biological contamination of waters in tropical areas. Fecal streptococci and coliphages in tropical waters, violate the same under lying assumptions of indicator assays as the coliforms. Anaerobic bacteria like Bifidobacterium spp. and Clostridium perfringens show some promise in terms of survival but not in ease of enumeration and media specificity. The best course at present lies in using current techniques for direct enumeration of pathogens by fluorescent staining and nucleic acid analysis and developing tropical maximum containmant levels for certain resistant pathogens in tropical waters. 66 refs.

  1. Contamination of tomatoes with coliforms and Escherichia coli on farms and in markets of northwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenge, Kenneth C; Whong, Clement M Z; Yakubu, Lydia L; Omolehin, Raphael A; Erbaugh, J Mark; Miller, Sally A; LeJeune, Jeffrey T

    2015-01-01

    Although recent reports indicated that produce contamination with foodborne pathogens is widespread in Nigeria, the sources and magnitude of microbial contamination of fruits and vegetables on farms and in markets have not been thoroughly identified. To ascertain possible pathways of contamination, the frequency and magnitude of coliform and Escherichia coli contamination of tomatoes produced in northwest Nigeria was assessed on farms and in markets. Eight hundred twenty-six tomato fruit samples and 36 irrigation water samples were collected and assessed for fecal indicator organisms. In addition, the awareness and use of food safety practices by tomato farmers and marketers were determined. Median concentration of coliforms on all field- and market-sourced tomato fruit samples, as well as in irrigation water sources, in Kaduna, Kano, and Katsina states exceeded 1,000 most probable number (MPN) per g. Median E. coli counts from 73 (17%) of 420 field samples and 231 (57%) of 406 market tomato fruit samples exceeded 100 MPN/g. Median E. coli concentrations on tomato fruits were higher (P market tomato fruit samples (2.66 Log MPN/g) were higher (P marketers were generally unaware of the relationship between food safety practices and microbial contamination on fresh produce. Good agricultural practices pertaining to food safety on farms and in local markets were seldom used. Adoption of food safety practices on-farm, during transport, and during marketing could improve the microbial quality of tomatoes available to the public in this region of the world.

  2. Contamination of milk by enterococci and coliforms from bovine faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagkli, D M; Vancanneyt, M; Vandamme, P; Hill, C; Cogan, T M

    2007-11-01

    To determine the contribution of enterococci and coliforms from bovine faeces and teats to contamination of raw milk. Putative enterococci (n = 301) and coliforms (n = 365) were isolated from bovine faeces (n = 20), cows' teats (n = 20), the raw milk (n = 1) and the milking environment (n = 4) on one farm. The clonal relationships of each bacterial group were investigated using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis of genomic macrorestriction fragments. Representatives of the different clusters of enterococci were identified by molecular techniques including rep-PCR, SDS protein profiling, Fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (FAFLP), phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS) sequence analysis and/or 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Coliforms were identified by API 20E strips. The majority of the bovine faecal enterococcal isolates were identified as a potential new species of Aerococcus (100 isolates); E. faecium (28 isolates), and Aerococcus viridans (28 isolates) were also found. All coliform isolates from the bovine faeces were identified as Escherichia coli. The coliforms present in the milk were Hafnia alvei, Serratia liquefaciens, Yersinia enterocolitica and Enterobacter amnigenus. No E. coli, Enterococcus or Aerococcus from the bovine faeces were found in the milk. A single clone of H. alvei was found in the water, the milking equipment and the milk, suggesting that the water was the source of the organism in the milk. No vancomycin-resistant aerococci or enterococci were found while most of the isolates tested showed the presence of at least one virulence gene. The milk-sock retained strains that adhered to particulate faecal material. Coliforms were present at approx. 2 orders of magnitude greater than enterococci in the bovine faeces. The results imply that bovine faeces are not an important source of contamination of raw milk with enterococci or coliforms. The results confirm those of two previous studies (Gelsomino et al. 2001, Int J Food Microbiol71, 177

  3. Storage induced changes in coliform, heterotrophic groups of bacteria and nutrient levels of human urine for its safe use in biological production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, B B; Lahiri, Susmita; Sarkar, D; Rana, Sukanta; Bhakta, J N; Paul, Dipak

    2016-08-01

    Human urine is a potential source of various nutrients, minerals and trace elements. Its use as a fertilizer is growing popular among farmers. Here, we examined the pattern of changes in the counts of coliform, heterotrophic bacteria as well as physico-chemical characteristics of human urine during different days of storage under closed conditions at ambient temperature. We observed that after 253 days of storage under closed condition, the coliform counts were reduced significantly and remained within the safe limit to be used as fertilizer. With increase in storage period, the concentration of phosphate showed decline coupled with rise in pH, alkalinity and electrical conductance. Our study revealed that human urine can be used as safe fertilizer after 8 months of storage under closed conditions at ambient temperature ranging 25-35ºC.

  4. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF METHODS FOR ENUMERATION OF FECAL COLIFORM AND SALMONELLA IN BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current federal regulations require monitoring for fecal coliforms or Salmonella in biosolids destined for land application. Methods used for analysis of fecal coliforms and Salmonella were reviewed and a standard protocol was developed. The protocols were then evaluated by testi...

  5. Public Notification - Revised Total Coliform Rule Failure To Report Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a PWS fails to report their monitoring results for Total Coliform bacteria, it must issue a public notice to inform consumers of its water of that failure to report. This template can be used as a guide for preparing that public notice.

  6. Estimation of coliform contamination rate and impact of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kl

    2012-04-17

    Apr 17, 2012 ... At the same time, selective isolation of two other enteric bacteria namely, Klebsiella sp. and Salmonella sp., as model organisms of enteric pathogen, was attempted. In present study the. Hicrome Coliform Agar w/SLS-M1300 from Himedia Company,. India was used as selective and differential media for ...

  7. Evaluation of new chromogenic substrates for the detection of coliforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, N K; Huang, Z; Dockrell, M; Hashmi, P; Price, R G

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate a new range of chromogenic substrates for the detection of beta-galactosidase activity in coliforms and to compare their performance in agar media and broths. Sixteen novel galactoside substrates were prepared and incorporated into agar and broth. Their performance was compared using Escherichia coli (five strains), Salmonella (two strains), Enterobacter (two strains), Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Listeria, Serratia, Shigella, Citrobacter, Proteus and Staphylococcus as well as pathological urine samples. The six substrates out of the initial 16 that showed the greatest sensitivity were VQE-gal, VQM-gal, VLPr-gal, VLE-gal, VLM-gal and VBzTM-gal, whose released chromophores were red, brown or purple. VQE-gal and VLPr-gal were studied in greater detail and were incorporated into agar medium. Coliform colonies appeared red and brown respectively, following incubation at 37 degrees C for 24 h; however, positive results were obtained within a working day. The VQE-gal medium was compared with some commercially available media. The range of substrates described can be used in broths as well as in agars. The VQE agar allows the detection of coliforms within a working day. VQE-gal medium proved to be more sensitive when compared to other available chromogenic media and allows the unambiguous detection of coliforms.

  8. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and coliform bacteria in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    September-November) of the year 1994 to find out if these untreated underground waters contain dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and coliform bracteria. Out of the 40 sites sampled during both the wet and dry seasons, 11 contained colifrorm ...

  9. Total Coliform Determinations. Training Module 5.205.3.77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with multiple tube and membrane filter techniques for determining total coliform concentration of a water supply. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers proper…

  10. Fecal Coliform Determinations. Training Module 5.115.3.77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with multiple tube and membrane filter techniques for determining fecal coliform concentrations in a wastewater sample. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers proper…

  11. Estimation of coliform contamination rate and impact of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the presence of fecal coliforms in tube wells of Khorramdarreh County, Iran, and impact of environmental factors on quantity and quality of these organisms were evaluated. In a cross-sectional survey, 76 tube well water samples from March to September 2010 were tested to determine presence of fecal ...

  12. Coliforms and enterococci as indicators of faecal pollution of Woji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the influence of the abattoir effluents and other human centred activities on the microbial quality of the Woji Trans-Amadi River of Port Harcourt, using coliforms and enterococci as indicators of faecal pollution. Four sites on the Woji River namely: the abattoir effluent, the waste/faeces disposal, upstream ...

  13. Analysis of Coliform Bacteria in WSPs at ALSCON Using Macconkey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of the Analysis showed that the imported media yielded higher numbers of coliform bacteria per 100ml, as compared to the locally prepared media. Two methods where used for this analysis namely: the membrane Filtration Technique (MFT) and the Multiple Tube Technique (MTT). The MFT was more precise, ...

  14. 40 CFR 142.63 - Variances and exemptions from the maximum contaminant level for total coliforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... maximum contaminant level for total coliforms. 142.63 Section 142.63 Protection of Environment... Available § 142.63 Variances and exemptions from the maximum contaminant level for total coliforms. (a) No... due to a persistent growth of total coliforms in the distribution system rather than fecal or...

  15. Variability in the characterization of total coliforms, fecal coliforms, and escherichia coli in recreational water supplies of North Mississippi, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fecal coliform, Escherichia coli, is a historical organism for the detection of fecal pollution in water supplies. The presence of E. coli indicates a potential contamination of the water supply by other more hazardous human pathogens. In order to accurately determine the presence and degree o...

  16. Head counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattenberg, B

    1994-08-24

    A fellow at the American Enterprise Institute remarked that population growth slowed from 1.73% to 1.57% during 1990 to 1994. In Eastern Europe alone population declined by 1 million in the past 4 years. Fertility decline is evident even in Africa and a rapid fertility transition has appeared in Iran. The data are based on figures recently generated by the UN and published in "World Population Prospects: 1994 revision." The projected medium fertility variant was 9.8 billion by 2050 and 10 billion in 2054. UN statisticians have reported that the real numbers are likely to be even higher despite their own reports of fertility decline. The UN believes that sustaining 2.1 children per woman at replacement level will not be allowed by countries. The more developed countries are now at or below replacement: Japan at 1.5, Korea at 1.7, Germany at 1.3, and Italians at 1.3. Large population numbers threaten stability and are related to famine, pollution, war, and animal and plant species decimation. The evidence from Rwanda and Bosnia is clear. A more desirable and realistic estimate should be 7-8 billion by 2050. World population in preparation for the International Conference on Population and Development is being publicized as a problem so that the UN and environmentalists can increase their funding and attain a high spot on the global agenda. The author's experience as part of the US delegation to the International Population Conference in Mexico City in 1984 led to the conclusion that these international policy conferences are really public relations events. Gloom and doom predictions are constantly being modified; for instance, what was the "coming ice age" is now "global warming." The world has survived thus far, while the numbers have been increasing. If the world does not prosper in the years ahead, it is unlikely to be due to too many people.

  17. Solubilization and Elimination of Coliforms from Sewage Sludge by Sonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathki, Snehal; Kumar, M Suresh; Vaidya, A N

    2014-01-01

    Disposal of sewage secondary excess sludge is a great problem globally, and stabilization of this excess sludge by anaerobic digestion is hampered due to its constituents resistant to biodegradation. Sludge pre-treatment enhances the performance of anaerobic digestion. In this study, sewage sludge was collected from a full-scale sewage treatment plant and characterized. Ultrasonic method was used for the excess sludge disintegration of microbial flocks and cells, so as to breakdown the intracellular or extracellular polymeric materials to enhance the anaerobic digestion. The studies related to the effect of sonication on release of nutrients, increase in soluble COD and reduction in pathogenic coliforms as well as heterotrophic microorganisms and the optimization of sonication time were carried out. The results showed that the twenty minutes sonication (25 kHz) increased the soluble COD content, nutrient release and complete disappearance of fecal as well as total coliforms in the treated sludge. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  18. Evaluation of the lactose Tergitol-7, m-Endo LES, Colilert 18, Readycult Coliforms 100, Water-Check-100, 3M Petrifilm EC and DryCult Coliform test methods for detection of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörman, Ari; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2006-10-01

    In this study we compared the reference membrane filtration (MF) lactose Tergitol-7 (LTTC) method ISO 9308-1:2000 with the MF m-Endo LES method SFS 3016:2001, the defined substrate chromogenic/fluorogenic Colilert 18, Readycult Coliforms and Water Check methods, and ready-made culture media, 3M Petrifilm EC and DryCult Coli methods for the detection of coliforms and Escherichia coli in various water samples. When the results of E. coli detection were compared between test methods, the highest agreement (both tests negative or positive) with the LTTC method was calculated for the m-Endo LES method (83.6%), followed by Colilert 18 (82.7%), Water-Check (81.8%) and Readycult (78.4%), whereas Petrifilm EC (70.6%) and DryCult Coli (68.9%) showed the weakest agreement. The m-Endo LES method was the only method showing no statistical difference in E. coli counts compared with the LTTC method, whereas the Colilert 18 and Readycult methods gave significantly higher counts for E. coli than the LTTC method. In general, those tests based on the analysis of a 1-ml sample (Petrifilm EC and DryCult Coli) showed weak sensitivity (39.5-52.5%) but high specificity (90.9-78.8%).

  19. Keberadaan Salmonella dan Bakteri Coliform pada Bumbu Kacang Baso Tahu

    OpenAIRE

    Indrawaty; Onggowidjaja, Philips

    2002-01-01

    “Baso tahu” is common food.  Salmonella and colifom bacteria commonly contaminate foods.  The presence of both groups was examined from “baso tahu” peanut thick sauce, by growing it on SS agar and MacConkey agar respectively.  Results of biochemical test showed Salmonella did not contaminate it.  The thick sauce was contaminated by 2895,4 coliform bacteria per gr (on average), which exceeded the standard.

  20. Survival of fecal coliforms in dry-composting toilets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlinger, T; Graham, J; Corella-Barud, V; Avitia, R

    2001-09-01

    The dry-composting toilet, which uses neither water nor sewage infrastructure, is a practical solution in areas with inadequate sewage disposal and where water is limited. These systems are becoming increasingly popular and are promoted to sanitize human excreta and to recycle them into fertilizer for nonedible plants, yet there are few data on the safety of this technology. This study analyzed fecal coliform reduction in approximately 90 prefabricated, dry-composting toilets (Sistema Integral de Reciclamiento de Desechos Orgánicos [SIRDOs]) that were installed on the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico. The purpose of this study was to determine fecal coliform reduction over time and the most probable method of this reduction. Biosolid waste samples were collected and analyzed at approximately 3 and 6 months and were classified based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards. Results showed that class A compost (high grade) was present in only 35.8% of SIRDOs after 6 months. The primary mechanism for fecal coliform reduction was found to be desiccation rather than biodegradation. There was a significant correlation (P = 0.008) between classification rating and percent moisture categories of the biosolid samples: drier samples had a greater proportion of class A samples. Solar exposure was critical for maximal class A biosolid end products (P = 0.001). This study only addressed fecal coliforms as an indicator organism, and further research is necessary to determine the safety of composting toilets with respect to other pathogenic microorganisms, some of which are more resistant to desiccation.

  1. KUALITAS MIKROBIOLOGI NASI JINGGO BERDASARKAN ANGKA LEMPENG TOTAL, COLIFORM TOTAL DAN KANDUNGAN ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Luh Payastiti Yunita

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate quality of food products that do not meet standard quality may lead to food poisoning cases and become a concern in public health sector. Nasi Jinggo is a small amount of cooked rice with little bit fried tempe, shredded spicy chicken, traditional made chili sauce that is packed with banana leaves, and all the cooking process usually done traditionally. Nasi jinggo is sold at night by street vendor with price ranged from Rp. 1.500,- to Rp. 2.000,- per package. The study was a quantitative descriptive study with cross-sectional design that was aimed to identify the microbiology quality of nasi jinggo that were sold in Denpasar Selatan area. From 48 population of nasi jinggo street vendor, 23 vendor was taken as samples. The microbiology quality being assessed was Total Plate Count (TPC, Total Coliform with MPN method and Escherichia coli content with Eosin Methylene Blue Agar as medium. Laboratory analysis showed that only 21,7% sample that met TPC standard with average value of 2,3 x 107 CFU/gram sample, only 8,7% that met Total Coliform standard with average value of 1,4 x 105 MPN/100 gram sample and 52,2% sample that met E. coli content standard with average value is 2,6 x 102 MPN/100 gram sample. It is recommended to the government to do quality check towards nasi jinggo in a regular basis as well as to provide education and assistance to nasi jinggo street vendors in order to improve the microbiology quality of food product and ensure food safety to the consumer.

  2. Variability in the characterization of total coliforms, fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli in recreational water supplies of north Mississippi, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiello, M; Mikell, A T; Moore, M T; Cooper, C M

    2014-08-01

    The fecal coliform, Escherichia coli, is a historical organism for the detection of fecal pollution in water supplies. The presence of E. coli indicates a potential contamination of the water supply by other more hazardous human pathogens. In order to accurately determine the presence and degree of fecal contamination, it is important that standard methods approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency are designed to determine the presence of E. coli in a water supply, and distinguish E. coli from other coliform bacteria (e.g. Citrobacter, Klebsiella and Enterobacter). These genera of bacteria are present not only in fecal matter, but also in soil and runoff water and are not good indicators of fecal contamination. There is also ambiguity in determining a positive result for fecal coliforms on M-FC filters by a blue colony. When all variations of blue, including light blue or glossy blue, were examined, confirmation methods agreed with the positive M-FC result less often than when colonies that the technician would merely call "blue", with no descriptors, were examined. Approximately 48 % of M-FC positive colonies were found to be E. coli with 4 methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucuronide (MUG), and only 23 % of samples producing a positive result on M-FC media were found to be E. coli using API-20E test strips and current API-20E profiles. The majority of other M-FC blue colonies were found to be Klebsiella or were unidentifiable with current API-20E profiles. Two positive M-FC colonies were found to be Kluyvera with API-20E, both of which cleaved MUG and produced fluorescence under UV light, a characteristic used to differentiate E. coli from other fecal coliforms.

  3. Photon-counting image sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Teranishi, Nobukazu; Theuwissen, Albert; Stoppa, David; Charbon, Edoardo

    2017-01-01

    The field of photon-counting image sensors is advancing rapidly with the development of various solid-state image sensor technologies including single photon avalanche detectors (SPADs) and deep-sub-electron read noise CMOS image sensor pixels. This foundational platform technology will enable opportunities for new imaging modalities and instrumentation for science and industry, as well as new consumer applications. Papers discussing various photon-counting image sensor technologies and selected new applications are presented in this all-invited Special Issue.

  4. Fecal coliform population dynamics associated with the thermophilic stabilization of treated sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Chris; Peccia, Jordan

    2012-10-26

    The inactivation of fecal coliforms in anaerobic batch reactors has been investigated at the thermophilic temperatures of 50, 55 and 60 °C. Throughout inactivation experiments at each temperature, individual colonies were isolated and identified by 16S rDNA gene sequencing to illustrate how the diversity of fecal coliforms is affected by thermophilic treatment. Results indicate that even though fecal coliforms in raw sewage sludge are comprised of several different bacterial species, each with variable temperature induced decay rates, the overall inactivation of fecal coliforms in raw sewage sludge was found to follow a first-order relationship. No tailing was observed across the range of fecal coliform concentrations measured. Fecal coliforms in raw sludge contained six different genera of bacteria and were 62% enriched in E. coli. Within 1.5 log removal of fecal coliform concentration by thermophilic treatment, the populations had shifted to, and remained at 100% E. coli. Subsequent inactivation rates measured in isolated fecal coliform strains confirmed that E. coli cells isolated post-treatment were more thermotolerant than E. coli and non-E coli bacteria isolated prior to thermal treatment. Overall, this study describes the potential enrichment of thermotolerant E. coli in biosolids fecal coliforms and demonstrates that while thermotolerant species are present at the end of treatment, pure first-order approximations are appropriate for estimating residence times to reduce fecal coliforms to levels promulgated in U.S. Class A biosolids standards.

  5. Effect of oral administration of Bacillus coagulans B37 and Bacillus pumilus B9 strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Lopamudra; Gandhi, D N

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effect of oral administration of two Bacillus strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model. An in vivo experiment was conducted for 49-day period on 36 adult male albino Wister rats divided equally into to four groups. After 7-day adaptation period, one group (T1) was fed on sterile skim milk along with basal diet for the next 28 days. Second (T2) and (T3) groups received spore biomass of Bacillus coagulans B37 and Bacillus pumilus B9, respectively, suspended in sterilized skim milk at 8-9 log colony-forming units/ml plus basal diet for 28 days, while control group (T4) was supplied with clean water along with basal diet. There was a 14-day post-treatment period. A total of 288 fecal samples (8 fecal collections per rat) were collected at every 7-day interval starting from 0 to 49 days and subjected to the enumeration of the counts of coliforms and lactobacilli and Bacillus spores using respective agar media. In vitro acid and bile tolerance tests on both the strains were performed. The rats those (T2 and T3) received either B. coagulans B37 or B. pumilus B9 spore along with non-fermented skim milk showed decrease (pcoliform counts and increase (pcoliform counts accompanied by concurrent increase in lactobacilli counts in the intestinal flora in rats.

  6. Full-scale studies of factors related to coliform regrowth in drinking water.

    OpenAIRE

    LeChevallier, M W; Welch, N J; Smith, D B

    1996-01-01

    An 18-month survey of 31 water systems in North America was conducted to determine the factors that contribute to the occurrence of coliform bacteria in drinking water. The survey included analysis of assimilable organic carbon (AOC), coliforms, disinfectant residuals, and operational parameters. Coliform bacteria were detected in 27.8% of the 2-week sampling periods and were associated with the following factors: filtration, temperature, disinfectant type and disinfectant level, AOC level, c...

  7. Jumlah Bakteri Coliform dan Deteksi Escherichia Coli pada Daging Ayam di Pekanbaru

    OpenAIRE

    Juwita, Usna; Haryani, Yuli; Jose, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Coliform bacteria are often referred as indicator organisms to indicate the potential presence of disease-causing bacteria. Escherichia coli is a type of Coliform bacteria. Most Escherichia coli are harmless and commonly found in the intestines of humans and animals. However, some strains can cause illness. Coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli contamination in chicken could be detected using Most Probable Number (MPN) multi-step assay which consists of presumptive, confirmed, and completed ...

  8. Coliforms Everywhere! Using Microbiology to Teach the Scientific Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy R. Cisar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The scientific method is a fundamental concept in science. In this exercise the scientific method is taught as a hands-on investigative laboratory experience. Students generate a hypothesis concerning the environmental distribution of coliforms, design and execute an experimental test of that hypothesis, and analyze the resulting data. The exercise is safe and straightforward. It is appropriate for use in undergraduate laboratory courses for science majors and secondary school students and undergraduate non-majors with the appropriate mathematical backgrounds. Students learn both the process by which science progresses, as well as more advanced concepts in microbiology and statistics.

  9. Method and automated apparatus for detecting coliform organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, W. P.; Taylor, R. E.; Jeffers, E. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Method and automated apparatus are disclosed for determining the time of detection of metabolically produced hydrogen by coliform bacteria cultured in an electroanalytical cell from the time the cell is inoculated with the bacteria. The detection time data provides bacteria concentration values. The apparatus is sequenced and controlled by a digital computer to discharge a spent sample, clean and sterilize the culture cell, provide a bacteria nutrient into the cell, control the temperature of the nutrient, inoculate the nutrient with a bacteria sample, measures the electrical potential difference produced by the cell, and measures the time of detection from inoculation.

  10. Matrix Extension Study: Validation of the Compact Dry CF Method for Enumeration of Total Coliform Bacteria in Selected Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuochi, Shingo; Nelson, Maria; Baylis, Chris; Green, Becky; Jewell, Keith; Monadjemi, Farinaz; Chen, Yi; Salfinger, Yvonne; Fernandez, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Dry "Nissui" CF method, Performance Tested Method(SM) 110401, was originally certified for enumeration of coliform bacteria by the AOAC Research Institute Performance Tested Methods(SM) program for raw meat products. Compact Dry CF is a ready-to-use dry media sheet, containing a cold-soluble gelling agent, a chromogenic medium, and selective agents, which are rehydrated by adding 1 mL of diluted sample. Coliform bacteria produce blue/blue-green colonies on the Compact Dry CF, allowing a coliform colony count to be determined in the sample after 24 ± 2 h incubation. A validation study was organized by Campden BRI (formerly Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association Technology, Ltd), Chipping Campden, United Kingdom, to extend the method's claim to include cooked chicken, fresh bagged prewashed shredded iceberg lettuce, frozen fish, milk powder, and pasteurized 2% milk. Campden BRI collected single-laboratory data for cooked chicken, lettuce, frozen fish, and milk powder, whereas a multilaboratory study was conducted on pasteurized milk. Thirteen laboratories participated in the interlaboratory study. The Compact Dry CF method was compared to ISO 4832:2006 "Microbiology of food and animal feeding stuffs-Horizontal method for the enumeration of coliforms-Colony-count technique," the current version at the time this study was conducted. Each matrix was evaluated at either four or five contamination levels of coliform bacteria (including an uncontaminated level). After logarithmic transformation of counts at each level, the data for pasteurized whole milk were analyzed for sr, sR, RSDr, and RSDR. Regression analysis was also performed and r(2) was reported. Mean difference between methods with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. A log10 range of -0.5 to 0.5 for the CI was used as the acceptance criterion to establish significant statistical difference between methods. In the single-laboratory evaluation (for cooked chicken, lettuce, frozen

  11. Assessment of the climate change impacts on fecal coliform contamination in a tidal estuarine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Cheng; Chan, Wen-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is one of the key factors affecting the future microbiological water quality in rivers and tidal estuaries. A coupled 3D hydrodynamic and fecal coliform transport model was developed and applied to the Danshuei River estuarine system for predicting the influences of climate change on microbiological water quality. The hydrodynamic and fecal coliform model was validated using observational salinity and fecal coliform distributions. According to the analyses of the statistical error, predictions of the salinity and the fecal coliform concentration from the model simulation quantitatively agreed with the observed data. The validated model was then applied to predict the fecal coliform contamination as a result of climate change, including the change of freshwater discharge and the sea level rise. We found that the reduction of freshwater discharge under climate change scenarios resulted in an increase in the fecal coliform concentration. The sea level rise would decrease fecal coliform distributions because both the water level and the water volume increased. A reduction in freshwater discharge has a negative impact on the fecal coliform concentration, whereas a rising sea level has a positive influence on the fecal coliform contamination. An appropriate strategy for the effective microbiological management in tidal estuaries is required to reveal the persistent trends of climate in the future.

  12. Recurrence of fecal coliforms and Salmonella species in biosolids following thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranpour, Reza; Cox, Huub H J

    2006-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Part 503 Biosolids Rule requires the fecal coliform (indicator) or Salmonella species (pathogen) density requirements for Class A biosolids to be met at the last point of plant control (truck-loading facility and/or farm for land application). The three Southern Californian wastewater treatment plants in this study produced biosolids by thermophilic anaerobic digestion and all met the Class A limits for both fecal coliforms and Salmonella sp. in the digester outflow biosolids. At two plants, however, a recurrence of fecal coliforms was observed in postdigestion biosolids, which caused exceedance of the Class A limit for fecal coliforms at the truck-loading facility and farm for land application. Comparison of observations at the three plants and further laboratory tests indicated that the recurrence of fecal coliforms can possibly be related to the following combination of factors: (1) incomplete destruction of fecal coliforms during thermophilic anaerobic digestion, (2) contamination of Class A biosolids with fecal coliforms from external sources during postdigestion, (3) a large drop of the postdigestion biosolids temperature to below the maximum for fecal coliform growth, (4) an unknown effect of biosolids dewatering in centrifuges. At Hyperion Treatment Plant (City of Los Angeles, California), fecal coliform recurrence could be prevented by the following: (1) complete conversion to thermophilic operation to exclude contamination by mesophilically digested biosolids and (2) insulation and electrical heat-tracing of postdigestion train for maintaining a high biosolids temperature in postdigestion.

  13. Effect of oral administration of Bacillus coagulans B37 and Bacillus pumilus B9 strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopamudra Haldar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the effect of oral administration of two Bacillus strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model. Materials and Methods: An in vivo experiment was conducted for 49-day period on 36 adult male albino Wister rats divided equally into to four groups. After 7-day adaptation period, one group (T1 was fed on sterile skim milk along with basal diet for the next 28 days. Second (T2 and (T3 groups received spore biomass of Bacillus coagulans B37 and Bacillus pumilus B9, respectively, suspended in sterilized skim milk at 8-9 log colony-forming units/ml plus basal diet for 28 days, while control group (T4 was supplied with clean water along with basal diet. There was a 14-day post-treatment period. A total of 288 fecal samples (8 fecal collections per rat were collected at every 7-day interval starting from 0 to 49 days and subjected to the enumeration of the counts of coliforms and lactobacilli and Bacillus spores using respective agar media. In vitro acid and bile tolerance tests on both the strains were performed. Results: The rats those (T2 and T3 received either B. coagulans B37 or B. pumilus B9 spore along with non-fermented skim milk showed decrease (p<0.01 in fecal coliform counts and increase (p<0.05 in both fecal lactobacilli and Bacillus spore counts as compared to the control group (T4 and the group fed only skim milk (T1. In vitro study indicated that both the strains were found to survive at pH 2.0 and 3.0 even up to 3 h and tolerate bile up to 2.0% concentration even after 12 h of exposure. Conclusions: This study revealed that oral administration of either B. coagulans B37 or B. pumilus B9 strains might be useful in reducing coliform counts accompanied by concurrent increase in lactobacilli counts in the intestinal flora in rats.

  14. Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program: Rapid Ecological Assessments of Fish Large-Area Stationary Point Count Surveys (SPC) in the Pacific Ocean from 2000-09-09 to 2007-06-08 (NCEI Accession 0162466)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The large-area stationary point count (SPC) method is used to conduct reef fish surveys in the Hawaiian and Mariana Archipelagos, American Samoa, and the Pacific...

  15. Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program: Rapid Ecological Assessments of Fish Large-Area Stationary Point Count Surveys (SPC) at Coral Reef Sites across the Pacific Ocean from 2000 to 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The large-area stationary point count (SPC) method is used to conduct reef fish surveys in the Hawaiian and Mariana Archipelagos, American Samoa, and the Pacific...

  16. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ... intended to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the ...

  17. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

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  18. Clean Hands Count

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  19. Coliforms as a measure of sewage contamination of the River Zambezi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feresu, S B; Van Sickle, J

    1990-04-01

    The effect of releasing untreated sewage from Victoria Falls Town into the Zambezi river was determined by bacteriological examination of water samples collected upstream of Victoria Falls and for 22 km downstream. Most probable numbers of faecal coliforms and Escherichia coli were estimated. Water upstream of the falls, on the Zimbabwe side of the river, contained between seven and 130 E. coli per 100 ml. This section of the river was free from major sources of faecal pollution. Below the falls, but before the Victoria Falls Town sewage outfall, numbers of E. coli were between 1.8 X 10(2) and 1.4 X 10(4)/100 ml, indicating the existence of a sewage discharge other than that from Victoria Falls Town. The river was also highly polluted from the Victoria Falls Town sewage outfall to a point 18.6 km downstream. The highest E. coli count was 3.3 X 10(4)/100 ml and declined slowly to 1.4 X 10(3)/100 ml 18.6 km downstream of the outfall.

  20. Adenovirus, enterovirus and thermotolerant coliforms in recreational waters from Lake Guaíba beaches, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, C P; Simonetti, A B; Staggemeier, R; Rigotto, C; Heinzelmann, L S; Spilki, F R

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, molecular detection of human adenoviruses (HAdV) and enteroviruses (EV) was performed in surface water samples collected from beaches Ipanema and Lami, located on the shores of Lake Guaíba, city of Porto Alegre, RS, southern Brazil. Furthermore, water safety was evaluated by counting thermotolerant coliforms (TC), following local government regulations. A total of 36 samples were collected monthly from six different sites along the beaches. Viral genomes were found in 30 (83.3%) samples. The higher detection rate was observed for HAdV (77.8%), followed by EV (22.2%). Although low concentrations of TC have been found, the occurrence of viral genomes in water samples was frequent and may pose a potential risk of infection for people bathing in these beaches.

  1. Microbial counts of food contact surfaces at schools depending on a feeding scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nthabiseng Nhlapo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The prominence of disease transmission between individuals in confined environments is a concern, particularly in the educational environment. With respect to school feeding schemes, food contact surfaces have been shown to be potential vehicles of foodborne pathogens. The aim of this study was to assess the cleanliness of the surfaces that come into contact with food that is provided to children through the National School Nutrition Programme in central South Africa. In each school under study, microbiological samples were collected from the preparation surface and the dominant hand and apron of the food handler. The samples were analysed for total viable counts, coliforms, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and yeasts and moulds. The criteria specified in the British Columbia Guide for Environmental Health Officers were used to evaluate the results. Total viable counts were high for all surfaces, with the majority of colonies being too numerous to count (over 100 colonies per plate. Counts of organisms were relatively low, with 20% of the surfaces producing unsatisfactory enumeration of S. aureus and E. coli and 30% unsatisfactory for coliforms. Yeast and mould produced 50% and 60% unsatisfactory counts from preparation surfaces and aprons, respectively. Statistically significant differences could not be established amongst microbial counts of the surfaces, which suggests cross-contamination may have occurred. Contamination may be attributed to foodstuffs and animals in the vicinity of the preparation area rather than to the food handlers, because hands had the lowest counts of enumerated organisms amongst the analysed surfaces.

  2. Effect of phenolic compounds on the rapid direct enzymatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-15

    May 15, 2009 ... β-D-Galactosidase and β-D-glucuronidase are 2 marker enzymes used in the rapid detection of total coliforms and E. coli, respectively. A range of bioprobes and biosensors have recently been developed for the rapid, direct and in situ detection of these enzymes. Chromogenic substrates are often used to ...

  3. Anaerobic incubation of membrane filter cultures for improved detection of fecal coliforms from recreational waters.

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, J D; Tunnicliff, B; Brickler, S K; Kramer, R E; Sinclair, N A

    1984-01-01

    Anaerobic incubation of membrane filter cultures significantly enhanced detection of fecal coliforms in surface-water samples from recreational beaches. In contrast to standard aerobic incubation, anaerobic incubation suppressed overgrowth of masking, noncoliform bacteria but did not increase the frequency of fecal coliform recovery.

  4. Test/QA Plan for Verification of Coliform Detection Technologies for Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coliform detection technologies to be tested use chromatogenic and fluorogenic growth media to detect coliforms and E. coli based on the enzymatic activity of these organisms. The systems consist of single-use sample containers that contain pre-measured reagents and can be u...

  5. Nematodes as a source of total coliforms in a distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locas, Annie; Barbeau, Benoit; Gauthier, Vincent

    2007-05-01

    In a distribution system of a large North American city, recurring total coliforms and atypical coliforms were detected at the exit (distribution pumps) of a storage reservoir. The presence of total coliforms and atypical coliforms was noted when the pumps were in operation and the water temperature was higher than 18 degrees C. The total coliform and atypical coliform concentrations at the volute pump casings ranged from 0 to 93.5 colony forming units (cfu)/100 mL. Significant concentrations of nematodes were also detected at this sampling location, averaging 12.0 nematodes/L in 2001 and 17.4 nematodes/L in 2002. The hypothesis that coliforms were released from the nematodes during their transit through the high-pressure pump was tested by recovering nematodes by filtering large volumes of water and grinding the nematodes in the laboratory, using various techniques. Total coliform and heterotrophic bacteria concentrations ranged from 0 to 27 cfu/nematode and 0 to 643 cfu/nematode, respectively. The origin of the nematodes was traced back to the sand filters located at the two water treatment plants. The importance of invertebrates in the distribution system should not be dismissed and the associated health risks, if any, should be assessed.

  6. Evaluation of Colilert-18 for Detection of Coliforms and Eschericha coli in Subtropical Freshwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kuo-Kuang; Chao, Chen-Ching; Chao, Wei-Liang

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy of Colilert-18 as a test for coliforms and Escherichia coli in subtropical freshwater was evaluated by using API 20E strips and fatty acid methyl ester analysis. The false-positive and -negative rates of detection were 7.4 and 3.5%, respectively, for E. coli and 9.6 and 6.3%, respectively, for coliforms. PMID:14766614

  7. Evaluation of Colilert-18 for Detection of Coliforms and Eschericha coli in Subtropical Freshwater

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Kuo-Kuang; Chao, Chen-Ching; Chao, Wei-Liang

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy of Colilert-18 as a test for coliforms and Escherichia coli in subtropical freshwater was evaluated by using API 20E strips and fatty acid methyl ester analysis. The false-positive and -negative rates of detection were 7.4 and 3.5%, respectively, for E. coli and 9.6 and 6.3%, respectively, for coliforms.

  8. Evaluation of Colilert-18 for detection of coliforms and Eschericha coli in subtropical freshwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kuo-Kuang; Chao, Chen-Ching; Chao, Wei-Liang

    2004-02-01

    The accuracy of Colilert-18 as a test for coliforms and Escherichia coli in subtropical freshwater was evaluated by using API 20E strips and fatty acid methyl ester analysis. The false-positive and -negative rates of detection were 7.4 and 3.5%, respectively, for E. coli and 9.6 and 6.3%, respectively, for coliforms.

  9. Seasonality of Coliform Bacteria Detection Rates in New Jersey Domestic Wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherholt, Thomas B; Procopio, Nicholas A; Goodrow, Sandra M

    2017-05-01

    It is important that indicators of fecal pollution are reliable. Coliform bacteria are a commonly used indicator of fecal pollution. As other investigators have reported elsewhere, we observed a seasonal pattern of coliform bacteria detections in domestic wells in New Jersey. Examination of a statewide database of 10 years of water quality data from 93,447 samples, from 78,207 wells, generated during real estate transactions, revealed that coliform bacteria were detected in a higher proportion of wells during warm weather months. Further examination of the seasonal pattern of other data, including well water pH, precipitation, ground and surface water temperatures, surface water coliform bacteria concentrations, and vegetation, resulted in the hypothesis that these bacteria may be derived from nonfecal (or environmentally adapted) as well as fecal sources. We provide evidence that the coliform seasonality may be the result of seasonal changes in groundwater extraction volumes (and to a lesser extent precipitation), and temperature-driven changes in the concentration of surface or near-surface coliform sources. Nonfecal coliform sources may not indicate the presence of fecal wastes and hence the potential presence of pathogens, or do so in an inconsistent fashion. Additional research is needed to identify the sources of the coliforms detected in groundwater. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  10. 78 FR 10269 - National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Revisions to the Total Coliform Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... of fecal origin and do not have any direct public health implication. Under the treatment technique... pathogens include hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) (kidney failure), hepatitis, and bloody diarrhea (WHO 2004... organisms detected by total coliform and fecal coliform methods are not of fecal origin and do not have any...

  11. Review of Risk Status of Groundwater Supply Wells by Tracing the Source of Coliform Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Somaratne

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Coliform source tracking was undertaken on 48 water sources of which 42 are potable in 26 water supply systems spread across South Australia. The water sources in the study vary from unprotected springs in creek beds to deep confined aquifers. The frequency analysis of historical coliform detections indicate that aquifer types, depth to water and casing depth are important considerations; whilst maintaining well integrity and the presence of low permeable clay layers above the production zone are the dominant parameters for minimizing coliform contamination of water supply wells. However, in karst and fractured rock aquifers, pathways for coliform transport exist, as evidenced in the >200 MPN/100 mL level of coliform detection. Data indicate that there is no compelling evidence to support the contention that the wells identified as low risk are contaminated through geological strata and clay barriers. However, data strongly supports the suggestion that coliform detection from sample taps and wellheads stem from the surrounding groundwater and soil-plant sources as a result of failed well integrity, or potentially from coliform bacteria that can persist within biofilms formed on well casings, screens, pump columns and pumps. Coliform sub-typing results show that most coliform bacteria detected in town water supply wells are associated with the soil-water-plant system and are ubiquitous in the environment: Citrobacter spp. (65%, Enterobacter spp. (63%, Pantoea spp. (17%, Serratia spp. (19%, Klebsiella spp. (34%, and Pseudomonas spp. (10%. Overall, 70% of wells harbor detectable thermotolerant coliforms (TTC with potentially 36% of species of animal origin, including Escherichia coli species found in 12% of wells.

  12. Antibiotic resistance and virulence genes in coliform water isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, C; Sidhu, J P S; Tiehm, A; Toze, S

    2016-11-01

    Widespread fecal pollution of surface water may present a major health risk and a significant pathway for dissemination of antibiotic resistance bacteria. The River Rhine is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe and an important raw water source for drinking water production. A total of 100 coliform isolates obtained from River Rhine (Germany) were examined for their susceptibility to seven antimicrobial agents. Resistances against amoxicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline were detected in 48%, 11% and 9% of isolates respectively. The antibiotic resistance could be traced back to the resistance genes blaTEM, blaSHV, ampC, sul1, sul2, dfrA1, tet(A) and tet(B). Whereby, the ampC gene represents a special case, because its presence is not inevitably linked to a phenotypic antibiotic resistance. Multiple antibiotics resistance was often accompanied by the occurrence of class 1 or 2 integrons. E. coli isolates belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1 (commensal) were more predominant (57%) compared to B2 and D groups (43%) which are known to carry virulent genes. Additionally, six E. coli virulence genes were also detected. However, the prevalence of virulence genes in the E. coli isolates was low (not exceeding 4.3% per gene) and no diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes were detected. This study demonstrates that surface water is an important reservoir of ARGs for a number of antibiotic classes such as sulfonamide, trimethoprim, beta-lactam-antibiotics and tetracycline. The occurrence of antibiotic resistance in coliform bacteria isolated from River Rhine provides evidence for the need to develop management strategies to limit the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria in aquatic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. The Seasonality of Fecal Coliform Bacteria Pollution and its Influence on Closures of Shellfish Harvesting Areas in Mississippi Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Runoff from agricultural lands and farm animal feedlots is one of the major sources of fecal coliforms in surface waters, and fecal coliform (FC bacteria concentrations tend to vary with season because of seasonal variations in climatic factors. However, El Niño -Southern Oscillation (ENSO events may affect the extent and patterns of seasonality in FC levels in coastal waters. Water quality monitoring data for shellfish management collected during El Niño (1990, 1992, 1997, and La Niña (1999, 2000 years were analyzed to evaluate the extent to which these events influenced Pearl River stage, and bacterial levels, water temperature, and salinity in the western part of Mississippi Sound. Models to predict FC levels in relation to various environmental factors were also developed. In 1990, 1992 and 1997, FC geometric mean counts peaked in late winter (January/February reaching 120 MPN (February 1990, 165 MPN (January 1992, and 86 MPN (January 1997, and then decreased considerably during spring and summer (1.2 – 19 MPN. Thereafter, FC abundance increased slightly in fall and early winter (1.9 – 24 MPN. Fecal coliform abundance during the 2000 La Niña year was much lower (1.0 – 10.3 MPN than in 1992 (1.2 – 165 MPN, and showed no seasonal pattern from January to August, perhaps due to the relative scarcity of rainfall in 2000. In 1995 (ENSO neutral year, peak geometric mean FC count (46 MPN was lower than during El Niño years and occurred in early spring (March. The seasonal and between year variations in FC levels determined the number of days during which the conditionally approved shellfish growing area was opened for harvesting shellfish. For example, from January to April 1997, the area was not opened for shellfish harvesting, whereas in 2000, the number of days during which the area was opened ranged from 6 - 27 (January to April to 24 - 26 (October to December

  14. Count data distributions and their zero-modified equivalents as a framework for modelling microbial data with a relatively high occurrence of zero counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Barron, Ursula; Kerr, Marie; Sheridan, James J; Butler, Francis

    2010-01-01

    In many cases, microbial data are characterised by a relatively high proportion of zero counts, as occurs with some hygiene indicators and pathogens, which complicates the statistical treatment under the assumption of log normality. The objective of this work was to introduce an alternative Poisson-based distribution framework capable of representing this kind of data without incurring loss of information. The negative binomial, and two zero-modified parameterizations of the Poisson and negative binomial distributions (zero-inflated and hurdle) were fitted to actual zero-inflated bacterial data consisting of total coliforms (n=590) and Escherichia coli (n=677) present on beef carcasses sampled from nine Irish abattoirs. Improvement over the simple Poisson was shown by the simple negative binomial (p=0.426 for chi(2) test for the coliforms data) due to the added heterogeneity parameter, although it slightly overestimated the zero counts and underestimated the first few positive counts for both data sets. Whereas, the zero-modified Poisson could not cope with the data over-dispersion in any of its parameterizations (pdistribution was comparable to the simpler negative binomial distribution. Thus, bacterial data consisting of a considerable number of zero counts can be appropriately represented by using such count distributions, and this work serves as the starting point for an alternative statistical treatment of this kind of data and stochastic risk assessment modelling. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Phenotypic and Phylogenetic Identification of Coliform Bacteria Obtained Using 12 Coliform Methods Approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Hong, Pei-Ying; LeChevallier, Mark W; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2015-09-01

    The current definition of coliform bacteria is method dependent, and when different culture-based methods are used, discrepancies in results can occur and affect the accuracy of identification of true coliforms. This study used an alternative approach to the identification of true coliforms by combining the phenotypic traits of the coliform isolates and the phylogenetic affiliation of 16S rRNA gene sequences with the use of lacZ and uidA genes. A collection of 1,404 isolates detected by 12 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved coliform-testing methods were characterized based on their phylogenetic affiliations and responses to their original isolation media and lauryl tryptose broth, m-Endo, and MI agar media. Isolates were phylogenetically classified into 32 true-coliform, or targeted Enterobacteriaceae (TE), groups and 14 noncoliform, or nontargeted Enterobacteriaceae (NTE), groups. It was shown statistically that detecting true-positive (TP) events is more challenging than detecting true-negative (TN) events. Furthermore, most false-negative (FN) events were associated with four TE groups (i.e., Serratia group I and the Providencia, Proteus, and Morganella groups) and most false-positive (FP) events with two NTE groups, the Aeromonas and Plesiomonas groups. In Escherichia coli testing, 18 out of 145 E. coli isolates identified by enzymatic methods were validated as FN. The reasons behind the FP and FN reactions could be explained through analysis of the lacZ and uidA genes. Overall, combining the analyses of the 16S rRNA, lacZ, and uidA genes with the growth responses of TE and NTE on culture-based media is an effective way to evaluate the performance of coliform detection methods. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Phenotypic and Phylogenetic Identification of Coliform Bacteria Obtained Using 12 Coliform Methods Approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Hong, Pei-Ying; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    The current definition of coliform bacteria is method dependent, and when different culture-based methods are used, discrepancies in results can occur and affect the accuracy of identification of true coliforms. This study used an alternative approach to the identification of true coliforms by combining the phenotypic traits of the coliform isolates and the phylogenetic affiliation of 16S rRNA gene sequences with the use of lacZ and uidA genes. A collection of 1,404 isolates detected by 12 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved coliform-testing methods were characterized based on their phylogenetic affiliations and responses to their original isolation media and lauryl tryptose broth, m-Endo, and MI agar media. Isolates were phylogenetically classified into 32 true-coliform, or targeted Enterobacteriaceae (TE), groups and 14 noncoliform, or nontargeted Enterobacteriaceae (NTE), groups. It was shown statistically that detecting true-positive (TP) events is more challenging than detecting true-negative (TN) events. Furthermore, most false-negative (FN) events were associated with four TE groups (i.e., Serratia group I and the Providencia, Proteus, and Morganella groups) and most false-positive (FP) events with two NTE groups, the Aeromonas and Plesiomonas groups. In Escherichia coli testing, 18 out of 145 E. coli isolates identified by enzymatic methods were validated as FN. The reasons behind the FP and FN reactions could be explained through analysis of the lacZ and uidA genes. Overall, combining the analyses of the 16S rRNA, lacZ, and uidA genes with the growth responses of TE and NTE on culture-based media is an effective way to evaluate the performance of coliform detection methods. PMID:26116679

  17. Identifying fecal pollution sources using 3M(™) Petrifilm (™) count plates and antibiotic resistance analysis in the Horse Creek Watershed in Aiken County, SC (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, S Michele; West, Ryan T; Yates, James R

    2014-12-01

    Sources of fecal coliform pollution in a small South Carolina (USA) watershed were identified using inexpensive methods and commonly available equipment. Samples from the upper reaches of the watershed were analyzed with 3M(™) Petrifilm(™) count plates. We were able to narrow down the study's focus to one particular tributary, Sand River, that was the major contributor of the coliform pollution (both fecal and total) to a downstream reservoir that is heavily used for recreation purposes. Concentrations of total coliforms ranged from 2,400 to 120,333 cfu/100 mL, with sharp increases in coliform counts observed in samples taken after rain events. Positive correlations between turbidity and fecal coliform counts suggested a relationship between fecal pollution and stormwater runoff. Antibiotic resistance analysis (ARA) compared antibiotic resistance profiles of fecal coliform isolates from the stream to those of a watershed-specific fecal source library (equine, waterfowl, canines, and untreated sewage). Known fecal source isolates and unknown isolates from the stream were exposed to six antibiotics at three concentrations each. Discriminant analysis grouped known isolates with an overall average rate of correct classification (ARCC) of 84.3 %. A total of 401 isolates from the first stream location were classified as equine (45.9 %), sewage (39.4 %), waterfowl (6.2 %), and feline (8.5 %). A similar pattern was observed at the second sampling location, with 42.6 % equine, 45.2 % sewage, 2.8 % waterfowl, 0.6 % canine, and 8.8 % feline. While there were slight weather-dependent differences, the vast majority of the coliform pollution in this stream appeared to be from two sources, equine and sewage. This information will contribute to better land use decisions and further justify implementation of low-impact development practices within this urban watershed.

  18. Automated differential leukocyte counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, E E; Nashed, A; Spilove, L

    1989-01-01

    Automated differential counts have the advantage of precision, efficiency, safety, and economy. They could potentially serve effectively in 90 percent of patients with normal counts or in 75 percent of patients with anemia only (64 percent of the total in this study). Even patients with increased white blood cell counts and major population shifts (toward granulocytes or lymphocytes) could be followed with automated differential counts. Such a tactic would decrease turnaround time for results, be less expensive, and reduce exposure of technologists to direct contact with patients' blood. However, presently available instruments fail to detect patients' blood samples with small numbers of abnormal cells, e.g., blasts in early relapse of acute leukemia, atypical lymphocytes in viral diseases such as infectious mononucleosis, eosinophils in allergic or parasitic disease, and band forms in early infectious diseases. Clinical judgment should be used in selectively ordering manual differential counts for these patients. While automated differential counts can be very useful in screening general medical and surgical patients in the ambulatory setting, in referral centers where hematologic abnormalities are more prevalent, the manual differential count and further examination of a smear is particularly necessary at least on initial presentation. Selective manual differential counts may improve efficiency, economy, and safety while not compromising patient care. Further studies of the correlation of clinical disease with automated differential counts are necessary.

  19. Health Physics counting room

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1970-01-01

    The Health Physics counting room, where the quantity of induced radioactivity in materials is determined. This information is used to evaluate possible radiation hazards from the material investigated.

  20. Coliform density in oyster culture waters and its relationship with environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Mignani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the total and thermotolerant coliform densities in the oyster culture water of Cananeia, SP, Brazil, correlating these densities with environmental variables and tidal variations. Superficial water samples were collected in two tide conditions (spring and neap from three areas of Cananéia municipality (Mandira, Itapitangui and Cooperostra. The three studied areas showed good conditions for the culture regarding coliform densities. The two tidal conditions differed significantly as to total coliform concentration; however, the same procedure was not performed for thermotolerant coliforms. No correlation was observed between water temperature, pH, and concentrations of total and thermotolerant coliforms. Coliform density was positively correlated with rainfall and negatively correlated with salinity. Spring and neap tides differed significantly as to coliform number. Simple diagnosis of environmental conditions of the crop fields is insufficient to assess water quality of shellfish cultivation. A continuous monitoring program of planted areas is necessary both for the assessment of water quality potential for marine culture and for ensuring safe consumption of seafood, besides constituting an important tool to understand the relationships between contamination and the involved environmental variables.

  1. Enterococci vs coliforms as a possible fecal contamination indicator: baseline data for Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mushtaq; Rasool, Sheikh Ajaz; Khan, Muhammad Tanweer; Wajid, Abdul

    2007-04-01

    Fecal contamination of drinking water is the major cause of water borne illnesses. For long time coliforms are exploited as fecal contamination indicator. However, recent studies indicate low survival rate of coliforms in stress conditions, hence it's use as indicator of fecal pollution is being abandoned in many parts of the developed world. Implementation of such strategy demands availability of local data in the cities like Karachi. The present study provides a comparison between coliforms and enterococcal load and its variation in sewage samples collected (June, August and November, 2006) from eighteen towns of Karachi. All the diluted samples were selective media to obtain colony-forming units (CFU) mainly for coliforms and enterococci. The bacteria isolated were identified on the basis of conventional microbiological methods. Observations thus obtained were subjected to rigorous statistical analysis. The total load of enterococci was found in range of 1.27-8.47 X 10(7) as compared to coliforms (3.03-13.9 X 10(7)). However, segregation of data reveals greater inter town variability in CFU/ml both in coliforms and enterococci as suggested by their cumulative standard deviation +/-1.5 X 107. Furthermore, CFU/ml of both coliforms and enterococci also varies to variable scale when collected at different time intervals and at intra town level. Conclusively, the studies suggest high survival rate and lower variability of Enterococci compared to escherichia hence indicating its potential advantage to be used as fecal contamination indicator.

  2. Development of a Methodology for the Rapid Detection of Coliform Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-27

    and 563Y) using an eyepiece micrometer . Surfactants were also judged visibly in terms of desree of settling, flocculation, coalescence, and bulk phase...Independent control of individual flow rates was accomplished by means of flow loops, outfitted with vernier handled metering valves, and connected by T...settings were determined for each input stream using both deionized water and silicone oil to maintain a constant flow equilibrium. Vernier settings

  3. Environmental monitoring of bacterial contamination and antibiotic resistance patterns of the fecal coliforms isolated from Cauvery River, a major drinking water source in Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Mahajanakatti, Arpitha Badarinath; Grandhi, Nisha Jayaprakash; Prasanna, Akshatha; Sen, Ballari; Sharma, Narasimha; Vasist, Kiran S; Narayanappa, Rajeswari

    2015-05-01

    The present study focuses prudent elucidation of microbial pollution and antibiotic sensitivity profiling of the fecal coliforms isolated from River Cauvery, a major drinking water source in Karnataka, India. Water samples were collected from ten hotspots during the year 2011-2012. The physiochemical characteristics and microbial count of water samples collected from most of the hotspots exhibited greater biological oxygen demand and bacterial count especially coliforms in comparison with control samples (p ≤ 0.01). The antibiotic sensitivity testing was performed using 48 antibiotics against the bacterial isolates by disk-diffusion assay. The current study showed that out of 848 bacterial isolates, 93.51% (n = 793) of the isolates were found to be multidrug-resistant to most of the current generation antibiotics. Among the major isolates, 96.46% (n = 273) of the isolates were found to be multidrug-resistant to 30 antibiotics and they were identified to be Escherichia coli by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Similarly, 93.85% (n = 107), 94.49% (n = 103), and 90.22% (n = 157) of the isolates exhibited multiple drug resistance to 32, 40, and 37 antibiotics, and they were identified to be Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas trivialis, and Shigella sonnei, respectively. The molecular studies suggested the prevalence of bla TEM genes in all the four isolates and dhfr gene in Escherichia coli and Sh. sonnei. Analogously, most of the other Gram-negative bacteria were found to be multidrug-resistant and the Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus spp. isolated from the water samples were found to be methicillin and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This is probably the first study elucidating the bacterial pollution and antibiotic sensitivity profiling of fecal coliforms isolated from River Cauvery, Karnataka, India.

  4. EcoCount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip P. Allen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Techniques that analyze biological remains from sediment sequences for environmental reconstructions are well established and widely used. Yet, identifying, counting, and recording biological evidence such as pollen grains remain a highly skilled, demanding, and time-consuming task. Standard procedure requires the classification and recording of between 300 and 500 pollen grains from each representative sample. Recording the data from a pollen count requires significant effort and focused resources from the palynologist. However, when an adaptation to the recording procedure is utilized, efficiency and time economy improve. We describe EcoCount, which represents a development in environmental data recording procedure. EcoCount is a voice activated fully customizable digital count sheet that allows the investigator to continuously interact with a field of view during the data recording. Continuous viewing allows the palynologist the opportunity to remain engaged with the essential task, identification, for longer, making pollen counting more efficient and economical. EcoCount is a versatile software package that can be used to record a variety of environmental evidence and can be installed onto different computer platforms, making the adoption by users and laboratories simple and inexpensive. The user-friendly format of EcoCount allows any novice to be competent and functional in a very short time.

  5. Effect of different oral oxytetracycline treatment regimes on selection of antimicrobial resistant coliforms in nursery pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fresno, Ana Herrero; Zachariasen, Camilla; Norholm, Nanna

    2017-01-01

    A major concern derived from using antimicrobials in pig production is the development of resistance. This study aimed to assess the impact of selected combinations of oral dose and duration of treatment with oxytetracycline (OTC) on selection of tetracycline resistant (TET-R) coliforms recovered......, under field conditions. Statistical modeling was applied to analyze trends in the proportion of TET-R coliforms. In the experimental study, no statistical difference in proportion of TET-R coliforms was observed between treatments at the end of the trial (day 18) and compared to day 0. In the field...

  6. The Evolving Role of Coliforms as Indicators of Unhygienic Processing Conditions in Dairy Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole Helen Martin; Aljosa Trmčić; Tsung-Han Hsieh; Kathryn Boor; Martin Wiedmann

    2016-01-01

    Testing for coliforms has a long history in the dairy industry and has helped to identify raw milk and dairy products that may have been exposed to unsanitary conditions. Coliform standards are included in a number of regulatory documents (e.g., the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Grade “A” Pasteurized Milk Ordinance). As a consequence, detection above a threshold of members of this method-defined, but diverse, group of bacteria can result in a wide range of regulatory outcomes. Coliforms...

  7. Comparison and Recovery of Escherichia coli and Thermotolerant Coliforms in Water with a Chromogenic Medium Incubated at 41 and 44.5°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose L.; Soriano, Adela; Carbajo, Oscar; Amoros, Inmaculada; Garelick, Hemda

    1999-01-01

    This study compared the performance of a commercial chromogenic medium, CHROMagarECC (CECC), and CECC supplemented with sodium pyruvate (CECCP) with the membrane filtration lauryl sulfate-based medium (mLSA) for enumeration of Escherichia coli and non-E. coli thermotolerant coliforms (KEC). To establish that we could recover the maximum KEC and E. coli population, we compared two incubation temperature regimens, 41 and 44.5°C. Statistical analysis by the Fisher test of data did not demonstrate any statistically significant differences (P = 0.05) in the enumeration of E. coli for the different media (CECC and CECCP) and incubation temperatures. Variance analysis of data performed on KEC counts showed significant differences (P = 0.01) between KEC counts at 41 and 44.5°C on both CECC and CECCP. Analysis of variance demonstrated statistically significant differences (P = 0.05) in the enumeration of total thermotolerant coliforms (TTCs) on CECC and CECCP compared with mLSA. Target colonies were confirmed to be E. coli at a rate of 91.5% and KEC of likely fecal origin at a rate of 77.4% when using CECCP incubated at 41°C. The results of this study showed that CECCP agar incubated at 41°C is efficient for the simultaneous enumeration of E. coli and KEC from river and marine waters. PMID:10427079

  8. Beverages obtained from soda fountain machines in the U.S. contain microorganisms, including coliform bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Amy S; Godard, Renee D; Belling, Carolyn; Kasza, Victoria; Beach, Rebecca L

    2010-01-31

    Ninety beverages of three types (sugar sodas, diet sodas and water) were obtained from 20 self-service and 10 personnel-dispensed soda fountains, analyzed for microbial contamination, and evaluated with respect to U.S. drinking water regulations. A follow-up study compared the concentration and composition of microbial populations in 27 beverages collected from 9 soda fountain machines in the morning as well as in the afternoon. Ice dispensed from these machines was also examined for microbial contamination. While none of the ice samples exceeded U.S. drinking water standards, coliform bacteria was detected in 48% of the beverages and 20% had a heterotrophic plate count greater than 500cfu/ml. Statistical analyses revealed no difference in levels of microbial contamination between beverage types or between those dispensed from self-service and personnel-dispensed soda fountains. More than 11% of the beverages analyzed contained Escherichia coli and over 17% contained Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. Other opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms isolated from the beverages included species of Klebsiella, Staphylococcus, Stenotrophomonas, Candida, and Serratia. Most of the identified bacteria showed resistance to one or more of the 11 antibiotics tested. These findings suggest that soda fountain machines may harbor persistent communities of potentially pathogenic microorganisms which may contribute to episodic gastric distress in the general population and could pose a more significant health risk to immunocompromised individuals. These findings have important public health implications and signal the need for regulations enforcing hygienic practices associated with these beverage dispensers. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A Revised Total Coliform Rule Guide for Small Public Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document aims to assist small water systems serving 1,000 persons with fewer in complying with the requirements of the Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR). It is divided into four parts, Parts A, B, C and D.

  10. Revised Total Coliform Rule Implementation in Wyoming and Tribal Lands in EPA Region 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) aims to increase public health protection through the reduction of potential pathways for fecal contamination in the distribution system of a public water system (PWS).

  11. Memo Clarifying Requirements and State Reporting Guidance to Transition to the Revised Total Coliform Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    This memorandum provides guidance to primacy agencies with enforcement responsibility under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) concerning the requirements to transition public water systems (PWSs) from the Total Coliform Rule (TCR) to the RTCR

  12. Public Notification Instructions and Templates for the Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has developed public notification (PN) templates to help with implementation of the PN Rule. This document aims to assist water systems with the Public Notification requirements specific to the Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR).

  13. Coliform density in oyster culture waters and its relationship with environmental factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mignani, Luciene; Barbieri, Edison; Marques, Helcio Luis de Almeida; Oliveira, Ana Julia Fernandes Cardoso de

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the total and thermotolerant coliform densities in the oyster culture water of Cananeia, SP, Brazil, correlating these densities with environmental variables...

  14. Comparison of three different media for the detection of E. coli and coliforms in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, C; Volponi, G; Bonadonna, L

    2006-01-01

    The European Drinking Water Directive defines reference methods for the enumeration of microbiological parameters in drinking water. The method to be used for Escherichia coli and coliforms is the membrane filtration technique on Lactose TTC agar with Tergitol 7. Many technical drawbacks of the procedure, as well as its limitations regarding the recent taxonomy of coliforms, make it necessary to evaluate alternative methods. Two alternative assays, a chromogenic media (m-ColiBlu24) and a defined substrate technology-DST test (Colilert 18/Quanty Tray) were compared with the ISO standard with attention to the phenotypic characteristic of the isolates. Results showed that the ISO method failed to detect an important percentage of coliforms and E. coli while m-ColiBlu24 and Colilert 18 provided results in a shorter time allowing the simultaneous detection of E. coli and coliforms with no further confirmation steps.

  15. Fecal coliform contamination: a literature review and case history analysis in B.C.

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levitan, C.W

    1991-01-01

    .... Since the early 1900s, fecal coliforms, normal bacterial inhabitants of the gastro- intestinal tract of warm blooded animals, have been used to indicate the presence of fecal contamination in water...

  16. Evaluation of Colilert-18 for the detection of coliforms and Escherichia coli in tropical fresh water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    W L Chao

    2006-01-01

    ...%, respectively, while for coliform detection the false-positive rate was 10.3%. Significance and Impact of the Study: The high false-positive rate of Colilert18, tempers its value for E. coli detect...

  17. 75 FR 49930 - Stakeholder Meeting Regarding Re-Evaluation of Currently Approved Total Coliform Analytical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... use in evaluation of method performance, setting method performance acceptance criteria, and/or... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Stakeholder Meeting Regarding Re-Evaluation of Currently Approved Total Coliform Analytical...

  18. Pengaruh Penambahan Zeolit pada Proses Pelletizing Limbah Penetasan Terhadap Kandungan Coliform dan Salmonella Produk Pellet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiar Ali Wardana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK. Penelitian untuk mengkajipengaruh penambahan zeolit pada proses pelletizing limbah penetasan, terhadap total Coliform dan Salmonella,telah dilaksanakan di Laboratorium Teknologi Pakan, Fakultas Peternakan dan Pertanian, Universitas Diponegoro. Zeolit dilaporkan mampu mengikat berbagai senyawa kimia, termasuk senyawa beracun, serta mampu mempengaruhi aktivitas mikrobia. Penambahan zeolit dalam pelletizing limbah penetasan diharapkan mampu menurunkan total Coliform dan Salmonella dalam produk pellet, sehingga dapat meningkatkan keamanan produk pellet sebagai bahan pakan alternatif. Dosis penambahan zeolit pada pembuatan pellet yaitu: 0, 2, 4 dan 6%. Data dianalisis dengan analisis ragam dan dilanjutkan dengan uji jarak berganda Duncan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan penambahan zeolit dalam proses Pelletizing limbah penetasan berpengaruh sangat nyata (P<0,01 terhadap penurunan total Coliform. Peningkatan dosis zeolite dapat menurunkan Total Coliform dan bakteri Salmonella tidak terdekteksi pada pellet limbah penetasan. Dapat disimpulkan bahwa pelletizing limbah penetasan dengan dosis zeolit hingga 6% terbuktimampu menurunkan kandungan Coliform dan Salmonella pada produk pellet.    (Effect administering zeolite in the pelletizing of hatchery waste to contents of coliform and salmonella of the pellet products  ABSTRACT. Experiment to study effect of administering zeolite in the pelletizing hatchery wastes on the total Coliform and Salmonella was done in the Laboratory of Feed Technology, Faculty of Animal Science and Agriculture, University of Diponegoro. Zeolite has been reported have binding capacity on wide range of chemicals, including toxic compounds, and interfere the activity of microbes. Administration zeolite in the pelletizing of hatchery wastes are expected to reduce the total Coliform and Salmonella in the pellet products, therefore improved the safety of the pellet products as an alternative feed ingredients. Doses of zeolite

  19. Increasing Efficiency of Fecal Coliform Testing Through EPA-Approved Alternate Method Colilert*-18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The 21 SM 9221 E multiple-tube fermentation method for fecal coliform analysis requires a large time and reagent investment for the performing laboratory. In late 2010, the EPA approved an alternative procedure for the determination of fecal coliforms designated as Colilert*-18. However, as of late 2016, only two VELAP-certified laboratories in the Commonwealth of Virginia have been certified in this method.

  20. Comparison of four membrane filter methods for fecal coliform enumeration in tropical waters.

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago-Mercado, J; Hazen, T C

    1987-01-01

    Four membrane filter methods for the enumeration of fecal coliforms were compared for accuracy, specificity, and recovery. Water samples were taken several times from 13 marine, 1 estuarine, and 4 freshwater sites around Puerto Rico, from pristine waters and waters receiving treated and untreated sewage and effluent from a tuna cannery and a rum distillery. Differences of 1 to 3 orders of magnitude in the levels of fecal coliforms were observed in some samples by different recovery techniques...

  1. Housing Inventory Count

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the data communities reported to HUD about the nature of their dedicated homeless inventory, referred to as their Housing Inventory Count (HIC)....

  2. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... out why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe ...

  3. Allegheny County Traffic Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Traffic sensors at over 1,200 locations in Allegheny County collect vehicle counts for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Data included in the Health...

  4. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 59K ...

  5. Clean Hands Count

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  6. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also ... views 3:56 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History ...

  7. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also ... 3:56 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History Help ...

  8. White Blood Cell Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acidosis and Alkalosis Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison Disease Alcoholism Allergies Alzheimer Disease Anemia Angina Ankylosing Spondylitis Anthrax ... smoking status. It is not uncommon for the elderly to fail to develop high WBC count ( leukocytosis ) ...

  9. Calorie count - fast food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000887.htm Calorie count - fast food To use the sharing features on this page, ... Nutrition Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  10. Clean Hands Count

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  11. Clean Hands Count

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  12. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 61K Loading... ...

  13. Reticulocyte Count Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain clinical conditions and in assessing iron deficiency anemia in children. Can the reticulocyte count be done on the ... Irwin, J. and Kirchner, J. (2001 October 15). Anemia in Children. American Family Physician [On-line journal]. Available online ...

  14. Prevalence of bacterial contamination with antibiotic-resistant and enterotoxigenic fecal coliforms in treated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, S P; Gopal, K

    2008-01-01

    Pollution indicator bacteria such as coliforms, fecal coliforms, and fecal streptococci were enumerated using a multiple-tube fermentation method in 100 treated drinking-water samples from 20 locations in residential, commercial, and industrial areas of a tropical city during summer. Thirty-four percent of the samples were bacteriologically nonpotable. Maximum coliform-contaminated (27%) samples were derived from industrial areas, while samples contaminated with fecal coliform (23%) and fecal streptococci (20%) originated from commercial areas. Coliforms identified as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Enterobacter sp., and Citrobacter sp. were present in 29%, 26%, 24%, and 15% of samples, respectively. Fecal coliforms were examined for antibiotic susceptibility with disc diffusion method. All test isolates exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) for kanamycin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, and trimethoprim. Escherichia coli isolates were examined for enterotoxigenicity using the suckling mice bioassay and 60% of the isolates displayed enterotoxigenicity. Data indicate that drinking water contaminated with antibiotic-resistant enterotoxigenic fecal bacteria may be responsible for presence of waterborne diarrheal diseases attributed to therapeutic agents used by urban populations in the tropics.

  15. Coliforms removal in full-scale activated sludge plants in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmi, A A; Tyagi, V K; Trivedi, R C; Kumar, Arvind

    2008-05-01

    This paper investigates the removal of coliforms in full-scale activated sludge plants (ASP) operating in northern regions of India. Log2.2 and log2.4 removal were observed for total coliforms (TC) and fecal coliforms (FC), respectively. However, the effluent still contained a significant number of TC and FC which was greater than the permissible limit for unrestricted irrigation as prescribed by WHO. The observations also suggest that extended aeration (EA) process operating under high mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) and sludge retention time (SRT) is more efficient in the removal of coliforms. Further attempts have been made to establish the relationship between two key wastewater parameters, i.e. biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and suspended solids (SS) with respect to fecal and TC. The relationships were observed to be linear with a good coefficient of correlation. The interrelationship of BOD and SS with coliforms manifest that improvement of the microbiological quality of wastewater could be linked with the removal of SS. Therefore, SS can serve as a regulatory tool in lieu of an explicit coliforms standard.

  16. [Alternative test for detection of coliforms bacteria in manually expressed human milk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Franz R; de Almeida, João Aprígio Guerra

    2002-01-01

    To compare an alternative method to the most probable number (MPN) test for the detection of total coliform present in manually expressed human milk. 343 samples of manually expressed human milk from flasks donated to the Human Milk Bank of Instituto Fernandes Figueira--IFF were sent to the Laboratory of Food Control of IFF. The samples were used for comparing both methods, i.e., the most probable number (MPN) method, as described in the "Standard methods for the examination of dairy products", and the alternative method. Coliforms were detected in 31.2% of the samples analyzed, with populations ranging from 3.0 x 10(0) to 1.1 x 10(4) total coliform MPN/mL. The comparison between classical and alternative methods showed similar results regarding the presence of coliform microorganisms in expressed human milk samples. The alternative method detected the presence of total coliform in all contaminated and in four noncontaminated samples according to the MNP method. The alternative test allows the detection of the presence or absence of coliforms and it is useful for the quality control of pasteurized flasks containing manually expressed human milk manipulated at human milk banks. Therefore, we conclude that the alternative test can be used in the routine of human milk banks as a substitute for the MNP method, since its cost is equivalent to 1/7 of the cost of the traditional method.

  17. Incidence of Faecal coliforms Isolated From Different Foods Sold ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty-six (66) food products and ten water samples were collected from food vendors and restaurants and examined for bacteriological quality using both the most probable number (MPN) technique and the plate count of Escherichia coli on Eosin Ethylene Blue (EMB) and lactose fermenters on MacConkey agar. All results ...

  18. Arsenic presence and coliforms in drinking water of the Tecuala municipality, Nayarit, Mexico; Presencia de arsenico y coliformes en agua potable del municipio de Tecuala, Nayarit, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora B, D.; Gonzalez A, C. A.; Medina D, I. M.; Robledo M, M. L.; Rojas G, A. E. [Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Secretaria de Investigacion y Posgrado, Ciudad de la Cultura Amado Nervo, 63155 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Sanchez P, L. C.; Del Razo, L. M., E-mail: aerg81@gmail.com [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Departamento de Toxicologia, Av. IPN No. 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    Total arsenic concentrations (t As) and the presence of total and fecal coliforms in drinking water from Tecuala, Nayarit, Mexico, were determined. The presence of t As was analyzed by means of hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Total and fecal coliforms were determined through the Most Probable Number (MPN) method. According to the results, the mean concentration of t As in Tecuala wa 15.82 {mu}g/L, in Atotonilco 19.88 {mu}g/L, in Pajaritos 21.49 {mu}g/L, in Quimichis 17.80 {mu}g/L, and in Playas de Novillero 19.79 {mu}g/L. The t As concentrations in drinking water from Tecuala, Nayarit, are within the limit set by the Mexican official standards (25 {mu}g/L); still, they are over the limit established by the World Health Organization (10 {mu}g/L). The concentration of coliforms in water from wells 1 and 3 was 180 MPN/100 ml and 43 MPN/100 ml for well water 2. The presence of total and fecal coliforms, suggest the infiltration of sewage which could increase the levels of dissolved arsenic. The results of this study will serve as an antecedent of the water quality in Tecuala, Nayarit. (Author)

  19. Detecção de emissão espontânea de luz em ensaios de colimetria aplicados ao monitoramento de efluentes sanitários Spontaneous light emission in coliforms test applied to wastewater monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ricardo dos Santos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho avaliou-se o potencial do emprego da técnica biofotônica ao monitoramento da qualidade microbiológica de efluentes sanitários, por meio da detecção de emissão ultrafraca de luz em testes envolvendo bactéria do grupo coliforme. Foram acompanhados os padrões de emissão de luz em câmara escura com o uso de efluente doméstico, antes e após tratamento, incubados em meio nutritivo à base de lactose e lauril triptose. O controle foi efetuado com o uso de cepa de Escherichia coli (ATCC 25.922, tendo seu crescimento sido monitorado por emissão de luz em câmara escura com fotomultiplicador acoplado. Os dados demonstraram que o monitoramento microbiológico pode ser efetuado por meio técnica biofotônica, podendo ser aplicado, com respostas rápidas, ao monitoramento microbiológico de efluentes, por meio de testes envolvendo coliformes.The spontaneous light emission of living systems emerge as a promising methodology that applied to microbiological in monitoring water can lead to short-term analysis. The present study evaluated the potential of biophoton measurements applied to wastewater monitoring by using ultraweak light emission in coliform tests. The procedure is based on photon-counting measurements inside a dark-chamber, of wastewater samples, before and after treatment, inoculated in nutrient presence/absence medium (lactose and lauryl triptose broth. Strain of Escherichia coli (ATCC 25,922 was used in control tests by monitoring the light emission inside a dark-chamber with an acoplade photomultiplier. The data showed that microbiological monitoring can be done by photon-counting in real-time applied to microbiological wastewater monitoring using coliform test.

  20. Rainflow counting revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeker, H. [Deutsches Windenergie-Institut (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    As state of the art method the rainflow counting technique is presently applied everywhere in fatigue analysis. However, the author feels that the potential of the technique is not fully recognized in wind energy industries as it is used, most of the times, as a mere data reduction technique disregarding some of the inherent information of the rainflow counting results. The ideas described in the following aim at exploitation of this information and making it available for use in the design and verification process. (au)

  1. Carriage and fecal counts of cefotaxime M-producing Escherichia coli in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Katrine Hartung; Damborg, Peter Panduro; Andreasen, Margit

    2013-01-01

    , and finishers). Cefotaxime (CTX)-resistant coliforms in feces were counted on MacConkey agar containing 2 µg/ml CTX and characterized for the presence of ESBL-encoding genes by PCR and sequencing. CTX-M-positive pigs were detected in all age groups at farms A (bla(CTX-M-9) group, compatible with bla(CTX-M-14......% just before weaning, 29% during weaning, and 12% during finishing. The observed reduction in numbers of CTX-M-positive pigs was accompanied by a significant reduction in mean fecal counts of CTX-resistant coliforms from ~10(7) CFU/g in piglets to ~10(3) CFU/g in finishers (P

  2. Effect of growth conditions and substratum composition on the persistence of coliforms in mixed-population biofilms.

    OpenAIRE

    Camper, A K; Jones, W L; Hayes, J T

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory reactors operated under oligotrophic conditions were used to evaluate the importance of initial growth rate and substratum composition on the long-term persistence of coliforms in mixed-population biofilms. The inoculum growth rate had a dramatic effect on the ability of coliforms to remain on surfaces. The most slowly grown coliforms (mu = 0.05/h) survived at the highest cell concentration. Antibody staining revealed that Klebsiella pneumoniae existed primarily as discrete microco...

  3. Comparison of the hydrophobic-grid membrane filter procedure and standard methods for coliform analysis of water.

    OpenAIRE

    McDaniels, A E; Bordner, R. H.; Menkedick, J R; Weber, C I

    1987-01-01

    The hydrophobic-grid membrane filter (HGMF) has been proposed as an alternate method to the standard membrane filter (MF) procedure for the detection and enumeration of coliforms from water. Eight samples of nonchlorinated wastewater effluents were analyzed by the HGMF, standard MF, and tube fermentation most-probable-number methods for fecal coliforms, and eight samples each of polluted surface and dosed drinking waters were analyzed by the same methods for total coliforms. The drinking wate...

  4. Optical planar waveguide for cell counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, John; Mueller, Andrew J.; Prinz, Adrian; Butte, Manish J.

    2012-01-01

    Low cost counting of cells has medical applications in screening, military medicine, disaster medicine, and rural healthcare. In this report, we present a shallow, buried, planar waveguide fabricated by potassium ion exchange in glass that enables low-cost and rapid counting of metal-tagged objects that lie in the evanescent field of the waveguide. Laser light transmitted through the waveguide was attenuated proportionately to the presence of metal-coated microstructures fabricated from photoresist. This technology enables the low-cost enumeration of cells from blood, urine, or other biofluids.

  5. Patterns and sources of fecal coliform bacteria in three streams in Virginia, 1999-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Kenneth; Moyer, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Surface-water impairment by fecal coliform bacteria is a water-quality issue of national scope and importance. In Virginia, more than 175 stream segments are on the Commonwealth's 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of elevated concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria. These fecal coliform-impaired stream segments require the development of total maximum daily load (TMDL) and associated implementation plans, but accurate information on the sources contributing these bacteria usually is lacking. The development of defendable fecal coliform TMDLs and management plans can benefit from reliable information on the bacteria sources that are responsible for the impairment. Bacterial source tracking (BST) recently has emerged as a powerful tool for identifying the sources of fecal coliform bacteria that impair surface waters. In a demonstration of BST technology, three watersheds on Virginia's 1998 303(d) list with diverse land-use practices (and potentially diverse bacteria sources) were studied. Accotink Creek is dominated by urban land uses, Christians Creek by agricultural land uses, and Blacks Run is affected by both urban and agricultural land uses. During the 20-month field study (March 1999?October 2000), water samples were collected from each stream during a range of flow conditions and seasons. For each sample, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen concentration, pH, turbidity, flow, and water temperature were measured. Fecal coliform concentrations of each water sample were determined using the membrane filtration technique. Next, Escherichia coli (E. coli) were isolated from the fecal coliform bacteria and their sources were identified using ribotyping (a method of 'genetic fingerprinting'). Study results provide enhanced understanding of the concentrations and sources of fecal coliform bacteria in these three watersheds. Continuum sampling (sampling along the length of the streams) indicated that elevated concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria

  6. Coliform detection in cheese is associated with specific cheese characteristics, but no association was found with pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trmčić, A; Chauhan, K; Kent, D J; Ralyea, R D; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2016-08-01

    Coliform detection in finished products, including cheese, has traditionally been used to indicate whether a given product has been manufactured under unsanitary conditions. As our understanding of the diversity of coliforms has improved, it is necessary to assess whether coliforms are a good indicator organism and whether coliform detection in cheese is associated with the presence of pathogens. The objective of this study was (1) to evaluate cheese available on the market for presence of coliforms and key pathogens, and (2) to characterize the coliforms present to assess their likely sources and public health relevance. A total of 273 cheese samples were tested for presence of coliforms and for Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and other Listeria species. Among all tested cheese samples, 27% (75/273) tested positive for coliforms in concentrations >10cfu/g. Pasteurization, pH, water activity, milk type, and rind type were factors significantly associated with detection of coliforms in cheese; for example, a higher coliform prevalence was detected in raw milk cheeses (42% with >10cfu/g) compared with pasteurized milk cheese (21%). For cheese samples contaminated with coliforms, only water activity was significantly associated with coliform concentration. Coliforms isolated from cheese samples were classified into 13 different genera, including the environmental coliform genera Hafnia, Raoultella, and Serratia, which represent the 3 genera most frequently isolated across all cheeses. Escherichia, Hafnia, and Enterobacter were significantly more common among raw milk cheeses. Based on sequencing of the housekeeping gene clpX, most Escherichia isolates were confirmed as members of fecal commensal clades of E. coli. All cheese samples tested negative for Salmonella, Staph. aureus, and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli. Listeria spp. were found in 12 cheese samples, including 5 samples positive for L

  7. Control of coliform bacteria detected from diarrhea associated patients by extracts of Moringa oleifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Rahman, M M; Akhter, S; Jamal, M A H M; Pandeya, D R; Haque, M A; Alam, M F; Rahman, A

    2010-03-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the total population of coliform bacteria in the samples collected from diarrhea associated patients from the local area of Bangladesh and to examine the antibacterial efficacy of leaf extracts of Moringa oleifera (Moringaceae) against the isolated coliform bacteria. The coliform bacteria detected in these samples by some microbial-biochemical tests such as Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella sp., Enterobacter sp., Klebsiella pneumoniae and Serratia marcescens. The total isolation rate of coliform bacterial species was ranged from 38.01-3.51%. At the concentration of 300 ig/disc, the organic extracts of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Moringa oleifera leaf exhibited a remarkable antibacterial effect against all the tested bacterial pathogens. The zones of inhibition against all the tested bacterial pathogens were found in the range of 8.0 to 23.2 mm, along with their respective minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 62.5-1000 ig/mL. The results obtained in this study suggest that the extracts from Moringa oleifera leaf can be a source of natural antimicrobials with potential applications in pharmaceutical industry to control coliform bacteria.

  8. Removal of total coliform and E. coli using zeliac as filter media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nurazim; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian

    2017-10-01

    High loading of wastewater and surface run off into river contributed to large amount of microorganisms entering drinking water sources. The aim of this study was to investigate the capability of composite adsorbent namely Zeliac to remove total coliform and E. coli from river water using fixed bed column experiment. Two ranges of Zeliac particle sizes (1.18- 2 mm and 0.425- 0.6 mm) were applied to observe the effect of particle size on the removal of the selected pollutants. Kerian River water with a total coliform and E. coli concentration of 14, 082 ± 4, 209 and 208 ± 166 MPN/100 mL respectively was continuously supplied to the column at constant flow rate of 20 (Column A) and 21 ml/min (Column B) for 991 hours. The presence of total coliform and E. coli in the treated water were detected using Colilert test kit from IDEXX Corporation. The performance of Zeliac as filter media was analysed by a breakthrough curve plotted from normalized concentration (C/Co) against time. It was discovered that a difference in particle size does not give a significant impact to the removal of total coliform and E. coli in this system. According to the plotted breakthrough curves, Zeliac as filter media was capable to immobilize total coliform and E. coli for up to 31 hours of contact time. This finding shows that Zeliac has the potential to retain pathogenic microorganism such as E. coli in a continuous fluid flow.

  9. Handling may cause increased shedding of Escherichia coli and total coliforms in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Scot E; Callaway, Todd R; Morrow-Tesch, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Many common management practices such as transportation, weaning, handling, and changes in social groups are stressful to animals. The effects of stressors on the intestinal microbial ecosystem are still being investigated. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of handling on naturally occurring intestinal populations of Escherichia coli and total coliforms in swine. Finishing pigs were subjected to repeated handling, in which they were removed from their pens each day, moved down an alley to a scale, weighed individually, and moved back to their pens. This procedure was performed with the control groups once at the beginning and once at the end of the study, while treatment groups were herded and weighed each day for 8 days. Most probable numbers (MPN)/g of E. coli (a subset of the coliform group) and total coliforms were measured daily for treatment and control groups. Using repeated measures analyses, increased MPN/g of feces, for both E. coli and total coliforms, were seen in the treatment groups compared to the control groups (P coliforms, possibly due to stress, and these populations of bacteria may have potential utility as inexpensive, noninvasive indicators of handling-related stress in pigs.

  10. Coliforms removal by an integrated activated sludge-maturation pond system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher Miranzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study assesses the removal of fecal indicators (i.e., total coliforms, fecal coliforms in a full-scale activated sludge and maturation pond system with primary screening facility that is operating in center of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 grab samples for microbiological test were collected from the inlet and outlet of activated sludge (AS and maturation pond (MP during the winter and summer 2010 (3 sample per month in 3 locations. Collected samples were sent to laboratory and were analyzed for total coliformbacteria (TCB and fecal coliform bacteria (FCB according to Standard Methods. Results: The results of this study show that the maximum TCB removal in AS (92.2% and MP (99.2% were occurred in summer. Also, for FCB, the highest removal rate (99.7% was recorded during the summer. The mean winter TCB numbers for AS and MP effluents were 2.7 × 10 7 and 2.3 × 10 6 (MPN per 100 ml, respectively. However, the effluent still contained a significant number of coliforms, which was greater than the permissible limit for unrestricted irrigation as prescribed by Iranian and WHO guidelines. Conclusion: Removal efficiencies of fecal indicator bacteria were maximum during summer and minimum during winter. Statistical analysis indicated that TCB and FCB removal in MP is significantly affected by ambient temperature, whereas there was weak correlation between ambient temperature and coliform removal in AS system.

  11. What Counts as Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Each disciplinary community has its own criteria for determining what counts as evidence of knowledge in their academic field. The criteria influence the ways that a community's knowledge is created, communicated, and evaluated. Situating reading, writing, and language instruction within the content areas enables teachers to explicitly…

  12. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also aims to address myths and misperceptions ... views 3:56 Creative Communication - LifeBouy Hand Washing Campaign - Duration: 2:08. LIQVD ASIA 15,338 views ...

  13. Platelet Count and Plateletcrit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine whether platelet count, plateletcrit (PCT), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width. (PDW) and their ratios can predict mortality in hospitalised children. Methods: Children who died during hospital stay were the cases. Controls were age matched children admitted contempora- neously.

  14. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... starting stop Loading... Watch Queue Queue __count__/__total__ Music makes for happy holidays Loading... Even the scrooges ... smile at 3 free months of ad-free music with YouTube Red. Working... No thanks Try it ...

  15. What Counts as Prostitution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart P. Green

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available What counts, or should count, as prostitution? In the criminal law today, prostitution is understood to involve the provision of sexual services in exchange for money or other benefits. But what exactly is a ‘sexual service’? And what exactly is the nature of the required ‘exchange’? The key to answering these questions is to recognize that how we choose to define prostitution will inevitably depend on why we believe one or more aspects of prostitution are wrong or harmful, or should be criminalized or otherwise deterred, in the first place. These judgements, in turn, will often depend on an assessment of the contested empirical evidence on which they rest. This article describes a variety of real-world contexts in which the ‘what counts as prostitution’ question has arisen, surveys a range of leading rationales for deterring prostitution, and demonstrates how the answer to the definition question depends on the answer to the normative question. The article concludes with some preliminary thoughts on how analogous questions about what should count as sexual conduct arise in the context of consensual offences such as adultery and incest, as well as non-consensual offences such as sexual assault.

  16. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in to report inappropriate content. Sign in Transcript Statistics Add translations 30,667 views 113 Like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 114 2 Don't like this video? Sign in to ...

  17. A new membrane filtration medium for simultaneous detection and enumeration of Escherichia coli and total coliforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, M A

    1997-09-01

    Recovery of total coliforms and Escherichia coli on a new membrane filtration (MF) medium was evaluated with 25 water samples from seven states. Testing of the new medium, m-ColiBlue24 broth, was conducted according to a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency protocol. For comparison, this same protocol was used to measure recovery of total coliforms and E. coli with two standard MF media, m-Endo broth and mTEC broth. E. coli recovery on the new medium was also compared to recovery on nutrient agar supplemented with 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide. Comparison of specificity, sensitivity, false positive error, undetected target error, and overall agreement indicated E. coli recovery on m-ColiBlue24 was superior to recovery on mTEC for all five parameters. Recovery of total coliforms on the new medium was comparable to recovery on m-Endo.

  18. Sub electron readout noise & photon counting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, J.-L.; Balard, Ph.; Daigle, O.; Destefanis, G.; Feautrier, Ph.; Guillaume, Ch.; Rothman, J.

    We present recent advances on ultra low noise visible detectors at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, photon counting and EMCCD developments in collaboration with Observatoire de haute provence, Laboratoire d'astrophysique de l'observatoire de Grenoble and Laboratoire d'Astrophysique Experimentale (Montreal). After a review of the progress with third generation Image Photon Counting Systems (IPCS), we present the OCAM camera, based on the E2V CCD220 EMCCD, part of the Opticon JRA2 programme, and the CCCP controller, a new controller for the 3DNTT instrument that reduces the clock induced charge of an EMCCD by a factor 10, making it competitive with IPCS detectors for very faint fluxes. We will finally present the RAPID project and the concept of photon counting avalanche photodiode CMOS device (in collaboration with CEA-LETI) which is foreseen to be the ultimate detector for the visible-IR range providing no readout noise, high QE and extremely fast readout.

  19. Molecular method for detection of total coliforms in drinking water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, Andrée F; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bisson, Marc-Antoine; Dion-Dupont, Vanessa; Bouchard, Sébastien; Nkuranga, Martine; Bergeron, Michel G; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2014-07-01

    This work demonstrates the ability of a bacterial concentration and recovery procedure combined with three different PCR assays targeting the lacZ, wecG, and 16S rRNA genes, respectively, to detect the presence of total coliforms in 100-ml samples of potable water (presence/absence test). PCR assays were first compared to the culture-based Colilert and MI agar methods to determine their ability to detect 147 coliform strains representing 76 species of Enterobacteriaceae encountered in fecal and environmental settings. Results showed that 86 (58.5%) and 109 (74.1%) strains yielded a positive signal with Colilert and MI agar methods, respectively, whereas the lacZ, wecG, and 16S rRNA PCR assays detected 133 (90.5%), 111 (75.5%), and 146 (99.3%) of the 147 total coliform strains tested. These assays were then assessed by testing 122 well water samples collected in the Québec City region of Canada. Results showed that 97 (79.5%) of the samples tested by culture-based methods and 95 (77.9%), 82 (67.2%), and 98 (80.3%) of samples tested using PCR-based methods contained total coliforms, respectively. Consequently, despite the high genetic variability of the total coliform group, this study demonstrated that it is possible to use molecular assays to detect total coliforms in potable water: the 16S rRNA molecular assay was shown to be as efficient as recommended culture-based methods. This assay might be used in combination with an Escherichia coli molecular assay to assess drinking water quality. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Enumeration and Identification of Coliform Bacteria Injured by Chlorine or Fungicide Mixed with Agricultural Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hidemi; Nakata, Yuji; Inoue, Ayano

    2016-10-01

    Chemical sanitizers may induce no injury (bacteria survive), sublethal injury (bacteria are injured), or lethal injury (bacteria die). The proportion of coliform bacteria that were injured sublethally by chlorine and fungicide mixed with agricultural water (pond water), which was used to dilute the pesticide solution, was evaluated using the thin agar layer (TAL) method. In pure cultures of Enterobacter cloacae , Escherichia coli , and E. coli O157:H7 (representing a human pathogen), the percentage of chlorine-injured cells was 69 to 77% for dilute electrolyzed water containing an available chlorine level of 2 ppm. When agricultural water was mixed with electrolyzed water, the percentage of injured coliforms in agricultural water was 75%. The isolation and identification of bacteria on TAL and selective media suggested that the chlorine stress caused injury to Enterobacter kobei . Of the four fungicide products tested, diluted to their recommended concentrations, Topsin-M, Sumilex, and Oxirane caused injury to coliform bacteria in pure cultures and in agricultural water following their mixture with each pesticide, whereas Streptomycin did not induce any injury to the bacteria. The percentage of injury was 45 to 97% for Topsin-M, 80 to 87% for Sumilex, and 50 to 97% for Oxirane. A comparison of the coliforms isolated from the pesticide solutions and then grown on either TAL or selective media indicated the possibility of fungicide-injured Rahnella aquatilis , Yersinia mollaretii , and E. coli . These results suggest the importance of selecting a suitable sanitizer and the necessity of adjusting the sanitizer concentration to a level that will kill the coliforms rather than cause sanitizer-induced cell injury that can result in the recovery of the coliforms.

  1. Comparison of four membrane filter methods for fecal coliform enumeration in tropical waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Mercado, J; Hazen, T C

    1987-12-01

    Four membrane filter methods for the enumeration of fecal coliforms were compared for accuracy, specificity, and recovery. Water samples were taken several times from 13 marine, 1 estuarine, and 4 freshwater sites around Puerto Rico, from pristine waters and waters receiving treated and untreated sewage and effluent from a tuna cannery and a rum distillery. Differences of 1 to 3 orders of magnitude in the levels of fecal coliforms were observed in some samples by different recovery techniques. Marine water samples gave poorer results, in terms of specificity, selectivity, and comparability, than freshwater samples for all four fecal coliform methods used. The method using Difco m-FC agar with a resuscitation step gave the best overall results; however, even this method gave higher false-positive error, higher undetected-target error, lower selectivity, and higher recovery of nontarget organisms than the method using MacConkey membrane broth, the worst method for temperate waters. All methods tested were unacceptable for the enumeration of fecal coliforms in tropical fresh and marine waters. Thus, considering the high densities of fecal coliforms observed at most sites in Puerto Rico by all these methods, it would seem that these density estimates are, in many cases, grossly overestimating the degree of recent fecal contamination. Since Escherichia coli appears to be a normal inhabitant of tropical waters, fecal contamination may be indicated when none is present. Using fecal coliforms as an indicator is grossly inadequate for the detection of recent human fecal contamination and associated pathogens in both marine and fresh tropical waters.

  2. Teste alternativo para detecção de coliformes em leite humano ordenhado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak Franz R.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: comparar um método alternativo com o teste do número mais provável (NMP para detecção de coliformes totais em leite humano ordenhado. Métodos: 343 amostras de leite humano ordenhado, obtidas a partir de frascos oriundos de coleta domiciliar, recebidas pelo Banco de Leite Humano do Instituto Fernandes Figueira - IFF, por doadoras previamente orientadas, foram encaminhadas ao laboratório de controle de alimentos do IFF e empregadas na comparação de dois métodos: 1 - técnica do número mais provável, conforme descrito no Standard methods for the examination of dairy products; 2 - método alternativo proposto. Resultados: os microorganismos do grupo coliformes foram detectados em 31,2% das amostras analisadas, com populações variando de 3,0 x 100 a 1,1 x 104 coliformes totais N.M.P/ml. A comparação do teste clássico com o alternativo revelou resultados semelhantes quanto à recuperação de microorganismos coliformes em amostras de leite humano ordenhado. O método alternativo detectou a presença de coliformes totais em todas as amostras contaminadas e em quatro amostras não contaminadas, segundo o teste de NMP. Conclusão: o teste alternativo permite constatar a presença ou ausência de coliformes, tornando-se útil no controle de qualidade dos frascos de leite humano ordenhado pasteurizados, manipulados nos bancos de leite humano. Portanto, o teste de NMP pode ser substituído pelo teste alternativo, que poderá ser empregado como rotina nos bancos de leite humano, já que seu custo equivale a 1/7 do tradicional.

  3. Matrix Extension Study: Validation of the Compact Dry EC Method for Enumeration of Escherichia coli and non-E. coli Coliform Bacteria in Selected Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuochi, Shingo; Nelson, Maria; Baylis, Chris; Green, Becky; Jewell, Keith; Monadjemi, Farinaz; Chen, Yi; Salfinger, Yvonne; Fernandez, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Dry "Nissui" EC method, originally certified by the AOAC Research Institute Performance Test Method(SM) program for enumeration of Escherichia coli and non-E. coli coliforms in raw meat products (Performance Tested Method(SM) 110402), has undergone an evaluation to extend the method's claim to cooked chicken, prewashed bagged shredded iceberg lettuce, frozen cod filets, instant nonfat dry milk powder, and pasteurized milk (2% fat). Compact Dry EC is a ready-to-use dry media sheet containing a cold-soluble gelling agent, selective agents, and a chromogenic medium, which are rehydrated by adding 1 mL diluted sample. E. coli form blue/blue-purple colonies, whereas other coliform bacteria form red/pink colonies. Users can obtain an E. coli count (blue/blue-purple colonies only) and a total coliform count (red/pink plus blue/blue-purple colonies) after 24 ± 2 h of incubation at 37 ± 1°C. The matrix extension study was organized by Campden BRI (formerly Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association Technology, Ltd), Chipping Campden, United Kingdom. Method comparison data for cooked chicken, prewashed bagged shredded iceberg lettuce, frozen cod filets, and instant nonfat dry milk powder were collected in a single-laboratory evaluation by Campden BRI. A multilaboratory study was conducted on pasteurized milk (2% fat), with 13 laboratories participating. The Compact Dry EC method was compared to ISO 16649-2:2001 "Microbiology of food and animal feeding stuffs-Horizontal method for the enumeration of beta-glucuronidase-positive Escherichia coli-Part 2: Colony-count technique at 44 degrees C using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl beta-D-glucuronide" and to ISO 4832:2006 "Microbiology of food and animal feeding stuffs-Horizontal method for the enumeration of coliforms-Colony-count technique," the current standards at the time of this study. Each matrix was evaluated separately for E. coli and non-E. coli coliforms at each contamination level (including an

  4. [Significance of the automated blood count].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratwohl, A; Tichelli, A; Speck, B

    1992-03-28

    Modern hematology depends on rapid and accurate determination of quantitative and qualitative blood counts. Fully automated analyzers based on the principles of flow cytometry have replaced the traditional blood smear in the routine laboratory. They count the number of red cells, platelets and leukocytes with high precision. In addition, they divide the cells into different populations according to their physical or chemical properties. This population distribution pattern mimics a "differential" blood smear. Normality can be assessed with a high degree of accuracy, rapidly and reproducibly. The qualitative changes frequently provide pointers to the final diagnosis. In case of abnormalities the reports are flagged. A microscopic analysis should be added according to internal laboratory guidelines. It clarifies pathological findings and is essential in the search for specific abnormalities such as malaria. This underlines the need for exchange of information between physician and laboratory.

  5. Asellus aquaticus as a Potential Carrier of Escherichia coli and Other Coliform Bacteria into Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Sarah C. B.; Arvin, Erik; Nissen, Erling; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Individuals of the water louse, Asellus aquaticus, enter drinking water distribution systems in temperate parts of the world, where they establish breeding populations. We analysed populations of surface water A. aquaticus from two ponds for associated faecal indicator bacteria and assessed the risk of A. aquaticus transporting bacteria into distribution systems. Concentrations of up to two E. coli and five total coliforms·mL−1 were measured in the water and 200 E. coli and >240 total coliforms·mL−1 in the sediments of the investigated ponds. Concentrations of A. aquaticus associated bacteria never exceeded three E. coli and six total coliforms·A. aquaticus−1. During exposure to high concentrations of coliforms, concentrations reached 350 coliforms·A. aquaticus−1. A. aquaticus associated E. coli were only detected as long as E. coli were present in the water and sediment. The calculated probability of exceeding drinking water guideline values in non-disinfected systems by intrusion of A. aquaticus was low. Only in scenarios with narrow pipes and low flows, did total coliforms exceed guideline values, implying that the probability of detection by routine monitoring is also low. The study expands the knowledge base for evaluating incidents with presence of coliform indicators in drinking water by showing that intruding A. aquaticus were not important carriers of E. coli or other coliform bacteria even when emerging from faecally contaminated waters. PMID:23455399

  6. Asellus aquaticus as a Potential Carrier of Escherichia coli and Other Coliform Bacteria into Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jørgen Albrechtsen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Individuals of the water louse, Asellus aquaticus, enter drinking water distribution systems in temperate parts of the world, where they establish breeding populations. We analysed populations of surface water A. aquaticus from two ponds for associated faecal indicator bacteria and assessed the risk of A. aquaticus transporting bacteria into distribution systems. Concentrations of up to two E. coli and five total coliforms·mL−1 were measured in the water and 200 E. coli and >240 total coliforms·mL−1 in the sediments of the investigated ponds. Concentrations of A. aquaticus associated bacteria never exceeded three E. coli and six total coliforms·A. aquaticus−1. During exposure to high concentrations of coliforms, concentrations reached 350 coliforms·A. aquaticus−1. A. aquaticus associated E. coli were only detected as long as E. coli were present in the water and sediment. The calculated probability of exceeding drinking water guideline values in non-disinfected systems by intrusion of A. aquaticus was low. Only in scenarios with narrow pipes and low flows, did total coliforms exceed guideline values, implying that the probability of detection by routine monitoring is also low. The study expands the knowledge base for evaluating incidents with presence of coliform indicators in drinking water by showing that intruding A. aquaticus were not important carriers of E. coli or other coliform bacteria even when emerging from faecally contaminated waters.

  7. Asellus aquaticus as a potential carrier of Escherichia coli and other coliform bacteria into drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Sarah C B; Arvin, Erik; Nissen, Erling; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-03-01

    Individuals of the water louse, Asellus aquaticus, enter drinking water distribution systems in temperate parts of the world, where they establish breeding populations. We analysed populations of surface water A. aquaticus from two ponds for associated faecal indicator bacteria and assessed the risk of A. aquaticus transporting bacteria into distribution systems. Concentrations of up to two E. coli and five total coliforms·mL-1 were measured in the water and 200 E. coli and >240 total coliforms·mL-1 in the sediments of the investigated ponds. Concentrations of A. aquaticus associated bacteria never exceeded three E. coli and six total coliforms·A. aquaticus-1. During exposure to high concentrations of coliforms, concentrations reached 350 coliforms·A. aquaticus-1. A. aquaticus associated E. coli were only detected as long as E. coli were present in the water and sediment. The calculated probability of exceeding drinking water guideline values in non-disinfected systems by intrusion of A. aquaticus was low. Only in scenarios with narrow pipes and low flows, did total coliforms exceed guideline values, implying that the probability of detection by routine monitoring is also low. The study expands the knowledge base for evaluating incidents with presence of coliform indicators in drinking water by showing that intruding A. aquaticus were not important carriers of E. coli or other coliform bacteria even when emerging from faecally contaminated waters.

  8. The proteomic advantage: label-free quantification of proteins expressed in bovine milk during experimentally induced coliform mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, Jamie L; DeGrasse, Jeffrey A; McFarland, Melinda A; Tall, Elizabeth A; Shefcheck, Kevin J; Ward, Jeffrey L; Bannerman, Douglas D

    2010-12-15

    Coliform mastitis remains a primary focus of dairy cattle disease research due in part to the lack of efficacious treatment options for the deleterious side effects of exposure to LPS, including profound intra-mammary inflammation. To facilitate new veterinary drug approvals, reliable biomarkers are needed to evaluate the efficacy of adjunctive therapies for the treatment of inflammation associated with coliform mastitis. Most attempts to characterize the host response to LPS, however, have been accomplished using ELISAs. Because a relatively limited number of bovine-specific antibodies are commercially available, reliance on antibodies can be very limiting for biomarker discovery. Conversely, proteomic approaches boast the capability to analyze an unlimited number of protein targets in a single experiment, independent of antibody availability. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), a widely used proteomic strategy for the identification of proteins in complex mixtures, has gained popularity as a means to characterize proteins in various bovine milk fractions, both under normal physiological conditions as well as during clinical mastitis. The biological complexity of bovine milk has, however, precluded the complete annotation of the bovine milk proteome. Conventional approaches to reducing sample complexity, including fractionation and the removal of high abundance proteins, has improved proteome coverage, but the dynamic range of proteins present, and abundance of a relatively small number of proteins, continues to hinder comparative proteomic analyses of bovine milk. Nonetheless, advances in both liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry instrumentation, including nano-flow liquid chromatography (nano-LC), nano-spray ionization, and faster scanning speeds and ionization efficiency of mass spectrometers, have improved analyses of complex samples. In the current paper, we review the proteomic approaches used to conduct comparative

  9. Assessment of the efficiency of ColiSure™ for coliforms Escherichia coli enumeration in pasteurizad milk / Avaliação do desempenho do ColiSure™ na enumeração de coliformes totais e Escherichia coli em leite pasteurizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Helena Walter de Santana

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In the dairy industry the coliforms detection can he used as indicative of hygiene production of the raw milk and the contamination after-pasteurization. The traditional methods for the enumeration of the total and faecal coliforms are laborious and needs an incubation time of 96 hours. Rapid methods for detection of these microorganisms have been developed and among them the ColsSuroit is a rapid method that gives results in 24 hours and involves defined substrates for simultaneous determination of total conforms and E. coli in water based in specific enzymatic reactions of these microorganisms. The objective of this study was to evaluate its utilization in milk. Ninety-five samples of pasteurized milk were collected from the markets in Londrina city, Parana and analyzed by the Most Probable Number (NMP enumeration using the Brilliant Green Bile Lactose Broth (BGBL and ColiSure™. There was a correlation of 0.80 betwee-n the mediums when the incubation time was 43 hours for total conforms. The low down occurrence of E. coffin the analyzed samples made impossible to comparate the performance of methods for this microorganism. Compfementary analysis showed a greater sensibility and especifity of the ColiSure™ in comparation with the BGBL. The CofiSure™ can be indicated as a substitute for the traditional method, with the advantage to be faster and easier.Na indústria láctea a detecção de microrganismos do grupo coliformes é utilizada como indicativo da higiene na produção do leite e de contaminação pós-pasteurizaçüo. Os métodos tradicionais para a enumeração de coliformes totais e fecais são trabalhosos, com tempo de incubação longo, de até 96 horas. Métodos rápidos para a detecção destes microrganismos têm sido desenvolvidos na área de microbiologia de alimentos. O ColiSure™ é um método rápido, que fornece resultados simultaneamente para a presença ou a ausência de coliformes totais e Escherichia coli em

  10. The right to count does not always count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The best prescription against illness is learning to read and to count. People who are unable to count have a harder time learning to read. People who have difficulty counting make poorer decisions, are less able to combine information and are less likely to have a strategy for life...

  11. Coliform bacteria in Sierra Nevada wilderness lakes and streams: what is the impact of backpackers, pack animals, and cattle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlet, Robert W; Carlson, James R

    2006-01-01

    The presence of coliform bacteria indicates a watershed risk for harboring microbes capable of causing human disease. We hypothesized that water from watersheds that have different human- or animal-use patterns would have differing risks for the presence of coliform bacteria. METHODS; Water was collected in wilderness areas of the Sierra Nevada range in California. A total of 60 sites from lakes or streams were selected to statistically differentiate the risk categories: 1) high use by backpackers, 2) high use by pack animals, 3) cattle- and sheep-grazing tracts, and 4) natural areas rarely visited by humans or domestic animals. Water was collected in sterile test tubes and Millipore coliform samplers during the summer of 2004. Water was analyzed at the university microbiology lab, where bacteria were harvested and then subjected to analysis by standardized techniques. Confirmation was performed with a Phoenix 100 bacteria analyzer. Statistical analysis to compare site categories was performed with Fisher exact test. Only 1 of 15 backpacker sites yielded coliforms. In contrast, 12 of 15 sites with heavy pack-animal traffic yielded coliforms. All 15 sites below the cattle-grazing areas grew coliforms. Differences between backpacker and cattle or pack-animal areas were significant (P coliforms. All coliforms were identified as Escherichia coli. All samples grew normal aquatic bacteria of the genera Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, and Serratia and nonpathogenic strains of Yersinia. No correlation could be made with temperature or elevation. Sites below cattle-grazing tracts and pack-animal usage areas tended to have more total bacteria. Alpine wilderness water below cattle-grazing tracts or areas used by pack animals are at risk for containing coliform organisms. Areas exclusively used by backpackers were nearly free of coliforms.

  12. SOLAIR disinfection of coliform bacteria in hand-drawn drinking water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    specifically UV-A and UV-B radiation) and oxygen (from atmospheric air) to damage, inactivate and / or kill the coliform bacteria found in contaminated water. It is a natural process (virtually self-purification) with no need to add any potentially hazardous ...

  13. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia Coli Bacteria from Reflected Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light and a method of detecting Eschericha Coli bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  14. Distribution and retention of faecal coliforms in the Nakivubo wetland in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansiime, F; van Bruggen, J J

    2001-01-01

    Nakivubo wetland, which has been receiving wastewater from the capital of Uganda for more than 40 years is a tropical wetland dominated by Cyperus papyrus and Miscanthidium violaceum. Field, pilot and laboratory studies were carried out to assess the distribution of faecal coliforms and factors responsible for their retention in different compartments of the two macrophytes in the wetland. There were higher coliform numbers in the free water column below the mat of zones dominated by Miscanthidium (11.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(5) MPN/100 ml) compared to those dominated by papyrus (8.9 +/- 3.1 x 10(4) MPN/100 ml). The thick (1.3 m) and compact mat of Miscanthidium restricts vertical transport of wastewater into the mat, resulting in flow-through of wastewater under the mat. The papyrus mat is loose, open and thin (0.5 m) and allows easy vertical penetration of wastewater into the mat. The unrestricted interaction between the wastewater in the water column and that in the mat of papyrus in addition to plant debris and detritus continuously sedimenting out of the mat to the wetland bottom are responsible for the retention of coliforms in the papyrus dominated zones. Attachment, sedimentation and natural die-off were found to be important mechanisms responsible for the retention of coliforms in the Nakivubo wetland.

  15. 75 FR 14607 - Small Entity Compliance Guide: Bottled Water: Total Coliform and E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... and E. coli; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food... ``Bottled Water: Total Coliform and E. coli--Small Entity Compliance Guide'' for a final rule published in... are Escherichia coli (E. coli), an indicator of fecal contamination. FDA also amended its bottled...

  16. Removal of fluoride, arsenic and coliform bacteria by modified homemade filter media from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Rani; Alemayehu, Esayas; Singh, Vijender; Kumar, Ashok; Mengistie, Embialle

    2008-05-01

    An attempt was made to investigate the removal of fluoride, arsenic and coliform bacteria from drinking water using modified homemade filter media. Batch mode experimental study was conducted to test the efficiency of modified homemade filter for reduction of impurities under the operating condition of treatment time. The physico-chemical and biological analysis of water samples had been done before and after the treatment with filter media, using standard methods. Optimum operating treatment time was determined for maximum removal of these impurities by running the experiment for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12h, respectively. The maximum reduction of fluoride, arsenic and coliform bacteria in percentage was 85.60%, 93.07% and 100% and their residual values were 0.72 mg/l, 0.009 mg/l and 0 coliform cells/100ml, respectively after a treatment time of 10h. These residual values were under the permissible limits prescribed by WHO. Hence this could be a cheap, easy and an efficient technique for removal of fluoride, arsenic and coliform bacteria from drinking water.

  17. Modeling seasonal variability of fecal coliform in natural surface waters using the modified SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung Hwa; Pachepsky, Yakov A.; Kim, Minjeong; Pyo, JongCheol; Park, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Young Mo; Kim, Jung-Woo; Kim, Joon Ha

    2016-04-01

    Fecal coliforms are indicators of pathogens and thereby, understanding of their fate and transport in surface waters is important to protect drinking water sources and public health. We compiled fecal coliform observations from four different sites in the USA and Korea and found a seasonal variability with a significant connection to temperature levels. In all observations, fecal coliform concentrations were relatively higher in summer and lower during the winter season. This could be explained by the seasonal dominance of growth or die-off of bacteria in soil and in-stream. Existing hydrologic models, however, have limitations in simulating the seasonal variability of fecal coliform. Soil and in-stream bacterial modules of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model are oversimplified in that they exclude simulations of alternating bacterial growth. This study develops a new bacteria subroutine for the SWAT in an attempt to improve its prediction accuracy. We introduced critical temperatures as a parameter to simulate the onset of bacterial growth/die-off and to reproduce the seasonal variability of bacteria. The module developed in this study will improve modeling for environmental management schemes.

  18. Thermotolerant coliforms are not a good surrogate for Campylobacter spp. in environmental water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Karen; Lévesque, Simon; Frost, Eric; Carrier, Nathalie; Arbeit, Robert D; Michaud, Sophie

    2009-11-01

    This study aimed to assess the importance of quantitatively detecting Campylobacter spp. in environmental surface water. The prevalence and the quantity of Campylobacter spp., thermotolerant coliforms, and Escherichia coli in 2,471 samples collected weekly, over a 2-year period, from 13 rivers and 12 streams in the Eastern Townships, Québec, Canada, were determined. Overall, 1,071 (43%), 1,481 (60%), and 1,463 (59%) samples were positive for Campylobacter spp., thermotolerant coliforms, and E. coli, respectively. There were weak correlations between the weekly distributions of Campylobacter spp. and thermotolerant coliforms (Spearman's rho coefficient = 0.27; P = 0.008) and between the quantitative levels of the two classes of organisms (Kendall tau-b correlation coefficient = 0.233; P coliforms. These findings suggest that microbial monitoring of raw water by using only fecal indicator organisms is not sufficient for assessing the occurrence or the load of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. Insights into the role of environmental water as sources for sporadic Campylobacter infection will require genus-specific monitoring techniques.

  19. Concentrations of faecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci and Campylobacter spp. in equine faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, E M; Downing, M; Bellamy, J; Gilpin, B J

    2015-03-01

    To determine the concentration of Campylobacter spp. as well as faecal indicator bacteria; faecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and enterococci in the faeces of healthy adult horses in a sample of properties in the Canterbury region of New Zealand. The faeces of healthy adult horses (n=59), including ponies, pleasure horses and Thoroughbreds, were collected from eight properties around Christchurch, New Zealand. The faeces were analysed for concentrations of Campylobacter spp and faecal indicator bacteria; faecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and enterococci. The presence of other animals on the properties sampled as well as the age, feed and health of the horses at the time of sampling was recorded. Enterococci and faecal coliforms were isolated from all samples, and E. coli was isolated from 58/59 samples. Mean concentrations of faecal coliforms and E. coli did not differ between properties, but there was a significant difference in mean concentration of enterococci between properties. Campylobacter spp. were detected in two faecal samples with one isolate being determined by PCR analysis to be a thermotolerant Campylobacter species, the other C. jejuni. This is the first known report quantifying the concentration of Campylobacter spp. present in healthy adult horses in New Zealand. The presence of equine faecal material in water could elevate concentrations of faecal bacteria and therefore needs to be considered as a source of water contamination. The access of horses to waterways and coastal environments may also need to be restricted to prevent transmission of faecal indicator bacteria and potentially zoonotic agents.

  20. Fluorogenic membrane overlays to enumerate total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and total Vibrionaceae in shellfish and seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three assays were developed to enumerate total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and total Vibrionaceae in shellfish and other foods and in seawater and other environmental samples. Assays involve membrane overlays of overnight colonies on non-selective agar plates to detect ß-glucuronidase and lysyl am...

  1. Thermotolerant Coliforms Are Not a Good Surrogate for Campylobacter spp. in Environmental Water ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Karen; Lévesque, Simon; Frost, Eric; Carrier, Nathalie; Arbeit, Robert D.; Michaud, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the importance of quantitatively detecting Campylobacter spp. in environmental surface water. The prevalence and the quantity of Campylobacter spp., thermotolerant coliforms, and Escherichia coli in 2,471 samples collected weekly, over a 2-year period, from 13 rivers and 12 streams in the Eastern Townships, Québec, Canada, were determined. Overall, 1,071 (43%), 1,481 (60%), and 1,463 (59%) samples were positive for Campylobacter spp., thermotolerant coliforms, and E. coli, respectively. There were weak correlations between the weekly distributions of Campylobacter spp. and thermotolerant coliforms (Spearman's ρ coefficient = 0.27; P = 0.008) and between the quantitative levels of the two classes of organisms (Kendall tau-b correlation coefficient = 0.233; P coliforms. These findings suggest that microbial monitoring of raw water by using only fecal indicator organisms is not sufficient for assessing the occurrence or the load of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. Insights into the role of environmental water as sources for sporadic Campylobacter infection will require genus-specific monitoring techniques. PMID:19734335

  2. Inactivation of indigenous coliform bacteria in unfiltered surface water by ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Raymond E; Hofmann, Ron

    2008-05-01

    This study examined the potential for naturally occurring particles to protect indigenous coliform from ultraviolet (UV) disinfection in four surface waters. Tailing in the UV dose-response curve of the bacteria was observed in 3 of the 4 water samples after 1.3-2.6-log of log-linear inactivation, implying particle-related protection. The impact of particles was confirmed by comparing coliform UV inactivation data for parallel filtered (11 microm pore-size nylon filters) and unfiltered surface water. In samples from the Grand River (UVT: 65%/cm; 5.4 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU)) and the Rideau Canal (UVT: 60%/cm; 0.84 NTU), a limit of approximately 2.5 log inactivation was achieved in the unfiltered samples for a UV dose of 20 mJ/cm2 while both the filtered samples exhibited >3.4-log inactivation of indigenous coliform bacteria. The results suggest that particles as small as 11 microm, naturally found in surface water with low turbidity (<3NTU), are able to harbor indigenous coliform bacteria and offer protection from low-pressure UV light.

  3. Comparison of Selected Methods for the Enumeration of Fecal Coliforms and Escherichia coli in Shellfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabow, W. O. K.; De Villiers, J. C.; Schildhauer, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    In a comparison of five selected methods for the enumeration of fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli in naturally contaminated and sewage-seeded mussels (Choromytilus spp.) and oysters (Ostrea spp.), a spread-plate procedure with mFC agar without rosolic acid and preincubation proved the method of choice for routine quality assessment. PMID:1444438

  4. Improved detection of Escherichia coli and coliform bacteria by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Felipe; López-Acedo, Elena; Tabla, Rafael; Roa, Isidro; Gómez, Antonia; Rebollo, José E

    2015-06-04

    The presence of coliform bacteria is routinely assessed to establish the microbiological safety of water supplies and raw or processed foods. Coliforms are a group of lactose-fermenting Enterobacteriaceae, which most likely acquired the lacZ gene by horizontal transfer and therefore constitute a polyphyletic group. Among this group of bacteria is Escherichia coli, the pathogen that is most frequently associated with foodborne disease outbreaks and is often identified by β-glucuronidase enzymatic activity or by the redundant detection of uidA by PCR. Because a significant fraction of essential E. coli genes are preserved throughout the bacterial kingdom, alternative oligonucleotide primers for specific E. coli detection are not easily identified. In this manuscript, two strategies were used to design oligonucleotide primers with differing levels of specificity for the simultaneous detection of total coliforms and E. coli by multiplex PCR. A consensus sequence of lacZ and the orphan gene yaiO were chosen as targets for amplification, yielding 234 bp and 115 bp PCR products, respectively. The assay designed in this work demonstrated superior detection ability when tested with lab collection and dairy isolated lactose-fermenting strains. While lacZ amplicons were found in a wide range of coliforms, yaiO amplification was highly specific for E. coli. Additionally, yaiO detection is non-redundant with enzymatic methods.

  5. Resistência antimicrobiana de coliformes isolados de leite humano ordenhado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak Franz Reis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A veiculação de microrganismos potencialmente patogênicos, resistentes aos antibióticos, por meio de leite humano ordenhado, pode ser um fator de risco potencial. Este estudo teve como objetivo contribuir para um melhor conhecimento dos coliformes isolados de leite humano ordenhado (LHO e de seu perfil de resistência a antimicrobianos. Seguiu-se um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, utilizando 837 amostras de LHO, nas quais 71 (8,48% estavam contaminadas com coliformes totais, cuja contagem em nenhuma das amostras ultrapassava 1,0x10³NMP/ml. A maioria dos microrganismos isolados (91,6% pertencia a apenas duas espécies, Enterobacter cloacae e Klebsiella pneumoniae. As 71 cepas de coliformes apresentavam resistência a pelo menos um dos antimicrobianos testados. Conclui-se que o LHO coletado e armazenado sob condições higiênico-sanitárias insatisfatórias, pode apresentar coliformes, que desgastam os fatores de proteção, reduzem o valor nutricional e a qualidade do produto.

  6. Resistência antimicrobiana de coliformes isolados de leite humano ordenhado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Reis Novak

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A veiculação de microrganismos potencialmente patogênicos, resistentes aos antibióticos, por meio de leite humano ordenhado, pode ser um fator de risco potencial. Este estudo teve como objetivo contribuir para um melhor conhecimento dos coliformes isolados de leite humano ordenhado (LHO e de seu perfil de resistência a antimicrobianos. Seguiu-se um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, utilizando 837 amostras de LHO, nas quais 71 (8,48% estavam contaminadas com coliformes totais, cuja contagem em nenhuma das amostras ultrapassava 1,0x10³NMP/ml. A maioria dos microrganismos isolados (91,6% pertencia a apenas duas espécies, Enterobacter cloacae e Klebsiella pneumoniae. As 71 cepas de coliformes apresentavam resistência a pelo menos um dos antimicrobianos testados. Conclui-se que o LHO coletado e armazenado sob condições higiênico-sanitárias insatisfatórias, pode apresentar coliformes, que desgastam os fatores de proteção, reduzem o valor nutricional e a qualidade do produto.

  7. Assessment of total coliform removal and leaching of metal ions from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness of fly ash as a stabilising agent for heavy metals leaching was studied for different ratios of sewage sludge (SS)-fly ash (FA) mixtures at different pH and washing conditions. The supernatant liquid was analysed for total coliforms. The results obtained from the microbiological analysis of 1:1, 4:1, 1:4 sewage ...

  8. Total Coliform, Acid Bacteria and Total Bacteria in Intestine of Broiler Chicken Given Turmeric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Halimatunnisroh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of boiled turmeric water on total coliform bacteria, lactic acid bacteria (BAL and total bacteria in the small intestine of broiler chicken. 200 day-old-chick (DOC Lohman strain with the average initial body weight of 41,48 ± 0,99 g were used. Chickens kept for 35 days and the treatment of turmeric water in drinking water start given at 11 days old. The experimental design was Completely Randomized Design (RAL were used with 5 treatments and 5 replications, which each replication consist of 8 chicken. The treatments were T0 (100% water, T1 (25% boiled turmeric water : 75% water, T3 (75% boiled turmeric water : 25% water, and T4 (100% boiled turmeric water. Parameters that investigated were total coliform, BAL, and total bacteria in the small intestine. The results of boiled turmeric water in drinking water of broiler chicken small intestine that shows significant different (p0,05 on total coliform. Conclusion, that boiled turmeric water in drinking water not increasing/decreasing total coliform but decreasing total bacteria and increasing BAL.

  9. CalCOFI Egg Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish egg counts and standardized counts for eggs captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets], and...

  10. Coliform Sources and Mechanisms for Regrowth in Household Drinking Water in Limpopo, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Jonathan E.; Samie, Amidou; Dillingham, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Resource-limited communities throughout the developing world face significant environmental health problems related to the myriad of coliform sources within those communities. This study comprehensively investigated contamination sources and the biological and chemical mechanisms sustaining them in two adjacent communities in rural Limpopo, South Africa. An 8-month study was conducted of household (n = 14) and source water quality, measurements of biofilm layers on the inside of household water storage containers and water transfer devices, and also hand-based coliforms and hand-washing effectiveness. A 7-day water container incubation experiment was also performed to determine the biological and chemical changes that occur in a household water storage container independent of human interference. Results indicate that household drinking water frequently becomes contaminated after collection but before consumption (197 versus 1,046 colony-forming units/100 mL; n = 266; p storage containers (1.85 ± 1.59 colony-forming units/cm2; n = 44), hands (5,097 ± 2,125 colony-forming units/hand; n = 48), and coliform regrowth resulting from high assimilable organic carbon (AOC) levels during storage. A maximum specific growth rate, μmax, of 0.072 ± 0.003 h−1 was determined for total coliform bacteria on AOC, and a high correlation between AOC concentrations and the growth potential of total coliform bacteria was observed. These results support the implementation of point-of-use water treatment and other interventions aimed at maintaining the safe water chain and preventing biological regrowth. PMID:25190902

  11. Comparison of MI, Chromocult® coliform, and Compass CC chromogenic culture-based methods to detect Escherichia coli and total coliforms in water using 16S rRNA sequencing for colony identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, Andrée F; Bouchard, Sébastien; Bérubé, Ève; Bergeron, Michel G

    2017-06-01

    The MI, Chromocult® coliform, and Compass CC chromogenic culture-based methods used to assess water quality by the detection of Escherichia coli and total coliforms were compared in terms of their specificity and sensitivity, using 16S rRNA sequencing for colony identification. A sewage water sample was divided in 2-μL subsamples for testing by all three culture-based methods. All growing colonies were harvested and subjected to 16S rRNA sequencing. Test results showed that all E. coli colonies were correctly identified by all three methods, for a specificity and a sensitivity of 100%. However, for the total coliform detection, the MI agar, Chromocult® coliform agar, and Compass CC agar were specific for only 69.2% (9/13), 47.2% (25/53), and 40.5% (17/42), whereas sensitive for 97.8% (45/46), 97.5% (39/40), and 85.7% (24/28), respectively. Thus, given the low level of specificity of these methods for the detection of total coliforms, confirming the identity of total coliform colonies could help to take public health decisions, in particular for cities connected to a public drinking water distribution system since the growth of few putative total coliform colonies on chromogenic agar is problematic and can lead to unnecessary and costly boiling notices from public health authorities.

  12. Making Pythagoras Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses Pythagoras' theorem, typically, it is introduce to students in the junior years of secondary school. Students consolidate their understanding of the theorem by using it for finding missing sides of triangles and for checking whether a given triangle has a right angle. But the topic often seems to dry up rapidly once these…

  13. Prevalensi Bakteri Coliform dan Escherichia Coli pada Daging Sapi yang Dijual di Pasar Tradisional dan Pasar Modern di Kota Pekanbaru

    OpenAIRE

    ', Jasmadi; Haryani, Yuli; Jose, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Beef is potential as a medium for microbial growth such as coliform bacteria since it has a high nutrients content. Coliform bacteria in a given amount could be used as a hygienic indicator and a sign for the presence of pathogenic bacteria. One species of coliform bacteria that often contaminate meat is Escherichia coli. Escherichia coli is a normal flora in gastrointestinal tract, but some strains of them are pathogens which cause acute diarrhea. The aim of this study was to calculate the n...

  14. AdipoCount: A New Software for Automatic Adipocyte Counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhao Zhi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has spread worldwide and become a common health problem in modern society. One typical feature of obesity is the excessive accumulation of fat in adipocytes, which occurs through the following two physiological phenomena: hyperplasia (increase in quantity and hypertrophy (increase in size of adipocytes. In clinical and scientific research, the accurate quantification of the number and diameter of adipocytes is necessary for assessing obesity. In this study, we present a new automatic adipocyte counting system, AdipoCount, which is based on image processing algorithms. Comparing with other existing adipocyte counting tools, AdipoCount is more accurate and supports further manual correction. AdipoCount counts adipose cells by the following three-step process: (1 It detects the image edges, which are used to segment the membrane of adipose cells; (2 It uses a watershed-based algorithm to re-segment the missing dyed membrane; and (3 It applies a domain connectivity analysis to count the cells. The outputs of this system are the labels and the statistical data of all adipose cells in the image. The AdipoCount software is freely available for academic use at: http://www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/AdipoCount/.

  15. Study of Slow Sand Filtration in Removing Total Coliforms and E.Coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekha Yogafanny

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to evaluate the performance of SSF in removing bacteria (Total Coliforms and E. Coli in regard to grain size distribution and grain shape intermittently. Two methodological approaches used in this reasearch were literature review and laboratory work. Bacteria removal was analyzed considering two different filter media (Rhine sand-spherical shape and Lava sand-angular shape with three different grain size distributions. The best performance was attained by filter column F4 which consisted of Lava sand and had the configuration C2 (d10 = 0.07 mm; Cu = 4.2. This filter column achieved 4.7log-units removal of Total Coliforms and 5.0log-units removal of E. coli. The results show that a smaller grain size and an angular shape of sand grain lead to an increase in bacteria removal.

  16. The ultraviolet absorbance spectrum of coliform bacteria and its relationship to astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, F.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Jansz, E. R.; Jayatissa, P. M.

    1983-09-01

    The ultraviolet absorbance spectrum of a mixed culture of coliform bacteria is obtained and compared to recent measurements of the extinction curve of starlight. The absorbance of the bacterial suspensions over the wavebands 3500-2000 A and 7000-3400 A are presented along with a comparison of the extinction values for the star HD 14250 with the alpha function of the coliform suspension, which is a measure of the total amount of the material in the line of sight of the star. The agreement is excellent and is just as good as the agreement obtained by Karim et al. (1983) for typtophan in isolation, supporting the contention that the tryptophan responsible for the astronomical extinction is present in the interstellar grains in protein form.

  17. The occurrence of coliform bacteria in the cave waters of Slovak Karst, Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seman, Milan; Gaálová, Barbora; Cíchová, Marianna; Prokšová, Miloslava; Haviarová, Dagmar; Fľaková, Renáta

    2015-05-01

    The diversity and abundance of coliform bacteria (taxonomically enterobacterias), an important quality water indicator, were determined for four representative caves in Slovak Karst: Domica Cave, Gombasecká Cave, Milada Cave and Krásnohorská Cave. Three hundred and fifty-two enterobacterial isolates were successfully identified by biochemical testing (commercial ENTEROtest 24) and selected isolates confirmed by molecular techniques (PCR, 16S rDNA sequence analysis). A total of 39 enterobacterial species were isolated from cave waters, with predominance of Escherichia coli, Serratia spp. and Enterobacter spp. PCR amplification of lacZ gene is not specific enough to provide a reliable detection of coliform bacteria isolated from the environment. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA confirmed that all of the selected isolates belong to the family Enterobacteriaceae. In general, physical and chemical parameters of cave waters in Slovak Karst corresponded to national drinking water quality standards.

  18. [Presence of total coliforms, Escherichia coli and Listeria sp. in enteral formulas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M L; Monge, R; Rodríguez, J

    1998-03-01

    The presence of total coliforms, Escherichia coli and Listeria sp. was evaluated in 65 samples of enteral nutrition formulas. In more than the 75% of the samples made up from cooked vegetables, fruits or meat broth, the score level of total coliforms was of 10(4) UFC/g. In 12-31% of the different enteral food formula, E. coli was isolated in levels ranging form 3.0 x 10(2) to 2.1 x 10(4) UFC/g. Enteral nutrition formulas made out of fruits and those elaborated with meal broth presented this agent more frequently and in bigger quantities. Listeria sp. was isolated in 17% of the fruit preparations and in enteral formulas made with milk. L. grayi, L welshimeri and L. innocua were the species found.

  19. Using Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Profiles of Coliforms as a Tool to Investigate Combined Sewer Overflow Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Gaurav; Burns, Emma N; Morris, David W

    2016-10-01

    Studies have shown that fecal contamination can be determined by conducting multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) analyses. The hypothesis is if bacteria exhibit resistance, they are likely to be derived from organisms exposed to antimicrobial agents. Therefore, this project seeks to apply MAR analysis to nonpoint source (NPS) and combined sewer overflow (CSO) areas along the Anacostia River in Washington, DC. Presumptive E. coli was isolated from NPS and CSO samples and tested with eight different antimicrobial agents to assess MAR indices. Isolates from CSO sources showed significantly greater resistance (p coliforms are associated with CSO overflows, indicating that pollution-derived coliform levels are strongly linked to antimicrobial resistance. The implementation of this method as an index for water quality in the remediation of the Anacostia River has the ability to serve as a model and monitoring tool for the rehabilitation of urban watersheds.

  20. Multiple antibiotic resistance indexing of coliforms to identify high risk contamination sites in aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitanand, M P; Kadam, T A; Gyananath, G; Totewad, N D; Balhal, D K

    2010-06-01

    Bacteriological analysis of the water samples collected from upstream, midstream and downstream points along the bank of the river revealed high populations of Escherichia coli, Citrobacter freundii, Citrobacter diversus, Enterobacter aerogens and Klebsiella species. All these isolates were screened against eight antibiotics to determine the prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistance among isolates at different sites of the river. The study revealed that multiple antibiotic resistance was prominently seen in coliforms at downstream sites (Average multiple antibiotic resistance index, MAR Index = 0.43) while it was low in coliforms at upstream sites (MAR Index = 0.15). These differences in MAR indices provide a method for distinguishing high risk contamination sites in aquatic environment.

  1. Oral carriage of yeasts and coliforms in stroke sufferers: a prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H W; McMillan, A S; McGrath, C; Li, L S W; Samaranayake, L P

    2008-01-01

    To investigate prospectively the qualitative and quantitative changes in oral carriage of yeasts and coliforms in southern Chinese people suffering from stroke. In 56 elderly people suffering from stroke in a rehabilitation unit of a general medical hospital in Hong Kong, oral microbiological sampling using a combined imprint culture, oral rinse approach and clinical assessment was made during the acute stroke phase, on hospital discharge and 6 months later. The oral carriage of yeasts increased significantly during acute stroke (Pcoliform carriage did not. A reduction in oral carriage of yeasts was found on hospital discharge and 6 months later and in coliforms at the 6-month assessment (Pcoliform respectively. Stroke-related difficulty in tooth brushing and denture wearing were associated with higher oral yeast carriage (Pcoliforms in people suffering from stroke is noteworthy by care providers as K. pneumoniae may cause aspiration pneumonia.

  2. The modified SWAT model for predicting fecal coliforms in the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung Hwa; Pachepsky, Yakov A; Kim, Joon Ha; Kim, Jung-Woo; Park, Mi-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    This study assessed fecal coliform contamination in the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed in Massachusetts, USA using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) because bacteria are one of the major water quality parameters of concern. The bacteria subroutine in SWAT, considering in-stream bacteria die-off only, was modified in this study to include solar radiation-associated die-off and the contribution of wildlife. The result of sensitivity analysis demonstrates that solar radiation is one of the most significant fate factors of fecal coliform. A water temperature-associated function to represent the contribution of beaver activity in the watershed to fecal contamination improved prediction accuracy. The modified SWAT model provides an improved estimate of bacteria from the watershed. Our approach will be useful for simulating bacterial concentrations to provide predictive and reliable information of fecal contamination thus facilitating the implementation of effective watershed management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Colilert-18 for the detection of coliforms and Escherichia coli in tropical fresh water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, W L

    2006-02-01

    To evaluate the suitability of Colilert-18 in detecting Escherichia coli and total coliforms in tropical freshwater samples. Target organisms were isolated from yellow-fluorescent and yellow wells of Colilert-18/Quanti-Tray using m-TEC agar and m-ENDO LES agar respectively. All the selected isolates were first identified based on their fatty acid methyl ester profile. Isolates showing contradictory results to that of the Colilert-18 procedure were re-identified using API 20E strips. A total of 357 isolates, 177 from yellow-fluorescent wells and 180 from yellow wells, were identified. The false-positive and -negative rates for E. coli detection using Colilert-18 were 36.4% and 11%, respectively, while for coliform detection the false-positive rate was 10.3%. The high false-positive rate of Colilert-18, tempers its value for E. coli detection when used for tropical freshwater samples.

  4. Amperometric quantification of total coliforms and specific detection of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmann, Adrian Schwartz; Ron, Eliora Z; Rishpon, Judith

    2002-02-15

    The quantitative determination of total and fecal coliforms, as indicators of fecal pollution, is essential for water quality control. We developed a sensitive, inexpensive amperometric enzyme biosensor based on the electrochemical detection of beta-galactosidase activity, using p-amino-phenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside as substrate, for determining the density of coliforms, represented by Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The specific detection of E. coli was achieved using an antibody-coated electrode that specifically binds the target bacteria. Amperometric detection enabled the determination of 1000 colony-forming units/mL within 60-75 min. Preincubation for 5-6 h further increased the sensitivity more than 100-fold. The present experimental setup allowed the simultaneous analysis of up to eight samples, using disposable screen-printed electrodes.

  5. Survival of coliform bacteria in static compost piles of dairy waste solids intended for freestall bedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, C R; Emerton, B L; Allison, J S; Dowlen, H H; Oliver, S P

    1988-06-01

    Dairy waste solids separated from a slurry by a centrifugal separator were composted in 12 static piles. Seven of the compost piles were naturally aerated, and five were aerated by a fan that forced air through the piles of solids. The natural aeration process aged the manure solids in an unconfined pile. The fan in the forced aeration process forced air into a perforated plenum beneath the compost piles. Dairy waste solids in each compost pile were heated into the thermophilic temperature range and generally composted well. At most sampling points, coliform bacteria declined to low or undetectable numbers early in the composting period. However, as the composting process proceeded, bacterial numbers increased to approximately those present in raw dairy waste solids. Findings of this study suggest that composting offers little benefit toward net reduction in coliform bacterial numbers in dairy waste solids.

  6. Counting Frequencies from Zotero Items

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer Roberts

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In Counting Frequencies you learned how to count the frequency of specific words in a list using python. In this lesson, we will expand on that topic by showing you how to get information from Zotero HTML items, save the content from those items, and count the frequencies of words. It may be beneficial to look over the previous lesson before we begin.

  7. LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY COUNTING HANDBOOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Nuclear Instrumentation

    1966-10-01

    The Counting Handbook is a compilation of operational techniques and performance specifications on counting equipment in use at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley. Counting notes have been written from the viewpoint of the user rather than that of the designer or maintenance man. The only maintenance instructions that have been included are those that can easily be performed by the experimenter to assure that the equipment is operating properly.

  8. Trapping cells in paper for white blood cell count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Jianhao; Wu, Hong; Ying, Jackie Y

    2015-07-15

    White blood cell count is an important indicator of each individual's health condition. An abnormal white blood cell count usually results from an infection, cancer, or other conditions that trigger systemic inflammation responses. White blood cell count also provides predictive information on the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes. Therefore, monitoring white blood cell count on a regular basis can potentially help individuals to take preventive measures and improve healthcare outcomes. Currently, white blood cell count is primarily conducted in centralized laboratories, and it requires specialized equipment and dedicated personnel to perform the test and interpret the results. So far there has been no rapid test that allows white blood cell count in low-resource settings. In this study, we have demonstrated a vertical flow platform that quantifies white blood cells by trapping them in the paper. White blood cells were tagged with gold nanoparticles, and flowed through the paper via a small orifice. The white blood cell count was determined by measuring the colorimetric intensity of gold nanoparticles on the surface of white blood cells that were trapped in the paper mesh. Using this platform, we were able to quantify white blood cells in 15 μL of blood, and visually differentiate the abnormal count of white blood cells from the normal count. The proposed platform enabled rapid white blood cell count in low resource settings with a small sample volume requirement. Its low-cost, instrument-free operations would be attractive for point-of-care applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. SUMS Counts-Related Projects

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Staging Instance for all SUMs Counts related projects including: Redeterminations/Limited Issue, Continuing Disability Resolution, CDR Performance Measures, Initial...

  10. Salmonelas e coliformes fecais em águas de bebida para animais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos de Souza

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available De um total de 402 propriedades rurais do Município de Botucatu, SP (Brasil com atividades de exploração pecuária, foram sorteadas 60 (15% pelo processo de amostragem probabilística simples. Nestas 60 propriedades localizaram-se 113 bebedouros que eram os mais utilizados pelos animais para sua dessedentação. Foram colhidas amostras de água desses bebedouros visando a pesquisa de bactérias do gênero Salmonella, a determinação do Número Mais Provável (NMP de bactérias coliformes fecais e a verificação do pH e da temperatura. Obteve-se isolamento positivo para salmonelas nas amostras de água de 15 (13,27% bebedouros correspondentes a 12 (20% das 60 propriedades visitadas, identificando-se os seguintes sorotipos: S. dublin, S. newport, S. madelia, S. IV 43:g, z57: -, S. saphra, S. glostrup, S. IV ochsenzool, S. I 9, 12:i: - e dois novos sorotipos S. IV 41:z52: - e S. IV 50:d:-. Das 113 amostras de água analisadas, 14 (12,39% apresentaram-se com NMP/100 mL de coliformes fecais acima de 4.000. Não foi constatada associação entre o isolamento positivo de salmonelas e NMP/100 mL de coliformes fecais acima de 4.000. O isolamento de salmonelas e NMP/100 mL de coliformes fecais acima de 4.000 deu-se em temperaturas superiores a 18°C e em pH entre 6,0 e 7,0.

  11. Salmonelas e coliformes fecais em águas de bebida para animais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Luiz Carlos de

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available De um total de 402 propriedades rurais do Município de Botucatu, SP (Brasil com atividades de exploração pecuária, foram sorteadas 60 (15% pelo processo de amostragem probabilística simples. Nestas 60 propriedades localizaram-se 113 bebedouros que eram os mais utilizados pelos animais para sua dessedentação. Foram colhidas amostras de água desses bebedouros visando a pesquisa de bactérias do gênero Salmonella, a determinação do Número Mais Provável (NMP de bactérias coliformes fecais e a verificação do pH e da temperatura. Obteve-se isolamento positivo para salmonelas nas amostras de água de 15 (13,27% bebedouros correspondentes a 12 (20% das 60 propriedades visitadas, identificando-se os seguintes sorotipos: S. dublin, S. newport, S. madelia, S. IV 43:g, z57: -, S. saphra, S. glostrup, S. IV ochsenzool, S. I 9, 12:i: - e dois novos sorotipos S. IV 41:z52: - e S. IV 50:d:-. Das 113 amostras de água analisadas, 14 (12,39% apresentaram-se com NMP/100 mL de coliformes fecais acima de 4.000. Não foi constatada associação entre o isolamento positivo de salmonelas e NMP/100 mL de coliformes fecais acima de 4.000. O isolamento de salmonelas e NMP/100 mL de coliformes fecais acima de 4.000 deu-se em temperaturas superiores a 18degreesC e em pH entre 6,0 e 7,0.

  12. Coliform and Metal Contamination in Lago de Colina, a Recreational Water Body in Chihuahua State, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Rubio-Arias

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lago de Colina (Colina Lake is located about 180 km south of the city of Chihuahua (Mexico, and during the Semana Santa (Holy Week vacation period its recreational use is high. The objective of this study was to quantify coliform and heavy metal levels in this water body before and after the Holy Week vacation period in 2010. Twenty sampling points were randomly selected and two water samples were collected at each point near the surface (0.30 m and at 1 m depth. After the Holy Week vacation the same twenty points were sampled at the same depths. Therefore, a total 80 water samples were analyzed for fecal and total coliforms and levels of the following metals: Al, As, B, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Se, Si and Zn. It was hypothesized that domestic tourism contaminated this water body, and as a consequence, could have a negative impact on visitor health. An analysis of variance (ANOVA study was performed for each element and its interactions considering a factorial design where factor A was sample date and factor B was sample depth. Fecal coliforms were only detected at eight sampling points in the first week, but after Holy Week, both fecal and total coliforms were detected at most sampling points. The concentrations of Al, B, Na, Ni and Se were only statistically different for factor A. The levels of Cr, Cu, K and Mg was different for both date and depth, but the dual factor interaction was not significant. The amount of Ca and Zn was statistically different due to date, depth and their interaction. No significant differences were found for any factor or the interaction for the elements As, Fe and Mn. Because of the consistent results, it is concluded that local tourism is contaminating the recreational area of Colina Lake, Chihuahua, Mexico.

  13. Coliform and metal contamination in Lago de Colina, a recreational water body in Chihuahua State, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Arias, Hector; Rey, Nora I; Quintana, Rey M; Nevarez, G Virginia; Palacios, Oskar

    2011-06-01

    Lago de Colina (Colina Lake) is located about 180 km south of the city of Chihuahua (Mexico), and during the Semana Santa (Holy Week) vacation period its recreational use is high. The objective of this study was to quantify coliform and heavy metal levels in this water body before and after the Holy Week vacation period in 2010. Twenty sampling points were randomly selected and two water samples were collected at each point near the surface (0.30 m) and at 1 m depth. After the Holy Week vacation the same twenty points were sampled at the same depths. Therefore, a total 80 water samples were analyzed for fecal and total coliforms and levels of the following metals: Al, As, B, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Se, Si and Zn. It was hypothesized that domestic tourism contaminated this water body, and as a consequence, could have a negative impact on visitor health. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) study was performed for each element and its interactions considering a factorial design where factor A was sample date and factor B was sample depth. Fecal coliforms were only detected at eight sampling points in the first week, but after Holy Week, both fecal and total coliforms were detected at most sampling points. The concentrations of Al, B, Na, Ni and Se were only statistically different for factor A. The levels of Cr, Cu, K and Mg was different for both date and depth, but the dual factor interaction was not significant. The amount of Ca and Zn was statistically different due to date, depth and their interaction. No significant differences were found for any factor or the interaction for the elements As, Fe and Mn. Because of the consistent results, it is concluded that local tourism is contaminating the recreational area of Colina Lake, Chihuahua, Mexico.

  14. Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Simulation of Fecal Coliforms in the Lower Appomattox River, Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, Andrew Jesse

    2004-01-01

    The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VADEQ) under the direction of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has listed the lower Appomattox River as impaired because it violates current water quality standards for fecal coliforms. To advance the analytical process by which various scenarios for improving water quality within the estuary are examined, an array of computer-based hydrodynamic and water quality models were investigated. The Dynamic Estuary Model (DYN...

  15. Probabilistic assessment of compliance with the numerical criteria for fecal coliforms in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, YoonKyung

    2017-04-01

    Most guidelines for assessing fecal contamination in surface waters suggest that a waterbody is impaired if a certain percent or the geometric mean of samples exceeds the numerical criteria for fecal indicator organisms. However, this raw score approach is not able to account for the uncertainty and variability in the sample statistics. In a Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach, the uncertainty in the mean parameter is expressed as a posterior distribution, and the probability of not violating the criterion is referred to as the confidence of compliance (COC). Further, the spatiotemporal variability in the mean parameter can be quantified by imposing the hierarchical structure on the model. The monitoring data spanning 91 sites across the four major rivers (the Han, Geum, Yeongsan, and Nakdong) of South Korea for the years 2007-2016 were used. The Bayesian hierarchical model was developed for each river to predict the COC with the criteria for fecal coliforms. The established criteria for fecal coliforms are less than 10, 100, 200, and 1,000 CFU/100mL in the river whose water quality goal corresponds to Class Ia, Ib, II, and III, respectively. The model results suggested that the COC varied significantly by site, ranging from 0.0 to 98.9 percent across the four rivers. In the Geum, Yeongsan, and Nakdong Rivers, COC values in the upper river sections were substantially lower than those in the upper river sections. The model suggested that for all four rivers the spatial component, compared with annual and seasonal components, made the largest contribution to the variability in mean fecal coliforms. In all four rivers, mean levels for fecal coliform during the summer (July to September) were distinctly higher than those during other seasons. A decreasing pattern was clearly shown in the Yeongsan River over the recent decade, while monotonic increases or decreases were not shown in other three rivers.

  16. A Study of Faecal Coliform Die-Off in Sewage Sludge Drying Bed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to assess the interacting characteristics of sewage sludge such as temperature, pH, and moisture content of sludge at defined time intervals as to how they affect Coliform die-off in a drying bed. Samples were collected at 0.0mm depth (i.e. surface of sludge), 60mm, 120mm, 180mm and 240mm, ...

  17. Coliform and Metal Contamination in Lago de Colina, a Recreational Water Body in Chihuahua State, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Arias, Hector; Rey, Nora I.; Quintana, Rey M.; Nevarez, G. Virginia; Palacios, Oskar

    2011-01-01

    Lago de Colina (Colina Lake) is located about 180 km south of the city of Chihuahua (Mexico), and during the Semana Santa (Holy Week) vacation period its recreational use is high. The objective of this study was to quantify coliform and heavy metal levels in this water body before and after the Holy Week vacation period in 2010. Twenty sampling points were randomly selected and two water samples were collected at each point near the surface (0.30 m) and at 1 m depth. After the Holy Week vacation the same twenty points were sampled at the same depths. Therefore, a total 80 water samples were analyzed for fecal and total coliforms and levels of the following metals: Al, As, B, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Se, Si and Zn. It was hypothesized that domestic tourism contaminated this water body, and as a consequence, could have a negative impact on visitor health. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) study was performed for each element and its interactions considering a factorial design where factor A was sample date and factor B was sample depth. Fecal coliforms were only detected at eight sampling points in the first week, but after Holy Week, both fecal and total coliforms were detected at most sampling points. The concentrations of Al, B, Na, Ni and Se were only statistically different for factor A. The levels of Cr, Cu, K and Mg was different for both date and depth, but the dual factor interaction was not significant. The amount of Ca and Zn was statistically different due to date, depth and their interaction. No significant differences were found for any factor or the interaction for the elements As, Fe and Mn. Because of the consistent results, it is concluded that local tourism is contaminating the recreational area of Colina Lake, Chihuahua, Mexico. PMID:21776236

  18. Coliform bacteria in New Jersey domestic wells: influence of geology, laboratory, and method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherholt, Thomas B; Bousenberry, Raymond T; Carter, Gail P; Korn, Leo R; Louis, Judith B; Serfes, Michael E; Waller, Debra A

    2013-01-01

    Following passage of the New Jersey Private Well Testing Act, 50,800 domestic wells were tested between 2002 and 2007 for the presence of total coliform (TC) bacteria. Wells containing TC bacteria were further tested for either fecal coliform or Escherichia coli (FC/E. coli) bacteria. Analysis of the data, generated by 39 laboratories, revealed that the rate of coliform detections in groundwater (GW) was influenced by the laboratory and the method used, and also by geology. Based on one sample per well, TC and FC/E. coli were detected in wells located in bedrock 3 and 3.7 times more frequently, respectively, than in wells located in the unconsolidated strata of the Coastal Plain. In bedrock, detection rates were higher in sedimentary rock than in igneous or metamorphic rock. Ice-age glaciers also influenced detection rates, most likely by removing material in some areas and depositing thick layers of unconsolidated material in other areas. In bedrock, coliform bacteria were detected more often in wells with a pH of 3 to 6 than in wells with a pH of 7 to 10 whereas the reverse was true in the Coastal Plain. TC and FC/E. coli bacteria were detected in 33 and 9.5%, respectively, of sedimentary rock wells with pH 3 to 6. Conversely, for Coastal Plain wells with pH 3 to 6, detection rates were 4.4% for TC and 0.6% for FC/E. coli. © 2012, The Author(s). GroundWater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  19. Can E. coli or thermotolerant coliform concentrations predict pathogen presence or prevalence in irrigation waters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachepsky, Yakov; Shelton, Daniel; Dorner, Sarah; Whelan, Gene

    2016-05-01

    An increase in food-borne illnesses in the United States has been associated with fresh produce consumption. Irrigation water presents recognized risks for microbial contamination of produce. Water quality criteria rely on indicator bacteria. The objective of this review was to collate and summarize experimental data on the relationships between pathogens and thermotolerant coliform (THT) and/or generic E. coli, specifically focusing on surface fresh waters used in or potentially suitable for irrigation agriculture. We analyzed peer-reviewed publications in which concentrations of E. coli or THT coliforms in surface fresh waters were measured along with concentrations of one or more of waterborne and food-borne pathogenic organisms. The proposed relationships were significant in 35% of all instances and not significant in 65% of instances. Coliform indicators alone cannot provide conclusive, non-site-specific and non-pathogen-specific information about the presence and/or concentrations of most important pathogens in surface waters suitable for irrigation. Standards of microbial water quality for irrigation can rely not only on concentrations of indicators and/or pathogens, but must include references to crop management. Critical information on microbial composition of actual irrigation waters to support criteria of microbiological quality of irrigation waters appears to be lacking and needs to be collected.

  20. PARAMETER FISIK DAN JUMLAH PERKIRAAN TERDEKAT COLIFORM AIR DANAU BUYAN DESA PANCASARI KECAMATAN SUKASADA BULELENG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Luh Putu Manik Widiyanti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Air merupakan kebutuhan pokok bagi makhluk hidup di bumi ini. Air bersih maupun air minum harus memenuhi syarat fisik, kimia, mikrobiologi dan radioaktif. Parameter mikrobiologi merupakan salah satu parameter yang harus mendapat perhatian karena dampaknya yang berbahaya yaitu dapat menimbulkan penyakit infeksi. Dalam penyediaan air minum harus memenuhi syarat-syarat sesuai dengan Permenkes RI No 492/MENKES/Per/IV/2010. Menurut ketentuan WHO dan APHA, kualitas air ditentukan oleh kehadiran dan jumlah bakteri di dalam air. Terdapat beberapa jenis bakteri yang hidup di dalam air antara lain bakteri coliform dan jenis Escherichia coli sebagai indikator pencemaran air. Coliform merupakan bakteri fekal berasal dari tinja hewan termasuk manusia. Danau Buyan yang terletak di Desa Pancasari-Sukasada-Buleleng- Bali merupakan kawasan pariwisata yang air danaunya digunakan untuk pariwisata air yaitu dayung dan memancing. Jenis penelitian ini adalah penelitian deskriptif. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan parameter fisik air danau Buyan yang terukur pada saat penelitian : pH terendah dan kecerahan tidak memenuhi baku mutu air. Sedangkan parameter pH tertinggi, salinitas dan suhu memenuhi baku mutu air. Jumlah total bakteri coliform pada air danau Buyan berdasarkan metode Most Probable Number berkisar antara 20 – >1100.

  1. Evaluation of fecal contamination indicators (fecal coliforms, somatic phages, and helminth eggs) in ryegrass sward farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Martha; Moreno, Gerardo; Campos, Claudia

    2009-02-15

    The effect of soil supplementation with biosolids at various ratios on fecal-origin microorganism activity was evaluated in a ryegrass sward farm. Fifteen plots with 3 different soil and biosolid mixture ratios were assessed. Soil and grass were sampled over a period of 4 months (days 0, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 120) for soil and on days 75 and 120 for grass, corresponding to first and second grass harvest periods. We analyzed fecal coliforms, somatic phages, helminth eggs, and environmental factors, such as rainfall, temperature, and moisture. The fecal coliforms decreased by 2 logarithmic units (LU) in all soils containing biosolids and by 1 LU in the soil alone and in biosolid control plots alone. The concentration of somatic phages decreased to 2 to 3 LU in the soil containing biosolids and to 1 to 2 LU in the control plots. In contrast, however, there was a noticeable increase in helminth eggs on days 75 ad 120, but not in the soil control alone. Maximum concentrations (10(2) CFU/g TS; colony forming units per gram total solids) of fecal coliforms were found on the grass and in other samples, but the concentrations of phages and helminth eggs were below detection limits. Environmental factors did not significantly influence the results, and grass production increased from 35 to 50 Ton/Ha (tons per hectare) with biosolid supplementation, as compared with controls (14 Ton/Ha).

  2. Antibacterial Activities of Jatropha curcas (LINN) on Coliforms Isolated from Surface Waters in Akure, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, E O; Ekundayo, F O; Makanjuola, O O

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the antibacterial activities of hot water, ethanol and acetone extracts of Jatropha curcas (LINN) leaves on coliforms isolated from surface waters using growth inhibition indices based on agar plate technique. The percentage recovery of the extracts was 19.17%, 18.10% and 18.80% for hot water, ethanol and acetone respectively. Phytochemical screening of the extracts was also determined. Qualitative phytochemical screening showed that the plant extracts contained steroids, tannins, flavonoids and cardiac glycosides, while alkaloids, phlobatannin, terpenoids and anthraquinones were absent. Only ethanolic extract did not possess saponins. Aqueous extracts of J. curcas compared most favourably with the standard antibiotics (gentamycin) on all the coliform bacteria except on K. pneumoniae and E. coli likely due to a measurably higher antibacterial activity compared to the organic extracts. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the aqueous extract ranged from 3.00 to 7.00 mg/L while minimum bactericidal concentration ranged from 4.00 to 10.00 mg/L. Aqueous extract of J. curcas could be used as antibacterial agents against diseases caused by coliforms.

  3. Comparison of thermotolerant coliforms and Escherichia coli densities in freshwater bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachich, Elayse M; Di Bari, Marisa; Christ, Ana Paula G; Lamparelli, Cláudia C; Ramos, Solange S; Sato, Maria Inês Z

    2012-04-01

    Fecal bacterial indicator analyses have been widely used for monitoring the water quality. This study was designed to determine the ratio between the density of Escherichia coli and other Thermotolerant Coliforms (TtC) bacteria from freshwater samples collected for a two-year period of monitoring. TtC were enumerated by membrane filtration on mFC agar. E. coli enumeration was done by two methods: TtC colonies identified in mFC were inoculated in EC-MUG or water samples were filtered and inoculated in modified mTEC agar media, and both methods were compared for quantitative recovery of E. coli. The results pointed out a mean percentage of E. coli among other thermotolerant coliforms (E. coli/TtC ratio) of 84.3% in mFC media. Taking these results into account, a mandatory standard of 1000 thermotolerant coliforms would correspond to 800 E. coli and the adoption of these E. coli based standards will represent a major improvement for the monitoring of freshwater quality.

  4. Elimination of coliforms and Salmonella spp. in sheep meat by gamma irradiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Luciana Salles Vasconcelos; da Costa Henry, Fábio; Barbosa, João Batista; Ladeira, Silvania Alves; de Faria Pereira, Silvia Menezes; da Silva Antonio, Isabela Maria; Teixeira, Gina Nunes; Martins, Meire Lelis Leal; de Carvalho Vital, Helio; dos Prazeres Rodrigues, Dália; dos Reis, Eliane Moura Falavina

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the bacteriological effects of the treatment of sheep meat contaminated with total coliforms, coliforms at 45 °C and Salmonella spp. by using irradiation at doses of 3 kGy and 5 kGy. Thirty sheep meat samples were collected from animals located in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, and then grouped in three lots including 10 samples: non-irradiated (control); irradiated with 3 kGy; and irradiated with 5 kGy. Exposure to gamma radiation in a (137)Cs source-driven irradiating facility was performed at the Nuclear Defense Section of the Brazilian Army Technological Center (CTEx) in Rio de Janeiro. The samples were kept under freezing temperature (-18 °C) until the analyses, which occurred in two and four months after irradiation. The results were interpreted by comparison with the standards of the current legislation and demonstrated that non-irradiated samples were outside the parameters established by law for all groups of bacteria studied. Gamma irradiation was effective in inactivating those microorganisms at both doses tested and the optimal dose was achieved at 3 kGy. The results have shown not only the need for sanitary conditions improvements in slaughter and processing of sheep meat but also the irradiation effectiveness to eliminate coliform bacteria and Salmonella spp.

  5. Diversity of fecal coliforms and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in wastewater treatment model plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczkiewicz, A; Fudala-Ksiazek, S; Jankowska, K; Quant, B; Olańczuk-Neyman, K

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of resistance patterns among wastewater fecal coliforms was determined in the study. Susceptibility of the isolates was tested against 19 antimicrobial agents: aminoglycosides, aztreonam, carbapenems, cephalosporines, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors, penicillines, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and fluoroquinolones. Additionally the removal of resistant isolates was evaluated in the laboratory-scale wastewater treatment model plant (M-WWTP), continuously supplied with the wastewater obtained from the full-scale WWTP. Number of fecal coliforms in raw (after mechanical treatment) and treated wastewater, as well as in aerobic chamber effluent was determined using selective medium. The selected strains were identified and examined for antibiotic resistance using Phoenix Automated Microbiology System (BD Biosciences, USA). The strains were identified as Escherichia coli (n=222), Klebsiella pneumoniae ssp. ozaenae (n=9), and Pantoea agglomerans (n=1). The isolate of P. agglomerans as well as 48% of E. coli isolates were sensitive to all antimicrobials tested. The most frequent resistance patterns were found for ampicillin: 100% of K. pneumoniae ssp. ozaenae and 41% of E. coli isolates. Among E. coli isolates 12% was regarded as multiple antimicrobial resistant (MAR). In the studied M-WWTP, the applied activated sludge processes reduced considerably the number of fecal coliforms, but increased the ratio of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli isolates to sensitive ones, especially among strains with MAR patterns.

  6. Survival of total coliforms in lawn irrigated with secondary wastewater and chlorinated effluent in the Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manios, T; Moraitaki, G; Mantzavinos, D

    2006-03-01

    Pregrown, two-month-old lawn was layered in 12 large square pots with an area of 0.25 m2 each, filled with a mixture of topsoil, peat, and sand. In late July, in the heart of the Mediterranean summer, the pots were divided into two groups, with six pots per group. On four different occasions, the pots in each group were sprinkled (surface irrigation) with 2 L of either secondary-treated wastewater (STW, group A) or chlorinated effluent (CHE, group B). Wastewater application always took place at 0700 hours. Samples of the surface soil and grass from each pot were collected at the following times: before irrigation, immediately after irrigation, two hours later (0900 hours), and four hours later (1100 hours). In the samples collected, the number of total coliforms per gram was measured using standard microbiological analyses. Temperature and sunlight intensity were also monitored. There was an increase in the coliforms population in soil and grass samples of both groups immediately after the wastewater application. In group A, the mean number of coliforms recorded in the soil samples reached mean values higher than 5000 cfu/g compared to 312 cfu/g recorded before application. The increase in group B was smaller but still significant. Two hours later, the number of coliforms was reduced substantially in all samples (e.g., group A, soil samples 477 cfu/g). Coliform inactivation is thought to result from the effect of temperature and mainly sunlight. However, four hours after application (1100 hours), there was a noticeable increase in the coliform number again, in all sample categories of both groups. Coliform reactivation could be a result of shadowing effect resulting from the thick foliage of the grass, where the microorganisms were protected by the sunlight radiation and regrowth in a friendly environment (especially of the soil) where moisture and nutrients were present. This, in addition to the fact that coliforms seemed to retain a sizable population between

  7. Making environmental DNA count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    The arc of reception for a new technology or method--like the reception of new information itself--can pass through predictable stages, with audiences' responses evolving from 'I don't believe it', through 'well, maybe' to 'yes, everyone knows that' to, finally, 'old news'. The idea that one can sample a volume of water, sequence DNA out of it, and report what species are living nearby has experienced roughly this series of responses among biologists, beginning with the microbial biologists who developed genetic techniques to reveal the unseen microbiome. 'Macrobial' biologists and ecologists--those accustomed to dealing with species they can see and count--have been slower to adopt such molecular survey techniques, in part because of the uncertain relationship between the number of recovered DNA sequences and the abundance of whole organisms in the sampled environment. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Evans et al. (2015) quantify this relationship for a suite of nine vertebrate species consisting of eight fish and one amphibian. Having detected all of the species present with a molecular toolbox of six primer sets, they consistently find DNA abundances are associated with species' biomasses. The strength and slope of this association vary for each species and each primer set--further evidence that there is no universal parameter linking recovered DNA to species abundance--but Evans and colleagues take a significant step towards being able to answer the next question audiences tend to ask: 'Yes, but how many are there?' © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. COUNTS OF MICROORGANISMS CAUSING BOVINE MASTITIS AND STUDY OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanessa Oliveira Ribeiro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary gland caused mainly by microorganisms, altering the characteristics of milk and results in significant economic losses for this production complex. The study aimed to determine the main causative agents of bovine mastitis in a dairy farm in Rio Pomba city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, and evaluate the use of plant extract and antibiotics commonly used in the control of microorganisms that cause this disease. Raw milk samples coming from 47 dairy cow were individually collected for microbiological evaluation. We also evaluated the sensitivity of isolates from the plant extract and the antibiotics commonly used in the farm. It was found that 17.0 %, 31.9 %, 85.4 % and 38.3 % of the samples presented, respectively, Staphylococcus aureus, coliforms, faecal coliforms and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, most of the samples showed counts of aerobic mesophilic microorganisms and Streptococcus sp. between 104 and 105 CFU.mL-1, while the counts of S. aureus ranged between 102 and 103 CFU.mL-1 in most of samples. A higher efficacy of tetracycline on the isolates of S. aureus was verified and of ampicillin on the E. coli isolates. All isolates of the latter bacteria were resistant to plant extract. Due to the high incidence of microorganisms, we emphasize the need for implementation of Good Agricultural Practices in milk production, because these bacteria are coming from hair, skin, mucous membranes of animals and/or belonging to the enteric microbiota of mammals, respectively.

  9. Analisa Bakteri Coliform Dan Identifikasi Escherichia Coli Pada Sop Buah Yang Dijual Di Jalan Dr Mansur Medan Tahun 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Parthipan, Vimalan

    2014-01-01

    Around Jalan dr Mansur, Medan there are quite a lot of sop buah vendors that uses carts equipped with a special machine. With many factors and opportunities for the bacteria to live and breed in the sop buah, there are responsibilities that it may become contaminated with coliform bacteria. Coliform bacteria are including Escherichia coli which is the indicators of contamination and it is not good conditions for food and beverages. This study aims to determine the number of colonies of Col...

  10. Quantificação de coliformes, Staphylococcus aureus e mesófilos presentes em diferentes etapas da produção de queijo frescal de leite de cabra em laticínios Enumeration of coliforms, Staphylococcus aureus and aerobic mesofilic bacteria throughout the manufacture process of a goat unripened cheese produced in a dairy plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Ulrich Picoli

    2006-03-01

    submitted to coliform, S. aureus and aerobic mesofilic bacteria enumeration using routine protocols. It was observed a great decreasing of bacterial counts in the raw milk during the pasteurization process. In spite of that, the transfer of the pasteurized milk to the coagulation tank by an equipment, which was previously in contact with the raw milk and was inadequately disinfected, resulted in the recontamination of the pasteurized milk. The packed cheese had bacterial counts according to the standards imposed by the Brazilian food regulatory agency. However, the high aerobic mesofilic bacteria counts suggest that the good manufactures practices have to be improved in order to guarantee the hygienic quality and an extender shelf life for the cheese.

  11. Discrimination efficacy of fecal pollution detection in different aquatic habitats of a high-altitude tropical country, using presumptive coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byamukama, Denis; Mach, Robert L; Kansiime, Frank; Manafi, Mohamad; Farnleitner, Andreas H

    2005-01-01

    The performance of rapid and practicable techniques that presumptively identify total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC), Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens spores (CP) by testing them on a pollution gradient in differing aquatic habitats in a high-altitude tropical country was evaluated during a 12-month period. Site selection was based on high and low anthropogenic influence criteria of paired sites including six spring, six stream, and four lakeshore sites spread over central and eastern parts of Uganda. Unlike the chemophysical water quality, which was water source type dependent (i.e., spring, lake, or stream), fecal indicators were associated with the anthropogenic influence status of the respective sites. A total of 79% of the total variability, including all the determined four bacteriological and five chemophysical parameters, could be assigned to either a pollution, a habitat, or a metabolic activity component by principal-component analysis. Bacteriological indicators revealed significant correlations to the pollution component, reflecting that anthropogenic contamination gradients were followed. Discrimination sensitivity analysis revealed high ability of E. coli to differentiate between high and low levels of anthropogenic influence. CP also showed a reasonable level of discrimination, although FC and TC were found to have worse discrimination efficacy. Nonpoint influence by soil erosion could not be detected during the study period by correlation analysis, although a theoretical contamination potential existed, as investigated soils in the immediate surroundings often contained relevant concentrations of fecal indicators. The outcome of this study indicates that rapid techniques for presumptive E. coli and CP determination may be reliable for fecal pollution monitoring in high-altitude tropical developing countries such as those of Eastern Africa.

  12. Uncertainty in measurements by counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bich, Walter; Pennecchi, Francesca

    2012-02-01

    Counting is at the base of many high-level measurements, such as, for example, frequency measurements. In some instances the measurand itself is a number of events, such as spontaneous decays in activity measurements, or objects, such as colonies of bacteria in microbiology. Countings also play a fundamental role in everyday life. In any case, a counting is a measurement. A measurement result, according to its present definition, as given in the 'International Vocabulary of Metrology—Basic and general concepts and associated terms (VIM)', must include a specification concerning the estimated uncertainty. As concerns measurements by counting, this specification is not easy to encompass in the well-known framework of the 'Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement', known as GUM, in which there is no guidance on the topic. Furthermore, the issue of uncertainty in countings has received little or no attention in the literature, so that it is commonly accepted that this category of measurements constitutes an exception in which the concept of uncertainty is not applicable, or, alternatively, that results of measurements by counting have essentially no uncertainty. In this paper we propose a general model for measurements by counting which allows an uncertainty evaluation compliant with the general framework of the GUM.

  13. High Count Rate Single Photon Counting Detector Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An optical communications receiver requires efficient and high-rate photon-counting capability so that the information from every photon, received at the aperture,...

  14. Coliform Contamination of Peri-urban Grown Vegetables and Potential Public Health Risks: Evidence from Kumasi, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abass, Kabila; Ganle, John Kuumuori; Adaborna, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Peri-urban vegetable farming in Ghana is an important livelihood activity for an increasing number of people. However, increasing quality and public health concerns have been raised, partly because freshwater availability for irrigation purposes is a major constraint. This paper investigated on-farm vegetable contamination and potential health risks using samples of lettuce, spring onions and cabbage randomly selected from 18 vegetable farms in peri-urban Kumasi, Ghana. Vegetable samples were tested for total coliform, fecal coliform, Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. bacteria contamination using the Most Probable Number method. Results show high contamination levels of total and fecal coliforms, and Escherichia coli bacteria in all 18 vegetable samples. The mean total coliform/100 ml concentration for spring onions, lettuce and cabbage were 9.15 × 10(9), 4.7 × 10(7) and 8.3 × 10(7) respectively. The mean fecal coliform concentration for spring onions, lettuce and cabbage were also 1.5 × 10(8), 4.15 × 10(7) and 2.15 × 10(7) respectively, while the mean Escherichia coli bacteria contamination for spring onions, lettuce and cabbage were 1.4 × 10(8), 2.2 × 10(7) and 3.2 × 10(7) respectively. The level of total coliform, fecal coliform and Escherichia coli bacteria contamination in all the vegetable samples however declined as the distance between the main water source (Wiwi River) and farms increases. Nonetheless, all contamination levels were well above acceptable standards, and could therefore pose serious public health risks to consumers. Increased education and supervision of farmers, as well as public health and food hygiene education of consumers, are critical to reducing on-farm vegetable contamination and the health risks associated with consumption of such vegetables.

  15. Risk factors for coliform bacteria in backcountry lakes and streams in the Sierra Nevada mountains: a 5-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlet, Robert W; Ger, K Ali; Richards, John R; Carlson, James R

    2008-01-01

    To provide a 5-year longitudinal assessment of risk of acquiring disease from Sierra Nevada Wilderness area lakes and streams. This study examines the relative risk factors for harmful water microorganisms, using coliforms as an indicator. Streams and lakes in the backcountry of Yosemite and Kings Canyon National Parks and neighboring wilderness areas were selected and water was analyzed each year over a 5-year period. A total of 364 samples from lakes or streams were chosen to statistically differentiate the risk categories based on land usage, as follows: 1) areas rarely visited by humans (Wild), 2) human day-use-only areas (Day Hike), 3) areas used by backpackers with overnight camping allowed (Backpack), 4) areas primarily impacted by horses or pack animals (Pack Animal), and 5) cattle and sheep grazing tracts (Cattle). Water was collected in sterile test tubes and Millipore coliform samplers. Water was analyzed at the university microbiology lab, where bacteria were harvested and then subjected to analysis using standardized techniques. Statistical analysis to compare site categories was performed utilizing Fisher exact test and analysis of variance. A total of 364 sampling sites were analyzed. Coliforms were found in 9% (4/47) of Wild site samples, 12% (5/42) of Day Hike site samples, and 18% (20/111) of Backpacker site samples. In contrast, 63% (70/111) of Pack Animal site samples yielded coliforms, and 96% (51/53) of samples from the Cattle areas grew coliforms. Differences between Backpacker vs Cattle or Pack Animal areas were significant at P coliform organisms. Water from Wild, Day Hike, or Backpack sites poses far less risk for contamination by coliforms.

  16. Effect of Arbutus pavarii, Salvia officinalis and Zizyphus Vulgaris on growth performance and intestinal bacterial count of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Asheg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the effect of three native plants from El-Jabal al ELAkhdar, (Libya on performance and cecal coliform count of broiler chickens. A total of 1260 one-day-old male Cobb chickens were used in the experiment. The birds were assigned to 7 treatment groups (6 replicates per treatment. The dietary treatments included basal diet with no additive (control, and 6 other dietary treatments (Arbutus pavarii, Salvia officinalis and Zizyphus Vulgaris each of which was added at the rate of 0.5 g and 1 g/kg of basal diet. Results explicitly revealed that all dietary treatments had a significant effect on body performance of broiler chickens compared to the control with the exception of the dietary treatment of S. officinalis at dosage of 0.5 g/kg that has expressed noticeable reduction in body weight. Coliform counts in the cecum of birds receiving 1% A. pavarii and 1% Z. Vulgaris were significantly lower (P ⩽ 0.05 than those of control group from early weeks of treatments, whereas all plant shows a significant lowering (P ⩽ 0.05 of cecal coliform count during the rest of experiment compared to control group. These results emphasize the potential biotic role of such plants together with the immune modulating effects on treated birds. However, further pharmacological and clinical work should be adopted in the future to present an obvious understandable theory behind the potential beneficial as well as side effects of such natural plants.

  17. Make My Trip Count 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Make My Trip Count (MMTC) commuter survey, conducted in September and October 2015 by GBA, the Pittsburgh 2030 District, and 10 other regional transportation...

  18. Effect of different oral oxytetracycline treatment regimes on selection of antimicrobial resistant coliforms in nursery pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Zachariasen, Camilla; Nørholm, Nanna; Holm, Anders; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2017-09-01

    A major concern derived from using antimicrobials in pig production is the development of resistance. This study aimed to assess the impact of selected combinations of oral dose and duration of treatment with oxytetracycline (OTC) on selection of tetracycline resistant (TET-R) coliforms recovered from swine feces. The work encompassed two studies: 1) OTC 5mg/kg and 20mg/kg were administered to nursery pigs for 3 and 10days, respectively, under controlled experimental conditions, and 2) 10mg/kg, 20mg/kg and 30mg/kg OTC were given to a higher number of pigs for 6, 3 and 2days, respectively, under field conditions. Statistical modeling was applied to analyze trends in the proportion of TET-R coliforms. In the experimental study, no statistical difference in proportion of TET-R coliforms was observed between treatments at the end of the trial (day 18) and compared to day 0. In the field study, treatment had a significant effect on the proportion of TET-R bacteria two days after the end of treatment (2dAT) with the regimes "low dose-six days" and "medium dose-three days" yielding the highest and lowest proportions of TET-R strains, respectively. No indication of co-selection for ampicillin- and sulphonamide -R bacteria was observed for any treatment at 2dAT. By the end of the nursery period, the proportion of TET-R bacteria was not significantly different between treatments and compared to day 0. Our results suggest that similar resistance levels might be obtained by using different treatment regimes regardless of the combinations of oral dose-duration of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Teste alternativo para detecção de coliformes em leite humano ordenhado

    OpenAIRE

    Novak,Franz R.; Almeida,João Aprígio Guerra de

    2002-01-01

    Objetivo: comparar um método alternativo com o teste do número mais provável (NMP) para detecção de coliformes totais em leite humano ordenhado. Métodos: 343 amostras de leite humano ordenhado, obtidas a partir de frascos oriundos de coleta domiciliar, recebidas pelo Banco de Leite Humano do Instituto Fernandes Figueira - IFF, por doadoras previamente orientadas, foram encaminhadas ao laboratório de controle de alimentos do IFF e empregadas na comparação de dois métodos: 1 - técnica do número...

  20. Influence of Seasonal Environmental Variables on the Distribution of Presumptive Fecal Coliforms around an Antarctic Research Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kevin A.

    2003-01-01

    Factors affecting fecal microorganism survival and distribution in the Antarctic marine environment include solar radiation, water salinity, temperature, sea ice conditions, and fecal input by humans and local wildlife populations. This study assessed the influence of these factors on the distribution of presumptive fecal coliforms around Rothera Point, Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula during the austral summer and winter of February 1999 to September 1999. Each factor had a different degree of influence depending on the time of year. In summer (February), although the station population was high, presumptive fecal coliform concentrations were low, probably due to the biologically damaging effects of solar radiation. However, summer algal blooms reduced penetration of solar radiation into the water column. By early winter (April), fecal coliform concentrations were high, due to increased fecal input by migrant wildlife, while solar radiation doses were low. By late winter (September), fecal coliform concentrations were high near the station sewage outfall, as sea ice formation limited solar radiation penetration into the sea and prevented wind-driven water circulation near the outfall. During this study, environmental factors masked the effect of station population numbers on sewage plume size. If sewage production increases throughout the Antarctic, environmental factors may become less significant and effective sewage waste management will become increasingly important. These findings highlight the need for year-round monitoring of fecal coliform distribution in Antarctic waters near research stations to produce realistic evaluations of sewage pollution persistence and dispersal. PMID:12902283

  1. Prevention of clinical coliform mastitis in dairy cows by a mutant Escherichia coli vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R N; Cullor, J S; Jasper, D E; Farver, T B; Bushnell, R B; Oliver, M N

    1989-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken in two commercial California dairies. The treatment group, 246 cows, received three doses of a whole cell bacterin of J5 Escherichia coli (mutant of E. coli O111:B4) plus Freund's incomplete adjuvant vaccine (two in the dry period and one after calving) while 240 unvaccinated cows served as controls. Thirty-five cases of clinical coliform mastitis were diagnosed, six in vaccinated cows and 29 in unvaccinated cows. Bacteria isolated from the clinical cases included 15 E. coli five Klebsiella pneumoniae, three K. oxytoca, three K. ozaenae, five Enterobacter aerogenes, three Serratia marcescens and one Serratia spp. Four control cows were culled, three of them because of chronic coliform mastitis and one because of postcoliform infection agalactia. Incidence rate of clinical gram-negative mastitis was 2.57% in vaccinated cows and 12.77% in unvaccinated cows. The estimated risk ratio, the measure of risk of having clinical gram-negative mastitis for vaccinated cows to unvaccinated cows, was 0.20 (p less than 0.005), indicating a strong relationship between vaccination and lack of clinical gram-negative mastitis. The results of this trial indicate that the administration of the E. coli J5 vaccine is protective against natural challenge to gram-negative bacteria, and reduces the incidence of clinical gram-negative mastitis in dairy cows during the first three months of lactation. PMID:2670166

  2. KOMPARASI ANALISIS TOTAL COLIFORM DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN METODE MPN 5 TABUNG DAN ENZIM SUBSTRAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novarina Irnaning Handayani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dalam pemantauan kualitas lingkungan untuk air minum, air bersih, air limbah, dan air sungai, mensyaratkan aspek mikrobiologi parameter coliform dan atau coli tinja sebagai indikator pencemaran lingkungan. Pada saat ini metode yang paling banyak digunakan adalah Number (MPN 5 tabung yang memiliki waktu pengerjaan minimal 4 hari. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk menjajaki kemungkinan pemakaian metode lain yang telah terstandarisasi dan memiliki beberapa keunggulan. Metode yang dipilih adalah enzim substrat. Uji laboratorium dilakukan dengan membandingkan hasil analisis antara MPN 5 tabung dan enzim substrat, masing-masing dengan ulangan 7 kali. Hasil komparasi menunjukkan bahwa analisa dengan menggunakan metode enzim substrat memberikan hasil yang lebih besar atau lebih sensitif dibanding MPN 5 tabung. Pada sampel yang mengandung bakteri coli yang tinggi, dalam hal ini pada sampel air limbah dan air sungai perbedaan hasil antara MPN 5 tabung dan enzim substrat sangat signifikan, sedangkan pada sampel dengan kandungan coli kecil atau tidak ada, hasil keduanya sama.  Metode enzim substrat sangat direkomendasikan untuk sampel air minum dan air bersih sehingga akan memberikan hasil yang lebih meyakinkan bagi penggunanya. Kandungan coliform pada sampel air minum dan air bersih walaupun sangat kecil akan benar-benar terdeteksi oleh metode yang memiliki sensitifitas lebih baik.

  3. Chlorine disinfection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, total coliforms, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis: revisiting reclaimed water regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Reyes-Gómez, Lidia María; Hernández-Muñoz, Aurelio; Martínez-Falcón, Ana Paola; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela A; Iturbe, Ulises

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic organisms can be transmitted orally through drinking water or through skin and mucosae by both direct and indirect contact, and their presence in water thus has a negative impact on public health. In wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), water is disinfected to inactivate pathogens. The quantification of several microbial indicators in aquatic systems is required to estimate the biological quality of such systems. So far, coliform bacteria have been used as traditional indicators world-wide. This study has assessed the resistance of total coliforms, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis to three dosages of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) at two exposure times. The bacteria were isolated from secondary effluents of a WWTP located in Hidalgo, Mexico. The results show that the number of colony-forming units of all studied bacterial types decreased when both the NaClO concentration and exposure times increased. However, they were not eliminated. The inclusion of the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa in regulations for treated wastewater quality as a new indicator is highly recommended due to its importance as an opportunistic pathogen. The detection of this species along with the traditional organisms could be particulary significant for reclaimed water to be used with direct human contact.

  4. Prediction of Salmonella in seawater by total and faecal coliforms and Enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstratiou, Maria A; Mavridou, Athena; Richardson, Clive

    2009-02-01

    The power of total coliforms (TC), faecal coliforms (FC) and Enterococci to predict the presence of Salmonella in seawater was investigated. Indicator cut-off values with the most satisfactory combination of sensitivity and specificity in predicting Salmonella presence were 1,000 CFU 100ml(-1)TC, 200 CFU 100ml(-1)FC, 500 CFU 100ml(-1) Enterococci. When TC or FC were used for Salmonella prediction in logistic regression, then the addition of another indicator did not have a statistically significant effect. When Enterococci were used for prediction, then the addition of either of the two other indicators led to a statistically significant improvement (P=0.001 for TC, P=0.003 for FC). These results suggest that using either TC or FC alone provided an adequate indicator of Salmonella presence, but a statistically significant improvement is possible over using Enterococci alone. Concerning Enterococci, European Union limits for excellent coastal water quality (100 CFU 100 ml(-1)) and United States Environmental Protection Agency criteria for marine bathing waters (35 CFU 100 ml(-1)) have the same value in predicting Salmonella absence (92.5%).

  5. Fate of coliforms and pathogenic parasite in four full-scale sewage treatment systems in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Vinay Kumar; Sahoo, B K; Khursheed, Anwar; Kazmi, A A; Ahmad, Z; Chopra, A K

    2011-10-01

    The occurrence and removal of fecal indicators (total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC), fecal streptococci (FS)) and pathogens (helminthes eggs) were studied in various municipal wastewater treatment processes (UASB + FPU, ASP, EA, WSP). The reductions in TC and FC concentrations were usually between 2.0 and 2.5 log units in up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor incorporated with final polishing unit (UASB + FPU). Almost similar reduction was observed in activated sludge process system (ASP) and waste stabilization ponds system (WSP), while it was log 3.0 in extended aeration system (EA). UASB + FPU and WSP systems were observed more efficient to reduce helminthes eggs at almost 100%, whereas only 97% removal was observed in case of ASP and EA system. In addition to monitoring of indicator organisms, turbidity, suspended solids (SS), and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) were used as indirect measure of the potential presence of microorganisms. Interrelationship of BOD, SS, and turbidity with fecal indicator bacteria concentration in influent and effluent manifest that improvement of the microbiological quality of wastewater is strongly linked to the removal of BOD and SS.

  6. Distribución y concentración de Coliformes totales, Coliformes fecales, Escherichia coli Y Enterococos en el agua y sedimento en el estero salado (tramos B, D, E Y G)

    OpenAIRE

    Baños Cruz, Luís Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Se realizaron dos muestreos en marea roja, uno en Diciembre del 2009 y el otro en Enero del 2010, para determinar los microorganismos en el Estero Salado como indicadores de contaminación. El análisis incluyó parámetros fisicoquímicos como pH, salinidad, temperatura y oxígeno disuelto, y además la medición de las bacterias coliformes totales, coliformes fecales, Escherichia coli y enterococos. Se obtuvieron altos niveles de contaminación bacteriana en el agua. La mayor contaminación está...

  7. Hanford whole body counting manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Lynch, T.P.

    1990-06-01

    This document describes the Hanford Whole Body Counting Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy--Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include providing in vivo measurements of internally deposited radioactivity in Hanford employees (or visitors). Specific chapters of this manual deal with the following subjects: program operational charter, authority, administration, and practices, including interpreting applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for in vivo measurement frequency, etc., for the plant-wide whole body counting services; state-of-the-art facilities and equipment used to provide the best in vivo measurement results possible for the approximately 11,000 measurements made annually; procedures for performing the various in vivo measurements at the Whole Body Counter (WBC) and related facilities including whole body counts; operation and maintenance of counting equipment, quality assurance provisions of the program, WBC data processing functions, statistical aspects of in vivo measurements, and whole body counting records and associated guidance documents. 16 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

  8. Asellus aquaticus as a potential carrier of Escherichia coli and other coliform bacteria into drinking water distribution systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sarah Christine Boesgaard; Arvin, Erik; Nissen, E.

    2013-01-01

    guideline values in non-disinfected systems by intrusion of A. aquaticus was low. Only in scenarios with narrow pipes and low flows, did total coliforms exceed guideline values, implying that the probability of detection by routine monitoring is also low. The study may expand the knowledge base......Individuals of the water louse, Asellus aquaticus, enter drinking water distribution systems in temperate parts of the world, where they establish breeding populations. Populations of A. aquaticus in surface water from 2 ponds were analysed for associated faecal indicator bacteria and the risk of A....... aquaticus transporting bacteria into distribution systems was assessed. Concn. of ≤2 Escherichia coli and 5 total coliforms ml-1 were measured in the water and 200 E. coli and >240 total coliforms ml-1 in the sediments of the investigated ponds. Concn. of A. aquaticus associated bacteria never exceeded 3 E...

  9. RAPID3? Aptly named!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, J-M

    2014-01-01

    The RAPID3 score is the sum of three 0-10 patient self-report scores: pain, functional impairment on MDHAQ, and patient global estimate. It requires 5 seconds for scoring and can be used in all rheumatologic conditions, although it has mostly been used in rheumatoid arthritis where cutoffs for low disease activity (12/30) have been set. A RAPID3 score of ≤ 3/30 with 1 or 0 swollen joints (RAPID3 ≤ 3 + ≤ SJ1) provides remission criteria comparable to Boolean, SDAI, CDAI, and DAS28 remission criteria, in far less time than a formal joint count. RAPID3 performs as well as the DAS28 in separating active drugs from placebos in clinical trials. RAPID3 also predicts subsequent structural disease progression. RAPID3 can be determined at short intervals at home, allowing the determination of the area under the curve of disease activity between two visits and flare detection. However, RAPID3 should not be seen as a substitute for DAS28 and face to face visits in routine care. Monitoring patient status with only self-report information without a rheumatologist's advice (including joints and physical examination, and consideration of imaging and laboratory tests) may indeed be as undesirable for most patients than joint examination without a patient questionnaire. Conversely, combining the RAPID3 and the DAS28 may consist in faster or more sensitive confirmation that a medication is effective. Similarly, better enquiring of most important concerns of patients (pain, functional status and overall opinion on their disorder) should reinforces patients' confidence in their rheumatologist and treatments.

  10. Confirmation of E. coli among other thermotolerant coliform bacteria in paper mill effluents, wood chips screening rejects and paper sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Chantal J; Simao-Beaunoir, Anne-Marie; Beaulieu, Carole; Chalifour, François-Philippe

    2006-07-01

    Paper sludges are solid wastes material generated from the paper production, which have been characterized for their chemical contents. Some are rich in wood fiber and are a good carbon source, for example the primary and de-inking paper sludges. Others are made rich in nitrogen and phosphorus by pressing the activated sludge, resulting from the biological water treatments, with the primary sludge, yielding the combined paper sludge. Still, in the absence of sanitary effluents very few studies have addressed the characterization of their coliform microflora. Therefore, this study investigated the thermotolerant coliform population of one paper mill effluent and two paper mill sludges and wood chips screening rejects using chromogenic media. For the first series of analyses, the medium used was Colilert broth and positive tubes were selected to isolate bacteria in pure culture on MacConkey agar. In a second series of analyses, double selective media, based on ss-galactosidase and ss-glucuronidase activities, were used to isolate bacteria. First, the presence of thermotolerant coliforms was detected in low numbers in most water effluents, but showed that the entrance of the thermotolerant coliforms was early in the industrial process. Also, large numbers of thermotolerant coliforms, i.e., 7,000,000 MPN/g sludge (dry weight; d.w.), were found in combined sludges. From this first series of isolations, bacteria were purified on MacConkey medium and identified as Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter sp, E. sakazakii, E. cloacae, Escherichia coli, K. pneumoniae, K. pneumoniae subsp. rhinoscleromatis, K. pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae, K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae, Pantoea sp, Raoultella terrigena, R. planticola. Second, the presence of thermotolerant coliforms was measured at more than 3,700-6,000 MPN/g (d.w) sludge, whereas E. coli was detected from 730 to more than 3,300 MPN/g (d.w.) sludge. The presence of thermotolerant coliform bacteria and E. coli was sometimes detected

  11. Fresh steam-flaked corn in cattle feedlots is an important site for fecal coliform contamination by house flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anuradha; Zurek, Ludek

    2015-03-01

    House flies are a common pest at food animal facilities, including cattle feedlots. Previously, house flies were shown to play an important role in the ecology of Escherichia coli O157:H7; house flies in cattle feedlots carried this zoonotic pathogen and were able to contaminate cattle through direct contact and/or by contamination of drinking water and feed. Because house flies aggregate in large numbers on fresh ( # 6 h) steam-flaked corn (FSFC) used in cattle feed, the aim of this study was to assess FSFC in a cattle feedlot as a potentially important site of fecal coliform contamination by house flies. House flies and FSFC samples were collected, homogenized, and processed for culturing of fecal coliforms on membrane fecal coliform agar. Selected isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and representative isolates from each phylogenetic group were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Fecal coliforms were undetectable in FSFC shortly (0 h) after flaking; however, in summer, after 4 to 6 h, the concentrations of fecal coliforms ranged from 1.9 × 10(3) to 3.7 × 10(4) CFU/g FSFC (mean, 1.1 ± 3.0 × 10(4) CFU/g). House flies from FSFC carried between 7.6 × 10(2) and 4.1 × 10(6) CFU of fecal coliforms per fly (mean, 6.0 ± 2.3 × 10(5) CFU per fly). Fecal coliforms were represented by E. coli (85.1%), Klebsiella spp. (10.6%), and Citrobacter spp. (4.3%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated clonal matches of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. between house flies and FSFC. In contrast, in winter and in the absence of house flies, the contamination of corn by fecal coliforms was significantly (∼10-fold) lower. These results indicate that FSFC is an important site for bacterial contamination by flies and possible exchange of E. coli and other bacteria among house flies. Further research is needed to evaluate the potential use of screens or blowers to limit the access of house flies to FSFC and therefore their effectiveness in preventing

  12. Seasonality of water quality and diarrheal disease counts in urban and rural settings in south India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinkina, Alexandra V.; Mohan, Venkat R.; Francis, Mark R.; Kattula, Deepthi; Sarkar, Rajiv; Plummer, Jeanine D.; Ward, Honorine; Kang, Gagandeep; Balraj, Vinohar; Naumova, Elena N.

    2016-02-01

    The study examined relationships among meteorological parameters, water quality and diarrheal disease counts in two urban and three rural sites in Tamil Nadu, India. Disease surveillance was conducted between August 2010 and March 2012; concurrently water samples from street-level taps in piped distribution systems and from household storage containers were tested for pH, nitrate, total dissolved solids, and total and fecal coliforms. Methodological advances in data collection (concurrent prospective disease surveillance and environmental monitoring) and analysis (preserving temporality within the data through time series analysis) were used to quantify independent effects of meteorological conditions and water quality on diarrheal risk. The utility of a local calendar in communicating seasonality is also presented. Piped distribution systems in the study area showed high seasonal fluctuations in water quality. Higher ambient temperature decreased and higher rainfall increased diarrheal risk with temperature being the predominant factor in urban and rainfall in rural sites. Associations with microbial contamination were inconsistent; however, disease risk in the urban sites increased with higher median household total coliform concentrations. Understanding seasonal patterns in health outcomes and their temporal links to environmental exposures may lead to improvements in prospective environmental and disease surveillance tailored to addressing public health problems.

  13. Bacterial Count of Pasteurized Milk Packed by Plastic Distributed in Malang Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rini Mastuti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of study was to investigated the number of bacteria in pasteurized milk packed by plastic and distributed in Malang Municipality. The results were compared with the standards, then. The material consisted of six different products obtained from six milk pasteurized agents. A survey research was carried out, and sampling of pasteurized milk was taken by simple random sampling and the agent was taken as total sampling. The number and type of bacteria were determined in the laboratory. TPC method was used to test the number of bacteria, MPN method on coliform bacteria, Gram colouring on bacterial identification, and TPC method on the number of bacteria in plastic packaging. Data were descriptively analysed. Compared with standard of pasteurized milk quality according to the standard regulated by government. The results showed the pasteurized milk packed by plastic distributed in Malang Municipality was unsuitable according to the standards with bacterial content and still found the coliform bacteria. It is recommended the need of agency which enable to control and testing for the products in Malang Municipality to keep quality and safety for the consument.   Keywords : bacterial count, pasteurized milk, plastic packaging.

  14. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Maro Reef, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Maro Reef, in September, 2004...

  15. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Oahu Island, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 1 site at Oahu in February, 2005 from...

  16. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 9 sites around Kure Atoll in the...

  17. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Howland, Pacific Remote Island Areas (PRIAs), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 6 sites around Howland in the...

  18. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Howland Island, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 5 sites at Howland Island in January,...

  19. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Jarvis, Pacific Remote Island Areas (PRIAs), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 9 sites around Jarvis in the...

  20. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Johnston Island, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Johnston Island in January,...

  1. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at the Jarvis Island, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 6 sites at Jarvis Island in March from...

  2. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Supply Reef, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 1 sites at Supply Reef in the...

  3. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Ofu and Olosega Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Ofu and Olosega Islands in...

  4. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Sarigan, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 3 sites around Sarigan in the...

  5. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 9 sites around Maro Reef in the NW...

  6. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Pathfinder Reef, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 2 sites around Pathfinder Reef in...

  7. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Pagan, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 10 sites around Pagan in the...

  8. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Agrihan, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 4 sites around Agrihan in the...

  9. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Zealandia Bank, Marianas Archipelago, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 2 sites around Zealandia Bank in...

  10. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Ofu-Olosega, American Samoa, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 12 sites around Ofu-Olosega in the...

  11. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at the Palmyra Atoll, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 10 sites at Palmyra Atoll in March and...

  12. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at French Frigate Shoals, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at French Frigate Shoals in...

  13. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Howland, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 11 sites around Howland in the...

  14. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Kingman Reef, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kingman Reef in April, 2004...

  15. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Baker, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 4 sites around Baker in the...

  16. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Laysan Island, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at Laysan Island in...

  17. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Lisianski, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 9 sites around Lisianski in the NW...

  18. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Kaula Rock, Main Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 2 sites around Kaula Rock in the...

  19. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Lanai, Main Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 6 sites around Lanai in the Main...

  20. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at the Maui Island, February 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at Maui in February, 2005 from...

  1. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Ta'u, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Ta'u, Island in American...

  2. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Laysan, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 3 sites around Laysan in the NW...

  3. Salmonella and fecal coliforms in cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia Blume and Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees) sold in the city of Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Philippi, Jane Maria de S.; Moretto, Eliane

    1995-01-01

    Cem amostras de canela em pó de dez marcas diferentes comercializadas na cidade de Florianópolis, SC, foram submetidas à análise microbiológica, pesquisando-se Salmonella e coliformes de origem fecal. Em nenhuma amostra foi detectada Salmonella. Coliformes de origem fecal foram encontrados entre os valores

  4. Rapid methods for detection of bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Andersen, B.Ø.; Miller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional methods for detection of bacteria in drinking water e.g. Heterotrophic Plate Counts (HPC) or Most Probable Number (MNP) take 48-72 hours to give the result. New rapid methods for detection of bacteria are needed to protect the consumers against contaminations. Two rapid methods...

  5. Counting a Culture of Mealworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    Math is not the only topic that will be discussed when young children are asked to care for and count "mealworms," a type of insect larvae (just as caterpillars are the babies of butterflies, these larvae are babies of beetles). The following activity can take place over two months as the beetles undergo metamorphosis from larvae to adults. As the…

  6. Verbal Counting in Bilingual Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donevska-Todorova, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Informal experiences in mathematics often include playful competitions among young children in counting numbers in as many as possible different languages. Can these enjoyable experiences result with excellence in the formal processes of education? This article discusses connections between mathematical achievements and natural languages within…

  7. Shakespeare Live! and Character Counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookshire, Cathy A.

    This paper discusses a live production of Shakespeare's "Macbeth" (in full costume but with no sets) for all public middle school and high school students in Harrisonburg and Rockingham, Virginia. The paper states that the "Character Counts" issues that are covered in the play are: decision making, responsibility and…

  8. On modelling overdispersion of counts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortema, Klaas

    1999-01-01

    For counts it often occurs that the observed variance exceeds the nominal variance of the claimed binomial, multinomial or Poisson distributions. We study how models can be extended to cope with this phenomenon: a survey of literature is given. We focus on modelling, not on estimation or testing

  9. Kids Count Data Sheet, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD.

    Data from the 50 United States are listed for 1997 from Kids Count in an effort to track state-by-state the status of children in the United States and to secure better futures for all children. Data include percent low birth weight babies; infant mortality rate; child death rate; rate of teen deaths by accident, homicide, and suicide; teen birth…

  10. Vote Counting as Mathematical Proof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Pattinson, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    -based formalisation of voting protocols inside a theorem prover, we synthesise vote counting programs that are not only provably correct, but also produce independently verifiable certificates. These programs are generated from a (formal) proof that every initial set of ballots allows to decide the election winner...

  11. Kids Count New Hampshire, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Susan Palmer; Hall, Douglas E.

    This Kids Count report presents statewide trends in the well-being of New Hampshire's children. The statistical report is based on 14 indicators of child well being: (1) children in poverty; (2) fatherless families; (3) maternal education; (4) teen births; (5) births to unmarried mothers; (6) low birth weight births; (7) insurance coverage; (8)…

  12. EFEKTIVITAS KAPORIT PADA PROSES KLORINASI TERHADAP PENURUNAN BAKTERI Coliform DARI LIMBAH CAIR RUMAH SAKIT X SAMARINDA (The Effectiveness of Calcium Hypochlorite to Chlorination Process in Decreasing the Amount of Coliform Bacteria in the Wastewater of X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Busyairi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Kaporit pada limbah cair rumah sakit digunakan sebagai desinfektan, tetapi, penggunaan kaporit dengan dosis yang tidak tepat akan menyebabkan pembentukan senyawa Trihalomethane (THMs yang beracun dan bersifat karsinogenik. Pada limbah cair rumah sakit X Samarinda, diperoleh nilai MPN Coliform sebesar >160.000 MPN / 100 mL dengan residu klor sebesar 0 ppm. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menentukan dosis optimum dari penggunaan kaporit menggunakan titik Breakpoint Chlorination (BPC dan pengaruhnya terhadap penurunan Coliform. Analisis dilakukan dengan titrasi iodometri dan menghitung jumlah bakteri Coliform memakai metode Most Probable Number (MPN. Penentuan dosis kaporit berdasarkan dosis optimum pada titik BPC dimaksudkan agar dapat menjaga residu klor dari penambahan dosis yang semakin meningkat. Hasil penelitian mempengarui rerata kadar bahan organik pada sampel limbah cair sebesar 137,26 ppm, sehingga dosis kaporit yang dibubuhkan dimulai dari 130-165 ppm. Titik BPC terjadi pada pembubuhan klor aktif 160 ppm untuk kedua waktu kontak yaitu 30 dan 40 menit. Pada titik BPC, waktu kontak 30 menit diperoleh rerata persentase penurunan nilai Coliform yaitu 98,21% sebesar 2.899 MPN / 100 mL dengan residu klor sebesar 88 ppm. Pada waktu kontak 40 menit diperoleh persentase penurunan bakteri Coliform hingga 98,83%, yaitu dari >160.000/100 mL menjadi 1.866/100 mL dengan residu klor 97,5 ppm. ABSTRACT Calcium hypochlorite of hospital wastewater serves as disinfectant, however, inappropriate dose of it will lead to the formation of Trihalomethane (THMs which is toxic and carcinogenic. The value of MPN Coliform of wastewater in X hospital Samarinda is >160.000 MPN / 100 mL with residual chlorine 0 ppm. This research aims at determining the optimum dose of calcium hypochlorite usage by using Breakpoint Chlorination curve and its effect to Coliform decrease. Further, the analysis is done by employing iodometric titration and the amount of Coliform

  13. [Fecal coliforms in sewage. II. Transfer of markers and the presence of plasmids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincente, A C; Dias, J C; Hofer, E

    1988-01-01

    The transference of the genetic markers and the presence of DNA plasmidial in 240 cultures of Escherichia coli was investigated. The strains were originated from Waste Treatment Plant (inffluent and effluents) located in Ilha do Governador, Rio de Janeiro. By conjugation analysis, E. coli K 12 allowed the isolation of the transconjugants resistant to antibiotics Su, Sm, Tc, Cm, Ap; heavy metals (Cu, Hg and Zn) and colicinogenic factors (Ia, Ib and V) mainly in coliforms isolated Cm and Ap from the terminals of the treatment plant. The percentual distribution of the plasmids was prevalent in the cultures of E. coli originated from material collected in the effluents and reached a rate higher than 65%.

  14. Modeling of Fecal Coliform Bacteria in Surface Drip Irrigationin Clay Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    foroogh abbasi teshnizi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Water for agriculture is one of the most important factors in arid and semi-arid areas and municipal wastewater treatment is an important resource for this purpose. Therefore, potential of transfer contaminations is a serious problem regarding use of treated wastewater for agriculture. Due to the risk of transfer contaminations through the use of wastewater, the study of transfer microbes in soil in recent decades has been of interest to researchers. In the present study, the transfer of bacteria fecal coliform was investigated in a lysimeter and the HYDRUS-1D model was used to simulate water flow and the fecal coliform in the soil. For calibration of the model and estimating the model input parameters, soil hydraulic and transport parameters, were inversely estimated. Results represented that the HYDRUS-1D with reasonably accurately simulated the outlet flow. To simulate the transfer of the bacteria in the soil, one site sorption model, two kinetic sites model (particle transport using attachment/detachment and one kinetic site model were used. In the simulation of bacterial transfer, one site sorption model was selected as the proper model for this study. One site sorption model estimated solid-phase growth coefficient ( about sextuple more than liquid-phase. It showed that deposited cells had a higher division rate compared with the cell in liquid-phase. The calibrated model was used for surveying the effect various irrigation intervals and irrigation times on bacterial transfer. The results showed that by increasing irrigation times, more bacteria leached out from the soil. Also by increasing irrigation intervals, more bacteria observed in the soil profile, due to favorable environmental conditions and food for the bacteria growth. According to the results, the best interval and irrigation times were one day and four hours, respectively.

  15. Selection of Potential Probiotic Lactobacillus with Inhibitory Activity Against Salmonella and Fecal Coliform Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhisingha, Mattika; Dumnil, Jureeporn; Pitaksutheepong, Chetsadaporn

    2017-07-15

    Three hundred and sixty presumptive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from pregnant sows, newborn, suckling, and weaned piglets were preliminarily screened for anti-Salmonella activity. Fifty-eight isolates consisting of Lactobacillus reuteri (n = 32), Lactobacillus salivarius (n = 10), Lactobacillus mucosae (n = 8), Lactobacillus johnsonii (n = 5), and Lactobacillus crispatus (n = 3) were selected and further characterized for probiotic properties including production of antimicrobial substances, acid and bile tolerance, and cell adherence to Caco-2 cells. Eight isolates including Lact. johnsonii LJ202 and Lact. reuteri LR108 were identified as potential probiotics. LJ202 was selected for further use in co-culture studies of two-bacterial and multiple-bacterial species to examine its inhibitory activity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis DMST7106 (SE7106). Co-culture of LJ202 and SE7106 showed that LJ202 could completely inhibit the growth of SE7106 in 10 h of co-culture. In co-culture of multiple-bacterial species, culturable fecal bacteria from pig feces were used as representative of multiple-bacterial species. The study was performed to examine whether interactions among multiple-bacterial species would influence antagonistic activity of LJ202 against SE7106 and fecal coliform bacteria. Co-culture of SE7106 with different combinations of fecal bacteria and probiotic (LJ202 and LR108) or non-probiotic (Lact. mucosae LM303) strains revealed that the growth of SE7106 was completely inhibited either in the presence or in the absence of probiotic strains. Intriguingly, LJ202 exhibited notable inhibitory activity against fecal coliform bacteria while LR108 did not. Taken together, the results of co-culture studies suggested that LJ202 is a good probiotic candidate for further study its inhibitory effects against pathogen infections in pigs.

  16. Fast coliform detection in portable microbe enrichment unit (PMEU) with Colilert(®) medium and bubbling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakalehto, Elias; Heitto, Anneli; Heitto, Lauri

    2013-09-01

    Laboratory strains of coliforms Escherichia coli and Klebsiella mobilis were used to artificially contaminate water samples in two different cultivation and detection systems, without and with bubble flow. Samples were collected with an automated system (ASCS). The positive coliform signal caused the color change into yellow (at 550-570nm). This signal could also be transmitted on-line to cell phones. E. coli containing samples emitted UV fluorescence at 480-560nm when activated by UV light. If cultivation was started with inocula varying from 10,000 to 1cfu/ml, the positive detection was obtained between 2 and 18h, respectively, in Colilert medium using Coline PMEU device without gas bubbling. Accordingly, a single K. mobilis cell produced detectable growth in 18h. Various clinical E. coli strains were compared to each other with equal inoculum sizes, and they showed slight variations in the initiation and speed of growth. The gas bubble flow in PMEU Spectrion promoted the mixing and interaction of bacteria and indicator media and speeded the onset of growth. Carbon dioxide also accelerated bacterial growth. In the presence of vancomycin, the onset of E. coli culture growth was speeded up by the volatile outlet flow from previous cultures. In the last cultivation syringe in a series of five, the lag phase disappeared and the growth of the inoculum continued without major interruption. the stimulation of the cultures by the gas flow turned out to be a useful means for improving the detection of indicator bacteria. It could also be used in combination with antibiotic selection in the broth medium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Downflow Hanging Sponge (DHS) reactor for faecal coliform removal from an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) effluent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yaya Beas, R.E.; Kujawa-Roeleveld, K.; Lier, van J.B.; Zeeman, G.

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted to study the faecal coliforms removal capacity of Downflow Hanging Sponge (DHS) reactors as a post-treatment for an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor. Three long-term continuous lab-scale DHS reactors i.e. a reactor with cube type sponges without

  18. Inactivation and injury of total coliform bacteria after primary disinfection of drinking water by TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Luigi, E-mail: l.rizzo@unisa.it [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    In this study the potential application of TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis as primary disinfection system of drinking water was investigated in terms of coliform bacteria inactivation and injury. As model water the effluent of biological denitrification unit for nitrate removal from groundwater, which is characterized by high organic matter and bacteria release, was used. The injury of photocatalysis on coliform bacteria was characterized by means of selective (mEndo) and less selective (mT7) culture media. Different catalyst loadings as well as photolysis and adsorption effects were investigated. Photocatalysis was effective in coliform bacteria inactivation (91-99% after 60 min irradiation time, depending on both catalyst loading and initial density of coliform bacteria detected by mEndo), although no total removal was observed after 60 min irradiation time. The contribution of adsorption mechanism was significant (60-98% after 60 min, depending on catalyst loading) compared to previous investigations probably due to the nature of source water rich in particulate organic matter and biofilm. Photocatalysis process did not result in any irreversible injury (98.8% being the higher injury) under investigated conditions, thus a bacteria regrowth may take place under optimum environment conditions if any final disinfection process (e.g., chlorine or chlorine dioxide) is not used.

  19. Effect of anaerobic digestion temperature on odour, coliforms and chlortetracycline in swine manure or monensin in cattle manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varel, V H; Wells, J E; Shelver, W L; Rice, C P; Armstrong, D L; Parker, D B

    2012-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of anaerobic digestion at 22, 38 and 55°C on odour, coliforms and chlortetracycline (CTC) in swine manure or monensin (MON) in cattle manure. Swine or cattle were fed the respective growth promotant, manure was collected, and 2-l laboratory methane digesters were established at the various temperatures and sampled over 25 or 28 days. After 21 days, the concentration of CTC in the 22, 38 and 55°C swine digester slurries decreased 7, 80 and 98%, respectively. Coliforms in the 22°C digester slurries were still viable after 25 days; however, they were not detectable in the 38 and 55°C slurries after 3 and 1 days, respectively. After 28 days, the concentration of MON in the 22, 38 and 55°C cattle digester slurries decreased 3, 8 and 27%, respectively. Coliforms in the 22°C cattle digester slurries were still viable after 28 days; however, they were not detectable in the 38 and 55°C slurries after 14 and 1 days, respectively. These studies indicate that anaerobic digestion at 38 or 55°C may be an effective treatment to reduce coliforms and CTC; however, it is not an effective treatment to reduce MON. More studies are needed to determine which pharmaceuticals are susceptible to degradation by a specific manure treatment to prevent negative environmental consequences. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Characterization of genetic determinants involved in antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas spp. and fecal coliforms isolated from different aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnelli, Alessandro; Mauri, Federica; Demarta, Antonella

    2017-06-01

    Aeromonas spp. and fecal coliforms, two abundant and cultivable bacterial populations that can be found in water ecosystems, might substantially contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance. We investigated the presence and spread of transposons (elements that can move from one location to another in the genome), integrons (structures able to capture and incorporate gene cassettes) and resistance plasmids in strains isolated from polluted and unpolluted water. We recovered 231 Aeromonas and 250 fecal coliforms from water samplings with different degrees of pollution (hospital sewage, activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant, river water before and after treatment and water from an alpine lake). Sixteen Aeromonas spp. and 22 fecal coliforms carried intI, coding for the site-specific integrase of class 1 integrons, while 22 Aeromonas spp. and 14 fecal coliforms carried tnpA, the transposase gene of the Tn3-family of replicative transposons. The majority of intI and tnpA-positive strains were phenotypically resistant to at least four antibiotics. Integrons and transposons were mainly located on mobilizable plasmids. Our results did not detect common mobile structures in the two populations and therefore relativize the role played by Aeromonas spp. as vectors of antimicrobial resistance determinants between water and commensal gut bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Viral and bacterial contamination in a sedimentary aquifer in Uruguay: evaluation of coliforms as regional indicators of viral contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazo, Pablo; Colina, Rodney; Victoria, Matias; Alvareda, Elena; Burutatran, Luciana; Ramos, Julian; Olivera, María; Soler, Joan

    2015-04-01

    In many areas of Uruguay groundwater is the only source of water for human consumption and for industrial-agricultural economic activities. Traditionally considered as a safe source, groundwater is commonly used without any treatment. The Uruguayan law requires bacteriological (fecal) analysis for most water uses, but virological analyses are not mentioned in the legislation. In the Salto district, where groundwater is used for human consumption and for agricultural activities, bacterial contamination has been detected in several wells but no viruses analysis have been performed. The Republic University (UDELAR), with the support of the National Agency for Research and Innovation (ANII), is studying the incidence of virus and fecal bacteria in groundwater on an intensive agriculture area of the Salto district. An initial screening campaign of 44 wells was performed in which, besides total and fecal coliforms, rotavirus and adenovirus were detected. A subgroup of the screening wells (15) where selected for bimonthly sampling during a year. In accordance with literature results, single well data analysis shows that coliform and viral contamination can be considered as independent variables. However, when spatial data is integrated, coliform and viral contamination show linear correlation. In this work we present the survey results, we analyse the temporal incidence of variables like precipitation, temperature and chemical composition in well contamination and we discuss the value of coliforms as global indicator of viral contamination for the Salto aquifer.

  2. Comparison of methods for enumeration of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in water samples in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schets FM; Nobel PJ; Strating S; Mooijman KA; Engels GB; Brouwer A; Kiwa; PWN; MGB

    2001-01-01

    The new European Drinking Water Directive (December 1998) defines a reference method for estimating the concentration of coliforms and Escherichia coli in drinking water. Laboratories may use other methods, but should demonstrate that results obtained are at least as reliable as those produced with

  3. Fecal Coliform and E. coli Concentrations in Effluent-Dominated Streams of the Upper Santa Cruz Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily C. Sanders

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the water quality of the Upper Santa Cruz Watershed in southern Arizona in terms of fecal coliform and Escherichia coli (E. coli bacteria concentrations discharged as treated effluent and from nonpoint sources into the Santa Cruz River and surrounding tributaries. The objectives were to (1 assess the water quality in the Upper Santa Cruz Watershed in terms of fecal coliform and E. coli by comparing the available data to the water quality criteria established by Arizona, (2 to provide insights into fecal indicator bacteria (FIB response to the hydrology of the watershed and (3 to identify if point sources or nonpoint sources are the major contributors of FIB in the stream. Assessment of the available wastewater treatment plant treated effluent data and in-stream sampling data indicate that water quality criteria for E. coli and fecal coliform in recreational waters are exceeded at all locations of the Santa Cruz River. For the wastewater discharge, 13%–15% of sample concentrations exceeded the 800 colony forming units (cfu per 100 mL sample maximum for fecal coliform and 29% of samples exceeded the full body contact standard of 235 cfu/100 mL established for E. coli; while for the in-stream grab samples, 16%–34% of sample concentrations exceeded the 800 cfu/100 mL sample maximum for fecal coliforms and 34%–75% of samples exceeded the full body contact standard of 235 cfu/100 mL established for E. coli. Elevated fecal coliform and E. coli concentrations were positively correlated with periods of increased streamflow from rainfall. FIB concentrations observed in-stream are significantly greater (p-value < 0.0002 than wastewater treatment plants effluent concentrations; therefore, water quality managers should focus on nonpoint sources to reduce overall fecal indicator loads. Findings indicate that fecal coliform and E. coli concentrations are highly variable, especially along urban streams and generally increase with

  4. Temporal trends in sperm count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Hagai; Jørgensen, Niels; Martino-Andrade, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    , method of measuring SC and semen volume, exclusion criteria and indicators of completeness of covariate data]. The slopes of SC and TSC were estimated as functions of sample collection year using both simple linear regression and weighted meta-regression models and the latter were adjusted for pre......-determined covariates and modification by fertility and geographic group. Assumptions were examined using multiple sensitivity analyses and nonlinear models. OUTCOMES: SC declined significantly between 1973 and 2011 (slope in unadjusted simple regression models -0.70 million/ml/year; 95% CI: -0.72 to -0.69; P ...BACKGROUND: Reported declines in sperm counts remain controversial today and recent trends are unknown. A definitive meta-analysis is critical given the predictive value of sperm count for fertility, morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: To provide a systematic review and meta-regression...

  5. 1/Nc Countings in Baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose Goity

    2004-05-01

    The 1/N{sub c} power countings for baryon decays and configuration mixings are determined by means of a non-relativistic quark picture. Such countings are expected to be robust as the quark masses are decreased towards the chiral limit. It is shown that excited baryons have natural widths of {Omicron}(N{sub c}{sup 0}). These dominant widths are due to the decays that proceed directly to the ground state baryons, with cascade decays being suppressed to {Omicron}(1/N{sub c}). Configuration mixings, defined as mixings between states belonging to different O(3) x SU(2N{sub f}) multiplets, are shown to be sub-leading in an expansion in 1/{radical}N{sub c}, except for certain mixings between excited multiplets belonging to the mixed-symmetric spin-flavor representation and different O(3) representations, where the mixings are of zeroth order in 1/N{sub c}.

  6. Presence of faecal coliforms and selected heavy metals in ice cubes from food outlets in Taman Universiti, Johor Bahru, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, N A; Meor Ahmad, Z; Abdul Wahab, R

    2015-09-01

    Consumption of iced beverages is common in Malaysia although specific research focusing on its safety parameters such as presence of faecal coliforms and heavy metal elements remains scarce. A study conducted in Kelantan indicated that faecal coliforms were detected in the majority of the ice cube samples analyzed, largely attributable to improper handling. Hence, it was found pertinent to conduct similar study in other parts of the country such as Johor Bahru if the similar pattern prevailed. Therefore, this present cross sectional study which randomly sampled ice cubes from 30 permanent food outlets in Taman Universiti, Johor Bahru for detecting contamination by faecal coliforms and selected heavy metal elements (lead, copper, manganese and zinc) acquires significance. Faecal coliforms were detected in 11 (36.67%) of the samples, ranging between 1 CFU/100 mL to > 50 CFU/100 mL; two of the samples were grossly contaminated (>50 CFU/100 mL). Interestingly, while positive detection of lead was observed in 29 of the 30 ice cube samples (mean: 0.511±0.105 ppm; range: 0.489-0.674 ppm), copper, manganese and zinc were not detected. In addition, analysis on commercially bottled mineral water as well as in tap water samples did not detect such contaminations. Therefore, it appears that (1) contamination of faecal coliforms in ice cubes in food outlets in Malaysia may not be sporadic in pattern but rather prevalent and (2) the source of water used for manufacturing the ice cubes that contained significant amount of lead would suggest that (3) it was neither originated from the treated tap water supply nor bottled mineral water or (4) perhaps contaminated during manufacturing process. Further studies exploring the source of water used for manufacturing these ice cubes as well as the handling process among food operators deserve consideration.

  7. Genetic relatedness of faecal coliforms and enterococci bacteria isolated from water and sediments of the Apies River, Gauteng, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwanzala, Mutshiene Deogratias; Abia, Akebe Luther King; Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice; Keshri, Jitendra; Momba, Ndombo Benteke Maggy

    2017-12-01

    To date, the microbiological quality of river sediments and its impact on water resources are not included in the water quality monitoring assessment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish genetic relatedness between faecal coliforms and enterococci isolated from the river water and riverbed sediments of Apies River to better understand the genetic similarity of microorganisms between the sediment and water phases. Indicator bacteria were subjected to a molecular study, which consisted of PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA gene using specific primers for faecal coliforms and enterococci, respectively. Results revealed that the Apies River had high faecal pollution levels with enterococci showing low to moderate correlation coefficient (r2 values ranged from 0.2605 to 0.7499) compared to the faecal coliforms which showed zero to low correlation (r2 values ranged from 0.0027 to 0.1407) indicating that enterococci may be better indicator than faecal coliforms for detecting faecal contamination in riverbed sediments. The phylogenetic tree of faecal coliforms revealed a 98% homology among their nucleotide sequences confirming the close genetic relatedness between river water and riverbed sediment isolates. The phylogenetic tree of the enterococci showed that Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium are the predominant species found in both river water and riverbed sediments with bootstrap values of ≥99%. A high degree of genetic relatedness between sediment and water isolates indicated a possible common ancestry and transmission pathway. We recommend the microbial monitoring of riverbed sediments as it harbours more diverse microbial community and once resuspended may cause health and environmental problems.

  8. Monitoring Milk Somatic Cell Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Şteţca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of somatic cells in milk is a widely disputed issue in milk production sector. The somatic cell counts in raw milk are a marker for the specific cow diseases such as mastitis or swollen udder. The high level of somatic cells causes physical and chemical changes to milk composition and nutritional value, and as well to milk products. Also, the mastitic milk is not proper for human consumption due to its contribution to spreading of certain diseases and food poisoning. According to these effects, EU Regulations established the maximum threshold of admitted somatic cells in raw milk to 400000 cells / mL starting with 2014. The purpose of this study was carried out in order to examine the raw milk samples provided from small farms, industrial type farms and milk processing units. There are several ways to count somatic cells in milk but the reference accepted method is the microscopic method described by the SR EN ISO 13366-1/2008. Generally samples registered values in accordance with the admissible limit. By periodical monitoring of the somatic cell count, certain technological process issues are being avoided and consumer’s health ensured.

  9. A novel interference fringes software counting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanzhao; Chen, Benyong; Wu, Xiaowei; Li, Dacheng

    2005-02-01

    Conventional interference fringes counting methods often process two sinusoidal interference signals with a phase difference of π/2 to realize fringe-counting. But when the signals fluctuate in half a period of the signal, the conventional fringe-counting method sometimes produces direction-distinguishing mistakes, then resulting in counting errors. To address the problem, this paper presents a novel interference fringes counting method that uses software to distinguish the forward or backward direction of interference fringe and to count. This fringe-counting method can accurately distinguish the moving direction induced by the fluctuation of interference fringes, so it has the advantages of exact counting, intelligence and reliability. An experimental setup based on a Michelson interferometer is constructed to demonstrate the utility of this fringe-counting method for displacement measurement, and experimental results with a range of 1036mm is presented.

  10. Colimetria de água marinha em áreas de cultivo e extrativismo de mexilhões no município de Niterói, RJ Coliform enumeration in mussel-growing waters from Niteroi city, RJ-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Pinheiro Jr.

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Analisaram-se amostras de água do mar de cinco pontos da Baía de Guanabara quanto ao número mais provável (NMP de coliformes totais e de Escherichia coli usando-se o método fluorogênico, e verificaram-se o pH, a salinidade e a temperatura dos locais de colheita. As contagens de E. coli nas amostras das estações Icaraí, Boa Viagem e Santa Cruz foram, em média, acima do previsto na legislação, enquanto que nas estações Piratininga e Rio Branco, 92,9% e 100% das amostras tiveram contagens de E. coli menor que 3/100ml. Observou-se relação positiva entre coliformes totais e E. coli, enquanto que a correlação entre colimetria, pH, salinidade e temperatura da água não foi significativa. Temperatura e pH mostraram pouca variação entre as estações, sendo as médias de salinidade, coliformes totais e E. coli semelhantes em Icaraí, Boa Viagem e Santa Cruz. Piratininga e Rio Branco apresentaram médias diferentes destas e semelhantes entre si. Os resultados em Icaraí, Boa Viagem e Santa Cruz indicam provável impropriedade para o cultivo e/ou extrativismo de mexilhões destinados ao consumo, enquanto que os de Piratininga e Rio Branco indicam provável propriedade para a instalação de cultivo de mexilhões ou mesmo para depuração natural de mexilhões cultivados em águas contaminadas.Water samples from five different sites on Guanabara Bay (Icaraí, Boa Viagem, Santa Cruz, Piratininga, and Rio Branco were analyzed for estimated numbers of coliform and Escherichiacoli. Water pH, salt concentration, and temperature were measuredin the sampling place. E.coli countings for samples collected in Icaraí, Boa Viagem, and Santa Cruz were usually higher than the values legallyaccepted by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture. In Piratininga and Rio Branco, respectively, 92.3% and 100% of the sampleshad countings of lessthan 3 E.coli/100ml. A significant correlation was found between total coliforms and E. coli countings. The average

  11. Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.; Dik, N.; Nielen, M.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms,

  12. CalCOFI Larvae Counts Positive Tows

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for eggs captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  13. Alaska Steller Sea Lion Pup Count Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains counts of Steller sea lion pups on rookeries in Alaska made between 1961 and 2015. Pup counts are conducted in late June-July. Pups are...

  14. White blood cell count - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The White Blood Cell (WBC) Count measures two components: the total number of WBC's (leukocytes), and the differential count. ... and basophils) and non-granulocytes (lymphocytes and monocytes). White blood cells are a major component of the ...

  15. Interaction between Thermotolerant Coliforms and Rhizobacteria in Soil Fertilized with Treated Domestic Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fortes Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Studies on the survival of pathogenic microorganisms in the soil after use of wastewater for fertilization of agricultural crops report the effects of moisture, pH, organic matter, and soil temperature on microorganisms. There are few studies that assess the survival of these microorganisms in the rhizosphere of plants fertilized with wastewater. Thus, the aim of this study was to quantify the number of fecal coliforms and rhizobacteria (fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp, in the rhizosphere of winter and summer crops fertilized with wastewater. In the experiment, we used 20 plots, and each plot occupied an area of 200 m2. The treatments used in the winter crop consisted of uncultivated plots and single crops of wheat, triticale, black bean, and intercropped black bean/wheat. In the summer season, we used uncultivated plots and single crops of corn, sunflower, bean, and intercropped bean/corn. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design with five treatments and four replications. Soil samples from the rhizosphere for microbiological analyses were collected at the flowering stage of the crops at a depth of 0.00-0.20 m. Plants stimulated fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp. in the rhizosphere, with average scores of 7.9 and 6.9 log CFU g-1 of dry soil, respectively, whereas in bare soil, these scores were 6.7 and 5.8 log CFU g-1 of dry soil for these rhizobacteria groups. However, this stimulating effect was not seen for fecal coliforms, which had an average score of 31.7 × 103 MPN g-1 of dry soil in the uncultivated area and 20.0 × 103 MPN g-1 of dry soil in crop areas. Overall, the numbers of rhizobacteria colonies in the rhizosphere soil under intercropping were higher than those observed in the rhizosphere soils of single winter and summer crops. Therefore, the presence of plants enhances the development of rhizobacteria and changes the balance among the species of microorganisms in the soil microbial

  16. Identifikasi Bakteri Coliform pada Air Kobokan di Rumah Makan Kelurahan Andalas Kecamatan Padang Timur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervan Arditya Kusuma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Air kobokan merupakan media untuk cuci tangan yang banyak digunakan di rumah makan di  Kota Padang. Diare adalah penyakit yang ditularkan melalui air yang terkontaminasi oleh bakteri. Angka perkiraan kasus diare di Padang Timur merupakan yang tertinggi di Kota Padang. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui kualitas mikrobiologi air kobokan di rumah makan di Kelurahan Andalas Kecamatan Padang Timur. Sebanyak 21 sampel yang diambil dan dibagi sesuai dengan sumber airnya yaitu 12 sumber air PDAM dan 9 sumber air sumur bor. Penelitian ini dibagi dalam dua tahap, tahap pertama:  pengambilan sampel dan observasi faktor yang mempengaruhi kontaminasi. Kedua: uji bakteriologi dengan metode Most Propable Number (MPN yang meliputi uji penduga, uji konfirmasi dan uji lengkap.Seluruh sampel air kobokan mengandung bakteri coliform. Sebagian besar sampel tidak memenuhi syaratmikrobiologis sesuai dengan PERMENKES no 46 tahun 1990 dan hanya satu sampel yang berasal dari air PDAM memenuhi syarat mikrobiologis. Sampel yang berasal dari PDAM didapatkan 4 yang mengandung E.coli dan dari sumber sumur bor didapatkan 3 sampel mengandung E.coli dan lainnya mengandung bakteri lain seperti Klebsiella, Enterobacter dan Pseudomonas. Hal ini dipengaruhi oleh banyak faktor seperti kebersihan wadah, lokasi rumah makan dan lokasi sumur bor.Kata kunci: air kobokan, most propable number (MPN. Abstract Water is the common use for hand washing in restaurant in Padang city. The research was conducted at restaurant in Andalas, East Padang. Diarrhea is a disease transmitted through water contaminated by bacteria.Morbidity of diarrhea in East Padang is the highest in Padang. The objective of this study was to identify microbiological quality of water for cleaning hand at Restaurant in Andalas sub-district, East Padang district. Total 21 sampels were taken and divided according to the water source is 12 by PDAM and 9 from dug well. This research implemented in two

  17. Using Bromocresol Purple to Determine Fecal Coliforms with the Most Probable Number Technique; Utilizacion de purpura de bromocresol para la determinacion de coliformes fecales con la tecnica del numero mas probable (NMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Borges, E.; Mendez Novelo, R.

    2003-07-01

    The object of this piece of research was to determine the reliability of using bromocresol purple as an indicator for determining fecal coliforms by means of the most probable number (MPN) technique using multiple tubes and comparing the results obtained in this way with those obtained using the traditional technique of the formation of carbon dioxide in a Durham tube. Twelve samples of different types of water were analysed using sets of nine tubes, one with a Durham tube and another with the addition of bromocresol purple. In the former case, a reaction was jadged as positive (indicating the presence of coliforms) if CO{sub 2} was formed in the Durham tube. In the latter case, the reaction was considered as positive if a change in colour-from purple to yellow-of the culture medium was observed. A statistical analysis was performed to determine the significant differences in the sensitivity and specificity of both methods. (Author)

  18. Microbiological analysis of coliforms and mesophilic aerobic spore formers in gamma irradiated cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.); Analise microbiologica de coliformes e aerobicos mesofilos em amendoas de cacau (Theobroma cacao L.) irradiadas com radiacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barata, Anderson Demetrio; Mansur Netto, Elias [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia

    1995-12-31

    The presence of coliforms in processed foods is an useful indicator of post-sanitization and post processing contamination, and members of the mesophilic aerobic spore formers have great importance in food spoilage. Spore - forming aerobic bacilli have been observed in fermenting cocoa in Jamaica and West Africa. The results of this work has shown a considerable reduction of the mesophilic aerobic spore formers in irradiated Brazilian Comun Cocoa beans as long as the irradiation dose was increased from 1.05 to 3.99 kGy. The presence of coliforms irradiated has not been found even in the coroa beans with the dose of 1.05 kGy. (author). 4 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Modeling and Simulation of Count Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plan, E L

    2014-01-01

    Count data, or number of events per time interval, are discrete data arising from repeated time to event observations. Their mean count, or piecewise constant event rate, can be evaluated by discrete probability distributions from the Poisson model family. Clinical trial data characterization often involves population count analysis. This tutorial presents the basics and diagnostics of count modeling and simulation in the context of pharmacometrics. Consideration is given to overdispersion, underdispersion, autocorrelation, and inhomogeneity. PMID:25116273

  20. 7 CFR 1220.625 - Counting requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counting requests. 1220.625 Section 1220.625... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.625 Counting requests. (a) The requests for a referendum shall be counted by county FSA offices on the same day as the requests are...

  1. OCORRÊNCIA DE COLIFORMES FECAIS E Escherichia coli EM ALFACE COMERCIALIZADA EM GOIÂNIA-GO OCCURRENCE OF FECAL COLIFORMS AND E. coli ON LETTUCE MARKETED IN GOIÂNIA-GOIÁS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriqueta Merçon Vieira Rolim

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Exames bacteriológicos foram realizados em 51 amostras de alface procedentes de sete setores de Goiânia - GO e expostas à venda ao consumidor. Destas, 48 (91,1% revelaram a presença de coliformes fecais e 15 (22,9% de Escherichia coli. No conjunto das amostras, 11 (22,9% apresentaram-se fora dos padrões estabelecidos pela legislação, no que se refere à presença de coliformes fecais.

    Fifty samples of fresh lettuce from seven different sources of production and marketing places in Goiânia, Goiás, were submitted to bacteriological analyses. Fecal coliforms were found in 91.1% of the samples and E. coli was detected in 29.4%. An average of 22.9% of the samples did not comply with the standard allowed by the Brazilian legislation.

  2. How much do women count if they not counted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Taddia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The condition of women throughout the world is marked by countless injustices and violations of the most fundamental rights established by the Universal Declaration of human rights and every culture is potentially prone to commit discrimination against women in various forms. Women are worse fed, more exposed to physical violence, more exposed to diseases and less educated; they have less access to, or are excluded from, vocational training paths; they are the most vulnerable among prisoners of conscience, refugees and immigrants and the least considered within ethnic minorities; from their very childhood, women are humiliated, undernourished, sold, raped and killed; their work is generally less paid compared to men’s work and in some countries they are victims of forced marriages. Such condition is the result of old traditions that implicit gender-differentiated education has long promoted through cultural models based on theories, practices and policies marked by discrimination and structured differentially for men and women. Within these cultural models, the basic educational institutions have played and still play a major role in perpetuating such traditions. Nevertheless, if we want to overcome inequalities and provide women with empowerment, we have to start right from the educational institutions and in particular from school, through the adoption of an intercultural approach to education: an approach based on active pedagogy and on methods of analysis, exchange and enhancement typical of socio-educational animation. The intercultural approach to education is attentive to promote the realisation of each individual and the dignity and right of everyone to express himself/herself in his/her own way. Such an approach will give women the opportunity to become actual agents of collective change and to get the strength and wellbeing necessary to count and be counted as human beings entitled to freedom and equality, and to have access to all

  3. Ocorrência de Salmonella e coliformes de origem fecal na canela em pó (Cinnamomum cassia Blume a Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees comercializada em Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brasil Salmonella and fecal coliforms in cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia Blume and Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees sold in the city of Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Maria de S. Philippi

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Cem amostras de canela em pó de dez marcas diferentes comercializadas na cidade de Florianópolis, SC, foram submetidas à análise microbiológica, pesquisando-se Salmonella e coliformes de origem fecal. Em nenhuma amostra foi detectada Salmonella. Coliformes de origem fecal foram encontrados entre os valores The microbiological quality of a hundred samples of ten differents commercial brands of a ground cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia Blume and Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees from supermarkets in the city of Florianópolis, Brazil, was assessed. Salmonella and fecal coliforms were determined. Results were negative for Salmonella Fecal coliforms values ranged from 100 MPN per g. Fecal coliforms were detected in 37% of the cinnamon samples.

  4. Evaluation of media for simultaneous enumeration of total coliform and Escherichia coli in drinking water supplies by membrane filtration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dunling; Fiessel, Wanda

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated three different dehydrated media for simultaneous detection and enumeration of total coliform (TC) and Escherichia coli in drinking water samples with a standard membrane filtration procedure. The experiment indicated that the differential coliform agar (DCA) medium was the most effective among the tested media in enumerating TC and E. coli, without the need for extensive accompanying confirmation tests. The results for DCA medium were highly reproducible for both TC and E. coli with standard deviation of 6.0 and 6.1, respectively. A high agreement (82%) was found between DCA and m-Endo media on 152 drinking water samples in terms of TC positive. The DCA medium also reduced concealment of background bacteria.

  5. Salmonelas e coliformes fecais em águas de bebida para animais Salmonellas and fecal conforms in animal drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos de Souza

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available De um total de 402 propriedades rurais do Município de Botucatu, SP (Brasil com atividades de exploração pecuária, foram sorteadas 60 (15% pelo processo de amostragem probabilística simples. Nestas 60 propriedades localizaram-se 113 bebedouros que eram os mais utilizados pelos animais para sua dessedentação. Foram colhidas amostras de água desses bebedouros visando a pesquisa de bactérias do gênero Salmonella, a determinação do Número Mais Provável (NMP de bactérias coliformes fecais e a verificação do pH e da temperatura. Obteve-se isolamento positivo para salmonelas nas amostras de água de 15 (13,27% bebedouros correspondentes a 12 (20% das 60 propriedades visitadas, identificando-se os seguintes sorotipos: S. dublin, S. newport, S. madelia, S. IV 43:g, z57: -, S. saphra, S. glostrup, S. IV ochsenzool, S. I 9, 12:i: - e dois novos sorotipos S. IV 41:z52: - e S. IV 50:d:-. Das 113 amostras de água analisadas, 14 (12,39% apresentaram-se com NMP/100 mL de coliformes fecais acima de 4.000. Não foi constatada associação entre o isolamento positivo de salmonelas e NMP/100 mL de coliformes fecais acima de 4.000. O isolamento de salmonelas e NMP/100 mL de coliformes fecais acima de 4.000 deu-se em temperaturas superiores a 18°C e em pH entre 6,0 e 7,0.Sixty small farms of Botucatu County, S.Paulo, Brazil, given over to cattle breeding were studied. These farms account for 15% of the total of 402 farms that exist in the county. The sample was drawn by simple probabilistic technique. There were found to be one hundred and thirteen drinking places located on the farms. Samples of water were taken from these drinking places and examined for bacteria of the genus Salmonella, for the determination of Most Probable Number (MNP of fecal coliform bacteria as well as determination of the water's pH. Water temperature was measured before collection. Samples from 15 drinking places (13.3% were positive for Salmonella. The drinking places

  6. Faecal coliform simulation on sewage discharge for an environmentally sustainable township in Medini Iskandar Johor Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Su Yean; Koh, Hock Lye; Lee, Elizabeth; Woo, Wing Thye; Tan, Wai Kiat

    2017-11-01

    The Medini Iskandar Development is a 2300-acre multi-purpose urban development comprising residential, commercial, educational, business and recreational areas. The developer applied to the Department of Environment (DOE) Johor in July 2008 for approval of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) report for the overall Medini development. A conditional approval of the EIA report was granted by the DOE subject to some conditions, one of which stipulated that sewage effluent from the centralized sewage treatment plant (STP) is not permitted to be discharged into Sungai Pendas. A suitable location for the discharge of sewage into the Selat Johor is to be identified, based on a hydraulic and water quality modelling investigation. This modelling investigation aims to assess the impact of the discharge of treated sewage effluent on the marine water quality and on aquatic life in the Selat Johor. The supplementary EIA report was submitted to the DOE. Approval was granted in December 2011 for the construction of the marine sewage outfall and its operations. This paper presents the sampling and simulation results for key hydraulic and environmental parameters suitable for sustaining acceptable faecal coliform criteria in Selat Johor. Simulation models used include WASP7 developed by USEPA and AQUASEA developed by Vatnaskil Consulting Engineers.

  7. A mechanistic model of runoff-associated fecal coliform fate and transport through a coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steets, B M; Holden, P A

    2003-02-01

    Fecal coliform (FC) contamination in coastal waters is an ongoing public health problem worldwide. Coastal wetlands and lagoons are typically expected to protect coastal waters by attenuating watershed pollutants including FC bacteria. However, new evidence suggests that coastal lagoons or marshes can also be a source of high indicator organism concentrations in coastal waters. We asked for a Mediterranean-type climate, what is the fate of runoff-associated FC through a coastal lagoon? To address this question, we developed a mass balance-based, mechanistic model of FC concentration through a coastal lagoon and simulated, for summer and winter conditions, FC within the lagoon water column, lagoon sediments, and in the ocean water just downstream of the lagoon mouth. Our model accounts for advective flow and dispersion, decay and sedimentation and resuspension of FC-laden sediments during high flow, erosional conditions. Under low flow conditions that occur in the summer, net FC decay and FC storage in lagoon sediments are predicted. Under high flow conditions that occur in the winter, FC-laden sediments are predicted to erode, resuspend and flow out of the lagoon where they elevate FC concentrations in the coastal ocean. For both seasonal conditions, the predicted water column FC concentrations were within an order of magnitude of field measurements for a reference site in southern California. Our results suggest that there are seasonally varying roles for coastal lagoons in mediating FC contamination to coastal waters.

  8. Influence of flow velocity on the removal of faecal coliforms in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohay, W S; Lyimo, T J; Njau, K N

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of flow velocity on the removal of faecal coliforms (FC) in constructed wetlands (CWs), removal rate constants of FC (k(FC)) were studied at various flow velocities (u). Membrane filtration technique was used during analysis. Values of k(FC) were determined using Reed's equation of pathogen removal; the results were compared with the plug flow equation. According to Reed's equation, k(FC) values ranged from 1.6 day⁻¹ at a velocity of 4 m/day to 34.5 day⁻¹ at a velocity of 42.9 m/day. The removal rates correlated positively with flow velocity (r = 0.84, p < 0.05). On assuming a plug flow equation, removal rates constants ranged from 0.77 to 11.69 day⁻¹; a more positive correlation (r = 0.93, p < 0.05) was observed. Optimum removal rate constants were observed for the velocity ranging 36 to 43 m/day. Generally, the increase of flow velocity improved FC removal rate constants: implying that pathogen removals are influenced by diffusion of the microorganisms into the biofilms on CW media. The velocity dependent approach together with the plug flow equation is therefore proposed for incorporation in the design of CW in a tropical climate where temperature variations are minor.

  9. Fecal coliform removal in a lightly loaded surface-flow constructed treatment wetland polishing agricultural runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Marc W; Whritenour, Victoria; Brouillard, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Constructed treatment wetlands can be an effective and sustainable method to remove pathogens that pose health risks from agricultural runoff. This study evaluated the removal of fecal coliform (FC) from agricultural runoff in a lightly loaded surface-flow treatment wetland prior to discharge to the Yakima River, Washington State, USA. The 1.6 ha system consisted of a sedimentation basin (1.4 d hydraulic retention time) followed by two wetlands (5-6 d hydraulic retention time). FC in inflow ranged from 100 to 1,000 cfu/100 mL. Mean annual FC log-removal in the sedimentation basin was 0.66 ± 0.17 (mean plus/minus standard deviation; n = 7). However, there was a comparable production of FC within the two wetlands where annual log-removal averaged -0.71 ± 0.39 in the north wetland and -0.57 ± 0.17 in the south wetland. FC removal in the sedimentation basin weakly correlated with turbidity removal (R(2) = 0.13, p wetlands negatively correlated with temperature (R(2) = 0.27-0.33, p wetlands in 2007 and 2008 corresponded with a marked increase in FC in wetland outflow. Results suggest that, regardless of the presence of muskrats, sedimentation basins alone are more effective than a combined sedimentation basin-wetland system in removing FC from dilute agricultural runoff.

  10. Effects of levan-type fructan on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, diarrhoea scores, faecal shedding of total lactic acid bacteria and coliform bacteria, and faecal gas emission in weaning pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xin Jian; Kim, Yong Min; Park, Jae Hong; Baek, Dong Heon; Nyachoti, Charles Martin; Kim, In Ho

    2018-03-01

    The use of antibiotics as growth promoters in feed has been fully or partially banned in several countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of levan-type fructan on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, faecal shedding of lactic acid bacteria and coliform bacteria, diarrhoea scores, and faecal gas emission in weaning pigs. A total of 144 weaning pigs [(Yorkshire × Landrace) × Duroc] were randomly allocated to four diets: corn-soybean meal-based diets supplemented with 0, 0.1, 0.5, or 1.0 g kg -1 levan-type fructan during this 42-day experiment. During days 0 to 21 and 0 to 42, average daily gain and average daily feed intake were linearly increased (P bacteria counts were linearly increased (P = 0.001). The results indicate that dietary supplementation with increasing levan-type fructan enhanced growth performance, improved nutrient digestibility, and increased faecal lactic acid bacteria counts in weaning pigs linearly. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Presence of antimicrobial resistance in coliform bacteria from hatching broiler eggs with emphasis on ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mezhoud, Halima; Chantziaras, Ilias; Iguer-Ouada, M; N. Moula; Garmyn, An; Martel, An; Touati, A.; Smet, Annemieke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Boyen, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is recognized as one of the most important global health challenges. Broilers are an important reservoir of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in general and, more particularly, extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL)/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Since contamination of 1-day-old chicks is a potential risk factor for the introduction of antimicrobial-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the broiler production chain, the presence of antimicrobial-resistant coliform bact...

  12. Antibiotic resistance in anaerobic and coliform bacteria from the intestinal tract of swine fed therapeutic and subtherapeutic concentrations of chlortetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, K A; Langlois, B E; Stahly, T S; Cromwell, G L

    1984-01-01

    Chlortetracycline (CTC) resistance in anaerobic and coliform bacteria was examined in the large intestines of two groups of growing pigs that had received antibiotic-free diets since weaning. One group of pigs was from a low resistance herd (LR) that had not received antibiotics for 8 yr, while the other group of pigs was from a high resistance herd (HR) that routinely received antibiotics. After a 20-d adjustment period in a common production facility, LR pigs on an antibiotic-free diet had lower proportions of anaerobes (27%) and coliforms (22%) that were resistant to 25 micrograms CTC/ml than did similarly fed HR pigs (81 and 48%, respectively). Continued maintenance of LR and HR pigs on the antibiotic-free diet in a common production facility tended to increase resistance in anaerobes and coliforms from LR pigs to levels comparable with those in HR pigs at the end of an 85-d feeding trial, but not after 14 d. Administration of CTC in the feed at therapeutic (220 micrograms/g for 14 d) and growth-promoting (27.5 micrograms/g for 85 d) levels markedly increased percentages of resistant anaerobes and coliforms in LR pigs, but not in HR pigs after 14 d. Similar antibiotic effects were not seen at the end of the 85-d trial. These data demonstrate that, while exposure to antibiotics in feed may increase resistance in intestinal populations, other factors such as environment, cross-contamination and herd history can also influence the observed level of antibiotic resistance in swine.

  13. Asellus aquaticus as a Potential Carrier of Escherichia coli and Other Coliform Bacteria into Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hans-Jørgen Albrechtsen; Erik Arvin; Erling Nissen; Sarah C. B. Christensen

    2013-01-01

    Individuals of the water louse, Asellus aquaticus, enter drinking water distribution systems in temperate parts of the world, where they establish breeding populations. We analysed populations of surface water A. aquaticus from two ponds for associated faecal indicator bacteria and assessed the risk of A. aquaticus transporting bacteria into distribution systems. Concentrations of up to two E. coli and five total coliforms?mL?1 were measured in the water and 200 E. coli and >240 total colifor...

  14. Anti-Biofilm Activity of Polyazolidinammonium Modified with Iodine Hydrate Ions against Microbial Biofilms of Uropathogenic Coliform Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaeva, O V; Tikhomirova, E I; Zayarsky, D A; Bespalova, N V; Glinskaya, E V; Shurshalova, N F; Al Bayati, B M; Babailova, A I

    2017-04-01

    The dynamics of microbial biofilm formation by standard strain and by clinical strains of uropathogenic coliform bacteria was investigated in vitro and the effect of sublethal concentrations of the polymer compound polyazolidinammonium modified with iodine hydrate ions on the initial stages of biofilm formation was assessed. Treatment of immunological plate wells with the polymeric compound prevented film formation, especially in case of clinical E. coli strain carrying FimH virulence gene.

  15. Analisis Penentuan Kualitas Air Dan Beban Pencemaran Untuk Parameter Fecal Coliform Di Hulu Sungai Progo Kabupaten Temanggung

    OpenAIRE

    Winih Isti N, Monalisatika Winih Isti N; Sudarno, Sudarno; Istirokhatun, Titik

    2014-01-01

    Progo Hulu River has function for the well-being of humans and wildlife that live in the river. Human activities who utilizing the river water and dispose waste to Progo Hulu River degrade the water quality. This study aims to analyze the water quality of the Progo Hulu River and calculate pollution load capacity for fecal coliform parameters. The study was conducted in 8 (eight) points along the main river in June 2014. Load capacity calculation methods Progo Hulu Rivercontamination calcula...

  16. Comparison of commercially available kits with standard methods for the detection of coliforms and Escherichia coli in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, K; Murakoshi, A; Satake, M

    1996-07-01

    Three commercially available kits that were supplemented with substrates for enzyme reactions were evaluated to determine their abilities to detect coliforms and fecal coliforms in foods. Japanese and U.S. Food and Drug Administration standard methods, as well as two agar plate methods, were compared with the three commercial kits. A total of 50 food samples from various retailers were examined. The levels of detection of coliforms were high with the commercial kits (78 to 98%) compared with the levels of detection with the standard methods (80 to 83%) and the agar plate methods (56 to 83%). Among the kits tested, the Colilert kit had highest level of recovery of coliforms (98%), and the level of recovery of Escherichia coli as determined by beta-glucuronidase activity with the Colilert kit (83%) was comparable to the level of recovery obtained by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration method (87%). Isolation of E. coli on the basis of the beta-glucuronidase enzyme reaction was found to be good. Levine's eosine methylene blue agar, which has been widely used in various laboratories to isolate E. coli was compared with 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (MUG)-supplemented agar for isolation of E. coli. Only 47% of the E. coli was detected when eosine methylene blue agar was used; however, when violet red bile (VRB)-MUG agar was used, the E. coli detection rate was twice as high. Of the 200 E. coli strains isolated, only 2 were found to be MUG negative, and the gene responsible for beta-glucuronidase activity (uidA gene) was detected by the PCR method in these 2 strains. Of the 90 false-positive strains isolated that exhibited various E. coli characteristic features, only 2 non-E.coli strains hydrolyzed MUG and produced fluorescent substrate in VRB-MUG agar. However, the PCR did not amplify uidA gene products in these VRB-MUG fluorescence-positive strains.

  17. Comparative reduction of Giardia cysts, F+ coliphages, sulphite reducing clostridia and fecal coliforms by wastewater treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Abidelfatah M; Benisti, Neta-Lee; Ofer, Naomi; Hovers, Sivan; Nitzan, Yeshayahu

    2017-01-28

    Advanced wastewater treatment processes are applied to prevent the environmental dissemination of pathogenic microorganisms. Giardia lamblia causes a severe disease called giardiasis, and is highly prevalent in untreated wastewater worldwide. Monitoring the microbial quality of wastewater effluents is usually based on testing for the levels of indicator microorganisms in the effluents. This study was conducted to compare the suitability of fecal coliforms, F+ coliphages and sulfide reducing clostridia (SRC) as indicators for the reduction of Giardia cysts in two full-scale wastewater treatment plants. The treatment process consists of activated sludge, coagulation, high rate filtration and either chlorine or UV disinfection. The results of the study demonstrated that Giardia cysts are highly prevalent in raw wastewater at an average concentration of 3600 cysts/L. Fecal coliforms, F+ coliphages and SRC were also detected at high concentrations in raw wastewater. Giardia cysts were efficiently removed (3.6 log10) by the treatment train. The greatest reduction was observed for fecal coliforms (9.6 log10) whereas the least reduction was observed for F+ coliphages (2.1 log10) following chlorine disinfection. Similar reduction was observed for SRC by filtration and disinfection by either UV (3.6 log10) or chlorine (3.3 log10). Since F+ coliphage and SRC were found to be more resistant than fecal coliforms for the tertiary treatment processes, they may prove to be more suitable as indicators for Giardia. The results of this study demonstrated that advanced wastewater treatment may prove efficient for the removal of Giardia cysts and may prevent its transmission when treated effluents are applied for crop irrigation or streams restoration.

  18. White blood cell counting on smartphone paper electrochemical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhao; Lin, Guohong; Cui, Guangzhe; Zhou, Xiangfei; Liu, Gang Logan

    2017-04-15

    White blood cell (WBC) analysis provides rich information in rapid diagnosis of acute bacterial and viral infections as well as chronic disease management. For patients with immune deficiency or leukemia WBC should be persistently monitored. Current WBC counting method relies on bulky instrument and trained personnel and is time consuming. Rapid, low-cost and portable solution is in highly demand for point of care test. Here we demonstrate a label-free smartphone based electrochemical WBC counting device on microporous paper with patterned gold microelectrodes. WBC separated from whole blood was trapped by the paper with microelectrodes. WBC trapped on the paper leads to the ion diffusion blockage on microelectrodes, therefore cell concentration is determined by peak current on the microelectrodes measured by a differential pulse voltammeter and the quantitative results are collected by a smartphone wirelessly within 1min. We are able to rapidly quantify WBC concentrations covering the common physiological and pathological range (200-20000μL-1) with only 10μL sample and high repeatability as low as 10% in CoV (Coefficient of Variation). The unique smartphone paper electrochemical sensor ensures fast cell quantification to achieve rapid and low-cost WBC analysis at the point-of-care under resource limited conditions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Comparison of an automated most-probable-number technique with traditional plating methods for estimating populations of total aerobes, coliforms, and Escherichia coli associated with freshly processed broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Line, J E; Stern, N J; Oakley, B B; Seal, B S

    2011-09-01

    An instrument (TEMPO) has been developed to automate the most-probable-number (MPN) technique and reduce the effort required to estimate some bacterial populations. We compared the automated MPN technique with traditional microbiological plating methods and Petrifilm methods for estimating the total viable count of aerobic microorganisms (TVC), total coliforms (CC), and Escherichia coli populations (EC) on freshly processed broiler chicken carcasses (postchill whole carcass rinse [WCR] samples) and cumulative drip-line samples from a commercial broiler processing facility. Overall, 120 broiler carcasses, 36 prechill drip-line samples, and 40 postchill drip-line samples were collected over 5 days (representing five individual flocks) and analyzed by the automated MPN and direct agar plating and Petrifilm methods. The TVC correlation coefficient between the automated MPN and traditional methods was very high (0.972) for the prechill drip samples, which had mean log-transformed values of 3.09 and 3.02, respectively. The TVC correlation coefficient was lower (0.710) for the postchill WCR samples, which had lower mean log values of 1.53 and 1.31, respectively. Correlations between the methods for the prechill CC and EC samples were 0.812 and 0.880, respectively. The estimated number of total aerobes was generally greater than the total number of coliforms or E. coli recovered for all sample types (P < 2e⁻¹⁶). Significantly more bacteria were recovered from the prechill samples than from the postchill WCR or cumulative drip samples (P < 9.5e⁻¹² and P < 2e⁻¹⁶, respectively). When samples below the limit of detection were excluded, 92.1% of the total responses were within a single log difference between the traditional plating or Petrifilm methods and the automated MPN method.

  20. Distribution of sewage pollution around a maritime Antarctic research station indicated by faecal coliforms, Clostridium perfringens and faecal sterol markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Kevin A.; Thompson, Anu

    2004-02-01

    This study describes the distribution of sewage pollution markers (faecal coliforms, Clostridium perfringens and faecal sterols) in seawater and marine sediments around Rothera Research Station, Antarctic Peninsula. Untreated sewage waste has been released from this site since 1975, creating the potential for long-term contamination of the benthic environment. Faecal coliform concentrations in seawater reached background levels within 300 m of the outfall. In sediment cores, both C. perfringens and faecal coliform concentrations declined with distance from the outfall, though C. perfringens persisted at greater depths in the sediment. High concentrations of 5{beta}(H)-cholestan-3{beta}-ol (coprostanol) relative to the corresponding 5{alpha}-epimer (cholestanol), indicative of sewage pollution, were only found in sediments within 200 m of the sewage outfall. This study has shown that sewage contamination is limited to the immediate vicinity of the sewage outfall. Nevertheless, a sewage treatment plant was installed in February 2003 to reduce this contamination further. - Sewage contamination of seawater and marine sediments near Rothera Research Station (Antarctic Peninsula) was limited to the immediate vicinity of the outfall.

  1. A downflow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor for faecal coliform removal from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaya Beas, Rosa Elena; Kujawa-Roeleveld, Katarzyna; van Lier, Jules B; Zeeman, Grietje

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted to study the faecal coliforms removal capacity of downflow hanging sponge (DHS) reactors as a post-treatment for an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. Three long-term continuous laboratory-scale DHS reactors, i.e. a reactor with cube type sponges without recirculation, a similar one with recirculation and a reactor with curtain type sponges, were studied. The porosities of the applied medium were 91%, 87% and 47% respectively. The organic loading rates were 0.86 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1), 0.53 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) and 0.24 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) correspondingly at hydraulic loading rates of 1.92 m3 m(-2) d(-1), 2.97 m3 m(-2) d(-1) and 1.32 m3 m(-2) d(-1), respectively (COD: chemical oxygen demand). The corresponding averages for faecal coliform removal were 99.997%, 99.919% and 92.121% respectively. The 1989 WHO guidelines standards, in terms of faecal coliform content for unrestricted irrigation (category A), was achieved with the effluent of the cube type DHS (G1) without recirculation. Restricted irrigation, category B and C, is assigned to the effluent of the cube type with recirculation and the curtain type, respectively. Particularly for organic compounds, the effluent of evaluated DHS reactors complies with USEPA standards for irrigation of so called non-food crops like pasture for milking animals, fodder, fibre, and seed crops.

  2. Response of coliform populations in streambed sediment and water column to changes in nutrient concentrations in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, D R; Pachepsky, Y A; Kiefer, L A; Blaustein, R A; McCarty, G W; Dao, T H

    2014-08-01

    As sediments increasingly become recognized as reservoirs of indicator and pathogen microorganisms, an understanding of the persistence of indicator organisms becomes important for assessment and predictions of microbial water quality. The objective of this work was to observe the response of water column and sediment coliform populations to the change in nutrient concentrations in the water column. Survival experiments were conducted in flow-through chambers containing sandy sediments. Bovine feces were collected fresh and introduced into sediment. Sixteen days later, the same fecal material was autoclaved and diluted to provide three levels - 1×, 0.5×, and 0.1× of nutrient concentrations - spike in water column. Total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and total aerobic heterotrophic bacterial concentrations were monitored in water and sediment. Bacteria responded to the nutrient spike with initial growth both in the water column and in sediment. The response of bacterial concentrations in water column was nonlinear, with no significant changes at 0.1 and .5× spikes, but a substantial change at 1× spike. Bacteria in sediment responded to the spikes at all added nutrient levels. Coliform inactivation rates both in sediment and in water after the initial growth occurred, were not significantly different from the inactivation rates before spike. These results indicate that introduction of nutrients into the water column results in nonlinear response of E. coli concentrations both in water and in sediments, followed by the inactivation with the same rate as before introduction of nutrients. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Counting paths with Schur transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz, Pablo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4 (Canada); Kemp, Garreth [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Véliz-Osorio, Alvaro, E-mail: aveliz@gmail.com [Mandelstam Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    In this work we explore the structure of the branching graph of the unitary group using Schur transitions. We find that these transitions suggest a new combinatorial expression for counting paths in the branching graph. This formula, which is valid for any rank of the unitary group, reproduces known asymptotic results. We proceed to establish the general validity of this expression by a formal proof. The form of this equation strongly hints towards a quantum generalization. Thus, we introduce a notion of quantum relative dimension and subject it to the appropriate consistency tests. This new quantity finds its natural environment in the context of RCFTs and fractional statistics; where the already established notion of quantum dimension has proven to be of great physical importance.

  4. Discrete calculus methods for counting

    CERN Document Server

    Mariconda, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to combinatorics, finite calculus, formal series, recurrences, and approximations of sums. Readers will find not only coverage of the basic elements of the subjects but also deep insights into a range of less common topics rarely considered within a single book, such as counting with occupancy constraints, a clear distinction between algebraic and analytical properties of formal power series, an introduction to discrete dynamical systems with a thorough description of Sarkovskii’s theorem, symbolic calculus, and a complete description of the Euler-Maclaurin formulas and their applications. Although several books touch on one or more of these aspects, precious few cover all of them. The authors, both pure mathematicians, have attempted to develop methods that will allow the student to formulate a given problem in a precise mathematical framework. The aim is to equip readers with a sound strategy for classifying and solving problems by pursuing a mathematically rigorous yet ...

  5. Fluorescent Biosensors Based on Single-Molecule Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Li, Ying; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2016-09-20

    Biosensors for highly sensitive, selective, and rapid quantification of specific biomolecules make great contributions to biomedical research, especially molecular diagnostics. However, conventional methods for biomolecular assays often suffer from insufficient sensitivity and poor specificity. In some case (e.g., early disease diagnostics), the concentration of target biomolecules is too low to be detected by these routine approaches, and cumbersome procedures are needed to improve the detection sensitivity. Therefore, there is an urgent need for rapid and ultrasensitive analytical tools. In this respect, single-molecule fluorescence approaches may well satisfy the requirement and hold promising potential for the development of ultrasensitive biosensors. Encouragingly, owing to the advances in single-molecule microscopy and spectroscopy over past decades, the detection of single fluorescent molecule comes true, greatly boosting the development of highly sensitive biosensors. By in vitro/in vivo labeling of target biomolecules with proper fluorescent tags, the quantification of certain biomolecule at the single-molecule level is achieved. In comparison with conventional ensemble measurements, single-molecule detection-based analytical methods possess the advantages of ultrahigh sensitivity, good selectivity, rapid analysis time, and low sample consumption. Consequently, single-molecule detection may be potentially employed as an ideal analytical approach to quantify low-abundant biomolecules with rapidity and simplicity. In this Account, we will summarize our efforts for developing a series of ultrasensitive biosensors based on single-molecule counting. Single-molecule counting is a member of single-molecule detection technologies and may be used as a very simple and ultrasensitive method to quantify target molecules by simply counting the individual fluorescent bursts. In the fluorescent sensors, the signals of target biomolecules may be translated to the

  6. [Presence of fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and DNAse- and coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus, in "colonial" cheese sold in the city of Blumenau, Estado de Santa Catarina, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibnitz, M G; Tavares, L B; García, J A

    1998-01-01

    Twenty cheese samples were collected at Blumenau (SC) and were submitted to analysis in order to verify the presence of fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Among the 20 samples of cheese, analysis revealed that 70% and 20% respectively, were not within present legal specifications (Norma 001/87-DNVSA) for fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli. For Staphylococcus, 95% of the samples were not within present legal specifications.

  7. Studi Penurunan Kandungan Total Coliform dengan Menggunakan Kombinasi Vertical Flow Roughing Filter (Vrf) dan Horizontal Flow Roughing Filter (Hrf) pada Air Buangan Domestik Artifisial

    OpenAIRE

    Suryanti, Irma; Samudro, Ganjar; Sumiyati, Sri

    2013-01-01

    This research is aims to reduce the content of total coliform bacteria in domestic wastewater using a combination of vertical flow roughing filter (VRF) and horizontal flow roughing filter (HRF) for each variation of flow rate, the type and the size of filter media. Domestic wastewater influent is used as an artificial wastewater containing total coliform bacteria sample 2400 MPN/100 ml. The results of the best drop reaches 0 MPN/100 ml sample contained in VRF combination with medium-sized fi...

  8. Influence of pH, Oxygen, and Humic Substances on Ability of Sunlight To Damage Fecal Coliforms in Waste Stabilization Pond Water

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Thomas P.; Mara, D. Duncan; Silva, Salomao A.

    1992-01-01

    Simple beaker experiments established that light damages fecal coliforms in waste stabilization ponds by an oxygen-mediated exogenous photosensitization. Wavelengths of up to 700 nm were able to damage bacteria. The ability of wavelengths of >425 nm to damage fecal coliforms was dependent on the presence of dissolved sensitizers. The sensitizers were ubiquitous in raw sewage, unaffected by sewage treatment, not derivatives of bacteriochlorophyll or chlorophyll, absorbed well in UV light, and ...

  9. REDUCCIÓN DE COLIFORMES y Escherichia coli EN UN SISTEMA RESIDUAL LÁCTEO MEDIANTE MICROORGANISMOS BENÉFICOS REDUÇÃO DE COLIFORMES E Escherichia coli EM UM SISTEMA DE ÁGUAS RESIDUAIS DE LEITE POR MICROORGANISMOS BENÉFICOS REDUCTION COLIFORM AND Escherichia coli IN A DAIRY WASTE SYSTEM THROUGH BENEFICIAL MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO JAVID CORPAS I.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A pesar de la disponibilidad comercial de diversos sistemas para tratar aguas residuales, muchas empresas no poseen plantas, y otras poseen sistemas ineficientes, por lo cual, descargan a los cuerpos de agua cantidades significativas de materia orgánica y microorganismos afines al sustrato, como los coliformes, comprometiendo el equilibrio ambiental. El presente estudio evaluó la capacidad de una mezcla de microorganismos beneficos (MB para remover coliformes y E. coli presentes en residuos líquidos generados en una planta de tratamiento lácteo, teniendo como factores controlados, la concentración del coctel de MB y el tipo de carga orgánica almacenada en el afluente. La reducción en la población de coliformes fluctuó entre 41,1 y 48% al utilizar las diferentes concentraciones de MB para las horas de toma establecidas. En cuanto a la eliminación de E. coli, se apreciaron reducciones notorias a partir de las muestras tomadas a las 10 a.m., con una reducción del 52% al utilizar el coctel al 2% y del 49,7% cuando la concentración de esta mezcla correspondió al 4%. Se recomendó mejorar la eficacia en la remoción de coliformes y E. coli a partir de la valoración de diversas proporciones entre las concentraciones de los microorganismos constituyentes de la mezcla.Apesar da disponibilidade comercial de vários sistemas de tratamento de esgoto, muitas empresas não têm instalações de esgoto, e outros ter sistemas ineficientes, assim, descarregados em massas de água grandes quantidades de matéria orgânica e microrganismos relacionados com o substrato, como o coliformes, comprometer o equilíbrio ambiental. Este estudo avaliou a capacidade de uma mistura de microorganismos benéficos (MB para remover coliformes e E. coli presente em resíduos líquidos geraçãos em uma estação de tratamento de efluente lácteo, tendo como variável, a concentração de cocktail de MB e tipo de carga orgânica armazenada no afluente. A redução na

  10. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  11. Water quality and sources of fecal coliform bacteria in the Meduxnekeag River, Houlton, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Charles W.; Huntington, Thomas G.; Stoeckel, Donald M.; Caldwell, James M.; O'Donnell, Cara

    2014-01-01

    In response to bacterial contamination in the Meduxnekeag River and the desire to manage the watershed to reduce contaminant sources, the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians (HBMI) and the U.S. Geological Survey began a cooperative effort to establish a baseline of water-quality data that can be used in future studies and to indicate potential sources of nutrient and bacterial contamination. This study was conducted during the summer of 2005 in the Meduxnekeag River Basin near Houlton, Maine. Continuously recorded specific conductance can be a good indicator for water quality. Specific conductance increased downstream from the town of Houlton, between runoff events, and decreased sharply following major runoff events. Collections of discrete samples during the summer of 2005 indicated seasonal positive concentration-discharge relations for total phosphorus and total nitrogen; these results indicate that storm runoff may mobilize and transport these nutrients from the terrestrial environment to the river. Data collected by the HBMI on fecal coliform bacteria indicated that bacterial contamination enters the Meduxnekeag River from multiple paths including tributaries and surface drains (ditches) in developed areas in Houlton, Maine. The Houlton wastewater treatment discharge was not an important source of bacterial contamination. Bacteroidales-based tests for general fecal contamination (Bac32 marker) were predominantly positive in samples that had excessive fecal contamination as indicated by Enterococci density greater than 104 colony-forming units per 100 millilters. Of the 22 samples tested for Bacteroidales-based markers of human-associated fecal contamination (HF134 and HF183), 8 were positive. Of the 22 samples tested for Bacteroidales-based markers of ruminant-associated fecal contamination (CF128 and CF193), 7 were positive. Human fecal contamination was detected consistently at two sites (surface drains in urban areas in the town of Houlton) and occasionally

  12. Optimisation of hydraulic performance to maximise faecal coliform removal in maturation ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, Nibis; Lloyd, Barry; Aldana, Gerardo

    2006-05-01

    The present study was conducted with the aim of improving faecal coliform (FC) and faecal streptococcus (FS) removal efficiencies in tertiary maturation stages of a sewage treatment plant in Southern England, where climatic conditions are sub-optimal. The research used intensive field assessments (bacteriological, general quality and hydraulic) to identify the parameters that affect the bacteriological quality of the effluent from three parallel maturation ponds (North, Central and South) of similar geometry and dimensions. An engineering intervention was carried out to convert the South pond to three channels to increase the L/W ratio from 9:1 to 79:1. Hydraulic tracer studies in the South pond with Rhodamine WT showed that the dispersion number 'd' was reduced from 0.37 (dispersed flow) to 0.074 by this intervention under similar flow conditions (4.5l/s). Hydraulic retention time was thus increased by 5h, delay in jet flow short-circuiting was increased from 2.5 to 17.5h thus increasing the exposure times for all elements. As a result of the intervention FC removal increased substantially. Maximum channel-lagoon efficiency of 99.84% was obtained at 4.5l/s and 19 degrees C, when exposure to sunlight was 17 h in summer. It is concluded that the channel configuration produces a higher hydraulic efficiency than conventional maturation ponds. It is therefore recommended as a viable engineering solution which permits a low-cost upgrading of plant performance, requiring no additional land, and with minimal maintenance costs.

  13. Absence of direct association between coliforms and Escherichia coli in irrigation water and on produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Gayeon; Schlegel, Pamela J; Schrock, Jennifer M; LeJeune, Jeffrey T

    2013-06-01

    Irrigation water is considered a potential source of preharvest pathogen contamination of vegetables. Hence, several organizations have recommended microbiological standards for water used to irrigate edible plants. The purpose of this study was to determine the strength of association between microbial quality indicators (coliforms and Escherichia coli) in irrigation water and on irrigated vegetables. Data analyzed included original results from a cross-sectional study conducted in the Midwestern United States during summer 2009 and information presented in two previously published studies performed in France and Portugal to investigate microbial quality of irrigation water and watered produce. In the cross-sectional study, repetitive PCR (rep-PCR) was used to characterize genetic relatedness of E. coli isolates from water and vegetables. No significant correlations were found between fecal indicators on leafy greens (lettuce and parsley, n = 91) or fruit (tomatoes and green peppers, n = 22) and those found in irrigation water used in the cross-sectional study (P > 0.40) or in the previously published data sets (data set 1: lettuce and waste irrigation water, n = 15, P > 0.40; data set 2: lettuce and irrigation water, n = 32, P = 0.06). Rep-PCR banding patterns of E. coli strains were all distinguishable among the pairs of E. coli isolates recovered from produce and irrigation water on the same farm. From the available data, the concentration of indicator organisms based on a single measure of irrigation water quality was not associated with the presence of these indicators on produce. In the absence of additional information, the use of a single microbial water quality parameter as an indicator of produce safety is of limited value for predicting the safety of the produce.

  14. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Baker, Pacific Remote Island Areas (PRIAs) in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 9 sites around Baker in the...

  15. Comparison of methods for enumeration of selected coliforms exposed to ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J C; Lytle, M S; Dickman, D G; Foster, D H; Connell, J P; Bressler, W R

    1989-01-01

    mT7 medium performed no better than m-Endo medium in enumerating cells of Escherichia coli and Citrobacter freundii exposed to ozone. Also, there was no difference in the plate count of heterotrophic bacteria in ozonated raw water determined on modified Henrici agar or R2A agar. Statistically significant differences were seen between bacteria and the type of water in which they were suspended during ozonation.

  16. Comparison of methods for enumeration of selected coliforms exposed to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.C.; Lytle, M.S.; Dickman, D.G.; Foster, D.H.; Connell, J.P.; Bressler, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    mT7 medium performed no better than m-Endo medium in enumerating cells of Escherichia coli and Citrobacter freundii exposed to ozone. Also, there was no difference in the plate count of heterotrophic bacteria in ozonated raw water determined on modified Henrici agar or R2A agar. Statistically significant differences were seen between bacteria and the type of water in which they were suspended during ozonation.

  17. Effect of Maillard reaction products on ruminal and fecal acid-resistant E. coli, total coliforms, VFA profiles, and pH in steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindt, J J; Drouillard, J S; Thippareddi, H; Phebus, R K; Coetzer, C M; Kerr, K D; Lambert, D L; Farran, T B; Montgomery, S P; LaBrune, H J

    2004-04-01

    Six ruminally cannulated Angus-cross steers (362 kg) were used in a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design to determine effects of supplementing Maillard reaction products (MRP) on acid-resistant E. coli and coliform populations. Steers were fed roughage-based diets supplemented (DM basis) with either 10% soybean meal (SBM), 10% nonenzymatically browned SBM (NESBM), or 10% SBM top-dressed with 45 g of a lysine-dextrose Maillard reaction product (LD-MRP). Equal weights of dextrose, lysine hydrochloride, and deionized water were refluxed to produce the LD-MRP. The NESBM was manufactured by treating SBM with invertase enzyme, followed by heating to induce nonenzymatic browning. Steers were allowed slightly less than ad libitum access to diets fed twice daily and were adapted to their respective treatments within 10 d. On d 11, ruminal and fecal samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 h after feeding from each of the steers and transported to the laboratory for microbial analysis. Ruminal samples and feces were analyzed for pH and VFA, and both ruminal fluid and feces were tested for acid-resistant E. coli and total coliforms by incubating samples in tryptic soy broth adjusted to pH 2, 4, and 7. Ruminal pH and total VFA concentrations did not differ among treatments. The molar proportion of ruminal acetate was higher (P coliforms than steers that received SBM. No differences were observed for ruminal E. coli and total coliforms at pH 2 and 7. Fecal pH was lower (P coliforms at pH 2 and 7 did not differ among treatments. Dietary MRP had limited effectiveness at decreasing acid-resistant coliforms in the rumen and feces of cattle. Acid resistance in coliforms may depend on protein availability.

  18. Effects of Gaseous Ozone Exposure on Bacterial Counts and Oxidative Properties in Chicken and Duck Breast Meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlisin, Muhlisin; Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Ji Hye; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-01-01

    The effects of gaseous ozone exposure on the bacterial counts and oxidative properties were evaluated in duck and chicken breast fillets, which were stored under a continuous flux of gaseous ozone (10×10(-6) kg O3/m(3)/h) at 4±1℃ for 4 d. The ozone generator was set to on for 15 min and off for 105 min, and this cyclic timer was set during storage. Ozone effectively reduced the growth of coliform, aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in both chicken and duck breast. However, lipid oxidation occurred faster in duck breast than chicken breast with higher degree of discoloration, TBARS value, and antioxidant enzyme (glutathione peroxidase and catalase) activity decline rates. It is concluded that ozone effectively controlled the growth of bacteria in both chicken and duck breast with less effects on oxidative deterioration in chicken breast.

  19. 15-F2t-Isoprostane Concentrations and Oxidant Status in Lactating Dairy Cattle with Acute Coliform Mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavangira, V; Mangual, M J; Gandy, J C; Sordillo, L M

    2016-01-01

    Severe mammary tissue damage during acute coliform mastitis in cattle is partially caused by oxidative stress. Although considered a gold standard biomarker in some human conditions, the utility of 15-F2t-Isoprostanes (15-F2t-Isop) in detecting oxidative stress in dairy cattle has not been validated. Concentrations of 15-F2t-Isop in plasma, urine, and milk correlate with changes in oxidant status during severe coliform mastitis in cattle. Eleven lactating Holstein-Friesian dairy cows in their 3rd-6th lactation. A case-control study using cows with acute coliform mastitis and matched healthy controls were enrolled into this study. Measures of inflammation, oxidant status, and redox status in plasma and milk samples were quantified using commercial assays. Plasma, urine, and milk 15-F2t-Isop were quantified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and ELISA assays. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon rank sum tests (α = 0.05). Plasma 15-F2t-Isop quantified by LC-MS/MS was positively correlated with systemic oxidant status (r = 0.83; P = .01). Urine 15-F2t-Isop quantified by LC-MS/MS did not correlate with systemic oxidant status, but was negatively correlated with redox status variables (r = -0.83; P = .01). Milk 15-F2t-Isop quantified by LC-MS/MS was negatively correlated (r = -0.86; P = .007) with local oxidant status. Total 15-F2t-Isop in milk quantified by a commercial ELISA (cbELISA) was positively correlated with oxidant status in milk (r = 0.98; P cows should currently be based on the LC-MS/MS method. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. Instream coliform gradients in the Holtemme, a small headwater stream in the Elbe River Basin, Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthe, Daniel; Lin, Pei-Ying; Westphal, Katja

    2017-09-01

    The Holtemme is a small headwater stream in North Germany's Elbe River Basin. According to German and European legislation, hygienic monitoring is not mandatory for such water bodies which are neither drinking water sources nor categorized as bathing waters. Consequently, relatively little is known about the occurrence of-potentially pathogenic-bacteria and viruses in Germany's streams and rivers. The Holtemme was selected for a case study because it is relatively well monitored for both chemical water quality and aquatic ecology, but not for hygiene. Originating in the mountains of Harz Nature Park, the 47 km long Holtemme is characterized by a strong longitudinal gradient in chemical water quality, which is related to different land uses and the influx of treated wastewater from two urban areas (Wernigerode and Halberstadt). Waste water loads received by the Holtemme are comparatively high when compared to similarly small streams. In 2015, total coliform concentrations between more than 200 and 77,010 bacteria per 100 mL, and fecal coliform concentrations between 5 and 24,060 bacteria per 100 mL were observed in the Holtemme's main channel. The highest concentrations were typically found below the outlets of the two wastewater treatment plants. The treated wastewater contained total and fecal coliform concentrations of up to 200,500 and 83,100 per 100 mL, respectively; however, there were significant temporal variations. While the observed concentrations are unproblematic from a legal perspective (because no maximum permissible limits are defined for streams in Germany), they would exceed the tolerable limits for bathing waters in the EU, indicating moderate to critical pollution limits.

  1. Counting losses due to saturation effects of scintillation counters at high count rates

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, K

    1999-01-01

    The counting statistics of a scintillation counter, with a preamplifier saturated by an overloading input, are investigated. First, the formulae for the variance and the mean number of counts, accumulated within a given gating time, are derived by considering counting-loss effects originating from the saturation and a finite resolving time of the electronic circuit. Numerical examples based on the formulae indicate that the saturation makes a positive contribution to the variance-to-mean ratio and that the contribution increases with count rate. Next the ratios are measured under high count rates when the preamplifier saturation can be observed. By fitting the present formula to the measured data, the counting-loss parameters can be evaluated. Corrections based on the parameters are made for various count rates measured in a nuclear reactor. As a result of the corrections, the linearity between count rate and reactor power can be restored.

  2. Tropical count of curves on abelian varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halle, Lars Halvard; Rose, Simon Charles Florian

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the problem of counting tropical genus g curves ing-dimensional tropical abelian varieties. We do this by studyingmaps from principally polarized tropical abelian varieties into afixed abelian variety. For g = 2, 3, we prove that the tropical countmatches the count provided in [Göt98...

  3. Is It Counting, or Is It Adding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhardt, Sara; Fisher, Molly H.; Thomas, Jonathan; Schack, Edna O.; Tassell, Janet; Yoder, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) expect second grade students to "fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies" (2.OA.B.2). Most children begin with number word sequences and counting approximations and then develop greater skill with counting. But do all teachers really understand how this…

  4. It Is Time to Count Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henscheid, Jean M.

    2015-01-01

    As the modern learning community movement turns 30, it is time to determine just how many, and what type, of these programs exist at America's colleges and universities. This article first offers a rationale for counting learning communities followed by a description of how disparate counts and unclear definitions hamper efforts to embed these…

  5. Lazy reference counting for the Microgrid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poss, R.; Grelck, C.; Herhut, S.; Scholz, S.-B.

    2012-01-01

    This papers revisits non-deferred reference counting, a common technique to ensure that potentially shared large heap objects can be reused safely when they are both input and output to computations. Traditionally, thread-safe reference counting exploit implicit memory-based communication of counter

  6. Power-counting theorem for staggered fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Giedt, J

    2006-01-01

    One of the assumptions that is used in Reisz's power-counting theorem does not hold for staggered fermions, as was pointed out long ago by Lüscher. Here, we generalize the power-counting theorem, and the methods of Reisz's proof, such that the dif culties posed by staggered fermions are overcome.

  7. Counting sequences, Gray codes and lexicodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suparta, I.N.

    2006-01-01

    A counting sequence of length n is a list of all 2^n binary n-tuples (binary codewords of length n). The number of bit positions where two codewords differ is called the Hamming distance of these two codewords. The average Hamming distance of a counting sequence of length n is defined as the average

  8. A comparison of discriminant analysis and logistic regression for the prediction of coliform mastitis in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, M E; White, M E; Martin, S W

    1987-01-01

    Results from discriminant analysis and logistic regression were compared using two data sets from a study on predictors of coliform mastitis in dairy cows. Both techniques selected the same set of variables as important predictors and were of nearly equal value in classifying cows as having, or not having mastitis. The logistic regression model made fewer classification errors. The magnitudes of the effects were considerably different for some variables. Given the failure to meet the underlying assumptions of discriminant analysis, the coefficients from logistic regression are preferable. PMID:3453271

  9. Remoção de coliformes do esgoto por meio de espécies vegetais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério de Araújo Almeida

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a eficiência de substratos e de espécies vegetais, nativas ou naturalizadas da região de Goiânia-GO, na remoção de coliformes do esgoto, num sistema de tratamento do tipo zona de raízes com fluxo subsuperficial descendente, precedido de decantação. O experimento foi conduzido no campus Samambaia da Universidade Federal de Goiás, em Goiânia. Após passar por uma caixa de decantação, o esgoto primário foi aplicado, diariamente, em módulos de tratamento contendo as espécies vegetais taboa (Typha angustifolia L., lírio-do-brejo (Hedychium coronarium J. König, conta-de-lágrima (Coix lacryma-jobi L. e capim Angola (Urochloa mutica (Forssk. T. Q. Nguyen, cultivadas em substratos com areia e/ou casca de coco. Foram construídos dezesseis módulos de tratamento, distantes dois metros uns dos outros, agrupados quatro a quatro, num delineamento experimental de parcelas subdivididas, sendo as parcelas representadas pelos substratos e as subparcelas pelas espécies vegetais. As repetições foram constituídas pelas amostragens do esgoto, que ocorreram quinzenalmente. As amostras do esgoto bruto, primário e secundário foram submetidas a análises laboratoriais e os resultados foram utilizados no cálculo de eficiência na remoção/redução dos coliformes do esgoto. Os valores de eficiência foram submetidos ao teste de Tukey-Kramer. O sistema de tratamento do tipo zona de raízes mostrou-se bastante eficiente na remoção de coliformes, atingindo níveis próximos à totalidade. As espécies vegetais comportaram-se de maneira semelhante na remoção dos coliformes fecais e o substrato com casca de coco mostrou-se menos eficiente que os substratos com areia.

  10. Evaluating Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) leukocyte differential counts comparing the CellaVision DM96 and the manual method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaias, Julia; Bradley, Christine; Richardson, Jill; Eskelinen, Holli C; Ikpatt, Frances; Cray, Carolyn

    2017-09-01

    The leukocyte differential count is an excellent diagnostic tool; however, the manual differential count has several drawbacks, especially for nontraditional species. Automated cell analyzers commonly used in veterinary practices require species-specific validation for use in nondomestic species other than dogs and cats. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential of the CellaVision DM96 (DM96), an automated image analysis system, as a rapid and accurate method for providing a WBC differential count in comparison to the manual WBC differential count in bottlenose dolphins. Ten fresh, EDTA anticoagulated blood samples were collected, blood smears were made and stained, and the differential WBC counts were performed on the DM96 and compared with manual differential WBC counts. Agreement, means, and errors were compared between the methods. There was good agreement between the DM96 and manual differential WBC counts for neutrophils; however, there was significant variation when comparing lymphocyte, monocyte, and eosinophil counts. No basophils were seen by any method. Despite a small sample size, the DM96 appeared to provide a viable alternative for automated neutrophil counting in blood of bottlenose dolphins. Whether the counts are comparable in animals with highly pathologic differential counts must be addressed in follow-up studies, preferably with more study animals. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  11. Surgical count process: evidence for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Patrícia Scotini; Mendes, Karina Dal Sasso; Galvão, Cristina Maria

    2017-02-23

    To analyze the surgical count process according to reports of nurses working in surgical centers of a city in the state of São Paulo. Cross-sectional study with a sample of 55 nurses. Data collection occurred from August to December 2013, with application of an instrument submitted to face and content validation, composed of data on variables regarding characteristics of nurses, hospital, and surgical count process. Fifty-two (94.5%) nurses reported that the surgical count process was carried out in their workplaces. A statistically significant association was found between the surgical count process and the type of institution (P=0.046), and between the presence of a surgical technologist and the processes for counting surgical instruments (Pprocess was carried out in the studied hospital.

  12. Cluster counting in helium based gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldi, G.; Grancagnolo, F.; Spagnolo, S.

    1997-02-01

    The statistical advantages deriving from counting primary ionization, as opposed to the conventional energy loss measurement, are extensively discussed. A primary ionization counting method is proposed for a "traditional", cylindrical, single sense wire cell drift chamber, which makes use of a helium based gas mixture. Its conceptual feasibility is proven by means of a simple Monte Carlo simulation. A counting algorithm is developed and tested on the simulation output. A definition of the parameters of the read-out and of the digitizing electronics is given, assuming the described counting algorithm applied to a general detector design, in order to have a complete and realistic planning of a cluster counting measurement. Finally, some interesting results from a beam test, performed according to the described parameters, on primary ionization measurements and on {π}/{μ} separation are shown.

  13. Antibacterial power Village Fowl Egg Albumen (Gallus domesticus and Kate chicken (Gallus Bantam against fecal Coliform Bacteria Species at Eggshell Egg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Pramesti Wijaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Daya Antibakteri Albumen Telur Ayam Kampung (Gallus Domesticus dan Ayam Kate (Gallus Bantam terhadap Spesies Bakteri Coliform Fekal pada Cangkang Telur Abstract: This study aims to identify the species of fecal coliform bacteria found in chicken egg shells and Bantam and analyze the influence of chicken egg albumen and egg Bantam on the inhibition of the growth of species of fecal coliform bacteria found in chicken egg shells. This study is experimental with the independent variable in the form of chicken egg albumen and kate. The dependent variable in the form of growth inhibition zone fecal coliform bacteria. Tests performed by the agar diffusion method. Testing the antibacterial activity of chicken egg albumen and Bantam done by measuring the diameter of growth inhibition zone of each species colonies of fecal coliform bacteria in the medium Nutrient Agar. The research data is the measurement data growth inhibition zone diameter species of fecal coliform bacteria. Results were analyzed using analysis of variance single, and continued with LSD 1%. Results of the study are: (1 species fecal coliform bacteria found in chicken egg shells and chicken egg is Actinobacillus sp., Serratia liquefaciens, ozaenae Klebsiella, and Escherichia vulneris; and (2 there is the effect of different chicken egg albumen and egg Bantam towards the inhibition of the growth of species of fecal coliform bacteria found in chicken egg shells. Key Words: albumen of eggs, chicken, Bantam, antibacterial, fecal coliform bacteria Abstrak: Penelitian ini bertujuan mengidentifikasi spesies-spesies bakteri koliform fekal yang terdapat pada cangkang telur ayam kampung dan ayam kate dan menganalisis pengaruh albumen telur ayam kampung dan telur ayam kate terhadap penghambatan pertumbuhan spesies-spesies bakteri koliform fekal yang terdapat pada cangkang telur ayam. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian ekperimen dengan variabel bebas berupa albumen telur ayam kampung dan kate

  14. Kids Count in Delaware, Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count Fact Book is combined with the Families Count Fact Book to provide information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The Kids Count statistical profile is based on 11 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens 15-17 years; (2) births to teens 10 to 14 years; (3) low birth weight babies; (3)…

  15. Use of the Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN and bacterial source tracking for development of the fecal coliform total maximum daily load (TMDL) for Blacks Run, Rockingham County, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Douglas; Hyer, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    Impairment of surface waters by fecal coliform bacteria is a water-quality issue of national scope and importance. Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act requires that each State identify surface waters that do not meet applicable water-quality standards. In Virginia, more than 175 stream segments are on the 1998 Section 303(d) list of impaired waters because of violations of the water-quality standard for fecal coliform bacteria. A total maximum daily load (TMDL) will need to be developed by 2006 for each of these impaired streams and rivers by the Virginia Departments of Environmental Quality and Conservation and Recreation. A TMDL is a quantitative representation of the maximum load of a given water-quality constituent, from all point and nonpoint sources, that a stream can assimilate without violating the designated water-quality standard. Blacks Run, in Rockingham County, Virginia, is one of the stream segments listed by the State of Virginia as impaired by fecal coliform bacteria. Watershed modeling and bacterial source tracking were used to develop the technical components of the fecal coliform bacteria TMDL for Accotink Creek. The Hydrological Simulation Program?FORTRAN (HSPF) was used to simulate streamflow, fecal coliform concentrations, and source-specific fecal coliform loading in Blacks Run. Ribotyping, a bacterial source tracking technique, was used to identify the dominant sources of fecal coliform bacteria in the Blacks Run watershed. Ribotyping also was used to determine the relative contributions of specific sources to the observed fecal coliform load in Blacks Run. Data from the ribotyping analysis were incorporated into the calibration of the fecal coliform model. Study results provide information regarding the calibration of the streamflow and fecal coliform bacteria models and also identify the reductions in fecal coliform loads required to meet the TMDL for Blacks Run. The calibrated streamflow model simulated observed streamflow

  16. Use of the Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN and Bacterial Source Tracking for Development of the fecal coliform Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for Accotink Creek, Fairfax County, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Douglas; Hyer, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    Impairment of surface waters by fecal coliform bacteria is a water-quality issue of national scope and importance. Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act requires that each State identify surface waters that do not meet applicable water-quality standards. In Virginia, more than 175 stream segments are on the 1998 Section 303(d) list of impaired waters because of violations of the water-quality standard for fecal coliform bacteria. A total maximum daily load (TMDL) will need to be developed by 2006 for each of these impaired streams and rivers by the Virginia Departments of Environmental Quality and Conservation and Recreation. A TMDL is a quantitative representation of the maximum load of a given water-quality constituent, from all point and nonpoint sources, that a stream can assimilate without violating the designated water-quality standard. Accotink Creek, in Fairfax County, Virginia, is one of the stream segments listed by the State of Virginia as impaired by fecal coliform bacteria. Watershed modeling and bacterial source tracking were used to develop the technical components of the fecal coliform bacteria TMDL for Accotink Creek. The Hydrological Simulation Program?FORTRAN (HSPF) was used to simulate streamflow, fecal coliform concentrations, and source-specific fecal coliform loading in Accotink Creek. Ribotyping, a bacterial source tracking technique, was used to identify the dominant sources of fecal coliform bacteria in the Accotink Creek watershed. Ribotyping also was used to determine the relative contributions of specific sources to the observed fecal coliform load in Accotink Creek. Data from the ribotyping analysis were incorporated into the calibration of the fecal coliform model. Study results provide information regarding the calibration of the streamflow and fecal coliform bacteria models and also identify the reductions in fecal coliform loads required to meet the TMDL for Accotink Creek. The calibrated streamflow model simulated observed

  17. Survey of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O157 and drug-resistant coliform bacteria from in-line milk filters on dairy farms in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cízek, A; Dolejská, M; Novotná, R; Haas, D; Vyskocil, M

    2008-03-01

    To determine the occurrence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and coliform bacteria isolates resistant to antimicrobial agents in dairy herds by examining milk filters and to analyse the influence of management factors and antibiotic use on antimicrobial resistance. A total of 192 in-line milk filters were sampled on 192 dairy farms in the Czech Republic. Information on feeding, husbandry, production, and antibiotic therapy were obtained by questionnaire. The milk filters were cultured for STEC O157 and coliform bacteria. All recovered isolates were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility and presence of antimicrobial-resistance genes. STEC O157 was detected in four (2%) of the filters. Resistant nonpathogenic E. coli and coliform bacteria isolates with specific genes were detected in 44 (23%) of the filters. The study demonstrated a high prevalence of resistant coliform bacteria in milk filters obtained on Czech dairy farms. The occurrence of resistant coliform bacteria in milk filters was significantly higher among isolates from farms where antibiotic therapy against mastitis was employed during the dry period (P < 0.05).

  18. Analytical limits of four beta-glucuronidase and beta-galactosidase-based commercial culture methods used to detect Escherichia coli and total coliforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, Andrée F; Huppé, Vicky; Boissinot, Maurice; Picard, François J; Bissonnette, Luc; Bernier, Jean-Luc T; Bergeron, Michel G

    2008-12-01

    Colilert (Colilert), Readycult Coliforms 100 (Readycult), Chromocult Coliform agar ES (Chromocult), and MI agar (MI) are beta-galactosidase and beta-glucuronidase-based commercial culture methods used to assess water quality. Their analytical performance, in terms of their respective ability to detect different strains of Escherichia coli and total coliforms, had never been systematically compared with pure cultures. Here, their ability to detect beta-glucuronidase production from E. coli isolates was evaluated by using 74 E. coli strains of different geographic origins and serotypes encountered in fecal and environmental settings. Their ability to detect beta-galactosidase production was studied by testing the 74 E. coli strains as well as 33 reference and environmental non-E. coli total coliform strains. Chromocult, MI, Readycult, and Colilert detected beta-glucuronidase production from respectively 79.9, 79.9, 81.1, and 51.4% of the 74 E. coli strains tested. These 4 methods detected beta-galactosidase production from respectively 85.1, 73.8, 84.1, and 84.1% of the total coliform strains tested. The results of the present study suggest that Colilert is the weakest method tested to detect beta-glucuronidase production and MI the weakest to detect beta-galactosidase production. Furthermore, the high level of false-negative results for E. coli recognition obtained by all four methods suggests that they may not be appropriate for identification of presumptive E. coli strains.

  19. An investigation into the effectiveness of sand media amended with biochar to remove BOD5, suspended solids and coliforms using wetland mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rozari, P; Greenway, M; El Hanandeh, A

    2015-01-01

    Constructed wetland ecotechnologies (CWEs) are a promising solution to effectively treat domestic wastewater in developing countries at low cost. This paper reports the findings of the effectiveness of sand media amended with woody biochar and two plants species (Melaleuca quinquenervia and Cymbopogon citratus) in removing biological oxygen demand (BOD5), suspended solids and coliforms. The experimental design consisted of 21 vertical flow (VF) mesocosms. There were seven media treatments using sand amended with varying proportions of biochar. During the first 8 months, the mesocosms were loaded with secondary clarified wastewater (SCW) then septage. The influent had a 4-day hydraulic retention time. Samples were monitored for BOD5, total suspended solids (TSS), total volatile solids (TVS), total coliforms and faecal coliforms. In the first 8 months, there were no significant performance differences between media treatments in the outflow concentrations of BOD5, TSS and TVS. The significant differences occurred during the last 3 months; using septage with biochar additions performed better than pure sand. For coliforms, the significant differences occurred after 6 months. In conclusion, the addition of biochar was not effective for SCW. The VF mesocosms system proved to be more effective in removing BOD5, TSS, TVS and coliforms when septage was loaded into the media.

  20. Risk factors for bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds. Part 2: bacteria count-specific risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmoslemany, A M; Keefe, G P; Dohoo, I R; Jayarao, B M

    2009-06-01

    A case-control study was conducted to identify specific on-farm risk factors that influence bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds. Total aerobic (TAC), preliminary incubation (PIC), laboratory pasteurization (LPC), and coliform (CC) counts were used to assess the bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk. Four case-control groups were defined based on the last 6 results of each test before on farm evaluation. A herd was classified as a TAC, PIC, or CC case when the herd had at least 4 high TAC, PIC, or CC counts out of the last 6 analyses for each test, respectively. For the LPC case group, a herd was required to have at least 3 high results out of the last 6 analyses. Control groups had low counts in the last 6 analyses for each test in the corresponding case group (TAC, PIC, CC, and LPC). The results of the study showed that TAC and PIC were mainly associated with cow and stall hygiene: washing the teats with water, not using teat predip, and dirty teats were risk factors. The LPC and CC were related to equipment hygiene, with high counts being associated with low temperature of the cleaning solution, high water-hardness score, and high alkalinity of alkaline detergent wash. Based on the findings of this study it can be concluded that TAC, PIC, LPC, and CC counts are of considerable value in identifying practices that could influence milk quality.

  1. Automated dead-end ultrafiltration for concentration and recovery of total coliform bacteria and laboratory-spiked Escherichia coli O157:H7 from 50-liter produce washes to enhance detection by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña, Sonia; Schlemmer, Sarah M; Leskinen, Stephaney D; Kearns, Elizabeth A; Lim, Daniel V

    2013-07-01

    An automated concentration system (ACS) based on dead-end ultrafiltration was used in this study to concentrate bacteria, including Escherichia coli O157:H7, from 50-liter produce washes (PWs, sieved produce wash). Cells trapped in the filters were recovered in approximately 400 ml of buffer to create PW retentates (PWRs). Extent of concentration was determined by analyzing PWs and PWRs for total coliform bacteria and E. coli O157:H7 using standard methods. In addition, an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay was evaluated for detection of E. coli O157:H7 in spiked PWs and PWRs to demonstrate usefulness of the ACS for same-day detection. The levels of total coliform bacteria and E. coli O157:H7 in PWRs were higher than those in PWs by 1.85 ± 0.41 log most probable number per 100 ml and 1.82 ± 0.24 log CFU/ml, respectively. Electrochemiluminescence detection of E. coli O157:H7 was accomplished within 2 h using ACS concentration of lettuce and spinach wash water artificially spiked with the pathogen at levels as low as 0.36 log CFU/ml and 1.39 log CFU/ml, respectively. Detection of E. coli O157:H7 at -0.93 ± 0.15 log CFU/ml in lettuce wash occurred within approximately 6 h when a 4-h enrichment step was added to the procedure. Use of dead-end ultrafiltration increased bacterial concentrations in PWR and allowed same-day detection of low levels of E. coli O157:H7 in PW. This concentration system could be useful to improve the sensitivity of current rapid methods for detection of low levels of foodborne pathogens in PW water.

  2. Generalised count distributions for modelling parity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Barakat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parametric count distributions customarily used in demography - the Poisson and negative binomial models - do not offer satisfactory descriptions of empirical distributions of completed cohort parity. One reason is that they cannot model variance-to-mean ratios below unity, i.e., underdispersion, which is typical of low-fertility parity distributions. Statisticians have recently revived two generalised count distributions that can model both over- and underdispersion, but they have not attracted demographers' attention to date. Objective: The objective of this paper is to assess the utility of these alternative general count distributions, namely the Conway-Maxwell-Poisson and gamma count models, for the modeling of distributions of completed parity. Methods: Simulations and maximum-likelihood estimation are used to assess their fit to empirical data from the Human Fertility Database (HFD. Results: The results show that the generalised count distributions offer a dramatically improved fit compared to customary Poisson and negative binomial models in the presence of under- dispersion, without performance loss in the case of equidispersion or overdispersion. Conclusions: This gain in accuracy suggests generalised count distributions should be used as a matter of course in studies of fertility that examine completed parity as an outcome. Contribution: This note performs a transfer of the state of the art in count data modelling and regression in the more technical statistical literature to the field of demography, allowing demographers to benefit from more accurate estimation in fertility research.

  3. Number of residual thermotolerant coliforms on plants and in soil when using reclaimed domestic wastewater for irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamkure, Sasirot; Cervantes, Edmundo Peña; Zermeño González, Alejandro; Cervantes, Rubén López; Melo, Prócoro Gamero; Ramírez, Homero

    2013-01-01

    The reclamation of domestic wastewater for irrigation is one alternative approach to solve the water scarcity crisis, but it is essential to control the microbiological quality of wastewater used for irrigation. The removal of thermotolerant coliforms, also known as faecal coliforms (FC), from treated domestic wastewater by intermittent media infiltration (IMI) in column was studied. The columns were filled with natural filter media (soil, soil/charcoal and zinc-modified zeolite, Zeo-Zn), and wastewater, IMI-treated wastewater and disinfected wastewater were compared. The numbers of residual FC on Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris) and in agricultural soil were determined over a 4-month period. The column using Zeo-Zn had a higher FC removal efficiency (2.98 log) than columns with other filter media and disinfection (1.87-2.57 log) due to the bactericidal properties of Zn(2+). The treatment of wastewater using Zeo-Zn and disinfection both decreased the accumulation of FC on plants and in soil to approximately 1-20 MPN/g dry matter. IMI-treated wastewater using the column with Zeo-Zn was suitable for unrestricted agricultural use, complied with Mexican regulations (as did disinfected wastewater) and had a low risk of FC contamination of plants and soil.

  4. Determination of fecal contamination origin in reclaimed water open-air ponds using biochemical fingerprinting of enterococci and fecal coliforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas-Massana, Arnau; Blanch, Anicet R

    2013-05-01

    Low levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) were recently detected in two reclaimed water open-air ponds used to irrigate a golf course located in Northeastern Spain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a biochemical fingerprinting method to track the origin of fecal contamination in water with low FIB levels, as in the aforementioned ponds. We also aimed to determine whether FIB presence was due to regrowth of the reclaimed water populations or to a contribution of fecal matter whose source was in the golf facility. Three hundred and fifty enterococcal strains and 308 fecal coliform strains were isolated from the ponds and reclamation plant, and they were biochemically phenotyped. In addition, the inactivation of several microbial fecal pollution indicators (fecal coliforms, total bifidobacteria, sorbitol-fermenting bifidobacteria, somatic bacteriophages, and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron) was studied using a mesocosm in situ in order to obtain information about their decay rate. Although FIB concentration was low, the biochemical fingerprinting provided evidence that the origin of the fecal contamination in the ponds was not related to the reclaimed water. Biochemical fingerprinting thus proved to be a successful approach, since other microbial source-tracking methods perform poorly when dealing with low fecal load matrices. Furthermore, the mesocosm assays indicated that none of the microbial fecal indicators was able to regrow in the ponds. Finally, the study highlights the fact that reclaimed water may be recontaminated in open-air reservoirs, and therefore, its microbial quality should be monitored throughout its use.

  5. Bacterial Growth State Distinguished by Single-Cell Protein Profiling: Does Chlorination Kill Coliforms in Municipal Effluent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockabrand, David; Austin, Teresa; Kaiser, Robyn; Blum, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Municipal effluent is the largest reservoir of human enteric bacteria. Its public health significance, however, depends upon the physiological status of the wastewater bacterial community. A novel immunofluorescence assay was developed and used to examine the bacterial growth state during wastewater disinfection. Quantitative levels of three highly conserved cytosolic proteins (DnaK, Dps, and Fis) were determined by using enterobacterium-specific antibody fluorochrome-coupled probes. Enterobacterial Fis homologs were abundant in growing cells and nearly undetectable in stationary-phase cells. In contrast, enterobacterial Dps homologs were abundant in stationary-phase cells but virtually undetectable in growing cells. The range of variation in the abundance of both proteins was at least 100-fold as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis. Enterobacterial DnaK homologs were nearly invariant with growth state, enabling their use as permeabilization controls. The cellular growth states of individual enterobacteria in wastewater samples were determined by measurement of Fis, Dps, and DnaK abundance (protein profiling). Intermediate levels of Fis and Dps were evident and occurred in response to physiological transitions. The results indicate that chlorination failed to kill coliforms but rather elicited nutrient starvation and a reversible nonculturable state. These studies suggest that the current standard procedures for wastewater analysis which rely on detection of culturable cells likely underestimate fecal coliform content. PMID:10473432

  6. Survey of verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli and faecal coliforms in beef carcasses destined for export at slaughterhouses in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele BIER

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study investigated the presence of generic and verotoxin-producing E. coli as well as enumerated faecal coliforms in 30 beef carcasses in different parts of the slaughter process (after skinning, washing and cooling at each of three slaughterhouses of the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Among the total number of carcasses examined (n = 90, 39 (43.3% had generic E. coli. Among the 270 samples analysed, 25 (9.3% were positive after skinning, 14 (5.2% were positive after washing and nine (3.3% were positive after cooling. The majority of isolates of E. coli was collected from samples after skinning, which is considered a critical point of the microbial contamination of carcasses. However, the highest concentration of faecal coliforms was found after the washing step. The cooling step proved to be important to reducing the amount of hygiene-indicator microorganisms. The E. coli isolates had no stx1 or stx2 genes associated with virulence.

  7. Surface water quality along the Central John Muir Trail in the Sierra Nevada Mountains: coliforms and algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursem, Carling; Evans, C Scott; Ger, Kemal Ali; Richards, John R; Derlet, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    The John Muir Trail (JMT) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California is one of the most popular alpine wilderness trails in the United States, where backpackers depend on trailside water sources for more than 335 km (208 miles). This study addressed the risk of acquiring waterborne disease by analyzing prevalence and changes in coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in lakes and streams adjacent to the central JMT. Chlorophyll-a levels were also measured as an indicator of high elevation eutrophication. Categories of environmental land use which might affect water quality were defined as: Pristine areas rarely traversed by humans; Backpack off-trail areas not traversed by pack or stock animals; and Multiuse areas with backpacker and animal use. We analyzed surface water at 36 different sites three separate times over an eight week period in the summer of 2008. Chlorophyll-a concentration increased significantly in Backpack and Multiuse sites over the summer months, but not in Pristine sites. Similar results were obtained for coliforms, with prevalence also increasing significantly over the summer months in Backpack and Multiuse sites. There was a much higher prevalence of E. coli in Multiuse sites compared to Pristine and Backpack sites. Our study provides evidence pack and stock animals serve as a source of microbial contamination of water along this section of trail.

  8. Bacterial growth state distinguished by single-cell protein profiling: Does chlorination kill coliforms in municipal effluent?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockabrand, D.; Austin, T.; Kaiser, R.; Blum, P.

    1999-09-01

    Municipal effluent is the largest reservoir of human enteric bacteria. Its public health significance, however, depends upon the physiological status of the wastewater bacterial community. A novel immunofluorescence assay was developed and used to examine the bacterial growth state during wastewater disinfection. Quantitative levels of three highly conserved cytosolic proteins (DnaK, Dps, and Fis) were determined by using enterobacterium-specific antibody fluorochrome-coupled probes. Enterobacterial Fis homologs were abundant in growing cells and nearly undetectable in stationary-phase cells. In contrast, enterobacterial Dps homologs were abundant in stationary-phase cells but virtually undetectable in growing cells. The range of variation in the abundance of both proteins was at least 100-fold as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis. Enterobacterial DnaK homologs were nearly invariant with growth state, enabling their use as permeabilization controls. The cellular growth states of individual enterobacteria in wastewater samples were determined by measurement of Fis, Dps, and DnaK abundance (protein profiling). Intermediate levels of Fis and Dps were evident and occurred in response to physiological transitions. The results indicate that chlorination failed to kill coliforms but rather elicited nutrient starvation and a reversible nonculturable state. These studies suggest that the current standard procedures for wastewater analysis which rely on detection of culturable cells likely underestimate fecal coliform content.

  9. Remoción mediante vermicomposteo de los coliformes fecales presentes en lodos biológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Verónica Droppelmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se buscó establecer el efecto de la densidad inicial de lombrices en la remoción de patógenos, mediante vermicomposteo de lodo, usando como indicador el número más probable de coliformes fecales (NMPCF. El lodo utilizado se generó en una planta de aireación extendida, se trabajó con 4 densidades: alta con 0,2 kg lombrices/kg lodo, media con 0,1 kg lombrices/ kg lodo, baja con 0,05 kg lombrices/kg lodo y un blanco sin la adición de lombrices al lodo. Al segundo día de experimentación con la densidad media se logró una mayor remoción, estadísticamente significativa, del NMPCF que la obtenida con la densidad alta. El mismo día, todas las densidades lograron la clasificación de lodo clase B según United States Enviroment Protection Agency. Entre el día 13 y el 20 las muestras con densidades alta, baja y media lograron la clasificación clase A, no así el blanco. Al día 20 tanto la densidad media como la alta lograron el 100% de remoción de los coliformes fecales.

  10. B Counting at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Grant Duncan

    2008-12-16

    In this thesis we examine the method of counting B{bar B} events produced in the BABAR experiment. The original method was proposed in 2000, but improvements to track reconstruction and our understanding of the detector since that date make it appropriate to revisit the B Counting method. We propose a new set of cuts designed to minimize the sensitivity to time-varying backgrounds. We find the new method counts B{bar B} events with an associated systematic uncertainty of {+-} 0.6%.

  11. Differential Counting of Asbestos Using Phase Contrast and Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomoki; Alexandrov, Maxym; Ishida, Takenori; Hirota, Ryuichi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Sekiguchi, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-11-01

    research is needed to fully clarify the causes of variability between FM- and SEM-based differential counting, PCM-FM could be used for rapid and selective detection of asbestos fibers in field samples. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  12. Comparative performance of Colisure (TM) and accepted methods in the detection of chlorine-injured total coliforms and E.coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFeters, G A; Broadaway, S C; Pyle, B H; Pickett, M; Egozy, Y

    1995-01-01

    Studies were done to examine the comparability of Colisure (TM) and accepted reference methods to detect low numbers of total coliform bacteria and E.coli subjected to chlorine stress. Colisure (TM) is a medium designed to concurrently detect coliform bacteria and E.coli in drinking water by the specific action of beta-galactosidase (total coliforms) and beta-glucuronidase (E.coli). The methods used to compare the performance of various media followed a protocol established by the USEPA. Samples (31) of sewage from six different regions of the US were treated with sufficient concentrations of chlorine (1.2-2.5mg/l) to reduce viability 1-3 logs (39% average injury) and diluted with drinking water to achieve ca. 3 viable coliforms/100ml. The mean log reductions in viable bacteria, determined with various media following disinfection of the 31 samples were: mEndo = 1.87 (TC), Colisure (TM) = 1.55 (TC), mTec = 3.63 (E.coli) and Colisure (TM) = 2.01 (E.coli). When Colisure (TM) was compared with accepted methods to detect total coliforms in the dilute, disinfected samples, Colisure (TM) yielded results that were 1.6 times greater than LTB confirmed in BGLB at 28h. Colisure (TM) also detected 1.7 times greater levels of E.coli than LTB confirmed in EC/MUG at 28h. Sensitivity and specificity of Colisure (TM) were between 96 and 100% when positive and negative tests were verified. These findings indicate that Colisure (TM) is superior to certain accepted reference methods in the detection of chlorine-injured coliforms and E.coli under conditions that resemble contaminated drinking water.

  13. Furbearer track count index testing and development

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Indices of abundance can be useful in monitoring furbearer populations where actual counts of individual animals are difficult. I sampled marten and snowshoe hare...

  14. CoC Housing Inventory Count Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Continuum of Care (CoC) Homeless Assistance Programs Housing Inventory Count Reports are a snapshot of a CoC’s housing inventory, available at the national and state...

  15. Mourning Dove Call-count Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) Call-Count Survey was developed to provide an index to population size and to detect annual changes in mourning dove breeding...

  16. Four square mile survey pair count instructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This standard operating procedure (SOP) provides guidance for conducting bird pair count measurements on wetlands for the HAPETs Four-Square-Mile survey. This set of...

  17. Global Population Count Grid Time Series Estimates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Population Count Grid Time Series Estimates provide a back-cast time series of population grids based on the year 2000 population grid from SEDAC's Global...

  18. 2013 bobwhite whistle count : performance report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Performance report for the 2013 spring whistle count to monitor northern bobwhite abundance in Kansas state. This survey was initiated in 1998, and is preformed on...

  19. 2012 bobwhite whistle count : performance report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Performance report for the 2012 spring whistle count to monitor northern bobwhite abundance in Kansas state. This survey was initiated in 1998, and is preformed on...

  20. Calorie count - sodas and energy drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000888.htm Calorie count - sodas and energy drinks To use the sharing features on this page, ... 150 Wild Cherry Pepsi 12 oz 160 Energy Drinks AMP Energy Strawberry Lemonade 16 oz 220 AMP Energy Boost ...

  1. Why calories count: from science to politics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nestle, Marion; Nesheim, Malden C

    2012-01-01

    .... They are also hard to understand. In Why Calories Count, Marion Nestle and Malden Nesheim explain in clear and accessible language what calories are and how they work, both biologically and politically...

  2. VSRR Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This data contains provisional counts for drug overdose deaths based on a current flow of mortality data in the National Vital Statistics System. National...

  3. White Blood Cell Counts and Malaria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKenzie, F. E; Prudhomme, Wendy A; Magill, Alan J; Forney, J. R; Permpanich, Barnyen; Lucas, Carmen; Gasser, Jr., Robert A; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda

    2005-01-01

    .... At each site and in each year, WBC counts in the Plasmodium falciparum infected patients were lower than those in the Plasmodium vivax infected patients, which, in turn, were lower than those in the uninfected patients...

  4. White Blood Cell Counts and Malaria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKenzie, F. E; Prudhomme, Wendy A; Magill, Alan J; Forney, J. R; Permpanich, Barnyen; Lucas, Carmen; Gasser, Jr., Robert A; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda

    2005-01-01

    White blood cells (WBCs) were counted in 4697 individuals who presented to outpatient malaria clinics in Maesod, Tak Province, Thailand, and Iquitos, Peru, between 28 May and 28 August 1998 and between 17 May and 9 July 1999...

  5. ANÁLISIS DE LA CONTAMINACIÓN MICROBIOLÓGICA (COLIFORMES TOTALES Y FECALES) EN LA BAHÍA DE SANTA MARTA, CARIBE COLOMBIANO

    OpenAIRE

    LINA MARÍA RAMOS-ORTEGA; LUÍS A. VIDAL; SANDRA VILARDY Q; LINA SAAVEDRA-DÍAZ

    2008-01-01

    Con el fin de realizar un análisis del nivel de contaminación microbiológica y de las principales fuentes de contaminación en la Bahía de Santa Marta (BSM), se colectaron muestras de agua para medir las concentraciones de coliformes totales y fecales en 11 estaciones y dos niveles de profundidad (1 y 20 m). Para la época de mayores precipitaciones se encontraron altos valores de coliformes totales y fecales, en los dos niveles de profundidad; presentándose una condición similar para la época ...

  6. Development of a sensitive chemiluminometric assay for the detection of beta-galactosidase in permeabilized coliform bacteria and comparison with fluorometry and colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Poucke, S O; Nelis, H J

    1995-01-01

    We developed a chemiluminometric assay of beta-galactosidase in coliform bacteria, using a phenylgalactose-substituted 1,2-dioxetane derivative as a substrate. Permeabilization of cells is required to ensure the efficient cellular uptake of this compound. By this method, one coliform seeded in 100 ml of sterile water can be detected after a 6- to 9-h propagation phase followed by a 45-min enzyme assay in the presence of polymyxin B. Compared with fluorometry and colorimetry, chemiluminometry afforded 4- and 1,000-fold increases in sensitivity and 1- and 6-h increases in the speed of detection, respectively. PMID:8534120

  7. Adaptive and Approximate Orthogonal Range Counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Timothy M.; Wilkinson, Bryan Thomas

    2013-01-01

    ]. •We give an O(n loglog n)-space data structure for approximate 2-D orthogonal range counting that can compute a (1+δ)-factor approximation to the count in O(loglog n) time for any fixed constant δ>0. Again, our bounds match the state of the art for the 2-D orthogonal range emptiness problem. •Lastly...

  8. How to count an introduction to combinatorics

    CERN Document Server

    Allenby, RBJT

    2010-01-01

    What's It All About? What Is Combinatorics? Classic Problems What You Need to Know Are You Sitting Comfortably? Permutations and Combinations The Combinatorial Approach Permutations CombinationsApplications to Probability Problems The Multinomial Theorem Permutations and Cycles Occupancy Problems Counting the Solutions of Equations New Problems from Old A ""Reduction"" Theorem for the Stirling Numbers The Inclusion-Exclusion Principle Double Counting Derangements A Formula for the Stirling NumbersStirling and Catalan Numbers Stirling Numbers Permutations and Stirling Numbers Catalan Numbers Pa

  9. Early surfactant guided by lamellar body counts on gastric aspirate in very preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verder, Henrik Axel; Ebbesen, Finn; Fenger-Grøn, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a rapid method, based on lamellar body counts (LBC) on gastric aspirate, for identifying newborns who will develop respiratory distress syndrome with a need for surfactant supplementation. Objective: We set out to test whether it was possible to improve the outcome when used...

  10. AMNIOTIC FLUID LAMELLAR BODY COUNT FOR PREDICTION OF FOETAL LUNG MATURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Ratikrinda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Predicting maturity of the foetal lung is extremely important in many obstetric situations as respiratory distress syndrome caused by surfactant deficiency remains one of the leading causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality. The need for predicting the foetal lung maturity by means of an accurate test which is done rapidly and available in majority of centres was the objective for this study. AIM To find out the optimum lamellar body count which correlates with foetal lung maturity and to compare the lamellar body count with shake bubble test. MATERIAL AND METHODS This prospective study was designed to evaluate the lamellar body count by standard haematology cell counter that is coulter counter and compare it with shake bubble test. Both the tests were done on 100 amniotic fluid samples in women with gestational age more than 28 weeks. Patients recruited were those who were sure of their last menstrual period (LMP, who were in active labour, and likely to deliver within 72 hours of collection of sample. Amniotic fluid samples obtained by transabdominal amniocentesis or by aspirating the forewaters per vaginum. Both shake bubble test and lamellar body count were done on the sample. RESULTS Lamellar body counts ranged from 10,000-2,43,000/microlitre and had a linear relationship with gestational age. The cut-off level of 30,000/microlitre was considered to be optimum to predict foetal lung maturity. Sensitivity and negative predictive value of lamellar body count at 30,000/microlitre and shake bubble test were comparable at 91.7%/91.7% and 97.3/96.6% respectively whereas with respect to specificity and positive predictive value, lamellar body count was superior to shake bubble test at 93.4%/73.7% and 81.5%/50%. CONCLUSION Lamellar body count is a rapid, inexpensive, simple and more reliable test to assess foetal lung maturity

  11. Ocorrência de Salmonella e coliformes de origem fecal na canela em pó (Cinnamomum cassia Blume a Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees) comercializada em Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Philippi Jane Maria de S.; Moretto Eliane

    1995-01-01

    Cem amostras de canela em pó de dez marcas diferentes comercializadas na cidade de Florianópolis, SC, foram submetidas à análise microbiológica, pesquisando-se Salmonella e coliformes de origem fecal. Em nenhuma amostra foi detectada Salmonella. Coliformes de origem fecal foram encontrados entre os valores

  12. Ferrrate(VI) and freeze-thaw treatment for oxidation of hormones and inactivation of fecal coliforms in sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diak, James; Örmeci, Banu

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the individual and combined effects of potassium ferrate(VI) additions and freeze-thaw conditioning for the treatment and dewatering of wastewater sludge in cold climates, with particular focus on the inactivation of fecal coliforms and oxidation of estrogens, androgens, and progestogens. The first phase of the study evaluated the effects of potassium ferrate(VI) pre-treatment followed by freeze-thaw at -20 °C using a low (0.5 g/L) and high (5.0 g/L) dose of potassium ferrate(VI). The results showed that pre-treatment of anaerobically digested sludge with 5 g/L of potassium ferrate(VI) reduced the concentration of fecal coliforms in the sludge cake to below 100 MPN/g DS. The second phase evaluated the ability of ferrate(VI) to oxidise selected hormones in sludge. Anaerobically digested sludge samples were spiked with 10 different hormones: estrone (E1), 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), equilin, mestranol, testosterone, norethindrone and norgestrel in two groups of low (3-75 ng/mL) and high (12-300 ng/L) concentration ranges of hormones. The samples were treated with either 0.5 or 1.0 g/L of potassium ferrate(VI), and hormone concentrations were measured again after treatment. Potassium ferrate(VI) additions as low as 1.0 g/L reduced the concentration of estrogens in sludge. Potassium ferrate(VI) additions of 0.5 and 1.0 g/L were less effective at reducing the concentrations of androgens and progestogens. Increasing ferrate(VI) dose would likely result in more substantial decreases in the concentrations of fecal coliforms and hormones. The results of this study indicate that the combined use of freeze-thaw and ferrate(VI) has the potential to provide a complete sludge treatment solution in cold regions.

  13. Rapid determination of radiostrontium in seawater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Utsey, Robin C.

    2013-03-12

    A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium and yttrium isotopes in seawater samples for measurement. The new SRNL method employs a novel and effective pre-concentration step that utilizes a blend of calcium phosphate with iron hydroxide to collect both strontium and yttrium rapidly from the seawater matrix with enhanced chemical yields. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with rapid Sr Resin and DGA Resin cartridge separation options using vacuum box technology, allow seawater samples up to 10 liters to be analyzed. The total 89Sr + 90Sr activity may be determined by gas flow proportional counting and recounted after ingrowth of 90Y to differentiate 89Sr from 90Sr. Gas flow proportional counting provides a lower method detection limit than liquid scintillation or Cerenkov counting and allows simultaneous counting of samples. Simultaneous counting allows for longer count times and lower method detection limits without handling very large aliquots of seawater. Seawater samples up to 6 liters may be analyzed using Sr Resin for 89Sr and 90Sr with a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of 1-10 mBq/L, depending on count times. Seawater samples up to 10 liters may be analyzed for 90Sr using a DGA Resin method via collection and purification of 90Y only. If 89Sr and other fission products are present, then 91Y (beta energy 1.55 MeV, 58.5 day half-life) is also likely to be present. 91Y interferes with attempts to collect 90Y directly from the seawater sample without initial purification of Sr isotopes first and 90Y ingrowth. The DGA Resin option can be used to determine 90Sr, and if 91Y is also present, an ingrowth option with using DGA

  14. Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford Count Rumford on the nature of heat

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Sanborn C

    1967-01-01

    Men of Physics: Benjamin Thompson - Count Rumford: Count Rumford on the Nature of Heat covers the significant contributions of Count Rumford in the fields of physics. Count Rumford was born with the name Benjamin Thompson on March 23, 1753, in Woburn, Massachusetts. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 11 chapters, and begins with a presentation of Benjamin Thompson's biography and his interest in physics, particularly as an advocate of an """"anti-caloric"""" theory of heat. The subsequent chapters are devoted to his many discoveries that profoundly affected the physical thought

  15. Blood Count Tests: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish WBC count (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Blood Count Tests ... WBC count Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Bleeding Disorders Blood Laboratory Tests National Institutes of ...

  16. Rapid visual colorimetry of peritoneal lavage fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandberg, D; Reitmeyer, S T; Cheney, P R

    1990-11-01

    That visual colorimetry can be used to rapidly and precisely estimate the erythrocyte count of 1:5 dilutions of simulated peritoneal lavage fluid. Fifty-four normal adult human subjects. The automated or chamber RBC count is often used on fluid obtained by peritoneal lavage in patients with abdominal trauma to help determine the need for surgery. Unfortunately, this method sometimes results in excessive delay. We designed and built a simple colorimeter that facilitated rapid direct visual comparison of unknown samples with known color standards. A radiograph view box was used as a light source. Standards were prepared in 16-mm glass tubes to simulate peritoneal lavage fluid with RBC counts ranging from 0 to 140,000 in 10,000 cell/microL increments; 1:5 dilutions with water were used throughout to reduce opacity. Thimerosal was added to unknowns and standards to stabilize color; all samples were kept refrigerated at 4 C when not in use. In a double-blind in-vitro study, each subject matched 20 randomly distributed unknowns ranging from 12,000 to 131,000 erythrocytes/microL to the nearest standard. The mean absolute error for all 1,080 determinations was 3,560 RBC/microL (95% CI = 4,290-4,830; SD = 4,560; t = 39.6; df = 1,079; P less than .001). This method correctly predicted the RBC count to within 9,000 cells/microL 95% of the time. Visual comparison of 1:5 dilutions of simulated peritoneal lavage fluid with known color standards can be used to rapidly and precisely estimate the erythrocyte count.

  17. Recommendations for monitoring avian populations with point counts: a case study in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Cavarzere

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the northern hemisphere, bird counts have been fundamental in gathering data to understand population trends. Due to the seasonality of the northern hemisphere, counts take place during two clearly defined moments in time: the breeding season (resident birds and winter (after migration. Depending on location, Neotropical birds may breed at any time of year, may or may not migrate, and those patterns are not necessarily synchronous among species. Also in contrast to the northern hemisphere, population trends and the impact of rapid urbanization and deforestation are unknown and unmonitored. Throughout one year, we used point counts to better understand temporal patterns of bird species richness and relative abundance in the state of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil, to examine how to implement similar bird counts in tropical America. We counted birds twice each day on 10 point transects (20 points day‑1, separated by 200 m, with a 100 m limited detection radius in a semideciduous tropical forest. Both species richness and bird abundance were greater in the morning, but accumulation curves suggest that longer-duration afternoon counts would reach the same total species as in morning counts. Species richness and bird abundance did not vary seasonally and unique species were counted every month; relatively few species (20% were present in all months. Most (84% known forest species in the area were encountered. We suggest that point counts can work here as they do in the northern hemisphere. We recommend that transects include at least 20 points and that the simplest timing of bird counts would also be seasonal, using timing of migration of austral migrants (and six months later to coordinate counts. We propose that bird counts in Brazil, and elsewhere in Latin America, would provide data to help understand population trends, but would require greater effort than in temperate latitudes due to greater species richness and different dynamics of

  18. Effect of tetracycline dose and treatment-mode on selection of resistant coliform bacteria in nursery pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders

    2017-01-01

    with oxytetracycline against Lawsonia intracellularis induced diarrhea in five pig herds. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with (i) high (20 mg/kg), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg) and (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dosage, (iv) oral-pen-wise (small group) treatment (10 mg...... and the way the drug was applied did not cause significantly different selection of tetracycline resistant coliform bacteria, under the conditions tested.IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a global treat to human health. Treatment of livestock with antimicrobials has a direct impact on this problem...... the environment with treated animals and take up resistant bacteria from the environment....

  19. The Acquisition of Counting Skill in Preschooler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Çakır

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract- The aim of this study was to find out more information on the acquisition of counting skill in preschool children. For this purpose, children’s judgment of acceptability of a counting activity was used to investigate whether children’s counting skills are governed by their implicit knowledge of a number of counting principles. Data showed that children easily recognized the violation of one or more counting principles in a one’s application of counting principles in sequences of English and Turkish count words, implying that children have the understanding of counting principles. The sessions on counting in Turkish make it very likely that the children were responding to violations of rules rather than merely violation of well-learning of count words. These results give additional support to the assumption that there are innate counting principles that rule young children’s counting. Keywords: counting principles, error-detection task, mathematical development. Özet- Okul Öncesi Çocuklarda Sayma İlkeleri. Bu çalışmada çocukların bir sayma etkinliğinin geçerli olup olmadığı hakkındaki yargıları kullanılarak, sayma becerisinin doğuştan sahip olunan bir dizi örtük ilkeler tarafından yönlendirilip yönlendirilmediği incelenmiştir. Bu amaç doğrultusunda, bir grup okul öncesi çocuklardan videodan izledikleri bir aktör çocuğun hem anadilinde (İngilizce hem de bilmedikleri bir yabancı dilde (Türkçe yaptığı farklı hatalar içeren sayma serilerinin doğru veya yanlış olup olmadığı belirtmesi istenmiştir. Elde edilen sonuçlar çocukların sayma etkinliklerine rehberlik eden doğuştan getirdikleri örtük “sayma ilkelerine” sahip olduklarına ilişkin görüşleri destekler yönündedir. Örneğin, gerek İngilizce gerekse Türkçe sayma serilerinde, “standart (doğru sayma” serisi diğer tüm serilere göre anlamlı ölçüde “doğru” bir sayma olarak değerlendirilirken, T

  20. Protecting count queries in study design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwate, Anand D; Boxwala, Aziz A

    2012-01-01

    Objective Today's clinical research institutions provide tools for researchers to query their data warehouses for counts of patients. To protect patient privacy, counts are perturbed before reporting; this compromises their utility for increased privacy. The goal of this study is to extend current query answer systems to guarantee a quantifiable level of privacy and allow users to tailor perturbations to maximize the usefulness according to their needs. Methods A perturbation mechanism was designed in which users are given options with respect to scale and direction of the perturbation. The mechanism translates the true count, user preferences, and a privacy level within administrator-specified bounds into a probability distribution from which the perturbed count is drawn. Results Users can significantly impact the scale and direction of the count perturbation and can receive more accurate final cohort estimates. Strong and semantically meaningful differential privacy is guaranteed, providing for a unified privacy accounting system that can support role-based trust levels. This study provides an open source web-enabled tool to investigate visually and numerically the interaction between system parameters, including required privacy level and user preference settings. Conclusions Quantifying privacy allows system administrators to provide users with a privacy budget and to monitor its expenditure, enabling users to control the inevitable loss of utility. While current measures of privacy are conservative, this system can take advantage of future advances in privacy measurement. The system provides new ways of trading off privacy and utility that are not provided in current study design systems. PMID:22511018