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Sample records for rapid cognitive decline

  1. Syndromes of rapidly progressive cognitive decline-our experience

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    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dementias are fairly slowly progressive degenerative diseases of brain for which treatment options are very less and carry a lot of burden on family and society. A small percentage of them are rapidly progressive and mostly carry a different course outcome. However, there are no definite criteria other than the time line for these patients. Aims: The aim of this was to identify and categorize the causes and course of rapidly progressive dementias seen in our center. Settings and Design: Patients who presented with rapid deterioration of cognitive functions within weeks to 1 year between 2011 and December 2016 were evaluated. Patients and Methods: All patients underwent all mandatory tests for dementia including brain imaging. Complete vasculitis workup, autoimmune encephalitis profile including Voltage Gated Potassium Channel, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor, glutamic acid-decarboxylase, thyroid-peroxidase antibody, cerebrospinal fluid, and other special tests such as duodenal biopsy and paraneoplastic workup were done based on clinical indications. Results and Conclusions: Out of 144 patients 42 had immune-mediated encephalopathy, 18 had Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, 3 had Vitamin B12 deficiency, 63 had infection with neurocysticercosis, 7 had tuberculosis, 2 had HIV, 1 had herpes simplex encephalitis, 1 had neurosyphilis, 1 Whipples disease, 1 had Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis, 1 had Mass lesion, 3 had Frontotemporal dementia, and 3 had small vessel disease. Good majority of these patients have infective and immune-mediated causes and less number belong to degenerative group. Therefore, caution is needed to look for treatable cause as it carries a different treatment options and outcome.

  2. Predictive Factors of Rapid Cognitive Decline in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

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    Coralie Barbe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine predictive factors associated with rapid cognitive decline (RCD in elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer disease (AD. Methods: Patients suffering from mild to moderate AD were included. RCD was defined as the loss of at least 3 points on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE over 12 months. Factors associated with RCD were identified by logistic regression. Results: Among 123 patients included, 61 were followed up until 12 months. RCD occurred in 46% of patients (n = 28. Polymedication (p < 0.0001, the fact that the caregiver was the child or spouse of the patient (p < 0.0001 and autonomy for washing (p < 0.0001 were protective factors against RCD, while the presence of caregiver burden (p < 0.0001 was shown to be a risk factor for RCD. Conclusion: Early detection of the RCD risk in AD patients could make it possible to anticipate the patient’s medical needs and adjust the care plan for caregiver burden.

  3. REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Is Not Associated with a More Rapid Cognitive Decline in Mild Dementia

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    Luiza Chwiszczuk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesREM sleep behavior disorder (RBD is associated with cognitive dysfunctions and is a risk factor for development of mild cognitive impairment and dementia. However, it is unknown whether RBD is associated with faster cognitive decline in already established dementia. The main goal of this study was to determine if patients with mild dementia with and without RBD differ in progression rate and in specific neuropsychological measures over 4-year follow-up.MethodsThis longitudinal, prospective study based on data from the DemVest study compares neuropsychological measures in a mild dementia cohort. A diagnosis of probable RBD (pRBD was made based on the Mayo Sleep Questionnaire. Neuropsychological domains were assessed by Mini Mental State Examination, total score and figure copying, California Verbal Learning Test-II, Visual Object and Space Perception Cube and Silhouettes, Boston Naming Test, Stroop test, Verbal Category Fluency, Trail Making Test A and B.ResultsAmong the 246 subjects, 47 (19.1% had pRBD at the baseline, and pRBD group was younger and with male predominance. During 4-year follow-up, we did not observe any significant differences in the rate of decline in neuropsychological measures. Patients with pRBD performed generally poorer in visuoconstructional, visuoperceptual, and executive/attention tests in comparison to RBD negative.ConclusionWe did not find any significant differences in progression rate of neurocognitive outcomes between dementia patients with and without RBD.

  4. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Mark Ide

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  5. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  6. Cardiovascular Prevention of Cognitive Decline

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    Jean-Jacques Monsuez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Midlife cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipemia, and an unhealthy lifestyle, have been linked to subsequent incidence, delay of onset, and progression rate of Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia. Conversely, optimal treatment of cardiovascular risk factors prevents and slows down age-related cognitive disorders. The impact of antihypertensive therapy on cognitive outcome in patients with hypertension was assessed in large trials which demonstrated a reduction in progression of MRI white matter hyperintensities, in cognitive decline and in incidence of dementia. Large-scale database correlated statin use and reduction in the incidence of dementia, mainly in patients with documented atherosclerosis, but clinical trials failed to reach similar conclusions. Whether a multitargeted intervention would substantially improve protection, quality of life, and reduce medical cost expenditures in patients with lower risk profile has not been ascertained. This would require appropriately designed trials targeting large populations and focusing on cognitive decline as a primary outcome endpoint.

  7. Predicting cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease: an integrated analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Oscar L; Schwam, Elias; Cummings, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined.......Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined....

  8. Cognitive decline in Huntington's disease expansion gene carriers.

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    Baake, Verena; Reijntjes, Robert H A M; Dumas, Eve M; Thompson, Jennifer C; Roos, Raymund A C

    2017-10-01

    In Huntington's Disease (HD) cognitive decline can occur before unequivocal motor signs become apparent. As cognitive decline often starts early in the course of the disease and has a progressive nature over time, cognition can be regarded as a key target for symptomatic treatment. The specific progressive profile of cognitive decline over time is unknown. The aim of this study is to quantify the progression of cognitive decline across all HD stages, from pre-motormanifest to advanced HD, and to investigate if CAG length mediates cognitive decline. In the European REGISTRY study 2669 HD expansion gene carriers underwent annual cognitive assessment. General linear mixed models were used to model the cognitive decline for each cognitive task across all disease stages. Additionally, a model was developed to evaluate the cognitive decline based on CAG length and age rather than disease stage. There was significant cognitive decline on all administered tasks throughout pre-motormanifest (close to estimated disease onset) participants and the subsequent motormanifest participants from stage 1 to stage 4. Performance on the Stroop Word and Stroop Color tests additionally declined significantly across the two pre-motormanifest groups: far and close to estimated disease onset. The evaluation of cognition performance in relation to CAG length and age revealed a more rapid cognitive decline in participants with longer CAG length than participants with shorter CAG length over time. Cognitive performance already shows decline in pre-motormanifest HD gene expansion carriers and gradually worsens to late stage HD. HD gene expansion carriers with certain CAG length have their own cognitive profile, i.e., longer CAG length is associated with more rapid decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predicting cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease: an integrated analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Oscar L; Schwam, Elias; Cummings, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined....

  10. Cognitive Issues: Decline, Delirium, Depression, Dementia.

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    Harris, Melodee

    2017-09-01

    Cognitive decline in older persons can be pathologic or occur as a part of the normal aging process. Delirium, depression, and dementia are geriatric syndromes and neurocognitive disorders that are the result of cognitive decline associated with pathology. This overview is a brief guide on cognitive decline and how to identify, manage, and treat associated neurocognitive disorders, including delirium, depression, and dementia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cholesterol and late-life cognitive decline.

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    van Vliet, Peter

    2012-01-01

    High cholesterol levels are a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but their role in dementia and cognitive decline is less clear. This review highlights current knowledge on the role of cholesterol in late-life cognitive function, cognitive decline, and dementia. When measured in midlife, high cholesterol levels associate with an increased risk of late-life dementia and cognitive decline. However, when measured in late-life, high cholesterol levels show no association with cognitive function, or even show an inverse relation. Although statin treatment has been shown to associate with a lower risk of dementia and cognitive decline in observational studies, randomized controlled trials show no beneficial effect of statin treatment on late-life cognitive function. Lowering cholesterol levels may impair brain function, since cholesterol is essential for synapse formation and maturation and plays an important role in the regulation of signal transduction through its function as a component of the cell membrane. However, membrane cholesterol also plays a role in the formation and aggregation of amyloid-β. Factors that influence cholesterol metabolism, such as dietary intake, are shown to play a role in late-life cognitive function and the risk of dementia. In conclusion, cholesterol associates with late-life cognitive function, but the association is strongly age-dependent. There is no evidence that treatment with statins in late-life has a beneficial effect on cognitive function.

  12. Can exercise prevent cognitive decline?

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    Behrman, Sophie; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2014-01-01

    As the tolerability of pharmacological agents decreases with age, exercise may be particularly helpful as a possible treatment or stabiliser of mood and cognitive function in older age. Exercise has been most commonly evaluated for the treatment of depression. Exercise interventions designed primarily for treatment of physical conditions in the elderly do appear to confer psychological benefits as well, with reduction in depressive symptoms over the course of treatment. The effects of exercise on reducing depressive symptoms are not dissimilar to the effects of antidepressant drugs and cognitive behaviour therapy. Exercise may be a useful low-tech intervention for people with mild to moderate depression. In particular, exercise may be helpful in the elderly and in patients who have had insufficient response to, or are intolerant of, pharmacotherapy. Mastery of a new skill and positive feedback from others may increase feelings of self-esteem and improve mood. Exercise may distract participants from persistent negative thoughts. Exercise has been shown to improve executive function acutely in adults of all ages. It is possible that dance routines or other exercise regimens requiring some cognitive input may confer additional benefit to cognitive function. Exercise has a moderate effect on the ability of people with dementia to perform activities of daily living and may improve cognitive function. Midlife exercise may also have an impact on later cognitive function.

  13. Research priorities for cognitive decline in India

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    Jahnavi S Kedare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The elderly population with cognitive decline is increasing at an alarming rate in developing countries such as India. There is a paucity of basic clinical research in the field of cognitive decline dealing with areas of prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and management. In India, prioritization of research capabilities is obligatory to decrease the research gap, i.e., the difference between the information needed to plan services and that which is available. The information can be gathered and utilized to frame policies and early remedial measures to tackle the emerging disease burden on the community. This article highlights the research done on cognitive decline so far and the further need for priority research on various important areas such as epidemiology, assessment methods and diagnosis, psychobehavioral symptoms, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and interventional studies to create an evidence base for our population.

  14. Genetic influences on cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease.

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    Morley, James F; Xie, Sharon X; Hurtig, Howard I; Stern, Matthew B; Colcher, Amy; Horn, Stacy; Dahodwala, Nabila; Duda, John E; Weintraub, Daniel; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Falcone, Dana; Siderowf, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    The role of genetic factors in cognitive decline associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) is unclear. We examined whether variations in apolipoprotein E (APOE), microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), or catechol-O-methytransferase (COMT) genotypes are associated with cognitive decline in PD. We performed a prospective cohort study of 212 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PD. The primary outcome was change in Mattis Dementia Rating Scale version 2 score. Linear mixed-effects models and survival analysis were used to test for associations between genotypes and change in cognitive function over time. The ε4 allele of APOE was associated with more rapid decline (loss of 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.7-4.1) of more points per year; P disease stages. Carrying at least one APOE ε4 allele is associated with more rapid cognitive decline in PD, supporting the idea of a component of shared etiology between PD dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Clinically, these results suggest that genotyping can provide information about the risk of future cognitive decline for PD patients. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  15. MIND diet slows cognitive decline with aging

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    Morris, Martha Clare; Tangney, Christy C; Wang, Yamin; Sacks, Frank Martin; Barnes, Lisa L.; Bennett, David William; Aggarwal, Neelum T.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Mediterranean and dash diets have been shown to slow cognitive decline; however, neither diet is specific to the nutrition literature on dementia prevention. METHODS: We devised the Mediterranean-Dietary Approach to Systolic Hypertension (DASH) diet intervention for neurodegenerative delay (MIND) diet score that specifically captures dietary components shown to be neuroprotective and related it to change in cognition over an average 4.7 years among 960 participants ...

  16. Bulgaria: Ethnic differentials in rapidly declining fertility

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    Dimiter Philipov

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This chapter provides a detailed description of the fertility changes in Bulgaria during recent decades and discusses possible reasons and consequences. It also gives an overview of the steps that the government has undertaken to offset the considerable decline in fertility. Before the fall of communism, fertility trends in Bulgaria were stable and characterized by a nearly universal entry into parenthood, dominance of a two-child family model, an early start and early end of childbearing, stable mean ages at entry into childbearing and marriage, and low percentages of non-marital births. During the 1990s and in the first years of the new century, we observe a marked, rapid change in fertility behaviour. Together with the severe decline in overall fertility rates, demographic data reveal a significant postponement of entry into motherhood and marriage, a decline of the two-child family model, and an emergence of new family forms. Most research attributes these changes to the particular political and social situation in Bulgaria since 1989.

  17. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V. Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer’s disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer’s disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation. PMID:26963387

  18. MIND diet slows cognitive decline with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Martha Clare; Tangney, Christy C; Wang, Yamin; Sacks, Frank M; Barnes, Lisa L; Bennett, David A; Aggarwal, Neelum T

    2015-09-01

    The Mediterranean and dash diets have been shown to slow cognitive decline; however, neither diet is specific to the nutrition literature on dementia prevention. We devised the Mediterranean-Dietary Approach to Systolic Hypertension (DASH) diet intervention for neurodegenerative delay (MIND) diet score that specifically captures dietary components shown to be neuroprotective and related it to change in cognition over an average 4.7 years among 960 participants of the Memory and Aging Project. In adjusted mixed models, the MIND score was positively associated with slower decline in global cognitive score (β = 0.0092; P diet scores versus the lowest was equivalent to being 7.5 years younger in age. The study findings suggest that the MIND diet substantially slows cognitive decline with age. Replication of these findings in a dietary intervention trial would be required to verify its relevance to brain health. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Inappropriate treatments for patients with cognitive decline.

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    Robles Bayón, A; Gude Sampedro, F

    2014-01-01

    Some treatments are inappropriate for patients with cognitive decline. We analyse their use in 500 patients and present a literature review. Benzodiazepines produce dependence, and reduce attention, memory, and motor ability. They can cause disinhibition or aggressive behaviour, facilitate the appearance of delirium, and increase accident and mortality rates in people older than 60. In subjects over 65, low systolic blood pressure is associated with cognitive decline. Maintaining this figure between 130 and 140 mm Hg (145 in patients older than 80) is recommended. Hypocholesterolaemia < 160 mg/dl is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, aggressiveness, and suicide; HDL-cholesterol<40 mg/dl is associated with memory loss and increased vascular and mortality risks. Old age is a predisposing factor for developing cognitive disorders or delirium when taking opioids. The risks of prescribing anticholinesterases and memantine to patients with non-Alzheimer dementia that is not associated with Parkinson disease, mild cognitive impairment, or psychiatric disorders probably outweigh the benefits. Anticholinergic drugs acting preferentially on the peripheral system can also induce cognitive side effects. Practitioners should be aware of steroid-induced dementia and steroid-induced psychosis, and know that risk of delirium increases with polypharmacy. Of 500 patients with cognitive impairment, 70.4% were on multiple medications and 42% were taking benzodiazepines. Both conditions were present in 74.3% of all suspected iatrogenic cases. Polypharmacy should be avoided, if it is not essential, especially in elderly patients and those with cognitive impairment. Benzodiazepines, opioids and anticholinergics often elicit cognitive and behavioural disorders. Moreover, systolic blood pressure must be kept above 130 mm Hg, total cholesterol levels over 160 mg/dl, and HDL-cholesterol over 40 mg/dl in this population. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurolog

  20. Preventing cognitive decline in preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

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    Riedel, Wim J

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease leading to cognitive decline, dementia, and ultimately death. Despite extensive R&D efforts, there are no diseases modifying treatments for AD available. The stage in which patients receive a clinical diagnosis of probable AD may be too late for disease modifying pharmacotherapy. Prevention strategies may be required to successfully tackle AD. Preclinical AD applies to over half of all healthy elderly subjects and manifests by signs of amyloid deposition and/or neuronal injury in the brain, preceding the stage in which symptoms of dementia, cognitive and functional impairment become observable. Prevention trials in preclinical AD require longer and larger clinical trials using biomarkers and cognitive endpoints, which requires collaboration across academia, government and industry. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Functional network integrity presages cognitive decline in preclinical Alzheimer disease.

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    Buckley, Rachel F; Schultz, Aaron P; Hedden, Trey; Papp, Kathryn V; Hanseeuw, Bernard J; Marshall, Gad; Sepulcre, Jorge; Smith, Emily E; Rentz, Dorene M; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Chhatwal, Jasmeer P

    2017-07-04

    To examine the utility of resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) measurements of network integrity as a predictor of future cognitive decline in preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD). A total of 237 clinically normal older adults (aged 63-90 years, Clinical Dementia Rating 0) underwent baseline β-amyloid (Aβ) imaging with Pittsburgh compound B PET and structural and rs-fcMRI. We identified 7 networks for analysis, including 4 cognitive networks (default, salience, dorsal attention, and frontoparietal control) and 3 noncognitive networks (primary visual, extrastriate visual, motor). Using linear and curvilinear mixed models, we used baseline connectivity in these networks to predict longitudinal changes in preclinical Alzheimer cognitive composite (PACC) performance, both alone and interacting with Aβ burden. Median neuropsychological follow-up was 3 years. Baseline connectivity in the default, salience, and control networks predicted longitudinal PACC decline, unlike connectivity in the dorsal attention and all noncognitive networks. Default, salience, and control network connectivity was also synergistic with Aβ burden in predicting decline, with combined higher Aβ and lower connectivity predicting the steepest curvilinear decline in PACC performance. In clinically normal older adults, lower functional connectivity predicted more rapid decline in PACC scores over time, particularly when coupled with increased Aβ burden. Among examined networks, default, salience, and control networks were the strongest predictors of rate of change in PACC scores, with the inflection point of greatest decline beyond the fourth year of follow-up. These results suggest that rs-fcMRI may be a useful predictor of early, AD-related cognitive decline in clinical research settings. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Cognitive decline after major oncological surgery in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, M.; Rotteveel, E.; Izaks, G. J.; Spikman, J. M.; van der Wal-Huisman, H.; van Etten, B.; Absalom, A. R.; Mourits, M. J. E.; de Bock, G. H.; van Leeuwen, B. L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Elderly patients undergoing oncological surgery experience postoperative cognitive decline. The aims of this study were to examine the incidence of cognitive decline 3 months after surgery and identify potential patient-, disease- and surgery-related risk factors for postoperative

  3. Speech prosody impairment predicts cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease.

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    Rektorova, Irena; Mekyska, Jiri; Janousova, Eva; Kostalova, Milena; Eliasova, Ilona; Mrackova, Martina; Berankova, Dagmar; Necasova, Tereza; Smekal, Zdenek; Marecek, Radek

    2016-08-01

    Impairment of speech prosody is characteristic for Parkinson's disease (PD) and does not respond well to dopaminergic treatment. We assessed whether baseline acoustic parameters, alone or in combination with other predominantly non-dopaminergic symptoms may predict global cognitive decline as measured by the Addenbrooke's cognitive examination (ACE-R) and/or worsening of cognitive status as assessed by a detailed neuropsychological examination. Forty-four consecutive non-depressed PD patients underwent clinical and cognitive testing, and acoustic voice analysis at baseline and at the two-year follow-up. Influence of speech and other clinical parameters on worsening of the ACE-R and of the cognitive status was analyzed using linear and logistic regression. The cognitive status (classified as normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment and dementia) deteriorated in 25% of patients during the follow-up. The multivariate linear regression model consisted of the variation in range of the fundamental voice frequency (F0VR) and the REM Sleep Behavioral Disorder Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ). These parameters explained 37.2% of the variability of the change in ACE-R. The most significant predictors in the univariate logistic regression were the speech index of rhythmicity (SPIR; p = 0.012), disease duration (p = 0.019), and the RBDSQ (p = 0.032). The multivariate regression analysis revealed that SPIR alone led to 73.2% accuracy in predicting a change in cognitive status. Combining SPIR with RBDSQ improved the prediction accuracy of SPIR alone by 7.3%. Impairment of speech prosody together with symptoms of RBD predicted rapid cognitive decline and worsening of PD cognitive status during a two-year period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Subjective cognitive decline and fall risk in community-dwelling older adults with or without objective cognitive decline.

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    Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Tashiro, Yuto; Nozaki, Yuma; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2017-07-19

    The association between subjective cognitive decline and falls has not been clearly determined. Our aim was to explore the effect of subjective cognitive decline on falls in community-dwelling older adults with or without objective cognitive decline. We included 470 older adults (mean age 73.6 ± 5.2; 329 women) living in the community and obtained data on fall history directly from the participants. Subjective cognitive decline was assessed using a self-administered question. Objective cognitive function was measured using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Statistical analyses were carried out separately for participants with objective cognitive decline and those without. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that, among participants without objective cognitive decline, subjective cognitive decline was positively associated with falls [OR 1.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-3.12; p = 0.01). Conversely, among participants with objective cognitive decline, subjective cognitive decline was negatively associated with falls (OR 0.07; 95% CI 0.01-0.85, p = 0.04). The result suggests that the objective-subjective disparity may affect falls in community-dwelling older adults. The presence of subjective cognitive decline was significantly positively associated with falls among cognitively intact older adults. However, among their cognitively impaired peers, the absence of subjective cognitive decline was positively associated with falls.

  5. Prevention of cognitive decline: Lifestyle and other issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyriac George

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ageing often leads to decline in cognitive abilities. Significant cognitive impairment leads to functional impairment and need for care. Prevention of cognitive decline and delaying its progression would help to reduce the need for long-term care. Both genetic and environmental factors are important determinants of cognitive health in late life. A better cognitive reserve helps to prevent cognitive decline. Cognitive reserve is now considered as a functional reserve rather than a structural reserve. Cognitive reserve can be enhanced through experience. People with higher level of education tend to have higher cognitive reserve. Better cognitive reserve can act as a buffer. Engagement in cognitively stimulating activities may prevent cognitive decline in late life. Physical exercise also improves cognitive health. Aerobic exercises, which improve cardiorespiratory fitness, improve cognitive functions like motor functions, cognitive speed, and auditory and visual attention. Beneficial effects on executive functions are also reported. Healthy diet, especially adherence to Mediterranean diet (MeDi, is considered to be useful in preserving cognitive health. Engagement in social activities might also reduce cognitive decline. Encouraging adherence to a healthy lifestyle and continuing to be physically, socially, and cognitively active seems to be a promising strategy to prevent cognitive decline.

  6. Cognition enhancers in age-related cognitive decline.

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    Riedel, W J; Jolles, J

    1996-04-01

    A review of recently published studies on the effect of cognition enhancers in non-demented human study participants is presented. The heterogeneity of the therapeutic target, age-associated cognitive decline, can be improved by separately treating groups in whom age-extrinsic factors may underlie cognitive pathology. Standardisation of cognitive assessments is necessary, since many different tests are applied to answer the same question. Modelling cognitive dysfunction, either by pharmacological or nonpharmacological means, in humans is highly recommended since it allows hypotheses to be tested in a clearly operationalised way. Predictive validity of the currently applied models for the clinical situation remains a problem, however. The scopolamine (hyoscine) model has, to a reasonable extent, predictive validity for the cholinergic agents. The results of 67 single-dose studies and 30 multiple-dose studies are summarised. All single-dose studies and 14 multiple-dose studies were carried out in young or elderly human volunteers. In 45 of 81 volunteer studies, models of cognitive dysfunction were employed. The scopolamine model was the most used (n = 21); the other studies induced cognitive dysfunction by means of benzodiazepines (8), hypoxia (7), alcohol (5) and sleep-deprivation (4). The remaining 16 multiple-dose studies were clinical trials of a duration varying between 2 weeks and 1 year (average duration was 14 weeks). In these trials, the effects of cognition enhancers were assessed in elderly people in whom impairment of memory, psychomotor performance or cognitive function was determined. These included age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) and age-associated cognitive decline (AACD). There were many studies in which the cognition enhancing properties of substances in humans were reliably demonstrated. The cognition enhancing properties of substances that are widely used, such as caffeine, nicotine and vitamins, may already be active against AACD. New

  7. Depressed Mood Mediates Decline in Cognitive Processing Speed in Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaliano, Peter P.; Zhang, Jianping; Young, Heather M.; Caswell, Lisa W.; Scanlan, James M.; Echeverria, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Very few studies have examined cognitive decline in caregivers versus noncaregivers, and only 1 study has examined mediators of such decline. We evaluated the relationship between caregiver status and decline on the digit symbol test (DST; a measure of processing speed, attention, cognitive-motor translation, and visual scanning) and…

  8. Cognitive decline and dementia in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hithersay, Rosalyn; Hamburg, Sarah; Knight, Bernice; Strydom, André

    2017-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is most likely universal in older individuals with Down syndrome, due to having three copies of the amyloid precursor protein gene, resulting in amyloid-beta plaque deposition. Down syndrome is an important population in which to consider clinical trials of treatments to prevent or delay the development of dementia. However, assessment of subtler cognitive changes is challenging due to the presence of intellectual disability. Recent research confirmed that older adults with Down syndrome often present with cognitive decline: more than 80% may experience dementia by age 65 years. Efforts have been made to improve and validate neuropsychological assessment and to describe the relationship with comorbidities such as epilepsy and haemorrhagic stroke. There have also been advances in biomarkers such as neuroimaging using amyloid PET. Clinical trials of treatments, particularly in the presymptomatic phase of Alzheimer's disease, are important to consider in individuals with Down syndrome given their high dementia burden, and may also serve as proof of concept for other forms of Alzheimer's disease. However, further work is required to improve outcome measures and better understand the biomarkers of progression of disorder and their relationship with symptom development during the presymptomatic period.

  9. Markers of cognitive decline in PD: The case for heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monchi, Oury; Hanganu, Alexandru; Bellec, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent and has a severe negative effect on health related and perceived quality of life in Parkinson's disease (PD). It is now established that 20-40% of persons with PD will develop cognitive deficits early in the disease. Moreover, the risk of developing dementia is six times higher in PD patients than in age-matched controls and it is estimated that 80% of patients will develop dementia after 20 years of the disease. In order to address these symptoms properly it is crucial to identify very early in the disease the patients who are most likely to develop dementia rapidly. Persons who meet criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) exhibit measurable cognitive deficits but those deficits are not severe enough to interfere significantly with daily life. While the presence of MCI in PD increases the chance of developing dementia, various studies suggest that PD-MCI might consist of distinct subtypes with different pathophysiologies and prognoses. In this paper we comment on various biomarkers associated with cognitive decline in PD, specifically clinical, neuropathological, genetic and neuroimaging ones. We also discuss disrupted functional connectivity in PD-MCI and reveal preliminary results from our own group. We propose that the current studies looking at different types of biomarkers provide support for different causes being associated with cognitive decline in PD. Large-scale multi-disciplinary and multi-modal longitudinal studies are required to identify more specifically the different phenotypes associated with different cognitive profiles and evolution in PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluating the Association between Diabetes, Cognitive Decline and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omorogieva Ojo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review the association between diabetes mellitus, cognitive decline and dementia, including the effects of cognitive decline and dementia on self management of diabetes. This is a literature review of primary research articles. A number of contemporary research articles that met the inclusion criteria were selected for this review paper. These articles were selected using a number of search strategies and electronic databases, such as EBSCOhost Research and SwetsWise databases. The duration of diabetes, glycated haemoglobin levels and glycaemic fluctuations were associated with cognitive decline and dementia. Similarly, hypoglycaemia was significantly related to increased risk of developing cognitive decline and dementia. Furthermore, cognitive decline and dementia were associated with poorer diabetes management. There is evidence of the association between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia including the shared pathogenesis between diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the self management of diabetes is affected by dementia and cognitive decline. It could be suggested that the association between diabetes and dementia is bidirectional with the potential to proceed to a vicious cycle. Further studies are needed in order to fully establish the relationship between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia. Patients who have diabetes and dementia could benefit from structured education strategies, which should involve empowerment programmes and lifestyle changes. The detection of cognitive decline should highlight the need for education strategies.

  11. Folic Acid Supplements: Can They Slow Cognitive Decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they slow cognitive decline? I've heard that folic acid supplements can improve cognitive function in older adults. Could those with Alzheimer's disease also benefit from folic acid? Answers from Paul Y. Takahashi, M.D. There's ...

  12. Cognitive decline after major oncological surgery in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plas, M; Rotteveel, E; Izaks, G J; Spikman, J M; van der Wal-Huisman, H; van Etten, B; Absalom, A R; Mourits, M J E; de Bock, G H; van Leeuwen, B L

    2017-11-01

    Elderly patients undergoing oncological surgery experience postoperative cognitive decline. The aims of this study were to examine the incidence of cognitive decline 3 months after surgery and identify potential patient-, disease- and surgery-related risk factors for postoperative cognitive decline in onco-geriatric patients. A consecutive series of elderly patients (≥65 years) undergoing surgery for the removal of a solid tumour were included (n = 307). Cognitive performance was assessed pre-operatively and 3 months postoperatively. Postoperative decline was defined as a decline in scores of cognitive tests of ≥25% on ≥2 of 5 tests. Of the patients who had completed the assessments, 117 (53%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 47-60) had improved cognitive test scores, whereas 26 (12%, 95% CI: 7.6-16) showed cognitive decline at 3 months postoperatively. In patients aged >75 years, the incidence of overall cognitive decline 3 months postoperatively was 18% (95% CI: 9.3-27). In patients with lower pre-operative Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score (≤26) the incidence was 37% (95% CI: 18-57), and in patients undergoing major surgery it was 18% (95% CI: 10.6-26). Of the cognitive domains, executive function was the most vulnerable to decline. About half of the elderly patients show improvement in postoperative cognitive performance after oncological surgery, whereas 12% show cognitive decline. Advanced age, lower pre-operative MMSE score and major surgery are risk factors for cognitive decline at 3 months postoperatively and should be taken into account in the clinical decision-making progress. Research to develop interventions to preserve quality of life should focus on this high-risk subpopulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Late life leisure activities and risk of cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Xin; Jin, Yinlong; Hendrie, Hugh C; Liang, Chaoke; Yang, Lili; Cheng, Yibin; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Ma, Feng; Hall, Kathleen S; Murrell, Jill R; Li, Ping; Bian, Jianchao; Pei, Jin-Jing; Gao, Sujuan

    2013-02-01

    Studies concerning the effect of different types of leisure activities on various cognitive domains are limited. This study tests the hypothesis that mental, physical, and social activities have a domain-specific protection against cognitive decline. A cohort of a geographically defined population in China was examined in 2003-2005 and followed for an average of 2.4 years. Leisure activities were assessed in 1,463 adults aged 65 years and older without cognitive or physical impairment at baseline, and their cognitive performances were tested at baseline and follow-up examinations. High level of mental activity was related to less decline in global cognition (β = -.23, p activity was related to less decline in episodic memory (β = -.08, p activity was associated with less decline in global cognition (β = -.11, p activities experienced a significant global cognitive decline, those who engaged in any one of the activities maintained their cognition, and those who engaged in two or three activities improved their cognition. The same pattern was observed in men and in women. Leisure activities in old age may protect against cognitive decline for both women and men, and different types of activities seem to benefit different cognitive domains.

  14. Literature review on the role of dietary protein and amino acids in cognitive functioning and cognitive decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, van de O.; Zwaluw, van der N.L.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    As the population of elderly people is growing rapidly, the number of individuals with dementia and cognitive impairment is also increasing. One of the preventive measures against cognitive decline is diet and different dietary factors have already been investigated. This review provides an overview

  15. Apolipoprotein E genotype, atherosclerosis, and cognitive decline : The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooter, A.J.C.; Duijn, C.M. van; Bots, M.L.; Ott, A.; Breteler, M.B.; Voecht, J. de; Wehnert, A.; Knijff, P. de; Havekes, L.M.; Grobbee, D.E.; Broeckhoven, C. van; Hofman, A.

    1998-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E4 allele (APOEε4) and atherosclerosis are risk factors for cognitive decline. We investigated whether the effects of APOEε4 and atherosclerosis on cognitive decline are independent. A population-based follow-up study was performed on 838 subjects who were non-demented at

  16. The potential effects of meditation on age-related cognitive decline: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Tim; Hölzel, Britta K; Lazar, Sara W

    2014-01-01

    With a rapidly aging society it becomes increasingly important to counter normal age-related decline in cognitive functioning. Growing evidence suggests that cognitive training programs may have the potential to counteract this decline. On the basis of a growing body of research that shows that meditation has positive effects on cognition in younger and middle-aged adults, meditation may be able to offset normal age-related cognitive decline or even enhance cognitive function in older adults. In this paper, we review studies investigating the effects of meditation on age-related cognitive decline. We searched the Web of Science (1900 to present), PsycINFO (1597 to present), MEDLINE (1950 to present), and CABI (1910 to present) to identify original studies investigating the effects of meditation on cognition and cognitive decline in the context of aging. Twelve studies were included in the review, six of which were randomized controlled trials. Studies involved a wide variety of meditation techniques and reported preliminary positive effects on attention, memory, executive function, processing speed, and general cognition. However, most studies had a high risk of bias and small sample sizes. Reported dropout rates were low and compliance rates high. We conclude that meditation interventions for older adults are feasible, and preliminary evidence suggests that meditation can offset age-related cognitive decline. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Terminal pathologies affect rates of decline to different extents and age accelerates the effects of terminal pathology on cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbitt, Patrick; Lunn, Mary; Pendleton, Neil; Yardefagar, Ghasem

    2011-05-01

    To test whether different terminal pathologies are associated with different rates of age-related decline in fluid and crystallized mental abilities and whether pathology-associated declines are accelerated by age. During a 20-year longitudinal study, 6203 participants were quadrennially assessed on the Heim's (Heim, A 1970) The AH4 series of intelligence tests Slough, U.K.: NEP) AH4-1 and AH4-2 tests of fluid intelligence and on the Raven's (Raven, J. C. 1965) The Mill Hill Vocabulary Scale London: H.K. Lewis) Mill Hill A and B tests of recognition and production vocabulary. Dates and proximate causes of death were logged for 2499 participants. Multilevel modelling compared rates of decline after effects of sex, demographics, and practice were taken into consideration. Rates of cognitive decline markedly differed across pathologies, being most rapid for dementias and infections, slower for malignancies, and most prolonged for cardiovascular conditions. Pathologies were associated with faster declines in older individuals. After sex, age, and demographics have also been considered, different terminal pathologies are associated with markedly different rates of decline. Age accelerates pathology-related decline. This raises the further question as to whether any, or how much of, age-related cognitive decline is brought about by other causes than an increasing burden of pathologies.

  18. Vitamin D and Risk of Cognitive Decline in Elderly Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, David J.; Lang, Iain A.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Muniz-Terrera, Graciela; Phillips, Caroline L.; Cherubini, Antonio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Melzer, David

    2014-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, no prospective study has examined the association between vitamin D and cognitive decline or dementia. Methods We determined whether low levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) were associated with an increased risk of substantial cognitive decline in the InCHIANTI population–based study conducted in Italy between 1998 and 2006 with follow-up assessments every 3 years. A total of 858 adults 65 years or older completed interviews, cognitive assessments, and medical examinations and provided blood samples. Cognitive decline was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and substantial decline was defined as 3 or more points. The Trail-Making Tests A and B were also used, and substantial decline was defined as the worst 10% of the distribution of decline or as discontinued testing. Results The multivariate adjusted relative risk (95% confidence interval [CI]) of substantial cognitive decline on the MMSE in participants who were severely serum 25 (OH)D deficient (levels Test B was 1.31 (95% CI, 1.03-1.51) among those who were severely 25(OH)D deficient compared with those with sufficient levels of 25(OH)D. No significant association was observed for Trail-Making Test A. Conclusion Low levels of vitamin D were associated with substantial cognitive decline in the elderly population studied over a 6-year period, which raises important new possibilities for treatment and prevention. PMID:20625021

  19. Healthy eating and reduced risk of cognitive decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Mahshid; O'Donnell, Martin; Anderson, Craig; Teo, Koon; Gao, Peggy; Sleight, Peter; Dagenais, Gilles; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the association of dietary factors and risk of cognitive decline in a population at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods: Baseline dietary intake and measures of the Mini-Mental State Examination were recorded in 27,860 men and women who were enrolled in 2 international parallel trials of the ONTARGET (Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial) and TRANSCEND (Telmisartan Randomised Assessment Study in ACE Intolerant Subjects with Cardiovascular Disease) studies. We measured diet quality using the modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to determine the association between diet quality and risk of ≥3-point decline in Mini-Mental State Examination score, and reported as hazard ratio with 95% confidence intervals with adjustment for covariates. Results: During 56 months of follow-up, 4,699 cases of cognitive decline occurred. We observed lower risk of cognitive decline among those in the healthiest dietary quintile of modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index compared with lowest quintile (hazard ratio 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.66–0.86, Q5 vs Q1). Lower risk of cognitive decline was consistent regardless of baseline cognitive level. Conclusion: We found that higher diet quality was associated with a reduced risk of cognitive decline. Improved diet quality represents an important potential target for reducing the global burden of cognitive decline. PMID:25948720

  20. Depressive symptoms and cognitive decline in elderly people. Longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterniti, Sabrina; Verdier-Taillefer, Marie-Hélène; Dufouil, Carole; Alpérovitch, Annick

    2002-11-01

    Depressive symptoms are associated with cognitive decline in elderly people, but the nature of their temporal relationship remains equivocal. To test whether depressive symptoms predict cognitive decline in elderly people with normal cognition. The Center for Epidemiologic Study depression scale (CES-D) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were used to evaluate depressive symptomatology and cognitive functioning, respectively. A sample of 1003 persons aged 59-71 years and with a MMSE score of 26 or over was selected. Cognitive decline was defined as a drop of at least 3 points on the MMSE at 4-year follow-up. Baseline high levels of depressive symptoms predicted a higher risk of cognitive decline at 4-year follow-up. The MMSE score of participants with depression was more likely to fall below 26 at 2-year follow-up and to remain below at 4-year follow-up than the MMSE score of those without depressive symptoms. Persistent but not episodic depressive episodes were associated with cognitive decline. High levels of depressive symptoms, when persistent, are associated with cognitive decline in a sample of elderly people.

  1. Associations between cognitively stimulating leisure activities, cognitive function and age-related cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Nicola; Owen, Adrian; Mohan, Anita; Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2015-04-01

    Emerging literature suggests that lifestyle factors may play an important role in reducing age-related cognitive decline. There have, however, been few studies investigating the role of cognitively stimulating leisure activities in maintaining cognitive health. This study sought to identify changes in cognitive performance with age and to investigate associations of cognitive performance with several key cognitively stimulating leisure activities. Over 65,000 participants provided demographic and lifestyle information and completed tests of grammatical reasoning, spatial working memory, verbal working memory and episodic memory. Regression analyses suggested that frequency of engaging in Sudoku or similar puzzles was significantly positively associated with grammatical reasoning, spatial working memory and episodic memory scores. Furthermore, for participants aged under 65 years, frequency of playing non-cognitive training computer games was also positively associated with performance in the same cognitive domains. The results also suggest that grammatical reasoning and episodic memory are particularly vulnerable to age-related decline. Further investigation to determine the potential benefits of participating in Sudoku puzzles and non-cognitive computer games is indicated, particularly as they are associated with grammatical reasoning and episodic memory, cognitive domains found to be strongly associated with age-related cognitive decline. Results of this study have implications for developing improved guidance for the public regarding the potential value of cognitively stimulating leisure activities. The results also suggest that grammatical reasoning and episodic memory should be targeted in developing appropriate outcome measures to assess efficacy of future interventions, and in developing cognitive training programmes to prevent or delay cognitive decline. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Subjective cognitive decline: The first clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Studart Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Mild cognitive impairment is considered as the first clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease (AD, when the individual exhibits below performance on standardized neuropsychological tests. However, some subjects before having a lower performance on cognitive assessments already have a subjective memory complaint. Objective: A review about subjective cognitive decline, the association with AD biomarkers and risk of conversion to dementia. Methods: We performed a comprehensive non-systematic review on PubMed. The keywords used in the search were terms related to subjective cognitive decline. Results: Subjective cognitive decline is characterized by self-experience of deterioration in cognitive performance not detected objectively through formal neuropsychological testing. However, various terms and definitions have been used in the literature and the lack of a widely accepted concept hampers comparison of studies. Epidemiological data have shown that individuals with subjective cognitive decline are at increased risk of progression to AD dementia. In addition, there is evidence that this group has a higher prevalence of positive biomarkers for amyloidosis and neurodegeneration. However, Alzheimer's disease is not the only cause of subjective cognitive decline and various other conditions can be associated with subjective memory complaints, such as psychiatric disorders or normal aging. The features suggestive of a neurodegenerative disorder are: onset of decline within the last five years, age at onset above 60 years, associated concerns about decline and confirmation by an informant. Conclusion: These findings support the idea that subjective cognitive complaints may be an early clinical marker that precedes mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Genetic Biomarkers on Age-Related Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chieh-Hsin; Lin, Eugene; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    With ever-increasing elder populations, age-related cognitive decline, which is characterized as a gradual decline in cognitive capacity in the aging process, has turned out to be a mammoth public health concern. Since genetic information has become increasingly important to explore the biological mechanisms of cognitive decline, the search for genetic biomarkers of cognitive aging has received much attention. There is growing evidence that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the ADAMTS9, BDNF, CASS4, COMT, CR1, DNMT3A, DTNBP1, REST, SRR, TOMM40, circadian clock, and Alzheimer's diseases-associated genes may contribute to susceptibility to cognitive aging. In this review, we first illustrated evidence of the genetic contribution to disease susceptibility to age-related cognitive decline in recent studies ranging from approaches of candidate genes to genome-wide association studies. We then surveyed a variety of association studies regarding age-related cognitive decline with consideration of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Finally, we highlighted their limitations and future directions. In light of advances in precision medicine and multi-omics technologies, future research in genomic medicine promises to lead to innovative ideas that are relevant to disease prevention and novel drugs for cognitive aging.

  4. Does Stroke Contribute to Racial Differences in Cognitive Decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Deborah A.; Kabeto, Mohammed; Langa, Kenneth M.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Rogers, Mary A.M.; Galecki, Andrzej T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is unknown whether blacks’ elevated risk of dementia is because of racial differences in acute stroke, the impact of stroke on cognitive health, or other factors. We investigated whether racial differences in cognitive decline are explained by differences in the frequency or impact of incident stroke between blacks and whites, controlling for baseline cognition. Methods Among 4908 black and white participants aged ≥65 years free of stroke and cognitive impairment in the nationally representative Health and Retirement Study with linked Medicare data (1998–2010), we examined longitudinal changes in global cognition (modified version of the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status) by race, before and after adjusting for time-dependent incident stroke followed by a race-by-incident stroke interaction term, using linear mixed-effects models that included fixed effects of participant demographics, clinical factors, and cognition, and random effects for intercept and slope for time. Results We identified 34 of 453 (7.5%) blacks and 300 of 4455 (6.7%) whites with incident stroke over a mean (SD) of 4.1 (1.9) years of follow-up (P=0.53). Blacks had greater cognitive decline than whites (adjusted difference in modified version of the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status score, 1.47 points; 95% confidence interval, 1.21 to 1.73 points). With further adjustment for cumulative incidence of stroke, the black–white difference in cognitive decline persisted. Incident stroke was associated with a decrease in global cognition (1.21 points; Pstroke on cognition did not statistically differ by race (P=0.52). Conclusions In this population-based cohort of older adults, incident stroke did not explain black–white differences in cognitive decline or impact cognition differently by race. PMID:25999389

  5. Cognitive impairment, decline and fluctuations in older community-dwelling subjects with Lewy bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitakis, Z.; Yu, L.; Boyle, P. A.; Leurgans, S. E.; Bennett, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    s disease pathology. Neocortical-type Lewy body pathology is associated with increased odds of dementia; lower and more rapid decline in all cognitive domains including episodic memory and fluctuations in decline in semantic and working memory. Limbic-type Lewy body pathology is specifically associated with lower and more rapid decline in visuospatial skills. The effect of Lewy body pathology on cognition appears to be independent of Alzheimer’s disease pathology. PMID:23065790

  6. Do sleep complaints contribute to age-related cognitive decline?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altena, E.; Ramautar, J.R.; van der Werf, Y.D.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive changes that occur with ageing are usually referred to as 'age-related cognitive decline'. The most pronounced changes may be found in the executive functions that require integrity of the prefrontal cortical circuitry. With age, sleep also changes profoundly, with more sleep

  7. Periventricular cerebral white matter lesions predict rate of cognitive decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, JC; de Leeuw, FE; Oudkerk, M; van Gijn, J; Hofman, A; Jolles, J; Breteler, MMB

    The prospect of declining cognitive functions is a major fear for many elderly persons. Cerebral white matter lesions, as commonly found with magnetic resonance imaging, have been associated with cognitive dysfunction in cross-sectional studies. Only a few longitudinal studies using small cohorts

  8. Cognitive Decline and Hearing Health Care for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to consider the implications of age-related cognitive decline for hearing health care. Recent research and current thinking about age-related declines in cognition and the links between auditory and cognitive aging are reviewed briefly. Implications of this research for improving prevention, assessment, and intervention in audiologic practice and for enhancing interprofessional teamwork are highlighted. Given the important connection between auditory and cognitive aging and given the high prevalence of both hearing and cognitive impairments in the oldest older adults, health care services could be improved by taking into account how both the ear and the brain change over the life span. By incorporating cognitive factors into audiologic prevention, assessment, and intervention, hearing health care can contribute to better hearing and communication as well as to healthy aging.

  9. Estimated cognitive decline in patients with schizophrenia: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Haruo; Sumiyoshi, Chika; Yasuda, Yuka; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Fujimoto, Michiko; Fukunaga, Masaki; Miura, Kenichiro; Takebayashi, Yuto; Okada, Naohiro; Isomura, Shuichi; Kawano, Naoko; Toyomaki, Atsuhito; Kuga, Hironori; Isobe, Masanori; Oya, Kazuto; Okahisa, Yuko; Takaki, Manabu; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kato, Masaki; Onitsuka, Toshiaki; Ueno, Takefumi; Ohnuma, Tohru; Kasai, Kiyoto; Ozaki, Norio; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Imura, Osamu; Hashimoto, Ryota

    2017-05-01

    Studies have reported that cognitive decline occurs after the onset of schizophrenia despite heterogeneity in cognitive function among patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of estimated cognitive decline in patients with schizophrenia by comparing estimated premorbid intellectual functioning and current intellectual functioning. A total of 446 patients with schizophrenia (228 male, 218 female), consisting of three sample sets obtained from 11 psychiatric facilities, and 686 healthy controls participated in this study. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) was used to measure the participants' current full-scale IQ (FSIQ). The premorbid IQ was estimated using the Japanese Adult Reading Test-25. Estimated cognitive decline (difference score) was defined as the difference between the estimated premorbid IQ and the current FSIQ. Patients with schizophrenia showed greater estimated cognitive decline, a lower FSIQ, and a lower premorbid IQ compared with the healthy controls. The mean difference score, FSIQ, and estimated premorbid IQ were -16.3, 84.2, and 100.5, respectively, in patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, 39.7% of the patients had a difference score of 20 points or greater decline. A discriminant analysis showed that the difference score accurately predicted 81.6% of the patients and healthy controls. These results show the distribution of difference score in patients with schizophrenia. These findings may contribute to assessing the severity of estimated cognitive decline and identifying patients with schizophrenia who suffer from cognitive decline. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  10. Excessive sleepiness is predictive of cognitive decline in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaussent, Isabelle; Bouyer, Jean; Ancelin, Marie-Laure; Berr, Claudine; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Ritchie, Karen; Ohayon, Maurice M; Besset, Alain; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2012-09-01

    To examine the association of sleep complaints reported at baseline (insomnia complaints and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS)) and medication, with cognitive decline in community-dwelling elderly. An 8-yr longitudinal study. The French Three-City Study. There were 4,894 patients without dementia recruited from 3 French cities and having a Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) score ≥ 24 points at baseline. Questionnaires were used to evaluate insomnia complaints (poor sleep quality (SQ), difficulty in initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty in maintaining sleep (DMS), early morning awakening (EMA)), EDS, and sleep medication at baseline. Cognitive decline was defined as a 4-point reduction in MMSE score during follow-up at 2, 4, and 8 yr. Logistic regression models were adjusted for sociodemographic, behavioral, physical, and mental health variables, and apolipoprotein E genotype. EDS independently increased the risk of cognitive decline (odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-1.56), especially for those patients who also developed dementia during the follow-up period (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.00-1.97). The number of insomnia complaints and DMS were negatively associated with MMSE cognitive decline (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.60-0.98 for 3-4 complaints, OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.68-0.96, respectively). The 3 other components of insomnia (SQ, DIS, EMA) were not significantly associated with MMSE cognitive decline. Our results suggest that EDS may be associated independently with the risk of cognitive decline in the elderly population. Such results could have important public health implications because EDS may be an early marker and potentially reversible risk factor of cognitive decline and onset of dementia.

  11. Serum inflammatory proteins and cognitive decline in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, M G; Jonker, C; Hack, C E; Smit, J H; Comijs, H C; Eikelenboom, P

    2005-04-26

    To assess whether serum levels of the inflammatory proteins alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin (ACT), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and albumin are associated with cognitive decline in older persons. The study sample consisted of 1,284 participants in the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam, aged 62 to 85 years. Cognition was assessed on general cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE]), memory (Auditory Verbal Learning Test), fluid intelligence (Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices), and information-processing speed (Coding Task) at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. The highest tertile of ACT was associated with an increased risk of decline on the MMSE (age-, sex-, education-adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.60; 95% CI: 1.05 to 2.43) but not on any other cognitive test score. CRP, IL-6, and albumin were not associated with cognitive decline on any cognitive test in our study. This population-based study showed that the serum inflammatory protein alpha1-antichymotrypsin is associated with cognitive decline in older persons, whereas C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and albumin are not.

  12. Predicting the Rate of Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer Disease: Data From the ICTUS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevelli, Marco; Kelaiditi, Eirini; Del Campo, Natalia; Bruno, Giuseppe; Vellas, Bruno; Cesari, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Different rates of cognitive progression have been observed among Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. The present study aimed at evaluating whether the rate of cognitive worsening in AD may be predicted by widely available and easy-to-assess factors. Mild to moderate AD patients were recruited in the ICTUS study. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed to measure the association between several sociodemographic and clinical variables and 3 different rates of cognitive decline defined by modifications (after 1 year of follow-up) of the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score: (1) "slow" progression, as indicated by a decrease in the MMSE score ≤1 point; (2) "intermediate" progression, decrease in the MMSE score between 2 and 5 points; and (3) "rapid" progression, decrease in the MMSE score ≥6 points. A total of 1005 patients were considered for the present analyses. Overall, most of the study participants (52%) exhibited a slow cognitive course. Higher ADAS-Cog scores at baseline were significantly associated with both "intermediate" and "rapid" decline. Conversely, increasing age was negatively associated with "rapid" cognitive worsening. A slow progression of cognitive decline is common among AD patients. The influence of age and baseline cognitive impairment should always be carefully considered when designing AD trials and defining study populations.

  13. Vascular risk factors as treatment target to prevent cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Edo; Moll van Charante, Eric P; van Gool, Willem A

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that vascular risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and lack of physical exercise are associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Neuroradiological and neuropathological studies have confirmed the importance of cerebrovascular lesions in the etiology of late onset dementia. We have reviewed the literature and conclude that up until now randomized controlled clinical trials targeting individual risk factors and assessing cognitive decline or dementia as an outcome have not convincingly shown that treatment of vascular risk factors can actually prevent or postpone cognitive decline and dementia. New studies targeting several vascular risk factors at the same time and using cognitive decline or dementia as primary outcome might answer the question whether cognitive decline can really be postponed or even prevented. The design of such studies is not straightforward and long follow-up is required. In this review we discuss several pertinent methodological issues that need to be addressed to achieve an optimal design of new randomized controlled trials.

  14. Antidepressant Use and Cognitive Decline: The Health and Retirement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saczynski, Jane S; Rosen, Allison B; McCammon, Ryan J; Zivin, Kara; Andrade, Susan E; Langa, Kenneth M; Vijan, Sandeep; Pirraglia, Paul A; Briesacher, Becky A

    2015-07-01

    Depression is associated with cognitive impairment and dementia, but whether treatment for depression with antidepressants reduces the risk for cognitive decline is unclear. We assessed the association between antidepressant use and cognitive decline over 6 years. Participants were 3714 adults aged 50 years or more who were enrolled in the nationally representative Health and Retirement Study and had self-reported antidepressant use. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 8-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Cognitive function was assessed at 4 time points (2004, 2006, 2008, 2010) using a validated 27-point scale. Change in cognitive function over the 6-year follow-up period was examined using linear growth models, adjusted for demographics, depressive symptoms, comorbidities, functional limitations, and antidepressant anticholinergic activity load. At baseline, cognitive function did not differ significantly between the 445 (12.1%) participants taking antidepressants and those not taking antidepressants (mean, 14.9%; 95% confidence interval, 14.3-15.4 vs mean, 15.1%; 95% confidence interval, 14.9-15.3). During the 6-year follow up period, cognition declined in both users and nonusers of antidepressants, ranging from -1.4 change in mean score in those with high depressive symptoms and taking antidepressants to -0.5 change in mean score in those with high depressive symptoms and not taking antidepressants. In adjusted models, cognition declined in people taking antidepressants at the same rate as those not taking antidepressants. Results remained consistent across different levels of baseline cognitive function, age, and duration of antidepressant use (prolonged vs short-term). Antidepressant use did not modify the course of 6-year cognitive change in this nationally representative sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neighborhood Integration and Connectivity Predict Cognitive Performance and Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Amber; Ferdous, Farhana; Moore, Keith Diaz; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Neighborhood characteristics may be important for promoting walking, but little research has focused on older adults, especially those with cognitive impairment. We evaluated the role of neighborhood characteristics on cognitive function and decline over a 2-year period adjusting for measures of walking. In a study of 64 older adults with and without mild Alzheimer's disease (AD), we evaluated neighborhood integration and connectivity using geographical information systems data and space syntax analysis. In multiple regression analyses, we used these characteristics to predict 2-year declines in factor analytically derived cognitive scores (attention, verbal memory, mental status) adjusting for age, sex, education, and self-reported walking. Neighborhood integration and connectivity predicted cognitive performance at baseline, and changes in cognitive performance over 2 years. The relationships between neighborhood characteristics and cognitive performance were not fully explained by self-reported walking. Clearer definitions of specific neighborhood characteristics associated with walkability are needed to better understand the mechanisms by which neighborhoods may impact cognitive outcomes. These results have implications for measuring neighborhood characteristics, design and maintenance of living spaces, and interventions to increase walking among older adults. We offer suggestions for future research measuring neighborhood characteristics and cognitive function.

  16. Neighborhood Integration and Connectivity Predict Cognitive Performance and Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Watts PhD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Neighborhood characteristics may be important for promoting walking, but little research has focused on older adults, especially those with cognitive impairment. We evaluated the role of neighborhood characteristics on cognitive function and decline over a 2-year period adjusting for measures of walking. Method: In a study of 64 older adults with and without mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD, we evaluated neighborhood integration and connectivity using geographical information systems data and space syntax analysis. In multiple regression analyses, we used these characteristics to predict 2-year declines in factor analytically derived cognitive scores (attention, verbal memory, mental status adjusting for age, sex, education, and self-reported walking. Results : Neighborhood integration and connectivity predicted cognitive performance at baseline, and changes in cognitive performance over 2 years. The relationships between neighborhood characteristics and cognitive performance were not fully explained by self-reported walking. Discussion : Clearer definitions of specific neighborhood characteristics associated with walkability are needed to better understand the mechanisms by which neighborhoods may impact cognitive outcomes. These results have implications for measuring neighborhood characteristics, design and maintenance of living spaces, and interventions to increase walking among older adults. We offer suggestions for future research measuring neighborhood characteristics and cognitive function.

  17. Literature review on the role of dietary protein and amino acids in cognitive functioning and cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Rest, Ondine; van der Zwaluw, Nikita L; de Groot, Lisette C P G M

    2013-11-01

    As the population of elderly people is growing rapidly, the number of individuals with dementia and cognitive impairment is also increasing. One of the preventive measures against cognitive decline is diet and different dietary factors have already been investigated. This review provides an overview of studies on dietary protein and cognitive functioning and cognitive decline. Also studies on the individual amino acids that are related to brain function, tryptophan and tyrosine, are discussed. Overall, the role of dietary protein intake on cognitive functioning as well as cognitive decline has hardly been studied; we found eight observational studies and three intervention studies. More studies investigated the role of tryptophan (14 studies) and tyrosine (nine studies) in relation to cognitive functioning, but all these studies were performed in young adult populations and mostly under special conditions. Research in elderly populations, in particular, is warranted. Also more research is needed to come to definitive conclusions and specific recommendations regarding protein intake or intake of specific amino acids for maintaining optimal cognitive functioning.

  18. Self-Reported Decline in Everyday Function, Cognitive Symptoms, and Cognitive Function in People With HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laverick, Rosanna; Haddow, Lewis; Daskalopoulou, Marina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We determined factors associated with self-reported decline in activities of daily living (ADLs) and symptoms of cognitive impairment in HIV positive adults in 5 European clinics. METHODS: HIV+ adults underwent computerized and pen-and-paper neuropsychological tests and questionnaires...... of cognitive symptoms and ADLs. We considered cognitive function in 5 domains, psychosocial factors, and clinical parameters as potentially associated with symptoms. Separate regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with a decline in ADL (defined as self-reported decline affecting ≥2 ADLs......% white, median CD4 count 550 cells/mm, median time since HIV diagnosis 9.9 years, 81% virologically suppressed (HIV-1 plasma RNA decline in ADLs and attributed this to cognitive difficulties. Self-reported decline in ADLs and increased symptoms of cognitive...

  19. Cognitive Predictors of Rapid Picture Naming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Scott L.; Roberts, Alycia M.; Englund, Julia A.

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in rapid automatized naming (RAN) have been found to be a sensitive cognitive marker for children with dyslexia. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding the construct validity and theoretical neuro-cognitive processes involved in RAN. Additionally, most studies investigating RAN include a narrow range of cognitive measures. The…

  20. Social activities are associated with cognitive decline in older Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, DaeHyun; Arai, Hidenori; Kim, SungHi

    2017-08-01

    Social activity seems to be important for the prevention of cognitive impairment and frailty. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether social activities are associated with the development of cognitive impairment in Korean older people. We analyzed data from the Korean National Longitudinal Study on Aging. A total of 2495 Korean community-dwelling older adults (1163 men and 1332 women) aged between 65 and 79 years at the first wave of the Korean National Longitudinal Study on Aging were used for analysis. Cognitive function was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination in 2006 and 2012. Multiple logistic regression analysis was carried out by adjusting covariates, such as age, sex, education, employment, Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression and instrumental activities of daily living scores, and weight loss. Among the participants, 951 participants (38.1%) showed cognitive decline. Compared with those who participated in a large number of group social activities, multivariate-adjusted odds ratios of cognitive decline in those who participated in a moderate and small number of group activities were 1.18 (95% CI 0.93-1.48) and 1.80 (95% CI 1.16-1.90), respectively. Among six types of group social activities, two types (social club/café and alumni) showed a significant correlation with less cognitive decline; adjusted odds ratios of the group with a small number of activities were 1.31 (95% CI 1.09-1.56) and 1.46 (95% CI 1.10-1.93), respectively, compared with the group with a large number of activities. Personal social activities and the other four types of activities (religious, political, leisure and volunteer) did not affect the outcome. Two social group activities (social club/café and alumni) were significantly associated with less cognitive decline in older Koreans. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1191-1196. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  1. Generalized atherosclerosis, cognitive decline, and depressive symptoms in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkers, D J; Stek, M L; van der Mast, R C; de Craen, A J M; Le Cessie, S; Jolles, J; Westendorp, R G J; Gussekloo, J

    2005-07-12

    Atherosclerosis may be linked to cognitive decline and depression in old age. The Leiden 85-Plus Study is a prospective population-based study of 599 subjects from age 85 onward. The generalized atherosclerotic burden was rated by the number of cardiovascular pathologies at baseline, as assessed by history taking from treating physicians and EKG. Cardiovascular pathologies included myocardial infarction, angina pectoris or myocardial ischemia, claudicatio intermittens, and arterial surgery. Global cognitive function (Mini-Mental State Examination), attention (Stroop Test), processing speed (Letter Digit Coding Test), immediate recall memory (Word Learning Test-Immediate Recall), delayed recall memory (Word Learning Test-Delayed Recall), and depressive symptoms (15-item Geriatric Depression Scale) were assessed each year from ages 85 through 90. The prospective associations between both the generalized atherosclerosis rating and stroke with cognitive function and depressive symptoms were analyzed by linear mixed models adjusted for sex and level of education. During follow-up, there was a significant cognitive decline and a significant increase of depressive symptoms. At baseline, a history of stroke was correlated with lower global cognitive function, slower processing speed, impaired immediate and delayed recall memory, and more depressive symptoms. In addition, a higher generalized atherosclerosis rating was correlated with impaired global cognitive function, lower attention, and a slower processing speed at baseline. During follow-up, a higher generalized atherosclerosis rating was associated with an accelerated decline of immediate recall memory and delayed recall memory. In contrast, there was no relation between the generalized atherosclerosis rating and depressive symptoms, either in the cross-sectional analysis or in the prospective analysis. In the population at large, generalized atherosclerosis contributes to cognitive decline in old age but not to

  2. Depressive symptoms predict slow cognitive decline in mild dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janzing, J.; Naarding, P.; Eling, P.A.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    Depression may be a prognostic marker of subsequent cognitive decline in patients with dementia. Earlier investigations did not find support for this hypothesis but have mainly considered syndromal depression. In this prospective study thirty-two subjects with mild dementia were followed up for 12

  3. Depressive symptoms predict slow cognitive decline in mild dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janzing, J.G.E.; Naarding, P.; Eling, P.A.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    Depression may be a prognostic marker of subsequent cognitive decline in patients with dementia. Earlier investigations did not find support for this hypothesis, but these considered mainly syndromal depression. In this prospective study, 32 subjects with mild dementia were followed up for 12

  4. Generalized atherosclerosis, cognitive decline, and depressive symptoms in old age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinkers, D.J.; Stek, M.L.; van der Mast, R.C.; de Craen, A.J.; Le Cessie, S.; Jolles, J.; Westendorp, R.G.; Gussekloo, J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis may be linked to cognitive decline and depression in old age. METHODS: The Leiden 85-Plus Study is a prospective population-based study of 599 subjects from age 85 onward. The generalized atherosclerotic burden was rated by the number of cardiovascular pathologies at

  5. Accelerated cognitive decline in a rodent model for temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, Sandra; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Rijkers, Kim; Lagiere, Melanie; Bogaarts, Jan G.; Blokland, Arjan; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Hoogland, Govert; Vles, Johan S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive impairment is frequently observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. It is hypothesized that cumulative seizure exposure causes accelerated cognitive decline in patients with epilepsy. We investigated the influence of seizure frequency on cognitive decline in a rodent

  6. Cognitive decline is associated with risk aversion and temporal discounting in older adults without dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D James

    Full Text Available Risk aversion and temporal discounting are preferences that are strongly linked to sub-optimal financial and health decision making ability. Prior studies have shown they differ by age and cognitive ability, but it remains unclear whether differences are due to age-related cognitive decline or lower cognitive abilities over the life span. We tested the hypothesis that cognitive decline is associated with higher risk aversion and temporal discounting in 455 older persons without dementia from the Memory and Aging Project, a longitudinal cohort study of aging in Chicago. All underwent repeated annual cognitive evaluations using a detailed battery including 19 tests. Risk aversion was measured using standard behavioral economics questions: participants were asked to choose between a certain monetary payment versus a gamble in which they could gain more or nothing; potential gamble gains varied across questions. Temporal discounting: participants were asked to choose between an immediate, smaller payment and a delayed, larger one; two sets of questions addressed small and large stakes based on payment amount. Regression analyses were used to examine whether prior rate of cognitive decline predicted level of risk aversion and temporal discounting, controlling for age, sex, and education. Over an average of 5.5 (SD=2.9 years, cognition declined at an average of 0.016 units per year (SD=0.03. More rapid cognitive decline predicted higher levels of risk aversion (p=0.002 and temporal discounting (small stakes: p=0.01, high stakes: p=0.006. Further, associations between cognitive decline and risk aversion (p=0.015 and large stakes temporal discounting (p=0.026 persisted in analyses restricted to persons without any cognitive impairment (i.e., no dementia or mild cognitive impairment; the association of cognitive decline and small stakes temporal discounting was no longer statistically significant (p=0.078. These findings are consistent with the

  7. Cognitive declines precede and predict functional declines in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Zahodne

    Full Text Available To investigate the temporal ordering of cognitive and functional declines separately in older adults with or without Alzheimer's disease (AD.A community-based longitudinal study of aging and dementia in Northern Manhattan (Washington Heights/Hamilton Heights Inwood Columbia Aging Project and a multicenter, clinic-based longitudinal study of prevalent AD at Columbia University Medical Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Hôpital de la Salpêtrière in Paris, France (the Predictors Study.3,443 initially non-demented older adults (612 with eventual incident dementia and 517 patients with AD.Cognitive measures included the modified Mini-Mental State Exam and composite scores of memory and language derived from a standardized neuropsychological battery. Function was measured with the Blessed Dementia Rating Scale, completed by the participant (in the sample of non-demented older adults or an informant (in the sample of prevalent AD patients. Data were analyzed with autoregressive cross-lagged panel analysis.Cognitive scores more consistently predicted subsequent functional abilities than vice versa in non-demented older adults, participants with eventual incident dementia, and patients with prevalent AD.Cognitive declines appear to precede and cause functional declines prior to and following dementia diagnosis. Standardized neuropsychological tests are valid predictors of later functional changes in both non-demented and demented older adults.

  8. Body Mass Index and Decline of Cognitive Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Kim

    Full Text Available The association between body mass index (BMI and cognitive function is a public health issue. This study investigated the relationship between obesity and cognitive impairment which was assessed by the Korean version of the Mini-mental state examination (K-MMSE among mid- and old-aged people in South Korea.A cohort of 5,125 adults, age 45 or older with normal cognitive function (K-MMSE≥24 at baseline (2006, was derived from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA 2006~2012. The association between baseline BMI and risk of cognitive impairment was assessed using multiple logistic regression models. We also assessed baseline BMI and change of cognitive function over the 6-year follow-up using multiple linear regressions.During the follow-up, 358 cases of severe cognitive impairment were identified. Those with baseline BMI≥25 kg/m2 than normal-weight (18.5≤BMI<23 kg/m2 were marginally less likely to experience the development of severe cognitive impairment (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.52 to 1.03; Ptrend = 0.03. This relationship was stronger among female (aOR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.40 to 1.00; Ptrend = 0.01 and participants with low-normal K-MMSE score (MMSE: 24-26 at baseline (aOR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.35 to 0.98; Ptrend<0.01. In addition, a slower decline of cognitive function was observed in obese individuals than those with normal weight, especially among women and those with low-normal K-MMSE score at baseline.In this nationally representative study, we found that obesity was associated with lower risk of cognitive decline among mid- and old-age population.

  9. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers predict cognitive decline in lewy body dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnour, Carla; van Steenoven, Inger; Londos, Elisabet; Blanc, Frédéric; Auestad, Bjørn; Kramberger, Milica G; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mollenhauer, Brit; Boada, Mercè; Aarsland, Dag

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease pathologies are common in dementia with Lewy bodies, but their clinical relevance is not clear. CSF biomarkers amyloid beta 1-42, total tau, and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 reflect Alzheimer's disease neuropathology antemortem. In PD, low CSF amyloid beta 1-42 predict long-term cognitive decline, but little is known about these biomarkers as predictors for cognitive decline in Lewy body dementia. The aim of this study was to assess whether Alzheimer's disease CSF biomarkers predict cognitive decline in Lewy body dementia. From a large European dementia with Lewy bodies multicenter study, we analyzed baseline Alzheimer's disease CSF biomarkers and serial MMSE (baseline and 1- and 2-year follow-up) in 100 patients with Lewy body dementia. Linear mixed-effects analyses, adjusted for sex, age, baseline MMSE, and education, were performed to model the association between CSF biomarkers and rate of cognitive decline measured with MMSE. An Alzheimer's disease CSF profile was defined as pathological amyloid beta 1-42 plus pathological total tau or phosphorylated tau. The Alzheimer's disease CSF profile, and pathological levels of amyloid beta 1-42, were associated with a more rapid decline in MMSE (2.2 [P Lewy body dementia patients. Future prospective studies should include larger samples, centralized CSF analyses, longer follow-up, and biomarker-pathology correlation. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Total daily activity declines more rapidly with increasing age in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Aron S; Wilson, Robert S; Yu, Lei; James, Bryan D; Boyle, Patricia A; Bennett, David A

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal studies of objectively measured physical activity are lacking in older adults. We tested whether objective measures of total daily activity decline more rapidly in older adults. This prospective, observational cohort study included 519 community-dwelling older persons from across metropolitan Chicago participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Repeated total daily activity measures (leisure and non-leisure physical activity) were derived from actigraphic recordings for up to 10 days. Generalized estimating equation models which controlled for demographics measures were employed. At baseline, age was inversely related with the level of total daily activity (estimate, -0.014, S.E. 0.002, pdaily activity declined by about 0.070 × 10(5) activity counts/day/yr (estimate -0.065, S.E. 0.005, pdaily activity declined 3% more rapidly for each additional year of age at baseline (estimate -0.002, S.E. 0.001, p=0.027). Thus, total daily activity declined almost twice as fast in an individual 91 years old at baseline versus an individual 71 years old. A higher level of education was associated with a slower rate of decline (estimate 0.004, S.E. 0.002, pdaily activity were unchanged when controlling for baseline level of motor and cognitive function, other late-life activities and chronic health conditions. These data suggest that total daily activity in very old adults declines more rapidly with increasing age. Thus, physical inactivity is likely to become a larger problem in our aging population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Progressive cognitive decline in an adult patient with cleidocranial dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Sato, Wakiro; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2014-07-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia is a skeletal disorder characterized by a defective skull and defective clavicles caused by RUNX2, an activator of osteoblast differentiation. Consistent with the expression pattern of RUNX2, this disorder typically affects the skeletal system, but not the central nervous system. A 56-year-old man with the prototypic skeletal defects of cleidocranial dysplasia and a RUNX2 deletion presented with a progressive cognitive decline after the age of 40 years. After a failed cranioplasty during childhood, he had worn a protective helmet until young adulthood. His current neuroimaging studies revealed extensive cystic encephalomalacia beneath the defective skull, suggesting that his cognitive decline could likely be attributed to repetitive cerebral contusions. Late-onset progressive cognitive decline in the context of a defective skull accompanied by extensive cystic encephalomalacia illustrates the importance of natural calvarial protection against head injury. Since the majority of patients with cleidocranial dysplasia do not wear protective helmets beyond childhood, mainly for cosmetic reasons, a discussion of whether the social disadvantage outweighs the potential risk of brain parenchymal injury may be necessary. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Cognitive decline following stroke : A comprehensive study of cognitive decline following stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hochstenbach, J; Mulder, T; Donders, R; Schoonderwaldt, H

    General insight into the frequency and gravity of cognitive dysfunctions following stroke and its influencing factors is still lacking. With an extensive neuropsychological battery 229 patients who had suffered a stroke were assessed. More than 70% of the patients showed a marked slowness of

  13. A review of new insights on the association between hearing loss and cognitive decline in ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Fortunato, Susanna; Forli, F.; V. Guglielmi; De Corso, E; PALUDETTI, G.; BERRETTINI, S.; Fetoni, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) has a multifactorial pathogenesis and it is an inevitable hearing impairment associated with reduction of communicative skills related to ageing. Increasing evidence has linked ARHL to more rapid progression of cognitive decline and incidental dementia. Many aspects of daily living of elderly people have been associated to hearing abilities, showing that hearing loss (HL) affects the quality of life, social relationships, motor skills, psychological asp...

  14. Metabolic syndrome and cognitive decline: the role of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rinaldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MetS is a cluster of conditions, each of which represents a risk factor for cardiovascular disease: central obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Any of these conditions and MetS itself have been associated to Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia. In recent years there is a growing evidence for the role of physical activity in preventing metabolic diseases and cognitive decline. In our research we assessed the prevalence of MetS in a sample of 154 elderly people. Furthermore, we evaluated cognition (with Mini Mental State Examination, MMSE  and the physical activity level in every patient. We found a significant association between MetS, borderline cognitive impairment and sedentary lifestyle.

  15. [Reading as a protective factor against cognitive decline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, Miguel Esteve; Gil, Angel Collado

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether reading is a protective factor against cognitive decline in the population aged over 65 years. We performed an unmatched case-control study in the Fuente de San Luis Health Center in Valencia, Spain. A total of 153 subjects aged more than 65 years old were studied, corresponding to 51 cases and 102 controls. Cognitive impairment was measured by the version of the Mini-Mental State Examination adapted and validated to Spanish. Reading habits were assessed with the scale of the Federación de Gremios y Editores de España. Logistic regression showed a significant association with the habit of frequent reading for more than 5 years, complete primary school education, and age lower than 75 years Reading is a protective factor against cognitive impairment. This protection is greater in frequent readers with a history of reading of over 5 years. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Renal function and long-term decline in cognitive function: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, Stephen L; Wendell, Carrington R; Waldstein, Shari R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zonderman, Alan B

    2015-01-01

    Renal disease has been associated with greater risk of dementia and greater cognitive impairment. However, the relationship of lower renal function with long-term decline in specific domains of cognitive function remains unclear among community-dwelling, non-demented individuals. Stroke- and dementia-free participants (n = 2,116) were enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, a community-based, prospective, longitudinal study. Renal function was estimated by the inverse of serum creatinine adjusted for age, sex and race and (in sensitivity analyses) estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the MDRD formula. Outcome measures were changes in scores on 6 cognitive tests encompassing a range of cognitive functions, measured at 2-year intervals. Mixed-effects regression models examined the longitudinal relations of renal function with cognitive functions after adjusting for demographics, comorbidity and other potential confounders. Mean age at initial testing was 53.9 years (SD 17.1), and 94 participants (4.4%) had an eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and 18.5% had at least one comorbidity. With increasing age, longitudinal increases in creatinine concentrations were associated with more rapid decline in performance on several cognitive measures, including the learning slope of the California Verbal Learning Test, a test of verbal learning (p < 0.01), and the Benton Visual Retention Test, a test of visual memory (p < 0.01). Associations were similar for changes in eGFRMDRD, which was also associated with the rate of decline in verbal memory. In a community-based adult population, declines in renal function independently associated with greater long-term declines in visual memory and verbal memory and learning. © 2015 National Institutes of Health (NIH). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Cognitive Decline and Dementia in the Oldest-Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Kravitz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The oldest-old are the fastest growing segment of the Western population. Over half of the oldest-old will have dementia, but the etiology is yet unknown. Age is the only risk factor consistently associated with dementia in the oldest-old. Many of the risk and protective factors for dementia in the young elderly, such as ApoE genotype, physical activity, and healthy lifestyle, are not relevant for the oldest-old. Neuropathology is abundant in the oldest-old brains, but specific pathologies of Alzheimer’s disease (AD or vascular dementia are not necessarily correlated with cognition, as in younger persons. It has been suggested that accumulation of both AD-like and vascular pathologies, loss of synaptic proteins, and neuronal loss contribute to the cognitive decline observed in the oldest-old. Several characteristics of the oldest-old may confound the diagnosis of dementia in this age group. A gradual age-related cognitive decline, particularly in executive function and mental speed, is evident even in non-demented oldest-old. Hearing and vision losses, which are also prevalent in the oldest-old and found in some cases to precede/predict cognitive decline, may mechanically interfere in neuropsychological evaluations. Difficulties in carrying out everyday activities, observed in the majority of the oldest-old, may be the result of motor or physical dysfunction and of neurodegenerative processes. The oldest-old appear to be a select population, who escapes major illnesses or delays their onset and duration toward the end of life. Dementia in the oldest-old may be manifested when a substantial amount of pathology is accumulated, or with a composition of a variety of pathologies. Investigating the clinical and pathological features of dementia in the oldest-old is of great importance in order to develop therapeutic strategies and to provide the most elderly of our population with good quality of life.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid PKR level predicts cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Dumurgier

    Full Text Available The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of the proapoptotic kinase R (PKR and its phosphorylated PKR (pPKR are increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD, but whether CSF PKR concentrations are associated with cognitive decline in AD patients remain unknown. In this study, 41 consecutive patients with AD and 11 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI from our Memory Clinic were included. A lumbar puncture was performed during the following month of the clinical diagnosis and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE evaluations were repeated every 6 months during a mean follow-up of 2 years. In AD patients, linear mixed models adjusted for age and sex were used to assess the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between MMSE scores and baseline CSF levels of Aβ peptide (Aβ 1-42, Tau, phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau 181, PKR and pPKR. The mean (SD MMSE at baseline was 20.5 (6.1 and MMSE scores declined over the follow-up (-0.12 point/month, standard error [SE] = 0.03. A lower MMSE at baseline was associated with lower levels of CSF Aβ 1-42 and p-Tau 181/Tau ratio. pPKR level was associated with longitudinal MMSE changes over the follow-up, higher pPKR levels being related with an exacerbated cognitive deterioration. Other CSF biomarkers were not associated with MMSE changes over time. In aMCI patients, mean CSF biomarker levels were not different in patients who converted to AD from those who did not convert.These results suggest that at the time of AD diagnosis, a higher level of CSF pPKR can predict a faster rate of cognitive decline.

  19. The Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised accurately detects cognitive decline in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begeti, Faye; Tan, Adrian Y K; Cummins, Gemma A; Collins, Lucy M; Guzman, Natalie Valle; Mason, Sarah L; Barker, Roger A

    2013-11-01

    Cognitive features, which begin before manifestation of the motor features, are an integral part of Huntington's disease and profoundly affect quality of life. A number of neuropsychological batteries have been used to assess this aspect of the condition, many of which are difficult to administer and time consuming, especially in advanced disease. We, therefore, investigated a simple and practical way to monitor cognition using the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R) in 126 manifest Huntington's disease patients, 28 premanifest gene carriers and 21 controls. Using this test, we demonstrated a selective decrease in phonemic, but not semantic, fluency in premanifest participants Cognitive decline in manifest Huntington's disease varied according to disease severity with extensive cognitive decline observed in early-stage Huntington's disease patients, indicating that this would be an optimal stage for interventions designed to halt cognitive decline, and lesser changes in the advanced cases. We next examined cognitive performance in patients prescribed antidopaminergic drugs as these drugs are known to decrease cognition when administered to healthy volunteers. We paradoxically found that these drugs may be beneficial, as early-stage Huntington's disease participants in receipt of them had improved attention and Mini-Mental State Examination scores. In conclusion, this is the first study to test the usefulness of the ACE-R in a Huntington's disease population and demonstrates that this is a brief, inexpensive and practical way to measure global cognitive performance in clinical practice with potential use in clinical trials.

  20. CSF VILIP-1 predicts rates of cognitive decline in early Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarawneh, R; Lee, J-M; Ladenson, J H; Morris, J C; Holtzman, D M

    2012-03-06

    Measures of neuronal damage/dysfunction are likely good surrogates for disease progression in Alzheimer disease (AD). CSF markers of neuronal injury may offer utility in predicting disease progression and guiding prognostic and outcome assessments in therapeutic trials. Visinin-like protein-1 (VILIP-1) has demonstrated potential utility as a marker of neuronal injury. We here investigate the utility of VILIP-1 and VILIP-1/Aβ42 in predicting rates of cognitive decline in early AD. Individuals with a clinical diagnosis of very mild or mild AD (n = 60) and baseline CSF measures of VILIP-1, tau, p-tau181, and Aβ42 were followed longitudinally for an average of 2.6 years. Annual assessments included the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), CDR-sum of boxes (CDR-SB), and global composite scores. Mixed linear models assessed the ability of CSF biomarker measures to predict rates of cognitive decline over time. Baseline CSF VILIP-1 and VILIP-1/Aβ42 levels predicted rates of future decline in CDR-SB and global composite scores over the follow-up period. Individuals with CSF VILIP-1 ≥560 pg/mL (corresponding to the upper tercile) progressed much more rapidly in CDR-SB (1.61 boxes/year; p = 0.0077) and global scores (-0.53 points/year; p = 0.0002) than individuals with lower values (0.85 boxes/year and -0.15 points/year, respectively) over the follow-up period. CSF tau, p-tau181, tau/Aβ42, and p-tau181/Aβ42 also predicted more rapid cognitive decline in CDR-SB and global scores over time. These findings suggest that CSF VILIP-1 and VILIP-1/Aβ42 predict rates of global cognitive decline similarly to tau and tau/Aβ42, and may be useful CSF surrogates for neurodegeneration in early AD.

  1. Delirium is a risk factor for further cognitive decline in cognitively impaired hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogseth, Maria; Watne, Leiv Otto; Juliebø, Vibeke; Skovlund, Eva; Engedal, Knut; Frihagen, Frede; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun

    2016-01-01

    Delirium is a risk factor for dementia in cognitively intact patients. Whether an episode of delirium accelerates cognitive decline in patients with known dementia, is less explored. This is a prospective follow-up study of 287 hip fracture patients with pre-fracture cognitive impairment. During the hospitalization, the patients were screened daily for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method. Pre-fracture cognitive impairment was defined as a score of 3.44 or higher on the pre-fracture Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly Short Form (IQCODE-SF). At follow-up after 4-6 months, the caregivers rated cognitive changes emerging after the fracture using the IQCODE-SF, and the patients were tested with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). A sub-group of the patients had a pre-fracture MMSE score which was used to calculate the yearly decline on the MMSE in patients with and without delirium. 201 of the 287 patients developed delirium in the acute phase. In linear regression analysis, delirium was a significant and independent predictor of a more prominent cognitive decline at follow-up measured by the IQCODE-SF questionnaire (p=0.002). Among patients having a pre-fracture MMSE score, the patients developing delirium had a median (IQR) yearly decline of 2.4 points (1.1-3.9), compared to 1.0 points (0-1.9) in the group without delirium (p=0.001, Mann-Whitney test). Hip fracture patients with pre-fracture dementia run a higher risk of developing delirium. Delirium superimposed on dementia is a significant predictor of an accelerated further cognitive decline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Curse of the Dolphins: Cognitive Decline and Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Randall; Tsai, Anne; Hagen, Arlene; Pinter, Joseph; Smith, Raegan; Stein, Martin T

    Isela is an 11-year-old Mexican-American girl with mild intellectual disability. During a vacation with her family, she went swimming with dolphins. A few days later, Isela awoke at night with laughing spells; during the day, she was pacing, aggressive, and had a decline in self-care and communication skills. Her parents attributed the symptoms to the dolphins. She was evaluated by a pediatric neurologist. The sleep-deprived electroencephalogram, brain magnetic resonance imaging, lumbar puncture, and thyroid function tests were normal. A genomic microarray was sent. The neurologist initiated empirical therapy for seizures with lamotrigine, which caused a rash. It was discontinued. She was then treated with oxcarbazepine followed by topiramate for several months without any change in symptoms. Comparative genomic hybridization revealed a small deletion at 14q13.1, which includes the NPAS3 gene. Psychiatry was consulted after several months of persistent symptoms. Isela seemed to be laughing in response to internal stimuli. Owing to the decline in communication and her apparent preoccupation with visual and auditory internal stimuli, Isela could not be interviewed adequately to confirm that she was experiencing hallucinations, but her laughter seemed to be in response to hallucinations. Isela was diagnosed with disorganized schizophrenia with psychosis. Risperidone was prescribed.A psychology evaluation was completed a few months later. Parents noted significant improvement after starting risperidone with reduced inappropriate laughing spells, reduced pacing, as well as improved eating, sleeping, communication, and self-care. Cognitive assessment with the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence-II indicated the following: verbal estimated intelligence quotient (IQ) = 70, perceptual estimated IQ = 71, and full-scale estimated IQ = 68. There was no cognitive decline compared with testing at school 4 years previously. Although psychotic symptoms were significantly

  3. A review of new insights on the association between hearing loss and cognitive decline in ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, S; Forli, F; Guglielmi, V; De Corso, E; Paludetti, G; Berrettini, S; Fetoni, A R

    2016-06-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) has a multifactorial pathogenesis and it is an inevitable hearing impairment associated with reduction of communicative skills related to ageing. Increasing evidence has linked ARHL to more rapid progression of cognitive decline and incidental dementia. Many aspects of daily living of elderly people have been associated to hearing abilities, showing that hearing loss (HL) affects the quality of life, social relationships, motor skills, psychological aspects and function and morphology in specific brain areas. Epidemiological and clinical studies confirm the assumption of a relationship between these conditions. However, the mechanisms are still unclear and are reviewed herein. Long-term hearing deprivation of auditory inputs can impact cognitive performance by decreasing the quality of communication leading to social isolation and depression and facilitate dementia. On the contrary, the limited cognitive skills may reduce the cognitive resources available for auditory perception, increasing the effects of HL. In addition, hearing loss and cognitive decline may reflect a 'common cause' on the auditory pathway and brain. In fact, some pathogenetic factors are recongised in common microvascular disease factors such as diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. Interdisciplinary efforts to investigate and address HL in the context of brain and cognitive ageing are needed. Surprisingly, few studies have been adressed on the effectiveness of hearing aids in changing the natural history of cognitive decline. Effective interventions with hearing aids or cochlear implant may improve social and emotional function, communication, cognitive function and positively impact quality of life. The aim of this review is to overview new insights on this challenging topic and provide new ideas for future research. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  4. Consumption of alcoholic beverages and cognitive decline at middle age: the Doetinchem Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooyens, Astrid C J; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; van Gelder, Boukje M; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Verschuren, W M Monique

    2014-02-01

    Accelerated cognitive decline increases the risk of dementia. Slowing down the rate of cognitive decline leads to the preservation of cognitive functioning in the elderly, who can live independently for a longer time. Alcohol consumption may influence the rate of cognitive decline. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the associations between the total consumption of alcoholic beverages and different types of alcoholic beverages and cognitive decline at middle age. In 2613 men and women of the Doetinchem Cohort Study, aged 43-70 years at baseline (1995-2002), cognitive function (global cognitive function and the domains memory, speed and flexibility) was assessed twice, with a 5-year time interval. In linear regression analyses, the consumption of different types of alcoholic beverages was analysed in relation to cognitive decline, adjusting for confounders. We observed that, in women, the total consumption of alcoholic beverages was inversely associated with the decline in global cognitive function over a 5-year period (P for trend = 0·02), while no association was observed in men. Regarding the consumption of different types of alcoholic beverages in men and women together, red wine consumption was inversely associated with the decline in global cognitive function (P for trend alcoholic beverages were associated with cognitive decline. In conclusion, only (moderate) red wine consumption was consistently associated with less strong cognitive decline. Therefore, it is most likely that non-alcoholic substances in red wine are responsible for any cognition-preserving effects.

  5. Cognition in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François eGagnon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD is a parasomnia characterized by excessive muscle activity and undesirable motor events during REM sleep. RBD occurs in approximately 0.5% of the general population, with a higher prevalence in older men. RBD is a frequent feature of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, but is only rarely reported in Alzheimer’s disease. RBD is also a risk factor for α-synuclein-related diseases, such as DLB, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and multiple system atrophy. Therefore, RBD has major implications for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and for understanding neurodegeneration mechanisms. Several markers of neurodegeneration have been identified in RBD, including cognitive impairments such as deficits in attention, executive functions, learning capacities, and visuospatial abilities. Approximately 50% of RBD patients present mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Moreover, RBD is also associated with cognitive decline in PD.

  6. Mild cognitive decline: Concept, types, presentation, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka A Subramanyam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As advancements are being made in the medical field, the average life span is increasing and more complaints related to the elderly are coming into notice. Of these, mild cognitive decline (MCD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI is recently becoming an increasingly recognized entity that is often considered a precursor of dementia but is found to have other outcomes as well. It also has variations in presentations; it does not present only as memory complaint but also in the form of other cognitive or behavioral manifestations and has always been a point of controversy regarding the objectivity of the diagnosis. It is considered as the appropriate stage for intervention to prevent its progression to dementia and therefore, requires early identification for which various diagnostic modalities such as neuroimaging, neuropsychological tests, and biological markers are considered. Currently, there are no specific treatment guidelines for MCD. Drugs used in Alzheimer′s disease (AD, lifestyle modifications, and other nonpharmacological approaches have shown some benefit in MCI but the results are variable; hence, the need for further research is warranted for effective preventive therapy. In this article, we will be discussing MCD as a clinical construct, evaluation of a person suspected of having MCD, and management of the same.

  7. Sleep duration, cognitive decline, and dementia risk in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Espeland, Mark A; Brunner, Robert L; Lovato, Laura C; Wallace, Robert B; Leng, Xiaoyan; Phillips, Lawrence S; Robinson, Jennifer G; Kotchen, Jane M; Johnson, Karen C; Manson, JoAnn E; Stefanick, Marcia L; Sarto, Gloria E; Mysiw, W Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Consistent evidence linking habitual sleep duration with risks of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia is lacking. We conducted a prospective study on 7444 community-dwelling women (aged 65-80 y) with self-reported sleep duration, within the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study in 1995-2008. Incident MCI/dementia cases were ascertained by validated protocols. Cox models were used to adjust for multiple sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, depression, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and other clinical characteristics. We found a statistically significant (P = .03) V-shaped association with a higher MCI/dementia risk in women with either short (≤6 hours/night) or long (≥8 hours/night) sleep duration (vs. 7 hours/night). The multicovariate-adjusted hazard for MCI/dementia was increased by 36% in short sleepers irrespective of CVD, and by 35% in long sleepers without CVD. A similar V-shaped association was found with cognitive decline. In older women, habitual sleep duration predicts the future risk for cognitive impairments including dementia, independent of vascular risk factors. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Can psychosocial work conditions protect against age-related cognitive decline? Results from a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Nex?, Mette Andersen; Meng, Annette; Borg, Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    According to the use it or lose it hypothesis, intellectually stimulating activities postpone age-related cognitive decline. A previous systematic review concluded that a high level of mental work demands and job control protected against cognitive decline. However, it did not distinguish between outcomes that were measured as cognitive function at one point in time or as cognitive decline. Our study aimed to systematically review which psychosocial working conditions were prospectively assoc...

  9. The Roles of Exercise and Yoga in Ameliorating Depression as a Risk Factor for Cognitive Decline

    OpenAIRE

    Danielle C. Mathersul; Simon Rosenbaum,

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are no effective pharmaceutical treatments to reduce cognitive decline or prevent dementia. At the same time, the global population is aging, and rates of dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are on the rise. As such, there is an increasing interest in complementary and alternative interventions to treat or reduce the risk of cognitive decline. Depression is one potentially modifiable risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia. Notably, exercise and yoga are two i...

  10. From mild cognitive impairment to subjective cognitive decline: conceptual and methodological evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng YW

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Wen Cheng,1 Ta-Fu Chen,2 Ming-Jang Chiu2,3 1Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Hsin-Chu Branch, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan; 2Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Psychology, College of Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Identification of subjects at the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD is fundamental for drug development and possible intervention or prevention of cognitive decline. The concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI evolved during the past two decades to define subjects at the transitional stage between normal aging and dementia. Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies has shown that MCI is associated with an increased risk of positive AD biomarkers and an increased annual conversion rate of 5%–17% to AD. The presence of AD biomarkers in subjects with MCI was associated with an even higher risk of progression to dementia. However, earlier clinical trials for pharmacotherapy in subjects with MCI were disappointing. To extend the spectrum of AD to an earlier stage before MCI, subjective cognitive decline (SCD was introduced and was defined as self-reported cognitive decline before the deficits could be detected by cognitive tests. Subjects with SCD have an increased risk of underlying AD pathology. However, SCD can also develop secondary to other heterogeneous etiologies, including other neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases, personality traits, physical conditions, and medication use. Several clinical and biomarker features were proposed to predict risk of conversion to AD in subjects with SCD. Further longitudinal studies are needed to support the validity of these high-risk features. Keywords: mild cognitive impairment, subjective cognitive decline, preclinical Alzheimer’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease

  11. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet, Cognitive Function, and Cognitive Decline in American Older Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, A.M.; Kang, Jae H.; Rest, van de O.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Grodstein, F.

    2017-01-01

    ObjectivesTo examine the association between long-term adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet with cognitive function and decline in older American women.DesignProspective cohort study.SettingThe Nurses' Health Study, a cohort of registered nurses residing in 11 US

  12. Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Joseph F.; Raman, Rema; Thomas, Ronald G.; Yurko-Mauro, Karin; Nelson, Edward B.; Van Dyck, Christopher; Galvin, James E.; Emond, Jennifer; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael; Shinto, Lynne; Aisen, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    Context Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the most abundant long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid in the brain. Epidemiological studies suggest that consumption of DHA is associated with a reduced incidence of Alzheimer disease. Animal studies demonstrate that oral intake of DHA reduces Alzheimer-like brain pathology. Objective To determine if supplementation with DHA slows cognitive and functional decline in individuals with Alzheimer disease. Design, Setting, and Patients A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of DHA supplementation in individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease (Mini-Mental State Examination scores, 14–26) was conducted between November 2007 and May 2009 at 51 US clinical research sites of the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study. Intervention Participants were randomly assigned to algal DHA at a dose of 2 g/d or to identical placebo (60% were assigned to DHA and 40% were assigned to placebo). Duration of treatment was 18 months. Main Outcome Measures Change in the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog) and change in the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) sum of boxes. Rate of brain atrophy was also determined by volumetric magnetic resonance imaging in a subsample of participants (n = 102). Results A total of 402 individuals were randomized and a total of 295 participants completed the trial while taking study medication (DHA: 171; placebo: 124). Supplementation with DHA had no beneficial effect on rate of change on ADAS-cog score, which increased by a mean of 7.98 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.51–9.45 points) for the DHA group during 18 months vs 8.27 points (95% CI, 6.72–9.82 points) for the placebo group (linear mixed-effects model: P = .41). The CDR sum of boxes score increased by 2.87 points (95% CI, 2.44–3.30 points) for the DHA group during 18 months compared with 2.93 points (95% CI, 2.44–3.42 points) for the placebo group (linear mixed-effects model: P = .68). In

  13. Accelerated cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes: MRI correlates and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmer, Y.D.; Berg, E. van den; Bresser, J.H.J. de; Kessels, R.P.C.; Biessels, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. We examined brain imaging correlates and vascular and metabolic risk factors of accelerated cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Cognitive functioning and brain volume

  14. Accelerated cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes : MRI correlates and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmer, Yael D.; van den Berg, Esther; de Bresser, Jeroen; Kessels, Roy P. C.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Algra, Ale; Biessels, Geert Jan

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. We examined brain imaging correlates and vascular and metabolic risk factors of accelerated cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Cognitive functioning and brain volume

  15. Accelerated cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes: MRI correlates and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmer, Y.D.; Berg, E. van den; Bresser, J. de; Kessels, R.P.C.; Kappelle, L.J.; Algra, A.; Biessels, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. We examined brain imaging correlates and vascular and metabolic risk factors of accelerated cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Cognitive functioning and brain volume

  16. Low vitamin B-12 status and risk of cognitive decline in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Robert; Birks, Jacqueline; Nexo, Ebba

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations have been associated with cognitive impairment, but it is unclear whether low vitamin B-12 or folate status is responsible for cognitive decline. OBJECTIVE: We examined the associations of cognitive decline with vitamin B-12 and folate...

  17. Invasive alien predator causes rapid declines of native European ladybirds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Helen E.; Adriaens, Tim; Isaac, Nick J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Aim Invasive alien species (IAS) are recognized as major drivers of biodiversity loss, but few causal relationships between IAS and species declines have been documented. In this study, we compare the distribution (Belgium and Britain) and abundance (Belgium, Britain and Switzerland) of formerly...

  18. Cognitive decline and slower reaction time in elderly individuals with mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ko-Chia; Weng, Chia-Ying; Hsiao, Sigmund; Tsao, Wen-Long; Koo, Malcolm

    2017-11-01

    The relationship between declining performance, as measured by changes in reaction time, and declining cognitive function has not been critically studied. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between reaction time during a task and cognitive ability in elderly Taiwanese individuals. Patients aged 65 years or older with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n = 33) and Alzheimer's disease (n = 26) were recruited from the neurology clinic of a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. In addition, 28 healthy controls aged 65 years or older were recruited from the community. The cognitive performance of the study participants was assessed using the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI). A computer-administered simple reaction time (SRT) task and a flanker reaction time (FRT) task were administered to assess participants' cognitive function. A non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to compare CASI scores, SRT, and FRT among the three groups. anova was also used to compare CASI scores, inverse-transformed SRT, and inverse-transformed FRT among the three groups, with adjustment for age and years of education. Additionally, Pearson's partial correlation coefficients were used to assess the association of CASI scores with inverse-transformed SRT, and inverse-transformed FRT within each of the three groups. Significant differences in CASI scores, SRT, and FRT were found between the Alzheimer's disease group and the other two groups, either with or without adjustment for age or education. The reaction time of patients with Alzheimer's disease was significantly slower than the other two groups. Moreover, significant correlation between CASI and FRT was found in patients with MCI. Altered performance in a speed task was observed in patients with MCI. The FRT task should further be explored for its role as a marker for cognitive decline in elderly individuals, particularly in those with MCI. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric

  19. Dietary pattern, inflammation and cognitive decline: The Whitehall II prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Ozawa, Mio; Shipley, Martin; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Brunner, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background & aims Low-grade inflammation appears to play an etiological role in cognitive decline. However the association between an inflammatory dietary pattern and cognitive decline has not been investigated. We aimed to investigate dietary patterns associated with inflammation and whether such diet is associated with cognitive decline. Methods We analyzed 5083 participants (28.7% women) from the Whitehall II cohort study. Diet and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) were assessed in 1991?1...

  20. Rapid decline of the volcanically threatened Montserrat oriole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoff M. Hilton; Phil W. Atkinson; Gerard A.L. Gray; Wayne J. Arendt; David W. Gibbons

    2003-01-01

    Prior to 1995, the Montserrat oriole (Icterus oberi) was confined to ca. 30 km2 of hill forest on the Lesser Antillean island of Montserrat, but was not listed as globally threatened. Since then, the eruption of the Soufriere Hills volcano has destroyed more than half of the species’ range. Recent intensive monitoring has indicated that the species has also declined...

  1. Coffee consumption is inversely associated with cognitive decline in elderly European men: the FINE Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gelder, van, B.M; Buijsse, B; Tijhuis, M.J; Kalmijn, S; Giampaoli, S; Nissinen, A; Kromhout, D

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether coffee consumption is associated with 10-year cognitive decline in elderly men, as results of previous studies obtained hitherto have been controversial and prospective...

  2. Sleep disturbances and cognitive decline in the Northern Manhattan Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alberto R; Gardener, Hannah; Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Dong, Chuanhui; Cheung, Ying Kuen; Stern, Yaakov; Sacco, Ralph L; Wright, Clinton B

    2016-10-04

    To examine frequent snoring, sleepiness, and sleep duration with baseline and longitudinal performance on neuropsychological (NP) battery. The analysis consists of 711 participants of the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS) with sleep data and NP assessment (age 63 ± 8 years, 62% women, 18% white, 17% black, 67% Hispanic) and 687 with repeat NP testing (at a mean of 6 ± 2 years). The main exposures were snoring, sleepiness, and sleep duration obtained during annual follow-up. Using factor analysis-derived domain-specific Z scores for episodic memory, language, executive function, and processing speed, we constructed multivariable regression models to evaluate sleep symptoms with baseline NP performance and change in performance in each NP domain. In the cross-sectional analysis, adjusting for demographics and the NOMAS vascular risk score, participants with frequent snoring had worse executive function (β = -12; p = 0.04) and processing speed (β = -13; p = 0.02), but no difference in with episodic memory or language. Those with severe daytime sleepiness (β = -26; p = 0.009) had worse executive function, but no changes in the other NP domains. There was no cross-sectional association between sleep duration and NP performance. Frequent snoring (β = -29; p = 0.0007), severe daytime sleepiness (β = -29; p = 0.05), and long sleep duration (β = -29; p = 0.04) predicted decline in executive function, adjusting for demographic characteristics and NOMAS vascular risk score. Sleep symptoms did not explain change in episodic memory, language, or processing speed. In this race-ethnically diverse community-based cohort, sleep symptoms led to worse cognitive performance and predicted decline in executive function. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. The impact of retirement on age related cognitive decline - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Annette; Nexø, Mette Andersen; Borg, Vilhelm

    2017-01-01

    related cognitive decline. METHOD: We conducted a systematic literature review, following the principles of the PRISMA statement, of longitudinal studies on the association between retirement and cognition. RESULTS: Only seven studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. We found weak evidence...

  4. Poor premorbid school performance, but not severity of illness, predicts cognitive decline in schizophrenia in midlife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Rannikko

    2015-09-01

    Premorbid school performance, but not later course of schizophrenia, related to change of cognition in midlife. Poor premorbid scholastic performance and post-onset cognitive decline may represent related processes as part of an endophenotype of schizophrenia.

  5. Depressive symptoms predict cognitive decline and dementia in older people independently of cerebral white matter changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdelho, Ana; Madureira, Sofia; Moleiro, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC).......Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC)....

  6. Differential association of concurrent, baseline, and average depressive symptoms with cognitive decline in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Vonetta M; Resnick, Susan M; Zonderman, Alan B

    2008-04-01

    The impact of depressive symptoms on cognitive decline in older adults remains unclear due to inconsistent findings in the literature. It is also unclear whether effects of depressive symptoms on cognitive decline vary with age. This study investigated the effect of concurrent, baseline, and average depressive symptoms on cognitive functioning and decline, and examined the interactive effect of age and depressive symptoms on cognition. Prospective observational design with examination of cognitive performance and depressive symptoms at 1- to 2-year intervals for up to 26 years. Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, National Institute on Aging. One thousand five hundred eighty-six dementia-free adults 50 years of age and older. Scores over time on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and measures of learning and memory, attention and executive functions, verbal and language abilities, visuospatial functioning, and general cognitive status. Increased depressive symptoms were associated with poor cognitive functioning and cognitive decline in multiple domains. Concurrent, baseline, and average depressive symptoms had differential associations with cognition. Average depressive symptoms, a measure of chronic symptoms, seemed to show the most widespread effects on cognitive abilities. Effects of depressive symptoms on some frontal functions were greater with advancing age. Depressive symptoms are associated with poor cognitive functioning and cognitive decline, particularly with advancing age. The widespread impact of average depressive symptoms on cognition suggests that clinicians should consider the chronicity of depressive symptoms when evaluating cognitive functioning in older adults.

  7. Differences in quantitative methods for measuring subjective cognitive decline - results from a prospective memory clinic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Salem, Lise Cronberg; Andersen, Birgitte Bo

    2016-01-01

    decline. Depression scores were significantly correlated to both scales measuring subjective decline. Linear regression models showed that age did not have a significant contribution to the variance in subjective memory beyond that of depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Measures for subjective cognitive......BACKGROUND: Cognitive complaints occur frequently in elderly people and may be a risk factor for dementia and cognitive decline. Results from studies on subjective cognitive decline are difficult to compare due to variability in assessment methods, and little is known about how different methods...... influence reports of cognitive decline. METHODS: The Subjective Memory Complaints Scale (SMC) and The Memory Complaint Questionnaire (MAC-Q) were applied in 121 mixed memory clinic patients with mild cognitive symptoms (mean MMSE = 26.8, SD 2.7). The scales were applied independently and raters were blinded...

  8. Decline in changing Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA scores is associated with post-stroke cognitive decline determined by a formal neuropsychological evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Hui Tan

    Full Text Available We aimed to examine changes in the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores within a one-year period after stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA in associating cognitive decline determined by a formal neuropsychological test battery.Patients with ischemic stroke/TIA received MoCA and MMSE at baseline within 14 days after stroke/TIA, at 3-6 months and 1-year follow-ups. The scores of MoCA and MMSE were considered to have declined if there were a reduction of ≥2 points in the respective scores measured across two time points. The decline in neuropsychological diagnosis transitional status was defined by a category transition from no cognitive impairment or any cognitive impairment to a more severe cognitive impairment or dementia.275 patients with a mean age of 59.8 ± 11.6 years, and education of 7.7 ± 4.3 years completed all the assessments at baseline, 3-6 months and 1-year follow-ups. A decline in MoCA scores from 3-6 months to 1 year was associated with higher risk of decline in diagnosis transitional status (odd ratio = 3.21, p = 0.004 in the same time period whereas there was no association with a decline in MMSE scores.The decline in MoCA scores from 3-6 months to 1 year after stroke/TIA has three times higher risk for decline in the diagnosis transitional status. The decline of MoCA scores (reduction ≥ 2points is associated with the decline in neuropsychological diagnosis transitional status.

  9. Anxiety as a Predictor for Cognitive Decline and Dementia : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulpers, Bernice; Ramakers, Inez; Hamel, Renske; Kohler, Sebastian; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.; Verhey, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Because anxiety is postulated as a risk factor for dementia, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether anxiety predicts cognitive decline and/or dementia, taking the stage of cognitive decline as well as setting into account. Methods: A systematic literature search up

  10. Depressive symptoms and cognitive decline in older african americans: two scales and their factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Arlener D; Capuano, Ana W; Wilson, Robert S; Barnes, Lisa L

    2015-06-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in older adults, and researchers have explored the possibility of a link between depressive symptoms and cognitive decline, with mixed results. Most studies use total score of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) with predominately non-Hispanic white participants. We sought to examine the relationship between the four factors of the CES-D and cognitive decline in older African Americans. Generalizability was determined using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and its factors. Participants without dementia from the Minority Aging Research Study (N = 298, mean age: 74 ± 5.68) underwent annual clinical evaluations (mean years: 5 ± 1.9), including depression assessment and cognitive testing, from which global and specific measures were derived. Cognitive decline was examined with linear mixed models adjusted for demographic variables and indicators of vascular risk. Total CES-D score was not related to baseline cognition or change over time, whereas total GDS score was related to decline in semantic and working memory. In examining CES-D factors, lack of positive affect (e.g., anhedonia) was related to decline in global cognition, episodic memory, and perceptual speed. Similarly for the GDS, anhedonia was associated with decline in semantic memory, and increased negative affect was associated with decline in global cognition and episodic, semantic, and working memory. Results suggest that depressive symptoms, particularly anhedonia and negative affect, are related to cognitive decline in older African Americans. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. White matter changes and diabetes predict cognitive decline in the elderly: the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdelho, A; Madureira, S; Moleiro, C

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to study if age-related white matter changes (WMC) and vascular risk factors were predictors of cognitive decline in elderly subjects with WMC living independently.......We aimed to study if age-related white matter changes (WMC) and vascular risk factors were predictors of cognitive decline in elderly subjects with WMC living independently....

  12. Taking Stock of Biodiversity to Stem Its Rapid Decline

    OpenAIRE

    Butchart, Stuart H. M; Stattersfield, Alison J; Bennun, Leon A; Shutes, Sue M; Akçakaya, H. Resit; Baillie, Jonathan E. M; Stuart, Simon N; Hilton-Taylor, Craig; Mace, Georgina M

    2004-01-01

    The rapid destruction of the planet's biodiversity has prompted the nations of the world to set a target of achieving a significant reduction in the rate of loss of biodiversity by 2010. However, we do not yet have an adequate way of monitoring progress towards achieving this target. Here we present a method for producing indices based on the IUCN Red List to chart the overall threat status (projected relative extinction risk) of all the world's bird species from 1988 to 2004. Red List Indice...

  13. Incidence and predictors of cognitive decline in patients with left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendler, Timothy J; Spertus, John A; Gosch, Kensey L; Jones, Philip G; Bruce, Jared M; Nassif, Michael E; Flint, Kelsey M; Dunlay, Shannon M; Allen, Larry A; Arnold, Suzanne V

    2015-05-01

    After left ventricular assist device (LVAD) placement for advanced heart failure, increased cerebral perfusion should result in improved cognitive function. However, stroke (a well-known LVAD complication) and subclinical cerebral ischemia may result in transient or permanent cognitive decline. We sought to describe the incidence and predictors of cognitive decline after LVAD using a valid, sensitive assessment tool. Among 4419 patients in the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support who underwent LVAD implantation between May 2012 and December 2013, cognitive function was assessed in 1173 patients with the Trail Making B Test before LVAD and at 3, 6, and 12 months. The test detects several forms of cognitive impairment, including subclinical stroke. Cognitive decline was defined as a clinically important increase during follow-up using a moderate Cohen d effect size of 0.5×baseline SD (32 s). The cumulative incidence of cognitive decline in the year after LVAD implantation, treating death and transplantation as competing risks, was 29.2%. In adjusted analysis, older age (≥70 versus decline. Cognitive decline occurs commonly in patients in the year after LVAD and is associated with older age and destination therapy. These results could have important implications for patient selection and improved communication of risks before LVAD implantation. Additional studies are needed to explore the association between cognitive decline and subsequent stroke, health status, and mortality in patients after LVAD. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Association between apolipoprotein E4 and cognitive decline in elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Chris J; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Stott, David J; Caslake, Muriel J; Murray, Heather M; Shepherd, James; Blauw, Gerard J; Murphy, Michael B; Bollen, Edward L E M; Buckley, Brendan M; Cobbe, Stuart M; Ford, Ian; Gaw, Allan; Hyland, Michael; Jukema, J Wouter; Kamper, Adriaan M; Macfarlane, Peter W; Jolles, Jellemer; Perry, Ivan J; Sweeney, Brian J; Twomey, Cillian

    2007-11-01

    To determine the influence of apolipoprotein E on cognitive decline in a cohort of elderly men and women. Prospective study. Scotland, Ireland, and the Netherlands. Five thousand eight hundred four subjects aged 70 to 82 from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). Subjects were assessed at baseline and over a mean 3.2-year (range 0.7-4.2) follow-up for memory (Picture-Word Recall), speed of information processing (Stroop and Letter-Digit Coding), global cognitive function (Mini-Mental State Examination), and activities of daily living. At baseline, subjects with apolipoprotein E(4) versus those without E(4) had poorer memory performance (mean score difference -0.20 (95% confidence interval (CI)=-0.31 to -0.09) for immediate recall and -0.32 (95% CI=-0.48 to -0.16) for delayed recall and slower information processing (difference in Stroop, 2.79 seconds, (95% CI=1.20-4.28); Letter-Digit score, -0.36, (95% CI=-0.77-0.05). Subjects with apolipoprotein E(4) showed a greater decline in immediate (-0.22, 95% CI=-0.33 to -0.11) and delayed (-0.30, 95% CI=-0.46 to -0.15) memory scores but no significant change in speed of information processing (Stroop, P=.17; Letter-Digit, P=.06). Memory scores decreased 2.5% from baseline in those without E(4), 4.3% in E(4) heterozygotes (P=.01 for immediate and P=.03 for delayed, vs no E(4)) and 8.9% to 13.8% in E(4) homozygotes (P=.04 for immediate and P=.004 for delayed, vs heterozygotes). Apolipoprotein E(4) was associated with greater decline in instrumental activities of daily living (P<.001). Cognitive decline was not associated with lipoprotein levels. Findings in PROSPER indicate that E(4) is associated with more-rapid cognitive decline and may, therefore, predispose to dementia.

  15. Trajectories of age-related cognitive decline and potential associated factors of cognitive function in senior citizens of Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Lv, Chenlong; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Kewei; Chen, Chuansheng; Gai, Guozhong; Hu, Liangping; Wang, Yongyan; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2014-01-01

    With a longer life expectancy and an increased prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases, investigations on trajectories of cognitive aging have become exciting and promising. This study aimed to estimate the patterns of age-related cognitive decline and the potential associated factors of cognitive function in community-dwelling residents of Beijing, China. In this study, 1248 older adults aged 52-88 years [including 175 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects] completed a battery of neuropsychological scales. The personal information, including demographic information, medical history, eating habits, lifestyle regularity and leisure activities, was also collected. All cognitive function exhibited an agerelated decline in normal volunteers. Piece-wise linear fitting results suggested that performance on the Auditory Verbal Learning Test remained stable until 58 years of age and continued to decline thereafter. The decline in processing speed and executive function began during the early 50's. Scores on visual-spatial and language tests declined after 66 years of age. The decline stage of the general mental status ranged from 63 to 70 years of age. However, the MCI group did not exhibit an obvious age-related decline in most cognitive tests. Multivariate linear regression analyses indicated that education, gender, leisure activities, diabetes and eating habits were associated with cognitive abilities. These results indicated various trajectories of age-related decline across multiple cognitive domains. We also found different patterns of agerelated cognitive decline between MCI and normal elderly. These findings could help improve the guidance of cognitive intervention program and have implications for public policy issues.

  16. The Roles of Exercise and Yoga in Ameliorating Depression as a Risk Factor for Cognitive Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle C. Mathersul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are no effective pharmaceutical treatments to reduce cognitive decline or prevent dementia. At the same time, the global population is aging, and rates of dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI are on the rise. As such, there is an increasing interest in complementary and alternative interventions to treat or reduce the risk of cognitive decline. Depression is one potentially modifiable risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia. Notably, exercise and yoga are two interventions known to both reduce symptoms of depression and improve cognitive function. The current review discusses the efficacy of exercise and yoga to ameliorate depression and thereby reduce the risk of cognitive decline and potentially prevent dementia. Potential mechanisms of change, treatment implications, and future directions are discussed.

  17. The Roles of Exercise and Yoga in Ameliorating Depression as a Risk Factor for Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathersul, Danielle C; Rosenbaum, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are no effective pharmaceutical treatments to reduce cognitive decline or prevent dementia. At the same time, the global population is aging, and rates of dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are on the rise. As such, there is an increasing interest in complementary and alternative interventions to treat or reduce the risk of cognitive decline. Depression is one potentially modifiable risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia. Notably, exercise and yoga are two interventions known to both reduce symptoms of depression and improve cognitive function. The current review discusses the efficacy of exercise and yoga to ameliorate depression and thereby reduce the risk of cognitive decline and potentially prevent dementia. Potential mechanisms of change, treatment implications, and future directions are discussed.

  18. Feasibility and validity of mobile cognitive testing in the investigation of age-related cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Pierre; Husky, Mathilde; Allard, Michèle; Amieva, Hélène; Pérès, Karine; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Dartigues, Jean-François; Swendsen, Joel

    2017-09-01

    Mobile cognitive testing may be used to help characterize subtle deficits at the earliest stages of cognitive decline. Despite growing interest in this approach, comprehensive information concerning its feasibility and validity has been lacking in elderly samples. Over a one-week period, this study applied mobile cognitive tests of semantic memory, episodic memory and executive functioning in a cohort of 114 elderly non-demented community residents. While the study acceptance rate was moderate (66%), the majority of recruited individuals met minimal compliance thresholds and responded to an average of 82% of the repeated daily assessments. Missing data did not increase over the course of the study, but practice effects were observed for several test scores. However, even when controlling for practice effects, traditional neuropsychological tests were significantly associated with mobile cognitive test scores. In particular, the Isaacs Set Test was associated with mobile assessments of semantic memory (γ = 0.084, t = 5.598, p mobile assessments of episodic memory (γ = 0.069, t = 3.156, p mobile assessments of executive functioning (γ = 0.168, t = 4.562, p Mobile cognitive testing in the elderly may provide complementary and potentially more sensitive data relative to traditional neuropsychological assessment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Association of long-term adherence to the mind diet with cognitive function and cognitive decline in American women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Agnes; Kang, J.H.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Grodstein, F.; Rest, van de O.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: There is increasing attention for dietary patterns as a potential strategy to prevent cognitive decline. We examined the association between adherence to a recently developed Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet with cognitive function and cognitive

  20. Does Activity Engagement Protect Against Cognitive Decline in Old Age? Methodological and Analytical Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Ghisletta, Paolo; Bickel, Jean-François; Lövdén, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The literature about relationships between activity engagement and cognitive performance is abundant yet inconclusive. Some studies report that higher activity engagement leads to lower cognitive decline; others report no functional links, or that higher cognitive performance leads to less decline in activity engagement. We first discuss some methodological and analytical features that may contribute to the divergent findings. We then apply a longitudinal dynamic structural equation model to ...

  1. Decline in Memory, Visuospatial Ability, and Crystalized Cognitive Abilities in Older Adults: Normative Aging or Terminal Decline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bendayan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the pattern of change in multiple measures of cognitive abilities in a sample of oldest-old adults, comparing two different time metrics (chronological age and time to death and therefore examining both underlying conceptual assumptions (age-related change and terminal decline. Moreover, the association with individual characteristics as sex, education, and dementia diagnosis was also examined. Measures of cognitive status (Mini-Mental State Examination and the Swedish Clock Test and tests of crystallized (knowledge and synonyms, memory (verbal memory, nonverbal long-term memory, recognition and correspondence, and short-term memory, and visuospatial ability were included. The sample consisted of 671 older Swedish adult participants of the OCTO Twin Study. Linear mixed models with random coefficients were used to analyse change patterns and BIC indexes were used to compare models. Results showed that the time to death model was the best option in analyses of change in all the cognitive measures considered (except for the Information Test. A significant cognitive decline over time was found for all variables. Individuals diagnosed with dementia had lower scores at the study entrance and a faster decline. More educated individuals performed better in all the measures of cognition at study entry than those with poorer education, but no differences were found in the rate of change. Differences were found in age, sex, or time to death at baseline across the different measures. These results support the terminal decline hypothesis when compared to models assuming that cognitive changes are driven by normative aging processes.

  2. Depressive symptoms and cognitive decline in late life: a prospective epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Mary; Du, Yangchun; Dodge, Hiroko H; Ratcliff, Graham G; Chang, Chung-Chou H

    2006-02-01

    Depression is associated with cognitive impairment and dementia. It is less clear whether depression contributes to further cognitive decline over time, independently of incipient dementia. To examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and subsequent cognitive decline in a cohort of nondemented older adults, some of whom remained dementia free during follow-up and others in whom incident dementia eventually developed. Twelve-year prospective epidemiological study, including biennial measurement of cognition and depressive symptoms, biennial assessment of dementia, and comparison of cognitive function at baseline and over time in persons with and without baseline depressive symptoms in the dementia-free and eventual-dementia groups, using random-effects models. A largely blue-collar rural community. Population-based sample of 1265 adults 67 years and older without dementia at baseline. Scores over time on each of several cognitive test composites. Among 1094 participants who remained dementia free, those with baseline depressive symptoms had significantly lower baseline scores on all cognitive composites than the nondepressed participants. Among the 171 individuals in whom dementia later developed, depression was associated with worse performance in some but not all baseline cognitive composites. Cognitive decline over time was minimal in the dementia-free group, whereas marked decline was seen in the eventual-dementia group. Depressive symptoms were not associated with rate of cognitive decline over time in either group. Depressive symptoms are cross-sectionally associated with cognitive impairment but not subsequent cognitive decline. Substantial cognitive decline over time cannot be explained by depression and most likely reflects incipient dementia.

  3. Divergent Roles of Vascular Burden and Neurodegeneration in the Cognitive Decline of Geriatric Depression Patients and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Ye

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Both geriatric depression and mild cognitive impairment (MCI confer an increased risk for the development of dementia. The mechanisms underlying the development of cognitive impairment in geriatric depression patients remain controversial. The present study aimed to explore the association of cognitive decline with vascular risk, white matter hyperintensity (WMH burden and hippocampal volume in both remitted geriatric depression (RGD subjects and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI subjects. Forty-one RGD subjects, 51 aMCI subjects, and 64 healthy elderly subjects underwent multimodal MRI scans and neuropsychological tests at both baseline and a 35-month follow-up. According to the changing patterns (declining or stable of global cognitive function during the follow-up period, each group was further divided into a declining subgroup and a stable subgroup. The Framingham 10-year cardiovascular risk, WMH volume and hippocampal volume were measured to assess vascular pathology and neurodegeneration, respectively. The RGD declining group displayed a higher vascular risk and greater WMH volume than the RGD stable group, whereas no such difference was found in the aMCI subjects. In contrast, the aMCI declining group displayed a smaller left hippocampal volume than the aMCI stable group, whereas no such difference was found in the RGD subjects. Furthermore, greater increases in the WHM volume correlated with greater decreases in global cognitive function in the RGD declining group, and greater decreases in the left hippocampal volume correlated with greater decreases in global cognitive function in the aMCI declining group. In conclusion, the cognitive decline in RGD patients is associated with vascular burden, whereas the cognitive decline in aMCI patients is associated with neurodegeneration. These findings could contribute to a better understanding of the specific mechanisms of the development of dementia in each condition.

  4. Divergent Roles of Vascular Burden and Neurodegeneration in the Cognitive Decline of Geriatric Depression Patients and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing; Su, Fan; Gong, Liang; Shu, Hao; Liao, Wenxiang; Xie, Chunming; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Zhijun; Bai, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Both geriatric depression and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) confer an increased risk for the development of dementia. The mechanisms underlying the development of cognitive impairment in geriatric depression patients remain controversial. The present study aimed to explore the association of cognitive decline with vascular risk, white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden and hippocampal volume in both remitted geriatric depression (RGD) subjects and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects. Forty-one RGD subjects, 51 aMCI subjects, and 64 healthy elderly subjects underwent multimodal MRI scans and neuropsychological tests at both baseline and a 35-month follow-up. According to the changing patterns (declining or stable) of global cognitive function during the follow-up period, each group was further divided into a declining subgroup and a stable subgroup. The Framingham 10-year cardiovascular risk, WMH volume and hippocampal volume were measured to assess vascular pathology and neurodegeneration, respectively. The RGD declining group displayed a higher vascular risk and greater WMH volume than the RGD stable group, whereas no such difference was found in the aMCI subjects. In contrast, the aMCI declining group displayed a smaller left hippocampal volume than the aMCI stable group, whereas no such difference was found in the RGD subjects. Furthermore, greater increases in the WHM volume correlated with greater decreases in global cognitive function in the RGD declining group, and greater decreases in the left hippocampal volume correlated with greater decreases in global cognitive function in the aMCI declining group. In conclusion, the cognitive decline in RGD patients is associated with vascular burden, whereas the cognitive decline in aMCI patients is associated with neurodegeneration. These findings could contribute to a better understanding of the specific mechanisms of the development of dementia in each condition.

  5. Cognitive decline impairs financial and health literacy among community-based older persons without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Patricia A; Yu, Lei; Wilson, Robert S; Segawa, Eisuke; Buchman, Aron S; Bennett, David A

    2013-09-01

    Literacy is an important determinant of health and well-being across the life span but is critical in aging, when many influential health and financial decisions are made. Prior studies suggest that older persons exhibit lower literacy than younger persons, particularly in the domains of financial and health literacy, but the reasons why remain unknown. The objectives of this study were to: (a) examine pathways linking diverse resources (i.e., education, word knowledge, cognitive function, and decision making style) to health and financial literacy among older persons and determine the extent to which the relation of age with literacy represents a direct effect versus an indirect effect due to decrements in specific cognitive functions (i.e., executive functions and episodic memory); and (b) test the hypothesis that declines in executive function and episodic memory are associated with lower literacy among older persons without dementia. Six-hundred and forty-five community-based older persons without dementia underwent detailed assessments of diverse resources, including education, word knowledge, cognitive function (i.e., executive function, episodic memory) and decision making style (i.e., risk aversion), and completed a measure of literacy that included items similar to those used in the Health and Retirement Study, such as numeracy, financial concepts such as compound inflation and knowledge of stocks and bonds, and important health concepts such as understanding of drug risk and Medicare Part D. Path analysis revealed a strong effect of age on literacy, with about half of the effect of age on literacy due to decrements in executive functions and episodic memory. In addition, executive function had an indirect effect on literacy via decision making style (i.e., risk aversion), and education and word knowledge had independent effects on literacy. Finally, among (n = 447) persons with repeated cognitive assessments available for up to 14 years, regression

  6. Prediction of Long-term Cognitive Decline Following Postoperative Delirium in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devore, Elizabeth E; Fong, Tamara G; Marcantonio, Edward R; Schmitt, Eva M; Travison, Thomas G; Jones, Richard N; Inouye, Sharon K

    2017-11-09

    Increasing evidence suggests that postoperative delirium may result in long-term cognitive decline among older adults. Risk factors for such cognitive decline are unknown. We studied 126 older participants without delirium or dementia upon entering the Successful AGing After Elective Surgery (SAGES) study, who developed postoperative delirium and completed repeated cognitive assessments (up to 36 months of follow-up). Pre-surgical factors were assessed preoperatively and divided into nine groupings of related factors ("domains"). Delirium was evaluated at baseline and daily during hospitalization using the Confusion Assessment Method diagnostic algorithm, and cognitive function was assessed using a neuropsychological battery and the Informant Questionnaire for Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE) at baseline and 6-month intervals over 3 years. Linear regression was used to examine associations between potential risk factors and rate of long-term cognitive decline over time. A domain-specific and then overall selection method based on adjusted R2 values was used to identify explanatory factors for the outcome. The General Cognitive Performance (GCP) score (combining all neuropsychological test scores), IQCODE score, and living alone were significantly associated with long-term cognitive decline. GCP score explained the most variation in rate of cognitive decline (13%), and six additional factors-IQCODE score, cognitive independent activities of daily living impairment, living alone, cerebrovascular disease, Charlson comorbidity index score, and exhaustion level-in combination explained 32% of variation in this outcome. Global cognitive performance was most strongly associated with long-term cognitive decline following delirium. Pre-surgical factors may substantially predict this outcome.

  7. Healthy eating and reduced risk of cognitive decline: A cohort from 40 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Andrew; Dehghan, Mahshid; O'Donnell, Martin; Anderson, Craig; Teo, Koon; Gao, Peggy; Sleight, Peter; Dagenais, Gilles; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-06-02

    We sought to determine the association of dietary factors and risk of cognitive decline in a population at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Baseline dietary intake and measures of the Mini-Mental State Examination were recorded in 27,860 men and women who were enrolled in 2 international parallel trials of the ONTARGET (Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial) and TRANSCEND (Telmisartan Randomised Assessment Study in ACE Intolerant Subjects with Cardiovascular Disease) studies. We measured diet quality using the modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to determine the association between diet quality and risk of ≥3-point decline in Mini-Mental State Examination score, and reported as hazard ratio with 95% confidence intervals with adjustment for covariates. During 56 months of follow-up, 4,699 cases of cognitive decline occurred. We observed lower risk of cognitive decline among those in the healthiest dietary quintile of modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index compared with lowest quintile (hazard ratio 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.66-0.86, Q5 vs Q1). Lower risk of cognitive decline was consistent regardless of baseline cognitive level. We found that higher diet quality was associated with a reduced risk of cognitive decline. Improved diet quality represents an important potential target for reducing the global burden of cognitive decline. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Physical activity in relation to cognitive decline in elderly men: the FINE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelder, B M; Tijhuis, M A R; Kalmijn, S; Giampaoli, S; Nissinen, A; Kromhout, D

    2004-12-28

    Physical activity may be associated with better cognition. To investigate whether change in duration and intensity of physical activity is associated with 10-year cognitive decline in elderly men. Data of 295 healthy survivors, born between 1900 and 1920, from the Finland, Italy, and the Netherlands Elderly (FINE) Study were used. From 1990 onward, physical activity was measured with a validated questionnaire for retired men and cognitive functioning with the Mini-Mental State Examination (maximum score 30 points). The rates of cognitive decline did not differ among men with a high or low duration of activity at baseline. However, a decrease in activity duration of >60 min/day over 10 years resulted in a decline of 1.7 points (p activity duration (p = 0.06). Men in the lowest intensity quartile at baseline had a 1.8 (p = 0.07) to 3.5 (p = 0.004) times stronger 10-year cognitive decline than those in the other quartiles. A decrease in intensity of physical activity of at least half a standard deviation was associated with a 3.6 times stronger decline than maintaining the level of intensity (p = 0.003). Even in old age, participation in activities with at least a medium-low intensity may postpone cognitive decline. Moreover, a decrease in duration or intensity of physical activity results in a stronger cognitive decline than maintaining duration or intensity.

  9. Job Strain and Cognitive Decline: A Prospective Study of the Framingham Offspring Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Agbenyikey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Workplace stress is known to be related with many behavioral and disease outcomes. However, little is known about its prospective relationship with measures of cognitive decline. Objective: To investigate the association of job strain, psychological demands and job control on cognitive decline. Methods: Participants from Framingham Offspring cohort (n=1429, were assessed on job strain, and received neuropsychological assessment approximately 15 years and 21 years afterwards. Results: High job strain and low control were associated with decline in verbal learning and memory. Job strain was associated with decline in word recognition skills. Active job and passive job predicted decline in verbal learning and memory relative to low strain jobs in the younger subgroup. Active job and demands were positively associated with abstract reasoning skills. Conclusions: Job strain and job control may influence decline in cognitive performance.

  10. Decline in Cognitive Function in Older Adults With Early-Stage Breast Cancer After Adjuvant Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Marie; Heutte, Natacha; Rigal, Olivier; Noal, Sabine; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel; Lévy, Christelle; Allouache, Djelila; Rieux, Chantal; Lefel, Johan; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Veyret, Corinne; Barthélémy, Philippe; Longato, Nadine; Castel, Hélène; Eustache, Francis; Giffard, Bénédicte; Joly, Florence

    2016-07-29

    The impact of chemotherapy on cognition among elderly patients has received little attention, although such patients are more prone to presenting with age-related cognitive deficits and/or cognitive decline during chemotherapy. The present study assessed the cognitive function in older adults treated for early-stage breast cancer (EBC). The participants were newly diagnosed EBC patients aged ≥65 years without previous systemic treatment or neurological or psychiatric disease and matched healthy controls. They underwent two assessments: before starting adjuvant therapy and after the end of chemotherapy (including doxorubicin ± docetaxel [CT+ group], n = 58) or radiotherapy for patients who did not receive chemotherapy (CT- group, n = 61), and at the same interval for the healthy controls (n = 62). Neuropsychological and geriatric assessments were performed. Neuropsychological data were analyzed using the Reliable Change Index. Forty-nine percent of the patients (mean age, 70 ± 4 years) had objective cognitive decline after adjuvant treatment that mainly concerned working memory. Among these patients, 64% developed a cognitive impairment after adjuvant treatment. Comorbidity was not associated with cognitive decline. No significant difference in objective cognitive decline was found between the two groups of patients; however, the CT+ group had more subjective cognitive complaints after treatment (p = .008). The oldest patients (aged 70-81 years) tended to have more objective decline with docetaxel (p = .05). This is the largest published study assessing cognitive function in older adults with EBC that included a group of patients treated with modern chemotherapy regimens. Approximately half the patients had objective cognitive decline after adjuvant treatment. The oldest patients were more likely to have cognitive decline with chemotherapy, particularly with docetaxel. This is the largest published study assessing cognitive function in older adults with early

  11. Decline in Cognitive Function in Older Adults With Early-Stage Breast Cancer After Adjuvant Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Marie; Heutte, Natacha; Rigal, Olivier; Noal, Sabine; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel; Lévy, Christelle; Allouache, Djelila; Rieux, Chantal; Lefel, Johan; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Veyret, Corinne; Barthélémy, Philippe; Longato, Nadine; Castel, Hélène; Eustache, Francis; Giffard, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of chemotherapy on cognition among elderly patients has received little attention, although such patients are more prone to presenting with age-related cognitive deficits and/or cognitive decline during chemotherapy. The present study assessed the cognitive function in older adults treated for early-stage breast cancer (EBC). Patients and Methods. The participants were newly diagnosed EBC patients aged ≥65 years without previous systemic treatment or neurological or psychiatric disease and matched healthy controls. They underwent two assessments: before starting adjuvant therapy and after the end of chemotherapy (including doxorubicin ± docetaxel [CT+ group], n = 58) or radiotherapy for patients who did not receive chemotherapy (CT− group, n = 61), and at the same interval for the healthy controls (n = 62). Neuropsychological and geriatric assessments were performed. Neuropsychological data were analyzed using the Reliable Change Index. Results. Forty-nine percent of the patients (mean age, 70 ± 4 years) had objective cognitive decline after adjuvant treatment that mainly concerned working memory. Among these patients, 64% developed a cognitive impairment after adjuvant treatment. Comorbidity was not associated with cognitive decline. No significant difference in objective cognitive decline was found between the two groups of patients; however, the CT+ group had more subjective cognitive complaints after treatment (p = .008). The oldest patients (aged 70–81 years) tended to have more objective decline with docetaxel (p = .05). Conclusion. This is the largest published study assessing cognitive function in older adults with EBC that included a group of patients treated with modern chemotherapy regimens. Approximately half the patients had objective cognitive decline after adjuvant treatment. The oldest patients were more likely to have cognitive decline with chemotherapy, particularly with docetaxel. Implications for Practice: This is

  12. Depression and risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. Results of two prospective community-based studies in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, M. I.; Schoevers, R. A.; Beekman, A. T.; Jonker, C.; Deeg, D. J.; Schmand, B.; Adèr, H. J.; Bouter, L. M.; van Tilburg, W.

    2000-01-01

    Depression may be associated with cognitive decline in elderly people with impaired cognition. To investigate whether depressed elderly people with normal cognition are at increased risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. Two independent samples of older people with normal cognition were

  13. Changes in physical activity and cognitive decline in older adults living in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunhwan; Kim, Jinhee; Han, Eun Sook; Chae, Songi; Ryu, Mikyung; Ahn, Kwang Ho; Park, Eun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that physical activity may be beneficial in preserving cognition in late life. This study examined the association between baseline and changes in physical activity and cognitive decline in community-dwelling older people. Data were from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging, with 2605 aged 65 years and older subjects interviewed in 2006 and followed up for 2 years. Cognitive decline was defined by calculating the Reliable Change Index using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Physical activity levels were categorized as sedentary, low, or high. Changes in physical activity were classified as inactive, decreaser, increaser, or active. Logistic regression analysis of baseline and changes in physical activity with cognitive decline was performed. Compared with the sedentary group at baseline, both the low and high activity groups were less likely to experience cognitive decline. The active (odds ratio [OR] = 0.40, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.23-0.68) and increaser (OR = 0.45, 95 % CI 0.27-0.74) group, compared with the inactive counterpart, demonstrated a significantly lower likelihood of cognitive decline. Older adults who remained active or increased activity over time had a reduced risk of cognitive decline. Engagement in physical activity in late life may have cognitive health benefits.

  14. Effects of Diabetes Mellitus on Cognitive Decline in Patients with Alzheimer Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Cesari, Matteo; Liu, Fei; Dong, Birong; Vellas, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    Basic and clinical research support a link between diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the relationship with AD progression is unclear. This review focuses on the association between diabetes and cognitive decline in patients with AD. The literature published through May 2015 was searched in 3 databases: PubMed, Embase and Cochrane. Studies evaluating the effects of diabetes on patients with AD or cognitive decline were included, and extracted data were analyzed. A total of 10 articles met the inclusion criteria for review. The results of these studies were inconsistent in terms of the association between diabetes and cognitive decline. Only 2 studies demonstrated that the presence of diabetes was independently related to the progression of cognitive decline in the patients with AD, and 3 studies suggested that histories of diabetes were not correlated with the changes in cognitive function in patients with AD. Half of the included studies even indicated that histories of diabetes were associated with lesser declines in cognitive function in patients with AD. Current evidence indicates that the link between diabetes and cognitive decline in patients with AD is uncertain. Further clinical studies are needed, with larger samples, long-term follow up and an extended battery of cognitive assessments. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Personality and Cognitive Decline in Older Adults: Data From a Longitudinal Sample and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Martina; Terracciano, Antonio; Stephan, Yannick; Sutin, Angelina R

    2016-07-01

    Personality traits are associated with risk of dementia; less is known about their association with the trajectory of cognitive functioning. This research examines the association between the 5 major dimensions of personality and cognitive function and decline in older adulthood and includes a meta-analysis of published studies. Personality traits, objective and subjective memory, and cognitive status were collected in a large national sample (N = 13,987) with a 4-year follow-up period. For each trait, the meta-analysis pooled results from up to 5 prospective studies to examine personality and change in global cognition. Higher Neuroticism was associated with worse performance on all cognitive measures and greater decline in memory, whereas higher Conscientiousness and Openness were associated with better memory performance concurrently and less decline over time. All traits were associated with subjective memory. Higher Conscientiousness and lower Extraversion were associated with better cognitive status and less decline. Although modest, these associations were generally larger than that of hypertension, diabetes, history of psychological treatment, obesity, smoking, and physical inactivity. The meta-analysis supported the association between Neuroticism and Conscientiousness and cognitive decline. Personality is associated with cognitive decline in older adults, with effects comparable to established clinical and lifestyle risk factors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Impaired Sleep Predicts Cognitive Decline in Old People: Findings from the Prospective KORA Age Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Hamimatunnisa; Kawan, Rasmila; Emeny, Rebecca Thwing; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the association between sleep-related characteristics and cognitive change over 3 years of follow up in an aged population. Sleep characteristics and covariates were assessed at baseline in a standardized interview and clinical examination of the population-based KORA Age Study (n = 740, mean age = 75 years). Cognitive score (determined by telephone interview for cognitive status, TICS-m) was recorded at baseline and 3 years later. At baseline, 82.83% (n = 613) of participants had normal cognitive status, 13.51% (n = 100) were classified with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 3.64% (n = 27) with probable dementia. The effect of three distinct patterns of poor sleep (difficulties initiating [DIS] or maintaining sleep [DMS], daytime sleepiness [DS] or sleep duration) were considered on a change in cognitive score with adjustments for potential confounders in generalized linear regression models. Cognitive decline was more pronounced in individuals with DMS compared to those with no DMS (β = 1.33, 95% CI = 0.41-2.24, P < 0.001). However, the predictive power of DMS was only significant in individuals with normal cognition and not impaired subjects at baseline. Prolonged sleep duration increased the risk for cognitive decline in cognitively impaired elderly (β = 1.86, 95% CI = 0.15-3.57, P = 0.03). Other sleep characteristics (DIS and DS) were not significantly associated with cognitive decline. DMS and long sleep duration were associated with cognitive decline in normal and cognitively impaired elderly, respectively. The identification of impaired sleep quality may offer intervention strategies to deter cognitive decline in the elderly with normal cognitive function. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  17. Roles of Arterial Stiffness and Blood Pressure in Hypertension-Associated Cognitive Decline in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, Ihab; Goldstein, Felicia C; Martin, Greg S; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2016-01-01

    Although there is strong evidence that hypertension leads to cognitive decline, especially in the executive domain, the relationship between blood pressure and cognition has been conflicted. Hypertension is characterized by blood pressure elevation and increased arterial stiffness. We aimed at investigating whether arterial stiffness would be superior to blood pressure in predicting cognitive decline and explaining the hypertension-executive decline association. A randomly selected asymptomatic population (n=591, age=49.2 years, 70% women, 27% black, and education=18 years) underwent annual vascular and cognitive assessments. Cognition was assessed using computerized versions commonly used cognitive tests, and principal component analysis was used for deriving cognitive scores for executive function, memory, and working memory. Arterial stiffness was measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Higher PWV, but not blood pressure, was associated with a steeper decline in executive (P=0.0002), memory (P=0.05), and working memory (P=0.02) scores after adjusting for demographics, education, and baseline cognitive performance. This remained true after adjusting for hypertension. Hypertension was associated with greater decline in executive score (P=0.0029) and those with combined hypertension and elevated PWV (>7 m/s) had the greatest decline in executive score (P value hypertension×PWV=0.02). PWV explained the association between hypertension and executive function (P value for hypertension=0.0029 versus 0.24 when adjusting for PWV). In healthy adults, increased arterial stiffness is superior to blood pressure in predicting cognitive decline in all domains and in explaining the hypertension-executive function association. Arterial stiffness, especially in hypertension, may be a target in the prevention of cognitive decline. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Benzodiazepine use and risk of incident dementia or cognitive decline: prospective population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Shelly L; Dublin, Sascha; Yu, Onchee; Walker, Rod; Anderson, Melissa; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Crane, Paul K; Larson, Eric B

    2016-02-02

    To determine whether higher cumulative use of benzodiazepines is associated with a higher risk of dementia or more rapid cognitive decline. Prospective population based cohort. Integrated healthcare delivery system, Seattle, Washington. 3434 participants aged ≥ 65 without dementia at study entry. There were two rounds of recruitment (1994-96 and 2000-03) followed by continuous enrollment beginning in 2004. The cognitive abilities screening instrument (CASI) was administered every two years to screen for dementia and was used to examine cognitive trajectory. Incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease were determined with standard diagnostic criteria. Benzodiazepine exposure was defined from computerized pharmacy data and consisted of the total standardized daily doses (TSDDs) dispensed over a 10 year period (a rolling window that moved forward in time during follow-up). The most recent year was excluded because of possible use for prodromal symptoms. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine time varying use of benzodiazepine and dementia risk. Analyses of cognitive trajectory used linear regression models with generalized estimating equations. Over a mean follow-up of 7.3 years, 797 participants (23.2%) developed dementia, of whom 637 developed Alzheimer's disease. For dementia, the adjusted hazard ratios associated with cumulative benzodiazepine use compared with non-use were 1.25 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.51) for 1-30 TSDDs; 1.31 (1.00 to 1.71) for 31-120 TSDDs; and 1.07 (0.82 to 1.39) for ≥ 121 TSDDs. Results were similar for Alzheimer's disease. Higher benzodiazepine use was not associated with more rapid cognitive decline. The risk of dementia is slightly higher in people with minimal exposure to benzodiazepines but not with the highest level of exposure. These results do not support a causal association between benzodiazepine use and dementia. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  19. Self-reported cognitive decline on the informant questionnaire on cognitive decline in the elderly is associated with dementia, instrumental activities of daily living and depression but not longitudinal cognitive change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eramudugolla, Ranmalee; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Easteal, Simon; Jorm, Anthony F; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2012-01-01

    A subjective history of cognitive decline is integral to dementia screening, yet there are few data on the accuracy of retrospective self-reports. We prospectively examined the longitudinal predictors of self-reported decline, including rate of cognitive change, clinical diagnosis, depressive symptoms and personality. We used a large (n = 2,551) community-dwelling sample of older adults (60-64 years at baseline) and tracked their cognitive functioning over 3 waves across a period of 8 years. Individual rates of change in multiple domains of cognition, incident dementia and mild cognitive disorders, apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 genotype, level of education, depressive symptoms and personality were examined as predictors of wave 3 retrospective self-reported decline as measured by the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly. The rate of cognitive decline did not predict subjective decline. Significant predictors of self-reported decline included dementia diagnosis, problems with instrumental activities of daily living, depression and neuroticism at the time of self-report, as well as the presence of an APOE ε4 allele. In this relatively young cohort, retrospective self-report of cognitive decline does not reflect objective deterioration in cognition over the time period in question, but it may identify individuals in the initial stages of dementia and those with elevated psychological and genotypic risk factors for the development of dementia. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Plasma n-3 fatty acids and the risk of cognitive decline in older adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beydoun, May A; Kaufman, Jay S; Satia, Jessie A; Rosamond, Wayne; Folsom, Aaron R

    2007-01-01

    Plasma fatty acids may affect the risk of cognitive decline in older adults. We prospectively studied the association between plasma fatty acids and cognitive decline in adults aged 50-65 y at baseline and conducted a subgroup analysis...

  1. Decline in Cognitive Function in Older Adults With Early-Stage Breast Cancer After Adjuvant Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, Marie; Heutte, Natacha; Rigal, Olivier; Noal, Sabine; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel; Lévy, Christelle; Allouache, Djelila; Rieux, Chantal; Lefel, Johan; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Veyret, Corinne; Barthélémy, Philippe; Longato, Nadine; Castel, Hélène; Eustache, Francis

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Background. The impact of chemotherapy on cognition among elderly patients has received little attention, although such patients are more prone to presenting with age-related cognitive deficits and/or cognitive decline during chemotherapy. The present study assessed the cognitive function in older adults treated for early-stage breast cancer (EBC). Patients and Methods. The participants were newly diagnosed EBC patients aged $65 years without previous systemic treatmen...

  2. Relation of neuropathology with cognitive decline among older persons without dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eBoyle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although it is now widely accepted that dementia has a long preclinical phase during which neuropathology accumulates and cognition declines, little is known about the relation of neuropathology with the longitudinal rate of change in cognition among older persons without dementia. We quantified the burden of the neuropathologies of the three most common causes of dementia (i.e., Alzheimer’s disease (AD, cerebrovascular disease (CVD, and Lewy body disease (LBD and examined their relation with cognitive decline in a large cohort of persons without dementia proximate to death. Methods: 467 deceased participants without dementia from two longitudinal clinical-pathologic studies, Rush Memory and Aging Project and Religious Orders Study, completed a mean of 7 annual evaluations including 17 cognitive tests. Neuropathologic examinations provided quantitative measures of AD (i.e., amyloid load, tangle density, CVD (i.e., macroscopic infarcts, microinfarcts, and neocortical Lewy bodies. Random coefficient models were used to examine the relation of the neuropathologies with rates of global cognitive decline as well as decline in 4 specific cognitive systems. Results: At autopsy, 82% of persons without dementia had amyloid, 100% had tangles, 29% had macroscopic infarcts, 25% had microinfarcts, and 6% had neocortical Lewy bodies. Global cognition declined a mean of 0.034 unit per year (SE=0.003, p<0.001. In separate analyses, amyloid, tangles (p-values<0.001 and neocortical Lewy bodies (p=0.015 were associated with an increased rate of global cognitive decline; macroscopic infarcts and microinfarcts were not. Further, when analyzed simultaneously, amyloid, tangles, and neocortical Lewy bodies remained associated with global cognitive decline (p- values<0.024. Finally, measures of AD were associated with decline in 3 of 4 systems, including episodic memory (i.e., tangles, semantic memory (i.e., amyloid and tangles, and working memory (i

  3. Cognitive Decline and Oral Health in Middle-aged Adults in the ARIC Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naorungroj, S.; Slade, G.D.; Beck, J.D.; Mosley, T.H.; Gottesman, R.F.; Alonso, A.; Heiss, G.

    2013-01-01

    Even before dementia becomes apparent, cognitive decline may contribute to deterioration in oral health. This cohort study of middle-aged adults evaluated associations of six-year change in cognitive function with oral health behaviors and conditions in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Cognitive function was measured at study visits in 1990-1992 and 1996-1998 with three tests: (a) Delayed Word Recall (DWR), (b) Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS), and (c) Word Fluency (WF). Cognitive decline scores were computed as ‘studentized’ residuals of 1996-1998 scores regressed against 1990-1992 scores. In 1996-1998, 10,050 participants answered dental screening questions, and 5,878 of 8,782 dentate participants received a comprehensive oral examination. Multiple regression models used cognitive change to predict oral health behaviors and conditions with adjustment for covariates. In the fully adjusted models, greater decline in all three measures of cognitive function was associated with increased odds of complete tooth loss. Greater decline in DSS and WF scores was associated with infrequent toothbrushing. Decline in WF scores was also associated with higher plaque levels. In these middle-aged adults, six-year cognitive decline was modestly associated with less frequent toothbrushing, plaque deposit, and greater odds of edentulism, but not with other oral behaviors or diseases. PMID:23872988

  4. Symptoms of anxiety and depression in the course of cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, E J M; Comijs, H C; Jonker, C; Beekman, A T F

    2007-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are common inpatients with cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and recognition and treatment of these symptoms can improve their quality of life. The present study investigates anxiety and depression in different phases of cognitive decline. The sample consisted of five groups of elderly people in different phases of cognitive decline; four from a community-based sample (Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam), and one group of elderly people diagnosed with AD. ANOVAs were performed to investigate group differences in the severity and prevalence of anxiety and depression, and comorbid anxiety and depressive symptoms. The prevalence rates of anxiety, comorbid anxiety and depressive symptoms and depressive symptoms follow a pattern of an increasing prevalence as cognitive performance declines and a decrease in the prevalence when cognitive functioning is severely impaired. AD patients report fewest anxiety symptoms. We found that the prevalence of anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms and comorbid anxiety and depressive symptoms seems to increase in the early phase of cognitive decline, and decreases as cognitive functioning further declines. Elderly diagnosed with AD report less anxiety as expected, probably due to lack of insight caused by AD. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Neurodegenerative properties of chronic pain: cognitive decline in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijtje L A Jongsma

    Full Text Available Chronic pain has been associated with impaired cognitive function. We examined cognitive performance in patients with severe chronic pancreatitis pain. We explored the following factors for their contribution to observed cognitive deficits: pain duration, comorbidity (depression, sleep disturbance, use of opioids, and premorbid alcohol abuse. The cognitive profiles of 16 patients with severe pain due to chronic pancreatitis were determined using an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Data from three cognitive domains (psychomotor performance, memory, executive functions were compared to data from healthy controls matched for age, gender and education. Multivariate multilevel analysis of the data showed decreased test scores in patients with chronic pancreatitis pain in different cognitive domains. Psychomotor performance and executive functions showed the most prominent decline. Interestingly, pain duration appeared to be the strongest predictor for observed cognitive decline. Depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, opioid use and history of alcohol abuse provided additional explanations for the observed cognitive decline in some of the tests, but to a lesser extent than pain duration. The negative effect of pain duration on cognitive performance is compatible with the theory of neurodegenerative properties of chronic pain. Therefore, early and effective therapeutic interventions might reduce or prevent decline in cognitive performance, thereby improving outcomes and quality of life in these patients.

  6. Cognitive decline and dementia in the elderly hypertensive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Hanon

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevention of cognitive disorders and dementia represents a major challenge in the coming years. The identification and management of the risk factors for these incapacitating conditions must therefore be a priority in order to define the best tools for early prevention. Studies over the past few years indicate that hypertension is involved not only in cerebro-vascular morbidity and mortality, but also in the pathogenesis of cognitive disorders and dementia. The existence of cognitive deficits and dementia syndromes in certain hypertensive elderly subjects has led a number of authors to study the relationships between cognitive functions and blood pressure (BP. Although the results of cross-sectional studies diverge, longitudinal studies show that subjects’ cognitive level is often inversely proportional to their BP values measured 15 or 20 years previously. The higher their BP used to be, the poorer their cognitive function. Data from certain recent therapeutic trials suggest that antihypertensive treatment might prevent the occurrence of dementia (of all aetiologies in hypertensive patients aged 60 years and over. In this context, the effect of antihypertensive treatment on cognitive functions should represent one of the main criteria of evaluation of future morbidity and mortality studies, some of which are already in progress, with results available in the near future.

  7. Foreign language training as cognitive therapy for age-related cognitive decline: a hypothesis for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Mark; Gunasekera, Geshri M; Wong, Patrick C M

    2013-12-01

    Over the next fifty years, the number of older adults is set to reach record levels. Protecting older adults from the age-related effects of cognitive decline is one of the greatest challenges of the next few decades as it places increasing pressure on families, health systems, and economies on a global scale. The disease-state of age-related cognitive decline-Alzheimer's disease and other dementias-hijacks our consciousness and intellectual autonomy. However, there is evidence that cognitively stimulating activities protect against the adverse effects of cognitive decline. Similarly, bilingualism is also considered to be a safeguard. We propose that foreign language learning programs aimed at older populations are an optimal solution for building cognitive reserve because language learning engages an extensive brain network that is known to overlap with the regions negatively affected by the aging process. It is recommended that future research should test this potentially fruitful hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pattern and Rate of Cognitive Decline in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: A Prospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Lawrence

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment, predominantly affecting processing speed and executive function, is an important consequence of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD. To date, few longitudinal studies of cognition in SVD have been conducted. We determined the pattern and rate of cognitive decline in SVD and used the results to determine sample size calculations for clinical trials of interventions reducing cognitive decline.121 patients with MRI confirmed lacunar stroke and leukoaraiosis were enrolled into the prospective St George's Cognition And Neuroimaging in Stroke (SCANS study. Patients attended one baseline and three annual cognitive assessments providing 36 month follow-up data. Neuropsychological assessment comprised a battery of tests assessing working memory, long-term (episodic memory, processing speed and executive function. We calculated annualized change in cognition for the 98 patients who completed at least two time-points.Task performance was heterogeneous, but significant cognitive decline was found for the executive function index (p<0.007. Working memory and processing speed decreased numerically, but not significantly. The executive function composite score would require the smallest samples sizes for a treatment trial with an aim of halting decline, but this would still require over 2,000 patients per arm to detect a 30% difference with power of 0.8 over a three year follow-up.The pattern of cognitive decline seen in SVD over three years is consistent with the pattern of impairments at baseline. Rates of decline were slow and sample sizes would need to be large for clinical trials aimed at halting decline beyond initial diagnosis using cognitive scores as an outcome measure. This emphasizes the importance of more sensitive surrogate markers in this disease.

  9. The importance of being subtle: small changes in calcium homeostasis control cognitive decline in normal aging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Toescu, E.C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 6, - (2007), s. 267-273 ISSN 1474-9718 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Aging * Ca homeostasis * Cognitive decline Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.854, year: 2007

  10. Adverse Childhood and Recent Negative Life Events: Contrasting Associations With Cognitive Decline in Older Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korten, Nicole C M; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pot, Anne Margriet; Deeg, Dorly J H; Comijs, Hannie C

    2014-06-01

    To examine whether persons who experienced adverse childhood events or recent negative life events have a worse cognitive performance and faster cognitive decline and the role of depression and apolipoprotein E-∊4 in this relationship. The community-based sample consisted of 10-year follow-up data of 1312 persons participating in the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (age range 65-85 years). Persons who experienced adverse childhood events showed a faster 10-year decline in processing speed but only when depressive symptoms were experienced. Persons with more recent negative life events showed slower processing speed at baseline but no faster decline. Childhood adversity may cause biological or psychological vulnerability, which is associated with both depressive symptoms and cognitive decline in later life. The accumulation of recent negative life events did not affect cognitive functioning over a longer time period. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Increased deoxythymidine triphosphate levels is a feature of relative cognitive decline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Frederiksen, Jane H; Olsen, Maria Nathalie Angleys

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetics, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular levels of nucleotides have been hypothesized as early indicators of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Utilizing relative decline of cognitive ability as a predictor of AD risk, we evaluated the correlation between chang...

  12. Exercise training for preventing dementia, mild cognitive impairment, and clinically meaningful cognitive decline: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Philipe de Souto; Demougeot, Laurent; Vellas, Bruno; Rolland, Yves

    2017-12-05

    To assess the effects of long-term exercise on the onset of dementia, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and other clinically meaningful cognitive decline in the elderly. Systematic review with preplanned meta-analysis. Electronic searches were performed between November 2016 and May 2017. RCTs examining the effects of long-term exercise (intervention length 12 months or longer) on the onset of dementia, MCI, or clinically meaningful cognitive decline in older adults without dementia at baseline were eligible. Two authors extracted the data independently. Four binary outcomes were defined: dementia onset, MCI onset, other clinically meaningful cognitive decline, and any of these three outcomes combined. Five studies (n=2878 participants randomized) were included in this review. Outcomes' incidence for exercisers and controls were, respectively: 3.7% (n=949) and 6.1% (n=1017) for dementia (three studies), 10.2% (n=686) and 9.1% (n=682) for MCI (one study), 14.5% (n=124) and 15.4% (n=123) for other clinically meaningful cognitive decline (two studies), and 11.4% (n=1073) and 12.5% (n=1140) for all outcomes combined. Meta-analyses found no significant effects of exercise for reducing the risk of dementia, MCI, other clinically meaningful cognitive decline, or all outcomes combined. Evidence from RCTs is limited and does not support that exercise reduces the risk of developing clinically important cognitive outcomes. Further long-term exercise RCTs are needed before solid conclusions can be drawn.

  13. Cerebral amyloidosis associated with cognitive decline in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Gordon, Brian A; Ryman, Davis C; Ma, Shengmei; Xiong, Chengjie; Hassenstab, Jason; Goate, Alison; Fagan, Anne M; Cairns, Nigel J; Marcus, Daniel S; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Ghetti, Bernardino; Farlow, Martin R; Sperling, Reisa; Salloway, Steve; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Martins, Ralph N; Rossor, Martin N; Jucker, Mathias; Danek, Adrian; Förster, Stefan; Lane, Christopher A S; Morris, John C; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Bateman, Randall J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the associations of cerebral amyloidosis with concurrent cognitive performance and with longitudinal cognitive decline in asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD). Two hundred sixty-three participants enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network observational study underwent neuropsychological evaluation as well as PET scans with Pittsburgh compound B. One hundred twenty-one participants completed at least 1 follow-up neuropsychological evaluation. Four composite cognitive measures representing global cognition, episodic memory, language, and working memory were generated using z scores from a battery of 13 standard neuropsychological tests. General linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate the relationship between baseline cerebral amyloidosis and baseline cognitive performance and whether baseline cerebral amyloidosis predicts cognitive change over time (mean follow-up 2.32 years ± 0.92, range 0.89-4.19) after controlling for estimated years from expected symptom onset, APOE ε4 allelic status, and education. In asymptomatic mutation carriers, amyloid burden was not associated with baseline cognitive functioning but was significantly predictive of longitudinal decline in episodic memory. In symptomatic mutation carriers, cerebral amyloidosis was correlated with worse baseline performance in multiple cognitive composites and predicted greater decline over time in global cognition, working memory, and Mini-Mental State Examination. Cerebral amyloidosis predicts longitudinal episodic memory decline in presymptomatic ADAD and multidomain cognitive decline in symptomatic ADAD. These findings imply that amyloidosis in the brain is an indicator of early cognitive decline and provides a useful outcome measure for early assessment and prevention treatment trials. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Job Strain and Cognitive Decline: A Prospective Study of the Framingham Offspring Cohort

    OpenAIRE

    W Agbenyikey; Karasek, R; Cifuentes, M.; PA Wolf; Seshadri, S; Taylor JA; AS Beiser; Au, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Workplace stress is known to be related with many behavioral and disease outcomes. However, little is known about its prospective relationship with measures of cognitive decline. Objective: To investigate the association of job strain, psychological demands and job control on cognitive decline. Methods: Participants from Framingham Offspring cohort (n=1429), were assessed on job strain, and received neuropsychological assessment approximately 15 years and 21 years afterwar...

  15. Computerized and virtual reality cognitive training for individuals at high risk of cognitive decline: systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Hannah; Traynor, Victoria; Solowij, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of cognitive training, specifically computerized cognitive training (CCT) and virtual reality cognitive training (VRCT), programs for individuals living with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia and therefore at high risk of cognitive decline. After searching a range of academic databases (CINHAL, PSYCinfo, and Web of Science), the studies evaluated (N = 16) were categorized as CCT (N = 10), VRCT (N = 3), and multimodal interventions (N = 3). Effect sizes were calculated, but a meta-analysis was not possible because of the large variability of study design and outcome measures adopted. The cognitive domains of attention, executive function, and memory (visual and verbal) showed the most consistent improvements. The positive effects on psychological outcomes (N = 6) were significant reductions on depressive symptoms (N = 3) and anxiety (N = 2) and improved perceived use of memory strategy (N = 1). Assessments of activities of daily living demonstrated no significant improvements (N = 8). Follow-up studies (N = 5) demonstrated long-term improvements in cognitive and psychological outcomes (N = 3), and the intervention groups showed a plateau effect of cognitive functioning compared with the cognitive decline experienced by control groups (N = 2). CCT and VRCT were moderately effective in long-term improvement of cognition for those at high risk of cognitive decline. Total intervention time did not mediate efficacy. Future research needs to improve study design by including larger samples, longitudinal designs, and a greater range of outcome measures, including functional and quality of life measures, to assess the wider effect of cognitive training on individuals at high risk of cognitive decline. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The effects of exercise on cognition in older adults with and without cognitive decline: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uffelen, J.G.Z.; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Hopman-Rock, M.; van Mechelen, W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the effect of physical exercise on cognition in older adults with and without cognitive decline. Data sources: Randomized controlled trials were identified by literature searches in PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, and AgeLine. Study selection: Papers were

  17. The effects of exercise on cognition in older adults with and without cognitive decline: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uffelen, J.G.Z. van; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Mechelen, W. van

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the effect of physical exercise on cognition in older adults with and without cognitive decline. Data sources: Randomized controlled trials were identified by literature searches in PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, and AgeLine. Study selection: Papers were

  18. Thought disorder, pragmatic language impairment, and generalized cognitive decline in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linscott, Richard J

    2005-06-15

    Schizophrenia is associated with pragmatic language impairment (PLI), a reduced ability to communicate intention in a rule-governed fashion. Two explanations for PLI include that PLI is equivalent to thought disorder and that PLI is secondary to generalized cognitive decline. The aims of this study were to demonstrate PLI in schizophrenia and to test which of these explanations best accounts for the relationships among thought disorder, PLI, and generalized cognitive decline. Schizophrenia (n=20) and control (n=26) participants provided speech samples that were scored for thought disorder (type-token ratio and Cloze procedure) and PLI [Profile of Pragmatic Impairment in Communication (PPIC)]. Generalized cognitive decline was determined from discrepancies between current and premorbid verbal IQ. Patients with schizophrenia exhibited significant PLI and generalized cognitive decline. There was no evidence of an association between thought disorder and PLI. Moreover, generalized cognitive decline predicted PLI (r(2)=0.33 to 0.59) but not thought disorder (r(2)=0.02 to 0.06). The results conformed to a predicted pattern of associations based on the notion that PLI in schizophrenia is secondary to generalized cognitive decline.

  19. Contribution of cognitive performance and cognitive decline to associations between socioeconomic factors and dementia: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusmaully, Jennifer; Dugravot, Aline; Moatti, Jean-Paul; Marmot, Michael G; Elbaz, Alexis; Kivimaki, Mika; Sabia, Séverine; Singh-Manoux, Archana

    2017-06-01

    Socioeconomic disadvantage is a risk factor for dementia, but longitudinal studies suggest that it does not affect the rate of cognitive decline. Our objective is to understand the manner in which socioeconomic disadvantage shapes dementia risk by examining its associations with midlife cognitive performance and cognitive decline from midlife to old age, including cognitive decline trajectories in those with dementia. Data are drawn from the Whitehall II study (N = 10,308 at study recruitment in 1985), with cognitive function assessed at 4 waves (1997, 2002, 2007, and 2012). Sociodemographic, behavioural, and cardiometabolic risk factors from 1985 and chronic conditions until the end of follow-up in 2015 (N dementia/total = 320/9,938) allowed the use of inverse probability weighting to take into account data missing because of loss to follow-up between the study recruitment in 1985 and the introduction of cognitive tests to the study in 1997. Generalized estimating equations and Cox regression were used to assess associations of socioeconomic markers (height, education, and midlife occupation categorized as low, intermediate, and high to represent hierarchy in the socioeconomic marker) with cognitive performance, cognitive decline, and dementia (N dementia/total = 195/7,499). In those with dementia, we examined whether retrospective trajectories of cognitive decline (backward timescale) over 18 years prior to diagnosis differed as a function of socioeconomic markers. Socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with poorer cognitive performance (all p performance. In further analyses restricted to those with dementia, retrospective cognitive trajectories over 18 years prior to dementia diagnosis showed faster cognitive decline in the high education (p = 0.006) and occupation (p = 0.001) groups such that large differences in cognitive performance in midlife were attenuated at dementia diagnosis. A major limitation of our study is the use of electronic health records

  20. [Physical activity diminishes aging-related decline of physical and cognitive performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apor, Péter; Babai, László

    2014-05-25

    Aging-related decline of muscle force, walking speed, locomotor coordination, aerobic capacity and endurance exert prognostic impact on life expectancy. Proper use of training may diminish the aging process and it may improve the quality of life of elderly persons. This paper provides a brief summary on the impact of training on aging-related decline of physical and cognitive functions.

  1. Accelerated cognitive decline in a rodent model for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Sandra; Aalbers, Marlien W; Rijkers, Kim; Lagiere, Melanie; Bogaarts, Jan G; Blokland, Arjan; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Hoogland, Govert; Vles, Johan S H

    2016-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is frequently observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. It is hypothesized that cumulative seizure exposure causes accelerated cognitive decline in patients with epilepsy. We investigated the influence of seizure frequency on cognitive decline in a rodent model for temporal lobe epilepsy. Neurobehavioral assessment was performed before and after surgery, after the induction of self-sustaining limbic status epilepticus (SSLSE), and in the chronic phase in which rats experienced recurrent seizures. Furthermore, we assessed potential confounders of memory performance. Rats showed a deficit in spatial working memory after the induction of the SSLSE, which endured in the chronic phase. A progressive decline in recognition memory developed in SSLSE rats. Confounding factors were absent. Seizure frequency and also the severity of the status epilepticus were not correlated with the severity of cognitive deficits. The effect of the seizure frequency on cognitive comorbidity in epilepsy has long been debated, possibly because of confounders such as antiepileptic medication and the heterogeneity of epileptic etiologies. In an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, we showed that a decrease in spatial working memory does not relate to the seizure frequency. This suggests for other mechanisms are responsible for memory decline and potentially a common pathophysiology of cognitive deterioration and the occurrence and development of epileptic seizures. Identifying this common denominator will allow development of more targeted interventions treating cognitive decline in patients with epilepsy. The treatment of interictal symptoms will increase the quality of life of many patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic architecture of age-related cognitive decline in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Towfique; Chibnik, Lori B.; McCabe, Cristin; Wong, Andus; Replogle, Joseph M.; Yu, Lei; Gao, Sujuan; Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Stranger, Barbara; Murrell, Jill; Barnes, Lisa; Hendrie, Hugh C.; Foroud, Tatiana; Krichevsky, Anna; Bennett, David A.; Hall, Kathleen S.; Evans, Denis A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify genetic risk factors associated with susceptibility to age-related cognitive decline in African Americans (AAs). Methods: We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and an admixture-mapping scan in 3,964 older AAs from 5 longitudinal cohorts; for each participant, we calculated a slope of an individual's global cognitive change from neuropsychological evaluations. We also performed a pathway-based analysis of the age-related cognitive decline GWAS. Results: We found no evidence to support the existence of a genomic region which has a strongly different contribution to age-related cognitive decline in African and European genomes. Known Alzheimer disease (AD) susceptibility variants in the ABCA7 and MS4A loci do influence this trait in AAs. Of interest, our pathway-based analyses returned statistically significant results highlighting a shared risk from lipid/metabolism and protein tyrosine signaling pathways between cognitive decline and AD, but the role of inflammatory pathways is polarized, being limited to AD susceptibility. Conclusions: The genetic architecture of aging-related cognitive in AA individuals is largely similar to that of individuals of European descent. In both populations, we note a surprising lack of enrichment for immune pathways in the genetic risk for cognitive decline, despite strong enrichment of these pathways among genetic risk factors for AD. PMID:28078323

  3. Genetic architecture of age-related cognitive decline in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Towfique; Chibnik, Lori B; McCabe, Cristin; Wong, Andus; Replogle, Joseph M; Yu, Lei; Gao, Sujuan; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Stranger, Barbara; Murrell, Jill; Barnes, Lisa; Hendrie, Hugh C; Foroud, Tatiana; Krichevsky, Anna; Bennett, David A; Hall, Kathleen S; Evans, Denis A; De Jager, Philip L

    2017-02-01

    To identify genetic risk factors associated with susceptibility to age-related cognitive decline in African Americans (AAs). We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and an admixture-mapping scan in 3,964 older AAs from 5 longitudinal cohorts; for each participant, we calculated a slope of an individual's global cognitive change from neuropsychological evaluations. We also performed a pathway-based analysis of the age-related cognitive decline GWAS. We found no evidence to support the existence of a genomic region which has a strongly different contribution to age-related cognitive decline in African and European genomes. Known Alzheimer disease (AD) susceptibility variants in the ABCA7 and MS4A loci do influence this trait in AAs. Of interest, our pathway-based analyses returned statistically significant results highlighting a shared risk from lipid/metabolism and protein tyrosine signaling pathways between cognitive decline and AD, but the role of inflammatory pathways is polarized, being limited to AD susceptibility. The genetic architecture of aging-related cognitive in AA individuals is largely similar to that of individuals of European descent. In both populations, we note a surprising lack of enrichment for immune pathways in the genetic risk for cognitive decline, despite strong enrichment of these pathways among genetic risk factors for AD.

  4. Depression and risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. Results from two prospective community-based studies in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, M.I.; Schoevers, R.A.; Beekman, A.; Jonker, C.; Deeg, D.J.H.; Schmand, B.A.; Ader, H.J.; Bouter, L.M.; van Tilburg, W.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Depression may be associated with cognitive decline in elderly people with impaired cognition. Aims: To investigate whether depressed elderly people with normal cognition are at increased risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. Methods: Two independent samples of older people

  5. Depression and risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. Results of two prospective community-based studies in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, M I; Schoevers, R A; Beekman, A T; Jonker, C; Deeg, D J; Schmand, B; Adèr, H J; Bouter, L M; Van Tilburg, W

    BACKGROUND: Depression may be associated with cognitive decline in elderly people with impaired cognition. AIMS: To investigate whether depressed elderly people with normal cognition are at increased risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. METHODS: Two independent samples of older people

  6. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) as a marker of cognitive decline in normal ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frater, Julanne; Lie, David; Bartlett, Perry

    2017-01-01

    contribute to age-related cognitive decline. Experimental studies have shown manipulation of the GH/GF-1 axis can slow rates of cognitive decline in animals, making IGF-1 a potential biomarker of cognition, and/or its signaling pathway a possible therapeutic target to prevent or slow age-related cognitive...

  7. Preventing cognitive decline, sedentariness and malnutrition: the DOREMI approach

    OpenAIRE

    Parodi, Oberdan; Vozzi, Federico; Ferro, Erina; Fortunati, Luigi; Micheli, Alessio; Bacciu, Davide; Gallicchio, Claudio; Chessa, Stefano; Ascolese, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    All countries in Europe are experiencing an ageing of their populations, with a decrease in the number of people of working age per retiree. Health trends among the elderly are mixed: severe disability is declining in some countries but increasing in others, while mild disability and chronic disease are generally increasing. As a consequence, long-term care costs are certain to increase with the ageing of the population, unless appropriate measures are implemented and elderly people empowered...

  8. Physical activity in relation to cognitive decline in elderly men: the FINE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, van B.M.; Tijhuis, M.A.R.; Kromhout, D.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity may be associated with better cognition. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether change in duration and intensity of physical activity is associated with 10-year cognitive decline in elderly men. METHODS: Data of 295 healthy survivors, born between 1900 and 1920, from the

  9. Adverse childhood and recent negative life events: contrasting associations with cognitive decline in older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korten, N.C.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Pot, A.M.; Deeg, D.; Comijs, H.C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether persons who experienced adverse childhood events or recent negative life events have a worse cognitive performance and faster cognitive decline and the role of depression and apolipoprotein E-e4 in this relationship. Methods: The community-based sample consisted of

  10. Whole-brain atrophy rate and cognitive decline: longitudinal MR study of memory clinic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluimer, J.D.; van der Flier, W.M.; Karas, G.B.; Fox, N.C.; Scheltens, P.; Barkhof, F.; Vrenken, H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively determine whole-brain atrophy rate in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD) and its association with cognitive decline, and investigate the risk of progression to dementia in initially non-demented patients given baseline brain volume and whole-brain

  11. Determinants of cognitive decline in older European men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, van B.M.

    2007-01-01

    In our ageing population, the number of persons with cognitive impairment, dementia and Alzheimer's disease still increase and cause many problems for the elderly themselves, their relatives and caregivers and for health care. Therefore, the need for preventive action is high. In this thesis we

  12. Subjective memory complaints in elders: depression, anxiety, or cognitive decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balash, Y; Mordechovich, M; Shabtai, H; Giladi, N; Gurevich, T; Korczyn, A D

    2013-05-01

    To study the association of subjective memory complaints (SMC) with affective state and cognitive performance in elders. We studied community dwelling elderly persons with normal physical examination. Participants completed questionnaires regarding memory difficulties and lifestyle habits, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Depending on their answers to the question about their memory condition, participants were divided into complainers and non-complainers and to five groups according to their MMSE scores. These data have been compared to objective cognitive performance according to Mindstreams - a computerized neuropsychological battery. A logistic regression was performed to evaluate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for those factors, which were associated with SMС (dependent variable). Of 636 consecutive subjects (61% females), 507 participants (79.7%) had SMС. Presence of SMC was inversely correlated with MMSE scores, (r = -0.108; P for trend = 0.007). GDS and STAI scores were higher among subjects with SMC (OR = 1.23: CI 95%: 1.1-1.36 and OR = 1.03: CI 95%: 1.01-1.07, respectively). SMC did not correlate with objective cognitive performance measured by Mindstreams. Subjective memory complaints are associated with sub-syndromal depression and anxiety in healthy cognitively normal elders. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. IANA task force on nutrition and cognitive decline with aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillette-Guyonnet, S.; Abellan van Kan, G.; Andrieu, S.; Barberger-Gateau, P.; Berr, C.; Bonnefoy, M.; Dartigues, J.F.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Ferry, M.; Galan, P.; Hercberg, S.; Jeandel, C.; Morris, M.C.; Nourhashemi, F.; Payette, H.; Poulain, J.P.; Portet, F.; Roussel, A.M.; Ritz, P.; Rolland, Y.; Vellas, B.

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive impairment can be influenced by a number of factors. The potential effect of nutrition has become a topic of increasing scientific and public interest. In particular, there are arguments that nutrients (food and/or supplements) such as vitamins, trace minerals, lipids, can affect the risk

  14. Folic Acid Supplements: Can They Slow Cognitive Decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or in people with Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia. Blood levels of folate are classified as either low or normal in the general population. Low folate blood levels are associated with poor cognitive performance, which could be improved by folic acid supplements. ...

  15. [Association between depression and cognitive decline in sclerosis multiplex patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, Katalin; Kárpáti, Judit; Szombathelyi, Éva; Simó, Magdolna

    2015-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common neuroimmunological disease. In addition to its somatic symptoms, fatigue, mood disorder (depression) and cognitive impairment can be detected. Cognitive impairment significantly affects social relationships, work capacity, quality of life independently of disability. The aim of our research is to analyse the complex relationship between depression, manifestation of which occurs more often in MS compared to normal population, and cognitive functioning in multiple sclerosis. Forty participants (sixteen men, twenty-four women) are MS patients of the Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University. Control group included forty-two age-, gender-, and education-matched subjects (sixteen men, twenty-six women). Patients were screened using MMSE; and verbal learning, visual information processing, attention, short-term and long-term memory were tested. Depression was also assessed. In multiple sclerosis learning, long-term verbal memory and short-term visuospatial memory were impaired compared to control group. Working memory, information processing and attention were found to be intact. Depression scores of MS patients were significantly higher than those of the normal population. Regarding the relationship between depression and cognitive impairment, negative correlation was found between mood and short-term visuospatial memory. Results of our research reflect the findings of clinical studies whereas short-term and long-term memory excluding working memory can be impaired in multiple sclerosis. Because of incidence of depression and fatigue and the important role of psychological factors in quality of life, more detailed analysis of the relationship between mood, fatigue and cognitive impairment would be required which is planned in the future.

  16. Ginkgo Biloba Extract and Long-Term Cognitive Decline: A 20-Year Follow-Up Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amieva, Hélène; Meillon, Céline; Helmer, Catherine; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Dartigues, Jean François

    2013-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have looked at the potential benefits of various nootropic drugs such as Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb761®; Tanakan®) and piracetam (Nootropyl®) on age-related cognitive decline often leading to inconclusive results due to small sample sizes or insufficient follow-up duration. The present study assesses the association between intake of EGb761® and cognitive function of elderly adults over a 20-year period. Methods and Findings The data were gathered from the prospective community-based cohort study ‘Paquid’. Within the study sample of 3612 non-demented participants aged 65 and over at baseline, three groups were compared: 589 subjects reporting use of EGb761® at at least one of the ten assessment visits, 149 subjects reporting use of piracetam at one of the assessment visits and 2874 subjects not reporting use of either EGb761® or piracetam. Decline on MMSE, verbal fluency and visual memory over the 20-year follow-up was analysed with a multivariate mixed linear effects model. A significant difference in MMSE decline over the 20-year follow-up was observed in the EGb761® and piracetam treatment groups compared to the ‘neither treatment’ group. These effects were in opposite directions: the EGb761® group declined less rapidly than the ‘neither treatment’ group, whereas the piracetam group declined more rapidly (β = −0.6). Regarding verbal fluency and visual memory, no difference was observed between the EGb761® group and the ‘neither treatment’ group (respectively, β = 0.21 and β = −0.03), whereas the piracetam group declined more rapidly (respectively, β = −1.40 and β = −0.44). When comparing the EGb761® and piracetam groups directly, a different decline was observed for the three tests (respectively β = −1.07, β = −1.61 and β = −0.41). Conclusion Cognitive decline in a non-demented elderly population was lower in subjects who reported using EGb761® than in

  17. Ginkgo biloba extract and long-term cognitive decline: a 20-year follow-up population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Amieva

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have looked at the potential benefits of various nootropic drugs such as Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb761®; Tanakan® and piracetam (Nootropyl® on age-related cognitive decline often leading to inconclusive results due to small sample sizes or insufficient follow-up duration. The present study assesses the association between intake of EGb761® and cognitive function of elderly adults over a 20-year period.The data were gathered from the prospective community-based cohort study 'Paquid'. Within the study sample of 3612 non-demented participants aged 65 and over at baseline, three groups were compared: 589 subjects reporting use of EGb761® at at least one of the ten assessment visits, 149 subjects reporting use of piracetam at one of the assessment visits and 2874 subjects not reporting use of either EGb761® or piracetam. Decline on MMSE, verbal fluency and visual memory over the 20-year follow-up was analysed with a multivariate mixed linear effects model. A significant difference in MMSE decline over the 20-year follow-up was observed in the EGb761® and piracetam treatment groups compared to the 'neither treatment' group. These effects were in opposite directions: the EGb761® group declined less rapidly than the 'neither treatment' group, whereas the piracetam group declined more rapidly (β = -0.6. Regarding verbal fluency and visual memory, no difference was observed between the EGb761® group and the 'neither treatment' group (respectively, β = 0.21 and β = -0.03, whereas the piracetam group declined more rapidly (respectively, β = -1.40 and β = -0.44. When comparing the EGb761® and piracetam groups directly, a different decline was observed for the three tests (respectively β = -1.07, β = -1.61 and β = -0.41.Cognitive decline in a non-demented elderly population was lower in subjects who reported using EGb761® than in those who did not. This effect may be a specific medication

  18. Clinical workout for the early detection of cognitive decline and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolaki, M

    2014-11-01

    Aging is the major risk factor for the development of human neurodegenerative maladies such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases (PDs) and prion disorders, all of which stem from toxic protein aggregation. All of these diseases are correlated with cognitive decline. Cognitive Decline is a dynamic state from normal cognition of aging to dementia. According to the original criteria for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) (1984), a clinical diagnosis was possible only when someone was already demented. The prevalence rates of Cognitive Decline (mild cognitive impairment plus dementia) are very high now and will be higher in future because of the increasing survival time of people. Many neurological and psychiatric diseases are correlated with cognitive decline. Diagnosis of cognitive decline is mostly clinical (clinical criteria), but there are multiple biomarkers that could help us mostly in research programs such as short or long, paper and pencil or computerized neuropsychological batteries for cognition, activities of daily living and behavior, electroencephalograph, event-related potentials, and imaging-structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional (fMRI, Pittsburgh bound positron emission tomography, FDG-PET, single photon emission computerized tomography and imaging of tau pathology)-cerebrospinal fluid proteins (Abeta, tau and phospho-tau in AD and α-synuclein (αSyn) for PD). Blood biomarkers need more studies to confirm their usefulness. Genetic markers are also studied but until now are not used in clinical praxis. Finally, in everyday clinical praxis and in research workout for early detection of cognitive decline, the combination of biomarkers is useful.

  19. CNS Medications as Predictors of Precipitous Cognitive Decline in the Cognitively Disabled Aged: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Puustinen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Psychotropics and antiepileptics (AE are medications commonly used among the aged with cognitive decline or dementia, although they may precipitate further cognitive decline. Our aim was to analyze the relationships between the use of (i psychotropics (i.e. benzodiazepines or related drugs, BZD, antipsychotics, AP, or antidepressants, AD, opioids (Op, anticholinergics (ACh or AEs or the concomitant use of two of these drugs, and (ii the risk of precipitous cognitive decline in an older (≧65 years cognitively disabled population. Methods: A longitudinal population-based study of general aged community-dwelling patients was executed in two phases (1990–1991 and 1998–1999 in Lieto, Finland. Fifty-two individuals cognitively disabled (MMSE score 0–23 at the 1990–1991 baseline form this study’s sample. Cognitive abilities were assessed in each phase with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and medication utilization data were collected in both phases. The mean follow-up time was 7.6 years. Multivariate models were used to analyze the change in MMSE total score between medication users and non-users. Results: BZD or any psychotropic use was associated with greater cognitive decline in elders aged ≧75 years compared to non-users (change in MMSE sum score: –8.6 ± 7.0 vs. –3.3 ± 5.6 and –5.9 ± 7.0 vs. –2.7 ± 6.4, respectively. A greater decline was also associated specifically with the concomitant use of BZD and AP (–16 vs. –1.4 ± 7.8; as were BZD and any drug with CNS effects (–9.6 ± 9.9 vs. –1.3 ± 7.2 compared to non-users. The concomitant use of BZD and AD (–10.7 ± 4.7 vs. –3.2 ± 5.6 or ACh (–15.0 ± 8.5 vs. –3.3 ± 5.6 or any drug with CNS effects (–13.3 ± 6.5 vs. –3.3 ± 5.6 was associated with cognitive decline in patients ≧75 years compared to non-users of any drug with CNS effects. Conclusion: The use of a BZD or any psychotropic medication may be an independent risk

  20. Association of Long-Term Adherence to the MIND Diet with Cognitive Function and Cognitive Decline in American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendsen, A M; Kang, J H; Feskens, E J M; de Groot, C P G M; Grodstein, F; van de Rest, O

    2018-01-01

    There is increasing attention for dietary patterns as a potential strategy to prevent cognitive decline. We examined the association between adherence to a recently developed Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet with cognitive function and cognitive decline, taking into account the interaction between the apolipoprotein E ε4 genotype and the MIND diet. Population-based prospective cohort study. A total of 16,058 older women aged 70 and over from the Nurses' Health Study. Dietary intake was assessed five times between 1984 and 1998 with a 116-item Food Frequency Questionnaire. The MIND score includes ten brain-healthy foods and five unhealthy foods. Cognition was assessed four times by telephone from 1995 to 2001 (baseline) with the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS) and by calculating composite scores of verbal memory and global cognition. Linear regression modelling and linear mixed modelling were used to examine the associations of adherence to the MIND diet with average cognitive function and cognitive change over six years, respectively. Greater long-term adherence to the MIND diet was associated with a better verbal memory score (multivariable-adjusted mean differences between extreme MIND quintiles=0.04 (95%CI 0.01-0.07), p-trend=0.006), but not with cognitive decline over 6 years in global cognition, verbal memory or TICS. Long-term adherence to the MIND diet was moderately associated with better verbal memory in later life. Future studies should address this association within populations at greater risk of cognitive decline.

  1. ω-3 fatty acids and cognitive decline: modulation by ApoEε4 allele and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samieri, Cécilia; Féart, Catherine; Proust-Lima, Cécile; Peuchant, Evelyne; Dartigues, Jean-François; Amieva, Hélène; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale

    2011-12-01

    Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may slow cognitive decline. The ε4 allele of the ApolipoproteinE (ApoE), the main genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, and depressive symptoms, which are frequently associated with cognitive impairment in older persons, may modify this relationship. We estimated the associations between EPA and DHA plasma levels and subsequent cognitive decline over 7 years, taking into account ApoE-ε4 status and depressive symptoms, in a prospective population-based cohort. Participants (≥ 65 years, n = 1,228 nondemented at baseline) were evaluated at least once over three follow-up visits using four cognitive tests. Plasma EPA was associated with slower decline on Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT) performances in ApoE-ε4 carriers, or in subjects with high depressive symptoms at baseline. Plasma DHA was associated with slower decline on BVRT performances in ApoE-ε4 carriers only. EPA and DHA may contribute to delaying decline in visual working memory in ApoE-ε4 carriers. In older depressed subjects, EPA, but not DHA, may slow cognitive decline. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and 15-Year Cognitive Decline: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsey, Pamela L; Bengtson, Lindsay G S; Punjabi, Naresh M; Shahar, Eyal; Mosley, Thomas H; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Wruck, Lisa M; MacLehose, Richard F; Alonso, Alvaro

    2016-02-01

    Prospective data evaluating abnormal sleep quality and quantity with cognitive decline are limited because most studies used subjective data and/or had short follow-up. We hypothesized that, over 15 y of follow-up, participants with objectively measured obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and other indices of poor sleep quantity and quality would experience greater decline in cognitive functioning than participants with normal sleep patterns. ARIC participants (n = 966; mean age 61 y, 55% women) with in-home polysomnography (1996-1998) and repeated cognitive testing were followed for 15 y. Three cognitive tests (Delayed Word Recall, Word Fluency, and Digit Symbol Substitution) were administered at two time points (1996-1998 and 2011-2013). Ten additional cognitive tests were administered at the 2011-2013 neurocognitive examination. OSA was modeled using established clinical OSA severity categories. Multivariable linear regression was used to explore associations of OSA and other sleep indices with change in cognitive tests between the two assessments. A median of 14.9 y (max: 17.3) passed between the two cognitive assessments. OSA category and additional indices of sleep (other measures of hypoxemia and disordered breathing, sleep fragmentation, sleep duration) were not associated with change in any cognitive test. Analyses of OSA severity categories and 10 cognitive tests administered only in 2011-2013 also showed little evidence of an association. Overall, abnormal sleep quality and quantity at midlife was not related to cognitive decline and later-life cognition. The effect of adverse sleep quality and quantity on cognitive decline among the elderly remains to be determined. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Ascorbic Acid and the Brain: Rationale for the Use against Cognitive Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona E.; Bowman, Gene L.; Polidori, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This review is focused upon the role of ascorbic acid (AA, vitamin C) in the promotion of healthy brain aging. Particular attention is attributed to the biochemistry and neuronal metabolism interface, transport across tissues, animal models that are useful for this area of research, and the human studies that implicate AA in the continuum between normal cognitive aging and age-related cognitive decline up to Alzheimer’s disease. Vascular risk factors and comorbidity relationships with cognitive decline and AA are discussed to facilitate strategies for advancing AA research in the area of brain health and neurodegeneration. PMID:24763117

  4. Effects of Comorbid Depression and Diabetes Mellitus on Cognitive Decline in Older Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Brian; Vickers, Benjamin N; Al Snih, Soham; Raji, Mukaila; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2016-01-01

    To assess the relationship between comorbid depression, diabetes mellitus (DM), and cognitive decline in Mexican Americans aged 65 and older. Retrospective cohort study with longitudinal analysis. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California. Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly. Cognition was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Depression was defined as a score of 16 or greater on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. DM was defined as according to self-reported history or taking insulin or oral hypoglycemic medication. Participants with depression and DM declined an average of 6.5 points on the MMSE; depression only, 4.4 points; DM only, 7.8 points; and neither condition, 4.2 points across the six examination waves. Participants with DM declined an average of 0.18 more points on the MMSE per year (P=.001) than those with neither DM nor depression, and those with comorbid DM and depression declined 0.25 more points per year (P=.002). Depression was associated with significantly greater cognitive decline (β^=-0.11, P=.05) after excluding participants with baseline cognitive impairment (MMSE score≤17). Participants with DM were 1.08 (95% CI=1.03-1.12) times as likely as those with neither DM nor depression, and those with comorbid DM and depression were 1.08 (95% CI=1.01-1.15) times as likely as those with neither DM nor depression to develop severe cognitive impairment per year. DM and comorbid depression and DM are risk factors for cognitive decline in older Mexican Americans. Interventions that reduce the prevalence of depression and DM in Mexican Americans may decrease the number of older adults who experience cognitive decline. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Treatment of cardiovascular risk factors to prevent cognitive decline and dementia: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne A Ligthart

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Suzanne A Ligthart1, Eric P Moll van Charante1, Willem A Van Gool2, Edo Richard21Department of General Practice, 2Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsBackground: Over the last decade, evidence has accumulated that vascular risk factors increase the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD. So far, few randomized controlled trials have focused on lowering the vascular risk profile to prevent or postpone cognitive decline or dementia.Objective: To systematically perform a review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating drug treatment effects for cardiovascular risk factors on the incidence of dementia or cognitive decline.Selection criteria: RCTs studying the effect of treating hypertension, dyslipidemia, ­hyperhomocysteinemia, obesity, or diabetes mellitus (DM on cognitive decline or dementia, with a minimum follow-up of 1 year in elderly populations.Outcome measure: Cognitive decline or incident dementia.Main results: In the identified studies, dementia was never the primary outcome. Statins (2 studies and intensified control of type II DM (1 study appear to have no effect on prevention of cognitive decline. Studies on treatment of obesity are lacking, and the results of lowering homocysteine (6 studies are inconclusive. There is some evidence of a preventive effect of antihypertensive medication (6 studies, but results are inconsistent.Conclusion: The evidence of a preventive treatment effect aimed at vascular risk factors on cognitive decline and dementia in later life is scarce and mostly based on secondary outcome parameters. Several important sources of bias such as differential dropout may importantly affect interpretation of trial results.Keywords: cardiovascular risk factors, cognitive decline, dementia, prevention

  6. The rapid decline of the prompt emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, Alvaro

    2008-01-01

    Many gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have been observed with the Burst-Alert and X-Ray telescopes of the SWIFT satellite. The successive `pulses' of these GRBs end with a fast decline and a fast spectral softening, until they are overtaken by another pulse, or the last pulse's decline is overtaken by a less rapidly-varying `afterglow'. The fast decline-phase has been attributed, in the standard fireball model of GRBs, to `high-latitude' synchrotron emission from a collision of two conical shells. This interpretation does not agree with the observed spectral softening. The temporal behaviour and the spectral evolution during the fast-decline phase agree with the predictions of the cannonball model of GRBs.

  7. Cognitive Function and Health Literacy Decline in a Cohort of Aging English Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Lindsay C; Wardle, Jane; Wolf, Michael S; von Wagner, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Low health literacy is common among aging patients and is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality. We aimed to describe health literacy decline during aging and to investigate the roles of cognitive function and decline in determining health literacy decline. Data were from 5,256 non-cognitively impaired adults aged ≥ 52 years in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Health literacy was assessed using a four-item reading comprehension assessment of a fictitious medicine label, and cognitive function was assessed in a battery administered in-person at baseline (2004-2005) and at follow-up (2010-2011). Overall, 19.6% (1,032/5,256) of participants declined in health literacy score over the follow-up. Among adults aged ≥ 80 years at baseline, this proportion was 38.2% (102/267), compared to 14.8% (78/526) among adults aged 52-54 years (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 2.26-4.57). Other sociodemographic predictors of health literacy decline were: male sex (OR = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.04-1.38), non-white ethnicity (OR = 2.42; 95% CI: 1.51-3.89), low educational attainment (OR = 1.58; 95% CI: 1.29-1.95 for no qualifications vs. degree education), and low occupational class (OR = 1.67; 95% CI: 1.39-2.01 for routine vs. managerial occupations). Higher baseline cognitive function scores protected against health literacy decline, while cognitive decline (yes vs. no) predicted decline in health literacy score (OR = 1.59; 95% CI: 1.35-1.87 for memory decline and OR = 1.56; 95% CI: 1.32-1.85 for executive function decline). Health literacy decline appeared to increase with age, and was associated with even subtle cognitive decline in older non-impaired adults. Striking social inequalities were evident, whereby men and those from minority and deprived backgrounds were particularly vulnerable to literacy decline. Health practitioners must be able to recognize limited health literacy to ensure that clinical demands match the literacy skills of diverse patients.

  8. The Cognitive Change Index as a Measure of Self and Informant Perception of Cognitive Decline: Relation to Neuropsychological Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanabannakit, Chatchawan; Risacher, Shannon L; Gao, Sujuan; Lane, Kathleen A; Brown, Steven A; McDonald, Brenna C; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Apostolova, Liana G; Saykin, Andrew J; Farlow, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    The perception of cognitive decline by individuals and those who know them well ("informants") has been inconsistently associated with objective cognitive performance, but strongly associated with depressive symptoms. We investigated associations of self-report, informant-report, and discrepancy between self- and informant-report of cognitive decline obtained from the Cognitive Change Index (CCI) with cognitive test performance and self-reported depressive symptoms. 267 participants with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or mild dementia were included from a cohort study and memory clinic. Association of test performance and self-rated depression (Geriatric Depression Scale, GDS) with CCI scores obtained from subjects (CCI-S), their informants (CCI-I), and discrepancy scores between subjects and informants (CCI-D; CCI-S minus CCI-I) were analyzed using correlation and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) models. CCI-S and CCI-I scores showed high internal consistency (Cronbach alpha 0.96 and 0.98, respectively). Higher scores on CCI-S and CCI-I, and lower scores on the CCI-D, were associated with lower performance on various cognitive tests in both univariate and in ANCOVA models adjusted for age, gender, and education. Adjustment for GDS slightly weakened the relationships between CCI and test performance but most remained significant. Self- and informant-report of cognitive decline, as measured by the CCI, show moderately strong relationships with objective test performance independent of age, gender, education, and depressive symptoms. The CCI appears to be a valid cross-sectional measure of self and informant perception of cognitive decline across the continuum of functioning. Studies are needed to address the relationship of CCI scores to longitudinal outcome.

  9. Recent advances in the understanding of cognitive decline among the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar Gangolli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-associated cognitive decline or normal (nonpathological, normative, usual cognitive aging has been found to be an inevitable part of increased age in humans and differs in extent among individuals. The determinants of the differences in age-related cognitive decline are not fully understood. Progress in the field is taking place across many areas of biomedical and psychosocial sciences. [1] The phenotype of normal cognitive aging is well-described. Some mental capabilities are well-maintained into old age. From early adulthood, there are declines in mental domains such as processing speed, reasoning, memory, and executive functions, some of which are underpinned by a decline in a general cognitive factor. There are contributions to understanding individual differences in normal cognitive aging from genetics, general health, and medical disorders such as atherosclerotic disease, biological processes such as inflammation, neurobiological changes, diet, and lifestyle. Many of the effect sizes are small; some are poorly replicated and in some cases, there is a possibility of reverse causation, with prior cognitive ability causing the supposed "cause" of cognitive ability in old age. [1] Genome-wide scans are a likely source to establish genetic contributions. The role of vascular factors in cognitive aging is increasingly studied and understood. The same applies to diet, biomarkers such as inflammation, and lifestyle factors such as exercise. There are marked advances in brain imaging, with better in vivo studies of brain correlates of cognitive changes. There is growing appreciation that factors affecting general bodily aging also influence cognitive functions in old age. [1

  10. Cognitive Decline in a Colombian Kindred With Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Acevedo, Daniel C.; Lopera, Francisco; Henao, Eliana; Tirado, Victoria; Muñoz, Claudia; Giraldo, Margarita; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I.; Reiman, Eric M.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Langbaum, Jessica B.; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Jaimes, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Data from an autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) kindred were used to track the longitudinal trajectory of cognitive decline associated with preclinical ADAD and explore factors that may modify the rate of cognitive decline. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the onset and rate of cognitive decline during preclinical ADAD and the effect of socioeconomic, vascular, and genetic factors on the cognitive decline. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We performed a retrospective cohort study from January 1, 1995, through June 31, 2012, of individuals from Antioquia, Colombia, who tested positive for the ADAD-associated PSEN1 E280A mutation. Data analysis was performed from August 20, 2014, through November 30, 2015. A mixed-effects model was used to estimate annual rates of change in cognitive test scores and to mark the onset of cognitive decline. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Memory, language, praxis, and total scores from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer Disease test battery. Chronologic age was used as a time scale in the models. We explore the effects of sex; educational level; socioeconomic status; residence area; occupation type; marital status; history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia; tobacco and alcohol use; and APOE ε4 on the rates of cognitive decline. RESULTS A total of 493 carriers met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. A total of 256 carriers had 2 or more assessments. At the time of the initial assessment, participants had a mean (SD) age of 33.4 (11.7) years and a mean (SD) educational level of 7.2 (4.2) years. They were predominantly female (270 [54.8%]), married (293 [59.4%]), and of low socioeconomic status (322 [65.3%]). Word list recall scores provided the earliest indicator of preclinical cognitive decline at 32 years of age, 12 and 17 years before the kindred’s respective median ages at mild cognitive impairment and dementia onset. After the change point, carriers had a statistically significant

  11. Declining Cognition and Falls: Role of Risky Performance of Everyday Mobility Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Carey E.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Janczewski, Jodi; Shea, Terry; Mahoney, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Declining cognition is a risk factor for falls among older adults. The extent to which impaired judgment in performance of daily activities increases fall risk is unclear. Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether engagement in mobility activities in a risky manner explains the association between declining cognition and rate of falls. Design This study was a secondary analysis of baseline and prospective data from older adults enrolled in the intervention arm of a randomized clinical trial. Methods Two hundred forty-five community-dwelling older adults (79% female; mean age=79 years, SD=8.0) who were at risk for falls received physical, cognitive, and functional evaluations. Cognition was assessed with the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ). Using interview and in-home assessment data, physical therapists determined whether participants were at risk for falls when performing mobility-related activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL). Falls were measured prospectively for 1 year using monthly falls diaries. Results Declining cognition was associated with increased number of mobility activities designated as risky (1.5% of mobility activities performed in a risky manner per SPMSQ point) and with increased rate of falls (rate ratio=1.16 for each unit change in SPMSQ score). Risky performance of mobility activities mediated the relationship between cognition and rate of falls. Limitations Risk assessment was based on the clinical judgment of experienced physical therapists. Cognition was measured with a relatively insensitive instrument, and only selected mobility activities were evaluated. Conclusions Engagement in mobility ADL and IADL tasks in a risky manner emerged as a link between declining cognition and increased number of falls, suggesting a mechanism through which the rate of falls may increase. Specifically, declining cognition is associated with performance of mobility activities in an unsafe

  12. Caffeine and cognitive decline in elderly women at high vascular risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercambre, Marie-Noël; Berr, Claudine; Ritchie, Karen; Kang, Jae H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Persons with vascular disorders are at higher risk of cognitive decline. Objective To determine whether caffeine may be associated with cognitive decline reduction in elderly at high vascular risk. Methods We included 2475 women aged 65+ years in the Women’s Antioxidant Cardiovascular Study, a randomized trial of antioxidants and B vitamins for cardiovascular disease secondary prevention. We ascertained regular caffeine intake at baseline (1995–1996) using a validated 116 item-food frequency questionnaire. From 1998–2000 to 2005–2006, we administered four telephone cognitive assessments at two-year intervals evaluating global cognition, verbal memory and category fluency. The primary outcome was the change in global cognitive score, which was the average of the z-scores of all tests. We used generalized linear models for repeated measures that were adjusted for various sociodemographic, health and lifestyle factors to evaluate the difference in cognitive decline rates across quintiles of caffeine intake. Results We observed significantly slower rates of cognitive decline with increasing caffeine intake (p-trend=0.02). The rate difference between the highest and lowest quintiles of usual caffeine intake (> 371 versus caffeinated coffee was significantly related to slower cognitive decline (p-trend=0.05), but not other caffeinated products (e.g., decaf, tea, cola, chocolate). We conducted interaction analyses and observed stronger associations in women assigned to vitamin B supplementation (p-interaction = 0.02). Conclusions Caffeine intake was related to moderately better cognitive maintenance over 5 years in older women with vascular disorders. PMID:23422357

  13. Differing effects of education on cognitive decline in diverse elders with low versus high educational attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B; Stern, Yaakov; Manly, Jennifer J

    2015-07-01

    In light of growing debate over whether and how early life educational experiences alter late-life cognitive trajectories, this study sought to more thoroughly investigate the relationship between educational attainment and rates of late-life cognitive decline in a racially, ethnically, and educationally diverse population. Older adults (N = 3,435) in the community-based Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project were administered neuropsychological tests of memory, language, visuospatial function, and processing speed at approximate 24-month intervals for up to 18 years. Second-order latent growth curves estimated direct and indirect (through income) effects of educational attainment on rates of global cognitive decline separately in individuals with low (0-8 years) and high (9-20 years) educational attainment. More years of education were associated with higher cognitive level and slower cognitive decline in individuals with low or high educational attainment. The association between having more than 9 years of education and exhibiting slower cognitive decline was fully mediated by income. Although having additional years of education up to 8 years was also associated with higher income, this did not explain associations between education and cognitive change in the low-education group. Early education (i.e., up to 8 years) may promote aspects of development during a sensitive period of childhood that protect against late-life cognitive decline independent of income. In contrast, later education (i.e., 9 years and beyond) is associated with higher income, which may influence late-life cognitive health through multiple, nonmutually exclusive pathways. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Physical Exercise-Induced Adult Neurogenesis: A Good Strategy to Prevent Cognitive Decline in Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-yu Yau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative evidence has indicated that there is an important role for adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cognitive function. With the increasing prevalence of cognitive decline associated with neurodegenerative diseases among the ageing population, physical exercise, a potent enhancer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, has emerged as a potential preventative strategy/treatment to reduce cognitive decline. Here we review the functional role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in learning and memory, and how this form of structural plasticity is altered in neurodegenerative diseases known to involve cognitive impairment. We further discuss how physical exercise may contribute to cognitive improvement in the ageing brain by preserving adult neurogenesis, and review the recent approaches for measuring changes in neurogenesis in the live human brain.

  15. Physical Exercise-Induced Adult Neurogenesis: A Good Strategy to Prevent Cognitive Decline in Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Suk-yu; Christie, Brian R.; So, Kwok-fai

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative evidence has indicated that there is an important role for adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cognitive function. With the increasing prevalence of cognitive decline associated with neurodegenerative diseases among the ageing population, physical exercise, a potent enhancer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, has emerged as a potential preventative strategy/treatment to reduce cognitive decline. Here we review the functional role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in learning and memory, and how this form of structural plasticity is altered in neurodegenerative diseases known to involve cognitive impairment. We further discuss how physical exercise may contribute to cognitive improvement in the ageing brain by preserving adult neurogenesis, and review the recent approaches for measuring changes in neurogenesis in the live human brain. PMID:24818140

  16. Sub-Clinical Cognitive Decline and Resting Cerebral Blood Flow in Middle Aged Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto Mølby; Hansen, Naja Liv; Osler, Merete

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although dementia is associated with both global and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes, little is known about cerebral perfusion in the early pre-clinical stages of cognitive decline preceding overt cognitive dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the association...... expected from testing at age 20. Participants underwent supplementary cognitive testing, blood sampling and MRI including measurements of regional and global CBF. RESULTS: Regional CBF was lower in group B than in group A in the posterior cingulate gyrus and the precuneus. The associations were attenuated...... of early sub-clinical cognitive decline with CBF. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study participants were recruited from a cohort of Danish men born in 1953. Based on a regression model we selected men who performed better (Group A, n = 94) and poorer (Group B, n = 95) on cognitive testing at age 57 than...

  17. Predictors of Cognitive Decline in Older Adult Type 2 Diabetes from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimering, Mark B; Knight, Jeffrey; Ge, Ling; Bahn, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive decline disproportionately affects older adult type 2 diabetes. We tested whether randomized intensive (INT) glucose-lowering reduces the rate(s) of cognitive decline in adults with advanced type 2 diabetes (mean: age, 60 years; diabetes duration, 11 years) from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial. A battery of neuropsychological tests [digit span, digit symbol substitution (DSym), and Trails-making Test-Part B (TMT-B)] was administered at baseline in ~1700 participants and repeated at year 5. Thirty-seven risk factors were evaluated as predictors of cognitive decline in multivariable regression analyses. The mean age-adjusted DSym or TMT-B declined significantly in all study participants (P < 0.001). Randomized INT glucose-lowering did not significantly alter the rate of cognitive decline. The final model of risk factors associated with 5-year decline in age-adjusted TMT-B included as significant predictors: longer baseline diabetes duration (beta = -0.028; P = 0.0057), lower baseline diastolic blood pressure (BP; beta = 0.028; P = 0.002), and baseline calcium channel blocker medication use (beta = -0.639; P < 0.001). Higher baseline pulse pressure was significantly associated with decline in age-adjusted TMT-B suggesting a role for both higher systolic and lower diastolic BPs. Baseline thiazide diuretic use (beta = -0.549; P = 0.015) was an additional significant predictor of 5-year decline in age-adjusted digit symbol score. Post-baseline systolic BP-lowering was significantly associated (P < 0.001) with decline in TMT-B performance. There was a significant inverse association between post-baseline plasma triglyceride-lowering (P = 0.045) and decline in digit symbol substitution task performance. A 5-year period of randomized INT glucose-lowering did not significantly reduce the rate of cognitive decline in older-aged adults with type 2 diabetes. Systolic and diastolic BPs as well as plasma triglycerides

  18. Predictors of cognitive decline in older adult type 2 diabetes from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Zimering

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Cognitive decline disproportionately affects older adult type 2 diabetes. We tested whether randomized intensive glucose-lowering reduces the rate(s of cognitive decline in adults with advanced type 2 diabetes (mean: age, 60 years; diabetes duration, 11 years from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial. Methods: A battery of neuropsychological tests (digit span, digit symbol substitution (DSym, and Trails-making Part B (TMT-B was administered at baseline in ~1700 participants and repeated at year 5. Thirty-six risk factors were evaluated as predictors of cognitive decline in multivariable regression analyses.Results: The mean age-adjusted, DSym or TMT-B declined significantly in all study participants (P < 0.001. Randomized intensive glucose-lowering did not significantly alter the rate of cognitive decline. The final model of risk factors associated with 5-year decline in age-adjusted TMT-B included as significant predictors: longer baseline diabetes duration (beta = -0.028; P = 0.0057, lower baseline diastolic blood pressure (beta = 0.028; P < 0.001, and baseline calcium channel blocker medication use (beta = -0.639; P < 0.001. Higher baseline pulse pressure was significantly associated with decline in age-adjusted TMT-B suggesting a role for both higher systolic and lower diastolic blood pressure. Baseline thiazide diuretic use (beta= -0.549; P =0.015 was an additional significant predictor of 5-year decline in age-adjusted digit symbol score. Post-baseline systolic blood pressure-lowering was significantly associated (P < 0.001 with decline in TMT-B performance. There was a significant inverse association between post-baseline plasma triglyceride- lowering (P = 0.045 and decline in digit symbol substitution task performance.Conclusions: A five-year period of randomized intensive glucose-lowering did not significantly reduce the rate of cognitive decline in older-aged adults with type 2 diabetes. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure as

  19. Is left-handedness associated with a more pronounced age-related cognitive decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Elst, Wim; Van Boxtel, Martin P J; Van Breukelen, Gerard J P; Jolles, Jelle

    2008-05-01

    The effect of handedness on cognitive functioning has been the subject of much controversy. The influential "pathological left-handedness theory" posited by Coren and Halpern (1991) claims that left-handedness is probabilistically related to deviations from the neurological and cognitive norm. Many studies have failed to find negative effects of left-handedness on cognitive functioning, but most of these studies related handedness to cognition at one moment in time. Such studies do not exclude the possibility that sinistrality may be related to a more pronounced age-related longitudinal decline in cognitive functions. This hypothesis was tested in the present study. In a longitudinal study involving a large population sample of cognitively intact people aged at least 50 years at baseline, we evaluated the effect of handedness on age-related decline in four major cognitive domains: speed of information processing, verbal learning, long-term verbal memory, and executive functioning. The results failed to provide support for the hypothesis that sinistrality is associated with a more pronounced age-related cognitive decline. Recommendations for future studies are provided.

  20. Surgery results in exaggerated and persistent cognitive decline in a rat model of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaomei; Degos, Vincent; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Zhu, Yinggang; Vacas, Susana; Terrando, Niccolò; Nelson, Jeffrey; Su, Xiao; Maze, Mervyn

    2013-05-01

    Postoperative cognitive decline can be reproduced in animal models. In a well-validated rat model of the Metabolic Syndrome, we sought to investigate whether surgery induced a more severe and persistent form of cognitive decline similar to that noted in preliminary clinical studies. In rats that had been selectively bred for low and high exercise endurance, the low capacity runners (LCR) exhibited features of Metabolic Syndrome (obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension). Tibial fracture surgery was performed under isoflurane anesthesia in LCR and high capacity runner (HCR) rats and cognitive function was assessed postoperatively in a trace-fear conditioning paradigm and Morris Water Maze; non-operated rats were exposed to anesthesia and analgesia (sham). Group sizes were n = 6. On postoperative D7, LCR rats had shorter freezing times than postoperative HCR rats. Five months postoperatively, LCR rats had a flatter learning trajectory and took longer to locate the submerged platform than postoperative HCR rats; dwell-time in the target quadrant in a probe trial was shorter in the postoperative LCR compared to HCR rats. LCR and HCR sham rats did not differ in any test. Postoperatively, LCR rats diverged from HCR rats exhibiting a greater decline in memory, acutely, with persistent learning and memory decline, remotely; this could not be attributed to changes in locomotor or swimming performance. This Metabolic Syndrome animal model of surgery-induced cognitive decline corroborates, with high fidelity, preliminary findings of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome patients.

  1. Sleep quality and cognitive decline in a community of older adults in Daqing City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jinya; Han, Huijun; Wang, Yanhong; Wang, Li; Gao, Xiang; Liao, Susu

    2016-01-01

    To examine the association between self-reported sleep quality and cognitive decline one year later. A longitudinal study of 1010 cognitively intact adults, aged 65-80 years at baseline, from two urban communities in China was performed. Sleep quality at baseline was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Cognitive function was determined by using the Chinese version of Mini-Mental State Examination (CMMSE) at the baseline and one year later. Substantial CMMSE decline was defined as the CMMSE score decreases by three or more points during the follow-up. Potential confounders, such as age, sex, education, baseline CMMSE score, depression, physical activity level, drinking status, smoking status, body mass index, snoring frequency, history of hypertension, diabetes, and coronary heart disease were measured via questionnaires or physical examination. After adjusting for potential confounders, individuals with poor sleep quality (PSQI > 7), relative to whose with good sleep quality, had 0.32 (95% CI: -0.62, -0.02; p = 0.04) CMMSE-points more decline and tended to have a higher likelihood of developing substantial CMMSE decline (OR = 1.46; 95% CI: 0.97, 2.18; p = 0.06). Among seven subscales of the PSQI, poor sleep efficiency was associated with greater CMMSE decline (beta = -0.16, 95% CI: -0.29, -0.03; p = 0.01) and higher risk of substantial CMMSE decline (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.46; p = 0.01). Short sleep duration (sleeping ≤5 h/night) was also significantly associated with more CMMSE decline and a higher likelihood of developing substantial CMMSE decline (p sleep quality may be an indicator of early cognitive decline for elderly people and should be paid particular attention by clinicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Early life origins cognitive decline: findings in elderly men in the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Raikkonen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine whether the adverse effects of slow prenatal and postnatal growth on cognitive function persist to old age and predict age related cognitive decline. DESIGN AND SETTING: A longitudinal birth cohort study of men born in Helsinki, Finland 1934-44. PARTICIPANTS: Nine-hundred-thirty-one men of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, with detailed data on growth from birth to adulthood, aged 20.1 (SD = 1.4 at the first and 67.9 (SD = 2.5 years at the second cognitive testing. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Finnish Defense Forces Basic Intellectual Ability Test assessed twice over nearly five decades apart. RESULTS: Lower weight, length and head circumference at birth were associated with lower cognitive ability at 67.9 years (1.04-1.55 points lower ability per each standard deviation [SD] unit decrease in body size, 95% Confidence Interval [95%CI]: 0.05 to 2.72 and with cognitive decline after 20.1 years (0.07-0.11 SD decline over time per each SD decrease in body size, 95%CI:0.00 to 0.19. Men who were born larger were more likely to perform better in the cognitive ability test over time (1.22-1.43 increase in odds to remain in the top relative to the lower two thirds in ability over time per each SD increase in body size, 95%CI:1.04 to 1.79 and were more resilient to cognitive decline after 20.1 years (0.69 to 0.76 decrease in odds to decline from than remain in the top third of ability over time per each SD increase in body size, 95%CI:0.49 to 0.99. Slower growth between birth and two years in weight, height and body mass index was associated with lower cognitive ability at 67.9 years, but not with cognitive decline. CONCLUSIONS: Poorer lifetime cognitive ability is predicted by slower growth before and after birth. In predicting resilience to age related cognitive decline, the period before birth seems to be more critical.

  3. Chocolate Consumption is Associated with a Lower Risk of Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Afonso; Diógenes, Maria José; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Lunet, Nuno; Barros, Henrique

    2016-05-06

    Cocoa-related products like chocolate have taken an important place in our food habits and culture. In this work, we aim to examine the relationship between chocolate consumption and cognitive decline in an elderly cognitively healthy population. In the present longitudinal prospective study, a cohort of 531 participants aged 65 and over with normal Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; median 28) was selected. The median follow-up was 48 months. Dietary habits were evaluated at baseline. The MMSE was used to assess global cognitive function at baseline and at follow-up. Cognitive decline was defined by a decrease ≥ 2 points in the MMSE score between evaluations. Relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) estimates were adjusted for age, education, smoking, alcohol drinking, body mass index, hypertension, and diabetes. Chocolate intake was associated with a lower risk of cognitive decline (RR = 0.59, 95% CI 0.38-0.92). This protective effect was observed only among subjects with an average daily consumption of caffeine lower than 75 mg (69% of the participants; RR = 0.50, 95% CI 0.31-0.82). To our knowledge, this is the first prospective cohort study to show an inverse association between regular long-term chocolate consumption and cognitive decline in humans.

  4.  Cortical Atrophy is Associated with Accelerated Cognitive Decline in Mild Cognitive Impairment with Subsyndromal Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Mitzi M; Insel, Philip S; Nelson, Craig; Tosun, Duygu; Mattsson, Niklas; Mueller, Susanne G; Sacuiu, Simona; Bickford, David; Weiner, Michael W; Mackin, R Scott

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the association between cognitive decline and cortical atrophy in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and chronic subsyndromal symptoms of depression (SSD) over a 4-year period. Prospective cohort study. Multicenter, clinic-based. Within the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative repository, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory was used to identify individuals with MCI and stable endorsement (SSD group N = 32) or no endorsement (non-SSD group N = 69) of depressive symptoms across time points. Repeated measures of cognitive outcomes, cortical atrophy, and their associations were evaluated with mixed effects models adjusting for age, education, sex, and APOE genotype. The SSD group demonstrated accelerated decline on measures of global cognition (Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale; df = 421, t = 2.242, p = 0.025), memory (Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised Logical Memory II; df = 244, t = -2.525, p = 0.011), information processing speed (Trail Making Test Parts A [df = 421, t = 2.376, p = 0.018] and B [df = 421, t = 2.533, p = 0.012]), and semantic fluency (Category Fluency; df = 424, t = -2.418, p = 0.016), as well as accelerated frontal lobe (df = 341, t = -2.648, p = 0.008) and anterior cingulate (df = 341, t = -3.786, p decline on measures of attention, learning, and confrontation naming or for rate of atrophy in any other regions. Accelerated frontal lobe and anterior cingulate atrophy was associated with cognitive decline on measures of global cognition, information processing speed, and semantic fluency (all p cognitive decline, an effect that may be governed by frontal lobe and anterior cingulate atrophy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. The LonDownS adult cognitive assessment to study cognitive abilities and decline in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Startin, Carla M; Hamburg, Sarah; Hithersay, Rosalyn; Davies, Amy; Rodger, Erin; Aggarwal, Nidhi; Al-Janabi, Tamara; Strydom, André

    2016-11-15

    Down syndrome (DS), the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, is associated with an ultra-high risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. However, there is individual variability in the onset of clinical dementia and in baseline cognitive abilities prior to decline, particularly in memory, executive functioning, and motor coordination. The LonDownS Consortium aims to determine risk and protective factors for the development of dementia and factors relating to cognitive abilities in people with DS. Here we describe our cognitive test battery and related informant measures along with reporting data from our baseline cognitive and informant assessments. We developed a cognitive test battery to assess general abilities, memory, executive function, and motor coordination abilities in adults with DS, with informant ratings of similar domains also collected, designed to allow for data on a broad range of participants. Participants (n=305) had a range of ages and abilities, and included adults with and without a clinical diagnosis of dementia. Results suggest the battery is suitable for the majority of adults with DS, although approximately half the adults with dementia were unable to undertake any cognitive task. Many test outcomes showed a range of scores with low floor and ceiling effects. Non-verbal age-adjusted IQ scores had lower floor effects than verbal IQ scores. Before the onset of any cognitive decline, females aged 16-35 showed better verbal abilities compared to males. We also identified clusters of cognitive test scores within our battery related to visuospatial memory, motor coordination, language abilities, and processing speed / sustained attention. Our further studies will use baseline and longitudinal assessments to explore factors influencing cognitive abilities and cognitive decline related to ageing and onset of dementia in adults with DS.

  6. Synaptic proteins predict cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereczki, Erika; Francis, Paul T; Howlett, David; Pereira, Joana B; Höglund, Kina; Bogstedt, Anna; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Baek, Jean-Ha; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Attems, Johannes; Ballard, Clive; Aarsland, Dag

    2016-11-01

    Our objective was to compare the levels of three synaptic proteins involved in different steps of the synaptic transmission: Rab3A, SNAP25, and neurogranin, in three common forms of dementia: Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and Parkinson's disease dementia. A total of 129 postmortem human brain samples were analyzed in brain regional specific manner exploring their associations with morphologic changes and cognitive decline. We have observed robust changes reflecting synaptic dysfunction in all studied dementia groups. There were significant associations between the rate of cognitive decline and decreased levels of Rab3 in DLB in the inferior parietal lobe and SNAP25 in AD in the prefrontal cortex. Of particular note, synaptic proteins significantly discriminated between dementia cases and controls with over 90% sensitivity and specificity. Our findings suggest that the proposition that synaptic markers can predict cognitive decline in AD, should be extended to Lewy body diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.

  7. Greater cognitive decline with aging among elders with high serum concentrations of organochlorine pesticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-A Kim

    Full Text Available Although cognitive decline is very common in elders, age-related cognitive decline substantially differs among elders and the determinants of the differences in age-related cognitive decline are unclear. We investigated our hypothesis that the association between age and cognition was stronger in those with higher serum concentrations of organochlorine (OC pesticides, common persistent and strongly lipophilic neurotoxic chemicals. Participants were 644 elders aged 60-85, participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. Six OC pesticides (p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT, p,p'-dichlorodipenyldichloroethylene (DDE, β-hexachlorocyclohexane, trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, and heptachlor epoxide were evaluated. "Lower cognitive function" was defined as having a low Digit-Symbol Substitution Test (DSST score (<25th percentile of DSST score, cutpoint 28 symbols substituted. Higher levels of β-hexachlorocyclohexane, trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, and heptachlor epoxide modified the associations between age and lower cognitive function (Pinteraction<0.01, 0.03, <0.01, and 0.02, respectively. Elders in the 3rd tertile of these chemicals demonstrated a greater risk of lower cognitive function with aging, compared to those in the combined 1st and 2nd tertiles. Among those with highest OC pesticides (3rd tertile, the odds ratio for the risk of lower cognitive function was about 6 to 11 for the highest quintile of age (80-85 years vs. the first quintile of age (60-63 years, while the association between age and lower cognitive function became flatter in those with lower OC pesticides (combined 1st and 2nd tertiles. Both DDT and DDE showed no interaction, with lower DSST scores for higher age irrespective of serum concentrations of DDT or DDE. Even though DSST score measures only one aspect of cognition, several OC pesticides modified aging-related prevalence of low cognitive score, a finding which should be evaluated

  8. Greater cognitive decline with aging among elders with high serum concentrations of organochlorine pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-A; Lee, Yu-Mi; Lee, Ho-Won; Jacobs, David R; Lee, Duk-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Although cognitive decline is very common in elders, age-related cognitive decline substantially differs among elders and the determinants of the differences in age-related cognitive decline are unclear. We investigated our hypothesis that the association between age and cognition was stronger in those with higher serum concentrations of organochlorine (OC) pesticides, common persistent and strongly lipophilic neurotoxic chemicals. Participants were 644 elders aged 60-85, participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. Six OC pesticides (p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), p,p'-dichlorodipenyldichloroethylene (DDE), β-hexachlorocyclohexane, trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, and heptachlor epoxide) were evaluated. "Lower cognitive function" was defined as having a low Digit-Symbol Substitution Test (DSST) score (DDT and DDE showed no interaction, with lower DSST scores for higher age irrespective of serum concentrations of DDT or DDE. Even though DSST score measures only one aspect of cognition, several OC pesticides modified aging-related prevalence of low cognitive score, a finding which should be evaluated in prospective studies.

  9. Association between long-term cognitive decline in Vietnam veterans with TBI and caregiver attachment style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brioschi Guevara, Andrea; Démonet, Jean-François; Polejaeva, Elena; Knutson, Kristine M; Wassermann, Eric M; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether a caregiver's attachment style is associated with patient cognitive trajectory after traumatic brain injury (TBI). National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. Forty Vietnam War veterans with TBI and their caregivers. Cognitive performance, measured by the Armed Forces Qualification Test percentile score, completed at 2 time points: preinjury and 40 years postinjury. On the basis of caregivers' attachment style (secure, fearful, preoccupied, dismissing), participants with TBI were grouped into a high or low group. To examine the association between cognitive trajectory of participants with TBI and caregivers' attachment style, we ran four 2 × 2 analysis of covariance on cognitive performances. After controlling for other factors, cognitive decline was more pronounced in participants with TBI with a high fearful caregiver than among those with a low fearful caregiver. Other attachment styles were not associated with decline. Caregiver fearful attachment style is associated with a significant decline in cognitive status after TBI. We interpret this result in the context of the neural plasticity and cognitive reserve literatures. Finally, we discuss its impact on patient demand for healthcare services and potential interventions.

  10. Influence of Cognitive Functioning on Age-Related Performance Declines in Visuospatial Sequence Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Melanie; Hinder, Mark R.; Puri, Rohan; Summers, Jeffery J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate how age-related performance differences in a visuospatial sequence learning task relate to age-related declines in cognitive functioning. Method: Cognitive functioning of 18 younger and 18 older participants was assessed using a standardized test battery. Participants then undertook a perceptual visuospatial sequence learning task. Various relationships between sequence learning and participants’ cognitive functioning were examined through correlation and factor analysis. Results: Older participants exhibited significantly lower performance than their younger counterparts in the sequence learning task as well as in multiple cognitive functions. Factor analysis revealed two independent subsets of cognitive functions associated with performance in the sequence learning task, related to either the processing and storage of sequence information (first subset) or problem solving (second subset). Age-related declines were only found for the first subset of cognitive functions, which also explained a significant degree of the performance differences in the sequence learning task between age-groups. Discussion: The results suggest that age-related performance differences in perceptual visuospatial sequence learning can be explained by declines in the ability to process and store sequence information in older adults, while a set of cognitive functions related to problem solving mediates performance differences independent of age. PMID:28626442

  11. Linking Cognitive and Visual Perceptual Decline in Healthy Aging: The Information Degradation Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, Zachary A.; Madden, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Several hypotheses attempt to explain the relation between cognitive and perceptual decline in aging (e.g., common-cause, sensory deprivation, cognitive load on perception, information degradation). Unfortunately, the majority of past studies examining this association have used correlational analyses, not allowing for these hypotheses to be tested sufficiently. This correlational issue is especially relevant for the information degradation hypothesis, which states that degraded perceptual signal inputs, resulting from either age-related neurobiological processes (e.g., retinal degeneration) or experimental manipulations (e.g., reduced visual contrast), lead to errors in perceptual processing, which in turn may affect non-perceptual, higher-order cognitive processes. Even though the majority of studies examining the relation between age-related cognitive and perceptual decline have been correlational, we reviewed several studies demonstrating that visual manipulations affect both younger and older adults’ cognitive performance, supporting the information degradation hypothesis and contradicting implications of other hypotheses (e.g., common-cause, sensory deprivation, cognitive load on perception). The reviewed evidence indicates the necessity to further examine the information degradation hypothesis in order to identify mechanisms underlying age-related cognitive decline. PMID:27484869

  12. Relation of DASH- and Mediterranean-like dietary patterns to cognitive decline in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangney, Christy C; Li, Hong; Wang, Yamin; Barnes, Lisa; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; Morris, Martha C

    2014-10-14

    We examined whether accordance to the DASH (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension) and Mediterranean diets is associated with slower cognitive decline in a prospective Chicago cohort study of older persons, the Memory and Aging Project. The sample comprised 826 Memory and Aging Project participants (aged 81.5 ± 7.1 years) who completed a 144-item food frequency questionnaire at baseline and 2 or more cognitive assessments over 4.1 years. Dietary scores were computed for accordance to the DASH diet (0-10) and the Mediterranean diet (MedDietScore) (0-55). For both, higher scores reflect greater accordance. Both patterns share at least 3 common food components. Cognitive function was assessed annually with 19 cognitive tests from which global cognitive scores and summary measures are computed. The mean global cognitive score at baseline was 0.12 (range, -3.23 to 1.60) with an overall mean annual change in score of -0.08 standardized units. Only 13 participants had possible dementia. The mean DASH score was 4.1 (range, 1.0-8.5) and the MedDietScore was 31.3 (range, 18-46). In mixed models adjusted for covariates, a 1-unit difference in DASH score was associated with a slower rate of global cognitive decline by 0.007 standardized units (standard error of estimate = 0.003, p = 0.03). Similarly, a 1-unit-higher MedDietScore was associated with a slower rate of global cognitive decline by 0.002 standardized units (standard error of estimate = 0.001, p = 0.01). These findings support the hypothesis that both the DASH and Mediterranean diet patterns are associated with slower rates of cognitive decline in the same cohort of older persons. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Traditional used Plants against Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunter Peter Eckert

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized clinically by progressive memory deficits, impaired cognitive function, and altered and inappropriate behavior. Aging represents the most important risk factor for AD and the global trend in the phenomenon of population aging has dramatic consequences for public health, healthcare financing and delivery systems in the word and, especially in developing countries. Mounting evidence obtained in in vitro and in vivo studies, suggests that various traditionally used plants in Asia, India and Europe significantly affect key metabolic alterations culminating in AD-typical neurodegeneration. The present article aims to bring the reader up-to-date on the most recent studies and advances describing the direct and indirect activities of traditional used plants and its constituents possibly relieving features of AD. A variety of traditional used plants and its extracts exerted activities on AD related drug targets including AChE activity antioxidative activity, modulation of Aβ-producing secretase activities, Aβ-degradation, heavy metal chelating, induction of neurotrophic factors and cell death mechanisms. Although pre-clinical investigations identified promising drug candidates for AD, clinical evidences are still pending.

  14. Effects of Comorbid Depression and Diabetes on Cognitive Decline Among Older Mexican Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Brian; Vickers, Benjamin N.; Al Snih, Soham; Raji, Mukaila; Markides, Kyriakos S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the relationship between comorbid depression and diabetes and cognitive decline among Mexican Americans age 65 and over. Design Retrospective cohort study with longitudinal analysis. Setting Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California Participants Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (H-EPESE). Measurements Cognition was assessed using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Depression was defined as a score ≥16 on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Diabetes was defined as according to self-reported history or taking insulin or oral hypoglycemic medication. Results Participants with depression and diabetes, depression only, diabetes only, and neither condition declined an average of 6.5, 4.4, 7.8, and 4.2 points on the MMSE, respectively, across the six examination waves. Participants with diabetes or comorbid diabetes and depression declined an average of 0.18 points per year (PDepression was associated with significantly greater cognitive decline (β̂ =−0.11, Pcognitive impairment (MMSE≤17). The odds for developing severe cognitive impairment among participants with diabetes increased by 1.08 times per year (95% CI=1.03 – 1.122) and by 1.08 times per year (95% CI=1.01 – 1.15) for participants with comorbid depression and diabetes compared to participants with neither of these conditions. Conclusion Diabetes and comorbid depression and diabetes are risk factors for cognitive decline among older Mexican Americans. Interventions that reduce the prevalence of depression and diabetes among Mexican Americans may decrease the number of older adults who experience cognitive decline. PMID:26782859

  15. Cognitive decline in patients with dementia as a function of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Michael A; Schnaider-Beeri, Michal; Wysocki, Michael; Guerrero-Berroa, Elizabeth; Grossman, Hillel T; Heinz, Andreas; Haroutunian, Vahram

    2011-04-01

    There is evidence that major depression increases the risk for dementia, but there is conflicting evidence as to whether depression may accelerate cognitive decline in dementia. The authors tested the hypothesis that decline in cognitive function over time is more pronounced in patients with dementia with comorbid depression, when compared with patients with dementia without depression history. Prospective, longitudinal cohort study of aging. Nursing home. Three hundred thirteen elderly nursing home residents (mean age at baseline: 86.99 years, standard deviation = 6.7; 83.1% women). At baseline, 192 residents were diagnosed with dementia, and another 27 developed dementia during follow-up. Thirty residents suffered from major depression at any point during the study, and 48 residents had a history of depression. The authors measured cognitive decline using change in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores over up to 36 months. The authors calculated multilevel regression models to estimate the effects of age, gender, education, dementia status, depression, depression history, and an interaction between dementia and depression, on change in MMSE scores over time. Beyond the effects of age, gender, and education, residents showed steeper cognitive decline in the presence of dementia (β = -13.69, standard error = 1.38) and depression (β = -4.16, SE = 1.2), which was further accelerated by the presence of both depression and dementia (β = -2.72, SE = 0.65). In dementia, the presence of depression corresponds to accelerated cognitive decline beyond gender and level of education, suggesting a unique influence of depression on the rate of cognitive decline in dementia.

  16. Informant-Reported Cognitive Decline and Activity Engagement across Four Years in a Community Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Diane E; Jiang, Da; Sargent-Cox, Kerry A; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2017-01-01

    Subtle age-related cognitive decline may be associated with the capacity to remain engaged in mental, physical, and social activities. Informant reports of cognitive decline potentially provide additional information to psychometric tests on change in everyday cognitive function relevant to activity engagement. To investigate relations between decline in everyday cognitive function as assessed by informant report and activity engagement in community-dwelling older adults. A sample of cognitively normal older adults was drawn from the 2 latest waves of the PATH Through Life Study (n = 1,391; mean age 74.5 ± 1.5, 48.4% female). PATH is a 16-year longitudinal cohort study set in the Canberra/Queanbeyan district, Australia. Assessments were carried out at baseline, and at 3 subsequent time-points 4 years apart. At wave-4, the IQCODE, an informant measure of 4-year cognitive decline was provided by a spouse, family member, or friend of each participant. Activity engagement was assessed by the abbreviated RIASEC Mental Activity List, self-reported frequency and duration of physical activity (Whitehall Questionnaire) and the Lubben Social Network Scale that assessed interaction with family/friends. Participants provided demographic information, self-reported health status (SF-12), and responses to the Goldberg Depression Scale. The Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) and California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) were used to measure objective 4-year cognitive change. Those with MMSE score of ≤27 were excluded. IQCODE score predicted disengagement from mental activities over 4 years in cognitively healthy adults (β = -0.056, standard error [SE] = 0.019, p = 0.004). This association was robust to covariate control and change on the SDMT which was also significantly related to mental activity disengagement. In models adjusted for change scores on the SDMT and the CVLT, the IQCODE was associated with less physical (β = -0.692, SE = 0.24, p = 0.004) and social engagement (

  17. Neuropsychiatric Predictors of Cognitive Decline in Parkinson Disease: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirogovsky-Turk, Eva; Moore, Raeanne C; Filoteo, J Vincent; Litvan, Irene; Song, David D; Lessig, Stephanie L; Schiehser, Dawn M

    2017-03-01

    To examine the relationship between anxiety, depression, apathy, and cognitive decline in Parkinson disease (PD). Longitudinal study design to assess whether specific neuropsychiatric, demographic, and clinical features predict future cognitive decline. Veterans Affairs San Diego Medical Center and the University of California, San Diego. PD patients (N = 68) and healthy controls (N = 30). Participants were administered self-report measures of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale), anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Scale), and apathy (Apathy Scale), and a comprehensive neuropsychological battery assessing attention, language, visuospatial function, verbal and visual learning and memory, and executive function. Participants were tested at baseline and after an approximate 2-year period. Anxiety and depression at baseline were the strongest predictors of longitudinal decline on measures of verbal and visual learning, over and above other clinical and demographic characteristics. However, baseline neuropsychiatric symptoms did not significantly correlate with decline in other cognitive domains. No significant correlations were detected between neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognition in the healthy control group. These results suggest that anxiety and depression in PD may be risk factors for subsequent declines in learning. Emerging evidence suggests nonmotor symptoms are critical determinants of PD prognosis, and the results of this study highlight the importance of assessment of depression and anxiety early in PD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Effect of Vitamin Intake on Cognitive Decline in Older Adults: Evaluation of the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, D; Roupas, P

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this review was to evaluate the evidence from human studies on the intake of vitamins, either as monotherapies or in combination with other vitamins, as neuroprotective agents that may delay the onset of cognitive decline in older adults. Evidence-based methodologies were used to capture and evaluate the highest levels of evidence. The current evidence available showed no association for cognitive benefits of vitamins B6 or B12 as a monotherapy, and recent systematic reviews provide no clear evidence that supplementation with vitamin B6, B12 and/or folic acid improves dementia outcomes or slows cognitive decline, even though it may normalise homocysteine levels. Meta-analyses from systematic reviews have shown an association between low vitamin D levels and diminished cognitive function, although causality cannot be confirmed from the available evidence. There is no convincing evidence for an association of vitamin A, vitamin C or vitamin E either as a monotherapy or in combination with other antioxidant vitamins such as β-carotene and the prevention of cognitive decline. The appraisal of nineteen systematic reviews and meta-analyses has highlighted the heterogeneity between studies, and the need for better consensus on definitions of cognitive decline, duration of testing and agreement on which specific endpoints are clinically relevant. Evaluation of the totality of the currently available evidence indicates that intake of the above vitamins, either as a monotherapy, or in combination with other vitamins, has no clinically-relevant effect on delaying cognitive decline or delaying the onset of dementia in older adults.

  19. Diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, and cognitive decline in a population of elderly community residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouch, Isabelle; Roche, Frédéric; Dauphinot, Virginie; Laurent, Bernard; Antérion, Catherine Thomas; Celle, Sébastien; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude

    2012-08-01

    Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose, as well as cognitive impairment, are common in the elderly. Although several cross-sectional studies have demonstrated the influence of diabetes on cognitive impairment, only a few longitudinal studies have assessed the relationship between diabetes, impaired fasting glucose and cognitive decline in non-demented elderly community dwellers, by means of extensive neuropsychological batteries. The present study assesses the relationship between baseline diabetes, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and 2- year evolution of memory, attention and executive performance in a sample of non-demented elderly subjects. Population-based cohort study [(PROgnostic indicator OF cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (PROOF)]. One hundred and sixty-three community dwellers aged 65 years without dementia at recruitment. Memory, attention and executive performance. A significant association was observed between baseline diabetes mellitus and a higher 2-year decline in the Trial Making Test B and Stroop test exploring attention and executive function. This effect remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, education, anxiety and depressive symptoms, as well as other cardiovascular risk factors (F=2.41; p=0.007). Instead, no relationship was observed between IFG and cognitive decline. Our study showed that, in a sample of elderly non-demented community dwellers, diabetes mellitus (but not IFG) is associated with a higher decline in selective attention and executive functioning. These results emphasize the importance of detecting and man- aging diabetes and impaired fasting glucose, in order to prevent cognitive impairment and dementia.

  20. Vascular and amyloid pathologies are independent predictors of cognitive decline in normal elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemuri, Prashanthi; Lesnick, Timothy G; Przybelski, Scott A; Knopman, David S; Preboske, Greg M; Kantarci, Kejal; Raman, Mekala R; Machulda, Mary M; Mielke, Michelle M; Lowe, Val J; Senjem, Matthew L; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Rocca, Walter A; Roberts, Rosebud O; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R

    2015-03-01

    Our primary objective was to investigate a biomarker driven model for the interrelationships between vascular disease pathology, amyloid pathology, and longitudinal cognitive decline in cognitively normal elderly subjects between 70 and 90 years of age. Our secondary objective was to investigate the beneficial effect of cognitive reserve on these interrelationships. We used brain amyloid-β load measured using Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography as a marker for amyloid pathology. White matter hyperintensities and brain infarcts were measured using fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging as a marker for vascular pathology. We studied 393 cognitively normal elderly participants in the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging who had a baseline 3 T fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging assessment, Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography scan, baseline cognitive assessment, lifestyle measures, and at least one additional clinical follow-up. We classified subjects as being on the amyloid pathway if they had a global cortical amyloid-β load of ≥1.5 standard uptake value ratio and those on the vascular pathway if they had a brain infarct and/or white matter hyperintensities load ≥1.11% of total intracranial volume (which corresponds to the top 25% of white matter hyperintensities in an independent non-demented sample). We used a global cognitive z-score as a measure of cognition. We found no evidence that the presence or absence of vascular pathology influenced the presence or absence of amyloid pathology and vice versa, suggesting that the two processes seem to be independent. Baseline cognitive performance was lower in older individuals, in males, those with lower education/occupation, and those on the amyloid pathway. The rate of cognitive decline was higher in older individuals (P pathologies. In those subjects with both vascular and amyloid pathologies, the effect of both pathologies on

  1. Mediterranean diet and cognitive decline in women with cardiovascular disease or risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercambre, Marie-Noel; Grodstein, Francine; Berr, Claudine; Kang, Jae H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease and vascular risk factors increase rates of cognitive impairment, but very little is known regarding prevention in this high-risk group. The heart-healthy Mediterranean-type dietary pattern may beneficially influence both vascular and cognitive outcomes. Objectives We examined the association between Mediterranean-style diet and cognitive decline in women with prevalent vascular disease or ≥3 coronary risk factors. Design / Participants / Setting Prospective cohort study among 2504 women participants of the Women’s Antioxidant Cardiovascular Study (WACS), a cohort of female health professionals Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was determined at WACS baseline (1995–1996) using a zero-to-nine-point scale with higher scores indicating higher adherence. In 1998–2000, participants aged ≥ 65 years underwent a telephone cognitive battery including five tests of global cognition, verbal memory, and category fluency. Tests were administered three additional times over 5.4 years. Statistical analyses performed We used multivariable-adjusted generalized linear models for repeated measures to compare the annual rates of cognitive score changes across tertiles of Mediterranean diet score, as assessed at WACS baseline. Results In both basic- and multivariable-adjusted models, Mediterranean diet was not related to cognitive decline. No effect modification was detected by age, education, depression, cardiovascular disease severity at WACS baseline, or level of cognition at initial assessment. Conclusions In women at higher risk of cognitive decline due to vascular disease or risk factors, adherence to the Mediterranean diet was not associated with subsequent 5-year cognitive change. PMID:22709809

  2. Cognitive impairment in hemodialysis patients: What can slow this decline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitesh Patel

    2016-04-01

    在 55 歲或以上的血液透析 (HD 病人間, 逾 70% 有中至重度的慢性認知障礙 (CI, 在目前老年化的人口中, 這是必須要解決的問題。在接受 HD 後, CI 可引發病人安全的隱憂, 同時亦限制患者接受資訊如醫囑、及決策的能力。然而, 至今關於 HD 病人認知功能與改善方案的數據仍非常有限。本文探討了認知功能的評估方法、及 CI 發生於 HD 的相關理論, 亦回顧了目前有關慢性病中認知功能改善方案的文獻, 雖然很多並不特定於 HD 病人群。我們注意到一種稱為認知刺激療法 (cognitive stimulation therapy, CST 的心理治療方案, 可望改善 CI 患者的認知功能和社交技能。本文將首度就這種療法對 HD 病人的效應作出探討。事實上, CST 經證實可於 6 個月期間達到認知功能的改善, 亦是英國 NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence 建議的失智症療法, 我們認為有需要研究 CST 對 HD 病人認知功能的影響, 不論是在短期 (日常活動及決策能力、或長期層面 (失智症的預防。

  3. Computational explorations of the influence of structured knowledge on age-related cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, David E; Charness, Neil

    2002-06-01

    Experience in a domain can sometimes offset cognitive declines that occur with aging. Using a series of neural network simulations of learning chess opening positions, the authors investigated how structured knowledge in a distributed representation may influence age-related declines. Aging manipulations implemented as modulations of neural noise showed increased knowledge as being protective of performance on a chess memory span task, whereas changes in neural plasticity and neural loss lead to main effects without interactions and steeper declines for the initially more able. The models could also simulate the increase in variability in older groups.

  4. Cognitive Decline in Neuronal Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: Role of NMDA Receptors and Associated Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Avila

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular changes associated with neuronal aging lead to a decrease in cognitive capacity. Here we discuss these alterations at the level of brain regions, brain cells, and brain membrane and cytoskeletal proteins with an special focus in NMDA molecular changes through aging and its effect in cognitive decline and Alzheimer disease. Here, we propose that some neurodegenerative disorders, like Alzheimer's disease (AD, are characterized by an increase and acceleration of some of these changes.

  5. Poor Sleep as a Precursor to Cognitive Decline in Down Syndrome : A Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Fabian; Edgin, Jamie O.

    2013-01-01

    We propose that sleep disruption is a lever arm that influences how cognition emerges in development and then declines in response to Alzheimer disease in people with Down syndrome. Addressing sleep disruptions might be an overlooked way to improve cognitive outcomes in this population. This article is a contribution to a Special Issue on Down Syndrome curated by the editors of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease & Parkinsonism.

  6. Poor Sleep as a Precursor to Cognitive Decline in Down Syndrome : A Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Fabian; Edgin, Jamie O

    2013-08-26

    We propose that sleep disruption is a lever arm that influences how cognition emerges in development and then declines in response to Alzheimer disease in people with Down syndrome. Addressing sleep disruptions might be an overlooked way to improve cognitive outcomes in this population. This article is a contribution to a Special Issue on Down Syndrome curated by the editors of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Parkinsonism.

  7. Cognitive decline and amyloid accumulation in patients with mild cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivunen, Jaana; Karrasch, Mira; Scheinin, Noora M

    2012-01-01

    was associated with faster decline in verbal learning. Higher baseline uptake in the caudate nucleus was related to faster decline in memory consolidation, and higher temporal uptake was associated with decline in executive function. Conclusion: Higher (11)C-PIB uptake in the caudate nucleus and temporal lobe...... was related to decline in memory and executive functions, whereas lower frontal uptake was related to decline in verbal learning. The results indicate that in prodromal AD, frontal amyloid accumulation reaches its maximum in the MCI stage, characterized by memory problems without full-blown dementia....

  8. A prospectus for ethical analysis of ageing individuals' responsibility to prevent cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlini, Cynthia; Hall, Wayne

    2017-11-01

    As the world's population ages, governments and non-governmental organizations in developed countries are promoting healthy cognitive ageing to reduce the rate of age-related cognitive decline and sustain economic productivity in an ageing workforce. Recommendations from the Productivity Commission (Australia), Dementia Australia, Government Office for Science (UK), Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (USA), Institute of Medicine (USA), among others, are encouraging older adults to engage in mental, physical, and social activities. These lifestyle recommendations for healthy cognitive ageing are timely and well supported by scientific evidence but they make implicit normative judgments about the responsibility of ageing individuals to prevent cognitive decline. Ethical tensions arise when this individual responsibility collides with social and personal realities of ageing populations. First, we contextualize the priority given to healthy cognitive ageing within the current brain-based medical and social discourses. Second, we explore the individual responsibility by examining the economic considerations, medical evidence and individual interests that relate to the priority given to healthy cognitive ageing. Third, we identify three key ethical challenges for policymakers seeking to implement lifestyle recommendations as an effective population-level approach to healthy cognitive ageing. The result is a prospectus for future in-depth analysis of ethical tensions that arise from current policy discussions of healthy cognitive ageing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sub-Clinical Cognitive Decline and Resting Cerebral Blood Flow in Middle Aged Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Mølby Henriksen

    Full Text Available Although dementia is associated with both global and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF changes, little is known about cerebral perfusion in the early pre-clinical stages of cognitive decline preceding overt cognitive dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of early sub-clinical cognitive decline with CBF.The study participants were recruited from a cohort of Danish men born in 1953. Based on a regression model we selected men who performed better (Group A, n = 94 and poorer (Group B, n = 95 on cognitive testing at age 57 than expected from testing at age 20. Participants underwent supplementary cognitive testing, blood sampling and MRI including measurements of regional and global CBF.Regional CBF was lower in group B than in group A in the posterior cingulate gyrus and the precuneus. The associations were attenuated when corrected for global atrophy, but remained significant in regions of interest based analysis adjusting for regional gray matter volume and vascular risk factors. No influence of group on global CBF was observed.We conclude that early sub-clinical cognitive decline is associated with reduced perfusion in the precuneus and posterior cingulate gyrus independently of regional atrophy and vascular risk factors, but cannot be statistically separated from an association with global atrophy.

  10. Dietary pattern, inflammation and cognitive decline: The Whitehall II prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Mio; Shipley, Martin; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Brunner, Eric J

    2017-04-01

    Low-grade inflammation appears to play an etiological role in cognitive decline. However the association between an inflammatory dietary pattern and cognitive decline has not been investigated. We aimed to investigate dietary patterns associated with inflammation and whether such diet is associated with cognitive decline. We analyzed 5083 participants (28.7% women) from the Whitehall II cohort study. Diet and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) were assessed in 1991-1993 and 1997-1999. We used reduced rank regression methods to determine a dietary pattern associated with elevated IL-6. Cognitive tests were performed in 1997-1999 and repeated in 2002-2004 and 2007-2009. The association between dietary pattern and cognitive decline between ages 45 and 79 was assessed using linear mixed models. We identified an inflammatory dietary pattern characterized by higher intake of red meat, processed meat, peas and legumes, and fried food, and lower intake of whole grains which correlated with elevated IL-6 both in 1991-1993 and 1997-1999. A greater decline in reasoning was seen in participants in the highest tertile of adherence to the inflammatory dietary pattern (-0.37 SD; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.40, -0.34) compared to those in the lowest tertile (-0.31; 95% CI -0.34, -0.28) after adjustment for age, sex, ethnicity, occupational status, education, and total energy intake (p for interaction across tertiles = 0.01). This association remained significant after multivariable adjustment. Similarly for global cognition, the inflammatory dietary pattern was associated with faster cognitive decline after multivariable adjustment (p for interaction across tertiles = 0.04). Associations were stronger in younger participants (peas, legumes and fried food, and lower intake of whole grains was associated with higher inflammatory markers and accelerated cognitive decline at older ages. This supports the case for further research. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by

  11. Perception and cognition in the ageing brain: A brief review of the short- and long-term links between perceptual and cognitive decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eRoberts

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with declines in both perception and cognition. We review evidence for an interaction between perceptual and cognitive decline in old age. Impoverished perceptual input can increase the cognitive difficulty of tasks, while changes to cognitive strategies can compensate, to some extent, for impaired perception. While there is strong evidence from cross-sectional studies for a link between sensory acuity and cognitive performance in old age, there is not yet compelling evidence from longitudinal studies to suggest that poor perception causes cognitive decline, nor to demonstrate that correcting sensory impairment can improve cognition in the longer term. Most studies have focused on relative simple measures of sensory (visual and auditory acuity, but more complex measures of suprathreshold perceptual processes, such as temporal processing, can show a stronger link with cognition. The reviewed evidence underlines the importance of fully accounting for perceptual deficits when investigating cognitive decline in old age.

  12. Variability in depressive symptoms predicts cognitive decline in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Leiby, Benjamin E

    2009-07-01

    The measurement of affective symptoms in older persons who decline cognitively is uncertain. The authors investigated whether mood variability predicts dementia in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Three-year observational study after a clinical trial. Community follow-up of outpatients ascertained from retina clinics. One hundred sixty patients with AMD. Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) administered every 2 weeks for 6 months to subjects; Informant Questionnaire for Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE) administered to subjects' knowledgeable informants. Twenty-three subjects (14.4%) declined cognitively. Age, education, baseline GDS score > or =5, and variability in GDS scores (i.e., fluctuations between adjacent time points) were associated with cognitive decline. For GDS variability, each 1 unit increase in the residual standard deviation (SD) of the GDS increased the risk for cognitive decline by 93% (IDR = 1.92; 95% CI [1.27-2.91]). Thus, subjects with a residual SD of 1 were nearly twice as likely to become demented as subjects with no variability in GDS scores. The risk for subjects with SDs of 2 increased more than threefold (IDR = 3.68; 95% CI [1.61-8.47]). A multiple regression analysis showed that GDS variability was a significant risk factor for dementia after controlling for significant covariates. These data suggest a useful approach to conceptualizing and measuring depressive symptoms in older persons. Variability in self-reported mood may be an early sign of dementia and may offer new insights into the neurobiological mechanisms linking depression and cognition

  13. Role of physical activity in reducing cognitive decline in older Mexican-American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenbacher, Allison J; Snih, Soham Al; Bindawas, Saad M; Markides, Kyriakos S; Graham, James E; Samper-Ternent, Rafael; Raji, Mukaila; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J

    2014-09-01

    The effect of physical activity on cognitive function in older adults from minority and disadvantaged populations is not well understood. This study examined the longitudinal association between physical activity and cognition in older Mexican Americans. The study methodology included a prospective cohort with longitudinal analysis of data from the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly. General linear mixed models were used to assess the associations and interactions between physical activity and cognitive function over 14 years. Community-based assessments were performed in participants' homes. Physical activity was recorded for 1,669 older Mexican Americans using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly. Cognition was measured using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and separated into memory and nonmemory components. A statistically significant positive association was observed between levels of physical activity and cognitive function after adjusting for age, sex, marital status, education, and comorbid health conditions. There was a statistically significant difference in MMSE scores over time between participants in the third (β = 0.11, standard error (SE) = 0.05) and fourth (β = 0.10, SE = 0.2) quartiles of physical activity and those in the first. The protective effect of physical activity on cognitive decline was evident for the memory component of the MMSE but not the nonmemory component after adjusting for covariates. Greater physical activity at baseline was associated with less cognitive decline over 14 years in older Mexican Americans. The reduction in cognitive decline appeared to be related to the memory components of cognitive function. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Factors associated with cognitive decline in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus during a 6-year observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Takahiko; Umemura, Toshitaka; Kawano, Naoko

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk for cognitive decline in older adults. The current study was carried out to determine the factors associated with cognitive decline. The older T2DM patients (aged ≥65 years, mean age 79.2 ± 5.1 years) were observed for 6 years, and the mean values in clinical indicators of participants with and without cognitive decline over a 6-year period were compared. Then, multiple logistic analysis was carried out to determine the factors associated with cognitive decline. Separate analyses were also carried out for each of five cognitive assessments (Mini-Mental State Examination, word immediate and delayed recall, Stroop test, digit symbol substitution). In the composite of several cognitive assessments, higher age and a lower level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were associated with cognitive decline in older T2DM patients. Lower systolic blood pressure was associated with a decline in delayed word list recall. Higher plasma insulin level was associated with a decline in the Stroop test performance. Lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly associated with general cognitive decline in older T2DM patients during our 6-year observation. Several other factors were also associated with cognitive assessments of various cognitive domains. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Social Networks, Social Integration, and Social Engagement Determine Cognitive Decline in Community-Dwelling Spanish Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Zunzunegui, María-Victoria; Alvarado, Beatriz E; del Ser, Teodoro; Otero, Angel

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the influence of social networks and social engagement on cognitive decline in a population-based cohort of elderly people, and to assess gender differences in the effect of social relations on cognition.

  16. The impact of residential status on cognitive decline among older adults in China: Results from a longitudinal study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanzhang Xu; Matthew E Dupre; Danan Gu; Bei Wu

    2017-01-01

    ...-being. However, the influence of residential status on cognitive decline remains unclear. The purpose of this research was to assess the changes of cognitive function among older adults with different residential status...

  17. Fish consumption, intake of fats and cognitive decline at middle and older age: the Doetinchem Cohort Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooyens, Astrid C J; van Gelder, Boukje M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Verschuren, W M Monique

    2017-01-01

    To get insight in the impact of fish and fat intake in the prevention of accelerated cognitive decline with ageing, we tested associations between fish and different fat intakes and 5-year change in cognitive functions.

  18. Albumin, apolipoprotein E-epsilon4 and cognitive decline in community-dwelling Chinese older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tze-Pin; Niti, Mathew; Feng, Lei; Kua, Ee-Heok; Yap, Keng-Bee

    2009-01-01

    To examine the association between serum albumin and cognitive impairment and decline in community-living older adults. Population-based cohort study, followed up to 2 years; serum albumin, apolipoprotein E (APOE)-epsilon4, and cognitive impairment measured at baseline and cognitive decline (> or =2-point drop in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score). Odds ratios were controlled for age, sex, education, medical comorbidity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cardiac disease, stroke, smoking, alcohol drinking, depression, APOE-epsilon4, nutritional status, body mass index, anemia, glomerular filtration rate, and baseline MMSE. Local area whole population. One thousand six hundred sixty-four Chinese older adults aged 55 and older. The mean age of the cohort was 66.0+/-7.3, 65% were women, mean serum albumin was 42.3+/-3.1 g/L, and mean MMSE score was 27.2+/-3.2. Lower albumin tertile was associated with greater risk of cognitive impairment in cross-sectional analysis (low, odds ratio (OR)=2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.31-4.03); medium, OR=1.59, 95% CI=0.88-2.88) versus high (P for trend=.002); and with cognitive decline in longitudinal analyses: low, OR=1.73, 95% CI=1.18-2.55; medium, OR=1.32, 95% CI=0.89-1.95, vs high (P for trend=.004). In cognitively unimpaired respondents at baseline (MMSE> or =24), similar associations with cognitive decline were observed (P for trends community-living older adults.

  19. Crowdsourced estimation of cognitive decline and resilience in Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Genevera I; Amoroso, Nicola; Anghel, Catalina; Balagurusamy, Venkat; Bare, Christopher J; Beaton, Derek; Bellotti, Roberto; Bennett, David A; Boehme, Kevin; Boutros, Paul C; Caberlotto, Laura; Caloian, Cristian; Campbell, Frederick; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Beibei; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chien, Ting-Ying; Clark, Tim; Das, Sudeshna; Davatzikos, Christos; Deng, Jieyao; Dillenberger, Donna; Dobson, Richard JB; Dong, Qilin; Doshi, Jimit; Duma, Denise; Errico, Rosangela; Erus, Guray; Everett, Evan; Fardo, David W; Friend, Stephen H; Fröhlich, Holger; Gan, Jessica; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Glaab, Enrico; Green, Robert C; Guan, Yuanfang; Hong, Ming-Yi; Huang, Chao; Hwang, Jinseub; Ibrahim, Joseph; Inglese, Paolo; Jiang, Qijia; Katsumata, Yuriko; Kong, Dehan; Krause, Roland; Lalonde, Emilie; Lauria, Mario; Lee, Eunjee; Lin, Xihui; Liu, Zhandong; Livingstone, Julie; Logsdon, Benjamin A; Lovestone, Simon; Lyappan, Anandhi; Ma, Michelle; Malhotra, Ashutosh; Maxwell, Taylor J; Merrill, Emily; Nagorski, John; Namasivayam, Aishwarya; Narayan, Manjari; Naz, Mufassra; Newhouse, Stephen J; Norman, Thea C; Nurtdinov, Ramil N; Oyang, Yen-Jen; Pawitan, Yudi; Peng, Shengwen; Piccolo, Stephen R; Praveen, Paurush; Priami, Corrado; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y; Senger, Philipp; Shen, Xia; Simmons, Andrew; Sotiras, Aristeidis; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Tangaro, Sabina; Tateo, Andrea; Tung, Yi-An; Tustison, Nicholas J; Varol, Erdem; Vradenburg, George; Weiner, Michael W; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Lei; Xie, Yang; Xu, Jia; Yang, Hojin; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yunyun; Zhu, Fan; Zhu, Hongtu; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2017-01-01

    Identifying accurate biomarkers of cognitive decline is essential for advancing early diagnosis and prevention therapies in Alzheimer’s Disease. The Alzheimer’s Disease DREAM Challenge was designed as a computational crowdsourced project to benchmark the current state-of-the-art in predicting cognitive outcomes in Alzheimer’s Disease based on high-dimensional, publicly available genetic and structural imaging data. This meta-analysis failed to identify a meaningful predictor developed from either data modality, suggesting that alternate approaches should be considered for to prediction of cognitive performance. PMID:27079753

  20. Rapid serial visual presentation design for cognition

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A powerful new image presentation technique has evolved over the last twenty years, and its value demonstrated through its support of many and varied common tasks. Conceptually, Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) is basically simple, exemplified in the physical world by the rapid riffling of the pages of a book in order to locate a known image. Advances in computation and graphics processing allow RSVP to be applied flexibly and effectively to a huge variety of common tasks such as window shopping, video fast-forward and rewind, TV channel selection and product browsing. At its heart is a

  1. Effects of Dexamethasone on Cognitive Decline after Cardiac Surgery A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottens, Thomas H.; Dieleman, Jan M.; Sauër, Anne-Mette C.; Peelen, Linda M.; Nierich, Arno P.; de Groot, Welmer J.; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Buijsrogge, Marc P.; Kalkman, Cor J.; van Dijk, Diederik; Bredée, Jaap J.; Buhre, Wolfgang F.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; van Klarenbosch, Jan; Moons, Karel G.; Numan, Sandra C.; Roes, Kit C.; Sauer, Anne-Mette C.; Slooter, Arjen J.; Ennema, Jacob J.; Rosseel, Peter M.; van der Meer, Nardo J.; van der Maaten, Joost M.; Cernak, Vlado; Hofland, Jan; van Thiel, Robert J.; Diephuis, Jan C.; Schepp, Ronald M.; Haenen, Jo; de Lange, Fellery; Boer, Christa; de Jong, Jan R.; Tijssen, Jan G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiac surgery can be complicated by postoperative cognitive decline (POCD), which is characterized by impaired memory function and intellectual ability. The systemic inflammatory response that is induced by major surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass may play an important role in the

  2. Socioeconomic differences in cognitive decline and the role of biomedical factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, A.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bosma, H.; Kempen, G.I.J.M.; Newman, A.B.; Rubin, S.M.; Satterfield, S.; Atkinson, H.H.; Ayonayon, H.N.; Rosano, C.; Yaffe, K.; Harris, T.B.; Rooks, R.N.; van Eijk, J.T.M.; Kritchevsky, S.B.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study examines the association between socioeconomic status and cognitive decline in a community-based cohort of well-functioning older adults and seeks to determine whether this link could be explained by biomedical factors. METHODS: Data are from 2574 men and women aged 70 to 79

  3. Social relationships and cognitive decline : a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Jisca S.; Zuidersma, Marij; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.; Smidt, Nynke

    Background: Although poor social relationships are assumed to contribute to cognitive decline, meta-analytic approaches have not been applied. Individual study results are mixed and difficult to interpret due to heterogeneity in measures of social relationships. We conducted a systematic review and

  4. Asymptomatic spontaneous cerebral emboli predict cognitive and functional decline in dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purandare, N.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Morris, J.; Byrne, J.; Wren, J.; Heller, R.F.; McCollum, C.N.; Burns, A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spontaneous cerebral emboli (SCE) are frequent in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). We investigated the effect of SCE on the rates of cognitive and functional decline in AD and VaD. METHODS: One hundred thirty-two patients with dementia (74 AD, National Institute of

  5. Thickness in Entorhinal and Subicular Cortex Predicts Episodic Memory Decline in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Burggren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI most likely to decline in cognition over time is a major focus in Alzheimer's disease (AD research. Neuroimaging biomarkers that predict decline would have great potential for increasing the efficacy of early intervention. In this study, we used high-resolution MRI, combined with a cortical unfolding technique to increase visibility of the convoluted medial temporal lobe (MTL, to assess whether gray matter thickness in subjects with MCI correlated to decline in cognition over two years. We found that thickness in the entorhinal (ERC and subicular (Sub cortices of MCI subjects at initial assessment correlated to change in memory encoding over two years (ERC: r=0.34; P=.003 and Sub (r=0.26; P=.011 but not delayed recall performance. Our findings suggest that aspects of memory performance may be differentially affected in the early stages of AD. Given the MTL's involvement in early stages of neurodegeneration in AD, clarifying the relationship of these brain regions and the link to resultant cognitive decline is critical in understanding disease progression.

  6. Social networks, social integration, and social engagement determine cognitive decline in community-dwelling Spanish older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunzunegui, María-Victoria; Alvarado, Beatriz E; Del Ser, Teodoro; Otero, Angel

    2003-03-01

    To examine the influence of social networks and social engagement on cognitive decline in a population-based cohort of elderly people, and to assess gender differences in the effect of social relations on cognition. A longitudinal study of community-dwelling people over 65 was carried out. Cognitive function (orientation and memory) in 1997 and cognitive decline (absent, mild, and severe) over 4 years (1993-1997) were assessed using an instrument previously validated for populations with a low level of education. The effect of social networks, social integration, and social engagement with friends, children, and relatives on cognitive function and cognitive decline was estimated by multiple linear and logistic regressions after adjusting for age, sex, education, depressive symptoms, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and functional status. Poor social connections, infrequent participation in social activities, and social disengagement predict the risk of cognitive decline in elderly individuals. The probability of cognitive decline was lower for both men and women with a high frequency of visual contact with relatives and community social integration. Engagement with friends seemed to be protective for cognitive decline in women but not in men. This longitudinal study indicates that few social ties, poor integration, and social disengagement are risk factors for cognitive decline among community-dwelling elderly persons. The nature of the ties that influence cognition may vary in men and women.

  7. HbA1c, diabetes and cognitive decline: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fanfan; Yan, Li; Yang, Zhenchun; Zhong, Baoliang; Xie, Wuxiang

    2018-01-25

    The aim of the study was to evaluate longitudinal associations between HbA1c levels, diabetes status and subsequent cognitive decline over a 10 year follow-up period. Data from wave 2 (2004-2005) to wave 7 (2014-2015) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) were analysed. Cognitive function was assessed at baseline (wave 2) and reassessed every 2 years at waves 3-7. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate longitudinal associations. The study comprised 5189 participants (55.1% women, mean age 65.6 ± 9.4 years) with baseline HbA1c levels ranging from 15.9 to 126.3 mmol/mol (3.6-13.7%). The mean follow-up duration was 8.1 ± 2.8 years and the mean number of cognitive assessments was 4.9 ± 1.5. A 1 mmol/mol increment in HbA1c was significantly associated with an increased rate of decline in global cognitive z scores (-0.0009 SD/year, 95% CI -0.0014, -0.0003), memory z scores (-0.0005 SD/year, 95% CI -0.0009, -0.0001) and executive function z scores (-0.0008 SD/year, 95% CI -0.0013, -0.0004) after adjustment for baseline age, sex, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, BMI, education, marital status, depressive symptoms, current smoking, alcohol consumption, hypertension, CHD, stroke, chronic lung disease and cancer. Compared with participants with normoglycaemia, the multivariable-adjusted rate of global cognitive decline associated with prediabetes and diabetes was increased by -0.012 SD/year (95% CI -0.022, -0.002) and -0.031 SD/year (95% CI -0.046, -0.015), respectively (p for trend <0.001). Similarly, memory, executive function and orientation z scores showed an increased rate of cognitive decline with diabetes. Significant longitudinal associations between HbA1c levels, diabetes status and long-term cognitive decline were observed in this study. Future studies are required to determine the effects of maintaining optimal glucose control on the rate of cognitive decline in people

  8. English Longitudinal Study of Aging: can Internet/E-mail use reduce cognitive decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, André J; d'Orsi, Eleonora; de Oliveira, Cesar M; Orrell, Martin; Demakakos, Panayotes; Biddulph, Jane P; Marmot, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive decline is a major risk factor for disability, dementia, and death. The use of Internet/E-mail, also known as digital literacy, might decrease dementia incidence among the older population. The aim was to investigate whether digital literacy might be associated with decreased cognitive decline in older adulthood. Data from the English Longitudinal Study of Aging cohort with 6,442 participants aged 50-89 years, followed for 8 years, with baseline cognitive testing and four additional time points. The main outcome variable was the relative percentage change in delayed recall from a 10-word-list learning task across five separate measurement points. In addition to digital literacy, socioeconomic variables, including wealth and education, comorbidities, and baseline cognitive function were included in predictive models. The analysis used Generalized Estimating Equations. Higher education, no functional impairment, fewer depressive symptoms, no diabetes, and Internet/E-mail use predicted better performance in delayed recall. Digital literacy may help reduce cognitive decline among persons aged between 50 and 89 years. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Vitamin K Status Is not Associated with Cognitive Decline in Middle Aged Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, E G H M; van Schoor, N M; Vermeer, C; Zwijsen, R M L; den Heijer, M; Comijs, H C

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between dephospho-uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein (dp-ucMGP), an indicator of vitamin K status, and cognitive decline, and the modifying role of 25(OH)D. Longitudinal study with six years follow-up. Community based. 599 participants of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (aged 55-65 years). Information processing speed and a composite Z-score by combining three domains of cognition reflecting general cognitive functioning. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) showed no significant associations between dp-ucMGP and decline in general cognitive functioning. Vitamin D modified the association between dp-ucMGP and speed of information processing (p 50 nmol/l, the highest tertile of dp-ucMGP (>406 pmol/l), which corresponds to lower vitamin K levels, was associated with 1.5 higher score on information processing speed (p=0.023) as compared to the lowest tertile of dp-ucMGP. In contrast to our hypothesis, a suboptimal vitamin K was not associated with cognitive decline in middle-aged adults.

  10. Social relationships and cognitive decline: a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Jisca S; Zuidersma, Marij; Zuidema, Sytse U; Burgerhof, Johannes Gm; Stolk, Ronald P; Oude Voshaar, Richard C; Smidt, Nynke

    2016-08-01

    Although poor social relationships are assumed to contribute to cognitive decline, meta-analytic approaches have not been applied. Individual study results are mixed and difficult to interpret due to heterogeneity in measures of social relationships. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the relation between poor social relationships and cognitive decline. MEDLINE, Embase and PsycINFO were searched for longitudinal cohort studies examining various aspects of social relationships and cognitive decline in the general population. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using random effects meta-analysis. Sources of heterogeneity were explored and likelihood of publication bias was assessed. We stratified analyses according to three aspects of social relationships: structural, functional and a combination of these. We identified 43 articles. Poor social relationships predicted cognitive decline; for structural (19 studies): pooled OR: 1.08 (95% CI: 1.05-1.11); functional (8 studies): pooled OR: 1.15 (95% CI: 1.00-1.32); and combined measures (7 studies): pooled OR: 1.12 (95% CI: 1.01-1.24). Meta-regression and subgroup analyses showed that the heterogeneity could be explained by the type of social relationship measurement and methodological quality of included studies. Despite heterogeneity in study design and measures, our meta-analyses show that multiple aspects of social relationships are associated with cognitive decline. As evidence for publication bias was found, the association might be overestimated and should therefore be interpreted with caution. Future studies are needed to better define the mechanisms underlying these associations. Potential causality of this prognostic association should be examined in future randomized controlled studies. © The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  11. Rapid global expansion of the fungal disease chytridiomycosis into declining and healthy amphibian populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Y James

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The fungal disease chytridiomycosis, caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, is enigmatic because it occurs globally in both declining and apparently healthy (non-declining amphibian populations. This distribution has fueled debate concerning whether, in sites where it has recently been found, the pathogen was introduced or is endemic. In this study, we addressed the molecular population genetics of a global collection of fungal strains from both declining and healthy amphibian populations using DNA sequence variation from 17 nuclear loci and a large fragment from the mitochondrial genome. We found a low rate of DNA polymorphism, with only two sequence alleles detected at each locus, but a high diversity of diploid genotypes. Half of the loci displayed an excess of heterozygous genotypes, consistent with a primarily clonal mode of reproduction. Despite the absence of obvious sex, genotypic diversity was high (44 unique genotypes out of 59 strains. We provide evidence that the observed genotypic variation can be generated by loss of heterozygosity through mitotic recombination. One strain isolated from a bullfrog possessed as much allelic diversity as the entire global sample, suggesting the current epidemic can be traced back to the outbreak of a single clonal lineage. These data are consistent with the current chytridiomycosis epidemic resulting from a novel pathogen undergoing a rapid and recent range expansion. The widespread occurrence of the same lineage in both healthy and declining populations suggests that the outcome of the disease is contingent on environmental factors and host resistance.

  12. Rapid declines of large mammal populations after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragina, Eugenia V; Ives, A R; Pidgeon, A M; Kuemmerle, T; Baskin, L M; Gubar, Y P; Piquer-Rodríguez, M; Keuler, N S; Petrosyan, V G; Radeloff, V C

    2015-06-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that socioeconomic shocks strongly affect wildlife populations, but quantitative evidence is sparse. The collapse of socialism in Russia in 1991 caused a major socioeconomic shock, including a sharp increase in poverty. We analyzed population trends of 8 large mammals in Russia from 1981 to 2010 (i.e., before and after the collapse). We hypothesized that the collapse would first cause population declines, primarily due to overexploitation, and then population increases due to adaptation of wildlife to new environments following the collapse. The long-term Database of the Russian Federal Agency of Game Mammal Monitoring, consisting of up to 50,000 transects that are monitored annually, provided an exceptional data set for investigating these population trends. Three species showed strong declines in population growth rates in the decade following the collapse, while grey wolf (Canis lupus) increased by more than 150%. After 2000 some trends reversed. For example, roe deer (Capreolus spp.) abundance in 2010 was the highest of any period in our study. Likely reasons for the population declines in the 1990s include poaching and the erosion of wildlife protection enforcement. The rapid increase of the grey wolf populations is likely due to the cessation of governmental population control. In general, the widespread declines in wildlife populations after the collapse of the Soviet Union highlight the magnitude of the effects that socioeconomic shocks can have on wildlife populations and the possible need for special conservation efforts during such times. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  13. Gender differences in tea, coffee, and cognitive decline in the elderly: the Cardiovascular Health Study.

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    Arab, Lenore; Biggs, Mary L; O'Meara, Ellen S; Longstreth, W T; Crane, Paul K; Fitzpatrick, Annette L

    2011-01-01

    Although caffeine can enhance cognitive function acutely, long-term effects of consumption of caffeine-containing beverages such as tea and coffee are uncertain. Data on 4,809 participants aged 65 and older from the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) were used to examine the relationship of consumption of tea and coffee, assessed by food frequency questionnaire, on change in cognitive function by gender. Cognitive performance was assessed using serial Modified Mini-Mental State (3MS) examinations, which were administered annually up to 9 times. Linear mixed models were used to estimate rates of change in standard 3MS scores and scores modeled using item response theory (IRT). Models were adjusted for age, education, smoking status, clinic site, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, coronary heart disease, depression score, and APOE genotype. Over the median 7.9 years of follow-up, participants who did not consume tea or coffee declined annually an average of 1.30 points (women) and 1.11 points (men) on standard 3MS scores. In fully adjusted models using either standard or IRT 3MS scores, we found modestly reduced rates of cognitive decline for some, but not all, levels of coffee and tea consumption for women, with no consistent effect for men. Caffeine consumption was also associated with attenuation in cognitive decline in women. Dose-response relationships were not linear. These longitudinal analyses suggest a somewhat attenuated rate of cognitive decline among tea and coffee consumers compared to non-consumers in women but not in men. Whether this association is causal or due to unmeasured confounding requires further study.

  14. Adiposity predicts cognitive decline in older persons with diabetes: a 2-year follow-up.

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    Angela Marie Abbatecola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanisms related to cognitive impairment in older persons with Type 2 diabetes (DM remains unclear. We tested if adiposity parameters and body fat distribution could predict cognitive decline in older persons with DM vs. normal glucose tolerance (NGT. METHODOLOGY: 693 older persons with no dementia were enrolled: 253 with DM in good metabolic control; 440 with NGT (age range:65-85 years. Longitudinal study comparing DM and NGT individuals according to the association of baseline adiposity parameters (body mass index (BMI, waist-hip-ratio (WHR, waist circumference (WC and total body fat mass to cognitive change (Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, a composite score of executive and attention functioning (CCS over time. FINDINGS: At baseline, in DM participants, MMSE correlated with WHR (beta = -0.240; p = 0.043, WC (beta = -0.264; p = 0.041 while CCS correlated with WHR (beta = -0.238; p = 0.041, WC (beta = -0.326; p = 0.013 after adjusting for confounders. In NGT subjects, no significant correlations were found among any adiposity parameters and MMSE, while CCS was associated with WHR (beta = -0.194; p = 0.036 and WC (beta = -0.210; p = 0.024. Participants with DM in the 3(rd tertile of total fat mass showed the greatest decline in cognitive performance compared to those in 1(st tertile (tests for trend: MMSE(p = 0.007, CCS(p = 0.003. Logistic regression models showed that 3(rd vs. 1(st tertile of total fat mass, WHR, and WC predicted an almost two-fold decline in cognitive function in DM subjects at 2(nd yr (OR 1.68, 95%IC 1.08-3.52. CONCLUSIONS: Total fat mass and central adiposity predict an increased risk for cognitive decline in older person with DM.

  15. Space and location of cerebral microbleeds, cognitive decline, and dementia in the community.

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    Ding, Jie; Sigurðsson, Sigurður; Jónsson, Pálmi V; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Meirelles, Osorio; Kjartansson, Olafur; Lopez, Oscar L; van Buchem, Mark A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2017-05-30

    To assess the association of the number and anatomic location of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), visible indicators of microvascular damage on MRI, with incident cognitive disease in the general population of older people. In the longitudinal population-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, 2,602 participants 66 to 93 years of age and free of prevalent dementia underwent brain MRI and cognitive testing of verbal memory, processing speed, and executive function at baseline and a mean of 5.2 years later. Adjudicated incident dementia cases were diagnosed according to international guidelines. In the multiple linear regression models adjusted for demographic, genetic, cardiovascular risk, and other cerebrovascular MRI markers, the presence of CMBs located in deep or mixed (deep and lobar) areas was associated with a greater decline in all 3 cognitive domains. Mixed CMBs were the strongest correlate for decline in memory and speed. Compared to those with no CMBs, participants with ≥3 CMBs had a steeper decline in a composite measure of global cognitive function, memory, and speed. Among those with ≥3 deep or mixed CMBs, associations were strongest for memory; the association with speed was strongest in those having ≥3 strictly lobar CMBs. People with ≥3 CMBs, regardless of their locations, had a higher incidence of all-cause dementia and vascular dementia. Mixed or a higher load of CMBs, with some specificity for location, is associated with accelerated cognitive decline in older people. These findings suggest a role for hypertensive vasculopathy and the combined effect of hypertensive and cerebral amyloid angiopathy in the pathogenesis of cognitive deterioration. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Predictors of Cognitive Decline in the Early Stages of Parkinson's Disease: A Brief Cognitive Assessment Longitudinal Study

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    Paulo Bugalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objectives were to perform a longitudinal assessment of mental status in early stage Parkinson’s disease (PD patients, with brief neuropsychological tests, in order to find predictive factors for cognitive decline. Sixty-one, early stage, and nondemented patients were assessed twice, over a 2-year interval, with a global cognitive test (mini-mental state examination (MMSE and a frontal function test (frontal assessment battery (FAB and motor function scales. Dementia and hallucinations were diagnosed according to the DSM-IV criteria. Cognitive function scores did not decrease significantly, except for FAB lexical fluency score. Four patients presented with dementia at followup. The MMSE score below cut-off, worse gait dysfunction, the nontremor motor subtype, and hallucinations were significantly related to dementia. Rigidity and speech dysfunction were related to dementia and a decrease in FAB scores. We can conclude that decline in the MMSE and FAB scores is small and heterogeneous in the early stages of PD. Scores below cut-off in the MMSE could be helpful to predict dementia. Nontremor motor deficits could be predictive factors for frontal cognitive decline and dementia.

  17. Polar bear and walrus response to the rapid decline in Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, K.; Whalen, M.; Douglas, D.; Udevitz, M.; Atwood, T.; Jay, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than other regions of the world due to positive climate feedbacks associated with loss of snow and ice. One highly visible consequence has been a rapid decline in Arctic sea ice over the past 3 decades - a decline projected to continue and result in ice-free summers likely as soon as 2030. The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) and the Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) are dependent on sea ice over the continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean's marginal seas. The continental shelves are shallow regions with high biological productivity, supporting abundant marine life within the water column and on the sea floor. Polar bears use sea ice as a platform for hunting ice seals; walruses use sea ice as a resting platform between dives to forage for clams and other bottom-dwelling invertebrates. How have sea ice changes affected polar bears and walruses? How will anticipated changes affect them in the future?

  18. Alzheimer's disease pattern of brain atrophy predicts cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Nicole; Duda, John E.; Wolk, David A.; Doshi, Jimit; Xie, Sharon X.; Davatzikos, Christos; Clark, Christopher M.; Siderowf, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests overlap in brain regions undergoing neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. To assess the clinical significance of this, we applied a validated Alzheimer's disease-spatial pattern of brain atrophy to patients with Parkinson's disease with a range of cognitive abilities to determine its association with cognitive performance and decline. At baseline, 84 subjects received structural magnetic resonance imaging brain scans and completed the Dementia Rating Scale-2, and new robust and expanded Dementia Rating Scale-2 norms were applied to cognitively classify participants. Fifty-nine non-demented subjects were assessed annually with the Dementia Rating Scale-2 for two additional years. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were quantified using both a region of interest approach and voxel-based morphometry analysis, and a method for quantifying the presence of an Alzheimer's disease spatial pattern of brain atrophy was applied to each scan. In multivariate models, higher Alzheimer's disease pattern of atrophy score was associated with worse global cognitive performance (β = −0.31, P = 0.007), including in non-demented patients (β = −0.28, P = 0.05). In linear mixed model analyses, higher baseline Alzheimer's disease pattern of atrophy score predicted long-term global cognitive decline in non-demented patients [F(1, 110) = 9.72, P = 0.002], remarkably even in those with normal cognition at baseline [F(1, 80) = 4.71, P = 0.03]. In contrast, in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses there was no association between region of interest brain volumes and cognitive performance in patients with Parkinson's disease with normal cognition. These findings support involvement of the hippocampus and parietal–temporal cortex with cognitive impairment and long-term decline in Parkinson's disease. In addition, an Alzheimer's disease pattern of brain atrophy may be a preclinical biomarker of cognitive decline

  19. Quantitative T2 mapping of white matter: applications for ageing and cognitive decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Michael J.; McCann, Bryony; Tsivos, Demitra; Dillon, Serena; Coulthard, Elizabeth; Kauppinen, Risto A.

    2016-08-01

    In MRI, the coherence lifetime T2 is sensitive to the magnetic environment imposed by tissue microstructure and biochemistry in vivo. Here we explore the possibility that the use of T2 relaxometry may provide information complementary to that provided by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in ageing of healthy controls (HC), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). T2 and diffusion MRI metrics were quantified in HC and patients with MCI and mild AD using multi-echo MRI and DTI. We used tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to evaluate quantitative MRI parameters in white matter (WM). A prolonged T2 in WM was associated with AD, and able to distinguish AD from MCI, and AD from HC. Shorter WM T2 was associated with better cognition and younger age in general. In no case was a reduction in T2 associated with poorer cognition. We also applied principal component analysis, showing that WM volume changes independently of  T2, MRI diffusion indices and cognitive performance indices. Our data add to the evidence that age-related and AD-related decline in cognition is in part attributable to WM tissue state, and much less to WM quantity. These observations suggest that WM is involved in AD pathology, and that T2 relaxometry is a potential imaging modality for detecting and characterising WM in cognitive decline and dementia.

  20. A Depressive Endophenotype for Predicting Cognitive Decline among Mexican American Adults and Elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Leigh A; Gamboa, Adriana; Vintimilla, Raul; Edwards, Melissa; Hall, James; Weiser, Brent; Yadav, Menaka; Dickensheets, Tony; O'Bryant, Sid E

    2016-07-25

    Late life depression is a prodromal feature and a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We identified five items in the Geriatric Depression scale (DepE) that are important as a risk for MCI and AD: memory problems, feeling blue, crying, feeling worthless, and trouble concentrating. Our goal was to examine the relationship between DepE and cognition in a cohort of Mexican Americans. Data from 317 Mexican Americans from the HABLE study were analyzed. DepE scores were dichotomized into two groups: endorsement of 1 item or less, and endorsement of 2 or more items. Cognition was assessed via neuropsychological tests, and diagnosis was based on consensus review. We utilized linear regression to examine the association between DepE and cognitive performance, and logistic regression to examine the utility of DepE in predicting MCI. To examine the impact of DepE on memory over 12 months, we performed ANOVA analysis. Elevated DepE scores were associated with poorer performance on various measures of memory and cognition, but not executive or visual spatial skills. Over 12 months, we found a decline in immediate memory among women but not men. Those with high scores were 4 times more likely to have MCI. ANOVA of total scores revealed differences between groups on immediate memory (p cognitive decline.

  1. Beneficial Effects of Yogasanas and Pranayama in limiting the Cognitive decline in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajani, Santhakumari; Archana, Rajagopalan; Indla, Yogananda Reddy; Rajesh, P

    2017-01-01

    Out of many complications that were observed in type 2 diabetes, cognitive impairment is the most neglected. The aim of the present study is to assess the cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes and to observe the role of yogasanas and pranayama in ameliorating the cognitive decline. Sixty eight type 2 diabetic subjects were recruited in the study, 34 of them did specific yogasanas and pranayama (test group) for six months and the remaining age and sex matched 34 subjects were recruited as (control group) who were not on any specific exercise regimen. Glycaemic index was estimated by measuring the glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentration with Bio-Rad apparatus and cognition was assessed by using Addenbrook's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R), which is a neuropsychological battery. Data was analysed with unpaired student t test. P valuecognitive scores in the test group when compared with the control group. In test group six months practice of yogasanas and pranayama has also significantly brought down the high glycaemic values which were observed in the control group. These findings allow the study to conclude that regular practice of yogasanas and pranayama has a beneficial effect on cognitive performance in type 2 diabetic subjects by stabilizing blood glucose.

  2. Neuroticism Traits Selectively Impact Long Term Illness Course and Cognitive Decline in Late-Life Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Kevin J; Chan, Grace; Steffens, David C

    2017-03-01

    Neuroticism is a broad construct that conveys a predisposition to experience psychological distress and negative mood states. Vulnerability to stress (VS) is one neuroticism trait that has been linked to worse mood and cognitive outcomes in older adults. We hypothesized that elevated VS would be associated with worse illness course and cognitive decline in older adults with late-life major depression (LLD). Participants were enrolled in the Neurocognitive Outcomes of Depression in the Elderly (NCODE), a longitudinal investigation of the predictors of poor illness course and cognitive decline in LLD. Participants were followed upwards of 10 years. NCODE operates in a naturalistic treatment milieu. 112 participants aged 60 and older with a current diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Treatment response was assessed at least every 3 months and more often if clinically needed. Participants also completed the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO PI-R) and an annual cognitive examination. Neuroticism traits from the NEO PI-R included anxiety, depression, anger-hostility, self-consciousness, impulsivity, and VS. Higher neuroticism traits of VS, impulsivity, anger-hostility, and anxiety were associated with worse treatment response over time. High VS was the only neuroticism trait significantly associated with cognitive functioning. High VS negatively influenced the rate of global cognitive decline over time. Individual personality traits within the neuroticism dimension are associated with treatment resistance and cognitive impairment in LLD. It remains to be seen whether these individual traits are associated with different neurobiological substrates and clinical characteristics of LLD. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Postural control and cognitive decline in older adults: position versus velocity implicit motor strategy.

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    Deschamps, Thibault; Beauchet, Olivier; Annweiler, Cédric; Cornu, Christophe; Mignardot, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the impact of cognitive decline on postural control strategies in older adults with and without cognitive decline from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to mild-to-moderate Alzheimer disease (MMAD). We hypothesized that the cognitive decline affected the postural control leading to higher bounding limits of COP velocity dynamics. Based on a cross-sectional design, 175 non-faller older adults were recruited in Angers University Hospital, France, including 50 cognitively healthy individuals [CHI] (mean age 76.42 ± 4.84 years; 30% women), 64 age- and body mass index-matched participants with MCI (mean age 77.51 ± 6.32 years; 39% women), and 61 age- and body mass index-matched participants with MMAD (mean age 78.44 ± 3.97 years; 62% women). For all data collection of postural sway, the participants were asked to maintain quiet stance on force platform. The postural test consisted of two trials of quiet stance, with eyes open and with eyes closed. The COP parameters were mean and standard deviation (SD) of position, velocity and average absolute maximal velocity (AAMV) in antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions. Overall, the analysis concerning all COP parameters revealed a significant main effect of cognitive status on velocity-based variables, with post hoc comparisons evidencing that SD velocity and AAMV increased with cognitive impairment. The current findings suggest an active control (or corrective process) of COP velocity dynamics for CHI, whereas MCI and MMAD are affected by COP movements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Performances on a cognitive theory of mind task: specific decline or general cognitive deficits? Evidence from normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliss, Rafika; Lemerre, Marion; Mollard, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    Compromised theory of mind (ToM) can be explained either by a failure to implement specific representational capacities (mental state representations) or by more general executive selection demands. In older adult populations, evidence supporting affected executive functioning and cognitive ToM in normal aging are reported. However, links between these two functions remain unclear. In the present paper, we address these shortcomings by using a specific task of ToM and classical executive tasks. We studied, using an original cognitive ToM task, the effect of age on ToM performances, in link with the progressive executive decline. 96 elderly participants were recruited. They were asked to perform a cognitive ToM task, and 5 executive tests (Stroop test and Hayling Sentence Completion Test to appreciate inhibitory process, Trail Making Test and Verbal Fluency for shifting assessment and backward span dedicated to estimate working memory capacity). The results show changes in cognitive ToM performance according to executive demands. Correlational studies indicate a significant relationship between ToM performance and the selected executive measures. Regression analyzes demonstrates that level of vocabulary and age as the best predictors of ToM performance. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that ToM deficits are related to age-related domain-general decline rather than as to a breakdown in specialized representational system. The implications of these findings for the nature of social cognition tests in normal aging are also discussed.

  5. Preventing cognitive decline in older African Americans with mild cognitive impairment: design and methods of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Hegel, Mark T; Leiby, Benjamin E

    2012-07-01

    Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) affects 25% of older African Americans and predicts progression to Alzheimer's disease. An extensive epidemiologic literature suggests that cognitive, physical, and/or social activities may prevent cognitive decline. We describe the methods of a randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of Behavior Activation to prevent cognitive decline in older African Americans with the amnestic multiple domain subtype of MCI. Community Health Workers deliver 6 initial in-home treatment sessions over 2-3 months and then 6 subsequent in-home booster sessions using language, materials, and concepts that are culturally relevant to older African Americans during this 24 month clinical trial. We are randomizing 200 subjects who are recruited from churches, senior centers, and medical clinics to Behavior Activation or Supportive Therapy, which controls for attention. The primary outcome is episodic memory as measured by the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised at baseline and at months 3, 12, 18, and 24. The secondary outcomes are general and domain-specific neuropsychological function, activities of daily living, depression, and quality-of-life. The negative results of recent clinical trials of drug treatments for MCI and Alzheimer's disease suggest that behavioral interventions may provide an alternative treatment approach to preserve cognition in an aging society. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Activities of Daily Living and Depressive Symptoms in Patients with Subjective Cognitive Decline, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogmann, Elisabeth; Moser, Doris; Klug, Stefanie; Gleiss, Andreas; Auff, Eduard; Dal-Bianco, Peter; Pusswald, Gisela; Lehrner, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) may be an early indicator for an increased risk of dementia. The exact definition of SCD remains unclear and has recently become a major research interest. To determine impairments in activities of daily living (ADL) and depressive symptoms in elderly individuals with SCD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We included 752 consecutive patients suffering from SCD, non-amnestic (naMCI) or amnestic MCI (aMCI), AD, and 343 healthy controls into this prospective cohort study. A neuropsychological test battery, B-ADL and BDI-II was performed. SCD patients showed a decreased performance in ADL compared to controls. Performance in ADL declined concurrently with cognitive abilities along the controls-SCD-naMCI-aMCI-AD continuum. Individuals with cognitive complains, no matter if SCD, MCI, or AD patients, reported more often depressive symptoms compared to healthy controls without complaints. Within all five cognitive subgroups, patients with depressive symptoms reported more difficulties in ADL in comparison to patients without depressive symptoms. Adjusting for depressive symptoms, there was no significant group difference between the control versus the SCD group (OR 1.1, CI 0.6-1.7). SCD is a heterogeneous clinical condition. Specific features such as slightly impaired ADL and depressive symptoms are associated with SCD. Clinical markers may serve as an indicator for preclinical AD and in combination with biomarkers guide to an early diagnosis of a progressive neurodegenerative disease.

  7. The relationship of bilingualism to cognitive decline: The Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukadam, Naaheed; Jichi, Fatima; Green, David; Livingston, Gill

    2018-02-01

    We wished to clarify the link between bilingualism and cognitive decline, and examine whether improved executive function due to bilingualism may be a factor in preventing cognitive decline. We used the Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing which collected data on 2087 participants aged over 65 over 20 years. We compared baseline demographics, health, and social characteristics between bilingual and non-bilingual participants. We used linear mixed models analysis to explore the effect of bilingualism on MMSE score over time and linear regression to explore the effect of bilingualism on baseline MMSE scores, controlling for pre-specified potential confounders. Bilingual participants had lower baseline MMSE scores than the non-bilingual population (mean difference = -2.3 points; 95% confidence intervals = 1.56-2.90). This was fully explained by education and National Adult Reading Test scores (17.4; standard deviation [SD] =7.7 versus 28.1; SD = 8.2) which also partly explained baseline executive function test scores differences. Bilingual and non-bilingual participants did not differ in MMSE decline over time (-0.33 points, P = 0.31) nor on baseline tests of executive function (-0.26, P = 0.051). In this cohort, education rather than bilingualism was a predictor of MMSE score, and being bilingual did not protect from cognitive decline. We conclude that bilingualism is complex, and when it is not the result of greater educational attainment, it does not always protect from cognitive decline. Neuroprotective effects of bilingualism over time may be attributable to the precise patterns of language use but not to bilingualism per se. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Reduction of Endogenous Melatonin Accelerates Cognitive Decline in Mice in a Simulated Occupational Formaldehyde Exposure Environment

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    Yufei Mei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Individuals afflicted with occupational formaldehyde (FA exposure often suffer from abnormal behaviors such as aggression, depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, and in particular, cognitive impairments. Coincidentally, clinical patients with melatonin (MT deficiency also complain of cognitive problems associated with the above mental disorders. Whether and how FA affects endogenous MT metabolism and induces cognitive decline need to be elucidated. To mimic occupational FA exposure environment, 16 healthy adult male mice were exposed to gaseous FA (3 mg/m3 for 7 consecutive days. Results showed that FA exposure impaired spatial memory associated with hippocampal neuronal death. Biochemical analysis revealed that FA exposure elicited an intensive oxidative stress by reducing systemic glutathione levels, in particular, decreasing brain MT concentrations. Inversely, intraperitoneal injection of MT markedly attenuated FA-induced hippocampal neuronal death, restored brain MT levels, and reversed memory decline. At tissue levels, injection of FA into the hippocampus distinctly reduced brain MT concentrations. Furthermore, at cellular and molecular levels, we found that FA directly inactivated MT in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that MT supplementation contributes to the rescue of cognitive decline, and may alleviate mental disorders in the occupational FA-exposed human populations.

  9. Role of Nut Consumption in the Management of Cognitive Decline - A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Kuca, Kamil; Valis, Martin; Hort, Jakub

    2018-02-01

    Currently, there is a significant increase in the number of older generation groups, which may result in serious economic and social issues. Therefore there is a need to prolong the active life of these older individuals, especially by focusing on modifying lifestyle factors such as healthy nutrition. In fact, recent research has shown that, for example, nuts are an important part of people's healthy diet because they have appeared to be neuroprotective compounds which might maintain or in some cases even improve people's cognitive functions. The purpose of this review study is to explore the role of the nut nutrition in the maintenance and delay of cognitive decline among older individuals. The findings indicate that the nut consumption may contribute to the delay of cognitive decline in aging. However, this nut diet is just one component of the multi-nutrient dietary intervention for health aging. More longitudinal controlled randomized studies have to be performed in this field to prove the efficacy of the nut nutrition for the delay of cognitive decline. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Cognitive decline in normal aging and its prevention: a review on non-pharmacological lifestyle strategies

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    Klimova B

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Blanka Klimova,1,2 Martin Valis,2 Kamil Kuca3,4 1Department of Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Kralove, 2Department of Neurology, 3Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, 4Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the selected non-pharmacological lifestyle activities on the delay of cognitive decline in normal aging. This was done by conducting a literature review in the four acknowledged databases Web of Science, Scopus, MEDLINE, and Springer, and consequently by evaluating the findings of the relevant studies. The findings show that physical activities, such as walking and aerobic exercises, music therapy, adherence to Mediterranean diet, or solving crosswords, seem to be very promising lifestyle intervention tools. The results indicate that non-pharmacological lifestyle intervention activities should be intense and possibly done simultaneously in order to be effective in the prevention of cognitive decline. In addition, more longitudinal randomized controlled trials are needed in order to discover the most effective types and the duration of these intervention activities in the prevention of cognitive decline, typical of aging population groups. Keywords: cognitive impairment, healthy older individuals, intervention, benefits

  11. Longitudinal relationship of severe periodontitis with cognitive decline in older Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, M; Yoshihara, A; Kimura, Y; Sato, M; Wada, T; Sakamoto, R; Ishimoto, Y; Fukutomi, E; Chen, W; Imai, H; Fujisawa, M; Okumiya, K; Taylor, G W; Ansai, T; Miyazaki, H; Matsubayashi, K

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiologic data examining the longitudinal relationship between periodontitis and cognitive status are very limited, especially in Asian populations. The present study examined the longitudinal relationship of periodontitis with cognitive decline in 85 Japanese community-dwelling individuals (average age: 79.3 years) for whom data were available from comprehensive health examinations conducted in 2010 and 2013. Based on a baseline full-mouth periodontal examination, severe periodontitis was defined using a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American Academy of Periodontology definition. Cognitive decline during the 3-year study period was defined using the results of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Information on age, gender, education, depression, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol use, exercise, hypertension, diabetes, history of cardiovascular disease and stroke, and baseline MMSE scores were obtained and tested as potential confounders in the statistical models. Among 85 study participants, 21 (24.7%) were defined as having severe periodontitis. Multivariable Poisson regression analyses revealed that severe periodontitis was significantly associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline [adjusted relative risk = 2.2; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.1-4.5]. Furthermore, multivariable linear regression analyses revealed that participants with severe periodontitis had a 1.8-point greater decrease (95% CI: -3.3 to -0.2) in MMSE score than those without severe periodontitis. Within the limitations related to its small sample size, the findings of the present study suggest that severe periodontitis is significantly associated with future decline in cognitive function among community-dwelling older Japanese subjects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Omega 3 fatty acid for the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Sydenham

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence from observational studies suggests that diets high in omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA may protect people from cognitive decline and dementia. The strength of this potential protective effect has recently been tested in randomized controlled trials. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of omega-3 PUFA supplementation for the prevention of dementia and cognitive decline in cognitively healthy older people. METHODS: Search: We searched ALOIS - the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group's Specialized Register on - 6 April 2012 using the terms: "omega 3", PUFA, "fatty acids", "fatty acid", fish, linseed, eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials of an omega-3 PUFA intervention which was provided for a minimum of six months to participants aged 60 years and over who were free from dementia or cognitive impairment at the beginning of the study. Two review authors independently assessed all trials. Data collection and analysis: The review authors sought and extracted data on incident dementia, cognitive function, safety and adherence, either from published reports or by contacting the investigators for original data. Data were extracted by two review authors. We calculated mean difference (MD or standardised mean differences (SMD and 95% confidence intervals (CI on an intention-to-treat basis, and summarized narratively information on safety and adherence. MAIN RESULTS: Information on cognitive function at the start of a study was available on 4080 participants randomised in three trials. Cognitive function data were available on 3536 participants at final follow-up. In two studies participants received gel capsules containing either omega-3 PUFA (the intervention or olive or sunflower oil (placebo for six or 24 months. In one study, participants received margarine spread for 40 months; the margarine for the intervention group contained omega-3 PUFA. Two studies

  13. Omega 3 fatty acid for the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Sydenham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence from observational studies suggests that diets high in omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA may protect people from cognitive decline and dementia. The strength of this potential protective effect has recently been tested in randomized controlled trials. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of omega-3 PUFA supplementation for the prevention of dementia and cognitive decline in cognitively healthy older people. METHODS: Search: We searched ALOIS - the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group's Specialized Register on - 6 April 2012 using the terms: "omega 3", PUFA, "fatty acids", "fatty acid", fish, linseed, eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials of an omega-3 PUFA intervention which was provided for a minimum of six months to participants aged 60 years and over who were free from dementia or cognitive impairment at the beginning of the study. Two review authors independently assessed all trials. Data collection and analysis: The review authors sought and extracted data on incident dementia, cognitive function, safety and adherence, either from published reports or by contacting the investigators for original data. Data were extracted by two review authors. We calculated mean difference (MD or standardised mean differences (SMD and 95% confidence intervals (CI on an intention-to-treat basis, and summarized narratively information on safety and adherence. MAIN RESULTS: Information on cognitive function at the start of a study was available on 4080 participants randomised in three trials. Cognitive function data were available on 3536 participants at final follow-up. In two studies participants received gel capsules containing either omega-3 PUFA (the intervention or olive or sunflower oil (placebo for six or 24 months. In one study, participants received margarine spread for 40 months; the margarine for the intervention group contained omega-3 PUFA. Two studies

  14. Cognitive decline tracks motor progression and not disease duration in Parkinson patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BD Riggeal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BD Riggeal1, GP Crucian1, P Seignourel2, CE Jacobson IV1, MS Okun1, RL Rodriguez1, Hubert H Fernandez11Department of Neurology; 2Department of Community Health and Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: We performed an analysis of prospectively-acquired cross sectional data on 106 Parkinson disease (PD patients who underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing and the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS motor scale. A significant correlation between the UPDRS motor and neuropsychological tests in all cognitive domains except for general intelligence and visuo-spatial function was seen. In this study, cognitive decline within this PD cohort correlated with motor impairment but not disease duration. Our findings suggest that overall cognitive impairment (except visuospatial dysfunction may track motor progression in PD more than duration of disease. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm our results.Keywords: Parkinson, dementia, cognition, visual-spatial dysfunction

  15. The LonDownS adult cognitive assessment to study cognitive abilities and decline in Down syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Carla M. Startin; Sarah Hamburg; Rosalyn Hithersay; Amy Davies; Erin Rodger; Nidhi Aggarwal; Tamara Al-Janabi; André Strydom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS), the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, is associated with an ultra-high risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. However, there is individual variability in the onset of clinical dementia and in baseline cognitive abilities prior to decline, particularly in memory, executive functioning, and motor coordination. The LonDownS Consortium aims to determine risk and protective factors for the development of dementia and factors relating to cognitiv...

  16. Adiposity, Change in Adiposity, and Cognitive Decline in Mid- and Late Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nancy A; Lirette, Seth T; Cannon, Victoria A; Turner, Stephen T; Mosley, Thomas H; Windham, Beverly G

    2017-06-01

    To examine associations between adiposity and adiposity change (loss, stable, gain) and subsequent longitudinal cognitive performance in African Americans in mid and late life. Cohort study using linear mixed models. Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy. African-American sibships with hypertension in Jackson, Mississippi (N = 1,108). Waist circumference and body mass index (BMI) were measured at two examinations 5 years apart. Stable adiposity was defined as values within 5% of the first measure. A composite cognitive Z-score was derived from individual cognitive test Z-scores at two study visits 6 years apart. Larger waist circumference was associated with greater rate of cognitive decline during follow-up (beta = -0.0009 per year, P = .001); BMI, change in waist circumference, and change in BMI were not associated with rate of decline. Loss of adiposity in midlife was associated with higher cognitive Z-scores in middle-aged individuals, and loss of adiposity in late life was associated with lower Z-scores in older adults (P = .01 for interaction between waist circumference and age; P = .04 for interaction between BMI and age). Simultaneous inclusion of waist circumference and BMI in the cross-sectional model suggested an association between larger waist circumference and poorer cognitive performance (beta = -0.009, P = .006) and between higher BMI and better cognitive performance (beta = 0.014, P = .06). The results suggested a differential pattern of the relationship between adiposity and cognition according to age (mid- or late life) and regional distribution of adiposity. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Case Report: Outcomes of Feldenkrais Movements on Self-reported Cognitive Decline in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, Gerhild

    2016-01-01

    Context • A lack of cognitive health can limit a person's well-being and may compromise independent living. The potential for cognitive decline is a major concern for aging individuals. Regular physical activity has been shown to improve cognitive processes. However, functional limitations frequently prevent older adults from participating in conventional exercise programs. Given the gentle nature of mind-body exercises, interventions such as the Feldenkrais may provide an alternative. Objective • The study intended to investigate whether Feldenkrais lessons can offset cognitive decline among older adults. The study was a case series with 2 participants. Setting • The study took place in the wellness center of a retirement community. Participants • Participants were 2 female residents in the community, with self-reported cognitive challenges. Intervention • The Feldenkrais method awareness through movement (ATM) was used. The lessons were based on common Feldenkrais themes, such as the relationship between eye organization and body movement, coordination of muscles, breathing, and an exploration of the participants' habits. Outcome Measures • The Trail Making Test A (TMT-A) and Trail Making Tests B (TMT-B) were used to measure cognitive function at baseline and after the Feldenkrais intervention. Results • Both participants improved their performance on the TMT-A and TMT-B after completing the Feldenkrais intervention. Neither of the 2 participants reported any adverse events related to the lessons. Conclusion • The beneficial results warrant further research into the efficacy of Feldenkrais as complementary, alternative therapy for preserving cognitive function on a larger scale and in populations with diagnosed cognitive impairments.

  18. Polyphenol- and PUFA-rich walnuts protect against age-associated cognitive decline through epigenetic modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A demographic shift towards an aging population and the incidence of age-related brain disorders are on the rise worldwide. A rapid decline in brain health with aging is primarily caused by the brain’s exceptionally high demand for energy which drives high oxygen consumption, leading to a subsequent...

  19. Meditation and Music Improve Memory and Cognitive Function in Adults with Subjective Cognitive Decline: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Kim E; Selfe, Terry Kit; Khalsa, Dharma Singh; Kandati, Sahiti

    2017-01-01

    While effective therapies for preventing or slowing cognitive decline in at-risk populations remain elusive, evidence suggests mind-body interventions may hold promise. In this study, we assessed the effects of Kirtan Kriya meditation (KK) and music listening (ML) on cognitive outcomes in adults experiencing subjective cognitive decline (SCD), a strong predictor of Alzheimer's disease. Sixty participants with SCD were randomized to a KK or ML program and asked to practice 12 minutes/day for 3 months, then at their discretion for the ensuing 3 months. At baseline, 3 months, and 6 months we measured memory and cognitive functioning [Memory Functioning Questionnaire (MFQ), Trail-making Test (TMT-A/B), and Digit-Symbol Substitution Test (DSST)]. The 6-month study was completed by 53 participants (88%). Participants performed an average of 93% (91% KK, 94% ML) of sessions in the first 3 months, and 71% (68% KK, 74% ML) during the 3-month, practice-optional, follow-up period. Both groups showed marked and significant improvements at 3 months in memory and cognitive performance (MFQ, DSST, TMT-A/B; p's≤0.04). At 6 months, overall gains were maintained or improved (p's≤0.006), with effect sizes ranging from medium (DSST, ML group) to large (DSST, KK group; TMT-A/B, MFQ). Changes were unrelated to treatment expectancies and did not differ by age, gender, baseline cognition scores, or other factors. Findings of this preliminary randomized controlled trial suggest practice of meditation or ML can significantly enhance both subjective memory function and objective cognitive performance in adults with SCD, and may offer promise for improving outcomes in this population.

  20. Differential effects of enriched environment at work on cognitive decline in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Then, Francisca S; Luck, Tobias; Luppa, Melanie; König, Hans-Helmut; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2015-05-26

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how different mentally demanding work conditions during the professional life-i.e., enriched environments at work-might influence the rate of cognitive decline in old age. Individuals (n = 1,054) of the Leipzig Longitudinal Study of the Aged, a representative population-based cohort study of individuals aged 75 years and older, underwent cognitive testing via the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in up to 6 measurement waves. Type and level of mentally demanding work conditions in the participants' former professional life were classified based on the O*NET job descriptor database. In multivariate mixed-model analyses (controlling for sociodemographic and health-related factors), a high level of mentally demanding work tasks stimulating verbal intelligence was significantly associated with a better cognitive functioning at baseline (on average 5 MMSE points higher) as well as a lower rate of cognitive decline (on average 2 MMSE points less) over the 8-year follow-up period compared with a low level. The rate of cognitive decline in old age was also significantly lower (on average 3 MMSE points less) in individuals who had a high level of mentally demanding work tasks stimulating executive functions than those who had a low level. The results suggest that a professional life enriched with work tasks stimulating verbal intelligence and executive functions may help to sustain a good cognitive functioning in old age (75+ years). The findings thus emphasize that today's challenging work conditions may also promote positive health effects. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Optimizing Cognitive Development over the Life Course and Preventing Cognitive Decline: Introducing the Cognitive Health Environment Life Course Model (CHELM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Kaarin J.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal cognitive development is defined in this article as the highest level of cognitive function reached in each cognitive domain given a person's biological and genetic disposition, and the highest possible maintenance of cognitive function over the adult life course. Theoretical perspectives underpinning the development of a framework…

  2. Depressive symptoms and cognitive decline: A longitudinal analysis of potentially modifiable risk factors in community dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Damien; Kiss, Alex; Lanctot, Krista; Herrmann, Nathan

    2016-01-15

    Depressive symptoms have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline in later life. There are no interventions proven to reduce risk of cognitive decline in older adults with depression, and it is unclear how these effects are mediated. We aim to determine what mediates the relationship between depressive symptoms and cognitive decline in later life. Seven thousand six hundred and sixty six community dwelling older adults (age ≥ 50) from the English Longitudinal study of Ageing (ELSA) underwent clinical assessment. Inflammation was assessed with C Reactive Protein and depressive symptoms were assessed with the 8-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies (CESD) scale. Five thousand, five hundred and ninety (73.5%) had a follow-up cognitive assessment after a median of 47 months. Depressive symptoms were independently associated with cognitive decline (B=0.09, pdepressive symptoms. Low physical activity (z=2.16, p=0.03) and inflammation (z=2.3, p=0.02) mediated the relationship between depressive symptoms and cognitive decline while hypertension, diabetes and smoking also contributed. This is an observational study with a limited duration of follow up. Not all variables related to cognitive decline were accounted for in this analysis. The relationship between depressive symptoms and cognitive decline in later life appears to be mediated by low physical activity, increased inflammation and vascular risk factors that may be amenable to modification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Role of metal ions in the cognitive decline of Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakisa eMalakooti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of whole or part of chromosome 21 is the most common mental impairment. All Down syndrome (DS individuals suffer from cognitive decline and develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD by the age of forty. The appearance of enlarged early endosomes, followed by Amyloid β peptide deposition, the appearance of tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles and basal forebrain cholinergic neuron (BFCN degeneration are the neuropathological characteristics of this disease. In this review we will examine the role of metal ion dyshomeostasis and the genes which may be involved in these processes, and relate these back to the manifestation of age-dependant cognitive decline in DS.

  4. Is impaired cerebral vasoreactivity an early marker of cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Aude; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Deverdun, Jeremy; Molino, François; Maréchal, Bénédicte; Picot, Marie-Christine; Ayrignac, Xavier; Carra, Clarisse; Bauchet, Luc; Krainik, Alexandre; Labauge, Pierre; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    The link between cerebral vasoreactivity and cognitive status in multiple sclerosis remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate a potential decrease of cerebral vasoreactivity in multiple sclerosis patients and correlate it with cognitive status. Thirty-three patients with multiple sclerosis (nine progressive and 24 remitting forms, median age: 39 years, 12 males) and 22 controls underwent MRI with a hypercapnic challenge to assess cerebral vasoreactivity and a neuropsychological assessment. Cerebral vasoreactivity, measured as the cerebral blood flow percent increase normalised by end-tidal carbon dioxide variation, was assessed globally and by regions of interest using the blood oxygen level-dependent technique. Non-parametric statistics tests were used to assess differences between groups, and associations were estimated using linear models. Cerebral vasoreactivity was lower in patients with cognitive impairment than in cognitively normal patients (p=0.004) and was associated with education level in patients (R 2 = 0.35; p = 0.047). There was no decrease in cerebral vasoreactivity between patients and controls. Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis may be mediated through decreased cerebral vasoreactivity. Cerebral vasoreactivity could therefore be considered as a marker of cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis. • Cerebral vasoreactivity does not differ between multiple sclerosis patients and controls. • Cerebral vasoreactivity measure is linked to cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis. • Cerebral vasoreactivity is linked to level of education in multiple sclerosis.

  5. Video Games as a Means to Reduce Age-related Cognitive Decline: Attitudes, Compliance, and Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Boot

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We explored these issues in an intervention that tested the ability of an action game and a brain fitness game to improve a variety of abilities. Cognitive abilities did not significantly improve, suggesting caution when recommending video game interventions as a means to reduce the effects of cognitive aging. However, the game expected to produce the largest benefit based on previous literature (an action game induced the lowest intervention compliance. We explain this low compliance by participants’ ratings of the action game as less enjoyable and by their prediction that training would have few meaningful benefits. Despite null cognitive results, data provide valuable insights into the types of video games older adults are willing to play and why.

  6. Video games as a means to reduce age-related cognitive decline: attitudes, compliance, and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Walter R; Champion, Michael; Blakely, Daniel P; Wright, Timothy; Souders, Dustin J; Charness, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We explored these issues in an intervention that tested the ability of an action game and a "brain fitness" game to improve a variety of abilities. Cognitive abilities did not significantly improve, suggesting caution when recommending video game interventions as a means to reduce the effects of cognitive aging. However, the game expected to produce the largest benefit based on previous literature (an action game) induced the lowest intervention compliance. We explain this low compliance by participants' ratings of the action game as less enjoyable and by their prediction that training would have few meaningful benefits. Despite null cognitive results, data provide valuable insights into the types of video games older adults are willing to play and why.

  7. P wave dispersion and maximum P wave duration are independently associated with rapid renal function decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ming Su

    Full Text Available The P wave parameters measured by 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG are commonly used as noninvasive tools to assess for left atrial enlargement. There are limited studies to evaluate whether P wave parameters are independently associated with decline in renal function. Accordingly, the aim of this study is to assess whether P wave parameters are independently associated with progression to renal end point of ≥25% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. This longitudinal study included 166 patients. The renal end point was defined as ≥25% decline in eGFR. We measured two ECG P wave parameters corrected by heart rate, i.e. corrected P wave dispersion (PWdisperC and corrected P wave maximum duration (PWdurMaxC. Heart function and structure were measured from echocardiography. Clinical data, P wave parameters, and echocardiographic measurements were compared and analyzed. Forty-three patients (25.9% reached renal end point. Kaplan-Meier curves for renal end point-free survival showed PWdisperC > median (63.0 ms (log-rank P = 0.004 and PWdurMaxC > median (117.9 ms (log-rank P<0.001 were associated with progression to renal end point. Multivariate forward Cox-regression analysis identified increased PWdisperC (hazard ratio [HR], 1.024; P = 0.001 and PWdurMaxC (HR, 1.029; P = 0.001 were independently associated with progression to renal end point. Our results demonstrate that increased PWdisperC and PWdurMaxC were independently associated with progression to renal end point. Screening patients by means of PWdisperC and PWdurMaxC on 12 lead ECG may help identify a high risk group of rapid renal function decline.

  8. Antihypertensive classes, cognitive decline and incidence of dementia: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi Marpillat, Natacha; Macquin-Mavier, Isabelle; Tropeano, Anne-Isabelle; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Maison, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    Prevention of cognitive decline and dementia with blood pressure lowering treatments has shown inconsistent results. We compared the effects of different classes of antihypertensive drugs on the incidence of dementia, and on cognitive function. We conducted a systematic review and included 19 randomized trials (18 515 individuals) and 11 studies (831 674 individuals) analysing the effects of antihypertensive treatment on cognition and on the incidence of dementia, respectively, in hypertensive patients without prior cerebrovascular disorders. Network meta-analysis was used for the comparison of antihypertensive classes. Antihypertensive treatment, regardless of the drug class, had benefits on overall cognition [effect size 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02-0.07] and all cognitive functions except language. Antihypertensive treatment reduced the risk of all-cause dementia by 9%, with reference to the control group (hazard ratio 0.91, 95% CI 0.89-0.94), when randomized trials and observationnal studies were combined (n = 15). Result was not significant with randomized trials alone (n = 4). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) had larger benefits than placebo on overall cognition (adjusted effect size 0.60 ± 0.18, P = 0.02). ARBs were more effective than β-blockers (0.67 ± 0.18, P = 0.01), diuretics (0.54 ± 0.19, P = 0.04) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (0.47 ± 0.17, P = 0.04) in rank. The mean change in blood pressure did not differ significantly between the different antihypertensive drug classes. Our results support the notion that antihypertensive treatment has beneficial effects on cognitive decline and prevention of dementia, and indicate that these effects may differ between drug classes with ARBs possibly being the most effective.

  9. Declínio da capacidade cognitiva durante o envelhecimento Decline of cognitive capacity during aging

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    Helenice Charchat-Fichman

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available O declínio da capacidade cognitiva (DCC decorre dos processos fisiológicos do envelhecimento normal ou de um estágio de transição para as demências. Estudos epidemiológicos mostram que idosos com declínio da capacidade cognitiva apresentam maior risco de desenvolver Doença de Alzheimer (DA, em particular aqueles com déficit de memória episódica. A presente atualização mostra os principais critérios diagnósticos, achados neuropatológicos e neuropsicológicos do declínio da capacidade cognitiva durante o envelhecimento.Decline of cognitive capacity (DCC is due to normal physiological aging processes or to pre-dementia stage. Epidemiological studies show that elderly with decline of cognitive capacity have higher risk to develop Alzheimer's disease (AD, especially those with episodic memory deficits. This review presents the most important diagnosis criteria, neuropathological and neuropsychological findings of decline of cognitive capacity during aging.

  10. The rapid FEV(1) decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with predominant emphysema: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveri, Isa; Corsico, Angelo G; Grosso, Amelia; Albicini, Federica; Ronzoni, Vanessa; Tripon, Bianca; Imberti, Federica; Galasso, Thomas; Klersy, Catherine; Luisetti, Maurizio; Pistolesi, Massimo

    2013-02-01

    Early identification of patients with COPD and prone to more rapid decline in lung function is of particular interest from both a prognostic and therapeutic point of view. The aim of this study was to identify the clinical, functional and imaging characteristics associated with the rapid FEV(1) decline in COPD. Between 2001 and 2005, 131 outpatients with moderate COPD in stable condition under maximum inhaled therapy underwent clinical interview, pulmonary function tests and HRCT imaging of the chest and were followed for at least 3 years. Twenty-six percent of patients had emphysema detected visually using HRCT. The FEV(1) decline was 42 ± 66 mL/y in the total sample, 88 ± 76 mL/y among rapid decliners and 6 ± 54 mL/y among the other patients. In the univariable analysis, the decline of FEV(1) was positively associated with pack-years (p emphysema at HRCT (p emphysema proved to be an independent prognostic factor of rapid decline (p = 0.001). When emphysema was replaced by RV, the model still remained significant. The rapid decline in lung function may be identified by the presence of emphysema at HRCT or increased RV in patients with a long smoking history.

  11. Bilingualism does not alter cognitive decline or dementia risk among Spanish-speaking immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B; Schofield, Peter W; Farrell, Meagan T; Stern, Yaakov; Manly, Jennifer J

    2014-03-01

    Clinic-based studies suggest that dementia is diagnosed at older ages in bilinguals compared with monolinguals. The current study sought to test this hypothesis in a large, prospective, community-based study of initially nondemented Hispanic immigrants living in a Spanish-speaking enclave of northern Manhattan. Participants included 1,067 participants in the Washington/Hamilton Heights Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP) who were tested in Spanish and followed at 18-24 month intervals for up to 23 years. Spanish-English bilingualism was estimated via both self-report and an objective measure of English reading level. Multilevel models for change estimated the independent effects of bilingualism on cognitive decline in 4 domains: episodic memory, language, executive function, and speed. Over the course of the study, 282 participants developed dementia. Cox regression was used to estimate the independent effect of bilingualism on dementia conversion. Covariates included country of origin, gender, education, time spent in the United States, recruitment cohort, and age at enrollment. Independent of the covariates, bilingualism was associated with better memory and executive function at baseline. However, bilingualism was not independently associated with rates of cognitive decline or dementia conversion. Results were similar whether bilingualism was measured via self-report or an objective test of reading level. This study does not support a protective effect of bilingualism on age-related cognitive decline or the development of dementia. In this sample of Hispanic immigrants, bilingualism is related to higher initial scores on cognitive tests and higher educational attainment and may not represent a unique source of cognitive reserve. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Anxiety symptoms and risk of cognitive decline in older community-dwelling men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Ahmed M; Ganguli, Mary; Yaffe, Kristine; Hanlon, Joseph T; Lopez, Oscar L; Wilson, John W; Cauley, Jane A

    2017-07-01

    Previous research regarding anxiety as a predictor of future cognitive decline in older adults is limited and inconsistent. We examined the independent relationship between anxiety symptoms and subsequent cognitive decline. We included 2,818 community-dwelling older men (mean age = 76.1, SD ±5.3 years) who were followed on an average for 3.4 years. We assessed anxiety symptoms at baseline using the Goldberg Anxiety Scale (GAS; range = 0-9). We assessed cognitive function at baseline and at two subsequent visits using the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS; global cognition) and the Trails B test (executive function). At baseline, there were 690 (24%) men with mild anxiety symptoms (GAS 1-4) and 226 (8%) men with moderate/severe symptoms (GAS 5-9). Men with anxiety symptoms were more likely to have depressed mood, poor sleep, more chronic medical conditions, and more impairment in activities of daily living compared to those with no anxiety symptoms. Compared to those with no anxiety symptoms at baseline, men with any anxiety symptoms were more likely to have substantial worsening in Trails B completion time (OR = 1.56, 95% CI 1.19, 2.05). The association was attenuated after adjusting for potential confounders, including depression and poor sleep, but remained significant (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.04, 1.88). In cognitively healthy older men, mild anxiety symptoms may potentially predict future decline in executive functioning. Anxiety is likely a manifestation of an underlying neurodegenerative process rather than a cause.

  13. Early-stage white matter lesions detected by multispectral MRI segmentation predict progressive cognitive decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna eJokinen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available White matter lesions (WML are the main brain imaging surrogate of cerebral small-vessel disease. A new MRI tissue segmentation method, based on a discriminative clustering approach without explicit model-based added prior, detects partial WML volumes, likely representing very early-stage changes in normal-appearing brain tissue. This study investigated how the different stages of WML, from a pre-visible stage to fully developed lesions, predict future cognitive decline. MRI scans of 78 subjects, aged 65-84 years, from the Leukoaraiosis and Disability (LADIS study were analyzed using a self-supervised multispectral segmentation algorithm to identify tissue types and partial WML volumes. Each lesion voxel was classified as having a small (33%, intermediate (66%, or high (100% proportion of lesion tissue. The subjects were evaluated with detailed clinical and neuropsychological assessments at baseline and at three annual follow-up visits. We found that voxels with small partial WML predicted lower executive function compound scores at baseline, and steeper decline of executive scores in follow-up, independently of the demographics and the conventionally estimated hyperintensity volume on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. The intermediate and fully developed lesions were related to impairments in multiple cognitive domains including executive functions, processing speed, memory and global cognitive function. In conclusion, early-stage partial WML, still too faint to be clearly detectable on conventional MRI, already predict executive dysfunction and progressive cognitive decline regardless of the conventionally evaluated WML load. These findings advance early recognition of small vessel disease and incipient vascular cognitive impairment.

  14. Albuminuria and Cognitive Decline in People with Diabetes and Normal Renal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, James F.; Murray, Anne M.; Williamson, Jeff; Ismail-Beigi, Faramaz; Karl, Diane; Papademetriou, Vasilios; Launer, Lenore J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment. This study examines whether microvascular disease, as measured by albuminuria and decline in estimated GFR (eGFR), is associated with cognitive decline during 3.3 years of follow-up in individuals with diabetes with a normal baseline eGFR (approximately 90 ml/min per 1.73 m2). Design, setting, participants, & measurements Participants were from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Memory in Diabetes study (N=2977; mean age 62.5±5.8 years; recruitment from August 2003 to December 2005, followed through June 2009), which examined the association of intensive versus standard glucose control on cognitive function. Participants underwent three neuropsychologic tests at baseline, 20 months, and 40 months. Tests included information processing speed, verbal memory, and executive function. Mixed-effects models were used to assess the association of albuminuria and eGFR on the percentage decline in each test. Results Participants with albuminuria at baseline and follow-up (persistent albuminuria) (−5.8% [95% confidence interval (CI), −7.3 to −4.2]) and participants with albuminuria at follow-up but none at baseline (progressive albuminuria) (−4.1% [95% CI, −5.6 to −2.7]) had greater percentage declines on information processing speed than participants without albuminuria at baseline and at follow-up (no albuminuria) (−2.6% [95% CI, −3.4 to −1.9]) (P=0.001 and P=0.10, respectively). There were borderline percentage changes in the test of verbal memory (4.8% [95% CI, 2.4 to 7.1] and 4.7% [95% CI, 2.5 to 7.0] versus 7.1% [95% CI, 6.0 to 8.3]; P=0.11 and P=0.08, respectively). On logistic regression analysis, persistent albuminuria (odds ratio, 1.37 [95% CI, 1.09 to 1.72]) and progressive albuminuria (odds ratio, 1.25 [95% CI, 1.02 to 1.56]) were associated with a ≥5% decline in information processing speed scores but not with

  15. Age-related cognitive decline and associations with sex, education and apolipoprotein E genotype across ethnocultural groups and geographic regions: a collaborative cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnicki, Darren M.; Crawford, John D.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Castro-Costa, Erico; Stephan, Blossom C. M.; Lipton, Richard B.; Katz, Mindy J.; Ritchie, Karen; Scali, Jacqueline; Ancelin, Marie-Laure; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Yannakoulia, Mary; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Lam, Linda C. W.; Fung, Ada W. T.; Vaccaro, Roberta; Davin, Annalisa; Kim, Ki Woong; Han, Ji Won; Kim, Tae Hui; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Butterworth, Peter; Scazufca, Marcia; Kumagai, Shuzo; Chen, Sanmei; Narazaki, Kenji; Lobo, Antonio; Lopez-Anton, Raúl; Santabárbara, Javier; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2017-01-01

    Background The prevalence of dementia varies around the world, potentially contributed to by international differences in rates of age-related cognitive decline. Our primary goal was to investigate how rates of age-related decline in cognitive test performance varied among international cohort studies of cognitive aging. We also determined the extent to which sex, educational attainment, and apolipoprotein E ε4 allele (APOE*4) carrier status were associated with decline. Methods and findings We harmonized longitudinal data for 14 cohorts from 12 countries (Australia, Brazil, France, Greece, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Singapore, Spain, South Korea, United Kingdom, United States), for a total of 42,170 individuals aged 54–105 y (42% male), including 3.3% with dementia at baseline. The studies began between 1989 and 2011, with all but three ongoing, and each had 2–16 assessment waves (median = 3) and a follow-up duration of 2–15 y. We analyzed standardized Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and memory, processing speed, language, and executive functioning test scores using linear mixed models, adjusted for sex and education, and meta-analytic techniques. Performance on all cognitive measures declined with age, with the most rapid rate of change pooled across cohorts a moderate -0.26 standard deviations per decade (SD/decade) (95% confidence interval [CI] [-0.35, -0.16], p cognitive measures, with processing speed showing the greatest difference (-0.08 SD/decade, 95% CI [-0.15, -0.01], p = 0.019). The same overall pattern of results was found when analyses were repeated with baseline dementia cases excluded. We used only one test to represent cognitive domains, and though a prototypical one, we nevertheless urge caution in generalizing the results to domains rather than viewing them as test-specific associations. This study lacked cohorts from Africa, India, and mainland China. Conclusions Cognitive performance declined with age, and more rapidly with increasing

  16. Daily Stress Magnifies the Association between Cognitive Decline and Everyday Memory Problems: An Integration of Longitudinal and Diary Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickenbach, Elizabeth H.; Almeida, David M.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Lachman, Margie E.

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether long-term fluid cognitive decline was associated with memory problems in everyday life, and whether stress plays a moderating role. We expected that the association between cognitive decline and everyday memory problems would be magnified in the context of self-reported and physiological stress. Data are from the Boston Longitudinal Study, a subsample of the Midlife in the United States study. Participants in the current study (n=112) completed a battery of tests measuring fluid cognitive functioning at Time 1 (T1) and 2 (T2) over ten years. At T2, participants completed weekly diaries of self-reported daily stressors and everyday memory problems for twelve consecutive weeks. Also at T2, participants provided four saliva samples over the course of one day to assess physiological stress using diurnal cortisol profiles [cortisol awakening response (CAR) and diurnal cortisol slope (DCS)]. Self-reported daily stressors and a less healthy DCS were associated with more everyday memory problems, and participants with greater cognitive decline reported more memory problems compared to those with less or no decline. Self-reported daily stressors and CAR moderated the relationship of cognitive decline and memory problems. As expected, more cognitive decline was associated with greater increases in memory problems on weeks when individuals reported more daily stressors and for individuals with a less healthy CAR. The current findings can inform interventions aimed to identify factors, such as daily stress, that contribute to daily functioning in the context of cognitive decline. PMID:25365691

  17. Human anterolateral entorhinal cortex volumes are associated with cognitive decline in aging prior to clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Rosanna K; Yeung, Lok-Kin; Noly-Gandon, Alix; D'Angelo, Maria C; Kacollja, Arber; Smith, Victoria M; Ryan, Jennifer D; Barense, Morgan D

    2017-09-01

    We investigated whether older adults without subjective memory complaints, but who present with cognitive decline in the laboratory, demonstrate atrophy in medial temporal lobe (MTL) subregions associated with Alzheimer's disease. Forty community-dwelling older adults were categorized based on Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) performance. Total gray/white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, and white matter hyperintensity load were quantified from whole-brain T1-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging scans, whereas hippocampal subfields and MTL cortical subregion volumes (CA1, dentate gyrus/CA2/3, subiculum, anterolateral and posteromedial entorhinal, perirhinal, and parahippocampal cortices) were quantified using high-resolution T2-weighted scans. Cognitive status was evaluated using standard neuropsychological assessments. No significant differences were found in the whole-brain measures. However, MTL volumetry revealed that anterolateral entorhinal cortex (alERC) volume-the same region in which Alzheimer's pathology originates-was strongly associated with MoCA performance. This is the first study to demonstrate that alERC volume is related to cognitive decline in undiagnosed community-dwelling older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Periodic Limb Movements in Sleep are Associated with Greater Cognitive Decline in Older Men without Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yue; Blackwell, Terri; Stone, Katie L; Hoang, Tina D; Redline, Susan; Yaffe, Kristine

    2016-10-01

    To examine the association between periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) and change in selected aspects of cognition in community-dwelling older men. We studied 2,636 older men without dementia who underwent in-home polysomnography with measurement of the periodic limb movement index (PLMI) and periodic limb movement arousal index (PLMAI) using piezoelectric sensors. Random-effects models and logistic regression were used to examine the association between PLMI, PLMAI, and 3- to 4-y change in cognition. After multivariable adjustment, men with a high PLMI had greater decline on the Trail Making Test - Part B (P trend = 0.02); those with a PLMI ≥ 30 were 48% more likely (odds ratio = 1.48, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-2.07) to experience the development of significant cognitive impairment (≥ 1 SD above mean change). Further adjustment for sleep efficiency, nocturnal hypoxemia, or dopaminergic medication use and analysis among men without Parkinson disease (n = 2,607) showed similar findings. No significant association was found for PLMAI or for Modified Mini-Mental State Examination scores. Among older men without dementia, higher PLMS frequency was associated with greater decline in cognition, particularly in executive function.

  19. Total daily physical activity and the risk of AD and cognitive decline in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, A S; Boyle, P A; Yu, L; Shah, R C; Wilson, R S; Bennett, D A

    2012-04-24

    Studies examining the link between objective measures of total daily physical activity and incident Alzheimer disease (AD) are lacking. We tested the hypothesis that an objective measure of total daily physical activity predicts incident AD and cognitive decline. Total daily exercise and nonexercise physical activity was measured continuously for up to 10 days with actigraphy (Actical®; Philips Healthcare, Bend, OR) from 716 older individuals without dementia participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a prospective, observational cohort study. All participants underwent structured annual clinical examination including a battery of 19 cognitive tests. During an average follow-up of about 4 years, 71 subjects developed clinical AD. In a Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for age, sex, and education, total daily physical activity was associated with incident AD (hazard ratio = 0.477; 95% confidence interval 0.273-0.832). The association remained after adjusting for self-report physical, social, and cognitive activities, as well as current level of motor function, depressive symptoms, chronic health conditions, and APOE allele status. In a linear mixed-effect model, the level of total daily physical activity was associated with the rate of global cognitive decline (estimate 0.033, SE 0.012, p = 0.007). A higher level of total daily physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of AD.

  20. Thyroid Antibodies, Autoimmunity and Cognitive Decline: Is There a Population-Based Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Napthali

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmunity is considered an uncommon but under-recognised cause of cognitive decline. Methods: Serum samples from 3,253 randomly selected subjects enrolled in the Hunter Community Study, aged 55-85 years, were assayed for thyrotropin stimulatory hormone, anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab, anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA and extractable nuclear antigens (ENA. Cognitive function was assessed using the Audio Recorded Cognitive Screen (ARCS tool. Results: TPO-Ab were found in 8.4% and ANA in 27.9% of the study population, of whom 3% had positive ENA findings. No relationship was found between the ARCS score and either TPO-Ab (coefficient = 0.133; 95% CI -0.20, 0.82, p = 0.616, ANA at a low (coefficient = 1.01; 95% CI -2.58, 0.55, p = 0.203 or a high titre (coefficient = -0.65; 95% CI -2.59, 1.28, p = 0.508, or ENA antibodies (coefficient = 5.12; 95% CI -0.53, 10.77; p = 0.076. Conclusions: Autoantibody findings are common in an aging population and are not associated with cognitive decline.

  1. Caffeine impact on working memory-related network activation patterns in early stages of cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Sven; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Rodriguez, Cristelle; Moser, Dominik; Toma, Simona; Hofmeister, Jeremy; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2017-04-01

    Recent evidence indicates that caffeine may have a beneficial effect on cognitive decline and dementia. The current investigation assessed the effect of acute caffeine administration on working memory during the earliest stage of cognitive decline in elderly participants. The study includes consecutive 45 elderly controls and 18 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, 71.6 ± 4.7 years, 7 females). During neuropsychological follow-up at 18 months, 24 controls remained stable (sCON, 70.0 ± 4.3 years, 11 women), while the remaining 21 showed subtle cognitive deterioration (dCON, 73.4 ± 5.9 years, 14 women). All participants underwent an established 2-back working task in a crossover design of 200 mg caffeine versus placebo. Data analysis included task-related general linear model and functional connectivity tensorial independent component analysis. Working memory behavioral performances did not differ between sCON and dCON, while MCI was slower and less accurate than both control groups (p caffeine administration essentially restricted to the right hemisphere (p caffeine effects on brain activation and DMN deactivation. These complex fMRI patterns possibly reflect the instable status of these cases with intact behavioral performances despite already existing functional alterations in neocortical circuits.

  2. CLU genetic variants and cognitive decline among elderly and oldest old.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Mengel-From

    Full Text Available The CLU gene is one of the prime genetic candidates associated with Alzheimers disease. In the present study CLU genotypes and haplotypes were associated with baseline cognition and the rate of cognitive decline in two cohorts, the Danish 1905 birth cohort (93 years of age in 1998 and the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish twins (LSADT (73-83 year old twins in 1997. Both Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE and a cognitive composite score was attained up to six times for up to 10 years and analysed using random effects models and vital status. The rs11136000 T allele was associated with better baseline cognitive performance both in the LSADT (effect on intercept: 0.41 95% CI [-0.04; 0.87] and the 1905 birth cohort (effect on intercept: 0.28 95% CI [0.01; 0.55], although it did not reach significance in the LSADT cohort. However, the rs11136000 T allele was significantly associated with a steeper decline (effect on slope: -0.06 95% CI [-0.11; -0.01] in the LSADT cohort, but not in the 1905 birth cohort. Haplotype analyses revealed that carriers of the common rs11136000, rs1532278 and rs9331888 TTC haplotype (36% in the CLU gene performed cognitively better than non-carriers in the 1905 birth cohort (effect on intercept: 0.50 95% CI [0.12; 0.91] and carriers of a rare TCC haplotype (1% performed worse on the cognitive composite score (effect on intercept: -1.51 95% CI [-2.92; -0.06]. The association between the TTC haplotype and better cognitive composite score was higher among those surviving past the age of 98 (p = 0.014, and among these the TTC haplotype was borderline associated with a steep decline (effect on slope: -0.13 95% CI [-0.27; 0.00]. In summery CLU genetic variants associate with cognition in two cohorts, but the genetic effect of CLU seems to regress toward the mean when aging.

  3. Risk of Cognitive Decline Associated With Paroxetine Use in Elderly Nursing Home Patients With Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Vishal; Chatterjee, Satabdi; Johnson, Michael L; Chen, Hua; Carnahan, Ryan M; Aparasu, Rajender R

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the risk of cognitive decline associated with paroxetine use in elderly nursing home patients with depression. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the 2007 to 2010 Medicare Part D claims and minimum data set (MDS) data involving new users of paroxetine and other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The primary outcome was MDS Cognition Scale. The repeated-measures mixed model was used to examine the effect of paroxetine on cognition after controlling for other factors. The baseline MDS Cognition Scale measures for paroxetine (n = 63) and other SSRI users (n =1018) were 2.02 (±1.85) and 2.50 (±2.39), respectively. The repeated-measures mixed model did not find statistically significant difference in cognition with the use of paroxetine (β = 0.02, 95% CI: -0.16 to 0.21]) when compared to other SSRIs. There was no differential effect of paroxetine on cognition when compared to other SSRIs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Initial cognitive decline is associated with cortical thinning in early Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Joana B; Svenningsson, Per; Weintraub, Daniel; Brønnick, Kolbjørn; Lebedev, Alexander; Westman, Eric; Aarsland, Dag

    2014-06-03

    Our aim was to assess cortical thickness in a large multicenter cohort of drug-naive patients with early Parkinson disease (PD), with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and explore the cognitive correlates of regional cortical thinning. One hundred twenty-three newly diagnosed patients with PD and 56 healthy controls with 3-tesla structural MRI scans and complete neuropsychological assessment from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative were included. Modified Movement Disorders Society Task Force level II criteria were applied to diagnose MCI in PD. FreeSurfer image processing and analysis software was used to measure cortical thickness across groups and the association with cognitive domains and tests. In patients with MCI, atrophy was found in temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital areas compared with controls. Specific regional thinning in the right inferior temporal cortex was also found in cognitively normal patients. Memory, executive, and visuospatial performance was associated with temporoparietal and superior frontal thinning, suggesting a relationship between cognitive impairment and both anterior and posterior cortical atrophy in the whole patient sample. These findings confirm that MCI is associated with widespread cortical atrophy. In addition, they suggest that regional cortical thinning is already present at the time of diagnosis in patients with early, untreated PD who do not meet the criteria for MCI. Together, the results indicate that cortical thinning can serve as a marker for initial cognitive decline in early PD. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Inflammatory Markers and Risk for Cognitive Decline in Chronic Kidney Disease: The CRIC Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Tam, Karman; Vittinghoff, Eric; Raj, Dominic; Sozio, Stephen M; Rosas, Sylvia E; Makos, Gail; Lora, Claudia; He, Jiang; Go, Alan S; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Yaffe, Kristine

    2017-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline, but the mechanisms remain poorly defined. We sought to determine the relation between serum inflammatory markers and risk of cognitive decline among adults with CKD. We studied 757 adults aged ≥55 years with CKD participating in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Cognitive study. We measured interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and fibrinogen in baseline plasma samples. We assessed cognitive function at regular intervals in 4 domains and defined incident impairment as a follow-up score more than 1 SD poorer than the group mean. The mean age of the sample was 64.3 ± 5.6 years, and the mean follow-up was 6.2 ± 2.5 years. At baseline, higher levels of each inflammatory marker were associated with poorer age-adjusted performance. In analyses adjusted for baseline cognition, demographics, comorbid conditions, and kidney function, participants in the highest tertile of hs-CRP, the highest tertile of fibrinogen, and the highest tertile of IL-1β had an increased risk of impairment in attention compared to participants in the lowest tertile of each marker. Participants in the highest versus lowest tertile of TNF-α had a lower adjusted risk of impairment in executive function. There was no association between other inflammatory markers and change in cognitive function. Among adults with CKD, higher levels of hs-CRP, fibrinogen, and IL-1β were associated with a higher risk of impairment in attention. Higher levels of TNF-α were associated with a lower risk of impaired executive function.

  6. Emerging infectious disease leads to rapid population declines of common British birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Robinson

    Full Text Available Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly cited as threats to wildlife, livestock and humans alike. They can threaten geographically isolated or critically endangered wildlife populations; however, relatively few studies have clearly demonstrated the extent to which emerging diseases can impact populations of common wildlife species. Here, we report the impact of an emerging protozoal disease on British populations of greenfinch Carduelis chloris and chaffinch Fringilla coelebs, two of the most common birds in Britain. Morphological and molecular analyses showed this to be due to Trichomonas gallinae. Trichomonosis emerged as a novel fatal disease of finches in Britain in 2005 and rapidly became epidemic within greenfinch, and to a lesser extent chaffinch, populations in 2006. By 2007, breeding populations of greenfinches and chaffinches in the geographic region of highest disease incidence had decreased by 35% and 21% respectively, representing mortality in excess of half a million birds. In contrast, declines were less pronounced or absent in these species in regions where the disease was found in intermediate or low incidence. Also, populations of dunnock Prunella modularis, which similarly feeds in gardens, but in which T. gallinae was rarely recorded, did not decline. This is the first trichomonosis epidemic reported in the scientific literature to negatively impact populations of free-ranging non-columbiform species, and such levels of mortality and decline due to an emerging infectious disease are unprecedented in British wild bird populations. This disease emergence event demonstrates the potential for a protozoan parasite to jump avian host taxonomic groups with dramatic effect over a short time period.

  7. Emerging Infectious Disease Leads to Rapid Population Declines of Common British Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toms, Mike P.; Peck, Kirsi M.; Kirkwood, James K.; Chantrey, Julian; Clatworthy, Innes R.; Evans, Andy D.; Hughes, Laura A.; Hutchinson, Oliver C.; John, Shinto K.; Pennycott, Tom W.; Perkins, Matthew W.; Rowley, Peter S.; Simpson, Vic R.; Tyler, Kevin M.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly cited as threats to wildlife, livestock and humans alike. They can threaten geographically isolated or critically endangered wildlife populations; however, relatively few studies have clearly demonstrated the extent to which emerging diseases can impact populations of common wildlife species. Here, we report the impact of an emerging protozoal disease on British populations of greenfinch Carduelis chloris and chaffinch Fringilla coelebs, two of the most common birds in Britain. Morphological and molecular analyses showed this to be due to Trichomonas gallinae. Trichomonosis emerged as a novel fatal disease of finches in Britain in 2005 and rapidly became epidemic within greenfinch, and to a lesser extent chaffinch, populations in 2006. By 2007, breeding populations of greenfinches and chaffinches in the geographic region of highest disease incidence had decreased by 35% and 21% respectively, representing mortality in excess of half a million birds. In contrast, declines were less pronounced or absent in these species in regions where the disease was found in intermediate or low incidence. Also, populations of dunnock Prunella modularis, which similarly feeds in gardens, but in which T. gallinae was rarely recorded, did not decline. This is the first trichomonosis epidemic reported in the scientific literature to negatively impact populations of free-ranging non-columbiform species, and such levels of mortality and decline due to an emerging infectious disease are unprecedented in British wild bird populations. This disease emergence event demonstrates the potential for a protozoan parasite to jump avian host taxonomic groups with dramatic effect over a short time period. PMID:20805869

  8. Effects of a computer-based cognitive exercise program on age-related cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozoki, Andrea; Radovanovic, Mirjana; Winn, Brian; Heeter, Carrie; Anthony, James C

    2013-01-01

    We developed a 'senior friendly' suite of online 'games for learning' with interactive calibration for increasing difficulty, and evaluated the feasibility of a randomized clinical trial to test the hypothesis that seniors aged 60-80 can improve key aspects of cognitive ability with the aid of such games. Sixty community-dwelling senior volunteers were randomized to either an online game suite designed to train multiple cognitive abilities, or to a control arm with online activities that simulated the look and feel of the games but with low level interactivity and no calibration of difficulty. Study assessment included measures of recruitment, retention and play-time. Cognitive change was measured with a computerized assessment battery administered just before and within two weeks after completion of the six-week intervention. Impediments to feasibility included: limited access to in-home high-speed internet, large variations in the amount of time devoted to game play, and a reluctance to pursue more challenging levels. Overall analysis was negative for assessed performance (transference effects) even though subjects improved on the games themselves. Post hoc analyses suggest that some types of games may have more value than others, but these effects would need to be replicated in a study designed for that purpose. We conclude that a six-week, moderate-intensity computer game-based cognitive intervention can be implemented with high-functioning seniors, but the effect size is relatively small. Our findings are consistent with Owen et al. (2010), but there are open questions about whether more structured, longer duration or more intensive 'games for learning' interventions might yield more substantial cognitive improvement in seniors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Subjective cognitive decline in patients with migraine and its relationship with depression, anxiety, and sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Hwa; Kang, Yeonwook; Cho, Soo-Jin

    2017-12-01

    Cognitive decline is a major concern in patients with migraine. Depression, anxiety, and/or poor sleep quality are well-known comorbidities of migraine, but available evidence on the subjective cognitive decline (SCD) is limited. This study aimed to investigate the presence and frequency of SCD and its relationship with anxiety, depression and sleep quality in patients with migraine. We enrolled patients with migraine who scored within the normal range of the Korean-Mini Mental State Examination and the Korean-Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Using the Subjective Cognitive Decline Questionnaire (SCD-Q), participants with ≥7 were assigned to the SCD group. The Headache Impact Test-6, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were used and analyzed between the two groups. A total of 188 patients with migraine, aged 38.1 ± 9.9 years, were enrolled. The mean SCD-Q score was 6.5 ± 5.5, and 44.7% of participants were identified as SCD. Migraineurs with SCD reported higher headache pain intensity and headache impact, as well as greater prevalence of anxiety, depression, reduced quality of sleep, and shorter sleep duration during weekdays compared to migraineurs without SCD. There were no significant differences in terms of age, sex, migraine type (chronic/episodic), medication, or sleep duration during weekends between the two groups. Upon multivariate logistic analysis adjusted for age, sex, headache characteristics, and psychological variables, depression was associated with increased risk of SCD (Odds ratio 1.31, 95% confidence interval 1.16-1.49) and sleep duration during weekdays was associated with decreased risk of SCD (Odds ratio 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.44-0.97). A non-negligible number of patients with migraine complained of SCD. Depression and short sleep duration during weekdays were related to SCD among adult migraineurs.

  10. Life-Space Mobility and Cognitive Decline Among Mexican Americans Aged 75 Years and Older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberschmidt, Seraina; Kumar, Amit; Raji, Mukaila M; Markides, Kyriakos; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Al Snih, Soham

    2017-07-01

    To examine the association between life-space mobility and cognitive decline over a five-year period among older Mexican Americans. Longitudinal study. Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly survey conducted in the southwestern of United States (Texas, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and California). Four hundred thirty-two Mexican Americans aged 75 and older with normal or high cognitive function at baseline. Socio-demographic factors, living arrangement, type of household, social support, financial strain, self-reported medical conditions, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), depressive symptoms, activities of daily living (ADLs), and Short Physical Performance Battery. Life-space assessment (LSA) during the past 4 weeks was assessed during in-home interview. Scores ranged from 0 (daily restriction to the bedroom) to 120 (daily trips outside of their own town without assistance) and categorized as 0 to 20, 21 to 40, 41 to 60, 61 to 80, and 81 to 120. Because of the small sample size in the category of 81 to 120, the two highest categories were combined into a single group. The mean LSA score and MMSE score of participants at baseline was 44.6 (Standard Deviation [SD], 20.7) and 25.7 (SD, 3.2), respectively. Mixed Model analyses showed that participants in the highest life-space category (≥61) experienced slower rates of cognitive decline over time compared to participants in the lowest category (0 to 20) (β = 1.03, Standard Error [SE] = 0.29, P = 0.0004), after adjusting for all covariates. Greater life-space mobility at baseline was predictor of slower rates of cognitive decline over 5 years in older Mexican Americans. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Late-onset Alzheimer's risk variants in memory decline, incident mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Crook, Julia E; Pedraza, Otto; Thomas, Colleen S; Pankratz, V Shane; Allen, Mariet; Nguyen, Thuy; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Ma, Li; Bisceglio, Gina D; Roberts, Rosebud O; Lucas, John A; Smith, Glenn E; Ivnik, Robert J; Machulda, Mary M; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2015-01-01

    We tested association of nine late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) risk variants from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with memory and progression to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or LOAD (MCI/LOAD) in older Caucasians, cognitively normal at baseline and longitudinally evaluated at Mayo Clinic Rochester and Jacksonville (n>2000). Each variant was tested both individually and collectively using a weighted risk score. APOE-e4 associated with worse baseline memory and increased decline with highly significant overall effect on memory. CLU-rs11136000-G associated with worse baseline memory and incident MCI/LOAD. MS4A6A-rs610932-C associated with increased incident MCI/LOAD and suggestively with lower baseline memory. ABCA7-rs3764650-C and EPHA1-rs11767557-A associated with increased rates of memory decline in subjects with a final diagnosis of MCI/LOAD. PICALM-rs3851179-G had an unexpected protective effect on incident MCI/LOAD. Only APOE-inclusive risk scores associated with worse memory and incident MCI/LOAD. The collective influence of the nine top LOAD GWAS variants on memory decline and progression to MCI/LOAD appears limited. Discovery of biologically functional variants at these loci may uncover stronger effects on memory and incident disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Longitudinal attentional engagement rescues mice from age-related cognitive declines and cognitive inflexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Matzel, Louis D.; Light, Kenneth R.; Wass, Christopher; Colas-Zelin, Danielle; Denman-Brice, Alexander; Waddel, Adam C.; Kolata, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Learning, attentional, and perseverative deficits are characteristic of cognitive aging. In this study, genetically diverse CD-1 mice underwent longitudinal training in a task asserted to tax working memory capacity and its dependence on selective attention. Beginning at 3 mo of age, animals were trained for 12 d to perform in a dual radial-arm maze task that required the mice to remember and operate on two sets of overlapping guidance (spatial) cues. As previously reported, this training res...

  13. APOE-epsilon4, depressive symptoms, and cognitive decline in Chinese older adults: Singapore Longitudinal Aging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niti, Mathew; Yap, Keng-Bee; Kua, Ee-Heok; Ng, Tze-Pin

    2009-02-01

    The precise relationship between depression and cognitive decline in older adults is unclear. We investigated the influence of apolipoprotein E (APOE)-epsilon4 genotype in modulating the effect of depressive symptoms on cognitive decline. Prospective cohort study of 1,487 cognitively high-functioning Chinese older adults. Depressive symptoms (Geriatric Depression Scale score >/=5) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were assessed at baseline, and cognitive decline (at least 1-point drop in MMSE) at 1-2 years after baseline. There was no significant difference in cognitive decline between depressed (32.9%) and nondepressed (31.5%) participants in the whole sample or among non-APOE-epsilon4 carriers. Among APOE-epsilon4 carriers, depressed participants showed more cognitive decline (40.0%) than their nondepressed counterparts (28.6%), odds ratio = 2.89, 95% confidence interval: 1.03-8.12; p = .04, after controlling for age, gender, education, vascular risk factors/events, smoking, alcohol drinking, physical functioning, subjective memory complaint, length of follow-up, and baseline MMSE scores (p for interaction = .03). Our study suggests that the presence of the APOE-epsilon4 allele significantly enhanced the risk of cognitive decline associated with depressive symptoms. This finding should be independently replicated in future studies.

  14. The Potential role of marine derived food products on Alzheimer\\'s disese and cognitive decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsan Assadi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer's disese is the most frequent cause of dementia and is one of important cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. Although, there are different therapeutic options for its treatment , the results of these therapies are disappointing. Omega-3 fatty acids in marine- derived food products, affect on different mechanisms, improve cognitive function, memory.in this study, effect Omega-3 fatty acids in marine- derived food products of cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's are reviewed. Methods: The method employed in this research was a systematic bibiliographic review,in which only the double-blind placebo-controlled studies or the clinically detailed enough open-labeled studies using validated scales were retained. Results: Many studies have shown that Omega-3 fatty acids in marine- derived food products, affect by different mechanisms include decrease inflammation and oxidative stress, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and neurogenesis promotion in neuroprotection and improvement cognitive function and memory, also omega3 fatty acid could lead to a decrease in risk of Alzheimer's diseas and the other cognitive impairements. Conclusion: However, more and large clinical trials are needed to confirm the beneficial effects of omega 3 fatty acid supplementation on the management of Alzheimer's disease and cognitive decline.

  15. Physical activity, structural brain changes and cognitive decline. The SMART-MR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, M; Boss, H M; van der Graaf, Y; Kappelle, L J; Biessels, G J; Geerlings, M I

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to examine the cross-sectional and prospective relationship between leisure time physical activity, brain MRI abnormalities and cognitive performance in patients with vascular disease. Within the SMART-MR study, 1.5 T MRI of the brain and neuropsychological examinations were performed at baseline (n = 1232) and after 3.9 ± 0.4 years follow-up (n = 663). Automatic brain segmentation was used to quantify intracranial (ICV), total brain, ventricular, and white matter lesion (WML) volumes. Brain infarcts were rated visually. Level of physical activity was expressed in metabolic equivalents (MET) hours p/week. With linear regression analysis we examined associations of level of physical activity with brain MRI measures and with cognitive performance, adjusted for potential confounders. For the association with brain infarcts relative risks (RR) were calculated with Poisson regression. At baseline, an increase in physical activity of one SD (39.7 METh/w) was significantly associated with larger total brain volume (B = 0.20% of ICV; 95% CI 0.06; 0.33%). A trend was found for the association of physical activity with smaller ventricular volume (B = -0.04% of ICV; 95% CI -0.09; 0.02%) and with a decreased risk for brain infarcts (RR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.82-1.02). No association was found with smaller WML volume (B = -0.02% of ICV; 95% CI -0.07; 0.04%). No associations with change in brain structures over time were observed. Also, no associations between physical activity and cognitive performance or cognitive decline were found. These data suggest that leisure time physical activity does not have a significant contribution in preventing or slowing down brain abnormalities and cognitive decline in this cohort of middle-aged individuals already burdened with vascular disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Computerized assessment of communication for cognitive stimulation for people with cognitive decline using spectral-distortion measures and phylogenetic inference.

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    Pham, Tuan D; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Truong, Cong-Thang; Okamoto, Kazushi; Futaba, Terufumi; Kanemoto, Shigeru; Sugiyama, Masahide; Lampe, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic communication and interpersonal relationships in care homes can help people to improve their mental wellbeing. Assessment of the efficacy of these dynamic and complex processes are necessary for psychosocial planning and management. This paper presents a pilot application of photoplethysmography in synchronized physiological measurements of communications between the care-giver and people with dementia. Signal-based evaluations of the therapy can be carried out using the measures of spectral distortion and the inference of phylogenetic trees. The proposed computational models can be of assistance and cost-effectiveness in caring for and monitoring people with cognitive decline.

  17. Computerized Assessment of Communication for Cognitive Stimulation for People with Cognitive Decline Using Spectral-Distortion Measures and Phylogenetic Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tuan D.; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Truong, Cong-Thang; Okamoto, Kazushi; Futaba, Terufumi; Kanemoto, Shigeru; Sugiyama, Masahide; Lampe, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic communication and interpersonal relationships in care homes can help people to improve their mental wellbeing. Assessment of the efficacy of these dynamic and complex processes are necessary for psychosocial planning and management. This paper presents a pilot application of photoplethysmography in synchronized physiological measurements of communications between the care-giver and people with dementia. Signal-based evaluations of the therapy can be carried out using the measures of spectral distortion and the inference of phylogenetic trees. The proposed computational models can be of assistance and cost-effectiveness in caring for and monitoring people with cognitive decline. PMID:25803586

  18. DNA methylation profile associated with rapid decline in kidney function: findings from the CRIC Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Maria R.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Joffe, Marshall M.; Xie, Dawei; Feldman, Harold I.; Dominic, Elizabeth A.; Guzman, Nicolas J.; Ramezani, Ali; Susztak, Katalin; Herman, James G.; Cope, Leslie; Harmon, Brennan; Kwabi-Addo, Bernard; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Go, Alan S.; He, Jiang; Lash, James P.; Kusek, John W.; Raj, Dominic S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epigenetic mechanisms may be important in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We studied the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern associated with rapid loss of kidney function using the Infinium HumanMethylation 450 K BeadChip in 40 Chronic Renal Insufficiency (CRIC) study participants (n = 3939) with the highest and lowest rates of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate. Results The mean eGFR slope was 2.2 (1.4) and −5.1 (1.2) mL/min/1.73 m2 in the stable kidney function group and the rapid progression group, respectively. CpG islands in NPHP4, IQSEC1 and TCF3 were hypermethylated to a larger extent in subjects with stable kidney function (P-values of 7.8E−05 to 9.5E−05). These genes are involved in pathways known to promote the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and renal fibrosis. Other CKD-related genes that were differentially methylated are NOS3, NFKBIL2, CLU, NFKBIB, TGFB3 and TGFBI, which are involved in oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways (P-values of 4.5E−03 to 0.046). Pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that gene networks related to cell signaling, carbohydrate metabolism and human behavior are epigenetically regulated in CKD. Conclusions Epigenetic modifications may be important in determining the rate of loss of kidney function in patients with established CKD. PMID:24516231

  19. Use of Vitamin E and C Supplements for the Prevention of Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basambombo, Luta Luse; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues; Côté, Sharlène; Laurin, Danielle

    2017-02-01

    There are few studies of the association between the use of antioxidant vitamin supplements and the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cognitive decline is generally viewed as part of the continuum between normal aging and AD. To evaluate whether the use of vitamin E and C supplements is associated with reduced risks of cognitive impairment, not dementia (CIND), AD, or all-cause dementia in a representative sample of older persons ≥65 years old. Data from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (1991-2002), a cohort study of dementia including 3 evaluation waves at 5-yearly intervals, were used. Exposure to vitamins E and C was self-reported at baseline in a risk factor questionnaire and/or in a clinical examination. The data set included 5269 individuals. Compared with those not taking vitamin supplements, the age-, sex-, and education-adjusted hazard ratios of CIND, AD, and all-cause dementia were, respectively, 0.77 (95% CI = 0.60-0.98), 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.86), and 0.62 (95% CI = 0.46-0.83) for those taking vitamin E and/or C supplements. Results remained significant in fully adjusted models except for CIND. Similar results were observed when vitamins were analyzed separately. This analysis suggests that the use of vitamin E and C supplements is associated with a reduced risk of cognitive decline. Further investigations are needed to determine their value as a primary prevention strategy.

  20. Moving Forward: Age Effects on the Cerebellum Underlie Cognitive and Motor Declines

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    Bernard, Jessica A.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2014-01-01

    Though the cortical contributions to age-related declines in motor and cognitive performance are well-known, the potential contributions of the cerebellum are less clear. The diverse functions of the cerebellum make it an important structure to investigate in aging. Here, we review the extant literature on this topic. To date, there is evidence to indicate that there are morphological age differences in the cerebellum that are linked to motor and cognitive behavior. Cerebellar morphology is often as good as -- or even better -- at predicting performance than the prefrontal cortex. We also touch on the few studies using functional neuroimaging and connectivity analyses that further implicate the cerebellum in age-related performance declines. Importantly, we provide a conceptual framework for the cerebellum influencing age differences in performance, centered on the notion of degraded internal models. The evidence indicating that cerebellar age differences associate with performance highlights the need for additional work in this domain to further elucidate the role of the cerebellum in age differences in movement control and cognitive function. PMID:24594194

  1. Cognitive decline is associated with systemic oxidative stress: the EVA study. Etude du Vieillissement Artériel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berr, C; Balansard, B; Arnaud, J; Roussel, A M; Alpérovitch, A

    2000-10-01

    To determine whether systemic oxidative stress status is associated with cognitive decline. A longitudinal population-based study. A cohort study of older subjects in Nantes, France. A total of 1166 high cognitive functioning subjects aged 60 to 70 in the Etude du Vieillissement Arteriel (EVA) cohort with a 4 year follow-up. Subjects completed a baseline interview and a global cognitive test (Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE)). Blood samples were obtained at baseline to determine plasma levels of selenium, carotenoids, thiobarbituric acid reactant substances (TBARS), an indicator of lipoperoxidation, and red blood cell vitamin E. Risk of cognitive decline, defined as a loss of 3 points in MMSE score between baseline and the 4 year follow-up, was assessed by oxidative stress level. Subjects with the highest levels of TBARS show an increased risk of cognitive decline (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.25; confidence interval (CI) 95% = 1.26-4.02). This result is reinforced in the lower antioxidant status subgroup. Subjects with low levels of selenium have an increased risk of cognitive decline (OR = 1.58; CI 95% = 1.08-2.31) after adjustment for various confounding factors. These results suggest that increased levels of oxidative stress and/or antioxidant deficiencies may pose risk factors for cognitive decline. The direct implication of oxidative stress in vascular and neurodegenerative mechanisms that lead to cognitive impairment should be further explored.

  2. Associations of hippocampal subfields in the progression of cognitive decline related to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Heidi; Mak, Elijah; Chander, Russell Jude; Ng, Aloysius; Au, Wing Lok; Sitoh, Yih Yian; Tan, Louis C S; Kandiah, Nagaendran

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal atrophy has been associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, literature on how hippocampal atrophy affects the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment in PD has been limited. Previous studies assessed the hippocampus as an entire entity instead of their individual subregions. We studied the progression of cognitive status in PD subjects over 18 in relation to hippocampal subfields atrophy. 65 PD subjects were included. Using the MDS task force criteria, PD subjects were classified as either having no cognitive impairment (PD-NCI) or PD-MCI. We extended the study by investigating the hippocampal subfields atrophy patterns in those who converted from PD-NCI to PD-MCI (PD-converters) compared to those who remained cognitively stable (PD-stable) over 18 months. Freesurfer 6.0 was used to perform the automated segmentation of the hippocampus into thirteen subregions. PD-MCI showed lower baseline volumes in the left fimbria, right CA1, and right HATA; and lower global cognition scores compared to PD-NCI. Baseline right CA1 was also correlated with baseline attention. Over 18 months, decline in volumes of CA2-3 and episodic memory were also seen in PD-converters compared to PD-stable. Baseline volumes of GC-DG, right CA4, left parasubiculum, and left HATA were predictive of the conversion from PD-NCI to PD-MCI. The findings from this study add to the anatomical knowledge of hippocampal subregions in PD, allowing us to understand the unique functional contribution of each subfield. Structural changes in the hippocampus subfields could be early biomarkers to detect cognitive impairment in PD.

  3. Potential cognitive decline linked to angiotensin-converting enzyme gene but not hypertension: Evidence from cognitive event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Li-Min; Yang, Yuan-Han; Lu, Shiang-Ru; Hsu, Chung-Yao; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Lai, Chiou-Lian

    2015-12-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the effect of hypertension and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotypes on cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs), and whether the impact of ACE genotypes on P300 is related to the influence of hypertension. Using the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI), we recruited 97 mentally healthy middle-aged and older adults. Medical histories were collected, and blood pressure, ACE insertion/deletion polymorphisms and ERPs in an auditory oddball task were measured for all participants. When the participants were stratified according to the presence or absence of hypertension, there were no differences in CASI score, percentage of ACE genotypes and ERPs. The subjects with the D/D homozygote displayed lower amplitude and longer latency of P300, although there were no differences in CASI score and the percentage of hypertension. The subjects with the D/D genotype tended to have decreased amplitude and prolonged latency of P300 ERPs which reflected subtle cognitive impairment. There were no associations between hypertension, CASI score and P300 measurements. Using ERPs, potential cognitive decline was linked to ACE genotypes, independently of the effect of hypertension. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Compensatory mechanisms in higher-educated subjects with Alzheimer's disease: a study of 20 years of cognitive decline.

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    Amieva, Hélène; Mokri, Hind; Le Goff, Mélanie; Meillon, Céline; Jacqmin-Gadda, Hélène; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Orgogozo, Jean-Marc; Stern, Yaakov; Dartigues, Jean-François

    2014-04-01

    A better knowledge of long-term trajectories of cognitive decline is a central feature of the study of the process leading to Alzheimer's dementia. Several factors may mitigate such decline, among which is education, a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. The aim of our work was to compare the pattern and duration of clinical trajectories before Alzheimer's dementia in individuals with low and high education within the PAQUID cohort involving 20 years of follow-up. The sample comprises 442 participants with incident Alzheimer's disease (27.2% were male)--171 with low education (mean age=86.2 years; standard deviation=5.3 years) and 271 with higher education (mean age=86.5; standard deviation=5.4)--and 442 control subjects matched according to age, sex and education. At each visit and up to the 20-year follow-up visit, several cognitive and clinical measures were collected and incident cases of Alzheimer's disease clinically diagnosed. The evolution of clinical measures in pre-demented subjects and matched controls was analysed with a semi-parametric extension of the mixed effects linear model. The results show that the first signs of cognitive decline occurred 15 to 16 years before achieving dementia threshold in higher-educated subjects whereas signs occurred at 7 years before dementia in low-educated subjects. There seemed to be two successive periods of decline in higher-educated subjects. Decline started ∼15 to 16 years before dementia with subtle impairment restricted to some cognitive tests and with no impact during the first 7 to 8 years on global cognition, cognitive complaints, or activities of daily living scales. Then, ∼7 years before dementia, global cognitive abilities begin to deteriorate, along with difficulties dealing with complex activities of daily living, the increase in self-perceived difficulties and depressive symptoms. By contrast, lower-educated subjects presented a single period of decline lasting ∼7 years, characterized by

  5. Mediterranean Diet and Age-Related Cognitive Decline: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Pedret, Cinta; Sala-Vila, Aleix; Serra-Mir, Mercè; Corella, Dolores; de la Torre, Rafael; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Fitó, Montserrat; Pérez-Heras, Ana; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Estruch, Ramon; Ros, Emilio

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress and vascular impairment are believed to partly mediate age-related cognitive decline, a strong risk factor for development of dementia. Epidemiologic studies suggest that a Mediterranean diet, an antioxidant-rich cardioprotective dietary pattern, delays cognitive decline, but clinical trial evidence is lacking. To investigate whether a Mediterranean diet supplemented with antioxidant-rich foods influences cognitive function compared with a control diet. Parallel-group randomized clinical trial of 447 cognitively healthy volunteers from Barcelona, Spain (233 women [52.1%]; mean age, 66.9 years), at high cardiovascular risk were enrolled into the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea nutrition intervention trial from October 1, 2003, through December 31, 2009. All patients underwent neuropsychological assessment at inclusion and were offered retesting at the end of the study. Participants were randomly assigned to a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extravirgin olive oil (1 L/wk), a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts (30 g/d), or a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat). Rates of cognitive change over time based on a neuropsychological test battery: Mini-Mental State Examination, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), Animals Semantic Fluency, Digit Span subtest from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Verbal Paired Associates from the Wechsler Memory Scale, and the Color Trail Test. We used mean z scores of change in each test to construct 3 cognitive composites: memory, frontal (attention and executive function), and global. Follow-up cognitive tests were available in 334 participants after intervention (median, 4.1 years). In multivariate analyses adjusted for confounders, participants allocated to a Mediterranean diet plus olive oil scored better on the RAVLT (P = .049) and Color Trail Test part 2 (P = .04) compared with controls; no between-group differences were observed for the other cognitive tests

  6. Autoimmune encephalitis: A potentially reversible cause of status epilepticus, epilepsy, and cognitive decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awadh Kishor Pandit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To review clinical characteristics and response to immunomodulation therapy in autoimmune encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus (SE, epilepsy, and cognitive decline. Design: Observational, prospective case series. Setting: All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: Prospective analysis of 15 patients, who presented with SE, epilepsy, cognitive decline, and other neurological symptoms with positive autoantibodies. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebrospinal-fluid analysis (CSF, and tumor screening were done periodically. Treatment received and responses (categorized as per patients and treating doctor′s information were noted. Results: There were 15 (males = 10 patients of autoimmune encephalitis. The mean age of presentation was 24 years (range: 2-64 years. The most common onset was subacute (64% and four (29% patients presented as SE. Predominant clinical presentations were seizures (100% almost of every semiology. CSF was done in 10 patients; it was normal in 60%. Brain MRI was done in all patients, in six (40% it was normal, six (40% showed T2W and FLAIR hyperintensities in bilateral limbic areas. Antibodies found were the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody in seven (50%, voltage-gated potassium channel antibody in five (36%, two of antiglutamic acid decarboxylase, and one patient with double stranded DNA (dsDNA antibodies. None showed evidence of malignancy. Patients received immunotherapy, either steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, or both. Follow-up showed significant improvement in majority of cases, neither further seizures nor relapse in nine (67% cases. One death occurred, due to delayed presentation. Conclusions: Uncommon but potentially reversible causes of SE, epilepsy, and cognitive decline may be immune-related and high index of suspicion will prevent missing the diagnosis.

  7. Increased levels of cerebrospinal fluid JNK3 associated with amyloid pathology: links to cognitive decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourmaud, Sarah; Paquet, Claire; Dumurgier, Julien; Pace, Clarisse; Bouras, Constantin; Gray, Françoise; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Meurs, Eliane F.; Mouton-Liger, François; Hugon, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease is characterized by cognitive decline, senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated τ proteins and neuronal loss. Aβ and τ are useful markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). C-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are serine-threonine protein kinases activated by phosphorylation and involved in neuronal death. Methods In this study, Western blots, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and histological approaches were used to assess the concentrations of Aβ, τ and JNK isoforms in postmortem brain tissue samples (10 Alzheimer disease and 10 control) and in CSF samples from 30 living patients with Alzheimer disease and 27 controls with neurologic disease excluding Alzheimer disease. Patients with Alzheimer disease were followed for 1–3 years and assessed using Mini–Mental State Examination scores. Results The biochemical and morphological results showed a significant increase of JNK3 and phosphorylated JNK levels in patients with Alzheimer disease, and JNK3 levels correlated with Aβ42 levels. Confocal microscopy revealed that JNK3 was associated with Aβ in senile plaques. The JNK3 levels in the CSF were significantly elevated in patients with Alzheimer disease and correlated statistically with the rate of cognitive decline in a mixed linear model. Limitations The study involved different samples grouped into 3 small cohorts. Evaluation of JNK3 in CSF was possible only with immunoblot analysis. Conclusion We found that JNK3 levels are increased in brain tissue and CSF from patients with Alzheimer disease. The finding that increased JNK3 levels in CSF could reflect the rate of cognitive decline is new and merits further investigation. PMID:25455349

  8. Behavioral and psychological symptoms and cognitive decline in patients with amnestic MCI and mild AD: a two-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocnet, Cornelia; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Donati, Alessia; Popp, Julius; Rossier, Jérôme; von Gunten, Armin

    2015-08-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has been defined as a transitional state between normal aging and dementia. In many cases, MCI represents an early stage of developing cognitive impairment. Patients diagnosed with MCI do not meet the criteria for dementia as their general intellect and everyday activities are preserved, although minor changes in instrumental activities of daily living (ADL) may occur. However, they may exhibit significant behavioral and psychological signs and symptoms (BPS), also frequently observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hence, we wondered to what extent specific BPS are associated with cognitive decline in participants with MCI or AD. Our sample consisted of 164 participants, including 46 patients with amnestic (single or multi-domain) MCI and 54 patients with AD, as well as 64 control participants without cognitive disorders. Global cognitive performance, BPS, and ADL were assessed using validated clinical methods at baseline and at two-year follow-up. The BPS variability over the follow-up period was more pronounced in the MCI group than in patients with AD: some BPS improve, others occur newly or worsen, while others still remain unchanged. Moreover, specific changes in BPS were associated with a rapid deterioration of the global cognitive level in MCI patients. In particular, an increase of euphoria, eating disorders, and aberrant motor behavior, as well as worsened sleep quality, predicted a decline in cognitive functioning. Our findings confirm a higher variability of BPS over time in the MCI group than in AD patients. Moreover, our results provide evidence of associations between specific BPS and cognitive decline in the MCI group that might suggest a risk of conversion of individuals with amnestic MCI to AD.

  9. Inhibition of the cerebral renin-angiotensin system to limit cognitive decline in elderly hypertensive persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opie, Lionel H

    2011-08-01

    Inhibition of then renin-angiotensin system (RAS) ranks among the best established and most used cardiovascular therapies. By providing protection against hypertension and heart failure, and also the microvascular complications of diabetes, RAS inhibitors have contributed to the longer life-expectancy now found in higher income populations throughout the world. However, longevity propels aging persons closer to the inevitable cognitive decline. It is here that the RAS-inhibitors may also have a special role, especially in the many elderly persons with hypertension.

  10. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Impaired Renal Function Are Associated With Brain Alterations and Poststroke Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Assayag, Einor; Eldor, Roy; Korczyn, Amos D; Kliper, Efrat; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Tene, Oren; Molad, Jeremy; Shapira, Itzhak; Berliner, Shlomo; Volfson, Viki; Shopin, Ludmila; Strauss, Yehuda; Hallevi, Hen; Bornstein, Natan M; Auriel, Eitan

    2017-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with diseases of the brain, kidney, and vasculature. However, the relationship between T2DM, chronic kidney disease, brain alterations, and cognitive function after stroke is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the inter-relationship between T2DM, impaired renal function, brain pathology on imaging, and cognitive decline in a longitudinal poststroke cohort. The TABASCO (Tel Aviv brain acute stroke cohort) is a prospective cohort of stroke/transient ischemic attack survivors. The volume and white matter integrity, ischemic lesions, and brain and hippocampal volumes were measured at baseline using 3-T MRI. Cognitive tests were performed on 507 patients, who were diagnosed as having mild cognitive impairment, dementia, or being cognitively intact after 24 months. At baseline, T2DM and impaired renal function (estimated creatinine clearance [eCCl] cognitive scores, and 19.7% of the participants developed cognitive decline (mild cognitive impairment or dementia). Multiple analysis, controlling for age, sex, education, and apolipoprotein E4, showed a significant association of both T2DM and eCCl cognitive decline. Having both conditions doubled the risk compared with patients with T2DM or eCCl performance in cognitive tests, 2 years after stroke. The presence of both conditions quadruples the risk for cognitive decline. T2DM and lower eCCl have an independent and additive effect on brain atrophy and the risk of cognitive decline. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01926691. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Exploring Experiences and Perceptions of Aging and Cognitive Decline Across Diverse Racial and Ethnic Groups

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    Lisa R. Roberts DrPH, MSN, FNP-BC

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore how older adults from three prominent ethnoracial groups experience cognitive decline and aging. Method: Semistructured key informant interviews (KIIs and focus groups (FGs were conducted with caregivers, experts, and older adults. Results: ( N = 75. Fifteen KIIs regarding cognitive aging issues were conducted among health care professionals and community-based agencies serving older adults. Eight FGs included family caregivers and physicians, and six FGs with Latino, African American, and White older adult community members. Major themes included (a personal expectations about aging, (b societal value of older adults, (c model of care preferred, and (d community concerns. An overarching theme was a sense of loss associated with aging; however, how this loss was experienced and dealt with varied. Discussion: Distinct patterns of concerns and views are important to understand for the development of programs aimed at meeting the needs of diverse older adult community members to improve health outcomes.

  12. Falls and cognitive decline in Mexican Americans 75 years and older

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    Padubidri A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anokha Padubidri,1,2 Soham Al Snih,2,3 Rafael Samper-Ternent,2,4 Kyriakos S Markides,2,5 Kenneth J Ottenbacher,2,3 Mukaila A Raji2,6 1College of Medicine, Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, OH, USA; 2Sealy Center on Aging, 3Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Professions, the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Universitario San Ignacio, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, Columbia; 5Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, 6Department of Internal Medicine, the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA Background: Little is known about long-term emotional and cognitive consequences of falls. We examined the association between falls and subsequent cognitive decline, and tested the hypothesis that depression would mediate any falls–cognition association among cognitively intact Hispanic Elders. Methods: We used data from the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly to examine change in Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE scores over the 6-year period according to number of falls. All participants (N=1,119 had MMSE scores ≥21 and complete data on Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression Scale, social and demographic factors, medical conditions (diabetes, heart attack, stroke, and hypertension, and hand grip muscle strength. Results: At baseline, participants’ mean age was 80.8 years (range, 74–109, mean ­education was 6.3 years (range, 0–17, and mean MMSE was 25.2 (range, 21–30. Of the 1,119 ­participants, 15.8% experienced one fall and 14.4% had two or more falls. In mixed model analyses, having two or more falls was associated with greater decline in MMSE score (estimate =–0.81, standard error =0.19, P<0.0001 compared to having no fall, after adjusting for age, sex, marital status, and education. The magnitude of the association decreased (estimate

  13. [Emotion regulation and the cognitive decline in aging: beyond the paradox].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Dominique; Sperduti, Marco; Blanchet, Sophie; Nicolas, Serge; Piolino, Pascale

    2015-09-01

    Aging is usually associated with cognitive decline, specifically of the executive functions supported by the frontal lobe. However, in line with observations about the preservation or even the increase of well-being with age, it has been suggested that emotion regulation efficiency follows the same developmental trajectory, remaining stable over time, or even increasing. Emotion regulation refers to a family of strategies aiming at modifying the nature, the intensity, the duration or the expression of emotions. These various strategies rely on different neurocognitive processes in order to be efficient. As these processes are differently affected by aging, some of those strategies appear more affected than others. Thus, elderly people tend to use more frequently situation selection strategies, such as avoiding potentially negative situations, while their ability to regulate an emotion using cognitive reappraisal (i.e., changing the meaning of the situation), a strategy drawing heavily on executive resources, appears less efficient than in younger people.

  14. Network functional connectivity and whole-brain functional connectomics to investigate cognitive decline in neurodegenerative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipasquale, O; Cercignani, Mara

    Non-invasive mapping of brain functional connectivity (FC) has played a fundamental role in neuroscience, and numerous scientists have been fascinated by its ability to reveal the brain's intricate morphology and functional properties. In recent years, two different techniques have been developed that are able to explore FC in pathophysiological conditions and to provide simple and non-invasive biomarkers for the detection of disease onset, severity and progression. These techniques are independent component analysis, which allows a network-based functional exploration of the brain, and graph theory, which provides a quantitative characterization of the whole-brain FC. In this paper we provide an overview of these two techniques and some examples of their clinical applications in the most common neurodegenerative disorders associated with cognitive decline, including mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy Bodies and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

  15. Monitoring the early signs of cognitive decline in elderly by computer games: an MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enikő Sirály

    Full Text Available It is anticipated that current and future preventive therapies will likely be more effective in the early stages of dementia, when everyday functioning is not affected. Accordingly the early identification of people at risk is particularly important. In most cases, when subjects visit an expert and are examined using neuropsychological tests, the disease has already been developed. Contrary to this cognitive games are played by healthy, well functioning elderly people, subjects who should be monitored for early signs. Further advantages of cognitive games are their accessibility and their cost-effectiveness.The aim of the investigation was to show that computer games can help to identify those who are at risk. In order to validate games analysis was completed which measured the correlations between results of the 'Find the Pairs' memory game and the volumes of the temporal brain regions previously found to be good predictors of later cognitive decline.34 healthy elderly subjects were enrolled in the study. The volume of the cerebral structures was measured by MRI. Cortical reconstruction and volumetric segmentation were performed by Freesurfer.There was a correlation between the number of attempts and the time required to complete the memory game and the volume of the entorhinal cortex, the temporal pole, and the hippocampus. There was also a correlation between the results of the Paired Associates Learning (PAL test and the memory game.The results gathered support the initial hypothesis that healthy elderly subjects achieving lower scores in the memory game have increased level of atrophy in the temporal brain structures and showed a decreased performance in the PAL test. Based on these results it can be concluded that memory games may be useful in early screening for cognitive decline.

  16. Diabetes and cognitive decline in a French cohort of patients infected with HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufouil, Carole; Richert, Laura; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Bruyand, Mathias; Amieva, Hélène; Dauchy, Frédéric-Antoine; Dartigues, Jean-François; Neau, Didier; Morlat, Philippe; Dehail, Patrick; Dabis, François; Bonnet, Fabrice; Chêne, Geneviève

    2015-09-22

    We investigated the relationship of diabetes and prediabetes with cognitive performances, assessed through raw test and z scores and according to neurocognitive impairment (NCI) classification in a cohort of individuals infected with HIV. The ANRS CO3 Aquitaine cohort is a prospective hospital-based cohort of HIV-1-infected patients under routine clinical management in 6 public hospitals in southwestern France. Between 2007 and 2009, an ancillary study consisted of a neuropsychological battery of 10 tests at baseline and 2-year follow-up. The severity of NCI (normal, asymptomatic, mild, HIV dementia) was assessed according to international guidelines. At baseline (400 patients, 33 with prediabetes, 39 with diabetes), in cross-sectional multivariable analyses, patients with diabetes performed significantly worse on 9 neuropsychological tests that assessed memory, executive functions, attention, psychomotor speed, language, and manual dexterity. Participants with prediabetes had worse performances compared with those who had normal glycemia in 5 tests. The longitudinal analysis of the association between glycemia status at baseline and change in cognitive performances over 2-year follow-up (n = 283) suggested that patients with diabetes also showed a slightly higher decline on 5 of the 10 tests, those involving executive functions and memory functioning. Glycemia status at baseline was not significantly associated with NCI severity in cross-sectional (p = 0.44) and longitudinal (p = 0.64) analyses. In this hospital-based cohort of people living with HIV, diabetes, but not the other cardiovascular risk factors, is associated with worse cognitive performances in several cognitive domains and with larger decline in fewer domains over the short term. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Monitoring the early signs of cognitive decline in elderly by computer games: an MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirály, Enikő; Szabó, Ádám; Szita, Bernadett; Kovács, Vivienne; Fodor, Zsuzsanna; Marosi, Csilla; Salacz, Pál; Hidasi, Zoltán; Maros, Viktor; Hanák, Péter; Csibri, Éva; Csukly, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    It is anticipated that current and future preventive therapies will likely be more effective in the early stages of dementia, when everyday functioning is not affected. Accordingly the early identification of people at risk is particularly important. In most cases, when subjects visit an expert and are examined using neuropsychological tests, the disease has already been developed. Contrary to this cognitive games are played by healthy, well functioning elderly people, subjects who should be monitored for early signs. Further advantages of cognitive games are their accessibility and their cost-effectiveness. The aim of the investigation was to show that computer games can help to identify those who are at risk. In order to validate games analysis was completed which measured the correlations between results of the 'Find the Pairs' memory game and the volumes of the temporal brain regions previously found to be good predictors of later cognitive decline. 34 healthy elderly subjects were enrolled in the study. The volume of the cerebral structures was measured by MRI. Cortical reconstruction and volumetric segmentation were performed by Freesurfer. There was a correlation between the number of attempts and the time required to complete the memory game and the volume of the entorhinal cortex, the temporal pole, and the hippocampus. There was also a correlation between the results of the Paired Associates Learning (PAL) test and the memory game. The results gathered support the initial hypothesis that healthy elderly subjects achieving lower scores in the memory game have increased level of atrophy in the temporal brain structures and showed a decreased performance in the PAL test. Based on these results it can be concluded that memory games may be useful in early screening for cognitive decline.

  18. Caffeine impact on working memory-related network activation patterns in early stages of cognitive decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Sven [Affidea Centre de Diagnostic Radiologique de Carouge CDRC, Geneva (Switzerland); Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Montandon, Marie-Louise; Rodriguez, Cristelle; Moser, Dominik; Toma, Simona; Hofmeister, Jeremy; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon [University Hospitals of Geneva, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Direction, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    Recent evidence indicates that caffeine may have a beneficial effect on cognitive decline and dementia. The current investigation assessed the effect of acute caffeine administration on working memory during the earliest stage of cognitive decline in elderly participants. The study includes consecutive 45 elderly controls and 18 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, 71.6 ± 4.7 years, 7 females). During neuropsychological follow-up at 18 months, 24 controls remained stable (sCON, 70.0 ± 4.3 years, 11 women), while the remaining 21 showed subtle cognitive deterioration (dCON, 73.4 ± 5.9 years, 14 women). All participants underwent an established 2-back working task in a crossover design of 200 mg caffeine versus placebo. Data analysis included task-related general linear model and functional connectivity tensorial independent component analysis. Working memory behavioral performances did not differ between sCON and dCON, while MCI was slower and less accurate than both control groups (p < 0.05). The dCON group had a less pronounced effect of acute caffeine administration essentially restricted to the right hemisphere (p < 0.05 corrected) and reduced default mode network (DMN) deactivation compared to sCON (p < 0.01 corrected). dCON cases are characterized by decreased sensitivity to caffeine effects on brain activation and DMN deactivation. These complex fMRI patterns possibly reflect the instable status of these cases with intact behavioral performances despite already existing functional alterations in neocortical circuits. (orig.)

  19. Brain-predicted age in Down syndrome is associated with beta amyloid deposition and cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James H; Annus, Tiina; Wilson, Liam R; Remtulla, Ridhaa; Hong, Young T; Fryer, Tim D; Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Cardenas-Blanco, Arturo; Smith, Robert; Menon, David K; Zaman, Shahid H; Nestor, Peter J; Holland, Anthony J

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) are more likely to experience earlier onset of multiple facets of physiological aging. This includes brain atrophy, beta amyloid deposition, cognitive decline, and Alzheimer's disease-factors indicative of brain aging. Here, we employed a machine learning approach, using structural neuroimaging data to predict age (i.e., brain-predicted age) in people with DS (N = 46) and typically developing controls (N = 30). Chronological age was then subtracted from brain-predicted age to generate a brain-predicted age difference (brain-PAD) score. DS participants also underwent [ 11 C]-PiB positron emission tomography (PET) scans to index the levels of cerebral beta amyloid deposition, and cognitive assessment. Mean brain-PAD in DS participants' was +2.49 years, significantly greater than controls (p brain-PAD was associated with the presence and the magnitude of PiB-binding and levels of cognitive performance. Our study indicates that DS is associated with premature structural brain aging, and that age-related alterations in brain structure are associated with individual differences in the rate of beta amyloid deposition and cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prospective Study of Arterial Stiffness and Subsequent Cognitive Decline Among Community-Dwelling Older Japanese

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    Yu Taniguchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV is inversely associated with cognitive function. However, it is not known whether baPWV predicts cognitive decline (CD in later life. We examined whether or not baPWV is an independent risk marker of subsequent CD in a population of older Japanese. Methods: Among 982 adults aged 65 years or older who participated in a baseline survey, 526 cognitively intact adults (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score ≥24; mean [SD] age, 71.7 [5.6] years; women, 57.8% were followed for a period of up to 5 years. Pulse wave velocity was determined using an automated waveform analyser. Cognition was assessed by the MMSE, and CD was defined as a decrease of two points or more on the MMSE. Results: During an average follow-up of 3.4 years, 85 participants (16.2% developed CD. After controlling for important confounders, the odds ratios for CD in the highest and middle tertiles of baPWV, as compared with the lowest tertile, were 2.95 (95% confidence interval, 1.29–6.74 and 2.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.11–5.15, respectively. Conclusions: High baPWV was an independent predictor of CD in a general population of older adults and may be useful in the clinical evaluation of elders.

  1. Increased non-protein bound iron in Down syndrome: contribution to lipid peroxidation and cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Caterina; Officioso, Arbace; Trojsi, Francesca; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Ciccoli, Lucia; De Felice, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21) is the leading cause of chromosomal-related intellectual disability. At an early age, adults with DS develop with the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, associated with a chronic oxidative stress. To investigate if non-protein bound iron (NPBI) can contribute to building up a pro-oxidative microenvironment, we evaluated NPBI in both plasma and erythrocytes from DS and age-matched controls, together with in vivo markers of lipid peroxidation (F2-isoprostanes, F2-dihomo-isoprostanes, F4-neuroprostanes) and in vitro reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in erythrocytes. The serum iron panel and uric acid were also measured. Second, we explored possible correlation between NPBI, lipid peroxidation and cognitive performance. Here, we report NPBI increase in DS, which correlates with increased serum ferritin and uric acid. High levels of lipid peroxidation markers and intraerythrocyte ROS formations were also reported. Furthermore, the scores of Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices (RCPM) test, performed as a measure of current cognitive function, are inversely related to NPBI, serum uric acid, and ferritin. Likewise, ROS production, F2-isoprostanes, and F4-neuroprostanes were also inversely related to cognitive performance, whereas serum transferrin positively correlated to RCPM scores. Our data reveal that increased availability of free redox-active iron, associated with enhanced lipid peroxidation, may be involved in neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in DS. In this respect, we propose chelation therapy as a potential preventive/therapeutic tool in DS.

  2. Religious attendance reduces cognitive decline among older women with high levels of depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsentino, Elizabeth A; Collins, Nicole; Sachs-Ericsson, Natalie; Blazer, Dan G

    2009-12-01

    There is growing evidence that regular attendance at religious functions is associated with less cognitive decline (CD). However, little research has investigated factors that may moderate the religious attendance-CD relationship. The present study examined the effects of gender and depressive symptoms on the relationship between religious attendance and CD. Data were drawn from waves 1 and 2 of the Duke Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly, which were 3 years apart. Participants consisted of a sample of community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older (N = 2,938). Linear regression analyses were conducted controlling for important demographic-, socioeconomic-, and health-related variables. Cognitive functioning was assessed at both waves to examine change in errors over time. Greater religious attendance was related to less CD. In addition, there was a three-way interaction between religious attendance, gender, and depressive symptoms in predicting CD. Among women with higher levels of depressive symptoms, those who less frequently attended religious services experienced greater CD than those who more frequently attended religious services. The interaction between attendance and depressive symptoms in men did not reach significance. Religious attendance may offer mental stimulation that helps to maintain cognitive functioning in later life, particularly among older depressed women. Given the possible benefits religious attendance may have on cognitive functioning, it may be appropriate in certain instances for clinicians to recommend that clients reengage in religious activities they may have given up as a result of their depression.

  3. White matter microstructure and cognitive decline in metabolic syndrome: a review of diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Freddy J; Gavrieli, Anna; Saade-Lemus, Patricia; Lioutas, Vasileios-Arsenios; Upadhyay, Jagriti; Novak, Vera

    2018-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors defined by the presence of abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertension and/or dyslipidemia. It is a major public health epidemic worldwide, and a known risk factor for the development of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Several studies have demonstrated a positive association between the presence of metabolic syndrome and worse cognitive outcomes, however, evidence of brain structure pathology is limited. Diffusion tensor imaging has offered new opportunities to detect microstructural white matter changes in metabolic syndrome, and a possibility to detect associations between functional and structural abnormalities. This review analyzes the impact of metabolic syndrome on white matter microstructural integrity, brain structure abnormalities and their relationship to cognitive function. Each of the metabolic syndrome components exerts a specific signature of white matter microstructural abnormalities. Metabolic syndrome and its components exert both additive/synergistic, as well as, independent effects on brain microstructure thus accelerating brain aging and cognitive decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Identifying residents at greater risk for cognitive decline by Minimum Data Set in long-term care settings

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    Liang-Yu Chen, MD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The diagnosis of dementia and depression remained lower than expected among the elderly population. As presented here, poor physical function, presence of RAP triggers for cognitive loss/dementia, and a higher sum of RAP triggers were strong predictors for cognitive decline.

  5. Smoking, dementia and cognitive decline in the elderly, a systematic review

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    Burch Lisa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotine may aid reaction time, learning and memory, but smoking increases cardiovascular risk. Cardiovascular risk factors have been linked to increased risk of dementia. A previous meta-analysis found that current smokers were at higher risk of subsequent dementia, Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and cognitive decline. Methods In order to update and examine this further a systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out using different search and inclusion criteria, database selection and more recent publications. Both reviews were restricted to those aged 65 and over. Results The review reported here found a significantly increased risk of Alzheimer's disease with current smoking and a likely but not significantly increased risk of vascular dementia, dementia unspecified and cognitive decline. Neither review found clear relationships with former smoking. Conclusion Current smoking increases risk of Alzheimer's disease and may increase risk of other dementias. This reinforces need for smoking cessation, particularly aged 65 and over. Nicotine alone needs further investigation.

  6. Age-related cognitive decline and associations with sex, education and apolipoprotein E genotype across ethnocultural groups and geographic regions: a collaborative cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnicki, Darren M; Crawford, John D; Dutta, Rajib; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Kochan, Nicole A; Andrews, Gavin; Lima-Costa, M Fernanda; Castro-Costa, Erico; Brayne, Carol; Matthews, Fiona E; Stephan, Blossom C M; Lipton, Richard B; Katz, Mindy J; Ritchie, Karen; Scali, Jacqueline; Ancelin, Marie-Laure; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Yannakoulia, Mary; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Lam, Linda C W; Wong, Candy H Y; Fung, Ada W T; Guaita, Antonio; Vaccaro, Roberta; Davin, Annalisa; Kim, Ki Woong; Han, Ji Won; Kim, Tae Hui; Anstey, Kaarin J; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Butterworth, Peter; Scazufca, Marcia; Kumagai, Shuzo; Chen, Sanmei; Narazaki, Kenji; Ng, Tze Pin; Gao, Qi; Reppermund, Simone; Brodaty, Henry; Lobo, Antonio; Lopez-Anton, Raúl; Santabárbara, Javier; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of dementia varies around the world, potentially contributed to by international differences in rates of age-related cognitive decline. Our primary goal was to investigate how rates of age-related decline in cognitive test performance varied among international cohort studies of cognitive aging. We also determined the extent to which sex, educational attainment, and apolipoprotein E ε4 allele (APOE*4) carrier status were associated with decline. We harmonized longitudinal data for 14 cohorts from 12 countries (Australia, Brazil, France, Greece, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Singapore, Spain, South Korea, United Kingdom, United States), for a total of 42,170 individuals aged 54-105 y (42% male), including 3.3% with dementia at baseline. The studies began between 1989 and 2011, with all but three ongoing, and each had 2-16 assessment waves (median = 3) and a follow-up duration of 2-15 y. We analyzed standardized Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and memory, processing speed, language, and executive functioning test scores using linear mixed models, adjusted for sex and education, and meta-analytic techniques. Performance on all cognitive measures declined with age, with the most rapid rate of change pooled across cohorts a moderate -0.26 standard deviations per decade (SD/decade) (95% confidence interval [CI] [-0.35, -0.16], p education was associated with a rate of decline slightly slower for the MMSE (0.004 SD/decade less, 95% CI [0.002, 0.006], p = 0.001), but slightly faster for language (-0.007 SD/decade more, 95% CI [-0.011, -0.003], p = 0.001). APOE*4 carriers declined slightly more rapidly than non-carriers on most cognitive measures, with processing speed showing the greatest difference (-0.08 SD/decade, 95% CI [-0.15, -0.01], p = 0.019). The same overall pattern of results was found when analyses were repeated with baseline dementia cases excluded. We used only one test to represent cognitive domains, and though a prototypical one, we

  7. Testing cognitive performance of socially housed monkeys: possibilities and limitations of the study of social influences on age-related cognitive decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toxopeus, Ido Bart

    2004-01-01

    In both humans and monkeys not all individuals show the same rate of age-related cognitive decline. One important factor to influence the rate of decline is extended exposure to elevated levels of glucocorticoids, which play a central role in the response to stress. Furthermore, studies with humans

  8. Enriched Childhood Experiences Moderate Age-related Motor and Cognitive Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan J. Metzler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with deterioration of skilled manual movement. Specifically, aging corresponds with increased reaction time, greater movement duration, segmentation of movement, increased movement variability, and reduced ability to adapt to external forces and inhibit previously learned sequences. Moreover, it is thought that decreased lateralization of neural function in older adults may point to increased neural recruitment as a compensatory response to deterioration of key frontal and intra-hemispheric networks, particularly of callosal structures. However, factors that mediate age-related motor decline are not well understood. Here we show that music training in childhood is associated with reduced age-related decline of bimanual and unimanual motor skills in a MIDI keyboard motor learning task. Compared to older adults without music training, older adults with more than a year of music training demonstrated proficient bimanual and unimanual movement, evidenced by enhanced speed and decreased movement errors. Further, this group demonstrated significantly better implicit learning in the weather prediction task, a non-motor task. The performance of older adults with music training in those tasks was comparable to young adults. Older adults, however, displayed greater verbal ability compared to young adults irrespective of a past history of music training. Our results indicate that music training early in life may reduce age-associated decline of neural motor and cognitive networks.

  9. Correlating Cognitive Decline with White Matter Lesion and Brain Atrophy Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilello, Michel; Doshi, Jimit; Nabavizadeh, S Ali; Toledo, Jon B; Erus, Guray; Xie, Sharon X; Trojanowski, John Q; Han, Xiaoyan; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Vascular risk factors are increasingly recognized as risks factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and early conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. While neuroimaging research in AD has focused on brain atrophy, metabolic function, or amyloid deposition, little attention has been paid to the effect of cerebrovascular disease to cognitive decline. To investigate the correlation of brain atrophy and white matter lesions with cognitive decline in AD, MCI, and control subjects. Patients with AD and MCI, and healthy subjects were included in this study. Subjects had a baseline MRI scan, and baseline and follow-up neuropsychological battery (CERAD). Regional volumes were measured, and white matter lesion segmentation was performed. Correlations between rate of CERAD score decline and white matter lesion load and brain structure volume were evaluated. In addition, voxel-based correlations between baseline CERAD scores and atrophy and white matter lesion measures were computed. CERAD rate of decline was most significantly associated with lesion loads located in the fornices. Several temporal lobe ROI volumes were significantly associated with CERAD decline. Voxel-based analysis demonstrated strong correlation between baseline CERAD scores and atrophy measures in the anterior temporal lobes. Correlation of baseline CERAD scores with white matter lesion volumes achieved significance in multilobar subcortical white matter. Both baseline and declines in CERAD scores correlate with white matter lesion load and gray matter atrophy. Results of this study highlight the dominant effect of volume loss, and underscore the importance of small vessel disease as a contributor to cognitive decline in the elderly.

  10. The MMSE orientation for time domain is a strong predictor of subsequent cognitive decline in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Berroa, Elizabeth; Luo, Xiaodong; Schmeidler, James; Rapp, Michael A; Dahlman, Karen; Grossman, Hillel T; Haroutunian, Vahram; Beeri, Michal Schnaider

    2009-12-01

    The mini-mental state exam (MMSE) has been used to address questions such as determination of appropriate cutoff scores for differentiation of individuals with intact cognitive function from patients with dementia and rate of cognitive decline. However, little is known about the relationship of performance in specific cognitive domains to subsequent overall decline. To examine the specific and/or combined contribution of four MMSE domains (orientation for time, orientation for place, delayed recall, and attention) to prediction of overall cognitive decline on the MMSE. Linear mixed models were applied to 505 elderly nursing home residents (mean age = 85, > 12 years education = 27%; 79% F, mean follow-up = 3.20 years) to examine the relationship between baseline scores of these domains and total MMSE scores over time. Orientation for time was the only domain significantly associated with MMSE decline over time. Combination of poor delayed recall with either attention or orientation for place was associated with significantly increased decline on the MMSE. The MMSE orientation for time predicts overall decline on MMSE scores over time. A good functioning domain added to good functioning delayed recall was associated with slower rate of decline. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Analysis of neuron-specific enolase and S100B as biomarkers of cognitive decline following surgery in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emma L; Gauge, Nathan; Nilsen, Odd Bjarte; Lowery, David; Wesnes, Keith; Katsaiti, Eirini; Arden, James; Amoako, Derek; Prophet, Nicholas; Purushothaman, Balaji; Green, David; Ballard, Clive

    2012-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive decline is frequent in older individuals following major surgery; however, biomarkers of this decline are less clearly defined. Sixty-eight participants over the age of 60 provided blood samples at baseline and 24 h post-surgery. Cognitive decline was measured at baseline and 52 weeks post-surgery using the Cambridge Assessment for Mental Disorder in the Elderly, section B (CAMCOG) score. Plasma levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100B were measured by ELISA. Baseline NSE and the change in NSE levels between baseline and 24 h were correlated with the change in CAMCOG score between baseline and 52 weeks. NSE concentrations may be a useful predictor of individuals at risk of more severe long-term cognitive decline. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Risk and protective factors associated with cognitive decline in aging - a systematic review of literature

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    Priscila Martins Foroni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct a systematic literature review, in SciELO and PubMed databases, about the cognitive and linguistic changes associated with aging, focusing on risk and protective factors. Methods: Articles conducted with people aged 60 or more and published between 2002 and 2008 were searched in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Results: 72 studies were reviewed in 38 different journals, being 9.7% (7 from national journals and 90.3% (65 from international ones, and 26.3% (10 in the area of Neurology, 23.7% (9 Geriatrics and Aging, 13.2% (5 Epidemiology and Public Health, 10.5% (4 Psychiatry and the rest from magazines of different health issues. The longitudinal design was used in 51.3% (37 and the cross-sectional one, in 36.1% (26. About the data collection instruments, 48.6% (35 of the works used the Mini-Mental State Examination, 15.1% (11 used the Verbal Fluency Test, 12.5% (9 the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, 9.7% (7 the Boston Naming Test and 13.8% (10 Geriatric Depression Scale. We identified relationships between cognition in aging and biological factors in 69.4% (50 of the researches. Some studies have indicated increased likelihood of cognitive impairment among elderly people with depressive symptoms and among smokers. Studies have shown a positive effect of education and participation in physical and social activities on cognition. Conclusions: Studies in the analyzed period specifically investigated the relationship between biological risk factors and cognitive decline. Little attention was given to linguistic changes and protective factors associated with aging.

  13. Effects of education and race on cognitive decline: An integrative study of generalizability versus study-specific results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Alden L; Mungas, Dan M; Crane, Paul K; Gibbons, Laura E; MacKay-Brandt, Anna; Manly, Jennifer J; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Romero, Heather; Sachs, Bonnie; Thomas, Michael; Potter, Guy G; Jones, Richard N

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was to examine variability across multiple prospective cohort studies in level and rate of cognitive decline by race/ethnicity and years of education. We compare data across studies, we harmonized estimates of common latent factors representing overall or general cognitive performance, memory, and executive function derived from the: (a) Washington Heights, Hamilton Heights, Inwood Columbia Aging Project (N = 4,115), (b) Spanish and English Neuropsychological Assessment Scales (N = 525), (c) Duke Memory, Health, and Aging study (N = 578), and (d) Neurocognitive Outcomes of Depression in the Elderly (N = 585). We modeled cognitive change over age for cognitive outcomes by race, education, and study. We adjusted models for sex, dementia status, and study-specific characteristics. The results found that for baseline levels of overall cognitive performance, memory, and executive function, differences in race and education tended to be larger than between-study differences and consistent across studies. This pattern did not hold for rate of cognitive decline: effects of education and race/ethnicity on cognitive change were not consistently observed across studies, and when present were small, with racial/ethnic minorities and those with lower education declining at faster rates. In this diverse set of datasets, non-Hispanic Whites and those with higher education had substantially higher baseline cognitive test scores. However, differences in the rate of cognitive decline by race/ethnicity and education did not follow this pattern. This study suggests that baseline test scores and longitudinal change have different determinants, and future studies to examine similarities and differences of causes of cognitive decline in racially/ethnically and educationally diverse older groups is needed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Effects of education and race on cognitive decline: An integrative analysis of generalizability versus study-specific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Alden L.; Mungas, Dan M.; Crane, Paul K.; Gibbons, Laura E.; MacKay-Brandt, Anna; Manly, Jennifer J.; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Romero, Heather; Sachs, Bonnie; Thomas, Michael; Potter, Guy G.; Jones, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine variability across multiple prospective cohort studies in level and rate of cognitive decline by race/ethnicity and years of education. Method To compare data across studies, we harmonized estimates of common latent factors representing overall or general cognitive performance, memory, and executive function derived from the: 1) Washington Heights, Hamilton Heights, Inwood Columbia Aging Project (N=4,115), 2) Spanish and English Neuropsychological Assessment Scales (N=525), 3) Duke Memory, Health, and Aging study (N=578), and 4) Neurocognitive Outcomes of Depression in the Elderly (N=585). We modeled cognitive change over age for cognitive outcomes by race, education, and study. We adjusted models for sex, dementia status, and study-specific characteristics. Results For baseline levels of overall cognitive performance, memory, and executive function, differences in race and education tended to be larger than between-study differences and consistent across studies. This pattern did not hold for rate of cognitive decline: effects of education and race/ethnicity on cognitive change were not consistently observed across studies, and when present were small, with racial/ethnic minorities and those with lower education declining at faster rates. Discussion In this diverse set of datasets, non-Hispanic whites and those with higher education had substantially higher baseline cognitive test scores. However, differences in the rate of cognitive decline by race/ethnicity and education did not follow this pattern. This study suggests that baseline test scores and longitudinal change have different determinants, and future studies to examine similarities and differences of causes of cognitive decline in racially/ethnically and educationally diverse older groups is needed. PMID:26523693

  15. NT-ProBNP and Troponin T and Risk of Rapid Kidney Function Decline and Incident CKD in Elderly Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ronit; Dalrymple, Lorien; de Boer, Ian; DeFilippi, Christopher; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Park, Meyeon; Sarnak, Mark; Seliger, Stephen; Shlipak, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Elevations in N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity troponin T are associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes. Whether elevations in these cardiac biomarkers are associated with decline in kidney function was evaluated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide and troponin T were measured at baseline in 3752 participants free of heart failure in the Cardiovascular Health Study. eGFR was determined from the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation using serum cystatin C. Rapid decline in kidney function was defined as decline in serum cystatin C eGFR≥30%, and incident CKD was defined as the onset of serum cystatin C eGFRkidney function decline adjusting for demographics, baseline serum cystatin C eGFR, diabetes, and other CKD risk factors. Results In total, 503 participants had rapid decline in serum cystatin C eGFR over a mean follow-up time of 6.41 (1.81) years, and 685 participants developed incident CKD over a mean follow-up time of 6.41 (1.74) years. Participants in the highest quartile of N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide (>237 pg/ml) had an 67% higher risk of rapid decline and 38% higher adjusted risk of incident CKD compared with participants in the lowest quartile (adjusted hazard ratio for serum cystatin C eGFR rapid decline, 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 2.23; hazard ratio for incident CKD, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.08 to 1.76). Participants in the highest category of troponin T (>10.58 pg/ml) had 80% greater risk of rapid decline compared with participants in the lowest category (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.35 to 2.40). The association of troponin T with incident CKD was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 1.50). Conclusions Elevated N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide and troponin T are associated with rapid decline of

  16. Genetic predisposition to higher production of interleukin-6 through -174 G > C polymorphism predicts global cognitive decline in oldest-old with cognitive impairment no dementia

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    Vanessa G. Fraga

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin 6 (IL-6 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine upregulated in neurodegenerative contexts. The polymorphism IL-6 -174 G > C influences release levels of this cytokine. We aimed to evaluate the influence of IL-6 -174 G > C on global cognitive score of a group with cognitive impairment no dementia in one year of follow-up.Methods The subjects were categorized in two groups: short-term decline in global cognitive score and those with short-term stability or improvement. IL-6 174 G > C information were compared among these groups.Results We observed that individuals with cognitive impairment no dementia with GGlowergenotype were more frequent among global cognitive score non-decliners while carriers of at least one Chigherallele were more frequent in the group with global cognitive score decliners (p = 0.012; RR = 3.095 IC95%= 1.087-8.812.Conclusion These results suggest that the higher expression of IL-6 gene may be an independent risk factor for cognitive decline among individuals with cognitive impairment no dementia.

  17. Psychosocial Risk Factors for Cognitive Decline in Late-Life Depression: Findings from the MTLD-III Study.

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    Rej, Soham; Begley, Amy; Gildengers, Ariel; Dew, Mary Amanda; Reynolds, Charles F; Butters, Meryl A

    2015-06-01

    Cognitive impairment and depression frequently co-occur in late life. There remains a need to better characterize psychosocial risk factors of cognitive decline in older adults with depression. We hypothesized that certain psychosocial factors would be associated with higher risk of cognitive decline in individuals with late-life depression. 130 individuals aged ≥ 65 years who had achieved remission from a major depressive episode were randomized to donepezil or placebo and then closely followed for two years. Using Cox proportional hazard models, we examined the association between baseline median household income, education level, race, marital status, and social support and cognitive decline over the follow-up. Lower interpersonal support (OR = 0.86 [0.74-0.99], p = .04) and lower baseline global neuropsychological score (OR = 0.56 [0.36-0.87], p = .001) predicted shorter time to conversion to MCI or dementia in univariate models. These exposures did not remain significant in multivariate analyses. Neither socioeconomic status nor other psychosocial factors independently predicted cognitive diagnostic conversion (p > .05). We did not find reliable associations between cognitive outcome and any of the psychosocial factors examined. Future large-scale, epidemiological studies, ideally using well-validated subjective measures, should better characterize psychosocial risk factors for cognitive decline in late-life depression.

  18. Lifelong bilingualism contributes to cognitive reserve against white matter integrity declines in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Brian T; Johnson, Nathan F; Powell, David K

    2013-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that lifelong bilingualism may contribute to cognitive reserve (CR) in normal aging. However, there is currently no neuroimaging evidence to suggest that lifelong bilinguals can retain normal cognitive functioning in the face of age-related neurodegeneration. Here we explored this issue by comparing white matter (WM) integrity and gray matter (GM) volumetric patterns of older adult lifelong bilinguals (N=20) and monolinguals (N=20). The groups were matched on a range of relevant cognitive test scores and on the established CR variables of education, socioeconomic status and intelligence. Participants underwent high-resolution structural imaging for assessment of GM volume and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for assessment of WM integrity. Results indicated significantly lower microstructural integrity in the bilingual group in several WM tracts. In particular, compared to their monolingual peers, the bilingual group showed lower fractional anisotropy and/or higher radial diffusivity in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus bilaterally, the fornix, and multiple portions of the corpus callosum. There were no group differences in GM volume. Our results suggest that lifelong bilingualism contributes to CR against WM integrity declines in aging. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Meditation and successful aging: can meditative practices counteract age-related cognitive decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperduti, Marco; Makowski, Dominique; Blondé, Philippe; Piolino, Pascale

    2017-06-01

    Life expectancy is constantly increasing in the developed countries due to medical, hygiene and socio-economic advances. Unfortunately, a longer life not always corresponds to a healthier life. Indeed, aging is associated with growing risk factors for illness associated with societal conditions (isolation, maltreatment), and neurodegenerative diseases. Even normal aging is associated with a cognitive decline that can hinder independence and quality of life of elderly. Thus, one major societal challenge is to build policies that support people of all ages to maintain a maximum health and functional capacity throughout their lives. Meditation could be a promising intervention in contrasting the negative effects of aging. Indeed, it has been shown to enhance cognitive efficiency in several domains, such as attention and executive functions in young adults. Nevertheless, whether these effects extend to old participants is still a matter of debate. Few studies have directly investigated this issue, reporting encouraging results in a large panel of cognitive functions, such as: attention, executive functions and memory. However, a final conclusion about the causal role of meditation and the generalization of these results is made difficult due to several methodological limitations. We propose a roadmap for future studies to pass these limitations with the hope that the present work would contribute to the development of the young research field of meditation in gerontology.

  20. Impact of behavioral subsyndromes on cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease: data from the ICTUS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevelli, Marco; Adali, Nawal; Cantet, Christelle; Andrieu, Sandrine; Bruno, Giuseppe; Cesari, Matteo; Vellas, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) represent common manifestations among patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). Some reports have recently classified BPSD into specific clusters/subsyndromes exploring the internal structure of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). We evaluated whether specific behavioral subsyndromes are associated with worsening cognitive function. Mild to moderate AD patients were recruited from the cohort of the Impact of Cholinergic Treatment USe (ICTUS) study. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were classified in three subsyndromes, identified at baseline, grouping different combinations of NPI items: (1) "psychotic" ("delusions" and/or "hallucinations"); (2) "affective" ("agitation" and/or "depression" and/or "anxiety" and/or "irritability"); and (3) "behavioral" ("euphoria" and/or "apathy" and/or "disinhibition" and/or "aberrant motor behavior"). Mixed model analyses were performed to measure six-monthly changes in the ADAS-Cog score over a follow-up of 2 years, according to these subsyndromes. All analyses were stratified according to AD severity as defined by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR). A total of 1,375 AD subjects were recruited. No NPI cluster was found to significantly (p < 0.05) affect the rate of cognitive decline across the 3 CDR classes. Our results suggest that the cognitive course of AD is not substantially influenced by the presence of specific neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Further studies are needed to extend the present findings and identify possible biological and clinical bases for behavioral subsyndromes.

  1. Administration of bovine casein-derived peptide prevents cognitive decline in Alzheimer disease model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li-Juan; Kobayashi, Yodai; Mogi, Masaki; Tsukuda, Kana; Yamada, Akio; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Iwanami, Jun; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in identifying natural food ingredients that may serve to prevent dementia such as that due to Alzheimer disease (AD). Peptides derived from food proteins have been demonstrated to have various physiological activities such as a hypotensive action. Recent findings have indicated possible associations of hypertension with AD progression, and suggest that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with potential to pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB) may reduce the risk of AD. In this study, we investigated the effect of milk peptide (CH-3) on cognitive function in AD model mice. CH-3 contains a tripeptide (methionine-lysine-proline, MKP) that has been found to have a strong ACE inhibitory effect and the potential to pass through the BBB. Adult male ddY mice were used in this study, and an animal model of AD was induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ1-42. CH-3 (250 mg/kg/day) or MKP (0.5 mg/kg/day) was orally administered every day starting 2 days before ICV injection. At 3 weeks after ICV injection, cognitive function was evaluated by the Morris water maze test. Brain samples were obtained after behavioral testing, and expression of inflammatory cytokines and NADPH oxidase subunits was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. ICV injection of Aβ1-42 significantly impaired cognitive function compared with that in PBS-injected mice. Daily administration of CH-3 markedly attenuated this Aβ1-42-induced cognitive decline. Aβ1-42 injection significantly enhanced the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and p22phox in the mouse hippocampus compared with PBS injection, and showed a tendency to increase the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), p47phox and gp91phox, whereas CH-3 treatment markedly reduced Aβ1-42-induced TNF-α, MCP-1, iNOS, p47phox and gp91phox expression. Finally, administration of MKP also attenuated Aβ1-42-induced

  2. Blood Biomarkers Associated with Cognitive Decline in Early Stage and Drug-Naive Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Santiago

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD continues to be a major challenge in the field. The lack of a robust biomarker to detect early stage PD patients has considerably slowed the progress toward the development of potential therapeutic agents. We have previously evaluated several RNA biomarkers in whole blood from participants enrolled in two independent clinical studies. In these studies, PD patients were medicated, thus, expression of these biomarkers in de novo patients remains unknown. To this end, we tested ten RNA biomarkers in blood samples from 99 untreated PD patients and 101 HC nested in the cross-sectional Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative by quantitative real-time PCR. One biomarker out of ten, COPZ1 trended toward significance (nominal p = 0.009 when adjusting for age, sex, and educational level. Further, COPZ1, EFTUD2 and PTBP1 mRNAs correlated with clinical features in PD patients including the Hoehn and Yahr scale, Movement Disorder Society revision of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA score. Levels of EFTUD2 and PTBP1 were significantly higher in cognitively normal PD patients (PD-CN compared to cognitively impaired PD patients (PD-MCI. Interestingly, blood glucose levels were significantly higher in PD and PD-MCI patients (≥ 100 mg/dL, pre-diabetes compared to HC. Collectively, we report the association of three RNA biomarkers, COPZ1, EFTUD2 and PTBP1 with clinical features including cognitive decline in early drug-naïve PD patients. Further, our results show that drug-naïve PD and PD-MCI patients have glucose levels characteristic of pre-diabetes patients, suggesting that impaired glucose metabolism is an early event in PD. Evaluation of these potential biomarkers in a larger longitudinal study is warranted.

  3. Geriatric problems correlated with cognitive decline using a screening test named "Dr. SUPERMAN" for comprehensive geriatric assessment in elderly inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namioka, Nayuta; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Terayama, Hideyuki; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Fujihira, Teruaki; Tsugehara, Hiromi; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Hanyu, Haruo

    2017-09-01

    We have recently developed and validated a screening test for comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). We investigated the prevalence of geriatric problems in elderly inpatients using CGA, and determined the relationship between geriatric problems and cognitive decline. We enrolled consecutive elderly inpatients aged >65 years who were admitted to all of the hospital departments at Tokyo Medical University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, between July and December 2013. We investigated the prevalence of specific geriatric problems or situations in elderly inpatients using a screening test for CGA named "Dr. SUPERMAN." We examined 3969 elderly inpatients (2211 men and 1758 women; mean age 75.5 ± 6.7 years) using CGA. Inpatients were divided into three groups by age, namely, 65-74 years, 75-84 years and ≥85 years. Inpatients were divided into the two groups of "internal medicine" and "other departments." Geriatric problems were more frequently found in patients who were aged ≥85 years and admitted to "internal medicine" departments. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis found cognitive decline significantly correlated with ADL decline, age, poor medication adherence, upper and lower extremity function disorder, visual/auditory disorder, and urinary disorder. In particular, cognitive decline strongly correlated with a decline in activities of daily living. CGA should be considered for the treatment of elderly inpatients, particularly those with cognitive decline and admitted to "internal medicine" departments. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1252-1256. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. Do changes in lifestyle engagement moderate cognitive decline in normal aging? Evidence from the Victoria Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Brent J; Dixon, Roger A; McArdle, John J; Grimm, Kevin J

    2012-03-01

    Do lifestyle activities buffer normal aging-related declines in cognitive performance? The emerging literature will benefit from theoretically broader measurement of both lifestyle activities and cognitive performance, and longer-term longitudinal designs complemented with dynamic statistical analyses. We examine the temporal ordering of changes in lifestyle activities and changes in cognitive neuropsychological performance in older adults. We assembled data (n = 952) across a 12-year (5-wave) period from the Victoria Longitudinal Study. Latent change score models were applied to examine whether (and in which temporal order) changes in physical, social, or cognitive lifestyle activities were related to changes in three domains of cognitive performance. Two main results reflect the dynamic coupling among changes in lifestyle activities and cognition. First, reductions in cognitive lifestyle activities were associated with subsequent declines in measures of verbal speed, episodic memory, and semantic memory. Second, poorer cognitive functioning was related to subsequent decrements in lifestyle engagement, especially in social activities. The results support the dual contention that (a) lifestyle engagement may buffer some of the cognitive changes observed in late life, and (b) persons who are exhibiting poorer cognitive performance may also relinquish some lifestyle activities.

  5. APOE ε4 allele modifies the association of lead exposure with age-related cognitive decline in older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Diddier; Colicino, Elena; Power, Melinda C; Weisskopf, Marc G; Zhong, Jia; Hou, Lifang; Spiro, Avron; Vokonas, Pantel; Brenan, Kasey; Herrera, Luis A; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea A

    2016-11-01

    Continuing chronic and sporadic high-level of lead exposure in some regions in the U.S. has directed public attention to the effects of lead on human health. Long-term lead exposure has been associated with faster cognitive decline in older individuals; however, genetic susceptibility to lead-related cognitive decline during aging has been poorly studied. We determined the interaction of APOE-epsilon variants and environmental lead exposure in relation to age-related cognitive decline. We measured tibia bone lead by K-shell-x-ray fluorescence, APOE-epsilon variants by multiplex PCR and global cognitive z-scores in 489 men from the VA-Normative Aging Study. To determine global cognitive z-scores we incorporated multiple cognitive assessments, including word list memory task, digit span backwards, verbal fluency test, sum of drawings, and pattern comparison task, which were assessed at multiple visits. We used linear mixed-effect models with random intercepts for individual and for cognitive test. An interquartile range (IQR:14.23μg/g) increase in tibia lead concentration was associated with a 0.06 (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: -0.11 to -0.01) lower global cognition z-score. In the presence of both ε4 alleles, one IQR increase in tibia lead was associated with 0.57 (95%CI: -0.97 to -0.16; p-value for interaction: 0.03) lower total cognition z-score. A borderline association was observed in presence of one ε4 allele (Estimate-effect per 1-IQR increase: -0.11, 95%CI: -0.22, 0.01) as well as lack of association in individuals without APOE ε4 allele. Our findings suggest that individuals carrying both ε4 alleles are more susceptible to lead impact on global cognitive decline during aging. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation and cognitive decline in Alzheimer disease: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Joseph F; Raman, Rema; Thomas, Ronald G; Yurko-Mauro, Karin; Nelson, Edward B; Van Dyck, Christopher; Galvin, James E; Emond, Jennifer; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael; Shinto, Lynne; Aisen, Paul S

    2010-11-03

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the most abundant long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid in the brain. Epidemiological studies suggest that consumption of DHA is associated with a reduced incidence of Alzheimer disease. Animal studies demonstrate that oral intake of DHA reduces Alzheimer-like brain pathology. To determine if supplementation with DHA slows cognitive and functional decline in individuals with Alzheimer disease. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of DHA supplementation in individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease (Mini-Mental State Examination scores, 14-26) was conducted between November 2007 and May 2009 at 51 US clinical research sites of the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study. Participants were randomly assigned to algal DHA at a dose of 2 g/d or to identical placebo (60% were assigned to DHA and 40% were assigned to placebo). Duration of treatment was 18 months. Change in the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog) and change in the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) sum of boxes. Rate of brain atrophy was also determined by volumetric magnetic resonance imaging in a subsample of participants (n = 102). A total of 402 individuals were randomized and a total of 295 participants completed the trial while taking study medication (DHA: 171; placebo: 124). Supplementation with DHA had no beneficial effect on rate of change on ADAS-cog score, which increased by a mean of 7.98 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.51-9.45 points) for the DHA group during 18 months vs 8.27 points (95% CI, 6.72-9.82 points) for the placebo group (linear mixed-effects model: P = .41). The CDR sum of boxes score increased by 2.87 points (95% CI, 2.44-3.30 points) for the DHA group during 18 months compared with 2.93 points (95% CI, 2.44-3.42 points) for the placebo group (linear mixed-effects model: P = .68). In the subpopulation of participants (DHA: 53; placebo: 49), the rate of brain atrophy was not affected by

  7. Acute parietal lobe infarction presenting as Gerstmann's syndrome and cognitive decline mimicking senile dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yen; Yen, Che-Hung; Kuo, Shin-Chang; Yeh, Yi-Wei; Chang, Serena; Huang, San-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Gerstmann's syndrome encompasses the tetrad of finger agnosia, agraphia, acalculia, and right-left confusion. An elderly man with a history of several cardiovascular diseases was initially brought to the psychiatric outpatient department by his family because of worsening of recent memory, executive function, and mixed anxious-depressive mood. Gerstmann's syndrome without obvious motor function impairment and dementia-like features could be observed at first. Emergent brain computed tomography scan revealed new left-middle cerebral artery infarction over the left posterior parietal lobe. This case reminds us that acute cerebral infarction involving the parietal lobe may present as Gerstmann's syndrome accompanied by cognitive decline mimicking dementia. As a result, emergent organic workups should be arranged, especially for elderly patients at high risk for cerebral vascular accident.

  8. Hearing loss and cognitive decline in older adults: questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, Roberto; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Maggi, Stefania; Marengoni, Alessandra; Martini, Alessandro; Memo, Maurizio; Pecorelli, Sergio; Peracino, Andrea P; Quaranta, Nicola; Stella, Roberto; Lin, Frank R

    2014-12-01

    The association between hearing impairment, the diagnosis of dementia, and the role of sensory therapy has been proposed for some time, but further research is needed. Current understanding of this association requires the commitment of those experts who can integrate experience and research from several fields to be able to understand the link from hearing to dementia. A workshop whose panelists included experts from many areas, ranging from ear, nose and throat (ENT) to dementia's specialists, was promoted and organized by the Giovanni Lorenzini Medical Science Foundation (Milan, Italy; Houston, TX, USA) to increase the awareness of the relationship between hearing loss and dementia, and included questions and comments following a presentation from the clinical researcher, Frank Lin, who has been evaluating the relationship between hearing loss and cognitive decline since 2009.

  9. Anxiety and depression symptoms among caregivers of care-recipients with subjective cognitive decline and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoniu; Guo, Qihao; Luo, Jianfeng; Li, Fang; Ding, Ding; Zhao, Qianhua; Hong, Zhen

    2016-10-03

    Caregivers of care-recipients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia experience high caregiver burden; however, the psychiatric burden of caregivers of care-recipients with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) has not been investigated. We aimed to explore the prevalence of and risk factors for anxiety and depression symptoms among the caregivers of care-recipients with SCD and cognitive impairment. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to examine the anxiety and depression symptoms among the caregivers of 343 care-recipients (84 with SCD, 120 with MCI and 139 with dementia) treated at the Memory Clinic of Huashan Hospital in Shanghai, China from May 2012 to October 2014. A logistic regression was used to explore the factors associated with caregiver's anxiety and depression symptoms. In total, 26.5 % of caregivers had anxiety symptoms, and 22.4 % had depression symptoms. Totals of 17.9, 30.0 and 28.8 % of caregivers of care-recipients with SCD, MCI or dementia, respectively, had anxiety symptoms (P = 0.1140), whereas 22.6, 24.2 and 20.9 %, respectively, had depression symptoms (P = 0.8165). The risk factors for caregiver's anxiety symptoms were increased caregiver age as well as having care-recipients who were male, had higher Cohen Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) scores, and higher Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) scores. The risk factors for caregiver's depression symptoms were increased caregiver age as well as caring for care-recipients with MCI or SCD, those with lower Toronto Empathy Questionnaire (TEQ) scores, and those with higher GDS scores. Caregivers of care-recipients with SCD showed the same level of depression symptoms as those of care-recipients with MCI. Caregiver's depression and anxiety symptoms were associated with their care-recipients' psychiatric and behavioral syndromes.

  10. Playing board games, cognitive decline and dementia: a French population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartigues, Jean François; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Le Goff, Mélanie; Viltard, Mélanie; Amieva, Hélène; Orgogozo, Jean Marc; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Helmer, Catherine

    2013-08-29

    To study the relationship between board game playing and risk of subsequent dementia in the Paquid cohort. A prospective population-based study. In the Bordeaux area in South Western France. 3675 non-demented participants at baseline. The risk of dementia during the 20 years of follow-up. Among 3675 non-demented participants at baseline, 32.2% reported regular board game playing. Eight-hundred and forty participants developed dementia during the 20 years of follow-up. The risk of dementia was 15% lower in board game players than in non-players (HR=0.85, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.99; p=0.04) after adjustment on age, gender, education and other confounders. The statistical significance disappeared after supplementary adjustment on baseline mini-mental state examination (MMSE) and depression (HR=0.96, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.12; p=0.61). However, board game players had less decline in their MMSE score during the follow-up of the cohort (β=0.011, p=0.03) and less incident depression than non-players (HR=0.84; 95% CI 0.72 to 0.98; pboard game playing on the risk of dementia could be mediated by less cognitive decline and less depression in elderly board game players.

  11. Protocol for project FACT: a randomised controlled trial on the effect of a walking program and vitamin B supplementation on the rate of cognitive decline and psychosocial wellbeing in older adults with mild cognitive impairment [ISRCTN19227688

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uffelen, J.G.Z.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; van Mechelen, W.

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The prevalence of individuals with cognitive decline is increasing since the number of elderly adults is growing considerably. The literature provides promising results on the beneficial effect of exercise and vitamin supplementation on cognitive function both in cognitively

  12. Last call: Passive acoustic monitoring shows continued rapid decline of critically endangered vaquita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Len; Jaramillo-Legorreta, Armando; Cardenas-Hinojosa, Gustavo; Nieto-Garcia, Edwyna; Rojas-Bracho, Lorenzo; Ver Hoef, Jay M; Moore, Jeffrey; Taylor, Barbara; Barlow, Jay; Tregenza, Nicholas

    2017-11-01

    The vaquita is a critically endangered species of porpoise. It produces echolocation clicks, making it a good candidate for passive acoustic monitoring. A systematic grid of sensors has been deployed for 3 months annually since 2011; results from 2016 are reported here. Statistical models (to compensate for non-uniform data loss) show an overall decline in the acoustic detection rate between 2015 and 2016 of 49% (95% credible interval 82% decline to 8% increase), and total decline between 2011 and 2016 of over 90%. Assuming the acoustic detection rate is proportional to population size, approximately 30 vaquita (95% credible interval 8-96) remained in November 2016.

  13. Age-Related Decline in Anticipatory Motor Planning and Its Relation to Cognitive and Motor Skill Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, Tino; Wunsch, Kathrin; Hughes, Charmayne M. L.

    2017-01-01

    Anticipatory motor planning abilities mature as children grow older, develop throughout childhood and are likely to be stable till the late sixties. In the seventh decade of life, motor planning performance dramatically declines, with anticipatory motor planning abilities falling to levels of those exhibited by children. At present, the processes enabling successful anticipatory motor planning in general, as do the cognitive processes mediating these age-related changes, remain elusive. Thus, the aim of the present study was (a) to identify cognitive and motor functions that are most affected by normal aging and (b) to elucidate key (cognitive and motor) factors that are critical for successful motor planning performance in young (n = 40, mean age = 23.1 ± 2.6 years) and older adults (n = 37, mean age = 73.5 ± 7.1 years). Results indicate that normal aging is associated with a marked decline in all aspects of cognitive and motor functioning tested. However, age-related declines were more apparent for fine motor dexterity, processing speed and cognitive flexibility. Furthermore, up to 64% of the variance in motor planning performance across age groups could be explained by the cognitive functions processing speed, response planning and cognitive flexibility. It can be postulated that anticipatory motor planning abilities are strongly influenced by cognitive control processes, which seem to be key mechanisms to compensate for age-related decline. These findings support the general therapeutic and preventive value of cognitive-motor training programs to reduce adverse effects associated with high age. PMID:28928653

  14. Aging process, cognitive decline and Alzheimer`s disease: can strength training modulate these responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugal, Eduardo Matta Mello; Vasconcelos, Poliane Gomes Torres; Souza, Renata; Lattari, Eduardo; Monteiro-Junior, Renato Sobral; Machado, Sergio; Deslandes, Andrea Camaz

    2015-01-01

    Some evidence shows that aerobic training can attenuate the aging effects on the brain structures and functions. However, the strength exercise effects are poorly discussed. Thus, in the present study, the effects of strength training on the brain in elderly people and Alzheimer`s disease (AD) patients were revised. Furthermore, it a biological explanation relating to strength training effects on the brain is proposed. Brain atrophy can be related to neurotransmission dysfunction, like oxidative stress, that generates mitochondrial damage and reduced brain metabolism. Another mechanism is related to amyloid deposition and amyloid tangles, that can be related to reductions on insulin-like growth factor I concentrations. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor also presents reduction during aging process and AD. These neuronal dysfunctions are also related to cerebral blood flow decline that influence brain metabolism. All of these alterations contribute to cognitive impairment and AD. After a long period of strength training, the oxidative stress can be reduced, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and insulin-like growth factor I serum concentrations enhance, and the cognitive performance improves. Considering these results, we can infer that strength training can be related to increased neurogenesis, neuroplasticity and, consequently, counteracts aging effects on the brain. The effect of strength training as an additional treatment of AD needs further investigation.

  15. Levels of CSF prostaglandin E2, cognitive decline, and survival in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combrinck, M; Williams, J; De Berardinis, M A; Warden, D; Puopolo, M; Smith, A D; Minghetti, L

    2006-01-01

    Background Although epidemiological, clinical, and experimental evidence indicates that the inducible isoform of cyclo‐oxygenase (COX‐2) may be involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, the mechanisms whereby COX‐2 contributes to Alzheimer's disease are largely unknown. Objective To undertake a longitudinal study of CSF levels of a major product of COX activity, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), in relation to cognitive decline and survival in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Methods CSF PGE2 was measured on at least three annual visits in 35 controls and 33 Alzheimer patients (26 necropsy confirmed) who completed the Cambridge cognitive assessment (CAMCOG). Results Compared with controls, CSF PGE2 was higher in patients with mild memory impairment, but lower in those with more advanced Alzheimer's disease. The median survival time of patients with higher initial PGE2 levels was five years longer than those with lower levels. Conclusions COX activity in Alzheimer's disease varies with stage of the disease. PGE2 levels correlate positively with patient survival. These findings suggest that inhibition of COX activity does not represent a major target for the pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:15944180

  16. An Examination of Age-Based Stereotype Threat About Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Sarah J

    2017-01-01

    "Stereotype threat" is often thought of as a singular construct, with moderators and mechanisms that are stable across groups and domains. However, this is not always true. To illustrate this, the current review focuses on the stereotype threat that older adults face about their cognitive abilities. Drawing upon the multithreat framework, I first provide evidence that this is a self-concept threat and not a group-reputation threat. Because this differs from the forms of stereotype threat experienced by other groups (e.g., the threat that minority students face about their intellectual abilities), the moderators of stereotype threat observed in other groups (i.e., group identification) do not always generalize to age-based stereotype threat about cognitive decline. Looking beyond the forms of stereotype threat elicited, this review also provides evidence that the mechanisms underlying stereotype-threat effects may vary across the adult life span. Because of age-related improvements in emotion-regulation abilities, stereotype threat does not seem to reduce older adults' executive-control resources. Overall, this review highlights the need to approach the concept of stereotype threat with more granularity, allowing researchers to design more effective stereotype-threat interventions. It will also shed light on why certain stereotype threat effects "fail to replicate" across domains or groups.

  17. More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinder RM

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Roger M PinderInternational Journal of Wine Research, York, UKThe beneficial impact of moderate and regular consumption of alcohol and wine for cognitive decline and the risks of dementia has been widely studied and reported.1-4 The pages of the International Journal of Wine Research have seen two reviews of the field,5,6 while our sister journal, Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, has also focused on this issue, first in 2006 with a research investigation in Danish women,7 and now in a more recent comprehensive review including 143 published papers.8 One of the more poignant aspects of the new publication is that the authors, Edward Neafsey and Michael Collins from Loyola University in Chicago, come from a background of experimental molecular pharmacology and wondered why moderate alcohol exposure appeared to protect rat hippocampal-entorhinal cortex brain slice cultures from the toxicity of amyloid-β, the protein that has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Their curiosity led to a literature search on whether alcohol protects against AD and other forms of cognitive impairment in humans, an endeavor that rather overwhelmed them with the immensity of the data.

  18. Distinguishing age-related cognitive decline from dementias: A study based on machine learning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Füsun; Iscen, Pınar; Sahin, Sevki; Çinar, Nilgun; Karsidag, Sibel; Goularas, Dionysis

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to examine the distinguishability of age-related cognitive decline (ARCD) from dementias based on some neurocognitive tests using machine learning. 106 subjects were divided into four groups: ARCD (n=30), probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n=20), vascular dementia (VD) (n=21) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n=35). The following tests were applied to all subjects: The Wechsler memory scale-revised, a clock-drawing, the dual similarities, interpretation of proverbs, word fluency, the Stroop, the Boston naming (BNT), the Benton face recognition, a copying-drawings and Öktem verbal memory processes (Ö-VMPT) tests. A multilayer perceptron, a support vector machine and a classification via regression with M5-model trees were employed for classification. The pairwise classification results show that ARCD is completely separable from AD with a success rate of 100% and highly separable from MCI and VD with success rates of 95.4% and 86.30%, respectively. The neurocognitive tests with the higher merit values were Ö-VMPT recognition (ARCD vs. AD), Ö-VMPT total learning (ARCD vs. MCI) and semantic fluency, proverbs, Stroop interference and naming BNT (ARCD vs. VD). The findings show that machine learning can be successfully utilized for distinguishing ARCD from dementias based on neurocognitive tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hyperuricemia Associated With Rapid Renal Function Decline in Elderly Taiwanese Subjects

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    Chung-Jen Yen

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: Serum uric acid level was associated with eGFR and decline in renal function in elderly Taiwanese subjects. Whether hypouricemic therapy could retard the progression of CKD deserves further in-depth study.

  20. Hearing Impairment and Incident Dementia and Cognitive Decline in Older Adults: The Health ABC Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Jennifer A; Betz, Josh; Yaffe, Kristine; Harris, Tamara; Purchase-Helzner, Elizabeth; Satterfield, Suzanne; Pratt, Sheila; Govil, Nandini; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Lin, Frank R

    2017-05-01

    Age-related peripheral hearing impairment (HI) is prevalent, treatable, and may be a risk factor for dementia in older adults. In prospective analysis, we quantified the association of HI with incident dementia and with domain-specific cognitive decline in memory, perceptual speed, and processing speed. Data were from the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) study, a biracial cohort of well-functioning adults aged 70-79 years. Dementia was defined using a prespecified algorithm incorporating medication use, hospital records, and neurocognitive test scores. A pure-tone average in decibels hearing level (dBHL) was calculated in the better hearing ear using thresholds from 0.5 to 4kHz, and HI was defined as normal hearing (≤25 dBHL), mild (26-40 dBHL), and moderate/severe (>40 dBHL). Associations between HI and incident dementia and between HI and cognitive change were modeled using Cox proportional hazards models and linear mixed models, respectively. Three-hundred eighty seven (20%) participants had moderate/severe HI, and 716 (38%) had mild HI. After adjustment for demographic and cardiovascular factors, moderate/severe audiometric HI (vs. normal hearing) was associated with increased risk of incident dementia over 9 years (hazard ratio: 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10, 2.19). Other than poorer baseline memory performance (difference of -0.24 SDs, 95% CI: -0.44, -0.04), no associations were observed between HI and rates of domain-specific cognitive change during 7 years of follow-up. HI is associated with increased risk of developing dementia in older adults. Randomized trials are needed to determine whether treatment of hearing loss could postpone dementia onset in older adults.

  1. Quetiapine and rivastigmine and cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease: randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Clive; Margallo-Lana, Marisa; Juszczak, Edmund; Douglas, Simon; Swann, Alan; Thomas, Alan; O'Brien, John; Everratt, Anna; Sadler, Stuart; Maddison, Clare; Lee, Lesley; Bannister, Carol; Elvish, Ruth; Jacoby, Robin

    2005-04-16

    To determine the respective efficacy of quetiapine and rivastigmine for agitation in people with dementia in institutional care and to evaluate these treatments with respect to change in cognitive performance. Randomised double blind (clinician, patient, outcomes assessor) placebo controlled trial. Care facilities in the north east of England. 93 patients with Alzheimer's disease, dementia, and clinically significant agitation. Atypical antipsychotic (quetiapine), cholinesterase inhibitor (rivastigmine), or placebo (double dummy). Agitation (Cohen-Mansfield agitation inventory) and cognition (severe impairment battery) at baseline and at six weeks and 26 weeks. The primary outcome was agitation inventory at six weeks. 31 patients were randomised to each group, and 80 (86%) started treatment (25 rivastigmine, 26 quetiapine, 29 placebo), of whom 71 (89%) tolerated the maximum protocol dose (22 rivastigmine, 23 quetiapine, 26 placebo). Compared with placebo, neither group showed significant differences in improvement on the agitation inventory either at six weeks or 26 weeks. Fifty six patients scored > 10 on the severe impairment battery at baseline, 46 (82%) of whom were included in the analysis at six week follow up (14 rivastigmine, 14 quetiapine, 18 placebo). For quetiapine the change in severe impairment battery score from baseline was estimated as an average of -14.6 points (95% confidence interval -25.3 to -4.0) lower (that is, worse) than in the placebo group at six weeks (P = 0.009) and -15.4 points (-27.0 to -3.8) lower at 26 weeks (P = 0.01). The corresponding changes with rivastigmine were -3.5 points (-13.1 to 6.2) lower at six weeks (P = 0.5) and -7.5 points (-21.0 to 6.0) lower at 26 weeks (P = 0.3). Neither quetiapine nor rivastigmine are effective in the treatment of agitation in people with dementia in institutional care. Compared with placebo, quetiapine is associated with significantly greater cognitive decline.

  2. Stressful life events and cognitive decline in late life: moderation by education and age. The Cache County Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschanz, Joann T; Pfister, Roxane; Wanzek, Joseph; Corcoran, Chris; Smith, Ken; Tschanz, Brian T; Steffens, David C; Østbye, Truls; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Norton, Maria C

    2013-08-01

    Stressful life events (SLE) have been associated with increased dementia risk, but their association with cognitive decline has been inconsistent. In a longitudinal population-based study of older individuals, we examined the association between SLE and cognitive decline, and the role of potential effect modifiers. A total of 2665 non-demented participants of the Cache County Memory Study completed an SLE questionnaire at Wave 2 and were revisited 4 and 7 years later. The events were represented via several scores: total number, subjective rating (negative, positive, and unexpected), and a weighted summary based on their impact. Cognition was assessed at each visit with the modified Mini-Mental State Exam. General linear models were used to examine the association between SLE scores and cognition. Effect modification by age, education, and APOE genotype was tested. Years of formal education (p = 0.006) modified the effect of number of SLE, and age (p = 0.009) modified the effect of negative SLE on the rate of cognitive decline. Faster decline was observed among those with fewer years of education experiencing more SLE and also among younger participants experiencing more negative SLE. There was no association between other indicators of SLE and cognitive decline. APOE genotype did not modify any of the aforementioned associations. The effects of SLE on cognition in late life are complex and vary by individual factors such as age and education. These results may explain some of the contradictory findings in the literature. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677C>T and methionine synthase 2756A>G mutations: no impact on survival, cognitive functioning, or cognitive decline in nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bathum, Lise; von Bornemann Hjelmborg, Jacob; Christiansen, Lene

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several reports have shown an association between homocysteine, cognitive functioning, and survival among the oldest-old. Two common polymorphisms in the genes coding for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C>T) and methionine synthase (MTR 2756A>G) have an impact on plasma...... homocysteine level. METHODS: We examined the effect of the MTHFR 677C>T and MTR 2756A>G genotypes on baseline cognitive functioning, cognitive decline over 5 years measured in three assessments, and survival in a population-based cohort of 1581 nonagenarians. Cognitive functioning was assessed by using...

  4. An inflammatory and trophic disconnect biomarker profile revealed in Down syndrome plasma: Relation to cognitive decline and longitudinal evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iulita, M Florencia; Ower, Alison; Barone, Concetta; Pentz, Rowan; Gubert, Palma; Romano, Corrado; Cantarella, Rita Anna; Elia, Flaviana; Buono, Serafino; Recupero, Marilena; Romano, Carmelo; Castellano, Sabrina; Bosco, Paolo; Di Nuovo, Santo; Drago, Filippo; Caraci, Filippo; Cuello, A Claudio

    2016-11-01

    Given that Alzheimer's pathology develops silently over decades in Down syndrome (DS), prognostic biomarkers of dementia are a major need. We investigated the plasma levels of Aβ, proNGF, tPA, neuroserpin, metallo-proteases and inflammatory molecules in 31 individuals with DS (with and without dementia) and in 31 healthy controls. We examined associations between biomarkers and cognitive decline. Aβ40 and Aβ42 were elevated in DS plasma compared to controls, even in DS individuals without dementia. Plasma Aβ correlated with the rate of cognitive decline across 2 years. ProNGF, MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9 activity, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 were higher in DS plasma, even at AD-asymptomatic stages. Declining plasma Aβ42 and increasing proNGF levels correlated with cognitive decline. A combined measure of Aβ and inflammatory molecules was a strong predictor of prospective cognitive deterioration. Our findings support the combination of plasma and cognitive assessments for the identification of DS individuals at risk of dementia. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of depression with accelerated cognitive decline among patients with type 2 diabetes in the ACCORD-MIND trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Mark D; Katon, Wayne J; Lovato, Laura C; Miller, Michael E; Murray, Anne M; Horowitz, Karen R; Bryan, R Nick; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Marcovina, Santica; Akpunonu, Basil E; Johnson, Janice; Yale, Jean Francois; Williamson, Jeff; Launer, Lenore J

    2013-10-01

    Depression has been identified as a risk factor for dementia among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus but the cognitive domains and patient groups most affected have not been identified. To determine whether comorbid depression in patients with type 2 diabetes accelerates cognitive decline. A 40-month cohort study of participants in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes-Memory in Diabetes (ACCORD-MIND) trial. Fifty-two clinics organized into 6 clinical networks across the United States and Canada. Two thousand nine hundred seventy-seven participants with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular events. The Digit Symbol Substitution Test, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the modified Stroop test were used to assess cognition. The 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire was used to assess depression. Mixed-effects statistical models were used to analyze cognitive test outcomes incorporating depression as a time-dependent covariate. Participants with scores indicative of depression (9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, ≥10) showed greater cognitive decline during 40-month follow-up on all tests, with the following differences in estimated least squares means: Digit Symbol Substitution Test, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.25 to 1.19; P = .003), Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, 0.18 (95% CI, 0.07 to 0.29; P = .001), and Stroop interference, -1.06 (95% CI, -1.93 to -0.18; P = .02). This effect of depression on risk of cognitive decline did not differ according to previous cardiovascular disease; baseline cognition or age; or intensive vs standard glucose-lowering treatment, blood pressure treatment, lipid treatment, or insulin treatment. Addition of demographic and clinical covariates to models did not significantly change the cognitive decline associated with depression. Depression in patients with type 2 diabetes was associated with greater cognitive decline in all domains, across all treatment arms, and in all participant subgroups assessed. Future

  6. Brain Amyloid Deposition and Longitudinal Cognitive Decline in Nondemented Older Subjects: Results from a Multi-Ethnic Population.

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    Yian Gu

    Full Text Available We aimed to whether the abnormally high amyloid-β (Aβ level in the brain among apparently healthy elders is related with subtle cognitive deficits and/or accelerated cognitive decline.A total of 116 dementia-free participants (mean age 84.5 years of the Washington Heights Inwood Columbia Aging Project completed 18F-Florbetaben PET imaging. Positive or negative cerebral Aβ deposition was assessed visually. Quantitative cerebral Aβ burden was calculated as the standardized uptake value ratio in pre-established regions of interest using cerebellar cortex as the reference region. Cognition was determined using a neuropsychological battery and selected tests scores were combined into four composite scores (memory, language, executive/speed, and visuospatial using exploratory factor analysis. We examined the relationship between cerebral Aβ level and longitudinal cognition change up to 20 years before the PET scan using latent growth curve models, controlling for age, education, ethnicity, and Apolipoprotein E (APOE genotype.Positive reading of Aβ was found in 41 of 116 (35% individuals. Cognitive scores at scan time was not related with Aβ. All cognitive scores declined over time. Aβ positive reading (B = -0.034, p = 0.02 and higher Aβ burden in temporal region (B = -0.080, p = 0.02 were associated with faster decline in executive/speed. Stratified analyses showed that higher Aβ deposition was associated with faster longitudinal declines in mean cognition, language, and executive/speed in African-Americans or in APOE ε4 carriers, and with faster memory decline in APOE ε4 carriers. The associations remained significant after excluding mild cognitive impairment participants.High Aβ deposition in healthy elders was associated with decline in executive/speed in the decade before neuroimaging, and the association was observed primarily in African-Americans and APOE ε4 carriers. Our results suggest that measuring cerebral Aβ may give us

  7. Influence of early maladaptive schemas, depression, and anxiety on the intensity of self-reported cognitive complaint in older adults with subjective cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandetnik, Caroline; Hergueta, Thierry; Bonnet, Philippe; Dubois, Bruno; Bungener, Catherine

    2017-10-01

    Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) designates a self-reported cognitive decline despite preserved cognitive abilities. This study aims to explore, in older adults with SCD, the association between intensity of self-reported cognitive complaint and psychological factors including Young's early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) (i.e. enduring cognitive structures giving rise to beliefs about oneself and the world), as well as depression and anxiety. Seventy-six subjects (69.22 years ± 6.1) with intact cognitive functioning were recruited through an advertisement offering free participation in an intervention on SCD. After undergoing a neuropsychological examination (including global cognition (MMSE) and episodic memory (FCSRT)) and a semi-structured interview to assess depressive symptoms (MADRS), they completed a set of online self-reported questionnaires on SCD (McNair questionnaire), Young's EMSs (YSQ-short form), depression (HADS-D), and anxiety (HADS-A and trait-STAI-Y). The McNair score did not correlate with the neuropsychological scores. Instead, it was highly (r > 0.400; p depression, anxiety, and these three EMSs as predictors (while controlling for age, gender, and objective cognition) accounted for 38.5% of the observed variance in SCD intensity. The level of cognitive complaint is significantly associated with Young's EMSs in the category of "Impaired autonomy and performance". We assume that SCD may primarily be driven by profound long-term inner beliefs about oneself that do not specifically refer to self-perceived memory abilities.

  8. Depressive symptoms predict cognitive decline and dementia in older people independently of cerebral white matter changes: the LADIS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdelho, Ana; Madureira, Sofia; Moleiro, Carla; Ferro, José M; O'Brien, John T; Poggesi, Anna; Pantoni, Leonardo; Fazekas, Franz; Scheltens, Philip; Waldemar, Gunhild; Wallin, Anders; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Inzitari, Domenico

    2013-11-01

    Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC). The LADIS (Leukoaraiosis And DISability in the elderly) prospective study evaluated the impact of WMC on the transition of independent older subjects into disability. Subjects were evaluated annually over a 3 year period with a comprehensive clinical and neuropsychological evaluation. Previous episodes of depression and current DS were assessed during each interview. Severity of DS was assessed using the self-rated 15 item Geriatric Depression Scale. A neuropsychological battery and clinical criteria for cognitive impairments were applied in all clinical visits, and cognitive compound measures were made based on neuropsychological results. MRI was performed at baseline and at year 3. 639 subjects were included (74.1 ± 5 years old, 55% women, 9.6 ± 3.8 years of schooling). Dementia was diagnosed in 90 patients and cognitive impairment not dementia in 147 patients at the last clinical evaluation. DS were an independent predictor of cognitive impairment (dementia and not dementia) during follow-up, independent of the effect of the severity of WMC, medial temporal lobe atrophy, age, education or global cognitive function at baseline. DS are associated with an increase risk of cognitive decline, independent of the effect of WMC, probably due to an additive or synergistic effect. In this context, DS probably represent a subtle ongoing organic dysfunction.

  9. The associations between serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor, potential confounders, and cognitive decline: a longitudinal study.

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    Jasmine Nettiksimmons

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays a role in the maintenance and function of neurons. Although persons with Alzheimer's disease have lower cortical levels of BDNF, evidence regarding the association between circulating BDNF and cognitive function is conflicting. We sought to determine the correlates of BDNF level and whether BDNF level was prospectively associated with cognitive decline in healthy older adults. We measured serum BDNF near baseline in 912 individuals. Cognitive status was assessed repeatedly with the modified Mini-Mental Status Examination and the Digit Symbol Substitution test over the next 10 years. We evaluated the association between BDNF and cognitive decline with longitudinal models. We also assessed the association between BDNF level and demographics, comorbidities and health behaviors. We found an association between serum BDNF and several characteristics that are also associated with dementia (race and depression, suggesting that future studies should control for these potential confounders. We did not find evidence of a longitudinal association between serum BDNF and subsequent cognitive test trajectories in older adults, although we did identify a potential trend toward a cross-sectional association. Our results suggest that serum BDNF may have limited utility as a biomarker of prospective cognitive decline.

  10. Relationships between Regional Radiation Doses and Cognitive Decline in Children Treated with Cranio-Spinal Irradiation for Posterior Fossa Tumors

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    Elodie Doger de Speville

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric posterior fossa tumor (PFT survivors who have been treated with cranial radiation therapy often suffer from cognitive impairments that might relate to IQ decline. Radiotherapy (RT distinctly affects brain regions involved in different cognitive functions. However, the relative contribution of regional irradiation to the different cognitive impairments still remains unclear. We investigated the relationships between the changes in different cognitive scores and radiation dose distribution in 30 children treated for a PFT. Our exploratory analysis was based on a principal component analysis (PCA and an ordinary least square regression approach. The use of a PCA was an innovative way to cluster correlated irradiated regions due to similar radiation therapy protocols across patients. Our results suggest an association between working memory decline and a high dose (equivalent uniform dose, EUD delivered to the orbitofrontal regions, whereas the decline of processing speed seemed more related to EUD in the temporal lobes and posterior fossa. To identify regional effects of RT on cognitive functions may help to propose a rehabilitation program adapted to the risk of cognitive impairment.

  11. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 but Not Insulin Predicts Cognitive Decline in Huntington’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssov, Katia; Dolbeau, Guillaume; Cleret, Laurent; Bourhis, Marie-Laure; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Verny, Christophe; Morin, Françoise; Moutereau, Stéphane; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Maison, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is one of several neurodegenerative disorders that have been associated with metabolic alterations. Changes in Insulin Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) and/or insulin input to the brain may underlie or contribute to the progress of neurodegenerative processes. Here, we investigated the association over time between changes in plasma levels of IGF-1 and insulin and the cognitive decline in HD patients. Methods We conducted a multicentric cohort study in 156 patients with genetically documented HD aged from 22 to 80 years. Among them, 146 patients were assessed at least twice with a follow-up of 3.5 ± 1.8 years. We assessed their cognitive decline using the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale, and their IGF-1 and insulin plasmatic levels, at baseline and once a year during the follow-up. Associations were evaluated using a mixed-effect linear model. Results In the cross-sectional analysis at baseline, higher levels of IGF-1 and insulin were associated with lower cognitive scores and thus with a higher degree of cognitive impairment. In the longitudinal analysis, the decrease of all cognitive scores, except the Stroop interference, was associated with the IGF-1 level over time but not of insulin. Conclusions IGF-1 levels, unlike insulin, predict the decline of cognitive function in HD. PMID:27627435

  12. Testing cognitive performance of socially housed monkeys: possibilities and limitations of the study of social influences on age-related cognitive decline

    OpenAIRE

    Toxopeus, Ido Bart

    2004-01-01

    In both humans and monkeys not all individuals show the same rate of age-related cognitive decline. One important factor to influence the rate of decline is extended exposure to elevated levels of glucocorticoids, which play a central role in the response to stress. Furthermore, studies with humans have suggested that the social environment influences such exposure to glucocorticoids. However, the complex social structure of human society complicates the investigation of the effects of the li...

  13. Gait dyspraxia as a clinical marker of cognitive decline in Down syndrome: A review of theory and proposed mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Mooney, Amelia J; Schmitt, Frederick A; Head, Elizabeth; Lott, Ira T; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2016-04-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability in children. With aging, DS is associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The development of AD neuropathology in individuals with DS can result in further disturbances in cognition and behavior and may significantly exacerbate caregiver burden. Early detection may allow for appropriate preparation by caregivers. Recent literature suggests that declines in gait may serve as an early marker of AD-related cognitive disorders; however, this relationship has not been examined in individuals with DS. The theory regarding gait dyspraxia and cognitive decline in the general population is reviewed, and potential applications to the population with individuals with DS are highlighted. Challenges and benefits in the line of inquiry are discussed. In particular, it appears that gait declines in aging individuals with DS may be associated with known declines in frontoparietal gray matter, development of AD-related pathology, and white matter losses in tracts critical to motor control. These changes are also potentially related to the cognitive and functional changes often observed during the same chronological period as gait declines in adults with DS. Gait declines may be an early marker of cognitive change, related to the development of underlying AD-related pathology, in individuals with DS. Future investigations in this area may provide insight into the clinical changes associated with development of AD pathology in both the population with DS and the general population, enhancing efforts for optimal patient and caregiver support and propelling investigations regarding safety/quality of life interventions and disease-modifying interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Does physical activity prevent cognitive decline and dementia?: A systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondell, Sarah J; Hammersley-Mather, Rachel; Veerman, J Lennert

    2014-05-27

    By 2050, it has been estimated that approximately one-fifth of the population will be made up of older adults (aged ≥60 years). Old age often comes with cognitive decline and dementia. Physical activity may prevent cognitive decline and dementia. We reviewed and synthesised prospective studies into physical activity and cognitive decline, and physical activity and dementia, published until January 2014. Forty-seven cohorts, derived from two previous systematic reviews and an updated database search, were used in the meta-analyses. Included participants were aged ≥40 years, in good health and/or randomly selected from the community. Studies were assessed for methodological quality. Twenty-one cohorts on physical activity and cognitive decline and twenty-six cohorts on physical activity and dementia were included. Meta-analysis, using the quality-effects model, suggests that participants with higher levels of physical activity, when compared to those with lower levels, are at reduced risk of cognitive decline, RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.55-0.76, and dementia, RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.76-0.97. Sensitivity analyses revealed a more conservative estimate of the impact of physical activity on cognitive decline and dementia for high quality studies, studies reporting effect sizes as ORs, greater number of adjustments (≥10), and longer follow-up time (≥10 years). When one heavily weighted study was excluded, physical activity was associated with an 18% reduction in the risk of dementia (RR 0.82; 0.73-0.91). Longitudinal observational studies show an association between higher levels of physical activity and a reduced risk of cognitive decline and dementia. A case can be made for a causal interpretation. Future research should use objective measures of physical activity, adjust for the full range of confounders and have adequate follow-up length. Ideally, randomised controlled trials will be conducted. Regardless of any effect on cognition, physical activity should be encouraged, as

  15. Association between apolipoprotein E ε4 and longitudinal cognitive decline: nested case-control study among chinese community-dwelling elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Wang, Jianhua; Miao, Rujuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Qian

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive decline in the elderly is an early predictor of dementia. The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele is considered an important genetic determinant of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and strongly suspected to play a role in cognitive variation. However, its effects upon predicting the progression of cognitive decline more generally remain unclear. Our aim was to explore the role of APOE ε4 in longitudinal cognitive decline, considering sociodemographics, vascular disease, and lipid profile. We chose a nested case-control design, and prospectively collected demographic and clinical data, determined APOE genotypes, and obtained follow-up information on cognitive variation (measured by a spectrum of cognitive tests) for 3 years. Cognitive decline was predefined as an increase in Clinical Dementia Rating Scale class, or at least a 4-point decrease (>1 SD) in MMSE, between baseline and follow-ups. Among 600 follow-up subjects with mild cognitive impairment and aged 65 years or older, 114 pairs of cognitive decline and stable subjects were identified and matched for sex, age, and educational level in a 1:1 ratio. The APOE ε4 frequency in the cognitive decline group was significantly higher than that in the stable group (p 0.05). At the first follow-up, modest but significant declines only in the memory domain were associated with APOE ε4. At the last follow-up, significant associations were noted between APOE ε4 and cognitive decline from 5 of the 6 cognitive outcomes, which included story recall, memory, spatial recognition, naming, and sustained attention. Conditional logistic regression showed that the presence of APOE ε4 was significantly associated with the cognitive decline group, as compared to the stable group, adjusting for vascular diseases and lipid profile. APOE ε4 offered information on the risk of cognitive decline in this longitudinal study, and may exert detectable effects early in a long prodromal AD trajectory. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG

  16. Total Cerebral Small Vessel Disease MRI Score Is Associated With Cognitive Decline In Executive Function In Patients With Hypertension

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    Renske Uiterwijk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hypertension is a major risk factor for white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds and perivascular spaces, which are MRI markers of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD. Studies have shown associations between these individual MRI markers and cognitive functioning and decline. Recently, a total SVD score was proposed in which the different MRI markers were combined into one measure of SVD, to capture total SVD-related brain damage. We investigated if this SVD score was associated with cognitive decline over 4 years in patients with hypertension. Methods: In this longitudinal cohort study, 130 hypertensive patients (91 patients with uncomplicated hypertension and 39 hypertensive patients with a lacunar stroke were included. They underwent a neuropsychological assessment at baseline and after 4 years. The presence of white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, and perivascular spaces were rated on baseline MRI. Presence of each individual marker was added to calculate the total SVD score (range 0-4 in each patient. Results: Uncorrected linear regression analyses showed associations between SVD score and decline in overall cognition (p=0.017, executive functioning (p<0.001 and information processing speed (p=0.037, but not with memory (p=0.911. The association between SVD score and decline in overall cognition and executive function remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, education, anxiety and depression score, potential vascular risk factors, patient group and baseline cognitive performance.Conclusions: Our study shows that a total SVD score can predict cognitive decline, specifically in executive function, over 4 years in hypertensive patients. This emphasizes the importance of considering total brain damage due to SVD.

  17. The LonDownS adult cognitive assessment to study cognitive abilities and decline in Down syndrome [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Carla M. Startin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Down syndrome (DS, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, is associated with an ultra-high risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. However, there is individual variability in the onset of clinical dementia and in baseline cognitive abilities prior to decline, particularly in memory, executive functioning, and motor coordination. The LonDownS Consortium aims to determine risk and protective factors for the development of dementia and factors relating to cognitive abilities in people with DS. Here we describe our cognitive test battery and related informant measures along with reporting data from our baseline cognitive and informant assessments. Methods: We developed a cognitive test battery to assess general abilities, memory, executive function, and motor coordination abilities in adults with DS, with informant ratings of similar domains also collected, designed to allow for data on a broad range of participants. Participants (n=305 had a range of ages and abilities, and included adults with and without a clinical diagnosis of dementia. Results: Results suggest the battery is suitable for the majority of adults with DS, although approximately half the adults with dementia were unable to undertake any cognitive task. Many test outcomes showed a range of scores with low floor and ceiling effects. Non-verbal age-adjusted IQ scores had lower floor effects than verbal IQ scores. Before the onset of any cognitive decline, females aged 16-35 showed better verbal abilities compared to males. We also identified clusters of cognitive test scores within our battery related to visuospatial memory, motor coordination, language abilities, and processing speed / sustained attention. Conclusions: Our further studies will use baseline and longitudinal assessments to explore factors influencing cognitive abilities and cognitive decline related to ageing and onset of dementia in adults with DS.

  18. Detection of Outliers Due to Participants' Non-Adherence to Protocol in a Longitudinal Study of Cognitive Decline.

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    Aline Dugravot

    Full Text Available Participants' non adherence to protocol affects data quality. In longitudinal studies, this leads to outliers that can be present at the level of the population or the individual. The purpose of the present study is to elaborate a method for detection of outliers in a study of cognitive ageing.In the Whitehall II study, data on a cognitive test battery have been collected in 1997-99, 2002-04, 2007-09 and 2012-13. Outliers at the 2012-13 wave were identified using a 4-step procedure: (1 identify cognitive tests with potential non-adherence to protocol, (2 choose a prediction model between a simple model with socio-demographic covariates and one that also includes health behaviours and health measures, (3 define an outlier using a studentized residual, and (4 study the impact of exclusion of outliers by estimating the effect of age and diabetes on cognitive decline.5516 participants provided cognitive data in 2012-13. Comparisons of rates of annual decline over the first three and all four waves of data suggested outliers in three of the 5 tests. Mean residuals for the 2012-13 wave were larger for the basic compared to the more complex prediction model (all p<0.001, leading us to use the latter for the identification of outliers. Residuals greater than two standard deviation of residuals identified approximately 7% of observations as being outliers. Removal of these observations from the analyses showed that both age and diabetes had associations with cognitive decline similar to that observed with the first three waves of data; these associations were weaker or absent in non-cleaned data.Identification of outliers is important as they obscure the effects of known risk factor and introduce bias in the estimates of cognitive decline. We showed that an informed approach, using the range of data collected in a longitudinal study, may be able to identify outliers.

  19. Review of information and communication technology devices for monitoring functional and cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Jagan A; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Detecting and monitoring early cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a significant need in the field of AD therapeutics. Successful AD clinical trial designs have to overcome challenges related to the subtle nature of early cognitive changes. Continuous unobtrusive assessments using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) devices to capture markers of intra-individual change over time to assess cognitive and functional disability therefore offers significant benefits. We review the literature and provide an overview on randomized clinical trials in AD that use intelligent systems to monitor functional decline, as well as strengths, weaknesses, and future directions for the use of ICTs in a new generation of AD clinical trials.

  20. Brain structural substrates of semantic memory decline in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, Simona; Cuetos, Fernando; Fasano, Fabrizio; Pellegrini, Francesca Ferrari; Marchi, Massimo; Venneri, Annalena; Caffarra, Paolo

    2013-05-01

    Semantic memory decline has been found in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In this study performance on a range of semantic tasks and structural brain patterns were examined in a group of MCI patients. Fourteen MCI and sixteen healthy elderly controls underwent semantic memory assessment and MRI brain scanning. The cognitive battery included visual naming and naming from definition tasks for objects, actions and famous people, semantic fluency for animals, fruits, tools, furniture, singers, politicians, actions, word-association task for early and late acquired words and a reading task. MCI patients performed worse on semantic fluency in all categories except for tools, produced a smaller number of words associated with early acquired nouns and a smaller total number of word-associations. Patients scored more poorly in all tasks of naming, naming of famous people, overall reading and reading of famous people's names. MCIs had fewer correct immediate recalls and more correct responses with cue in famous people naming, made more errors in naming and in the naming from definition task for famous people. Grey matter reduction in parahippocampus, frontal and cingulate cortices and amygdala was found in the MCI sample when compared with controls. Patients presented a different pattern of brain areas correlated with semantic tasks from that seen in controls, with more extensive involvement of subcortical regions in semantic fluency and word-association and more contribution of frontal than temporo-parietal areas in visual naming. This evidence suggests a reorganization of cortical associations of semantic processes in MCI that, following damage in the semantic circuit, explains its progressive breakdown.

  1. Needs in nursing homes and their relation with cognitive and functional decline, behavioral and psychological symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Unmet needs are becoming acknowledged as better predictors of the worst prognostic outcomes than common measures of functional or cognitive decline. Their accurate assessment is a pivotal component of effective care delivery, particularly in institutionalized care where little is known about the needs of its residents, many of whom suffer from dementia and show complex needs. The aims of this study were to describe the needs of an institutionalized sample and to analyze its relationship with demographic and clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample from three nursing homes. All residents were assessed with a comprehensive protocol that included Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI and Adults and Older Adults Functional Inventory (IAFAI. To identify needs, the Camberwell Assessment of Need for the Elderly (CANE was used. The final sample included 175 residents with a mean age of 80.6(sd=10.1. From these, 58.7% presented cognitive deficit (MMSE and 45.2% depressive symptoms (GDS. Statistically significant negative correlations were found between MMSE score and met(rs=-0.425, unmet(rs=-0.369 and global needs(rs=-0.565. Data also showed significant correlations between depressive symptoms and unmet(rs=0.683 and global needs(rs=0.407 and between behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD and unmet (rs=0.181 and global needs (rs=0.254. Finally, significant correlations between functional impairment and met(rs=0.642, unmet(rs=0.505 and global needs(rs=0.796 were also found. These results suggest that in this sample, more unmet needs are associated with the worst outcomes measured. This is consistent with previous findings and seems to demonstrate that the needs of those institutionalized elderly remain under-diagnosed and untreated.

  2. Impact of Gender and Blood Pressure on Post-Stroke Cognitive Decline among Older Latinos

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    Levine, Deborah A.; Haan, Mary N.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Neuhaus, John; Lee, Anne; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Post-stroke cognitive decline (PSCD) is an important consequence of stroke that may be more severe in women than men. The existence of any gender differences in PSCD among Mexican Americans, and their potential mechanisms, such as blood pressure (BP), remain unknown. We assessed PSCD stratified on gender in older Mexican Americans and explored the influence of pre-stroke and post-stroke systolic BP on PSCD. Methods Among 1,576 non-demented, stroke-free adults 60 years or older when recruited in 1998–99 in the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (SALSA) cohort, we examined pre-stroke and post-stroke longitudinal changes in Spanish English Verbal Learning test scores (WL), a verbal memory test, and errors on the Modified Mini Mental State Exam (3MSE) scores, a global cognition test, stratified by gender, adjusting for baseline and time-varying covariates with linear mixed-effects models. Results We identified 151 adults (mean age, 72 ± 8 years) with incident first-ever stroke during ten years of follow-up. After adjustment for age, education and time-varying depressive symptoms, 3MSE errors increased by 22%/year (95% CI, 6.8%–36.7%) in men and 13.2%/year (95% CI, 3.5%–22.9%) in women over the post-stroke period. Post-stroke WL scores improved by 0.05 words/year (95% CI, −0.24–0.33) in men and by 0.09 words/year (95% CI, −0.16–0.34) in women. Results persisted after adjustment for time-varying systolic BP. Conclusions Among this population of older Mexican Americans, PSCD did not differ by gender. We found no evidence that systolic BP influenced PSCD in women or men. PMID:22748715

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids and risk of cognitive decline in the elderly: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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    Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Hou, Wen-Shang; Li, Min; Tang, Zhen-Yu

    2016-02-01

    Evidence has demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids intake may be associated with age-related cognitive decline. However, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have drawn inconsistent conclusions. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between omega-3 fatty acids and risk of cognitive decline in the elderly. A strategic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library (updated to December 2014) was performed. We retrieved six randomized controlled studies as eligible for our meta-analysis. Among these six studies, the duration time ranged from 3 to 40 months. The dose of omega-3 fatty acids (DHA + EPA) ranged from 400 to 1800 mg. The result of our meta-analysis expressed that omega-3 fatty acids statistically decrease the rate of cognitive decline in MMSE score (WMD = 0.15, [0.05, 0.25]; p = 0.003). In conclusion, our meta-analysis indicated that omega-3 fatty acids may help to prevent cognitive decline in the elderly.

  4. Idioms in the aging brain : The effects of age-related cognitive decline on the processing and comprehension of idioms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    la Roi, Amélie; Sprenger, Simone; Hendriks, Petra

    2017-01-01

    The process of aging involves a decline in the brain’s executive functions. Executive functions are responsible for complex cognitive processes, such as the ability to control and plan thoughts and behavior. Compared to younger adults, elderly adults’ performance on tasks that require executive

  5. Is cognitive decline in the elderly associated with contextual income? Results of a population-based study in southern Brazil

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    Ana Lúcia Danielewicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of this study was to estimate the association between contextual income and cognitive decline in the elderly in Florianópolis, a medium-sized city in southern Brazil. A nested cross-sectional study was performed in a cohort of elderly ≥ 60 years (n = 1,197, interviewed in the second wave (2013/2014 of the EpiFloripa cohort. Cognitive decline was assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE and contextual income was measured as the mean monthly income of the heads of households. Individual adjustment variables were sex, age, skin color, per capita household income, years of schooling, and time living in the neighborhood. The data were analyzed using multilevel logistic regression. The odds of cognitive decline were twice as high (OR = 1.99; 95%CI: 1.03; 3.87 in elderly living in census tracts with the lowest income quintile compared to those in the highest quintile, independently of individual characteristics. In conclusion, the socioeconomic environment is related to cognitive decline and should be considered in public policies with a focus on health of the elderly.

  6. Dietary Patterns High in Red Meat, Potato, Gravy, and Butter Are Associated with Poor Cognitive Functioning but Not with Rate of Cognitive Decline in Very Old Adults1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Karen; Adamson, Ashley; Kirkwood, Thomas; Hill, Tom R; Siervo, Mario; Mathers, John C; Jagger, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background: Healthy dietary patterns (DPs) have been linked to better cognition and reduced risk of dementia in older adults, but their role in cognitive functioning and decline in the very old (aged ≥85 y) is unknown. Objective: We investigated the association between previously established DPs from the Newcastle 85+ Study and global and attention-specific cognition over 5 y. Methods: We followed up with 302 men and 489 women (1921 birth cohort from Northeast United Kingdom) for change in global cognition [measured by the Standardized Mini-Mental State Examination (SMMSE)] over 5 y and attention (assessed by the cognitive drug research attention battery) over 3 y. We used 2-step clustering to derive DPs and mixed models to determine the relation between DPs and cognition in the presence of the dementia susceptibility gene. Results: Previously, we characterized 3 DPs that differed in intake of red meat, potato, gravy, and butter and varied with key health measures. When compared with participants in DP1 (high red meat) and DP3 (high butter), participants in DP2 (low meat) had higher SMMSE scores at baseline (P butter (DP3) were associated with poor cognition but not with the rate of cognitive decline in very old adults. PMID:26740685

  7. Dietary Patterns High in Red Meat, Potato, Gravy, and Butter Are Associated with Poor Cognitive Functioning but Not with Rate of Cognitive Decline in Very Old Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granic, Antoneta; Davies, Karen; Adamson, Ashley; Kirkwood, Thomas; Hill, Tom R; Siervo, Mario; Mathers, John C; Jagger, Carol

    2016-02-01

    Healthy dietary patterns (DPs) have been linked to better cognition and reduced risk of dementia in older adults, but their role in cognitive functioning and decline in the very old (aged ≥85 y) is unknown. We investigated the association between previously established DPs from the Newcastle 85+ Study and global and attention-specific cognition over 5 y. We followed up with 302 men and 489 women (1921 birth cohort from Northeast United Kingdom) for change in global cognition [measured by the Standardized Mini-Mental State Examination (SMMSE)] over 5 y and attention (assessed by the cognitive drug research attention battery) over 3 y. We used 2-step clustering to derive DPs and mixed models to determine the relation between DPs and cognition in the presence of the dementia susceptibility gene. Previously, we characterized 3 DPs that differed in intake of red meat, potato, gravy, and butter and varied with key health measures. When compared with participants in DP1 (high red meat) and DP3 (high butter), participants in DP2 (low meat) had higher SMMSE scores at baseline (P butter (DP3) were associated with poor cognition but not with the rate of cognitive decline in very old adults.

  8. Cognitive decline and brain pathology in aging--need for a dimensional, lifespan and systems vulnerability view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walhovd, Kristine B; Fjell, Anders M; Espeseth, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Changes in brain structure and activity as well as cognitive function are commonly seen in aging. However, it is not known when aging of brain and cognition starts, and how much of the changes observed in seemingly healthy older adults that can be ascribed to incipient neurodegenerative disease. Recent research has yielded evidence that the borders between development and aging sometimes can be fuzzy, as can the borders between dementing disease and normal age changes. In this review, we argue that many factors affecting cognitive decline and dementia represents quantitative rather than qualitative differences in characteristics that commonly exist in the population. Further, factors known to affect brain and cognition in aging will often do so through a life-long accumulation of impact, and does not need to be specific to aging. And finally, a host of environmental and genetic factors and their interplay determine optimal aging, leaving room for potential for environmental interventions to affect the outcome of the aging process. Together, we argue that these factors call for a dimensional rather than categorical, lifespan rather than aging, and multidimensional systems-vulnerability rather than simple "hypothetical biomarker" model of age-associated cognitive decline and dementia. This has implications for how we should view lifespan trajectories of change in brain and cognitive function, and how we can study, prevent, diagnose and treat age-associated cognitive deficits. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Value of FDG-PET scans of non-demented patients in predicting rates of future cognitive and functional decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torosyan, Nare; Mason, Kelsey; Dahlbom, Magnus; Silverman, Daniel H.S. [David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles, Ahmanson Translational Imaging Division, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Collaboration: the Alzheimer' sDisease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2017-08-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the value of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in predicting subsequent rates of functional and cognitive decline among subjects considered cognitively normal (CN) or clinically diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Analyses of 276 subjects, 92 CN subjects and 184 with MCI, who were enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, were conducted. Functional decline was assessed using scores on the Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ) obtained over a period of 36 months, while cognitive decline was determined using the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. PET images were analyzed using clinically routine brain quantification software. A dementia prognosis index (DPI), derived from a ratio of uptake values in regions of interest known to be hypometabolic in Alzheimer's disease to regions known to be stable, was generated for each baseline FDG-PET scan. The DPI was correlated with change in scores on the neuropsychological examinations to examine the predictive value of baseline FDG-PET. DPI powerfully predicted rate of functional decline among MCI patients (t = 5.75, p < 1.0E-8) and pooled N + MCI patient groups (t = 7.02, p < 1.0E-11). Rate of cognitive decline on MMSE was also predicted by the DPI among MCI (t = 6.96, p < 1.0E-10) and pooled N + MCI (t = 8.78, p < 5.0E-16). Rate of cognitive decline on ADAS-cog was powerfully predicted by the DPI alone among N (p < 0.001), MCI (t = 6.46, p < 1.0E-9) and for pooled N + MCI (t = 8.85, p = 1.1E-16). These findings suggest that an index, derivable from automated regional analysis of brain PET scans, can be used to help predict rates of functional and cognitive deterioration in the years following baseline PET. (orig.)

  10. Impact of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/gonadal axes on trajectory of age-related cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Cheryl D; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2010-01-01

    Life expectancies have increased substantially in the last century, dramatically amplifying the proportion of individuals who will reach old age. As individuals age, cognitive ability declines, although the rate of decline differs amongst the forms of memory domains and for different individuals. Memory domains especially impacted by aging are declarative and spatial memories. The hippocampus facilitates the formation of declarative and spatial memories. Notably, the hippocampus is particularly vulnerable to aging. Genetic predisposition and lifetime experiences and exposures contribute to the aging process, brain changes and subsequent cognitive outcomes. In this review, two factors to which an individual is exposed, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, will be considered regarding the impact of age on hippocampal-dependent function. Spatial memory can be affected by cumulative exposure to chronic stress via glucocorticoids, released from the HPA axis, and from gonadal steroids (estrogens, progesterone and androgens) and gonadotrophins, released from the HPG axis. Additionally, this review will discuss how these hormones impact age-related hippocampal function. We hypothesize that lifetime experiences and exposure to these hormones contribute to the cognitive makeup of the aged individual, and contribute to the heterogeneous aged population that includes individuals with cognitive abilities as astute as their younger counterparts, as well as individuals with severe cognitive decline or neurodegenerative disease. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging response as an early biomarker of cognitive decline in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaeff, Nadia; Amaro, Edson; Franco, Fabio G M; Jacinto, Alessandro F; Chiochetta, Gabriela; Cendoroglo, Maysa S; Citero, Vanessa A

    2017-11-01

    We assessed whether potential changes in brain activation patterns of elderly individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) who were cognitively healthy (without mild cognitive impairment or dementia) were associated with cognitive decline in executive function in the short-term. We analyzed 43 individuals (23 MetS, 20 controls) using a global geriatric evaluation, a neuropsychological battery, and task-related (attention) fMRI exam. Correlation analysis between the fMRI signal at baseline and cognitive impairment after 1year was based on the voxel-based Pearson coefficient, corrected for multiple comparisons. At baseline, MetS patients showed reduced brain response in frontal and parietal regions compared to controls. After one year, the MetS group also showed a decline in verbal fluency performance. fMRI response in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and bilateral parietal lobes was negatively correlated with verbal fluency decline in the MetS group. Our results provide an early biomarker of the possible development of cognitive impairment, particularly in the executive function, of elderly individuals suffering from MetS. These findings also point to an up or down regulation which could be interpreted as compensatory mechanism for possible brain tissue burden caused by MetS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurodegenerative Properties of Chronic Pain: Cognitive Decline in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, M.L.A.; Postma, S.A.E.; Souren, P.M.; Arns, M.W.; Gordon, E.; Vissers, K.C.P.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Rijn, C.M. van; Goor, H. van

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain has been associated with impaired cognitive function. We examined cognitive performance in patients with severe chronic pancreatitis pain. We explored the following factors for their contribution to observed cognitive deficits: pain duration, comorbidity (depression, sleep disturbance),

  13. Modelling cognitive decline in the Hypertension in the Very Elderly Trial [HYVET] and proposed risk tables for population use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Peters

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Although, on average, cognition declines with age, cognition in older adults is a dynamic process. Hypertension is associated with greater decline in cognition with age, but whether treatment of hypertension affects this is uncertain. Here, we modelled dynamics of cognition in relation to the treatment of hypertension, to see if treatment effects might better be discerned by a model that included baseline measures of cognition and consequent mortality METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This is a secondary analysis of the Hypertension in the Very Elderly Trial (HYVET, a double blind, placebo controlled trial of indapamide, with or without perindopril, in people aged 80+ years at enrollment. Cognitive states were defined in relation to errors on the Mini-Mental State Examination, with more errors signifying worse cognition. Change in cognitive state was evaluated using a dynamic model of cognitive transition. In the model, the probabilities of transitions between cognitive states is represented by a Poisson distribution, with the Poisson mean dependent on the baseline cognitive state. The dynamic model of cognitive transition was good (R(2 = 0.74 both for those on placebo and (0.86 for those on active treatment. The probability of maintaining cognitive function, based on baseline function, was slightly higher in the actively treated group (e.g., for those with the fewest baseline errors, the chance of staying in that state was 63% for those on treatment, compared with 60% for those on placebo. Outcomes at two and four years could be predicted based on the initial state and treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A dynamic model of cognition that allows all outcomes (cognitive worsening, stability improvement or death to be categorized simultaneously detected small but consistent differences between treatment and control groups (in favour of treatment amongst very elderly people treated for hypertension. The model showed good fit, and

  14. Longitudinal cerebral diffusion changes reflect progressive decline of language and cognition.

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    Frings, Lars; Dressel, Katharina; Abel, Stefanie; Mader, Irina; Glauche, Volkmar; Weiller, Cornelius; Hüll, Michael

    2013-12-30

    Language deficits are regularly found in cortical neurodegenerative diseases. The progression of language deficits shows a considerable inter-individual variability even within one diagnostic group. We aimed at detecting patterns of altered diffusion as well as atrophy of cerebral gray and white matter which underlie ongoing language-related deterioration in patients with cortical neurodegenerative diseases. Diffusion tensor imaging and T1-weighted MRI data of 26 patients with clinically diagnosed neurodegenerative disorders were acquired at baseline and 14 months later in this prospective study. Language functions were assessed with a confrontation naming test and the Token Test. Diffusion and voxel-based morphometric measures were calculated and correlates of language performance were evaluated. Across all patients, the naming impairment was related to diffusion (false discovery rate-corrected Planguage-related deficits and to detect longitudinal changes that accompanied ongoing cognition and language decline, with mean diffusivity appearing most sensitive. This might indicate the usefulness of diffusion measures as markers for successful intervention in therapy studies. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute parietal lobe infarction presenting as Gerstmann’s syndrome and cognitive decline mimicking senile dementia

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    Chen TY

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tien-Yu Chen,1 Chun-Yen Chen,1,3 Che-Hung Yen,2,3 Shin-Chang Kuo,1,3 Yi-Wei Yeh,1,3 Serena Chang,1 San-Yuan Huang1,31Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Neurology, Tri-Service General Hospital, School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, 3Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaAbstract: Gerstmann’s syndrome encompasses the tetrad of finger agnosia, agraphia, acalculia, and right-left confusion. An elderly man with a history of several cardiovascular diseases was initially brought to the psychiatric outpatient department by his family because of worsening of recent memory, executive function, and mixed anxious-depressive mood. Gerstmann’s syndrome without obvious motor function impairment and dementia-like features could be observed at first. Emergent brain computed tomography scan revealed new left-middle cerebral artery infarction over the left posterior parietal lobe. This case reminds us that acute cerebral infarction involving the parietal lobe may present as Gerstmann’s syndrome accompanied by cognitive decline mimicking dementia. As a result, emergent organic workups should be arranged, especially for elderly patients at high risk for cerebral vascular accident.Keywords: Gerstmann’s syndrome, dementia, parietal lobe infarction

  16. Pathogenesis of Cognitive Decline Following Therapeutic Irradiation for Head and Neck Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abayomi, Olubunmi K. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2002-08-01

    Cognitive decline is a significant but largely unrecognized sequela following irradiation for several head and neck tumors, particularly cancer of the nasopharynx and paranasal sinuses. In this article the cellular mechanisms of radiation-induced vascular damage in the temporal lobe and its effects on the medial temporal lobe memory systems are described. Recognition of the mechanisms and site of the injury should permit the use of treatment planning systems, such as 3-dimensional (3-D) conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques, to spare large volumes of the temporal lobe from receiving a high dose. Furthermore, the emerging concepts of vascular irradiation damage as an inflammatory fibroproliferative response to endothelial injury may permit the application of measures directed at inhibiting the expression of proinflammatory genes and thus mitigate the inflammatory response. Moreover, comorbid factors such as hypertension, diabetes, lipidemia, obesity and smoking are known to promote atherogenesis and therefore may exacerbate radiation-induced vascular damage. Control of these factors may also reduce the incidence and severity of this sequela.

  17. MRI Markers of Neurodegenerative and Neurovascular Changes in Relation to Postoperative Delirium and Postoperative Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ilse M J; de Bresser, Jeroen; van Montfort, Simone J T; Slooter, Arjen J C; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2017-10-01

    Postoperative delirium (POD) and postoperative cognitive decline (POCD) are common in elderly patients. The aim of the present review was to explore the association of neurodegenerative and neurovascular changes with the occurrence of POD and POCD. Fifteen MRI studies were identified by combining multiple search terms for POD, POCD, and brain imaging. These studies described a total of 1,422 patients and were all observational in design. Neurodegenerative changes (global and regional brain volumes) did not show a consistent association with the occurrence of POD (four studies) or POCD (two studies). In contrast, neurovascular changes (white matter hyperintensities and cerebral infarcts) were more consistently associated with the occurrence of POD (seven studies) and POCD (five studies). In conclusion, neurovascular changes appear to be consistently associated with the occurrence of POD and POCD, and may identify patients at increased risk of these conditions. Larger prospective studies are needed to study the consistency of these findings and to unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving mitochondrial function significantly reduces metabolic, visual, motor and cognitive decline in aged Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Tobias W; Coyne, Ariathney; Salt, Thomas E; Hogg, Christopher; Jeffery, Glen

    2017-12-01

    Mitochondria play a major role in aging. Over time, mutations accumulate in mitochondrial DNA leading to reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and increased production of damaging reactive oxygen species. If cells fail to cope, they die. Reduced ATP will result in declining cellular membrane potentials leading to reduced central nervous system function. However, aged mitochondrial function is improved by long wavelength light (670 nm) absorbed by cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondrial respiration. In Drosophila, lifelong 670-nm exposure extends lifespan and improves aged mobility. Here, we ask if improved mitochondrial metabolism can reduce functional senescence in metabolism, sensory, locomotor, and cognitive abilities in old flies exposed to 670 nm daily for 1 week. Exposure significantly increased cytochrome c oxidase activity, whole body energy storage, ATP and mitochondrial DNA content, and reduced reactive oxygen species. Retinal function and memory were also significantly improved to levels found in 2-week-old flies. Mobility improved by 60%. The mode of action is likely related to improved energy homeostasis increasing ATP availability for ionic ATPases critical for maintenance of neuronal membrane potentials. 670-nm light exposure may be a simple route for resolving problems of aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. APOE ε4 and the risk for Alzheimer disease and cognitive decline in African Americans and Yoruba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrie, Hugh C; Murrell, Jill; Baiyewu, Olusegun; Lane, Kathleen A; Purnell, Christianna; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Hall, Kathleen; Callahan, Christopher M; Saykin, Andrew J; Gureje, Oye; Hake, Ann; Foroud, Tatiana; Gao, Sujuan

    2014-06-01

    There is little information on the association of the APOEe4 allele and AD risk in African populations. In previous analyses from the Indianapolis-Ibadan dementia project, we have reported that APOE ε4 increased the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in African Americans but not in Yoruba. This study represents a replication of this earlier work using enriched cohorts and extending the analysis to include cognitive decline. In this longitudinal study of two community dwelling cohorts of elderly Yoruba and African Americans, APOE genotyping was conducted from blood samples taken on or before 2001 (1,871 African Americans & 2,200 Yoruba). Mean follow up time was 8.5 years for African Americans and 8.8 years for Yoruba. The effects of heterozygosity or homozygosity of ε4 and of the possession of e4 on time to incident AD and on cognitive decline were determined using Cox's proportional hazards regression and mixed effects models. After adjusting for covariates, one or two copies of the APOE ε4 allele were significant risk factors for incident AD (p Yoruba, only homozygosity for APOE ε4 was a significant risk factor for AD (p = 0.0002) but not for cognitive decline (p = 0.2346), however, possession of an e4 allele was significant for both incident AD (p = 0.0489) and cognitive decline (p = 0.0425). In this large longitudinal comparative study, APOE ε4 had a significant, but weaker, effect on incident AD and on cognitive decline in Yoruba than in African Americans. The reasons for these differences remain unclear.

  20. Examining the impact of grape consumption on brain metabolism and cognitive function in patients with mild decline in cognition: A double-blinded placebo controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jooyeon; Torosyan, Nare; Silverman, Daniel H

    2017-01-01

    Natural compounds in grapes such as resveratrol are known for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Some studies have shown a potential role for grapes or wine in slowing cognitive decline and other effects of aging. However, well-controlled experimental data obtained in human subjects are still in need of further development. Here we aimed to systematically assess effects of grapes on regional cerebral metabolism. Ten subjects with mild decline in cognition (mean, 72.2±4.7years; 50% female) were included in this analysis. Participants were randomized into an active grape formulation arm or a placebo arm which consumed a formulation free of polyphenols for six months. Cognitive performance was measured through neuropsychological assessments performed at baseline and 6months after initiation of therapy. Changes in brain metabolism occurring with each therapy regimen were assessed by brain PET scans with the radiotracer [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), obtained during initial evaluation and 6months later. Standardized volumes of interest (sVOI) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) methods were applied to FDG-PET scans to identify significant regional cerebral metabolic changes. In contrast to participants taking the active grape formulation, who displayed no significant decline in metabolism, the placebo arm underwent significant metabolic decline in sVOI's of the right posterior cingulate cortex (p=0.01), and left superior posterolateral temporal cortex (p=0.04). SPM analyses also found significant declines in the placebo group, particularly in left prefrontal, cingulate, and left superior posterolateral temporal cortex (pDigital Span within the active formulation group (r=-0.69, p=0.04). The placebo arm had declines in regions of the brain known to be significantly affected in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, while the active formulation group was spared such decline. This suggests a protective effect of grapes against early pathologic

  1. Low Borderline Levels of Serum Vitamin B12 May Predict Cognitive Decline in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Eliyahu H; Lubart, Emilia; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2017-05-01

    The progression from cognitive impairment to dementia is a multifactorial process that involves genetic and environmental factors. Vitamin B12 deficiency can be an important factor in the progress from cognitive decline to dementia. To examine the relationship between borderline low level of vitamin B12 (≤ 350 pg/ml) and cognitive decline among a group of elderly hip fracture patients. This retrospective chart review study was conducted in a geriatric rehabilitation ward of a university-affiliated referral hospital. It comprised 91 elderly hip fracture patients. Cognition was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) tool. Fasting serum vitamin B12 levels were measured within 24 hours after admission to the rehabilitation ward. Twenty-two of the patients had vitamin B12 levels ≤ 350 pg/ml. In a multiple linear regression analysis, after adjusting for confounding variables, serum vitamin B12 levels ≤ 350 pg/ml were linked to a higher risk of developing cognitive decline (ß coefficient = -0.28, P = 0.008). In our study, serum vitamin B12 levels ≤ 350 pg/ml, were independently associated with lower MMSE scores in elderly hip fracture patients. Serum vitamin B12 may assist in identifying patients in the early stages of cognitive decline. This study joins others that have reported on the association of low normal range vitamin B12 blood levels and conditions like dementia, falls, fractures and frailty. We suggest a reexamination of what is currently considered as the normal range of vitamin B12 in the elderly.

  2. Subjective Cognitive Decline Correlates With Depression Symptoms and Not With Concurrent Objective Cognition in a Clinic-Based Sample of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatar, Zvinka Z; Muniz, Martha; Galasko, Douglas; Salmon, David P

    2017-01-19

    Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) is common in older adults; however, its utility in clinic-based samples remains controversial given its strong associations with mood symptoms. Five hundred nineteen individuals aged 60-95 with a wide range of cognitive performance scores were referred by community health clinics for brief screening of cognitive complaints. Linear regression models examined the cross-sectional associations between SCD (5-item self-reported questions), symptoms of depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]), and concurrent objective cognitive performance (Cognitive Composite) adjusting for demographics. There was not a significant association between SCD and concurrent objective cognition after adjusting for demographics and depression. In contrast, there was a significant association between SCD and depression after adjusting for demographics and objective cognition. There was also a consistent association between SCD and depression, but not between SCD and objective cognition, in those with high and low levels of SCD reporting, in all ranges of cognitive performance, and in those with mild to moderate depression. Results are consistent with previous findings and suggest that SCD does not accurately reflect concurrent cognitive performance in a clinic-based sample of older adults. Clinical interpretation of SCD should account for the role of depression.

  3. Large cross-sectional study of presbycusis reveals rapid progressive decline in auditory temporal acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmeral, Erol J; Eddins, Ann C; Frisina, D Robert; Eddins, David A

    2016-07-01

    The auditory system relies on extraordinarily precise timing cues for the accurate perception of speech, music, and object identification. Epidemiological research has documented the age-related progressive decline in hearing sensitivity that is known to be a major health concern for the elderly. Although smaller investigations indicate that auditory temporal processing also declines with age, such measures have not been included in larger studies. Temporal gap detection thresholds (TGDTs; an index of auditory temporal resolution) measured in 1071 listeners (aged 18-98 years) were shown to decline at a minimum rate of 1.05 ms (15%) per decade. Age was a significant predictor of TGDT when controlling for audibility (partial correlation) and when restricting analyses to persons with normal-hearing sensitivity (n = 434). The TGDTs were significantly better for males (3.5 ms; 51%) than females when averaged across the life span. These results highlight the need for indices of temporal processing in diagnostics, as treatment targets, and as factors in models of aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Electroencephalographic findings related with mild cognitive impairment in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

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    Sasai, Taeko; Matsuura, Masato; Inoue, Yuichi

    2013-12-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and electroencephalographic (EEG) slowing have been reported as common findings of idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) and α-synucleinopathies. The objective of this study is to clarify the relation between MCI and physiological markers in iRBD. Cross-sectional study. Yoyogi Sleep Disorder Center. Thirty-one patients with iRBD including 17 younger patients with iRBD (younger than 70 y) and 17 control patients for the younger patients with iRBD. N/A. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and n-polysomnogram (PSG) were conducted of all participants. In patients with iRBD, the factors associated with MCI were explored among parameters of REM sleep without atonia (RWA), score of Sniffin' Sticks Test (threshold-discrimination-identification [TDI] score), RBD morbidity, and RBD severity evaluated with the Japanese version of the RBD questionnaire (RBDQ-JP). The younger iRBD group showed significantly lower alpha power during wake and lower MoCA score than the age-matched control group. MCI was detected in 13 of 17 patients (76.5%) on MoCA in this group. Among patients wtih iRBD, the MoCA score negatively correlated with age, proportion of slow wave sleep, TDI score, and EEG spectral power. Multiple regression analysis provided the following equation: MoCA score = 50.871-0.116*age -5.307*log (δ power during REM sleep) + 0.086*TDI score (R² = 0.598, P sleep), and 0.357 for TDI score (F = 9.900, P sleep and olfactory dysfunction, was revealed to be associated with cognitive decline in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

  5. Working Memory and Executive Function Decline across Normal Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Anna-Mariya Kirova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease marked by deficits in episodic memory, working memory (WM, and executive function. Examples of executive dysfunction in AD include poor selective and divided attention, failed inhibition of interfering stimuli, and poor manipulation skills. Although episodic deficits during disease progression have been widely studied and are the benchmark of a probable AD diagnosis, more recent research has investigated WM and executive function decline during mild cognitive impairment (MCI, also referred to as the preclinical stage of AD. MCI is a critical period during which cognitive restructuring and neuroplasticity such as compensation still occur; therefore, cognitive therapies could have a beneficial effect on decreasing the likelihood of AD progression during MCI. Monitoring performance on working memory and executive function tasks to track cognitive function may signal progression from normal cognition to MCI to AD. The present review tracks WM decline through normal aging, MCI, and AD to highlight the behavioral and neurological differences that distinguish these three stages in an effort to guide future research on MCI diagnosis, cognitive therapy, and AD prevention.

  6. Rapid progressive visual decline and visual field defects in two patients with the Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeld-Jakob disease.

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    Lenk, Janine; Engellandt, Kay; Terai, Naim; Bottesi, Antonia; Matthé, Egbert

    2018-02-08

    Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob (HvCJD) is a rare disease, patients presenting with loss of visual acuity and a decline in visual fields. Two patients with rapid loss of visual acuity and declining visual fields presented with homonymic hemianopsia over several weeks. Cranial MRI showed neither stroke nor other morphological changes explaining the severe visual field defects. Neurological examination revealed no pathologies. However, lumbar puncture showed an increase in total protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Visual field testing revealed further deterioration during follow-up. Several weeks later, patients' behaviour changed markedly, exhibiting aggression, declining memory function and physical degeneration. The suspected diagnosis was the Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeld-Jakob disease (HvCJD). CSF analysis showed evidence of PrP Sc and 14-3-3 protein. Both patients died within 8 weeks of the CJD diagnosis. Loss of visual acuity and a decline in visual fields without corresponding MRI findings and marked changes in behaviour should lead to a diagnosis of HvCJD. Corresponding diagnostic tests should be performed for confirmation. The prognosis for survival is poor and should be immediately communicated to affected patients and their relatives. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of n-3 fatty acids on cognitive decline: A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in stable myocardial infarction patients

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    Geleijnse, J.M.; Giltay, E.J.; Kromhout, D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest a protective effect of n-3 fatty acids derived from fish (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) against cognitive decline. For a-linolenic acid (ALA) obtained from vegetable sources, the effect on cognitive decline is unknown. We

  8. NT-proBNP, blood pressure, and cognitive decline in the oldest old: The Leiden 85-plus Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Peter; Sabayan, Behnam; Wijsman, Liselotte W; Poortvliet, Rosalinde K E; Mooijaart, Simon P; de Ruijter, Wouter; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; de Craen, Anton J M; Westendorp, R G J

    2014-09-23

    To study the relation between N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels, used as a marker of heart failure in clinical practice, blood pressure (BP), and cognitive decline in the oldest old. In 560 participants of the Leiden 85-plus Study, we measured NT-proBNP levels and BP at age 85 years, at baseline, and global cognitive function (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE]) annually during the follow-up of 5 years. Subjects in the highest tertile of NT-proBNP levels scored 1.7 points lower on the MMSE at age 85 years than subjects in the lowest tertile (p = 0.004), and had a 0.24-point-steeper decline in MMSE score per year (p = 0.021). The longitudinal association disappeared after full adjustment for possible confounders (0.14-point-steeper decline, p = 0.187). Subjects in the category "highest tertile of NT-proBNP and the lowest tertile of systolic BP" had a 3.7-point-lower MMSE score at baseline (p < 0.001) and a 0.49-point-steeper decline in MMSE score per year (p < 0.001) compared with subjects in the other categories. In the oldest old, high NT-proBNP levels are associated with lower MMSE scores. The combination of high NT-proBNP levels and low systolic BP is associated with worst global cognitive function and the steepest cognitive decline. Possibly, a failing pump function of the heart results in lower BP and lower brain perfusion with resultant brain dysfunction. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Vascular Risk as a Predictor of Cognitive Decline in a Cohort of Elderly Patients with Mild to Moderate Dementia

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    Pedro K. Curiati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The purpose of our study was to evaluate vascular risk factors and other clinical variables as predictors of cognitive and functional decline in elderly patients with mild to moderate dementia. Methods: The clinical characteristics of 82 elderly patients (mean age 79.0 ± 5.9 years; 67.1% females with mild to moderate dementia were obtained at baseline, including years of education, Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk score, Hachinski Ischemic Score (HIS, Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE score, Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ score, Burden Interview Scale score, and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI score. Changes in MMSE and FAQ scores over time were assessed annually. The association between baseline clinical variables and cognitive and functional decline was investigated during 3 years of follow-up through the use of generalized linear mixed effects models. Results: A trend was found towards steeper cognitive decline in patients with less vascular burden according to the HIS (β = 0.056, p = 0.09, better cognitive performance according to the CDR score (β = 0.313, p = 0.06 and worse caregiver burden according to the Burden Interview Scale score (β = -0.012, p = 0.07 at baseline. Conclusion: Further studies with larger samples are necessary to confirm and expand our findings.

  10. Enlarged Virchow Robin spaces associate with cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis.

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    Alice Favaretto

    Full Text Available The clinical significance of Virchow Robin spaces (VRS in inflammatory brain disorders, especially in multiple sclerosis (MS, is still undefined. We analysed enlarged VRS (eVRS by means of phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR MRI sequence and investigated their association with inflammation or brain atrophy, and to clinical or physical disability. Forty-three MS patients (21 clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of MS [CIS], 15 RRMS, 7 progressive [PMS] and 10 healthy controls (HC were studied. 3DT1, 3DFLAIR and 2DPSIR images were obtained with a 3T MRI scanner. eVRS number and volume were calculated by manual segmentation (ITK-SNAP. Freesurfer was used to assess brain parenchymal fraction (BPF. All patients underwent clinical (EDSS and cognitive (Rao's BRB and DKEFS evaluation. eVRS number and volume resulted significantly higher on 2D-PSIR compared to both 3D-T1 (p<0.001 and 3D-FLAIR (p<0.001 and were significantly increased in CIS compared to HC (p<0.05, in PMS and RRMS compared to CIS (p<0.001 and in male versus female patients (p<0.05. eVRS volume increased significantly with disease duration (r = 0.6 but did not correlate with EDSS. eVRS significantly correlated with SPARTd (r = -0.47 and DKEFSfs (r = -0.46, especially when RRMS and PMS were merged in a single group (r = 0.89, p = 0.002 and r = 0.66, p = 0.009 respectively, while no correlation was found with BPF (r = 0.3, gadolinium-enhancing lesions (r = 0.2 and WMT2 lesion volume (r = 0.2. 2DPSIR allowed the detection of an impressive higher number of eVRS compared to 3DT1 and 3DFLAIR. eVRS associate with SPARTd and DKEFSfs failure in relapse-onset MS, suggesting they may contribute to cognitive decline in MS.

  11. Two Different Populations within the Healthy Elderly: Lack of Conflict Detection in Those at Risk of Cognitive Decline

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    Sergio M. Sánchez-Moguel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During healthy aging, inhibitory processing is affected at the sensorial, perceptual, and cognitive levels. The assessment of event-related potentials (ERPs during the Stroop task has been used to study age-related decline in the efficiency of inhibitory processes. Studies using ERPs have found that the P300 amplitude increases and the N500 amplitude is attenuated in healthy elderly adults compared to those in young adults. On the other hand, it has been reported that theta excess in resting EEG with eyes closed is a good predictor of cognitive decline during aging 7 years later, while a normal EEG increases the probability of not developing cognitive decline. The behavioral and ERP responses during a Counting-Stroop task were compared between 22 healthy elderly subjects with normal EEG (Normal-EEG group and 22 healthy elderly subjects with an excess of EEG theta activity (Theta-EEG group. Behaviorally, the Normal-EEG group showed a higher behavioral interference effect than the Theta-EEG group. ERP patterns were different between the groups, and two facts are highlighted: (a the P300 amplitude was higher in the Theta-EEG group, with both groups showing a P300 effect in almost all electrodes, and (b the Theta-EEG group did not show an N500 effect. These results suggest that the diminishment in inhibitory control observed in the Theta-EEG group may be compensated by different processes in earlier stages, which would allow them to perform the task with similar efficiency to that of participants with a normal EEG. This study is the first to show that healthy elderly subjects with an excess of theta EEG activity not only are at risk of developing cognitive decline but already have a cognitive impairment.

  12. Association of Delirium With Cognitive Decline in Late Life: A Neuropathologic Study of 3 Population-Based Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel H J; Muniz-Terrera, Graciela; Keage, Hannah A D; Stephan, Blossom C M; Fleming, Jane; Ince, Paul G; Matthews, Fiona E; Cunningham, Colm; Ely, E Wesley; MacLullich, Alasdair M J; Brayne, Carol

    2017-03-01

    Delirium is associated with accelerated cognitive decline. The pathologic substrates of this association are not yet known, that is, whether they are the same as those associated with dementia, are independent, or are interrelated. To examine whether the accelerated cognitive decline observed after delirium is independent of the pathologic processes of classic dementia. Harmonized data from 987 individual brain donors from 3 observational cohort studies with population-based sampling (Vantaa 85+, Cambridge City Over-75s Cohort, Cognitive Function and Ageing Study) performed from January 1, 1985, through December 31, 2011, with a median follow-up of 5.2 years until death, were used in this study. Neuropathologic assessments were performed with investigators masked to clinical data. Data analysis was performed from January 1, 2012, through December 31, 2013. Clinical characteristics of brain donors were not different from the rest of the cohort. Outcome ascertainment was complete given that the participants were brain donors. Delirium (never vs ever) and pathologic burden of neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid plaques, vascular lesions, and Lewy bodies. Effects modeled using random-effects linear regression and interactions between delirium and pathologic burden were assessed. Change in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores during the 6 years before death. There were 987 participants (290 from Vantaa 85+, 241 from the Cambridge City Over-75s Cohort, and 456 from the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study) with neuropathologic data; mean (SD) age at death was 90 (6.4) years, including 682 women (69%). The mean MMSE score 6 years before death was 24.7 points. The 279 individuals with delirium (75% women) had worse initial scores (-2.8 points; 95% CI, -4.5 to -1.0; P delirium was -0.37 MMSE points per year (95% CI, -0.60 to -0.13; P delirium and the pathologic processes of dementia resulted in the greatest decline, in which the interaction contributed an additional

  13. Effects of dexamethasone on early cognitive decline after cardiac surgery: A randomised controlled trial.

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    Glumac, Sandro; Kardum, Goran; Sodic, Lidija; Supe-Domic, Daniela; Karanovic, Nenad

    2017-11-01

    Postoperative cognitive decline (POCD), a very common complication after cardiac surgery, is characterised by impairment of both memory function and intellectual ability as well as being associated with increased use of healthcare resources. The investigators focused on the role of the inflammatory response to a surgical procedure as a potential factor involved in the pathogenesis of POCD. The use of prophylactic dexamethasone to attenuate the inflammatory response was hypothesised to reduce the risk of POCD. Randomised controlled study. Single university teaching hospital, from March 2015 to January 2016. A total of 169 patients scheduled for elective cardiac surgery were enrolled, and 161 patients were included in the analyses. Patients were randomised to receive a single intravenous bolus of 0.1 mg kg dexamethasone (n = 85) or placebo (n = 84) 10 h before the surgery. The primary outcome measure in both groups was the incidence of POCD on the 6th day after surgery. The investigators also evaluated the effect of dexamethasone on the incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, postoperative C-reactive protein levels and postoperative serum S100β protein levels. Compared to the placebo group, the dexamethasone group showed statistically significant reductions in the incidence of POCD (relative risk, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.21 to 0.89; P = 0.02), the incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (30.0 versus 58.0%, P < 0.001) and postoperative C-reactive protein levels (P < 0.001). Postoperative S100β levels were insignificantly lower (P = 0.56) in the dexamethasone group. Preoperative administration of dexamethasone reduced the inflammatory response and thereby decreased the risk of early POCD after cardiac surgery. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02767713.

  14. Highways block gene flow and cause a rapid decline in genetic diversity of desert bighorn sheep

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    Epps, CW; Palsboll, PJ; Wehausen, JD; Roderick, GK; Ramey, RR; McCullough, DR

    2005-01-01

    The rapid expansion of road networks has reduced connectivity among populations of flora and fauna. The resulting isolation is assumed to increase population extinction rates, in part because of the loss of genetic diversity. However, there are few cases where loss of genetic diversity has been

  15. The Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Prevention Instrument Project: Longitudinal Outcome of Behavioral Measures as Predictors of Cognitive Decline

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    Sarah Jane Banks

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Methods: The Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Prevention Instrument Project is a longitudinal study that recruited 644 cognitively healthy older subjects (aged between 75 and 93 years, 58% women at baseline and evaluated their cognitive change over 4 years. The study was structured like a clinical trial to anticipate a prevention trial and to determine the performance of novel trial instruments in a longitudinal non-interventional trial framework. Behavioral symptoms were assessed at baseline. Results: The existence of participant-reported behavioral symptoms at baseline predicted conversion to Clinical Dementia Rating scale score ≥0.5 over the 4-year period. Conclusions: The results imply that early anxiety and depression may be harbingers of future cognitive decline, and that patients exhibiting such symptoms, even in the absence of co-occurring cognitive symptoms, should be closely followed over time.

  16. Synergistic effects of aerobic exercise and cognitive training on cognition, physiological markers, daily function, and quality of life in stroke survivors with cognitive decline: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

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    Yeh, Ting-Ting; Wu, Ching-Yi; Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Chang, Ku-Chou; Lee, Lin-Chien; Hung, Jen-Wen; Lin, Keh-Chung; Teng, Ching-Hung; Liao, Yi-Han

    2017-08-31

    Aerobic exercise and cognitive training have been effective in improving cognitive functions; however, whether the combination of these two can further enhance cognition and clinical outcomes in stroke survivors with cognitive decline remains unknown. This study aimed to determine the treatment effects of a sequential combination of aerobic exercise and cognitive training on cognitive function and clinical outcomes. Stroke survivors (n = 75) with cognitive decline will be recruited and randomly assigned to cognitive training, aerobic exercise, and sequential combination of aerobic exercise and cognitive training groups. All participants will receive training for 60 minutes per day, 3 days per week for 12 weeks. The aerobic exercise group will receive stationary bicycle